WorldWideScience

Sample records for single nanotube devices

  1. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  2. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ju Teng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD. The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3.

  3. Fabrication of spintronics device by direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes from ferromagnetic electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ambri Mohamed, Nobuhito Inami, Eiji Shikoh, Yoshiyuki Yamamoto, Hidenobu Hori and Akihiko Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative method for realizing a carbon nanotube spin field-effect transistor device by the direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on substrates by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. We observed hysteretic magnetoresistance (MR at low temperatures due to spin-dependent transport. In these devices, the maximum ratio in resistance variation of MR was found to be 1.8%.

  4. Nanotube resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  5. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes on the threshold voltage of dye based photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Manik, N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being widely used in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices as their usage has been reported to enhance the device efficiency along with other related parameters. In this work we have studied the energy (E_c) effect of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the threshold voltage (V_t_h) and also on the trap states of dye based photovoltaic devices. SWCNT is added in a series of dyes such as Rose Bengal (RB), Methyl Red (MR), Malachite Green (MG) and Crystal Violet (CV). By analysing the steady state dark current–voltage (I–V) characteristics V_t_h and E_c is estimated for the different devices with and without addition of SWCNT. It is observed that on an average for all the dyes V_t_h is reduced by about 30% in presence of SWCNT. The trap energy E_c also reduces in case of all the dyes. The relation between V_t_h, E_c and total trap density is discussed. From the photovoltaic measurements it is seen that the different photovoltaic parameters change with addition of SWCNT to the dye based devices. Both the short circuit current density and fill factor are found to increase for all the dye based devices in presence of SWCNT.

  6. Growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition for electrical devices

    OpenAIRE

    Furer, Jürg

    2006-01-01

    Carbon emerges in di®erent forms. Diamond and graphite have been well known mate- rials for centuries. Moreover fullerenes and nanotubes were discovered only a few years ago. H. W. Kroto et al. depicted the fullerenes in 1985 [1]. A few years later, in 1991, S. Iijima described carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the ¯rst time [2] (Figure 1.1). CNTs have a close relation to graphite, since a single-wall carbon nanotube is like a rolled-up graphite mono layer. However a nanotube has wi...

  7. Chemiresistor Devices for Chemical Warfare Agent Detection Based on Polymer Wrapped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, John F; Hamaguchi, Hitoshi; Yoon, Bora; Swager, Timothy M

    2017-04-28

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) continue to present a threat to civilian populations and military personnel in operational areas all over the world. Reliable measurements of CWAs are critical to contamination detection, avoidance, and remediation. The current deployed systems in United States and foreign militaries, as well as those in the private sector offer accurate detection of CWAs, but are still limited by size, portability and fabrication cost. Herein, we report a chemiresistive CWA sensor using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) wrapped with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) derivatives. We demonstrate that a pendant hexafluoroisopropanol group on the polymer that enhances sensitivity to a nerve agent mimic, dimethyl methylphosphonate, in both nitrogen and air environments to concentrations as low as 5 ppm and 11 ppm, respectively. Additionally, these PEDOT/SWCNT derivative sensor systems experience negligible device performance over the course of two weeks under ambient conditions.

  8. Functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes as template for water storage device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Sanjib; Taraphder, Srabani, E-mail: srabani@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2016-11-10

    Single walled carbon nanotubes, endohedrally functionalized with a protonated/unprotonated carboxylic acid group, are examined as potential templates for water storage using classical molecular dynamics simulation studies. Following a spontaneous entry of water molecules into the core of model functionalized carbon nanotubes (FCNTs), a large fraction of water molecules are found to be trapped inside FCNTs of lengths 50 and 100 Å. Only water molecules near the two open ends of the nanotube are exchanged with the bulk solvent. The residence times of water molecules inside FCNTs are investigated by varying the length of the tube, the length of suspended functional group and the protonation state of the carboxylic acid group. Favorable energetic interactions between the functional group and water, assisted by a substantial gain in rotational entropy, are found to compensate for the entropy loss resulting from restricted translational diffusion of trapped water molecules.

  9. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  10. Enhanced UV photoresponse of KrF-laser-synthesized single-wall carbon nanotubes/n-silicon hybrid photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, V; Gautier, L A; Castrucci, P; Del Gobbo, S; De Crescenzi, M; El Khakani, M A

    2012-06-01

    We report on the KrF-laser ablation synthesis, purification and photocurrent generation properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The thermally purified SWCNTs are integrated into hybrid photovoltaic (PV) devices by spin-coating them onto n-Si substrates. These novel SWCNTs/n-Si hybrid devices are shown to generate significant photocurrent (PC) over the entire 250-1050 nm light spectrum with external quantum efficiencies (EQE) reaching up to ~23%. Our SWCNTs/n-Si hybrid devices are not only photoactive in the traditional spectral range of Si solar cells, but generate also significant PC in the UV domain (below 400 nm). This wider spectral response is believed to be the result of PC generation from both the SWCNTs themselves and the tremendous number of local p-n junctions created at the nanotubes/Si interface. To assess the prevalence of these two contributions, the EQE spectra and J-V characteristics of these hybrid devices were investigated in both planar and top-down configurations, as a function of SWCNTs' film thickness. A sizable increase in EQE in the near UV with respect to the silicon is observed in both configurations, with a more pronounced UV photoresponse in the planar mode, confirming thereby the role of SWCNTs in the photogeneration process. The PC generation is found to reach its maximum for an optimal the SWCNT film thickness, which is shown to correspond to the best trade-off between lowest electrical resistance and highest optical transparency. Finally, by analyzing the J-V characteristics of our SWCNTs/n-Si devices with an equivalent circuit model, we were able to point out the contribution of the various electrical components involved in the photogeneration process. The SWCNTs-based devices demonstrated here open up the prospect for their use in highly effective photovoltaics and/or UV-light sensors.

  11. Fabrication of coupled graphene–nanotube quantum devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, S; Weber, P; Terrés, B; Dauber, J; Volk, C; Wichmann, U; Stampfer, C; Meyer, C; Trellenkamp, S

    2013-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of all-carbon hybrid quantum devices based on graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes. We discuss both carbon nanotube quantum dot devices with graphene charge detectors and nanotube quantum dots with graphene leads. The devices are fabricated by chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes and subsequent structuring of mechanically exfoliated graphene. We study the detection of individual charging events in the carbon nanotube quantum dot by a nearby graphene nanoribbon and show that they lead to changes of up to 20% of the conductance maxima in the graphene nanoribbon, acting as a well performing charge detector. Moreover, we discuss an electrically coupled graphene–nanotube junction, which exhibits a tunneling barrier with tunneling rates in the low GHz regime. This allows us to observe Coulomb blockade on a carbon nanotube quantum dot with graphene source and drain leads. (paper)

  12. Optimizing the e-beam profile of a single carbon nanotube field emission device for electric propulsion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fujioka Mologni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies on field emission (FE arrays comprised of carbon nanotubes (CNT as an electron source for electric propulsion system show remarkably promising results. Design parameters for a carbon nanotube (CNT field-emission device operating on triode configuration were numerically simulated and optimized in order to enhance the e-beam focusing quality. An additional focus gate (FG was integrated to the device to control the profile of the emitted e-beam. An axisymmetric finite element model was developed to calculate the electric field distribution on the vacuum region and a modified Fowler-Nordheim (FN equation was used to evaluate the current density emission and the effective emitter area. Afterward, a FE simulation was employed in order to calculate the trajectory of the emitted electrons and define the electron-optical properties of the e-beam. The integration of the FG was fully investigated via computational intelligence techniques. The best performance device according to our simulations presents a collimated e-beam profile that suits well for field emission displays, magnetic field detection and electron microscopy. The automated computational design tool presented in this study strongly benefits the robust design of integrated electron-optical systems for vacuum field emission applications, including electrodynamic tethering and electric propulsion systems.

  13. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan [Princeton, NJ; Staii, Cristian [Madison, WI

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  14. Effect of different substitution position on the switching behavior in single-molecule device with carbon nanotube electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjuan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Peipei; Bian, Baoan; Wang, Yixiang

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of dihydroazulene (DHA) and vinylheptafulvene (VHF) molecule sandwiched between two carbon nanotubes using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function. The device displays significantly switching behavior between DHA and VHF isomerizations. It is found the different substitution position of F in the molecule influences the switching ratio of device, which is analyzed by transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian. The observed negative differential resistance effect is explained by transmission spectra and transmission eigenstates of transmission peak in the bias window. The observed reverse of current in VHF form in which two H atoms on the right side of the benzene ring of the molecule are replaced by F is explained by transmission spectra and molecule-electrode coupling with the varied bias. The results suggest that the reasonable substitution position of molecule may improve the switching ratio, displaying a potential application in future molecular circuit.

  15. Local gate control in carbon nanotube quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercuk, Michael Jordan

    This thesis presents transport measurements of carbon nanotube electronic devices operated in the quantum regime. Nanotubes are contacted by source and drain electrodes, and multiple lithographically-patterned electrostatic gates are aligned to each device. Transport measurements of device conductance or current as a function of local gate voltages reveal that local gates couple primarily to the proximal section of the nanotube, hence providing spatially localized control over carrier density along the nanotube length. Further, using several different techniques we are able to produce local depletion regions along the length of a tube. This phenomenon is explored in detail for different contact metals to the nanotube. We utilize local gating techniques to study multiple quantum dots in carbon nanotubes produced both by naturally occurring defects, and by the controlled application of voltages to depletion gates. We study double quantum dots in detail, where transport measurements reveal honeycomb charge stability diagrams. We extract values of energy-level spacings, capacitances, and interaction energies for this system, and demonstrate independent control over all relevant tunneling rates. We report rf-reflectometry measurements of gate-defined carbon nanotube quantum dots with integrated charge sensors. Aluminum rf-SETs are electrostatically coupled to carbon nanotube devices and detect single electron charging phenomena in the Coulomb blockade regime. Simultaneous correlated measurements of single electron charging are made using reflected rf power from the nanotube itself and from the rf-SET on microsecond time scales. We map charge stability diagrams for the nanotube quantum dot via charge sensing, observing Coulomb charging diamonds beyond the first order. Conductance measurements of carbon nanotubes containing gated local depletion regions exhibit plateaus as a function of gate voltage, spaced by approximately 1e2/h, the quantum of conductance for a single

  16. Towards self-assembled devices, a carbon nanotube approach

    OpenAIRE

    Del Rio Castillo, Antonio Esau

    2012-01-01

    2010/2011 In the last decade the nanostructured carbon materials, especially single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), had emerged as probable substitutes for Silicon in the next generation of electronic devices. This is due to their unique physic and chemical properties. Likewise, scientists all around the world have made a huge effort to introduce carbon materials into the market. Despite this effort, commercial application for carbon nanotubes in electronic devices has not yet been achiev...

  17. Electrostatic sensing and electrochemistry with single carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of devices based on single carbon nanotubes in the context of (bio)sensing in aqueous solutions. Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules of sp2- carbon, about one nanometer in diameter and typically several micrometers long, which have semiconducting

  18. Growth of a single-wall carbon nanotube film and its patterning as an n-type field effect transistor device using an integrated circuit compatible process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiau, S H; Gau, C [Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liu, C W; Dai, B T [National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 27, Nanke 3rd Road, Science-based Industrial Park, Hsin-shi, Tainan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: gauc@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2008-03-12

    This study presents the synthesis of a dense single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) network on a silicon substrate using alcohol as the source gas. The nanosize catalysts required are made by the reduction of metal compounds in ethanol. The key point in spreading the nanoparticles on the substrate, so that the SWNT network can be grown over the entire wafer, is making the substrate surface hydrophilic. This SWNT network is so dense that it can be treated like a thin film. Methods of patterning this SWNT film with integrated circuit compatible processes are presented and discussed for the first time in the literature. Finally, fabrication and characteristic measurements of a field effect transistor (FET) using this SWNT film are also demonstrated. This FET is shown to have better electronic properties than any other kind of thin film transistor. This thin film with good electronic properties can be readily applied in the processing of many other SWNT electronic devices.

  19. Electrical device fabrication from nanotube formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Kim, Myung Jong; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2013-03-12

    A method for forming nanotube electrical devices, arrays of nanotube electrical devices, and device structures and arrays of device structures formed by the methods. Various methods of the present invention allow creation of semiconducting and/or conducting devices from readily grown SWNT carpets rather than requiring the preparation of a patterned growth channel and takes advantage of the self-controlling nature of these carpet heights to ensure a known and controlled channel length for reliable electronic properties as compared to the prior methods.

  20. Physical removal of metallic carbon nanotubes from nanotube network devices using a thermal and fluidic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Alexandra C; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M; Kane, Alexander A; Krafcik, Karen L; Léonard, François; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Billups, W Edward; Hauge, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is versatile and is applied to devices post-fabrication. (paper)

  1. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also....... A model for the dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes on microelectrodes was developed and several simulations were conducted using values from the available literature for the various key parameters. The model can give qualitative results regarding the parameters dominating the dielectrophoretic...

  2. Single walled carbon nanotubes with functionally adsorbed biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T

    2013-12-17

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA or RNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Paper-Based Electroanalytical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngmi Koo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report on carbon nanotube paper-based electroanalytical devices. A highly aligned-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT array, grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD, was processed to form bi-layered paper with an integrated cellulose-based Origami-chip as the electroanalytical device. We used an inverse-ordered fabrication method from a thick carbon nanotube (CNT sheet to a thin CNT sheet. A 200-layered HA-CNT sheet and a 100-layered HA-CNT sheet are explored as a working electrode. The device was fabricated using the following methods: (1 cellulose-based paper was patterned using a wax printer, (2 electrical connection was made using a silver ink-based circuit printer, and (3 three electrodes were stacked on a 2D Origami cell. Electrochemical behavior was evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic voltammetry (CV. We believe that this platform could attract a great deal of interest for use in various chemical and biomedical applications.

  4. Detection of multiple tumor markers using ultra-long carbon nanotube devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hye-Mi; Park, Dong-Won; Kim, Beom Soo; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Buh, Gyoung-Ho; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O.; Kong, Jing

    2008-03-01

    For the simultaneous detection of multiple tumor markers, we have fabricated ultra-long carbon nanotube sensors that can detect carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), simultaneously. Ultra-long carbon nanotubes, several millimeters long, were grown by ethanol CVD, and fabricated as FET sensors by using conventional photolithography. To functionalize each segment of a single ultra-long nanotube device with multiple-tumor markers, we first functionalize the entire device with CDI-Tween 20 linking molecules, and then immobilized CEA and PSA antibodies using the microfluidic channel. The electrical conductance from CEA-antibody functionalized and PSA-antibody functionalized segment of a ultra-long carbon nanotube device was monitored simultaneously with Ag/AgCl reference electrode as a liquid gate. We will discuss the advantages of long-nanotube device in detail.

  5. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401-3305 USA; Ferguson, Andrew J. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401-3305 USA; Cho, Chungyeon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3003 USA; Grunlan, Jaime C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3003 USA

    2018-01-22

    Conversion of waste heat to voltage has the potential to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of a number of critical energy sectors, such as the transportation and electricity-generation sectors, and manufacturing processes. Thermal energy is also an abundant low-flux source that can be harnessed to power portable/wearable electronic devices and critical components in remote off-grid locations. As such, a number of different inorganic and organic materials are being explored for their potential in thermoelectric-energy-harvesting devices. Carbon-based thermoelectric materials are particularly attractive due to their use of nontoxic, abundant source-materials, their amenability to high-throughput solution-phase fabrication routes, and the high specific energy (i.e., W g-1) enabled by their low mass. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) represent a unique 1D carbon allotrope with structural, electrical, and thermal properties that enable efficient thermoelectric-energy conversion. Here, the progress made toward understanding the fundamental thermoelectric properties of SWCNTs, nanotube-based composites, and thermoelectric devices prepared from these materials is reviewed in detail. This progress illuminates the tremendous potential that carbon-nanotube-based materials and composites have for producing high-performance next-generation devices for thermoelectric-energy harvesting.

  6. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Thermoelectric Materials and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Ferguson, Andrew J; Cho, Chungyeon; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2018-03-01

    Conversion of waste heat to voltage has the potential to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of a number of critical energy sectors, such as the transportation and electricity-generation sectors, and manufacturing processes. Thermal energy is also an abundant low-flux source that can be harnessed to power portable/wearable electronic devices and critical components in remote off-grid locations. As such, a number of different inorganic and organic materials are being explored for their potential in thermoelectric-energy-harvesting devices. Carbon-based thermoelectric materials are particularly attractive due to their use of nontoxic, abundant source-materials, their amenability to high-throughput solution-phase fabrication routes, and the high specific energy (i.e., W g -1 ) enabled by their low mass. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) represent a unique 1D carbon allotrope with structural, electrical, and thermal properties that enable efficient thermoelectric-energy conversion. Here, the progress made toward understanding the fundamental thermoelectric properties of SWCNTs, nanotube-based composites, and thermoelectric devices prepared from these materials is reviewed in detail. This progress illuminates the tremendous potential that carbon-nanotube-based materials and composites have for producing high-performance next-generation devices for thermoelectric-energy harvesting. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Single Value Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mader, Angelika H.; Dertien, Edwin Christian; Reidsma, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    We live in a world of continuous information overflow, but the quality of information and communication is suffering. Single value devices contribute to the information and communication quality by fo- cussing on one explicit, relevant piece of information. The information is decoupled from a

  8. Bolometric-Effect-Based Wavelength-Selective Photodetectors Using Sorted Single Chirality Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Shi, Rongmei; Miao, Jinshui; Wei, Li; Chen, Yuan; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper exploits the chirality-dependent optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes for applications in wavelength-selective photodetectors. We demonstrate that thin-film transistors made with networks of carbon nanotubes work effectively as light sensors under laser illumination. Such photoresponse was attributed to photothermal effect instead of photogenerated carriers and the conclusion is further supported by temperature measurements. Additionally, by using different types of carbon nanotubes, including a single chirality (9,8) nanotube, the devices exhibit wavelength-selective response, which coincides well with the absorption spectra of the corresponding carbon nanotubes. This is one of the first reports of controllable and wavelength-selective bolometric photoresponse in macroscale assemblies of chirality-sorted carbon nanotubes. The results presented here provide a viable route for achieving bolometric-effect-based photodetectors with programmable response spanning from visible to near-infrared by using carbon nanotubes with pre-selected chiralities. PMID:26643777

  9. Carbon nanotubes for gas detection: materials preparation and device assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terranova, M L; Lucci, M; Orlanducci, S; Tamburri, E; Sessa, V; Reale, A; Carlo, A Di

    2007-01-01

    An efficient sensing device for NH 3 and NO x detection has been realized using ordered arrays of single-walled C nanotubes deposited onto an interdigitated electrode platform operating at room temperature. The sensing material has been prepared using several chemical-physical techniques for purification and positioning of the nanotubes inside the electrode gaps. In particular, both DC and AC fields have been applied in order to move and to align the nanostructures by electrophoresis and dielectrophoresis processes. We investigated the effects of different voltages applied to a gate contact on the back side of the substrate on the performances of the device and found that for different gas species (NH 3 , NO x ) a constant gate bias increases the sensitivity for gas detection. Moreover, in this paper we demonstrate that a pulsed bias applied to the gate contact facilitates the gas interaction with the nanotubes, either reducing the absorption times or accelerating the desorption times, thus providing a fast acceleration and a dramatic improvement of the time dependent behaviour of the device

  10. Conjugated Polymer-Assisted Dispersion of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes : The Power of Polymer Wrapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanta, Suman Kalyan; Fritsch, Martin; Scherf, Ullrich; Gomulya, Widianta; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    CONSPECTUS: The future application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in electronic (nano)devices is closely coupled to the availability of pure, semiconducting SWNTs and preferably, their defined positioning on suited substrates. Commercial carbon nanotube raw mixtures contain metallic as

  11. Synthesis of PbI(2) single-layered inorganic nanotubes encapsulated within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Laura; Ballesteros, Belén; Batista, Eudar; Magén, César; Arenal, Raúl; Oró-Solé, Judith; Rurali, Riccardo; Tobias, Gerard

    2014-04-02

    The template assisted growth of single-layered inorganic nanotubes is reported. Single-crystalline lead iodide single-layered nanotubes have been prepared using the inner cavities of carbon nanotubes as hosting templates. The diameter of the resulting inorganic nanotubes is merely dependent on the diameter of the host. This facile method is highly versatile opening up new horizons in the preparation of single-layered nanostructures. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  13. Nicotine adsorption on single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girao, Eduardo C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B.; Zanella, Ivana [Area de Ciencias Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano - UNIFRA, 97010-032 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Filho, Antonio G. Souza, E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    This work reports a theoretical study of nicotine molecules interacting with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through ab initio calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Different adsorption sites for nicotine on the surface of pristine and defective (8,0) SWCNTs were analyzed and the total energy curves, as a function of molecular position relative to the SWCNT surface, were evaluated. The nicotine adsorption process is found to be energetically favorable and the molecule-nanotube interaction is intermediated by the tri-coordinated nitrogen atom from the nicotine. It is also predicted the possibility of a chemical bonding between nicotine and SWCNT through the di-coordinated nitrogen.

  14. Noise And Charge Transport In Carbon Nanotube Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Shahed; Huynh, Quyen T.; Bosman, Gijs; Sippel, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2005-11-01

    The charge transport and noise properties of three terminal, gated devices containing multiple, single wall, metallic and semiconductor carbon nanotubes have been measured as a function of gate and drain bias at 300K. Using pulsed bias the metallic tubes could be burned sequentially enabling the separation of measured conductance and low frequency excess noise into metallic and semiconductor contributions. The relative low frequency excess noise of the metallic tubes was about a factor 100 lower than that of the semiconductor tubes, whereas the conductance of the metallic tubes was significantly higher (10 to 50 times) than that of the semiconductor tubes.

  15. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  16. Molecular discriminators using single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Ray, Nihar Ranjan; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and amphiphilic molecules has been studied in a solid phase. SWNTs are allowed to interact with different amphiphilic probes (e.g. lipids) in a narrow capillary interface. Contact between strong hydrophobic and amphiphilic interfaces leads to a molecular restructuring of the lipids at the interface. The geometry of the diffusion front and the rate and the extent of diffusion of the interface are dependent on the structure of the lipid at the interface. Lecithin having a linear tail showed greater mobility of the interface as compared to a branched tail lipid like dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, indicating the hydrophobic interaction between single wall carbon nanotube core and the hydrophobic tail of the lipid. Solid phase interactions between SWNT and lipids can thus become a very simple but efficient means of discriminating amphiphilic molecules in general and lipids in particular. (paper)

  17. Selective Deposition and Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Assisted by Dielectrophoresis: From Thin Films to Individual Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Xue, Wei

    2010-06-01

    Dielectrophoresis has been used in the controlled deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the focus on the alignment of nanotube thin films and their applications in the last decade. In this paper, we extend the research from the selective deposition of SWNT thin films to the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns are fabricated to study the influence of the electrode width on the deposition and alignment of SWNTs. The entire fabrication process is compatible with optical lithography-based techniques. Therefore, the fabrication cost is low, and the resulting devices are inexpensive. A series of SWNT solutions is prepared with concentrations ranging from 0.0125 to 0.2 mg/ml. The alignment of SWNT thin films, small bundles, and individual nanotubes is achieved under the optimized experimental conditions. The electrical properties of these samples are characterized; the linear current-voltage plots prove that the aligned SWNTs are mainly metallic nanotubes. The microscopy inspection of the samples demonstrates that the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes can only be achieved using narrow electrodes and low-concentration solutions. Our investigation shows that it is possible to deposit a controlled amount of SWNTs in desirable locations using dielectrophoresis.

  18. Selective Deposition and Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Assisted by Dielectrophoresis: From Thin Films to Individual Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Pengfei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dielectrophoresis has been used in the controlled deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs with the focus on the alignment of nanotube thin films and their applications in the last decade. In this paper, we extend the research from the selective deposition of SWNT thin films to the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns are fabricated to study the influence of the electrode width on the deposition and alignment of SWNTs. The entire fabrication process is compatible with optical lithography-based techniques. Therefore, the fabrication cost is low, and the resulting devices are inexpensive. A series of SWNT solutions is prepared with concentrations ranging from 0.0125 to 0.2 mg/ml. The alignment of SWNT thin films, small bundles, and individual nanotubes is achieved under the optimized experimental conditions. The electrical properties of these samples are characterized; the linear current–voltage plots prove that the aligned SWNTs are mainly metallic nanotubes. The microscopy inspection of the samples demonstrates that the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes can only be achieved using narrow electrodes and low-concentration solutions. Our investigation shows that it is possible to deposit a controlled amount of SWNTs in desirable locations using dielectrophoresis.

  19. A study on electromechanical carbon nanotube memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2005-01-01

    Electromechanical operations of carbon-nanotube (CNT) bridge memory device were investigated by using atomistic simulations based on empirical potentials. The nanotube-bridge memory device was operated by the electrostatic and the van der Waals forces acting on the nanotube-bridge. For the CNT bridge memory device, the van der Waals interactions between the CNT bridge and the oxide were very important. As the distance between the CNT bridge and the oxide decreased and the van der Waals interaction energy increased, the pull-in bias of the CNT-bridge decreased and the nonvolatility of the nanotube-bridge memory device increased, while the pull-out voltages increased. When the materials composed of the oxide film are different, since the van der Waals interactions must be also different, the oxide materials must be carefully selected for the CNT-bridge memory device to work as a nonvolatile memory.

  20. Printable Thin Film Supercapacitors Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kaempgen, Martti

    2009-05-13

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  1. Aligned carbon nanotubes. Physics, concepts, fabrication and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lan, Yucheng [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wang, Yang [South China Normal Univ. Guangzhou (China). Inst. for Advanced Materials

    2013-07-01

    This book gives a survey of the physics and fabrication of carbon nanotubes and their applications in optics, electronics, chemistry and biotechnology. It focuses on the structural characterization of various carbon nanotubes, fabrication of vertically or parallel aligned carbon nanotubes on substrates or in composites, physical properties for their alignment, and applications of aligned carbon nanotubes in field emission, optical antennas, light transmission, solar cells, chemical devices, bio-devices, and many others. Major fabrication methods are illustrated in detail, particularly the most widely used PECVD growth technique on which various device integration schemes are based, followed by applications such as electrical interconnects, nanodiodes, optical antennas, and nanocoax solar cells, whereas current limitations and challenges are also be discussed to lay the foundation for future developments.

  2. Superconductivity in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Yavari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   By using Greens function method we first show that the effective interaction between two electrons mediated by plasmon exchange can become attractive which in turn can lead to superconductivity at a high critical temperature in a singl wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. The superconducting transition temperature Tc for the SWCNT (3,3 obtained by this mechanism agrees with the recent experimental result. We also show as the radius of SWCNT increases, plasmon frequency becomes lower and leads to lower Tc.

  3. Symmetry Properties of Single-Walled BC2N Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jianyi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The symmetry properties of the single-walled BC2N nanotubes were investigated. All the BC2N nanotubes possess nonsymmorphic line groups. In contrast with the carbon and boron nitride nanotubes, armchair and zigzag BC2N nanotubes belong to different line groups, depending on the index n (even or odd and the vector chosen. The number of Raman- active phonon modes is almost twice that of the infrared-active phonon modes for all kinds of BC2N nanotubes.

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotube electromechanical switching behavior with shoulder slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter; Wu, Yu-Chiao; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Adams, George; McGruer, Nicol

    2011-04-01

    Several electromechanical devices, each consisting of a small bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended over an actuation electrode, have been fabricated and operated electrically. The nanotubes are assembled on the electrodes using dielectrophoresis, a potential high-rate nanomanufacturing process. A large decrease in the threshold voltage was seen after the first actuation. This is a result of the nanotubes sliding inward on their supports as they are pulled down toward the actuation electrode, leaving slack in the nanotube bundle for subsequent actuations. The electrical measurements agree well with an electromechanical model that uses a literature-reported value of the shear stress between the nanotubes and the SiO2 shoulders. Electrical measurements were performed in dry nitrogen as a large build-up of contamination was seen when the measurements were performed in lab air. We present measurements as well as a detailed mechanics model that support the interpretation of the data.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotube electromechanical switching behavior with shoulder slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Peter; Wu, Yu-Chiao; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Adams, George; McGruer, Nicol

    2011-01-01

    Several electromechanical devices, each consisting of a small bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended over an actuation electrode, have been fabricated and operated electrically. The nanotubes are assembled on the electrodes using dielectrophoresis, a potential high-rate nanomanufacturing process. A large decrease in the threshold voltage was seen after the first actuation. This is a result of the nanotubes sliding inward on their supports as they are pulled down toward the actuation electrode, leaving slack in the nanotube bundle for subsequent actuations. The electrical measurements agree well with an electromechanical model that uses a literature-reported value of the shear stress between the nanotubes and the SiO 2 shoulders. Electrical measurements were performed in dry nitrogen as a large build-up of contamination was seen when the measurements were performed in lab air. We present measurements as well as a detailed mechanics model that support the interpretation of the data.

  6. Properties of single-walled carbon nanotube-based aerogels as a function of nanotube loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Hamza, Alex V.; Satcher, Joe H.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2009-01-01

    Here, we present the synthesis and characterization of low-density single-walled carbon nanotube-based aerogels (SWNT-CA). Aerogels with varying nanotube loading (0-55 wt.%) and density (20-350 mg cm -3 ) were fabricated and characterized by four-probe method, electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and nitrogen porosimetry. Several properties of the SWNT-CAs were highly dependent upon nanotube loading. At nanotube loadings of 55 wt.%, shrinkage of the aerogel monoliths during carbonization and drying was almost completely eliminated. Electrical conductivities are improved by an order of magnitude for the SWNT-CA (55 wt.% nanotubes) compared to those of foams without nanotubes. Surface areas as high as 184 m 2 g -1 were achieved for SWNT-CAs with greater than 20 wt.% nanotube loading.

  7. Observation of Fermi Arc Surface States Induced by Organic Memristive/Memcapacitive Devices with a Double-Helical Polarized Single-Wall Nanotube Membrane for Direct Chelating with Matrix Matelloproteinase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. CHEN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Matelloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 plays a key role in many diseases. A new type of dual-functioning device was developed for fast, direct ultrasensitive detection of MMP-2. We report a memristive/memcapacitive device with vertex double-helical polarized biomimetic protein nanotubules forming double membranes with potential gradient mimicking mitochondria’s inner double membrane has developed. We also report Fermi arcs with nodes on the surface of the nanostructured membrane was observed at the first time by using a 3D real-time - energy-current dynamic mapping method based on data obtained from the Cyclic Voltammetry (CV method. The memristive/memcapacitive device comprises a cross- linked organic polymer having single-wall cross-bar polarized nanotube self-assembling membrane (SAM on a gold chip, under an applied potential, a pair of vertex double- helical circular current flow induced the Fermi arcs states occurrence and these Fermi arcs promoted a direct chelating with zinc ions of the MMP-2 to become possible without any antibody, tracer, or reagent used at room temperature was accomplished. We observed the pair of Dirac Cones became alignment and strengthened with each other in the presence of MMP-2 compared without MMP-2. The MMP-2 can be detected with ag/mL level sensitivity and the value of Detection of Limits (DOL reached orders of magnitude lower than published reports with simplified procedures by a Chronoamperometry (CA method and a Double Step Chronopotentiometry (DSCPO method using NIST SRM 965A standard human serum, respectively. The results show a feasible application for developing the commercial fast and real-time MMP monitoring devices for various diseases.

  8. Excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes: environmental effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyrnov, O.A.

    2010-01-01

    The properties of excitons in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) isolated in vacuum or a medium and their contributions to the optical spectra of nanotubes are studied within the elementary potential model, in which an exciton is represented as a bound state of two oppositely charged quasiparticles confined to the nanotube surface. The emphasis is given on the influence of the dielectric environment surrounding a nanotube on the exciton spectra. For nanotubes in the environment with a permittivity less than ∼ 1:8; the ground-state exciton binding energies exceed the respective energy gaps, whereas the obtained binding energies of excitons in nanotubes in a medium with permittivity greater than ∼ 4 are in good accordance with the corresponding experimental data and consistent with the known scaling relation for the environmental effect. The stabilization of a single-electron spectrum in SWCNTs in media with rather low permittivities is discussed.

  9. Influence of the contact geometry on single-walled carbon nanotube/Si photodetector response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagliotti, Mattia; Salvato, Matteo; De Crescenzi, Maurizio; Boscardin, Maurizio; Castrucci, Paola

    2018-03-01

    A systematic study of the optical response of photodetectors based on carbon nanotube/Si heterojunctions is performed by measuring the responsivity, the detectivity and the time response of the devices with different contact configurations. The sensors are obtained by dry transferring single-walled carbon nanotube films on the surface of n-doped Si substrate provided with a multifinger contact geometry. The experimental data show a consistent improvement of the photodetector parameters with the increase of the number of fingers without affecting the carbon nanotube film thickness for increase its optical transmittance as in previous experiments. The role of the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube film is discussed. The obtained results confirm the method and suggest new perspectives in the use of nanostructured materials as part of semiconducting optical devices.

  10. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  11. Laser-Assisted Simultaneous Transfer and Patterning of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Polymer Substrates for Flexible Devices

    KAUST Repository

    In, Jung Bin

    2012-09-25

    We demonstrate a laser-assisted dry transfer technique for assembling patterns of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on a flexible polymeric substrate. A laser beam is applied to the interface of a nanotube array and a polycarbonate sheet in contact with one another. The absorbed laser heat promotes nanotube adhesion to the polymer in the irradiated regions and enables selective pattern transfer. A combination of the thermal transfer mechanism with rapid direct writing capability of focused laser beam irradiation allows us to achieve simultaneous material transfer and direct micropatterning in a single processing step. Furthermore, we demonstrate that malleability of the nanotube arrays transferred onto a flexible substrate enables post-transfer tailoring of electric conductance by collapsing the aligned nanotubes in different directions. This work suggests that the laser-assisted transfer technique provides an efficient route to using vertically aligned nanotubes as conductive elements in flexible device applications. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Laser-assisted simultaneous transfer and patterning of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on polymer substrates for flexible devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Jung Bin; Lee, Daeho; Fornasiero, Francesco; Noy, Aleksandr; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2012-09-25

    We demonstrate a laser-assisted dry transfer technique for assembling patterns of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on a flexible polymeric substrate. A laser beam is applied to the interface of a nanotube array and a polycarbonate sheet in contact with one another. The absorbed laser heat promotes nanotube adhesion to the polymer in the irradiated regions and enables selective pattern transfer. A combination of the thermal transfer mechanism with rapid direct writing capability of focused laser beam irradiation allows us to achieve simultaneous material transfer and direct micropatterning in a single processing step. Furthermore, we demonstrate that malleability of the nanotube arrays transferred onto a flexible substrate enables post-transfer tailoring of electric conductance by collapsing the aligned nanotubes in different directions. This work suggests that the laser-assisted transfer technique provides an efficient route to using vertically aligned nanotubes as conductive elements in flexible device applications.

  13. Peptide aptamer-assisted immobilization of green fluorescent protein for creating biomolecule-complexed carbon nanotube device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Daisuke; Nozawa, Yosuke; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shimada, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a novel material for next-generation applications. In this study, we generated carbon nanotube and green fluorescent protein (GFP) conjugates using affinity binding peptides. The carbon nanotube-binding motif was introduced into the N-terminus of the GFP through molecular biology methods. Multiple GFPs were successfully aligned on a single-walled carbon nanotube via the molecular recognition function of the peptide aptamer, which was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and optical analysis. Fluorescence spectral analysis results also suggested that the carbon nanotube-GFP complex was autonomously formed with orientation and without causing protein denaturation during immobilization. This simple process has a widespread potential for fabricating carbon nanotube-biomolecule hybrid devices.

  14. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Il; Matsuo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-01-22

    Photovoltaics, more generally known as solar cells, are made from semiconducting materials that convert light into electricity. Solar cells have received much attention in recent years due to their promise as clean and efficient light-harvesting devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) could play a crucial role in these devices and have been the subject of much research, which continues to this day. SWNTs are known to outperform multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) at low densities, because of the difference in their optical transmittance for the same current density, which is the most important parameter in comparing SWNTs and MWNTs. SWNT films show semiconducting features, which make SWNTs function as active or charge-transporting materials. This chapter, consisting of two sections, focuses on the use of SWNTs in solar cells. In the first section, we discuss SWNTs as a light harvester and charge transporter in the photoactive layer, which are reviewed chronologically to show the history of the research progress. In the second section, we discuss SWNTs as a transparent conductive layer outside of the photoactive layer, which is relatively more actively researched. This section introduces SWNT applications in silicon solar cells, organic solar cells, and perovskite solar cells each, from their prototypes to recent results. As we go along, the science and prospects of the application of solar cells will be discussed.

  15. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  16. Nanotube devices based crossbar architecture: toward neuromorphic computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W S; Gamrat, C; Agnus, G; Derycke, V; Filoramo, A; Bourgoin, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale devices such as carbon nanotube and nanowires based transistors, memristors and molecular devices are expected to play an important role in the development of new computing architectures. While their size represents a decisive advantage in terms of integration density, it also raises the critical question of how to efficiently address large numbers of densely integrated nanodevices without the need for complex multi-layer interconnection topologies similar to those used in CMOS technology. Two-terminal programmable devices in crossbar geometry seem particularly attractive, but suffer from severe addressing difficulties due to cross-talk, which implies complex programming procedures. Three-terminal devices can be easily addressed individually, but with limited gain in terms of interconnect integration. We show how optically gated carbon nanotube devices enable efficient individual addressing when arranged in a crossbar geometry with shared gate electrodes. This topology is particularly well suited for parallel programming or learning in the context of neuromorphic computing architectures.

  17. Frontiers of graphene and carbon nanotubes devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on carbon nanotubes and graphene as representatives of nano-carbon materials, and describes the growth of new technology and applications of new devices. As new devices and as new materials, nano-carbon materials are expected to be world pioneers that could not have been realized with conventional semiconductor materials, and as those that extend the limits of conventional semiconductor performance. This book introduces the latest achievements of nano-carbon devices, processes, and technology growth. It is anticipated that these studies will also be pioneers in the development of future research of nano-carbon devices and materials. This book consists of 18 chapters. Chapters 1 to 8 describe new device applications and new growth methods of graphene, and Chapters 9 to 18, those of carbon nanotubes. It is expected that by increasing the advantages and overcoming the weak points of nanocarbon materials, a new world that cannot be achieved with conventional materials will be greatly expanded. W...

  18. Hot spot dynamics in carbon nanotube array devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Seo, Jung-Woo T; Hersam, Mark C; Avouris, Phaedon

    2015-03-11

    We report on the dynamics of spatial temperature distributions in aligned semiconducting carbon nanotube array devices with submicrometer channel lengths. By using high-resolution optical microscopy in combination with electrical transport measurements, we observe under steady state bias conditions the emergence of time-variable, local temperature maxima with dimensions below 300 nm, and temperatures above 400 K. On the basis of time domain cross-correlation analysis, we investigate how the intensity fluctuations of the thermal radiation patterns are correlated with the overall device current. The analysis reveals the interdependence of electrical current fluctuations and time-variable hot spot formation that limits the overall device performance and, ultimately, may cause device degradation. The findings have implications for the future development of carbon nanotube-based technologies.

  19. Carbon nanotube and graphene device modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Ki

    The performance of the semiconductors has been improved and the price has gone down for decades. It has been continuously scaled down in size year by year, and now it encounters the fundamental scaling limit. We, therefore, should prepare a new era beyond the conventional semiconductor technologies. One of the most promising devices is possible by carbon nanotube (CNT) or graphene nanoribbon (GNR) in terms of its excellent charge transport properties. Their fundamental material properties and device physics are totally different to those of the conventional devices. In this nano-regime, more sophisticated device modeling and simulation are really needed to elucidate nano-device operation and to save our resources from errors. The numerical simulation works in this dissertation will provide novel view points on the emerging devices. In this dissertation, CNT and GNR devices are numerically studied. The first part of this work is on CNT devices, and a common structure of CNT device has CNT channel, metal source and drain contacts, and gate electrode. We investigate the strain, geometry, and scattering effects on the device performance of CNT field-effect transistors (FETs). It is shown that even a small amount of strain can result in a large effect on the performance of CNTFETs due to the variation of the bandgap and band-structure-limited velocity. A type of strain which produces a larger bandgap results in increased Schottky barrier (SB) height and decreased band-structure-limited velocity, and hence a smaller minimum leakage current, smaller on current, larger maximum achievable Ion/Ioff, and larger intrinsic delay. We also examine geometry effect of partial gate CNTFETs. In the growth process of vertical CNT, underlap between the gate and the bottom electrode is advantageous for transistor operation because it suppresses ambipolar conduction of SBFETs. Both n-type and p-type transistor operations with balanced performance metrics can be achieved on a single

  20. Network single-walled carbon nanotube biosensors for fast and highly sensitive detection of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Pingan; Zhang Jia; Wen Zhenzhong; Zhang Can

    2011-01-01

    Detection of proteins is powerfully assayed in the diagnosis of diseases. A strategy for the development of an ultrahigh sensitivity biosensor based on a network single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) has been demonstrated. Metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in the network nanotube FET were selectively removed or cut via a carefully controlled procedure of electrical break-down (BD), and left non-conducting m-SWNTs which magnified the Schottky barrier (SB) area. This nanotube FET exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity and fast response to biomolecules. The lowest detection limit of 0.5 pM was achieved by exploiting streptavidin (SA) or a biotin/SA pair as the research model, and BD-treated nanotube biosensors had a 2 x 10 4 -fold lower minimum detectable concentration than the device without BD treatment. The response time is in the range of 0.3-3 min.

  1. Supercapacitance of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes-Polypyrrole Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matei Raicopol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The composites based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and conducting polymers (CPs are promising materials for supercapacitor devices due to their unique nanostructure that combines the large pseudocapacitance of the CPs with the fast charging/discharging double-layer capacitance and excellent mechanical properties of the CNTs. Here, we report a new electrochemical method to obtain polypyrrole (PPY/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT composites. In the first step, the SWCNTs are covalently functionalized with monomeric units of pyrrole by esterification of acyl chloride functionalized SWCNTs and N-(6-hydroxyhexylpyrrole. In the second step, the PPY/SWCNTs composites are obtained by copolymerizing the pyrrole monomer with the pyrrole units grafted on SWCNTs surface using controlled potential electrolysis. The composites were further characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed good electrochemical charge storage properties for the synthesized composites based on PPY and SWCNTs covalently functionalized with pyrrole units making them promising electrode materials for high power supercapacitors.

  2. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-01-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors

  3. Optical Characterization and Applications of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S.

    2005-03-01

    Recent advances in the dispersion and separation of single walled carbon nanotubes have led to new methods of optical characterization and some novel applications. We find that Raman spectroscopy can be used to probe the aggregation state of single-walled carbon nanotubes in solution or as solids with a range of varying morphologies. Carbon nanotubes experience an orthogonal electronic dispersion when in electrical contact that broadens (from 40 meV to roughly 80 meV) and shifts the interband transition to lower energy (by 60 meV). We show that the magnitude of this shift is dependent on the extent of bundle organization and the inter-nanotube contact area. In the Raman spectrum, aggregation shifts the effective excitation profile and causes peaks to increase or decrease, depending on where the transition lies, relative to the excitation wavelength. The findings are particularly relevant for evaluating nanotube separation processes, where relative peak changes in the Raman spectrum can be confused for selective enrichment. We have also used gel electrophoresis and column chromatography conducted on individually dispersed, ultrasonicated single-walled carbon nanotubes to yield simultaneous separation by tube length and diameter. Electroelution after electrophoresis is shown to produce highly resolved fractions of nanotubes with average lengths between 92 and 435 nm. Separation by diameter is concomitant with length fractionation, and nanotubes that have been cut shortest also possess the greatest relative enrichments of large-diameter species. The relative quantum yield decreases nonlinearly as the nanotube length becomes shorter. These findings enable new applications of nanotubes as sensors and biomarkers. Particularly, molecular detection using near infrared (n-IR) light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole blood media. Carbon nanotubes

  4. Electrostatically telescoping nanotube nonvolatile memory device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Jiang Qing

    2007-01-01

    We propose a nonvolatile memory based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serving as the key building blocks for molecular-scale computers and investigate the dynamic operations of a double-walled CNT memory element by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The localized potential energy wells achieved from both the interwall van der Waals energy and CNT-metal binding energy make the bistability of the CNT positions and the electrostatic attractive forces induced by the voltage differences lead to the reversibility of this CNT memory. The material for the electrodes should be carefully chosen to achieve the nonvolatility of this memory. The kinetic energy of the CNT shuttle experiences several rebounds induced by the collisions of the CNT onto the metal electrodes, and this is critically important to the performance of such an electrostatically telescoping CNT memory because the collision time is sufficiently long to cause a delay of the state transition

  5. Young's Modulus of Single-Crystal Fullerene C Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokushi Kizuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed bending tests on single-crystal nanotubes composed of fullerene C70 molecules by in situ transmission electron microscopy with measurements of loading forces by an optical deflection method. The nanotubes with the outer diameters of 270–470 nm were bent using simple-beam and cantilever-beam loading by the piezomanipulation of silicon nanotips. Young's modulus of the nanotubes increased from 61 GPa to 110 GPa as the outer diameter decreased from 470 nm to 270 nm. Young's modulus was estimated to be 66% of that of single-crystal C60 nanotubes of the same outer diameter.

  6. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yun, H.; McAllister, K.; Lee, S. W., E-mail: leesw@konkuk.ac.kr [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Na, J.; Kim, G. T. [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. J.; Jeong, G. H. [Department of Nano Applied Engineering, Kangwon National University, Kangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, I.; Kim, K. S. [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-20

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems.

  7. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    OpenAIRE

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled c...

  8. Alignment enhanced photoconductivity in single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ye; Lu Shaoxin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report, for the first time, the alignment enhanced photoconductivity of single wall carbon nanotube films upon laser illumination. The photoconductivity exhibited an increase, decrease or even 'negative' values when the laser spot was on different positions between contact electrodes, showing a 'position' dependent photoconductivity of partially aligned films of carbon nanotubes. Photon induced charge carrier generation in single wall carbon nanotubes and subsequent charge separation across the metal-carbon nanotube contacts is believed to cause the photoconductivity changes. A net photovoltage of ∼4 mV and a photocurrent of ∼10 μA were produced under the laser intensity of ∼273 mW with a quantum efficiency of ∼7.8% in vacuum. The photocurrent was observed to be in the direction of nanotube alignment. Finally, there was a strong dependence of the polarization of the incident light on the photocurrent and the orientation of the films influenced the dynamics of the rise and fall of the photocurrent. All of these phenomena clearly have significance in the area of design and fabrication of solar cells, micro-opto-mechanical systems and photodetectors based on carbon nanotubes.

  9. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battie, Y.; Jamon, D.; Lauret, J.S.; Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M.; En Naciri, A.; Loiseau, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S 11 , S 22 and M 11 transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ 0 of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes

  10. Electroluminescence from single-wall carbon nanotube network transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, E; Aguirre, C M; Marty, L; St-Antoine, B C; Meunier, F; Desjardins, P; Ménard, D; Martel, R

    2008-08-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) properties from single-wall carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NNFETs) and small bundle carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) are studied using spectroscopy and imaging in the near-infrared (NIR). At room temperature, NNFETs produce broad (approximately 180 meV) and structured NIR spectra, while they are narrower (approximately 80 meV) for CNFETs. EL emission from NNFETs is located in the vicinity of the minority carrier injecting contact (drain) and the spectrum of the emission is red shifted with respect to the corresponding absorption spectrum. A phenomenological model based on a Fermi-Dirac distribution of carriers in the nanotube network reproduces the spectral features observed. This work supports bipolar (electron-hole) current recombination as the main mechanism of emission and highlights the drastic influence of carrier distribution on the optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotube films.

  11. Estimation of mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular mechanics; single wall carbon nanotube; mechanical proper- ... Fracture Mechanics); Rossi & Meo 2009). Furthermore, the work carried out by Natsuki & Endo. (2004), Xiao et al (2005) and Sun & Zhao (2005) in the direction of ..... Jin Y and Yuan F G 2003 Simulation of elastic properties of single walled carbon ...

  12. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  13. Applied Physics of Carbon Nanotubes Fundamentals of Theory, Optics and Transport Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Rotkin, Slava V

    2005-01-01

    The book describes the state-of-the-art in fundamental, applied and device physics of nanotubes, including fabrication, manipulation and characterization for device applications; optics of nanotubes; transport and electromechanical devices and fundamentals of theory for applications. This information is critical to the field of nanoscience since nanotubes have the potential to become a very significant electronic material for decades to come. The book will benefit all all readers interested in the application of nanotubes, either in their theoretical foundations or in newly developed characterization tools that may enable practical device fabrication.

  14. Electric moulding of dispersed lipid nanotubes into a nanofluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frusawa, Hiroshi; Manabe, Tatsuhiko; Kagiyama, Eri; Hirano, Ken; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophilic nanotubes formed by lipid molecules have potential applications as platforms for chemical or biological events occurring in an attolitre volume inside a hollow cylinder. Here, we have integrated the lipid nanotubes (LNTs) by applying an AC electric field via plug-in electrode needles placed above a substrate. The off-chip assembly method has the on-demand adjustability of an electrode configuration, enabling the dispersed LNT to be electrically moulded into a separate film of parallel LNT arrays in one-step. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique as well as the digital microscopy visualised the overall filling of gold nanoparticles up to the inner capacity of an LNT film by capillary action, thereby showing the potential of this flexible film for use as a high-throughput nanofluidic device where not only is the endo-signalling and product in each LNT multiplied but also the encapsulated objects are efficiently transported and reacted.

  15. Investigation on single carbon atom transporting through the single-walled carbon nanotube by MD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yinfeng; Zhang Zhibin; Ke Xuezhi; Zhu Zhiyuan; Zhu Dezhang; Wang Zhenxia; Xu Hongjie

    2005-01-01

    The single carbon atom transporting through the single-walled carbon nanotube has been studied by molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. We got different trajectories of the carbon atom by changing the input parameters. The simulation results indicate that the single carbon atom with low energy can transport through the carbon nanotube under some input conditions and result in different trajectories being straight line or 'rosette' or circular. (authors)

  16. Electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Mensah, N.G.; Nkrumah, G.

    2001-09-01

    The electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube has been studied using the model based on infinitely long carbon atoms wrapped along a base helix of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs). The problem is solved semiclassically, and current density J, resistivity ρ, thermopower α z , and electrical power factor P calculated. It is noted that the current density j displays negative differential conductivity, whiles the resistivity ρ increases with increasing electrical field. ρ also slowly increases at low temperatures and then gradually increases with increasing temperature. The thermopower α z shows interesting behaviour. Very intriguing is the electrical power factor which shows relatively large values. (author)

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks for flexible and printed electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be processed from solution and have excellent mechanical properties. They are highly flexible and stretchable. Depending on the type of nanotubes (semiconducting or metallic) they can be used as replacements for metal or transparent conductive oxide electrodes or as semiconducting layers for field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities. They are thus competitive alternatives to other solution-processable materials for flexible and printed electronics. This review introduces the basic properties of SWNTs, current methods for dispersion and separation of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs and techniques to deposit and pattern dense networks from dispersion. Recent examples of applications of carbon nanotubes as conductors and semiconductors in (opto-)electronic devices and integrated circuits will be discussed. (paper)

  18. Spontaneous and controlled-diameter synthesis of single-walled and few-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shuhei; Lojindarat, Supanat; Kawamoto, Takahiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we explored the spontaneous and controlled-diameter growth of carbon nanotubes. We evaluated the effects of catalyst density, reduction time, and a number of catalyst coating on the substrate (for multi-walled carbon nanotubes) on the diameter of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the number of layers in few-walled carbon nanotubes. Increasing the catalyst density and reduction time increased the diameters of the carbon nanotubes, with the average diameter increasing from 1.05 nm to 1.86 nm for single-walled carbon nanotubes. Finally, we succeeded in synthesizing a significant double-walled carbon nanotube population of 24%.

  19. Flexible electroluminescent device with inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoubel, Suzanna; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2012-08-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNTs) inks may provide an effective route for producing flexible electronic devices by digital printing. In this paper we report on the formulation of highly concentrated aqueous CNT inks and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible electroluminescent (EL) devices by inkjet printing combined with wet coating. We also report, for the first time, on the formation of flexible EL devices in which all the electrodes are formed by inkjet printing of low-cost multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Several flexible EL devices were fabricated by using different materials for the production of back and counter electrodes: ITO/MWCNT and MWCNT/MWCNT. Transparent electrodes were obtained either by coating a thin layer of the CNTs or by inkjet printing a grid which is composed of empty cells surrounded by MWCNTs. It was found that the conductivity and transparency of the electrodes are mainly controlled by the MWCNT film thickness, and that the dominant factor in the luminance intensity is the transparency of the electrode.

  20. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  1. Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Del Gobbo, Silvano; Castrucci, P.; Fedele, S.; Riele, L.; Convertino, A.; Morbidoni, M.; De Nicola, F.; Scarselli, M.; Camilli, L.; De Crescenzi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and n-silicon multiple heterojunctions have been fabricated by a SWCNT film transferring process. We report on the ability of the carbon nanotubes to extend the Si spectral range towards the near ultraviolet (UV) and the near infrared regions. Semiconducting and about metallic SWCNT networks have been studied as a function of the film sheet resistance, Rsh. Optical absorbance and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assign nanotube chirality and electronic character. This gave us hints of evidence of the participation of the metal nanotubes in the photocurrent generation. Moreover, we provide evidence that the external quantum efficiency spectral range can be modulated as a function of the SWCNT network sheet resistance in a hybrid SWCNT/Si solar cell. This result will be very useful to further design/optimize devices with improved performance in spectral regions generally not covered by conventional Si p-n devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Flexible, transparent single-walled carbon nanotube transistors with graphene electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sukjae; Jang, Houk; Lee, Youngbin; Suh, Daewoo; Baik, Seunghyun; Hong, Byung Hee; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a mechanically flexible, transparent thin film transistor that uses graphene as a conducting electrode and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a semiconducting channel. These SWNTs and graphene films were printed on flexible plastic substrates using a printing method. The resulting devices exhibited a mobility of ∼ 2 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , On/Off ratio of ∼ 10 2 , transmittance of ∼ 81% and excellent mechanical bendability.

  3. Flexible, transparent single-walled carbon nanotube transistors with graphene electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sukjae; Jang, Houk; Lee, Youngbin; Suh, Daewoo; Baik, Seunghyun; Hong, Byung Hee; Ahn, Jong-Hyun, E-mail: ahnj@skku.edu, E-mail: byunghee@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-22

    This paper reports a mechanically flexible, transparent thin film transistor that uses graphene as a conducting electrode and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a semiconducting channel. These SWNTs and graphene films were printed on flexible plastic substrates using a printing method. The resulting devices exhibited a mobility of {approx} 2 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, On/Off ratio of {approx} 10{sup 2}, transmittance of {approx} 81% and excellent mechanical bendability.

  4. Sonochemical optimization of the conductivity of single wall nanotube networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaempgen, M.; Lebert, M.; Haluska, M.; Nicoloso, N.; Roth, S.

    2008-01-01

    Networks of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are covalently functionalized with oxygen-containing groups. In lower concentration, these functional groups act as stable dopands improving the conductivity of the SWCNT material. In higher concentration however, their role as defects with a certain

  5. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Ciudad Universitaria, Codigo Postal 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, L.F., E-mail: fernando@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arellano, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco. Avenida San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas Codigo Postal 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-06

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H{sub 2}). Nitrogen coverage was C{sub 8}N.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio; Magana, L.F.; Arellano, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H 2 ). Nitrogen coverage was C 8 N.

  7. Plasma excitations in a single-walled carbon nanotube

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of different uniform transverse external magnetic fields in plasma frequency when propagated parallel to the surface of the single-walled metallic carbon nanotubes is studied. The classical electrodynamics as well as Maxwell's equations are used in the calculations. Equations are developed for both short- and ...

  8. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized singlewalled ...

  9. Synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes by dual laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK et al.

    2006-02-27

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesised by the laser vaporisation of graphite composite targets in a tube furnace. Two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers operating at fundamental (1 064 nm) and 2nd harmonic (532 nm) were combined, focused and evaporated...

  10. Transient reflectivity on vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galimberti, Gianluca; Ponzoni, Stefano; Ferrini, Gabriele; Hofmann, Stephan; Arshad, Muhammad; Cepek, Cinzia; Pagliara, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    One-color transient reflectivity measurements are carried out on two different samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube bundles and compared with the response recently published on unaligned bundles. The negative sign of the optical response for both samples indicates that the free

  11. Synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes by dual laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Single walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the laser vaporization of graphite composite targets in a tube furnace. Two pulsed Nd:Yag lasers operating at fundamental (1064 nm) and 2 nd harmonic (532 nm) were combined, focused and evaporated...

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite microacoustic organic vapor sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penza, M. [ENEA, Materials and New Technologies Unit, SS. 7, Appia, km 714, 72100 Brindisi (Italy)]. E-mail: michele.penza@brindisi.enea.it; Tagliente, M.A. [ENEA, Materials and New Technologies Unit, SS. 7, Appia, km 714, 72100 Brindisi (Italy); Aversa, P. [ENEA, Materials and New Technologies Unit, SS. 7, Appia, km 714, 72100 Brindisi (Italy); Cassano, G. [ENEA, Materials and New Technologies Unit, SS. 7, Appia, km 714, 72100 Brindisi (Italy); Capodieci, L. [ENEA, Materials and New Technologies Unit, SS. 7, Appia, km 714, 72100 Brindisi (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    We have developed highly sensitive microacoustic vapor sensors based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) configured as oscillators using a two-port resonator 315, 433 and 915 MHz device. A nanocomposite film of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded in a cadmium arachidate (CdA) amphiphilic organic matrix was prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with a different SWCNTs weight filler content onto SAW transducers as nanosensing interface for vapor detection, at room temperature. The structural properties and surface morphology of the nanocomposite have been examined by X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The sensing properties of SWCNTs nanocomposite LB films consisting of tangled nanotubules have been also investigated by using Quartz Crystal Microbalance 10 MHz AT-cut quartz resonators. The measured acoustic sensing characteristics indicate that the room-temperature SAW sensitivity to polar and nonpolar tested organic molecules (ethanol, ethylacetate, toluene) of the SWCNTs-in-CdA nanocomposite increases with the filler content of SWCNTs incorporated in the nanocomposite; also the SWCNTs-in-CdA nanocomposite vapor sensitivity results significantly enhanced with respect to traditional organic molecular cavities materials with a linearity in the frequency change response for a given nanocomposite weight composition and a very low sub-ppm limit of detection.

  13. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  14. Logic circuits based on individual semiconducting and metallic carbon-nanotube devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Hyeyeon; Kaelblein, Daniel; Ante, Frederik; Zschieschang, Ute; Kern, Klaus; Klauk, Hagen; Weitz, R Thomas; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale transistors employing an individual semiconducting carbon nanotube as the channel hold great potential for logic circuits with large integration densities that can be manufactured on glass or plastic substrates. Carbon nanotubes are usually produced as a mixture of semiconducting and metallic nanotubes. Since only semiconducting nanotubes yield transistors, the metallic nanotubes are typically not utilized. However, integrated circuits often require not only transistors, but also resistive load devices. Here we show that many of the metallic carbon nanotubes that are deposited on the substrate along with the semiconducting nanotubes can be conveniently utilized as load resistors with favorable characteristics for the design of integrated circuits. We also demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of transistors and resistors, each based on an individual semiconducting or metallic carbon nanotube, and their integration on glass substrates into logic circuits with switching frequencies of up to 500 kHz using a custom-designed metal interconnect layer.

  15. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  16. Durable transparent carbon nanotube films for flexible device components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierros, K.A.; Hecht, D.S.; Banerjee, D.A.; Morris, N.J.; Hu, L.; Irvin, G.C.; Lee, R.S.; Cairns, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a durable carbon nanotube (CNT) film for flexible devices and its mechanical properties. Films as thin as 10 nm thick have properties approaching those of existing electrodes based on indium tin oxide (ITO) but with significantly improved mechanical properties. In uniaxial tension, strains as high as 25% are required for permanent damage and at lower strains resistance changes are slight and consistent with elastic deformation of the individual CNTs. A simple model confirms that changes in electrical resistance are described by a Poisson's ratio of 0.22. These films are also durable to cyclic loading, and even at peak strains of 10% no significant damage occurs after 250 cycles. The scratch resistance is also high as measured by nanoscratch, and for a 50 μm tip a load of 140 mN is required to cause initial failure. This is more than 5 times higher than is required to cause cracking in ITO. The robustness of the transparent conductive coating leads to significant improvement in device performance. In touch screen devices fabricated using CNT no failure occurs after a million actuations while for devices based on ITO electrodes 400,000 cycles are needed to cause failure. These durable electrodes hold the key to developing robust, large-area, lightweight, optoelectronic devices such as lighting, displays, electronic-paper, and printable solar cells. Such devices could hold the key to producing inexpensive green energy, providing reliable solid-state lighting, and significantly reducing our dependence on paper.

  17. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  18. Single-layer graphene-TiO{sub 2} nanotubes array heterojunction for ultraviolet photodetector application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Deng-Yue [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Ge, Cai-Wang [School of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Wang, Jiu-Zhen [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Zhang, Teng-Fei [School of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Wu, Yu-Cheng, E-mail: ycwu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Liang, Feng-Xia, E-mail: fxliang@hfut.edu.cn [School of Material Sciences and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Heterostructures comprised of a single-layer graphene and TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were constructed for ultraviolet detection. • The electrical properties of the fabricated heterostructures were dependent on the annealing atmospheres. • The effect of anodic TiO{sub 2} nanotube length on the performance of the photodetector were investigated. - Abstract: In this work, we reported on the fabrication of a single-layer graphene (SLG)-TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (NTs) heterostructures ultraviolet photodetector (UVPD) by transferring chemical vapor deposition derived MLG on the surface of anodic TiO{sub 2}NTs array. Through varying the annealing atmosphere and anodization time in the TiO{sub 2} synthesis procedure, the electronic and optoelectronic properties of the as-fabricated Schottky junction UVPD were studied. It was revealed that the anodic TiO{sub 2}NTs annealed in air showed a better rectifying behavior and was highly sensitive to UV light irradiation. Further investigation found that the device performance of the UVPD can be readily modulated by the anodization time, and the anodic TiO{sub 2}NTs with a medium tube length of 9.6 μm exhibits the highest device performance. These results demonstrated that the present SLG-TiO{sub 2}NTs array hetero-junction UVPD will be highly promising for fabricating high-performance optoelectronic device and system in the future.

  19. Giant electrical power factor in single-walled chiral carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Mensah, N.G.; Nkrumah, G.

    2001-10-01

    Using the semiclassical approach we studied the thermoelectrical properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We predict a giant electrical power factor and hence proposed the use of carbon nanotubes as thermoelements for refrigeration. (author)

  20. A bench arc-furnace facility for fullerene and single-wall nanotubes synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber John G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A metallic-sample arc-furnace was modified to synthesize fullerenes and nanotubes. The (reversible changes and the process for producing single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs are described.

  1. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  2. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  3. Quantum optics with single quantum dot devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwiller, Valery; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    A single radiative transition in a single-quantum emitter results in the emission of a single photon. Single quantum dots are single-quantum emitters with all the requirements to generate single photons at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. It is also possible to generate more than single photons with single quantum dots. In this paper we show that single quantum dots can be used to generate non-classical states of light, from single photons to photon triplets. Advanced solid state structures can be fabricated with single quantum dots as their active region. We also show results obtained on devices based on single quantum dots

  4. A photovoltaic self-powered gas sensor based on a single-walled carbon nanotube/Si heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Li, G H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y Y; Li, T; Zhang, T; Qin, S J

    2017-12-07

    We present a novel photovoltaic self-powered gas sensor based on a p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and n-type silicon (n-Si) heterojunction. The energy from visible light suffices to drive the device owing to a built-in electric field (BEF) induced by the differences between the Fermi levels of SWNTs and n-Si.

  5. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Centre Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1ère Avenue, Val d' Or, Quebec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Kroeger, J. [NanoIntegris & Raymor Nanotech, Raymor Industries Inc., 3765 La Vérendrye, Boisbriand, Quebec J7H 1R8 (Canada); Haddad, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0B8 (Canada); Rosei, F. [Centre Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, Boulevard Lionel-Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  6. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aïssa, B.; Nedil, M.; Kroeger, J.; Haddad, T.; Rosei, F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10 4 and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10 4  s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices

  7. Purity Evaluation of Bulk Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Hornbostel, B.; Cech, J.; Roth, S.; Wang, J.; Liang, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on our experience using a preliminary protocol for quality control of bulk single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) materials produced by the electric arc-discharge and laser ablation method. The first step in the characterization of the bulk material is mechanical homogenization. Quantitative evaluation of purity has been performed using a previously reported procedure based on solution phase near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results confirm that this method is reliable in determining the nanotube content in the arc-discharge sample containing carbonaceous impurities (amorphous carbon and graphitic particles). However, the application of this method to laser ablation samples gives a relative purity value over 100 %. The possible reason for that might be different extinction coefficient meaning different oscillator strength of the laser ablation tubes. At the present time, a 100 % pure reference sample of laser ablation SWNT is not available, so we chose to adopt the sample showing the highest purity as a new reference sample for a quantitative purity evaluation of laser ablation materials. The graphitic part of the carbonaceous impurities has been estimated using X-ray diffraction of 1:1 mixture of nanotube material and C60 as an internal reference. To evaluate the metallic impurities in the as prepared and homogenized carbon nanotube soot inductive coupled plasma (ICP) has been used

  8. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  9. AC-driven organic light emission devices with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, So-Yeon; Yu, SeGi

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated alternating current (AC)-driven organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) incorporated within the emission layer. With CNT incorporation, the brightness of the OLEDs was substantially improved, and the turn-on voltage was reduced by at least a factor of five. Furthermore, the current levels of the CNT-incorporated OLEDs were lower than that of the reference device. A roughly 70% decrease in the current level was obtained for a CNT concentration of 0.03 wt%. This was accomplished by keeping the concentration of CNTs low and the length of CNTs short, which helped to suppress the percolation networking of CNTs within the emitting layer. Strong local electric fields near the end-tips of CNTs and micro-capacitors formed by dispersed CNTs might have caused this high brightness and these low currents. CNT incorporation in the emitting layer can improve the characteristics of AC-driven OLEDs, which are considered to be one of the candidates for flat panel displays and lightning devices.

  10. AC-driven Organic Light Emission Devices with Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, So-Yeon [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, SeGi [Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    We have investigated alternating current (AC)-driven organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) incorporated within the emission layer. With CNT incorporation, the brightness of the OLEDs was substantially improved, and the turn-on voltage was reduced by at least a factor of five. Furthermore, the current levels of the CNT-incorporated OLEDs were lower than that of the reference device. A roughly 70% decrease in the current level was obtained for a CNT concentration of 0.03 wt%. This was accomplished by keeping the concentration of CNTs low and the length of CNTs short, which helped to suppress the percolation networking of CNTs within the emitting layer. Strong local electric fields near the end-tips of CNTs and micro-capacitors formed by dispersed CNTs might have caused this high brightness and these low currents. CNT incorporation in the emitting layer can improve the characteristics of AC-driven OLEDs, which are considered to be one of the candidates for flat panel displays and lightning devices.

  11. Dependence of the electrical properties of defective single-walled carbon nanotubes on the vacancy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yu-Pin; Tien Li-Gan; Tsai Chuen-Horng; Lee Ming-Hsien; Li Feng-Yin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the electric properties and the vacancy density in single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated from first principles as well as the dependence of the influencing range of a vacancy in the nanotube on the nanotube chirality. Compared with the long-range interaction of the vacancies in a single-walled carbon nanotube with non-zero chiral angle, a much shorter interaction was found between vacancies in a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube. In this study, we investigated the bandstructure fluctuations caused by the nanotube strain, which depends on both the vacancy density and the tube chirality. These theoretical results provide new insight to understand the relationship between the local deformation of a defective single-walled carbon nanotube and its measurable electronic properties. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. Ultraclean single, double, and triple carbon nanotube quantum dots with recessed Re bottom gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minkyung; Schindele, Jens; Nau, Stefan; Weiss, Markus; Baumgartner, Andreas; Schoenenberger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Ultraclean carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are free from disorder provide a promising platform to manipulate single electron or hole spins for quantum information. Here, we demonstrate that ultraclean single, double, and triple quantum dots (QDs) can be formed reliably in a CNT by a straightforward fabrication technique. The QDs are electrostatically defined in the CNT by closely spaced metallic bottom gates deposited in trenches in Silicon dioxide by sputter deposition of Re. The carbon nanotubes are then grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) across the trenches and contacted using conventional electron beam lithography. The devices exhibit reproducibly the characteristics of ultraclean QDs behavior even after the subsequent electron beam lithography and chemical processing steps. We demonstrate the high quality using CNT devices with two narrow bottom gates and one global back gate. Tunable by the gate voltages, the device can be operated in four different regimes: i) fully p-type with ballistic transport between the outermost contacts (over a length of 700 nm), ii) clean n-type single QD behavior where a QD can be induced by either the left or the right bottom gate, iii) n-type double QD and iv) triple bipolar QD where the middle QD has opposite doping (p-type). Research at Basel is supported by the NCCR-Nano, NCCR-QIST, ERC project QUEST, and FP7 project SE2ND.

  13. Synthesis of single and multi-shell carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J M [Groupe de Dynamique des Phases Condensees, Univ. de Montpellier 2, 34 Montpellier (France); Ajayan, P M [Lab. de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91 Orsay (France); Bernier, P [Groupe de Dynamique des Phases Condensees, Univ. de Montpellier 2, 34 Montpellier (France)

    1995-03-15

    We report here interesting growth morphologies produced during the electric arc-discharge between a graphite cathode and different composite metal-graphite anodes: when the metal is pure cobalt powder, we obtain, under certain conditions of pressure and cobalt content in the electrode, many single-shell carbon nanotubes of 1-2 nm diameter which appear in the soot, webs, threads (in the reactor chamber) and also on a collaret that forms around the conventional deposit containing multi-shell nanotubes. When the metal is pure manganese powder, we obtain multi-layer hollow carbon fibers in the soot similar to the carbon fibers grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Furthermore, many fibers have a good portion of the length filled with metal. We present here high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of these structures. (orig.)

  14. Diameter modulation of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Rong; Einarsson, Erik; Murakami, Yoichi; Shiomi, Junichiro; Chiashi, Shohei; Tang, Zikang; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate wide-range diameter modulation of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using a wet chemistry prepared catalyst. In order to ensure compatibility to electronic applications, the current minimum mean diameter of 2 nm for vertically aligned SWNTs is challenged. The mean diameter is decreased to about 1.4 nm by reducing Co catalyst concentrations to 1/100 or by increasing Mo catalyst concentrations by five times. We also propose a novel spectral analysis method that allows one to distinguish absorbance contributions from the upper, middle, and lower parts of a nanotube array. We use this method to quantitatively characterize the slight diameter change observed along the array height. On the basis of further investigation of the array and catalyst particles, we conclude that catalyst aggregation-rather than Ostwald ripening-dominates the growth of metal particles.

  15. Theoretical study on the combined systems of peanut-shaped carbon nanotubes encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guo; Huang, Yuanhe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The combined systems of peanut-shaped carbon nanotubes encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated. ► The band structures and related electronic properties are calculated by using crystal orbital method. ► The carrier mobility and mean free path are evaluated under the deformation potential theory. -- Abstract: The combined systems of peanut-shaped carbon nanotubes encapsulated in both semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated by using self-consistent field crystal orbital method based on the density functional theory. The investigation indicates that the interaction between the two constituents is mainly contributed by the π orbitals. The encapsulation does not change the semiconducting or metallic nature of the single-walled carbon nanotubes, but significantly changes the band dispersion and decreases the frontier band width of the metallic one. The carrier mobility and mean free path of the metallic single-walled carbon nanotube increase greatly after the encapsulation. The calculated mobilities have the order of 10 3 cm 2 V −1 s −1 for both of the semiconducting and metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes.

  16. On the charge transfer between single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Rahul; Pierce, Neal; Dasgupta, Archi

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the electronic interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene in order to use them efficiently in multifunctional hybrid devices. Here, we deposited SWNT bundles on graphene-covered copper and SiO 2 substrates by chemical vapor deposition and investigated the charge transfer between them by Raman spectroscopy. Our results revealed that, on both copper and SiO 2 substrates, graphene donates electrons to the SWNTs, resulting in p-type doped graphene and n-type doped SWNTs.

  17. Chirality Characterization of Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Min; Williams, Phillip A.; Mayweather, Candis D.; Wincheski, Buzz; Park, Cheol; Namkung, Juock S.

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for the chirality characterization of HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in aqueous solution with the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. Radial breathing mode (RBM) Raman peaks for semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are identified by directly comparing the Raman spectra with the Kataura plot. The SWNT diameters are calculated from these resonant peak positions. Next, a list of (n, m) pairs, yielding the SWNT diameters within a few percent of that obtained from each resonant peak position, is established. The interband transition energies for the list of SWNT (n, m) pairs are calculated based on the tight binding energy expression for each list of the (n, m) pairs, and the pairs yielding the closest values to the corresponding experimental optical absorption peaks are selected. The results reveal that (1, 11), (4, 11), and (0, 11) as the most probable chiralities of the semiconducting nanotubes. The results also reveal that (4, 16), (6, 12) and (8, 8) are the most probable chiralities for the metallic nanotubes. Directly relating the Raman scattering data to the optical absorption spectra, the present method is considered the simplest technique currently available. Another advantage of this technique is the use of the E(sup 8)(sub 11) peaks in the optical absorption spectrum in the analysis to enhance the accuracy in the results.

  18. Optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-11-01

    In a realistic three-dimensional model, optical matrix element and linear optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in the tight binding approximation are studied. In terms of absolute value of dipole matrix elements of the first three direct transitions at kz=0, we divided the zigzag BNNTs into three groups and investigated their optical absorption spectrum in energy ranges E7.5 eV. We found that in lower energies, E7.5 eV, their behaviors depend on their even or odd nanotube index. We also found that in the energy range 7nanotube diameter. We also found that increasing the tubes diameter leads to red shift for all peaks except ‘A’ peak where this peak moves to higher energies. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. DNA-templated synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lifeng

    2009-11-18

    A series of electron microscopy characterizations demonstrate that single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) can bind to nanotube surfaces and disperse bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into individual tubes. The ssDNA molecules on the nanotube surfaces demonstrate various morphologies, such as aggregated clusters and spiral wrapping around a nanotube with different pitches and spaces, indicating that the morphology of the SWCNT/DNA hybrids is not related solely to the base sequence of the ssDNA or the chirality or the diameter of the nanotubes. In addition to serving as a non-covalent dispersion agent, the ssDNA molecules bonded to the nanotube surface can provide addresses for localizing Pt(II) complexes along the nanotubes. The Pt nanoparticles obtained by a reduction of the Pt2+-DNA adducts are crystals with a size of direct ethanol/methanol fuel cells and nanoscale electronics.

  20. van der Waals interaction between a microparticle and a single-walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagov, E. V.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.

    2007-01-01

    The Lifshitz-type formulas describing the free energy and the force of the van der Waals interaction between an atom (molecule) and a single-walled carbon nanotube are obtained. The single-walled nanotube is considered as a cylindrical sheet carrying a two-dimensional free-electron gas with appropriate boundary conditions on the electromagnetic field. The obtained formulas are used to calculate the van der Waals free energy and force between a hydrogen atom (molecule) and single-walled carbon nanotubes of different radii. Comparison studies of the van der Waals interaction of hydrogen atoms with single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes show that depending on atom-nanotube separation distance, the idealization of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable to nanotubes with only two or three walls

  1. Electrochemical Charging of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Farhat, H.; Kavan, Ladislav; Kong, J.; Sasaki, K.; Saito, R.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 8 (2009), s. 2320-2328 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk ME09060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : single-walled carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroscopy * electrochemical gating * spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 7.493, year: 2009

  2. Improving Single-Carbon-Nanotube-Electrode Contacts Using Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittayavathananon, Atiweena; Ngamchuea, Kamonwad; Li, Xiuting; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Chaisiwamongkhol, Korbua; Sawangphruk, Montree; Compton, Richard G

    2017-08-17

    We report the use of an electroactive species, acetaminophen, to modify the electrical connection between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and an electrode. By applying a potential across two electrodes, some of the CNTs in solution occasionally contact the electrified interface and bridge between two electrodes. By observing a single CNT contact between two microbands of an interdigitated Au electrode in the presence and absence of acetaminophen, the role of the molecular species at the electronic junction is revealed. As compared with the pure CNT, the current magnitude of the acetaminophen-modified CNTs significantly increases with the applied potentials, indicating that the molecule species improves the junction properties probably via redox shuttling.

  3. Induced Magnetic Moment in Defected Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a large induced magnetic moment in defect single-walled carbon nanotube(SWNT) is predicted using the Green's function method. Specific to this magnetic moment of defect SWNT is its magnitude which is several orders of magnitude larger than that of perfect SWNT. The induced magnetic moment also shows certain remarkable features. Therefore, we suggest that two pair-defect orientations in SWNT can be distinguished in experiment through the direction of the induced magnetic moment at some Specific energy points

  4. Energy transfer from natural photosynthetic complexes to single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiwatowski, Kamil [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Dużyńska, Anna; Świniarski, Michał [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Szalkowski, Marcin [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Zdrojek, Mariusz; Judek, Jarosław [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wroclaw Research Center EIT+, Stablowicka 147, Wroclaw (Poland); Kaminska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    Combination of fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy results indicates that single-walled carbon nanotubes are extremely efficient quenchers of fluorescence emission associated with chlorophylls embedded in a natural photosynthetic complex, peridinin-chlorophyll-protein. When deposited on a network of the carbon nanotubes forming a thin film, the emission of the photosynthetic complexes diminishes almost completely. This strong reduction of fluorescence intensity is accompanied with dramatic shortening of the fluorescence lifetime. Concluding, such thin films of carbon nanotubes can be extremely efficient energy acceptors in structures involving biologically functional complexes. - Highlights: • Fluorescence imaging of carbon nanotube - based hybrid structure. • Observation of efficient energy transfer from chlorophylls to carbon nanotubes.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis of covalently functionalized single-chirality carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pingli; Meany, Brendan; Wang, Chunyan; Piao, Yanmei; Kwon, Hyejin; Deng, Shunliu; Wang, YuHuang

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the separation of chirality-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by degree of surface functionalization using high-performance CE. Controlled amounts of negatively charged and positively charged functional groups were attached to the sidewall of chirality-enriched SWCNTs through covalent functionalization using 4-carboxybenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate or 4-diazo-N,N-diethylaniline tetrafluoroborate, respectively. Surfactant- and pH-dependent studies confirmed that under conditions that minimized ionic screening effects, separation of these functionalized SWCNTs was strongly dependent on the surface charge density introduced through covalent surface chemistry. For both heterogeneous mixtures and single-chirality-enriched samples, covalently functionalized SWCNTs showed substantially increased peak width in electropherogram spectra compared to nonfunctionalized SWCNTs, which can be attributed to a distribution of surface charges along the functionalized nanotubes. Successful separation of functionalized single-chirality SWCNTs by functional density was confirmed with UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies of fraction collected samples. These results suggest a high degree of structural heterogeneity in covalently functionalized SWCNTs, even for chirality-enriched samples, and show the feasibility of applying CE for high-performance separation of nanomaterials based on differences in surface functional density. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High pressure Raman spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Effect of chemical environment on individual nanotubes and the nanotube bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, John E.; Halsall, Matthew P.; Ghandour, Ahmad; Dunstan, David J.

    2006-12-01

    The pressure-induced tangential mode Raman peak shifts for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied using a variety of different solvents as hydrostatic pressure-transmitting media. The variation in the nanotube response to hydrostatic pressure with different pressure transmitting media is evidence that the common solvents used are able to penetrate the interstitial spaces in the nanotube bundle. With hexane, we find the surprising result that the individual nanotubes appear unaffected by hydrostatic pressures (i.e. a flat Raman response) up to 0.7 GPa. Qualitatively similar results have been obtained with butanol. Following the approach of Amer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2004) 2752], we speculate that this is due to the inability of SWNTs to adsorb some solvents onto their surface at lower pressures. We also find that the role of cohesive energy density in the solvent nanotube interaction is more complex than previously thought.

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Detection Using Au-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Ju Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that Au-cluster-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs may be used to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. Nanoscale Au clusters were formed on the side walls of carbon nanotubes in a transistor geometry using electrochemical deposition. The effect of Au cluster decoration appeared as hole doping when electrical transport characteristics were examined. Thiolated single-stranded probe peptide nucleic acid (PNA was successfully immobilized on Au clusters decorating single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs, resulting in a conductance decrease that could be explained by a decrease in Au work function upon adsorption of thiolated PNA. Although a target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA with a single mismatch did not cause any change in electrical conductance, a clear decrease in conductance was observed with matched ssDNA, thereby showing the possibility of SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism detection using Au-cluster-decorated SWNT-FETs. However, a power to discriminate SNP target is lost in high ionic environment. We can conclude that observed SNP discrimination in low ionic environment is due to the hampered binding of SNP target on nanoscale surfaces in low ionic conditions.

  8. Vibrational Analysis of Curved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube on a Pasternak Elastic Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehdipour, I.; Barari, Amin; Kimiaeifar, Amin

    2012-01-01

    . By utilizing He’s Energy Balance Method (HEBM), the relationships of the nonlinear amplitude and frequency were expressed for a curved, single-walled carbon nanotube. The amplitude frequency response curves of the nonlinear free vibration were obtained for a curved, single-walled carbon nanotube embedded...

  9. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Astha; Homayoun, Aida; Bannister, Christopher W; Yum, Kyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that emit photostable near-infrared fluorescence have emerged as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine. Since the discovery of their near-infrared fluorescence, researchers have engineered single-walled carbon nanotubes to function as an optical biosensor that selectively modulates its fluorescence upon binding of target molecules. Here we review the recent advances in the single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical sensing technology for life sciences and biomedicine. We discuss the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the mechanisms for molecular recognition and signal transduction in single-walled carbon nanotube complexes, and the recent development of various single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical biosensors. We also discuss the opportunities and challenges to translate this emerging technology into biomedical research and clinical use, including the biological safety of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The advances in single-walled carbon nanotube-based near-infrared optical sensing technology open up a new avenue for in vitro and in vivo biosensing with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, beneficial for many areas of life sciences and biomedicine. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Excitons in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amori, Amanda R.; Hou, Zhentao; Krauss, Todd D.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding exciton dynamics in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is essential to unlocking the many potential applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding exciton photophysics and, in particular, exciton dynamics in SWCNTs. We outline the basic physical and electronic properties of SWCNTs, as well as bright and dark transitions within the framework of a strongly bound one-dimensional excitonic model. We discuss the many facets of ultrafast carrier dynamics in SWCNTs, including both single-exciton states (bright and dark) and multiple-exciton states. Photophysical properties that directly relate to excitons and their dynamics, including exciton diffusion lengths, chemical and structural defects, environmental effects, and photoluminescence photon statistics as observed through photon antibunching measurements, are also discussed. Finally, we identify a few key areas for advancing further research in the field of SWCNT excitons and photonics.

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of single-wall carbon nanotube-based material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, Pavel A; Ionin, Andrey A; Kudryashov, Sergey I; Makarov, Sergey V; Mel’nik, Nikolay N; Rudenko, Andrey A; Yurovskikh, Vladislav I; Zayarny, Dmitry V; Lednev, Vasily N; Obraztsova, Elena D; Pershin, Sergey M; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    Single- and multi-shot femtosecond laser surface ablation of a single-wall carbon nanotube-based substrate at 515- and 1030 nm wavelengths was studied by scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The laser ablation proceeds in two ways: as the low-fluence mesoscopic shallow disintegration of the surface nanotube packing, preserving the individual integrity and the semiconducting character of the nanotubes or as the high-fluence deep material removal apparently triggered by the strong intrinsic or impurity-mediated ablation of the individual carbon nanotubes on the substrate surface. (letter)

  13. Asymmetric devices based on carbon nanotubes for terahertz-range radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, G. E., E-mail: gefedorov@mail.ru; Stepanova, T. S.; Gazaliev, A. Sh.; Gaiduchenko, I. A.; Kaurova, N. S.; Voronov, B. M.; Goltzman, G. N. [Moscow State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Various asymmetric detecting devices based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are studied. The asymmetry is understood as inhomogeneous properties along the conducting channel. In the first type of devices, an inhomogeneous morphology of the CNT grid is used. In the second type of devices, metals with highly varying work functions are used as the contact material. The relation between the sensitivity and detector configuration is analyzed. Based on the data obtained, approaches to the development of an efficient detector of terahertz radiation, based on carbon nanotubes are proposed.

  14. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  15. High-performance photoresponse from single-walled carbon nanotube-zinc oxide heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jingbo; Najeeb, Choolakadavil Khalid; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Minsu; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Photoactive materials consisting of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-zinc oxide (ZnO) heterojunctions targeted for optoelectronic applications are investigated in terms of photoresponse and photovoltaic effects. The devices based on SWNT-ZnO heterojunction films are fabricated by two step processes: first, a well aligned SWNT monolayer is deposited on an oxide substrate by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique; then a ZnO film prepared by filtration of ZnO nanowire solution is transferred onto the SWNT film to form SWNT-ZnO junctions. The SWNT-ZnO heterojunction demonstrates faster photoresponse time (2.75 s) up to 18 times and photovoltaic efficiency (1.33 nA) up to 4 times higher than that of only a ZnO device. Furthermore, the mechanisms of UV sensitivity enhancement and photovoltaic effects are explained according to the high electron mobility in the SWNT-ZnO heterojunctions.

  16. Transparent and flexible electrodes and supercapacitors using polyaniline/single-walled carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jun; Cheng, Guanghui; Chen, Liwei

    2011-08-01

    Large-scale transparent and flexible electronic devices have been pursued for potential applications such as those in touch sensors and display technologies. These applications require that the power source of these devices must also comply with transparent and flexible features. Here we present transparent and flexible supercapacitors assembled from polyaniline (PANI)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite thin film electrodes. The ultrathin, optically homogeneous and transparent, electrically conducting films of the PANI/SWNT composite show a large specific capacitance due to combined double-layer capacitance and pseudo-capacitance mechanisms. A supercapacitor assembled using electrodes with a SWNT density of 10.0 µg cm-2 and 59 wt% PANI gives a specific capacitance of 55.0 F g-1 at a current density of 2.6 A g-1, showing its possibility for transparent and flexible energy storage.

  17. Transparent and flexible supercapacitors with single walled carbon nanotube thin film electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Recep; Sarioba, Zeynep; Cirpan, Ali; Hiralal, Pritesh; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2014-09-10

    We describe a simple process for the fabrication of transparent and flexible, solid-state supercapacitors. Symmetric electrodes made up of binder-free single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films were deposited onto polydimethylsiloxane substrates by vacuum filtration followed by a stamping method, and solid-state supercapacitor devices were assembled using a gel electrolyte. An optical transmittance of 82% was found for 0.02 mg of SWCNTs, and a specific capacitance of 22.2 F/g was obtained. The power density can reach to 41.5 kW · kg(-1) and shows good capacity retention (94%) upon cycling over 500 times. Fabricated supercapacitors will be relevant for the realization of transparent and flexible devices with energy storage capabilities, displays and touch screens in particular.

  18. Ultraclean individual suspended single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyu; Zhang, Jian; Nshimiyimana, Jean Pierre; Chi, Xiannian; Hu, Xiao; Wu, Pei; Liu, Jia; Wang, Gongtang; Sun, Lianfeng

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we report an effective technique of fabricating ultraclean individual suspended single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors. The surface tension of molten silver is utilized to suspend an individual SWNT between a pair of Pd electrodes during annealing treatment. This approach avoids the usage and the residues of organic resist attached to SWNTs, resulting ultraclean SWNT devices. And the resistance per micrometer of suspended SWNTs is found to be smaller than that of non-suspended SWNTs, indicating the effect of the substrate on the electrical properties of SWNTs. The ON-state resistance (˜50 kΩ), mobility of 8600 cm2 V-1 s-1 and large on/off ratio (˜105) of semiconducting suspended SWNT devices indicate its advantages and potential applications.

  19. Optical properties of armchair (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharbavi, K.; Badehian, H.

    2015-01-01

    Full potential linearized augmented plane waves method with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential was applied to calculate the optical properties of (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes. The both x and z directions of the incident photons were applied to estimate optical gaps, dielectric function, electron energy loss spectroscopies, optical conductivity, optical extinction, optical refractive index and optical absorption coefficient. The results predict that dielectric function, ε (ω), is anisotropic since it has higher peaks along z-direction than x-direction. The static optical refractive constant were calculated about 1.4 (z-direction) and 1.1 (x- direction). Moreover, the electron energy loss spectroscopy showed a sharp π electron plasmon peaks at about 6 eV and 5 eV for z and x-directions respectively. The calculated reflection spectra show that directions perpendicular to the tube axis have further optical reflection. Moreover, z-direction indicates higher peaks at absorption spectra in low range energies. Totally, increasing the diameter of armchair carbon nanotubes cause the optical band gap, static optical refractive constant and optical reflectivity to decrease. On the other hand, increasing the diameter cause the optical absorption and the optical conductivity to increase. Moreover, the sharp peaks being illustrated at optical spectrum are related to the 1D structure of CNTs which confirm the accuracy of the calculations

  20. Transient reflectivity on vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galimberti, Gianluca; Ponzoni, Stefano; Ferrini, Gabriele [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Materials Physics (i-LAMP) and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, I-25121 Brescia (Italy); Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Arshad, Muhammad [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen (Netherlands); ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy); National Centre for Physics Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali — CNR, Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park, Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Pagliara, Stefania, E-mail: pagliara@dmf.unicatt.it [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Materials Physics (i-LAMP) and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, I-25121 Brescia (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    One-color transient reflectivity measurements are carried out on two different samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube bundles and compared with the response recently published on unaligned bundles. The negative sign of the optical response for both samples indicates that the free electron character revealed on unaligned bundles is only due to the intertube interactions favored by the tube bending. Neither the presence of bundles nor the existence of structural defects in aligned bundles is able to induce a free-electron like behavior of the photoexcited carriers. This result is also confirmed by the presence of non-linear excitonic effects in the transient response of the aligned bundles. - Highlights: • Transient reflectivity measurements on two aligned carbon nanotube samples • Relationship between unalignment and/or bundling and intertube interaction • The bundling is not able to modify the intertube interactions • The presence of structural defects does not affect the intertube interactions • A localized exciton-like behavior has been revealed in these samples.

  1. Broadband Spectroscopic Thermoacoustic Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Bauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted interest as contrast agents for biomedical imaging because they strongly absorb electromagnetic radiation in the optical and microwave regions. This study applies thermoacoustic (TA imaging and spectroscopy to measure the frequency-dependent absorption profile of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT in the ranges of 2.7–3.1 GHz and 7–9 GHz using two tunable microwave sources. Between 7 and 9 GHz, the peak TA signal for solutions containing semiconducting and metallic SWNTs increased monotonically with a slope of 1.75 AU/GHz (R2=0.95 and 2.8 AU/GHz (R2=0.93, respectively, relative to a water baseline. However, after compensating for the background signal from water, it was revealed that the TA signal from metallic SWNTs increased exponentially within this frequency band. Results suggest that TA imaging and spectroscopy could be a powerful tool for quantifying the absorption properties of SWNTs and optimizing their performance as contrast agents for imaging or heat sources for thermal therapy.

  2. Economic assessment of single-walled carbon nanotube processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, J. A.; Tanwani, A.; Healy, M. L.; Dahlben, L. J.

    2010-02-01

    The carbon nanotube market is steadily growing and projected to reach 1.9 billion by 2010. This study examines the economics of manufacturing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using process-based cost models developed for arc, CVD, and HiPco processes. Using assumed input parameters, manufacturing costs are calculated for 1 g SWNT for arc, CVD, and HiPco, totaling 1,906, 1,706, and 485, respectively. For each SWNT process, the synthesis and filtration steps showed the highest costs, with direct labor as a primary cost driver. Reductions in production costs are calculated for increased working hours per day and for increased synthesis reaction yield (SRY) in each process. The process-based cost models offer a means for exploring opportunities for cost reductions, and provide a structured system for comparisons among alternative SWNT manufacturing processes. Further, the models can be used to comprehensively evaluate additional scenarios on the economics of environmental, health, and safety best manufacturing practices.

  3. Single-wall carbon nanotube chemical attachment at platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contes-de-Jesus, Enid J.; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques were used to adsorb 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on platinum electrodes in order to obtain an amino-terminated SAM as the base for the chemical attachment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A physico-chemical, morphological and electrochemical characterizations of SWCNTs attached onto the modified Pt electrodes was done by using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The SWNTs/4-ATP/Pt surface had regions of small, medium, and large thickness of carbon nanotubes with heights of 100-200 nm, 700 nm to 1.5 μm, and 1.0-3.0 μm, respectively. Cyclic voltammetries (CVs) in sulfuric acid demonstrated that attachment of SWNTs on 4-ATP/Pt is markedly stable, even after 30 potential cycles. CV in ruthenium hexamine was similar to bare Pt electrodes, suggesting that SWNTs assembly is similar to a closely packed microelectrode array.

  4. Modification of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, A.M.; Nouralishahi, A.; Karimi, A.; Kashefi, K. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of petroleum industry (RIPI), Tehran (Iran); Khodadadi, A.A.; Mortazavi, Y. [Chemical engineering Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    Due to unique structural, mechanical and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes, SWNTs, they have been proposed as promising hydrogen storage materials especially in automotive industries. This research deals with investing of CNT's and some activated carbons hydrogen storage capacity. The CNT's were prepared through natural gas decomposition at a temperature of 900 C over cobalt-molybdenum nanoparticles supported by nanoporous magnesium oxide (Co-Mo/MgO) during a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The effects of purity of CNT (80-95%wt.) on hydrogen storage were investigated here. The results showed an improvement in the hydrogen adsorption capacity with increasing the purity of CNT's. Maximum adsorption capacity was 0.8%wt. in case of CNT's with 95% purity and it may be raised up with some purification to 1%wt. which was far less than the target specified by DOE (6.5%wt.). Also some activated carbons were manufactured and the results compared to CNTs. There were no considerable H{sub 2}-storage for carbon nanotubes and activated carbons at room-temperature due to insufficient binding between H{sub 2} molecules carbon nanostructures. Therefore, hydrogen must be adsorbed via interaction of atomic hydrogen with the storage environment in order to achieve DOE target, because the H atoms have a very stronger interaction with carbon nanostructures. (author)

  5. Economic assessment of single-walled carbon nanotube processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, J. A., E-mail: jaisaacs@coe.neu.ed [Northeastern University, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (United States); Tanwani, A. [Infojini Solutions Inc. (United States); Healy, M. L. [Babcock Power Inc. (United States); Dahlben, L. J. [Northeastern University, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The carbon nanotube market is steadily growing and projected to reach $1.9 billion by 2010. This study examines the economics of manufacturing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using process-based cost models developed for arc, CVD, and HiPco processes. Using assumed input parameters, manufacturing costs are calculated for 1 g SWNT for arc, CVD, and HiPco, totaling $1,906, $1,706, and $485, respectively. For each SWNT process, the synthesis and filtration steps showed the highest costs, with direct labor as a primary cost driver. Reductions in production costs are calculated for increased working hours per day and for increased synthesis reaction yield (SRY) in each process. The process-based cost models offer a means for exploring opportunities for cost reductions, and provide a structured system for comparisons among alternative SWNT manufacturing processes. Further, the models can be used to comprehensively evaluate additional scenarios on the economics of environmental, health, and safety best manufacturing practices.

  6. Chemical detection with nano/bio hybrid devices based on carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Mitchell Bryant

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (NT-FETs) and graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) provide a unique transduction platform for chemical and biomolecular detection. The work presented in this thesis describes the fabrication, characterization, and investigation of operational mechanisms of carbon-based biosensors. In the first set of experiments, we used carbon nanotubes as fast, all-electronic readout elements in novel vapor sensors, suitable for applications in environmental monitoring and medicine. Molecules bound to the hybrid alter the electrical properties of the NT-FET via several mechanisms, allowing direct detection as a change in the transistor conduction properties. Vapor sensors suitable for more complex system architectures characteristic of mammalian olfaction were demonstrated using NT-FETs functionalized with mouse olfactory receptor (mOR) proteins or single stranded DNA (ssDNA). Substitution of graphene as the channel material enabled production of hundreds of electronically similar devices with high yield. Etching large scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene into small channels is itself a challenging problem, and we have developed novel fabrication methods to this end without sacrificing the inherent electrical quality that makes graphene such an attractive material. Large arrays of such devices have potential utility for understanding the physics of ligand-receptor interactions and contributing to the development of a new generation of devices for electronic olfaction. Tailored and specific detection was accomplished by chemically functionalizing the NT-FET or GFET with biomolecules, such as proteins or small molecules, to create a hybrid nanostructures. Targets for detection were widely varied, indicating the utility of these techniques, such as 1) live Salmonella cells in nutrient broth, 2) a biomarker protein indicative of prostate cancer, 3) antigen protein from the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, and 4) glucose

  7. Device-independent randomness amplification with a single device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plesch, Martin; Pivoluska, Matej

    2014-01-01

    Expansion and amplification of weak randomness with untrusted quantum devices has recently become a very fruitful topic of research. Here we contribute with a procedure for amplifying a single weak random source using tri-partite GHZ-type entangled states. If the quality of the source reaches a fixed threshold R=log 2 ⁡(10), perfect random bits can be produced. This technique can be used to extract randomness from sources that can't be extracted neither classically, nor by existing procedures developed for Santha–Vazirani sources. Our protocol works with a single fault-free device decomposable into three non-communicating parts, that is repeatedly reused throughout the amplification process. - Highlights: • We propose a protocol for device independent randomness amplification. • Our protocol repeatedly re-uses a single device decomposable into three parts. • Weak random sources with min-entropy rate greater than 1/4 log 2 ⁡(10) can be amplified. • Security against all-quantum adversaries is achieved

  8. Lightweight carbon nanotube-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Monica; Cole, Daniel P.; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Reddy, Arava L. M.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Karna, Shashi P.; Bundy, Mark L.

    2012-06-01

    There is a strong need for small, lightweight energy storage devices that can satisfy the ever increasing power and energy demands of micro unmanned systems. Currently, most commercial and developmental micro unmanned systems utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) lithium polymer batteries for their energy storage needs. While COTS lithium polymer batteries are the industry norm, the weight of these batteries can account for up to 60% of the overall system mass and the capacity of these batteries can limit mission durations to the order of only a few minutes. One method to increase vehicle endurance without adding mass or sacrificing payload capabilities is to incorporate multiple system functions into a single material or structure. For example, the body or chassis of a micro vehicle could be replaced with a multifunctional material that would serve as both the vehicle structure and the on-board energy storage device. In this paper we present recent progress towards the development of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems. Randomly oriented and vertically aligned CNT-polymer composite electrodes with varying degrees of flexibility are used as the primary building blocks for lightweight structural-supercapacitors. For the purpose of this study, the mechanical properties of the CNT-based electrodes and the charge-discharge behavior of the supercapacitor devices are examined. Because incorporating multifunctionality into a single component often degrades the properties or performance of individual structures, the performance and property tradeoffs of the CNT-based structural-energy storage devices will also be discussed.

  9. Solubilization of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes with Single- stranded DNA Generated from Asymmetric PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be effectively dispersed and functionalized bywrapping with long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA synthesized by asymmetric PCR. ThessDNA-CNTs attached on surface of glass carbon electrode made it possible forelectrochemical analysis and sensing, which was demonstrated by reduction of H2O2 onhemoglobin/ssDNA-CNTs modified electrodes. This research showed the potentialapplication of DNA-functionalised CNTs in construction of future electrochemicalbiosensors.

  10. Charge transport in transparent single-wall carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaiswal, Manu; Wang, Wei; Fernando, K A Shiral; Sun Yaping; Menon, Reghu

    2007-01-01

    We report the electric-field effects and magnetotransport in transparent networks of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The temperature dependence of conductance of the network indicates a 2D Mott variable-range hopping (VRH) transport mechanism. Electric field and temperature are shown to have similar effects on the carrier hops and identical exponents for the conductance of the network are obtained from the high electric field and temperature dependences. A power-law temperature dependence with an exponent 3/2 for the threshold field is obtained and explained as a result of the competing contributions from electric field and phonons to the carrier hop. A negative magnetoresistance (MR) is observed at low temperatures, which arises from a forward interference scattering mechanism in the weak scattering limit, consistent with the VRH transport

  11. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an ∼1 μm film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film (∼7 μm) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35±3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  12. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  13. Pressure effects on single wall carbon nanotube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teredesai, P.V.; Sharma, S.M.; Karmakar, S.; Sikka, S.K.; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2001-01-01

    We report high pressure Raman studies on single wall carbon nanotube bundles under hydrostatic conditions using two different pressure transmitting media, alcohol mixture and pure water. The radial and tangential modes show a blue shift when SWNT bundle is immersed in the liquids at ambient pressures. The pressure dependence of the radial modes is the same in both liquids. However, the pressure derivatives dω/dP of the tangential modes are slightly higher for the water medium. Raman results are compared with studies under non-hydrostatic conditions and with recent high-pressure X-ray studies. It is seen that the mode frequencies of the recovered sample after pressure cycling from 26 GPa are downshifted by ∝7-10 cm -1 as compared to the starting sample. (orig.)

  14. Signal Integrity Analysis in Single and Bundled Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumder, M.K.; Pandya, N.D.; Kaushik, B.K.; Manhas, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CN T) can be considered as an emerging interconnect material in current nano scale regime. They are more promising than other interconnect materials such as Al or Cu because of their robustness to electromigration. This research paper aims to address the crosstalk-related issues (signal integrity) in interconnect lines. Different analytical models of single- (SWCNT), double- (DWCNT), and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNT) are studied to analyze the crosstalk delay at global interconnect lengths. A capacitively coupled three-line bus architecture employing CMOS driver is used for accurate estimation of crosstalk delay. Each line in bus architecture is represented with the equivalent RLC models of single and bundled SWCNT, DWCNT, and MWCNT interconnects. Crosstalk delay is observed at middle line (victim) when it switches in opposite direction with respect to the other two lines (aggressors). Using the data predicted by ITRS 2012, a comparative analysis on the basis of crosstalk delay is performed for bundled SWCNT/DWCNT and single MWCNT interconnects. It is observed that the overall crosstalk delay is improved by 40.92% and 21.37% for single MWCNT in comparison to bundled SWCNT and bundled DWCNT interconnects, respectively.

  15. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Fluorescence Biosensors for Pathogen Recognition in Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata K. K. Upadhyayula

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs aggregates as fluorescence sensors for pathogen recognition in drinking water treatment applications has been studied. Batch adsorption study is conducted to adsorb large concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus aureus SH 1000 and Escherichia coli pKV-11 on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Subsequently the immobilized bacteria are detected with confocal microscopy by coating the nanotubes with fluorescence emitting antibodies. The Freundlich adsorption equilibrium constant (k for S.aureus and E.coli determined from batch adsorption study was found to be 9×108 and 2×108 ml/g, respectively. The visualization of bacterial cells adsorbed on fluorescently modified carbon nanotubes is also clearly seen. The results indicate that hydrophobic single-walled carbon nanotubes have excellent bacterial adsorption capacity and fluorescent detection capability. This is an important advancement in designing fluorescence biosensors for pathogen recognition in water systems.

  16. Resonant ablation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, N R; Komlenok, M S; Kononenko, V V; Pashinin, V P; Pozharov, A S; Konov, V I; Obraztsova, E D

    2015-01-01

    The thin 50 nm film of bundled arc-discharge single-wall carbon nanotubes was irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths 675, 1350 and 1745 nm corresponding to the absorption band of metallic nanotubes E 11 M , to the background absorption and to the absorption band of semiconducting nanotubes E 11 S , respectively. The aim was to induce a selective removal of nanotubes of specific type from the bundled material. Similar to conducted thermal heating experiments, the effect of laser irradiation results in suppression of all radial breathing modes in the Raman spectra, with preferential destruction of the metallic nanotubes with diameters less than 1.26 nm and of the semiconducting nanotubes with diameters 1.36 nm. However, the etching rate of different nanotubes depends on the wavelength of the laser irradiation. It is demonstrated that the relative content of nanotubes of different chiralities can be tuned by a resonant laser ablation of undesired nanotube fraction. The preferential etching of the resonant nanotubes has been shown for laser wavelengths 675 nm (E 11 M ) and 1745 nm (E 11 S ). (paper)

  17. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10 −3 Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm 3 , and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators

  18. Diameter grouping in bulk samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes from optical absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.; Dunsch, L.; Bauer, H.-D.; Reibold, M.; Knupfer, M.; Friedlein, R.; Pichler, T.; Jost, O.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the mean characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes in soot produced by the laser vaporization of graphite has been analyzed using optical absorption spectroscopy. The abundance and mean diameter of the nanotubes were found to be most influenced by

  19. Determination of the displacement cross section in single-walled carbon nanotubes under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Cruz, C.; Abreu, Y.; Leyva, D.

    2009-01-01

    Using the threshold energy value reported in literature for C atoms in single-walled carbon nanotube and taking into account the McKinley-Feshbach approach, the effective atomic displacement cross-section in nanotubes exposed to the gamma rays was estimated. In this calculation the Kinchin-Pease approximation for the damage function was considered. (Author)

  20. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  1. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Nlayered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6–31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid...

  2. Single-particle and collective dynamics of methanol confined in carbon nanotubes: a computer simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garberoglio, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of computer simulations of methanol confined in carbon nanotubes. Different levels of confinement were identified as a function of the nanotube radius and characterized using a pair-distribution function adapted to the cylindrical geometry of these systems. Dynamical properties of methanol were also analysed as a function of the nanotube size, both at the level of single-particle and collective properties. We found that confinement in narrow carbon nanotubes strongly affects the dynamical properties of methanol with respect to the bulk phase, due to the strong interaction with the carbon nanotube. In the other cases, confined methanol shows properties quite similar to those of the bulk phase. These phenomena are related to the peculiar hydrogen bonded network of methanol and are compared to the behaviour of water confined in similar conditions. The effect of nanotube flexibility on the dynamical properties of confined methanol is also discussed.

  3. Effects of junctions on carbon nanotube network-based devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Pil Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Realistic random networks of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were simulated by the noble hybrid method combining Monte Carlo and SPICE simulations. Near the percolation threshold, the electrical characteristics of networks are strongly affected by the contacts among nanotubes. The nonlinear electrical junctions in the CNT network were modeled by suitable SPICE models and simulated using our hybrid simulation method. We successfully described the morphological percolation threshold, and the critical density was determined as a function of normalized length. The effects of electrical junctions on the scaling of the sheet conductance were investigated. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Environmental Impacts from Photovoltaic Solar Cells Made with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ilke; Mason, Brooke E; Phillips, Adam B; Heben, Michael J; Apul, Defne

    2017-04-18

    An ex-ante life cycle inventory was developed for single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) PV cells, including a laboratory-made 1% efficient device and an aspirational 28% efficient four-cell tandem device. The environmental impact of unit energy generation from the mono-Si PV technology was used as a reference point. Compared to monocrystalline Si (mono-Si), the environmental impacts from 1% SWCNT was ∼18 times higher due mainly to the short lifetime of three years. However, even with the same short lifetime, the 28% cell had lower environmental impacts than mono-Si. The effects of lifetime and efficiency on the environmental impacts were further examined. This analysis showed that if the SWCNT device efficiency had the same value as the best efficiency of the material under comparison, to match the total normalized impacts of the mono- and poly-Si, CIGS, CdTe, and a-Si devices, the SWCNT devices would need a lifetime of 2.8, 3.5, 5.3, 5.1, and 10.8 years, respectively. It was also found that if the SWCNT PV has an efficiency of 4.5% or higher, its energy payback time would be lower than other existing and emerging PV technologies. The major impacts of SWCNT PV came from the cell's materials synthesis.

  5. Stable single helical C- and I-chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Z; Li Y; Jing X D; Meng F S; Zhao X; Li J H; Qiu Z Y; Yuan Q; Wang W X; Bi L; Liu H; Zhang Y P; Liu C J; Zheng S P; Liu B B

    2016-01-01

    The helicity of stable single helical carbon chains and iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic van der Waals interaction energy. The results show that the optimal helical radius increases linearly with increasing tube radius, which produces a constant separation between the chain structure and the tube wall. The helical angle exhibits a ladder-like decrease with increasing tube radius, indicating that a large tube can produce a small helicity in the helical structures. (paper)

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Isolated Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Their Molar Absorbance Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Kuwahara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The molar absorbance coefficients of metallic, semiconducting, and (6,5 chirality enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes were evaluated by a spray technique combined with atomic force microscopy. Single-wall carbon nanotubes with isolated and a single predominant electronic type were obtained by using the density-gradient ultracentrifugation technique. In the visible region, all coefficients had similar values around 2–5 × 109/mL mol−1 cm−1, independent of their diameter distribution and the electronic types of single-wall carbon nanotubes, and the εS22/εM11  and εS11/εM11 were estimated to be 1.0 and 4.0, respectively. The coefficient strongly depends on the length of single-wall carbon nanotubes, independent of their electronic types and chirality.

  7. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  8. Production and characterization of polymer nanocomposite with aligned single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Tao Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    We reported a simple method to fabricate polymer nanocomposites with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) having exceptional alignment and improved mechanical properties. The composite films were fabricated by casting a suspension of single walled carbon nanotubes in a solution of thermoplastic polyurethane and tetrahydrofuran. The orientation as well as dispersion of nanotubes was determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy. The macroscopic alignment probably results from solvent-polymer interaction induced orientation of soft segment chain during swelling and moisture curing. The tensile behavior of the aligned nanotube composite film was also studied. At a 0.5 wt.% nanotube loading, a 1.9-fold increase in Young's modulus was achieved

  9. Nanopattern formation using localized plasma for growth of single-standing carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser, E-mail: y.abdi@ut.ac.ir [University of Tehran, Nanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    We report a novel method for formation of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes by customizing a plasma-based process. The growth of carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition provides suitable grounds to utilize plasma–solid interactions for nanopatterning. The bulk plasma is utilized to fabricate carbon nanotubes on the prepatterned Ni catalyst which in turn can confine the plasma to the growth region. The plasma localization leads to a dielectrophoretic force exerted on Ni atoms and can be engineered in order to grow a specific pattern of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes. Numerical simulations based on the plasma localization and dielectrophoretic force confirmed the experimental results. This method provides a simple and cost-effective approach to obtain nanopatterned arrays of carbon nanotubes which can be used for fabrication of photonic and phononic crystals, self-gated field emission-based transistors and displays.

  10. Carbon nanotube-based sensing devices for human Arginase-1 detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baldo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new carbon nanotube-based device for detection of Arginase 1 (ARG-1 was produced. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were deposited between electrodes by dielectrophoresis (DEP in an accurate and reproducible way. This deposition method has the advantages of low cost and room temperature conditions and therefore, can be used on different kinds of substrates (silicon, glass, plastics allowing for large scale production of chemical or biological sensors. Scanning electrical microscope (SEM and electrical characterization have been performed on the biosensors before and after protein exposure. The devices were tested in the present work for the detection of ARG-1. They show high sensitivity and reproducibility, and can be easily and suitably modified to detect other proteins. Keywords: Carbon nanotube, Biosensor, Arginase, Dielectrophoresis, Biomarker, Protein

  11. Ab initio study of F- and Cl-functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, H; Feng, Y P; Lin, J Y

    2006-01-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to study the functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes by the chemical absorption of F and Cl atoms. Our results confirmed that the band gap of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes is reduced on addition of F or Cl atoms on the walls of the nanotubes. For metallic armchair nanotubes, the doubly degenerate states crossing the Fermi level were separated by the introduction of F or Cl atoms. An additional energy level emerged near the Fermi level, due to coupling between the carbon nanotube and the F or Cl atom. For zigzag nanotubes, charge transfers of 0.27e from the tube to the Cl atom and of 0.41e to the F atom took place, while for armchair nanotubes, the charge transfers from the nanotube to Cl and F are 0.25 and 0.42e, respectively. The Cl-C and F-C bond lengths were found to be 2.09 and 1.49 A, respectively. The systems show semiconducting behaviour when charged with one electron per halogen atom, but remain metallic under hole injection, regardless of the chirality of the carbon nanotubes

  12. Optical Detection of Paraoxon Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films with Attached Organophosphorus Hydrolase-Expressed Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intae Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In whole-cell based biosensors, spectrophotometry is one of the most commonly used methods for detecting organophosphates due to its simplicity and reliability. The sensor performance is directly affected by the cell immobilization method because it determines the amount of cells, the mass transfer rate, and the stability. In this study, we demonstrated that our previously-reported microbe immobilization method, a microbe-attached single-walled carbon nanotube film, can be applied to whole-cell-based organophosphate sensors. This method has many advantages over other whole-cell organophosphate sensors, including high specific activity, quick cell immobilization, and excellent stability. A device with circular electrodes was fabricated for an enlarged cell-immobilization area. Escherichia coli expressing organophosphorus hydrolase in the periplasmic space and single-walled carbon nanotubes were attached to the device by our method. Paraoxon was hydrolyzed using this device, and detected by measuring the concentration of the enzymatic reaction product, p-nitrophenol. The specific activity of our device was calculated, and was shown to be over 2.5 times that reported previously for other whole-cell organophosphate sensors. Thus, this method for generation of whole-cell-based OP biosensors might be optimal, as it overcomes many of the caveats that prevent the widespread use of other such devices.

  13. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  14. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Haiwon

    2007-01-01

    This project focused on the behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the electrophoresis cells and aligned growth of SWCNTs by thermal chemical vapor deposition on selectively deposited metallic nanoparticle...

  15. A one-step single source route to carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized via directly pyrolyzing ferrocene in the autoclave. The nanotubes with several micrometers in length have outer and inner diameters in the range of 40–100 nm and 20–40 nm, respectively. An yield of ∼70% of CNTs can be obtained without any accessorial solvents and ...

  16. Antenna-coupled terahertz radiation from joule-heated single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muthee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter an experimental method is introduced that allows detection of terahertz (THz radiation from arrays of joule-heated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs, by coupling this radiation through integrated antennas and a silicon lens. The radiation forms a diffraction-limited beam with a total maximum radiated power of 450 nW, significantly greater than the power estimated from Nyquist thermal noise (8 nW. The physical radiation process is unknown at this stage, but possible explanations for the high radiated power are discussed briefly. The emission has a typical bandwidth of 1.2 THz and can be tuned to different frequencies by changing the dimensions of the antennas. Arrays of the devices could be integrated in CMOS integrated circuits, and find application in THz systems, such as in near-range medical imaging.

  17. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  18. A study on AFM manipulation of single-wall carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Xiaojun; Dong Zaili; Yu Peng; Liu Zhu [State Key Lab. of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)], E-mail: xjtian@sia.cn

    2009-09-01

    As single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has special electrical and physical property, it can be used as excellent material to construct various nano electronic device. However, in the fabrication process, the modification of size, shape and even the electronic property, especially to the metallic SWCNT, is a key problem to be overcome. Here a modified nanomanipulation technology based on atomic force microscope (AFM) is utilized to perform various kinds of SWCNT manipulation, such as SWCNT separation, catalyst remove, continual nano buckles fabrication and even stretch to break, thus to modify the size, shape and eventually the electrical property of the SWCNT. In addition, the manipulation results are analyzed based on the mechanical mechanism.

  19. Inelastic x-ray study of plasmons in oriented single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casa, D.M.; Upton, M.H.; Gog, T.; Misewich, J.; Hill, J.P.; Lowndes, D.; Eres, G.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have a wide variety of interesting properties and a large number of potential aplications in electronic and optical devices. In this study we concentrate on one important aspect of their electronic stucture: the plasmon dispersions in both single- and multi-wall CNTs and their relation to those in graphite. For the first time inelastic X-ray scattering is used to study these collective electronic excitations in oriented CNT samples. The experiments were performed on the IXS instrument at beamline 9ID CMC-XOR, APS, ANL. The incident energy was defined by a Si(333) monochromator, a spherically bent Ge(733) diced analyzer at the end of a 1-m arm focused the incident radiation onto a solid-state detector. The overall resolution was ∼300 meV FWHM. The incident photons were linearly polarized perpendicular to the scattering plane. Energy loss scans were taken by varying the incident energy while keeping the exit energy fixed at 8.9805 keV. The momentum transfer was kept along the nanotubes axis. Spectra were taken at room temperature. The samples were oriented CNTs (both single- and multi-wall) grown on a Si substrate. The samples referred to as 'single-wall' were in fact a few walls at most (1-5) while the multi-walled ones had ∼12 walls. Fig. 1. shows the inelastic spectra for the single-, multi-wall, and highly oriented pyrolithic graphite (HOPG) from top to bottom. Momentum transfer was Q = 0.79 (angstrom) -1 in all cases, its direction was along the tubes for the first two samples or parallel to the sheets for graphite. The peaks at ∼10 and ∼30 eV are known as the π and σ + π plasmons respectively. Fig. 2. shows the complete dispersion curves for both plasmon modes as a function of momentum transfer for all three samples.

  20. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF6 electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azam, M.A.; Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A.; Kudin, T.I.T.; Yahya, M.Z.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF 6 non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g −1 . - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g −1 at a scan rate of 1 mV s −1

  1. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M.A., E-mail: asyadi@utem.edu.my [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A. [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Kudin, T.I.T. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, M.Z.A. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); National Defence University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF{sub 6} non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 1 mV s{sup −1}.

  2. Microbiological quality control of single-walled carbon-nanotubes-coated surfaces experimentally contaminated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalizi, T.; Frioni, A.; Passeri, D.; Pantanella, F.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of new nanotechnologies involves the spreading of nanoparticles in various fields of human life. Nanoparticles in general and, more specifically, carbon nanotubes have been adopted for many practical approaches i.e.: coatings for medical devices, food process industry and drug delivery. Humans will be increasingly exposed to nanoparticles but the susceptibility of nanostructured materials to microbial colonization in process of manufacturing and storage has not been thoroughly considered. Therefore, the microbiological quality control of nanoparticles plays a pivotal role. Different analytical methods have been attempted for detecting bacterial population contaminating a surface, but no one can be considered fully appropriate. Here, BioTimer Assay (BTA) and conventional sonication followed by colony forming units method (S-CFU) were applied for microbiological quality control of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-coated surfaces experimentally contaminated with Streptococcus mutans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results demonstrated that S-CFU is unreliable to actually determine the number of bacteria, contaminating abiotic surfaces, as it does not detach all adherent bacteria and kills part of the bacterial population. Instead, BTA is a reliable method to enumerate bacteria colonizing SWCNTs-coated surfaces and can be considered a useful tool for microbiological quality control of nanomaterials for human use.

  3. Reinforcement of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles by intertube bridging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, A.; Csányi, G.; Salvetat, J.-P.; Lee, Thien-Nga; Couteau, E.; Kulik, A. J.; Benoit, W.; Brugger, J.; Forró, L.

    2004-03-01

    During their production, single-walled carbon nanotubes form bundles. Owing to the weak van der Waals interaction that holds them together in the bundle, the tubes can easily slide on each other, resulting in a shear modulus comparable to that of graphite. This low shear modulus is also a major obstacle in the fabrication of macroscopic fibres composed of carbon nanotubes. Here, we have introduced stable links between neighbouring carbon nanotubes within bundles, using moderate electron-beam irradiation inside a transmission electron microscope. Concurrent measurements of the mechanical properties using an atomic force microscope show a 30-fold increase of the bending modulus, due to the formation of stable crosslinks that effectively eliminate sliding between the nanotubes. Crosslinks were modelled using first-principles calculations, showing that interstitial carbon atoms formed during irradiation in addition to carboxyl groups, can independently lead to bridge formation between neighbouring nanotubes.

  4. Ultrafast excitation energy transfer from encapsulated quaterrylene to single-walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Takeshi, E-mail: koyama@nuap.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tsunekawa, Takuya [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Saito, Takeshi [Research Center for Advanced Carbon Materials, AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Asaka, Koji; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kishida, Hideo [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Nakamura, Arao [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate excitation energy transfer from an encapsulated quaterrylene molecule to a single-walled carbon nanotube by means of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The time constant of energy transfer becomes shorter with increasing average diameter of nanotube: 1.4±0.2 ps for 1.0 nm, 1.1±0.2 ps for 1.4 nm, and 0.4±0.1 ps for 1.8 nm. The observed behavior is discussed considering the distance of less than 1 nm between the molecule and the nanotube wall. - Highlights: • Dynamical properties of excited states in quaterrylene/SWNT composites were studied. • Excitation energy transfer occurs in the time range of 0.4-1.4 ps. • The transfer rate depends on the nanotube diameter, i.e. molecule-nanotube wall distance. • This dependence indicates the feature of excitation energy transfer on the nanoscale.

  5. Chemisorption and Diffusion of H on a Graphene Sheet and Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor; Menon, Madhu

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments on hydrogen storage in single wall nanotubes and nanotube bundles have reported large fractional weight of stored molecular hydrogen which are not in agreement with theoretical estimates based of simulation of hydrogen storage by physisorption mechanisms. Hydrogen storage in catalytically doped nanotube bundles indicate that atomic H might undergo chemisorption changing the basic nature of the storage mechanism under investigation by many groups. Using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) method for reactive C-H dynamics, we investigate chemisorption and diffusion of atomic H on graphene sheet and C nanotubes. Effective potential energy surfaces (EPS) for chemisorption and diffusion are calculated for graphene sheet and nanotubes of different curvatures. Analysis of the activation barriers and quantum rate constants, computed via wave-packet dynamics method, will be discussed in this presentation.

  6. Printed energy storage devices by integration of electrodes and separators into single sheets of paper

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing; Wu, Hui; Cui, Yi

    2010-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube thin film-based supercapacitors fabricated with printing methods, where electrodes and separators are integrated into single sheets of commercial paper. Carbon nanotube films are easily printed with Meyer rod coating or ink

  7. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  9. Mechanisms of tryptophan adsorption onto single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jieping; Tan Jun; Xu Pengshou; Sheng Liusi; Pan Guoqiang

    2011-01-01

    Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES) were employed to investigate the adsorption mechanism of tryptophan (Trp) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The difference of the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectra between Trp molecules and Trp-adsorbed SWCNTs shows that a significant interaction occurs among the SWCNTs and Trp molecules adsorbed. However, negligible changes in the peak profiles and energy positions of nitrogen K-edge imply that neither of the two nitrogen atoms in Trp molecule is involved in the interface interaction. A change of the shape of the main absorption peak at the oxygen K-edge reveals that O atoms of the C=O or C-O or both are likely involved in the interface interaction. The fact that the peak at about 529 eV at the O K-edge become sharper and stronger demonstrates that the O atom in the C=O participates in the interface interaction, which was confirmed by O1s SRPES spectrum. (authors)

  10. Atomic structures and mechanical properties of single-crystal GaN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, B.; Lu, A.J.; Pan, B.C.; Yu, Q.X.

    2005-01-01

    An approach is proposed to theoretically construct a realistic single-crystal GaN nanotube at atomic scale. The generated atomic structures of the single-crystal GaN nanotubes match the structural aspects from experiment very well. Our energetic calculations show that a single-crystal GaN nanotube with [100]-oriented lateral facets is more stable than that with [110]-oriented lateral facets, when they have around the same wall thickness. For a specified orientation of the lateral facets on the single-crystal GaN nanotubes, the energetic stabilities of the tubes obey a P rule, in which P is the ratio of the number of four-coordinated atoms to the number of three-coordinated atoms. Furthermore, the Young's modulus of the considered GaN nanotubes decrease with increasing the ratio of the number of bulk atoms to the number of surface atoms in each type of tube. Our calculations and analysis demonstrate that the surface effect of a single-crystal nanotube enhances its Young's modulus significantly

  11. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas-Torres, David [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Huerta, Francisco [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell, 1. E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Montilla, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.montilla@ua.e [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Morallon, Emilia [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong {pi}-{pi} interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  12. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas-Torres, David; Huerta, Francisco; Montilla, Francisco; Morallon, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong π-π interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  13. Large-scale single-chirality separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by simple gel chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaping; Nishide, Daisuke; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    Monostructured single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are important in both scientific research and electronic and biomedical applications; however, the bulk separation of SWCNTs into populations of single-chirality nanotubes remains challenging. Here we report a simple and effective method for the large-scale chirality separation of SWCNTs using a single-surfactant multicolumn gel chromatography method utilizing one surfactant and a series of vertically connected gel columns. This method is based on the structure-dependent interaction strength of SWCNTs with an allyl dextran-based gel. Overloading an SWCNT dispersion on the top column results in the adsorption sites of the column becoming fully occupied by the nanotubes that exhibit the strongest interaction with the gel. The unbound nanotubes flow through to the next column, and the nanotubes with the second strongest interaction with the gel are adsorbed in this stage. In this manner, 13 different (n, m) species were separated. Metallic SWCNTs were finally collected as unbound nanotubes because they exhibited the lowest interaction with the gel. PMID:21556063

  14. Optical spectroscopy of iodine-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes of different diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Pozharov, Anatolii S.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Belkin, Alexey V.

    2012-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes with polyiodide chains inside are interesting from two points of view. According to predictions, first, the iodine structure type inside the nanotube is determined by the nanotube geometry. Second, after iodination all nanotubes become metallic. In this work, we made an attempt to check both predictions. To study the diameter-dependent properties we have taken for a gas-phase iodination the pristine single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by three different techniques providing a different average diameter: a chemical vapor deposition with a Co/Mo catalyst (CoMoCat) with a diameter range (0.6-1.3) nm, a high-pressure CO decomposition (HiPCO) - a diameter range (0.8-1.5) nm, and an aerosol technique with Fe catalyst - a diameter range (1.3-2.0) nm. The Raman spectra have shown a complication of the polyiodide chain structure while the nanotube diameter increased. The optical spectroscopy data (a suppression of E 11 band in the UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectrum) have confirmed the theoretical prediction about transformation of all nanotubes into metallic phase after doping. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Nanoparticle/nanotube-based nanoelectronic devices and chemically-directed assembly thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Howard K [Cypress, TX

    2011-02-22

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a nanoelectronic device based on a nanostructure that may include a nanotube with first and second ends, a metallic nanoparticle attached to the first end, and an insulating nanoparticle attached to the second end. The nanoelectronic device may include additional nanostructures so a to form a plurality of nanostructures comprising the first nanostructure and the additional nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures may arranged in a network comprising a plurality of edges and a plurality of vertices, wherein each edge comprises a nanotube and each vertex comprises at least one insulating nanoparticle and at least one metallic nanoparticle adjacent the insulating nanoparticle. The combination of at least one edge and at least one vertex comprises a diode. The device may be an optical rectenna.

  16. Mechanics of single-walled carbon nanotubes inside open single-walled carbon nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, R.; Hosseinzadeh, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) inside open single-walled carbon nanocones (CNCs). New semi-analytical expressions are presented to evaluate van der Waals (vdW) interactions between CNTs and open CNCs. Continuum approximation, along with the the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, is used in this study. The effects of geometrical parameters on alterations in vdW potential energy and the interaction force are extensively examined for the concentric CNT-open CNC configuration. The CNT is assumed to enter the nanocone either through the small end or the wide end of the cone. The preferred position of the CNT with respect to the nanocone axis is fully investigated for various geometrical parameters. The optimum nanotube radius minimizing the total potential energy of the concentric configuration is determined for different radii of the small end of the cone. The examined configuration generates asymmetric oscillation; thus, the system constitutes a nano-oscillator.

  17. High performance dendrimer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor biosensor for protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Kotnala, Ravinder K.

    2016-12-01

    We report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) functionalized with Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer with 128 carboxyl groups as anchors for site specific biomolecular immobilization of protein antibody for C-reactive protein (CRP) detection. The FET device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and current-gate voltage (I-Vg) characteristic studies. A concentration-dependent decrease in the source-drain current was observed in the regime of clinical significance, with a detection limit of ˜85 pM and a high sensitivity of 20% change in current (ΔI/I) per decade CRP concentration, showing SWNT being locally gated by the binding of CRP to antibody (anti-CRP) on the FET device. The low value of the dissociation constant (Kd = 0.31 ± 0.13 μg ml-1) indicated a high affinity of the device towards CRP analyte arising due to high anti-CRP loading with a better probe orientation on the 3-dimensional PAMAM structure.

  18. Microwave-induced electrophilic addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes with alkylhalides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yang [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang Xianbao [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)], E-mail: wxb@hubu.edu.cn; Tian Rong; Li Shaoqing; Wan Li; Li Mingjian; You Haijun; Li Qin [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang Shimin [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2008-02-15

    We report the microwave-induced electrophilic addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with alkylhalides using Lewis acid as a catalyst followed by hydrolysis. The reaction results in the attachment of alkyl and hydroxyl groups to the surface of the nanotubes. This rapid and high-energy microwave radiation is found to be highly efficient for this reaction, which only needs as low as several minutes. The resulting nanotubes were characterized with FTIR, UV-vis-NIR, Raman, TGA, TEM and AFM. It demonstrates that iodo-alkanes show higher reaction activity with SWNTs than chloro- and bromo-alkanes.

  19. The electronic fine structure of 4-nitrophenyl functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K; Coleman, Karl S; Dhanak, Vinod R

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance to various CNT based applications. Herein the electronic fine structure of single-walled carbon nanotube films modified with 4-nitrophenyl groups, produced following reaction with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate, was investigated for the first time. Various techniques such as x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies were used to explore the electronic structure, and the results were compared with the measured electrical resistances. A reduction in number of the π electronic states in the valence band consistent with the increased resistance of the functionalized nanotube films was observed.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Flexible Electrochemical Energy Storage: from Materials to Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lei; Li, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Flexible electrochemical energy storage (FEES) devices have received great attention as a promising power source for the emerging field of flexible and wearable electronic devices. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have many excellent properties that make them ideally suited for use in FEES devices. A brief definition of FEES devices is provided, followed by a detailed overview of various structural models for achieving different FEES devices. The latest research developments on the use of CNTs and graphene in FEES devices are summarized. Finally, future prospects and important research directions in the areas of CNT- and graphene-based flexible electrode synthesis and device integration are discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Noncovalent Attachment of PbS Quantum Dots to Single- and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of PbS quantum dots (QD to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT is described; wherein commercially obtained PbS-QD of size 2.7 nm, stabilized by oleic acid, are added to a suspension of single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT prefunctionalized noncovalently with 1,2-benzenedimethanethiol (1,2-BDMT in ethanol. The aromatic part of 1,2-BDMT attaches to the CNT by π-π stacking interactions, noncovalently functionalizing the CNT. The thiol part of the 1,2-BDMT on the functionalized CNT replaces oleic acid on the surface of the QD facilitating the noncovalent attachment of the QD to the CNT. The composites were characterized by TEM and FTIR spectroscopy. Quenching of NIR fluorescence of the PbS-QD on attachment to the carbon nanotubes (CNT was observed, indicating FRET from the QD to the CNT.

  2. A 66 fs highly stable single wall carbon nanotube mode locked fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xiao; Dong, Xinzheng; Tian, Jinrong; Song, Yanrong; Wang, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a highly stable mode locked fiber laser based on single wall carbon nanotubes. The mode locking is achieved by the evanescent field interaction of the propagating light with a single wall carbon nanotube saturable absorber in a microfiber. The pulse width is 66 fs, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the shortest pulse achieved in a carbon nanotube mode locked fiber laser. The maximum average output power is 26 mW, which is about 20 times larger than that of a typical carbon nanotube mode locked fiber laser. The center of the wavelength is 1555 nm, with 54 nm spectral width. The repetition rate is 146 MHz. To investigate the laser’s stability, the output pulses are monitored for 120 h and there is no significant degradation of the laser spectral width or shape. (paper)

  3. Hydrogen storage in single-wall carbon nano-tubes by means of laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksengorn, B.

    2010-01-01

    A new mode for hydrogen adsorption and storage in single-wall carbon nano-tubes is used, on the basis of laser excitation. Remember that this method has been useful to obtain, in the case of the fullerene C 60 , many complex C 60 -atoms or C 60 -molecules, where atoms or molecular particles are trapped inside the C 60 -molecules. We think this method might be important to store many hydrogen molecules inside carbon nano-tubes. (author)

  4. Novel Catalyst for the Chirality Selective Synthesis of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 03-April-2013 to 02-April-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Catalyst for the Chirality Selective...Distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chiral single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are known to possess unique... chirality control in SWCNT synthesis. A model catalyst based on CoSO4/SiO2 was developed that showed good selectivity to (9,8) nanotubes. Remote plasma

  5. Superemission in vertically-aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Presently we used two samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (VA SWCNTs) with parallelepiped geometry, sized 0.02 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm and 0.2 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm. We report absorption and emission properties of the VA SWCNTs, including strong anisotropy in both their absorption and emission spectra. We found that the emission spectra extend from the middle-IR range to the near-IR range, with such extended spectra being reported for the first time. Pumping the VA SWCNTs in the direction normal to their axis, superemission (SE) was observed in the direction along their axis. The SE band maximum is located at 7206 ± 0.4 cm-1. The energy and the power density of the superemission were estimated, along with the diffraction-limited divergence. At the pumping energy of 3 mJ/pulse, the SE energy measured by the detector was 0.74 mJ/pulse, corresponding to the total SE energy of 1.48 mJ/pulse, with the energy density of 18.5 mJ cm-2/pulse and the SE power density of 1.2 × 105 W cm-2/pulse. We report that a bundle of VA SWCNTs is an emitter with a relatively small divergence, not exceeding 3.9 × 10-3 rad. We developed a theoretical approach to explain such absorption and emission spectra. The developed theory is based on the earlier proposed SSH theory, which we extended to include the exchange interactions between the closest SWCNT neighbors. The developed theoretical ideas were implemented in a homemade FORTRAN code. This code was successfully used to calculate and reproduce the experimental spectra and to determine the SWCNT species that originate the respective absorption bands, with acceptable agreement between theory and experiment.

  6. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I

    2011-01-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  7. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  8. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ∼100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use. PMID:27350127

  9. Dynamics of a Dispersion-Managed Passively Mode-Locked Er-Doped Fiber Laser Using Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Nishizawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dynamics of a dispersion-managed, passively mode-locked, ultrashort-pulse, Er-doped fiber laser using a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT device. A numerical model was constructed for analysis of the SWNT fiber laser. The initial process of passive mode-locking, the characteristics of the output pulse, and the dynamics inside the cavity were investigated numerically for soliton, dissipative-soliton, and stretched-pulse mode-locking conditions. The dependencies on the total dispersion and recovery time of the SWNTs were also examined. Numerical results showed similar behavior to experimental results.

  10. Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Air Pocket Encapsulated Ultraviolet Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jin; Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Beomseok; Meyyappan, M

    2017-11-22

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a promising candidate as a sensor material for the sensitive detection of gases/vapors, biomarkers, and even some radiation, as all these external variables affect the resistance and other properties of nanotubes, which forms the basis for sensing. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation does not impact the nanotube properties given the substantial mismatch of bandgaps and therefore, CNTs have never been considered for UV sensing, unlike the popular ZnO and other oxide nanwires. It is well-known that UV assists the adsorption/desorption characteristics of oxygen on carbon nanotubes, which changes the nanotube resistance. Here, we demonstrate a novel sensor structure encapsulated with an air pocket, where the confined air is responsible for the UV sensing mechanism and assures sensor stability and repeatability over time. In addition to the protection from any contamination, the air pocket encapsulated sensor offers negligible baseline drift and fast recovery compared to previously reported sensors. The air pocket isolated from the outside environment can act as a stationary oxygen reservoir, resulting in consistent sensor characteristics. Furthermore, this sensor can be used even in liquid environments.

  11. Phthalimide containing donor-acceptor polymers for effective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Yilmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been dispersed by novel phthalimide containing donor-acceptor type copolymers in organic media. Brominated phthalimide comonomer has been copolymerized with several electron rich structures using Suzuki and Stille coupling reactions. Carbon nanotube dispersion capability of the resultant polymers has been assessed by exploiting the non-covalent interaction of nanotube surface with the pi-system of conjugated backbone of polymers. Four polymers have been found to be good candidates for individually dispersing nanotubes in solution. In order to identify the dispersed nanotube species, 2D excitation-emission map and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. Molecular dynamics modelling has been utilized to reveal the binding energies of dispersants with the nanotube surface and the simulation results have been compared with the experimental findings. Both experimental and theoretical results imply the presence of a complex mechanism that governs the extent of dispersion capacity and selectivity of each conjugated polymeric dispersant in solubilizing carbon nanotubes.

  12. Fabrication of Single, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in 3D Nanoscale Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Von Allmen, Paul A.; Baron, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and high-throughput manufacturing techniques for integrating single, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been developed. First, the PECVD growth technique ensures excellent alignment of the tubes, since the tubes align in the direction of the electric field in the plasma as they are growing. Second, the tubes generated with this technique are all metallic, so their chirality is predetermined, which is important for electronic applications. Third, a wafer-scale manufacturing process was developed that is high-throughput and low-cost, and yet enables the integration of just single, aligned tubes with nanoscale 3D architectures with unprecedented placement accuracy and does not rely on e-beam lithography. Such techniques should lend themselves to the integration of PECVD grown tubes for applications ranging from interconnects, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), sensors, bioprobes, or other 3D electronic devices. Chemically amplified polyhydroxystyrene-resin-based deep UV resists were used in conjunction with excimer laser-based (lambda = 248 nm) step-and-repeat lithography to form Ni catalyst dots = 300 nm in diameter that nucleated single, vertically aligned tubes with high yield using dc PECVD growth. This is the first time such chemically amplified resists have been used, resulting in the nucleation of single, vertically aligned tubes. In addition, novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been created using topdown techniques that integrate single, vertically aligned tubes. These were enabled by implementing techniques that use deep-UV chemically amplified resists for small-feature-size resolution; optical lithography units that allow unprecedented control over layer-to-layer registration; and ICP (inductively coupled plasma) etching techniques that result in near-vertical, high-aspect-ratio, 3D nanoscale architectures, in conjunction with the use of materials that are

  13. A study on carbon nanotube bridge as a electromechanical memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Ha Lee, Jun; Joo Lee, Hoong; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2005-04-01

    A nanoelectromechanical (NEM) nanotube random access memory (NRAM) device based on carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated using atomistic simulations. For the CNT-based NEM memory, the mechanical properties of the CNT-bridge and van der Waals interactions between the CNT-bridge and substrate were very important. The critical amplitude of the CNT-bridge was 16% of the length of the CNT-bridge. As molecular dynamics time increased, the CNT-bridge went to the steady state under the electrostatic force with the damping of the potential and the kinetic energies of the CNT-bridge. The interatomic interaction between the CNT-bridge and substrate, value of the CNT-bridge slack, and damping rate of the CNT-bridge were very important for the operation of the NEM memory device as a nonvolatile memory.

  14. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Liu, Yuxin; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Rojanasakul, Yon; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm −2 ) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  15. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-07-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm-2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  16. Length-dependent optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, Anton V.; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Length-independent absorption per atom in single-walled carbon nanotubes. ► Reduced fluorescence quantum yield for short nanotubes. ► Exciton quenching at nanotube ends, sidewall defects probably limits quantum yield. - Abstract: Contradictory findings have been reported on the length dependence of optical absorption cross sections and fluorescence quantum yields in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To clarify these points, studies have been made on bulk SWCNT dispersions subjected to length fractionation by electrophoretic separation or by ultrasonication-induced scission. Fractions ranged from ca. 120 to 760 nm in mean length. Samples prepared by shear-assisted dispersion were subsequently shortened by ultrasonic processing. After accounting for processing-induced changes in the surfactant absorption background, SWCNT absorption was found constant within ±11% as average nanotube length changed by a factor of 3.8. This indicates that the absorption cross-section per carbon atom is not length dependent. By contrast, in length fractions prepared by both methods, the bulk fluorescence efficiency or average quantum yield increased with SWCNT average length and approached an apparent asymptotic limit near 1 μm. This result is interpreted as reflecting the combined contributions of exciton quenching by sidewall defects and by the ends of shorter nanotubes

  17. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Assy, M.K.; Soliman, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  18. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkadi, Kiran; Muoth, Matthias; Roman, Cosmin; Haluska, Miroslav; Hierold, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors.

  19. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Assy, M.K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Soliman, M.S., E-mail: Mahmoud_einstien2@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  20. Uniform, dense arrays of vertically aligned, large-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2012-04-04

    Precisely controlled reactive chemical vapor synthesis of highly uniform, dense arrays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using tailored trilayered Fe/Al(2)O(3)/SiO(2) catalyst is demonstrated. More than 90% population of thick nanotubes (>3 nm in diameter) can be produced by tailoring the thickness and microstructure of the secondary catalyst supporting SiO(2) layer, which is commonly overlooked. The proposed model based on the atomic force microanalysis suggests that this tailoring leads to uniform and dense arrays of relatively large Fe catalyst nanoparticles on which the thick SWCNTs nucleate, while small nanotubes and amorphous carbon are effectively etched away. Our results resolve a persistent issue of selective (while avoiding multiwalled nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures) synthesis of thick vertically aligned SWCNTs whose easily switchable thickness-dependent electronic properties enable advanced applications in nanoelectronic, energy, drug delivery, and membrane technologies.

  1. Spin-orbit coupling and the static polarizability of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, Ginetom S.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the static longitudinal polarizability of single-wall carbon tubes in the long wavelength limit taking into account spin-orbit effects. We use a four-orbital orthogonal tight-binding formalism to describe the electronic states and the random phase approximation to calculate the dielectric function. We study the role of both the Rashba as well as the intrinsic spin-orbit interactions on the longitudinal dielectric response, i.e., when the probing electric field is parallel to the nanotube axis. The spin-orbit interaction modifies the nanotube electronic band dispersions, which may especially result in a small gap opening in otherwise metallic tubes. The bandgap size and state features, the result of competition between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit interactions, result in drastic changes in the longitudinal static polarizability of the system. We discuss results for different nanotube types and the dependence on nanotube radius and spin-orbit couplings.

  2. Spin-orbit coupling and the static polarizability of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, Ginetom S., E-mail: ginetom@gmail.com; Ulloa, Sergio E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701-2979 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    We calculate the static longitudinal polarizability of single-wall carbon tubes in the long wavelength limit taking into account spin-orbit effects. We use a four-orbital orthogonal tight-binding formalism to describe the electronic states and the random phase approximation to calculate the dielectric function. We study the role of both the Rashba as well as the intrinsic spin-orbit interactions on the longitudinal dielectric response, i.e., when the probing electric field is parallel to the nanotube axis. The spin-orbit interaction modifies the nanotube electronic band dispersions, which may especially result in a small gap opening in otherwise metallic tubes. The bandgap size and state features, the result of competition between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit interactions, result in drastic changes in the longitudinal static polarizability of the system. We discuss results for different nanotube types and the dependence on nanotube radius and spin-orbit couplings.

  3. An efficient route towards the covalent functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakade, Bhalchandra A.; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K.

    2008-01-01

    A simple and efficient method of chemical functionalization of both single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been discussed to give enhanced water solubility by rapidly and efficiently generating an appreciable amount of hydrophilic functional groups using microwave radiation. Surface functionalization containing more than 30 wt% of oxygen has been achieved, resulting into solubility of 2-5 mg/mL. Further covalent functionalization of such soluble SWNTs provides a remarkable degree of aniline functionalization through amidation, where the formation of polyaniline has been avoided. Functionalization of SWNTs is confirmed by techniques like electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Electrochemical analysis suggests an enhanced double layer capacitance (∼110 F/g) of nanotubes after microwave treatment. Aniline functionalization of SWNTs shows possible variations on the nanotube topography with concomitant formation of a dynamic polymer layer on the nanotube surface

  4. A triple quantum dot in a single-wall carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Jørgensen, Henrik Ingerslev; Hayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    A top-gated single-wall carbon nanotube is used to define three coupled quantum dots in series between two electrodes. The additional electron number on each quantum dot is controlled by top-gate voltages allowing for current measurements of single, double, and triple quantum dot stability diagrams...

  5. Carbon nanotubes as electromechanical resonators : Single-electron tunneling, nonlinearity, and high-bandwidth readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is a remarkable material and can be thought of as a single-atom thick cylinder of carbon atoms capped of with a semisphere. This is called a single-walled CNT and, depending on how the cylinder is rolled up, CNTs are either semiconducting or metallic. A CNT is made into a

  6. The synthesis and filling of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichs, Steffi

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the synthesis, properties and application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The two main objectives of the work were the development of a continuous-flow synthesis of SWNTs, using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques, and the application of the hollow SWNTs as moulds for the study of the crystallisation behaviour of inorganic materials in the confined space of their inner cavity. The latter study was mainly performed by interpreting high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of the filled SWNTs. A so-called focal series restoration approach, which enhances the resolution of the images and thereby increases the information content, was employed where possible. Chapter I reviews the previous work in the field of SWNTs and introduces their basic structure, symmetry, physical and mechanical properties and the common methods of SWNT synthesis. The chapter ends with an overview of the techniques used in the present work for the characterisation of carbon nanotube samples by giving a description of the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques and the digital image processing method. Other physical measurement techniques used, such as Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), are discussed with reference to their application for the characterisation of carbon nanotubes. Chapter II describes the development of an improved synthesis strategy for SWNTs. A continuous-flow chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method was explored using carbon monoxide or mixtures of methane and hydrogen as the carbon feedstock gas and introducing various volatile organometallic compounds to catalyse the formation of SWNTs. In this study, a special water-cooled copper nozzle was designed and built so as to prevent the premature decompositiont (disproportionation) of the reactants (the carbon monoxide gas) and to allow their direct introduction into the centre of the hot reaction zone. A

  7. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zeyuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-05-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical-vapor-deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides (MxOy (M=Fe, Co, Ni))/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obtained are of 3-17 nm in diameter and homogeneously anchor on the free-standing SWNT macrofilms. NiO/SWNT also exhibits a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 and fast charge-transfer Faradaic redox reactions to achieve asymmetric supercapacitors with a high power and energy density. All MxOy/SWNT nanocomposites could deliver a high capacity beyond 1000 mAh g-1 and show excellent cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. The impressive results demonstrate the promise for energy storage devices and the general approach may pave the way to synthesize other functional nanocomposites.

  8. Radiation-Hard Complementary Integrated Circuits Based on Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Julian J; Cress, Cory D; Gaviria Rojas, William A; Geier, Michael L; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2017-03-28

    Increasingly complex demonstrations of integrated circuit elements based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) mark the maturation of this technology for use in next-generation electronics. In particular, organic materials have recently been leveraged as dopant and encapsulation layers to enable stable SWCNT-based rail-to-rail, low-power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic circuits. To explore the limits of this technology in extreme environments, here we study total ionizing dose (TID) effects in enhancement-mode SWCNT-CMOS inverters that employ organic doping and encapsulation layers. Details of the evolution of the device transport properties are revealed by in situ and in operando measurements, identifying n-type transistors as the more TID-sensitive component of the CMOS system with over an order of magnitude larger degradation of the static power dissipation. To further improve device stability, radiation-hardening approaches are explored, resulting in the observation that SWNCT-CMOS circuits are TID-hard under dynamic bias operation. Overall, this work reveals conditions under which SWCNTs can be employed for radiation-hard integrated circuits, thus presenting significant potential for next-generation satellite and space applications.

  9. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyuan eCao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical-vapor-deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides (MxOy (M=Fe, Co, Ni/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obtained are of 3-17 nm in diameter and homogeneously anchor on the free-standing SWNT macrofilms. NiO/SWNT also exhibits a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 and fast charge-transfer Faradaic redox reactions to achieve asymmetric supercapacitors with a high power and energy density. All MxOy/SWNT nanocomposites could deliver a high capacity beyond 1000 mAh g-1 and show excellent cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. The impressive results demonstrate the promise for energy storage devices and the general approach may pave the way to synthesize other functional nanocomposites.

  10. Solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube transistor arrays for wearable display backplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Cheol Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT-TFT arrays with polymeric gate dielectrics on the polymeric substrates for wearable display backplanes, which can be directly attached to the human body. The optimized SWCNT-TFTs without any buffer layer on flexible substrates exhibit a linear field-effect mobility of 1.5cm2/V-s and a threshold voltage of around 0V. The statistical plot of the key device metrics extracted from 35 SWCNT-TFTs which were fabricated in different batches at different times conclusively support that we successfully demonstrated high-performance solution-processed SWCNT-TFT arrays which demand excellent uniformity in the device performance. We also investigate the operational stability of wearable SWCNT-TFT arrays against an applied strain of up to 40%, which is the essential for a harsh degree of strain on human body. We believe that the demonstration of flexible SWCNT-TFT arrays which were fabricated by all solution-process except the deposition of metal electrodes at process temperature below 130oC can open up new routes for wearable display backplanes.

  11. Probing Exciton Diffusion and Dissociation in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-C60 Heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Mistry, Kevin S.; Johnson, Justin C.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-19

    The efficiency of thin-film organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices relies heavily upon the transport of excitons to type-II heterojunction interfaces, where there is sufficient driving force for exciton dissociation and ultimately the formation of charge carriers. Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are strong near-infrared absorbers that form type-II heterojunctions with fullerenes such as C60. Although the efficiencies of SWCNT-fullerene OPV devices have climbed over the past few years, questions remain regarding the fundamental factors that currently limit their performance. In this study, we determine the exciton diffusion length in the C60 layer of SWCNT-C60 bilayer active layers using femtosecond transient absorption measurements. We demonstrate that hole transfer from photoexcited C60 molecules to SWCNTs can be tracked by the growth of narrow spectroscopic signatures of holes in the SWCNT 'reporter layer'. In bilayers with thick C60 layers, the SWCNT charge-related signatures display a slow rise over hundreds of picoseconds, reflecting exciton diffusion through the C60 layer to the interface. A model based on exciton diffusion with a Beer-Lambert excitation profile, as well as Monte Carlo simulations, gives the best fit to the data as a function of C60 layer thickness using an exciton diffusion length of approximately 5 nm.

  12. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  13. Single wall carbon nanotube supports for portable direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girishkumar, G; Hall, Timothy D; Vinodgopal, K; Kamat, Prashant V

    2006-01-12

    Single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes are employed as carbon supports in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The morphology and electrochemical activity of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes obtained from different sources have been examined to probe the influence of carbon support on the overall performance of DMFC. The improved activity of the Pt-Ru catalyst dispersed on carbon nanotubes toward methanol oxidation is reflected as a shift in the onset potential and a lower charge transfer resistance at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The evaluation of carbon supports in a passive air breathing DMFC indicates that the observed power density depends on the nature and source of carbon nanostructures. The intrinsic property of the nanotubes, dispersion of the electrocatalyst and the electrochemically active surface area collectively influence the performance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). As compared to the commercial carbon black support, single wall carbon nanotubes when employed as the support for anchoring the electrocatalyst particles in the anode and cathode sides of MEA exhibited a approximately 30% enhancement in the power density of a single stack DMFC operating at 70 degrees C.

  14. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farokhi, Mehdi [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanoechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, Ramin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghizadeh, Majid, E-mail: sadeghma@modares.ac.ir [Department Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  15. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Omidvar, Ramin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT

  16. Developing Xenopus Embryos Recover by Compacting and Expelling Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brian D.; Shawky, Joseph H.; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A.; Islam, Mohammad F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanomaterials that are being developed for use in materials, technological and biological applications due to their high mechanical stiffness, optical properties, and chemical inertness. Because of their prevalence, it is inevitable that biological systems will be exposed to nanotubes, yet studies of the effects of nanotubes on developing embryos have been inconclusive and are lacking for single-wall carbon nanotubes exposed to the widely studied model organism Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog). Microinjection of experimental substances into the Xenopus embryo is a standard technique for toxicology studies and cellular lineage tracing. Here we report the surprising finding that superficial (12.5 ± 7.5 μm below the membrane) microinjection of nanotubes dispersed with Pluronic F127 into one-to-two cell Xenopus embryos resulted in the formation and expulsion of compacted, nanotube-filled, punctate masses, at the blastula to mid-gastrula developmental stages, which we call “boluses”. Such expulsion of microinjected materials by Xenopus embryos has not been reported before and is dramatically different from the typical distribution of the materials throughout the progeny of the microinjected cells. Previous studies of microinjections of nanomaterials such as nanodiamonds, quantum dots or spherical nanoparticles report that nanomaterials often induce toxicity and remain localized within the embryos. In contrast, our results demonstrate an active recovery pathway for embryos after exposure to Pluronic F127-coated nanotubes, which we speculate is due to a combined effect of the membrane activity of the dispersing agent, Pluronic F127, and the large aspect ratio of nanotubes. PMID:26153061

  17. Developing Xenopus embryos recover by compacting and expelling single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brian D; Shawky, Joseph H; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A; Islam, Mohammad F

    2016-04-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanomaterials being developed for use in materials, technological and biological applications due to their high mechanical stiffness, optical properties and chemical inertness. Because of their prevalence, it is inevitable that biological systems will be exposed to nanotubes, yet studies of the effects of nanotubes on developing embryos have been inconclusive and are lacking for single wall carbon nanotubes exposed to the widely studied model organism Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog). Microinjection of experimental substances into the Xenopus embryo is a standard technique for toxicology studies and cellular lineage tracing. Here we report the surprising finding that superficial (12.5 ± 7.5 µm below the membrane) microinjection of nanotubes dispersed with Pluronic F127 into one- to two-cell Xenopus embryos resulted in the formation and expulsion of compacted, nanotube-filled, punctate masses, at the blastula to mid-gastrula developmental stages, which we call "boluses." Such expulsion of microinjected materials by Xenopus embryos has not been reported before and is dramatically different from the typical distribution of the materials throughout the progeny of the microinjected cells. Previous studies of microinjections of nanomaterials such as nanodiamonds, quantum dots or spherical nanoparticles report that nanomaterials often induce toxicity and remain localized within the embryos. In contrast, our results demonstrate an active recovery pathway for embryos after exposure to Pluronic F127-coated nanotubes, which we speculate is due to a combined effect of the membrane activity of the dispersing agent, Pluronic F127, and the large aspect ratio of nanotubes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Y- junction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallic- thiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures.

  19. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    microwave acid digestion to reduce the time taken for the purification. High temperature annealing of the purified samples has been adopted by some procedures.12,15 This removes the chemical functional groups created on the nanotube surface due to acid treatment.1,2 It is also important to note that the purification ...

  20. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-08-13

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction.

  1. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction

  2. Simultaneous synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene in a magnetically-enhanced arc plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-02-02

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices(1-4). Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT (5), narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes (6), and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes (7), as well as lead to graphene synthesis (8). Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the

  3. Chirality-Controlled Synthesis and Applications of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bilu; Wu, Fanqi; Gui, Hui; Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Chongwu

    2017-01-24

    Preparation of chirality-defined single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is the top challenge in the nanotube field. In recent years, great progress has been made toward preparing single-chirality SWCNTs through both direct controlled synthesis and postsynthesis separation approaches. Accordingly, the uses of single-chirality-dominated SWCNTs for various applications have emerged as a new front in nanotube research. In this Review, we review recent progress made in the chirality-controlled synthesis of SWCNTs, including metal-catalyst-free SWCNT cloning by vapor-phase epitaxy elongation of purified single-chirality nanotube seeds, chirality-specific growth of SWCNTs on bimetallic solid alloy catalysts, chirality-controlled synthesis of SWCNTs using bottom-up synthetic strategy from carbonaceous molecular end-cap precursors, etc. Recent major progresses in postsynthesis separation of single-chirality SWCNT species, as well as methods for chirality characterization of SWCNTs, are also highlighted. Moreover, we discuss some examples where single-chirality SWCNTs have shown clear advantages over SWCNTs with broad chirality distributions. We hope this review could inspire more research on the chirality-controlled preparation of SWCNTs and equally important inspire the use of single-chirality SWCNT samples for more fundamental studies and practical applications.

  4. Single walled carbon nanotube-based junction biosensor for detection of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Yamada

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogen detection using biomolecules and nanomaterials may lead to platforms for rapid and simple electronic biosensing. Integration of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and immobilized antibodies into a disposable bio-nano combinatorial junction sensor was fabricated for detection of Escherichia coli K-12. Gold tungsten wires (50 µm diameter coated with polyethylenimine (PEI and SWCNTs were aligned to form a crossbar junction, which was functionalized with streptavidin and biotinylated antibodies to allow for enhanced specificity towards targeted microbes. In this study, changes in electrical current (ΔI after bioaffinity reactions between bacterial cells (E. coli K-12 and antibodies on the SWCNT surface were monitored to evaluate the sensor's performance. The averaged ΔI increased from 33.13 nA to 290.9 nA with the presence of SWCNTs in a 10(8 CFU/mL concentration of E. coli, thus showing an improvement in sensing magnitude. Electrical current measurements demonstrated a linear relationship (R2 = 0.973 between the changes in current and concentrations of bacterial suspension in range of 10(2-10(5 CFU/mL. Current decreased as cell concentrations increased, due to increased bacterial resistance on the bio-nano modified surface. The detection limit of the developed sensor was 10(2 CFU/mL with a detection time of less than 5 min with nanotubes. Therefore, the fabricated disposable junction biosensor with a functionalized SWCNT platform shows potential for high-performance biosensing and application as a detection device for foodborne pathogens.

  5. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh eHaghighatpanah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube – polyethylene and single walled carbon nanotube – polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the single walled carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1% to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the single walled carbon nanotube wall.

  6. Reduction of single-walled carbon nanotube diameter to sub-nm via feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurakitseree, T.; Zhao, Pei; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kramberger, Christian [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Einarsson, Erik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Global Center of Excellence for Mechanical Systems Innovation, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays were synthesized from dip-coated binary Co/Mo catalyst by no-flow chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from either pure ethanol or acetonitrile as carbon feedstock. By changing to acetonitrile the mean diameter was reduced from 2.1 nm to less than 1.0 nm despite using identically prepared catalyst. The demonstrated diameter control on flat substrates is a versatile approach towards the direct synthesis of tailored single-walled carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by in situ Polymerization Under Sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; St.Clair, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stabilizing agents in red phosphorus Li-ion battery anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin

    2017-08-16

    Phosphorus boasts extremely high gravimetric and volumetric capacities but suffers from poor electrochemical stability with significant capacity loss immediately after the first cycle. We propose to circumvent this issue by mixing amorphous red phosphorus with single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing a non-destructive sublimation–deposition method, we have synthesized composites where the synergetic effect between red phosphorus and single-walled carbon nanotubes allows for a considerable improvement in the electrochemical stability of battery anodes. In contrast to the average 40% loss of capacity after 50 cycles for other phosphorus–carbon composites in the literature, our material shows losses of just 22% under analogous cycling conditions.

  9. A molecular-mechanics based finite element model for strength prediction of single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, M.; Rossi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a finite element model based on molecular mechanics to predict the ultimate strength and strain of single wallet carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The interactions between atoms was modelled by combining the use of non-linear elastic and torsional elastic spring. In particular, with this approach, it was tried to combine the molecular mechanics approach with finite element method without providing any not-physical data on the interactions between the carbon atoms, i.e. the CC-bond inertia moment or Young's modulus definition. Mechanical properties as Young's modulus, ultimate strength and strain for several CNTs were calculated. Further, a stress-strain curve for large deformation (up to 70%) is reported for a nanotube Zig-Zag (9,0). The results showed that good agreement with the experimental and numerical results of several authors was obtained. A comparison of the mechanical properties of nanotubes with same diameter and different chirality was carried out. Finally, the influence of the presence of defects on the strength and strain of a SWNT was also evaluated. In particular, the stress-strain curve a nanotube with one-vacancy defect was evaluated and compared with the curve of a pristine one, showing a reduction of the ultimate strength and strain for the defected nanotube. The FE model proposed demonstrate to be a reliable tool to simulate mechanical behaviour of carbon nanotubes both in the linear elastic field and the non-linear elastic field

  10. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.) Especially fascinating is the possibility of quantum conductors that require metallic armchair nanotubes. However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydisperse, with many (n,m) types present and typical approx.1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. Nanotube nucleation models predict that armchair nuclei are energetically preferential due to formation of partial triple bonds along the armchair edge. However, nuclei can not reach any meaningful thermal equilibrium in a rapidly expanding and cooling plume of carbon clusters, leading to polydispersity. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The carbon vapor plume cooling rate was either increased by change in the oven temperature (expansion into colder gas), or decreased via "warm-up" with a laser pulse at the moment of nucleation. The effect of oven temperature and "warm-up" on nanotube type population was studied via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that reduced temperatures leads to smaller average diameters, progressively narrower diameter distributions, and some preference toward armchair structures. "Warm-up" shifts nanotube population towards arm-chair structures as well, but the effect is small. Possible improvement of the "warm-up" approach to produce armchair SWCNTs will be discussed. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) population. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  11. Selective Etching of Thin Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 12 (2009), s. 4529-4534 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA AV ČR IAA400400911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroelectrochemistry * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 8.580, year: 2009

  12. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube-Coated Cotton Yarn for Electrocardiography Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Zhao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a type of conductive fabric, specifically single-wall carbon nanotube-coated cotton yarns (SWNT-CYs, for electrocardiography (ECG signal transmission utilizing a “dipping and drying” method. The conductive cotton yarns were prepared by dipping cotton yarns in SWNTs (single-wall carbon nanotubes solutions and then drying them at room temperature—a simple process that shows consistency in successfully coating cotton yarns with conductive carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The influence of fabrication conditions on the conductivity properties of SWNT-CYs was investigated. The results demonstrate that our conductive yarns can transmit weak bio-electrical (i.e., ECG signals without significant attenuation and distortion. Our conductive cotton yarns, which combine the flexibility of conventional fabrics and the good conductivity of SWNTs, are promising materials for wearable electronics and sensor applications in the future.

  13. Response of asymmetric carbon nanotube network devices to sub-terahertz and terahertz radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayduchenko, I.; Kardakova, A.; Voronov, B.; Finkel, M.; Fedorov, G.; Jiménez, D.; Morozov, S.; Presniakov, M.; Goltsman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Demand for efficient terahertz radiation detectors resulted in intensive study of the asymmetric carbon nanostructures as a possible solution for that problem. It was maintained that photothermoelectric effect under certain conditions results in strong response of such devices to terahertz radiation even at room temperature. In this work, we investigate different mechanisms underlying the response of asymmetric carbon nanotube (CNT) based devices to sub-terahertz and terahertz radiation. Our structures are formed with CNT networks instead of individual CNTs so that effects probed are more generic and not caused by peculiarities of an individual nanoscale object. We conclude that the DC voltage response observed in our structures is not only thermal in origin. So called diode-type response caused by asymmetry of the device IV characteristic turns out to be dominant at room temperature. Quantitative analysis provides further routes for the optimization of the device configuration, which may result in appearance of novel terahertz radiation detectors

  14. Lambertian white top-emitting organic light emitting device with carbon nanotube cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, P.; Zakhidov, Al. A.; Luessem, B.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Leo, K.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that white organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with top carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes show almost no microcavity effect and exhibit essentially Lambertian emission. CNT top electrodes were applied by direct lamination of multiwall CNT sheets onto white small molecule OLED stack. The devices show an external quantum efficiency of 1.5% and high color rendering index of 70. Due to elimination of the cavity effect, the devices show good color stability for different viewing angles. Thus, CNT electrodes are a viable alternative to thin semitransparent metallic films, where the strong cavity effect causes spectral shift and non-Lambertian angular dependence. Our method of the device fabrication is simple yet effective and compatible with virtually any small molecule organic semiconductor stack. It is also compatible with flexible substrates and roll-to-roll fabrication.

  15. Facile Preparation of Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Transparent Conducting Networks for Flexible Noncontact Sensing Device

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the controllable fabrication of transparent conductive films (TCFs) for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3

  16. Rapid prototyping of nanotube-based devices using topology-optimized microgrippers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardan, Özlem; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Petersen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Nanorobotic handling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using microgrippers is one of the most promising approaches for the rapid characterization of the CNTs and also for the assembly of prototypic nanotube-based devices. In this paper, we present pick-and-place nanomanipulation of multi-walled CNTs...... in a rapid and a reproducible manner. We placed CNTs on copper TEM grids for structural analysis and on AFM probes for the assembly of AFM super-tips. We used electrothermally actuated polysilicon microgrippers designed using topology optimization in the experiments. The microgrippers are able to open...... with an amorphous carbon layer, which is locally removed at the contact points with the microgripper. The assembled AFM super-tips are used for AFM measurements of microstructures with high aspect ratios....

  17. Facile Preparation of Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Transparent Conducting Networks for Flexible Noncontact Sensing Device

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2016-04-12

    Here, we report the controllable fabrication of transparent conductive films (TCFs) for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). How baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (> 69 %, PET = 90 %), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (> 1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing. Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5×5 sensing pixels).

  18. Room-Temperature Single-Photon Emission from Micrometer-Long Air-Suspended Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, A.; Uda, T.; Kato, Y. K.

    2017-11-01

    Statistics of photons emitted by mobile excitons in individual carbon nanotubes are investigated. Photoluminescence spectroscopy is used to identify the chiralities and suspended lengths of air-suspended nanotubes, and photon-correlation measurements are performed at room temperature on telecommunication-wavelength nanotube emission with a Hanbury-Brown-Twiss setup. We obtain zero-delay second-order correlation g(2 )(0 ) less than 0.5, indicating single-photon generation. Excitation power dependence of the photon antibunching characteristics is examined for nanotubes with various chiralities and suspended lengths, where we find that the minimum value of g(2 )(0 ) is obtained at the lowest power. The influence of exciton diffusion and end quenching is studied by Monte Carlo simulations, and we derive an analytical expression for the minimum value of g(2 )(0 ). Our results indicate that mobile excitons in micrometer-long nanotubes can in principle produce high-purity single photons, leading to new design strategies for quantum photon sources.

  19. Magnetic and electronic properties of single-walled Mo2C nanotube: a first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Abdul; Sun, Zhongti; Wang, Dayong; Wu, Xiaojun

    2018-04-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of single-walled Mo2C nanotubes are investigated by using first-principles calculations. We establish that single-walled Mo2C nanotubes can be rolled up from a graphene-like Mo2C monolayer with H- or T-type phase, i.e. H-Mo2C and T-Mo2C nanotubes. The armchair-type T-Mo2C nanotubes are more energetically stable than H-Mo2C nanotubes with the same diameter, while zigzag-type H-Mo2C nanotubes are more energetically stable than T-Mo2C nanotubes. In particular, (8, 0) H-Mo2C nanotube are more stable than Mo2C monolayer due to structural deformation. All Mo2C nanotubes are magnetic metals, independent of their chirality, and the magnetic moments of Mo atoms in the outer layer are larger than the inner. The ionic and metallic bonds in Mo2C nanotubes and delocalized electrons around Mo atoms lead to the versatile electronic and magnetic properties in them, endowing them potential applications in catalysts and electronics.

  20. Statistical Characterization of Dispersed Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, M; Moriyama, S; Suzuki, M; Fuse, T; Homma, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dots have been fabricated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) simply by depositing metallic contacts on top of them. The fabricated quantum dots show different characteristics from sample to sample, which are even different in samples fabricated in the same chip. In this report, we study the statistical variations of the quantum dots fabricated with our method, and suggest their possible origin

  1. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Park, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ho Sung; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji Beom; Kim, Sung Wng; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-01-01

    V. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers

  2. Synthesis of dark brown single-walled carbon nanotubes and their

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report here a simple and effective approach to the covalent attachment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and azo compounds. The functionalized SWCNTs prepared (through a radical mechanism) have been used for a diazonium coupling reaction. The results showed that the chemical method used has ...

  3. Synthesis of dark brown single-walled carbon nanotubes and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report here a simple and effective approach to the covalent attachment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and azo compounds. The functionalized SWCNTs prepared (through a radical mecha- nism) have been used for a diazonium coupling reaction. The results showed that the chemical method ...

  4. Increasing amperometric biosensor sensitivity by length fractionated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Federico; Gorton, Lo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    In this work the sensitivity-increasing effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in amperometric biosensors, depending on their average length distribution, was studied. For this purpose the SWCNTs were oxidatively shortened and subsequently length separated by size exclusion...

  5. Efficient organometallic spin filter between single-wall carbon nanotube or graphene electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koleini, Mohammad; Paulsson, Magnus; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of spin transport in a class of molecular systems consisting of an organometallic benzene-vanadium cluster placed in between graphene or single-wall carbon-nanotube-model contacts. Ab initio modeling is performed by combining spin density functional theory...

  6. High Electrocatalytic Activity of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes towards Sulfide Redox Shuttles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Feng; Dong, Pei; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchang; Loya, Phillip E; Hauge, Robert H; Li, Jianbao; Lou, Jun; Lin, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VASWCNTs) have been successfully transferred onto transparent conducting oxide glass and implemented as efficient low-cost, platinum-free counter electrode in sulfide -mediated dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), featuring notably improved electrocatalytic activity toward thiolate/disulfide redox shuttle over conventional Pt counter electrodes. Impressively, device with VASWCNTs counter electrode demonstrates a high fill factor of 0.68 and power conversion efficiency up to 5.25%, which is significantly higher than 0.56 and 3.49% for that with a conventional Pt electrode. Moreover, VASWCNTs counter electrode produces a charge transfer resistance of only 21.22 Ω towards aqueous polysulfide electrolyte commonly applied in quantum dots-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs), which is several orders of magnitude lower than that of a typical Pt electrode. Therefore, VASWCNTs counter electrodes are believed to be a versatile candidate for further improvement of the power conversion efficiency of other iodine-free redox couple based DSCs and polysulfide electrolyte based QDSCs.

  7. A single-walled carbon nanotube thin film-based pH-sensing microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng Ai; Han, Kwi Nam; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Seong, Gi Hun

    2014-04-21

    A novel microfluidic pH-sensing chip was developed based on pH-sensitive single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this study, the SWCNT thin film acted both as an electrode and a pH-sensitive membrane. The potentiometric pH response was observed by electronic structure changes in the semiconducting SWCNTs in response to the pH level. In a microfluidic chip consisting of a SWCNT pH-sensing working electrode and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the calibration plot exhibited promising pH-sensing performance with an ideal Nernstian response of 59.71 mV pH(-1) between pH 3 and 11 (standard deviation of the sensitivity is 1.5 mV pH(-1), R(2) = 0.985). Moreover, the SWCNT electrode in the microfluidic device showed no significant variation at any pH value in the range of the flow rate between 0.1 and 15 μl min(-1). The selectivity coefficients of the SWCNT electrode revealed good selectivity against common interfering ions.

  8. Adsorption of triclosan on single wall carbon nanotubes: A first principle approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, S.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65080-805 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil); Araújo, A.B. [Instituto Federal do Maranhão, Campus São Luis-Centro Histórico, 65010-500 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil); Nogueira, R.F.P. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química de Araraquara, UNESP e Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Guerini, S., E-mail: silvete@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65080-805 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The interaction between the (8,0) SWCNT and triclosan molecule occurs via chemical process in parallel configuration. • The semiconductor SWCNT present predominantly binding energies larger than that of metallic SWCNT. • Triclosan behaves as an electron donor or acceptor depending on configuration. - Abstract: The interaction of triclosan on (8,0) and (5,5) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was investigated using density functional calculations. The results show that the adsorption of triclosan modifies the electronic properties of pristine (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT and induced changes in the electronic properties are dependent on the triclosan adsorption site. It was observed through binding energy that triclosan molecule interacts mainly via chemical process in parallel configuration to (8,0) SWCNT, while interaction via physical process was observed with both (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT. It is proposed that these SWCNTs are a potential filter device due to reasonable physical interaction with triclosan molecule. Furthermore, this type of filter could be reusable, therefore after the filtering, the SWCNTs could be separated from triclosan molecule.

  9. Copper hexacyanoferrate functionalized single-walled carbon nano-tubes for selective cesium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draouil, H.; Alvarez, L.; Bantignies, J.L.; Causse, J.; Cambedouzou, J.; Flaud, V.; Zaibi, M.A.; Oueslati, M.

    2017-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWCNTs) are functionalized with copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) nanoparticles to prepare solid substrates for sorption of cesium ions (Cs + ) from liquid outflows. The high mechanical resistance and large electrical conductivity of SWCNTs are associated with the ability of CuHCF nanoparticles to selectively complex Cs + ions in order to achieve membrane-like buckypapers presenting high loading capacity of cesium. The materials are thoroughly characterized using electron microscopy, Raman scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analyses. Cs sorption isotherms are plotted after having measured the Cs + concentration by liquid phase ionic chromatography in the solution before and after exposure to the materials. It is found that the total sorption capacity of the material reaches 230 mg.g -1 , and that about one third of the sorbed Cs (80 mg.g -1 ) is selectively complexed in the CuHCF nanoparticles grafted on SWCNTs. The quantification of Cs + ions on different sorption sites is made for the first time, and the high sorption rates open interesting outlooks in the integration of such materials in devices for the controlled sorption and desorption of these ions. (authors)

  10. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  11. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-10-01

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths.

  12. Application of electron energy loss spectroscopy for single wall carbon nanotubes (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs. (authors)

  13. Effects of ion beam heating on Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulman, Martin; Skakalova, Viera; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Roth, S.

    2009-01-01

    Free standing films of single-wall carbon nanotubes were irradiated with energetic N + and C 4+ ions. The observed changes in the Raman line shape of the radial breathing mode and the G band of the C 4+ irradiated samples were similar to those found for a thermally annealed sample. We ascribe these changes to thermal desorption of volatile dopants from the initially doped nanotubes. A simple geometry of the experiment allows us to estimate the temperature rise by one-dimensional heat conductance equation. The calculation indicates that irradiation-mediated increase in temperature may account for the observed Raman spectra changes

  14. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Enriquez, C.D. [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo, J. [Grupo de Magnetismo y Simulacion Gplus, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-04-15

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  15. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar-Enríquez, C.D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Restrepo, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: ► Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. ► The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. ► Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  16. Effect of Length, Diameter, Chirality, Deformation, and Strain on Contact Thermal Conductance between Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Brown, Joshua S.; Farmer, Barry L.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2018-04-01

    Thermal energy transfer across physically interacting single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) interconnects has been investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The role of various geometrical and structural (length, diameter, chirality) as well as external (deformation and strain) carbon nanotube (CNT) parameters has been explored to estimate total as well as area-normalized thermal conductance across cross-contact interconnects. It is shown that the CNT aspect ratio and degree of lateral as well as tensile deformation play a significant role in determining the extent of thermal energy exchange across CNT contacts, while CNT chirality has a negligible influence on thermal transport. Depending on the CNT diameter, aspect ratio, and degree of deformation at the contact interface, the thermal conductance values can vary significantly –by more than an order of magnitude for total conductance and a factor of 3 to 4 for area-normalized conductance. The observed trends are discussed from the perspective of modulation in number of low frequency out-of-plane (transverse, flexural, and radial) phonons that transmit thermal energy across the contact and govern the conductance across the interface. The established general dependencies for phonon governed thermal transport at CNT contacts are anticipated to help design and performance prediction of CNT-based flexible nanoelectronic devices, where CNT-CNT contact deformation and strain are routinely encountered during device operations.

  17. Ultrahigh Carrier Mobility Achieved in Photoresponsive Hybrid Perovskite Films via Coupling with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng; Wang, Hong; Kufer, Dominik; Liang, Liangliang; Yu, Weili; Alarousu, Erkki; Ma, Chun; Li, Yangyang; Liu, Zhixiong; Liu, Changxu; Wei, Nini; Wang, Fei; Chen, Lang; Mohammed, Omar F.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Liu, Xiaogang; Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Wu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have drawn substantial interest for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications due to their remarkable physical properties and low processing cost. However, perovskite thin films suffer from low carrier mobility as a result of their structural imperfections such as grain boundaries and pinholes, limiting their device performance and application potential. Here we demonstrate a simple and straightforward synthetic strategy based on coupling perovskite films with embedded single-walled carbon nanotubes. We are able to significantly enhance the hole and electron mobilities of the perovskite film to record-high values of 595.3 and 108.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , respectively. Such a synergistic effect can be harnessed to construct ambipolar phototransistors with an ultrahigh detectivity of 3.7 × 10(14) Jones and a responsivity of 1 × 10(4) A W(-1) , on a par with the best devices available to date. The perovskite/carbon nanotube hybrids should provide a platform that is highly desirable for fields as diverse as optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and molecular sensing.

  18. Ultrahigh Carrier Mobility Achieved in Photoresponsive Hybrid Perovskite Films via Coupling with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng

    2017-02-22

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have drawn substantial interest for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications due to their remarkable physical properties and low processing cost. However, perovskite thin films suffer from low carrier mobility as a result of their structural imperfections such as grain boundaries and pinholes, limiting their device performance and application potential. Here we demonstrate a simple and straightforward synthetic strategy based on coupling perovskite films with embedded single-walled carbon nanotubes. We are able to significantly enhance the hole and electron mobilities of the perovskite film to record-high values of 595.3 and 108.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , respectively. Such a synergistic effect can be harnessed to construct ambipolar phototransistors with an ultrahigh detectivity of 3.7 × 10(14) Jones and a responsivity of 1 × 10(4) A W(-1) , on a par with the best devices available to date. The perovskite/carbon nanotube hybrids should provide a platform that is highly desirable for fields as diverse as optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and molecular sensing.

  19. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath, E-mail: Somnath.Bhattacharyya@wits.ac.za [Nano-Scale Transport Physics Laboratory, School of Physics and DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-07-14

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2–300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80–300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  20. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-07-01

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2-300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80-300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  1. Controlled nanostructure and high loading of single-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced polycarbonate composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shiren; Liang Zhiyong; Pham, Giang; Park, Young-Bin; Wang, Ben; Zhang, Chuck; Kramer, Leslie; Funchess, Percy

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an effective technique to fabricate thermoplastic nanocomposites with high loading of well-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNT membranes were made from a multi-step dispersion and filtration method, and then impregnated with polycarbonate solution to make thermoplastic nanocomposites. High loading of nanotubes was achieved by controlling the viscosity of polycarbonate solution. SEM and AFM characterization results revealed the controlled nanostructure in the resultant nanocomposites. Dynamic mechanical property tests indicated that the storage modulus of the resulting nanocomposites at 20 wt% nanotubes loading was improved by a factor of 3.4 compared with neat polycarbonate material. These results suggest the developed approach is an effective way to fabricate thermoplastic nanocomposites with good dispersion and high SWNT loading

  2. Interaction between fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Amrish, E-mail: amrish99@gmail.com; Kaur, Sandeep, E-mail: sipusukhn@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala (India); Mudahar, Isha, E-mail: isha@pbi.ac.in [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    2016-05-06

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  3. XPS Protocol for the Characterization of Pristine and Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, E. D.; Allada, R.; Huffman, C. B.; Arepalli, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent interest in developing new applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) has fueled the need to use accurate macroscopic and nanoscopic techniques to characterize and understand their chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has proved to be a useful analytical tool for nanoscale surface characterization of materials including carbon nanotubes. Recent nanotechnology research at NASA Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) helped to establish a characterization protocol for quality assessment for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Here, a review of some of the major factors of the XPS technique that can influence the quality of analytical data, suggestions for methods to maximize the quality of data obtained by XPS, and the development of a protocol for XPS characterization as a complementary technique for analyzing the purity and surface characteristics of SWCNTs is presented. The XPS protocol is then applied to a number of experiments including impurity analysis and the study of chemical modifications for SWCNTs.

  4. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies––from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems––whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties. PMID:24309375

  5. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  6. Photo-induced thermoelectric response in suspended single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Antoine, Benoit; Menard, David; Martel, Richard

    2010-03-01

    A study was carried out on the position dependent photovoltage of suspended single-walled carbon nanotube films in vacuum. The photoresponse of such films was found to be driven by a thermal mechanism, rather than by direct photoexcitation of carriers. [1] A model was developed which establishes a relation between the photoresponse profile and the local Seebeck coefficient of the film, thus opening up new perspectives for material characterization. The technique was demonstrated by monitoring the doping changes in the nanotube films obtained by successive current conditioning steps. Since the Seebeck coefficient of carbon nanotubes spans a considerable range depending on their doping state, the photovoltage amplitude can be tuned and large responses have been measured (up to 0.75mV for 1.2mW). [4pt] [1] B. St-Antoine et al. Nano Lett. 9, 3503 (2009)

  7. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas Fadel; Bekyarova, Elena; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Zahrani, Ali; Al-Agel, Faisal Abdulaziz M; Al-Marzouki, Fahad M.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  8. Interaction between fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Amrish; Kaur, Sandeep; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  9. Transverse electric field–induced deformation of armchair single-walled carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ningyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deformation of armchair single-walled carbon nanotube under transverse electric field has been investigated using density functional theory. The results show that the circular cross-sections of the nanotubes are deformed to elliptic ones, in which the tube diameter along the field direction is increased, whereas the diameter perpendicular to the field direction is reduced. The electronic structures of the deformed nanotubes were also studied. The ratio of the major diameter to the minor diameter of the elliptic cross-section was used to estimate the degree of the deformation. It is found that this ratio depends on the field strength and the tube diameter. However, the field direction has little role in the deformation. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-010-9617-y contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  10. Tight binding electronic band structure calculation of achiral boron nitride single wall nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Prapti; Sanyal, Sankar P

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report the Tight-Binding method, for the electronic structure calculations of achiral single wall Boron Nitride nanotubes. We have used the contribution of π electron only to define the electronic band structure for the solid. The Zone-folding method is used for the Brillouin Zone definition. Calculation of tight binding model parameters is done by fitting them to available experimental results of two-dimensional hexagonal monolayers of Boron Nitride. It has been found that all the boron nitride nanotubes (both zigzag and armchair) are constant gap semiconductors with a band gap of 5.27eV. All zigzag BNNTs are found to be direct gap semiconductors while all armchair nanotubes are indirect gap semiconductors. (author)

  11. Revealing properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Tang Jie; Sasaki, T; Yudasaka, M; Matsushita, A; Iijima, S

    2002-01-01

    It was found by the x-ray diffraction experiment under hydrostatic pressure that the carbon nanotubes are compressed easily with a high volume compressibility of 0.024 GPa sup - sup 1. The single-walled carbon nanotubes are polygonized when they form bundles of hexagonal close-packed structure and the inter-tubular gap is smaller than the equilibrium spacing of graphite. Under high pressure, further polygonization occurs to accommodate the extra amount of volume reduction. The ratio of the short and the long diagonals in the hexagonalized cross section is found to have changed from 0.991 at zero pressure to 0.982 at 1.5 GPa pressure, when the Bragg reflection from the nanotube lattice diminished. Accompanying polygonization, a discontinuous change in electrical resistivity was observed at 1.5 GPa pressure, suggesting a phase transition had occurred.

  12. Adhesion energy of single wall carbon nanotube loops on various substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianjun [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physique, ENS de Lyon, CNRS-46, Allée d' Italie, Lyon 69364 (France); Department of Physics, Shaoxing University, 508 Huancheng West Rd., Shaoxing 312000 (China); Ayari, Anthony [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bellon, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.bellon@ens-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physique, ENS de Lyon, CNRS-46, Allée d' Italie, Lyon 69364 (France)

    2015-04-28

    The physics of adhesion of one-dimensional nano structures such as nanotubes, nano wires, and biopolymers on different substrates is of great interest for the study of biological adhesion and the development of nano electronics and nano mechanics. In this paper, we present force spectroscopy experiments of individual single wall carbon nanotube loops using a home-made interferometric atomic force microscope. Characteristic force plateaus during the peeling process allow the quantitative measurement of the adhesion energy per unit length on various substrates: graphite, mica, platinum, gold, and silicon. Moreover, using a time-frequency analysis of the deflection of the cantilever, we estimate the dynamic stiffness of the contact, providing more information on the nanotube configurations and its intrinsic mechanical properties.

  13. Three-dimensional hot electron photovoltaic device with vertically aligned TiO2 nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddeti, Kalyan C; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Young Keun; Park, Jeong Young

    2018-05-09

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes with vertically aligned array structures show substantial advantages in solar cells as an electron transport material that offers a large surface area where charges travel linearly along the nanotubes. Integrating this one-dimensional semiconductor material with plasmonic metals to create a three-dimensional plasmonic nanodiode can influence solar energy conversion by utilizing the generated hot electrons. Here, we devised plasmonic Au/TiO 2 and Ag/TiO 2 nanodiode architectures composed of TiO 2 nanotube arrays for enhanced photon absorption, and for the subsequent generation and capture of hot carriers. The photocurrents and incident photon to current conversion efficiencies (IPCE) were obtained as a function of photon energy for hot electron detection. We observed enhanced photocurrents and IPCE using the Ag/TiO 2 nanodiode. The strong plasmonic peaks of the Au and Ag from the IPCE clearly indicate an enhancement of the hot electron flux resulting from the presence of surface plasmons. The calculated electric fields and the corresponding absorbances of the nanodiode using finite-difference time-domain simulation methods are also in good agreement with the experimental results. These results show a unique strategy of combining a hot electron photovoltaic device with a three-dimensional architecture, which has the clear advantages of maximizing light absorption and a metal-semiconductor interface area.

  14. Estimating Young’s Modulus of Single-Walled Zirconia Nanotubes Using Nonlinear Finite Element Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Dauda Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-walled zirconia nanotube is structurally modeled and its Young’s modulus is valued by using the finite element approach. The nanotube was assumed to be a frame-like structure with bonds between atoms regarded as beam elements. The properties of the beam required for input into the finite element analysis were computed by connecting energy equivalence between molecular and continuum mechanics. Simulation was conducted by applying axial tensile strain on one end of the nanotube while the other end was fixed and the corresponding reaction force recorded to compute Young’s modulus. It was found out that Young’s modulus of zirconia nanotubes is significantly affected by some geometrical parameters such as chirality, diameter, thickness, and length. The obtained values of Young’s modulus for a certain range of diameters are in agreement with what was obtained in the few experiments that have been conducted so far. This study was conducted on the cubic phase of zirconia having armchair and zigzag configuration. The optimal diameter and thickness were obtained, which will assist in designing and fabricating bulk nanostructured components containing zirconia nanotubes for various applications.

  15. Free vibration analysis of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes based on a computational mechanics framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, J. W.; Tong, L. H.; Xiang, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Free vibration behaviors of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes are investigated using a computational mechanics approach. Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to reflect atomic interaction between boron and nitrogen atoms. The higher-order Cauchy-Born rule is employed to establish the constitutive relationship for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes on the basis of higher-order gradient continuum theory. It bridges the gaps between the nanoscale lattice structures with a continuum body. A mesh-free modeling framework is constructed, using the moving Kriging interpolation which automatically satisfies the higher-order continuity, to implement numerical simulation in order to match the higher-order constitutive model. In comparison with conventional atomistic simulation methods, the established atomistic-continuum multi-scale approach possesses advantages in tackling atomic structures with high-accuracy and high-efficiency. Free vibration characteristics of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes with different boundary conditions, tube chiralities, lengths and radii are examined in case studies. In this research, it is pointed out that a critical radius exists for the evaluation of fundamental vibration frequencies of boron nitride nanotubes; opposite trends can be observed prior to and beyond the critical radius. Simulation results are presented and discussed.

  16. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  17. Dielectrophoresis Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as pH Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs. The SWNTs are dispersed in deionized (DI water after chemical functionalization and filtration. They are deposited and organized on silicon substrates with the dielectrophoresis process. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns—fabricated with photolithography and wet etching—are used to generate concentrated electric fields and strong dielectrophoretic forces for the SWNTs to deposit and align in desired locations. The device fabrication is inexpensive, solution-based, and conducted at room temperature. The devices are used as pH sensors with the electrodes as the testing pads and the dielectrophoretically captured SWNTs as the sensing elements. When exposed to aqueous solutions with various pH values, the SWNTs change their resistance accordingly. The SWNT-based sensors demonstrate a linear relationship between the sensor resistance and the pH values in the range of 5–9. The characterization of multiple sensors proves that their pH sensitivity is highly repeatable. The real-time data acquisition shows that the sensor response time depends on the pH value, ranging from 2.26 s for the pH-5 solution to 23.82 s for the pH-9 solution. The long-term stability tests illustrate that the sensors can maintain their original sensitivity for a long period of time. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the SWNT-based sensors facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas.

  18. Dielectrophoresis Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as pH Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Martin, Caleb M; Yeung, Kan Kan; Xue, Wei

    2011-01-31

    Here we report the fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNTs are dispersed in deionized (DI) water after chemical functionalization and filtration. They are deposited and organized on silicon substrates with the dielectrophoresis process. Electrodes with "teeth"-like patterns-fabricated with photolithography and wet etching-are used to generate concentrated electric fields and strong dielectrophoretic forces for the SWNTs to deposit and align in desired locations. The device fabrication is inexpensive, solution-based, and conducted at room temperature. The devices are used as pH sensors with the electrodes as the testing pads and the dielectrophoretically captured SWNTs as the sensing elements. When exposed to aqueous solutions with various pH values, the SWNTs change their resistance accordingly. The SWNT-based sensors demonstrate a linear relationship between the sensor resistance and the pH values in the range of 5-9. The characterization of multiple sensors proves that their pH sensitivity is highly repeatable. The real-time data acquisition shows that the sensor response time depends on the pH value, ranging from 2.26 s for the pH-5 solution to 23.82 s for the pH-9 solution. The long-term stability tests illustrate that the sensors can maintain their original sensitivity for a long period of time. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the SWNT-based sensors facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas.

  19. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high

  20. Carbon nanotubes/ceria composite layers deposited on surface acoustic wave devices for gas detection at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M., E-mail: marjorie.david@univ-tln.fr [Universite du Sud Toulon, Var, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, BP 20132. F 83 957 LA GARDE (France); Arab, M.; Martino, C. [Universite du Sud Toulon, Var, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, BP 20132. F 83 957 LA GARDE (France); Delmas, L. [SENSeOR, Sophia Antipolis, 06250 Mougins (France); Guinneton, F.; Gavarri, J.-R. [Universite du Sud Toulon, Var, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 6242, BP 20132. F 83 957 LA GARDE (France)

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor on ATquartz piezoelectric substrate has been designed and fabricated. Test devices were based on asynchronous single-port resonators operating near the 434-MHz-centered industrial, scientific, and medical band. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Ceria (MWNTs/CeO{sub 2}) nanocomposites were used as sensitive layers. The MWNTs were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method and coated with nanosized ceria oxide. The composites were deposited on SAW quartz resonator using air-brush technique. MWNTs/CeO{sub 2} nanocomposites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron and atomic force microscopy. The sensor responses were tested under acetone (C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OH) and ethanol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) gases. The output signal was done by S{sub 11} parameter of the SAW device and was monitored using a network analyzer. Frequency changes were observed under acetone and ethanol vapors. These changes depended on the surface conductivity of the nanocomposites deposited on the sensor. The single-port SAW gas sensor coated with the MWNTs/CeO{sub 2} presented the highest sensitivity in the case of acetone vapor interacting with these layers, with a frequency shift of 200 kHz at room temperature.

  1. TiS2 and ZrS2 single- and double-wall nanotubes: first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Andrei V; Evarestov, Robert A

    2014-02-15

    Hybrid density functional theory has been applied for investigations of the electronic and atomic structure of bulk phases, nanolayers, and nanotubes based on titanium and zirconium disulfides. Calculations have been performed on the basis of the localized atomic functions by means of the CRYSTAL-2009 computer code. The full optimization of all atomic positions in the regarded systems has been made to study the atomic relaxation and to determine the most favorable structures. The different layered and isotropic bulk phases have been considered as the possible precursors of the nanotubes. Calculations on single-walled TiS2 and ZrS2 nanotubes confirmed that the nanotubes obtained by rolling up the hexagonal crystalline layers with octahedral 1T morphology are the most stable. The strain energy of TiS2 and ZrS2 nanotubes is small, does not depend on the tube chirality, and approximately obeys to D(-2) law (D is nanotube diameter) of the classical elasticity theory. It is greater than the strain energy of the similar TiO2 and ZrO2 nanotubes; however, the formation energy of the disulfide nanotubes is considerably less than the formation energy of the dioxide nanotubes. The distance and interaction energy between the single-wall components of the double-wall nanotubes is proved to be close to the distance and interaction energy between layers in the layered crystals. Analysis of the relaxed nanotube shape using radial coordinate of the metal atoms demonstrates a small but noticeable deviation from completely cylindrical cross-section of the external walls in the armchair-like double-wall nanotubes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. ZnO nanotube-based dye-sensitized solar cell and its application in self-powered devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Jingbin; Fan Fengru; Xu Chen; Lin Shisheng; Wang Zhonglin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Wei Min; Duan Xue, E-mail: zhong.wang@mse.gatech.edu, E-mail: weimin@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2010-10-08

    High-density vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays were fabricated on FTO substrates by a simple and facile chemical etching process from electrodeposited ZnO nanorods. The nanotube formation was rationalized in terms of selective dissolution of the (001) polar face. The morphology of the nanotubes can be readily controlled by electrodeposition parameters for the nanorod precursor. By employing the 5.1 {mu}m-length nanotubes as the photoanode for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), a full-sun conversion efficiency of 1.18% was achieved. Furthermore, we show that the DSSC unit can serve as a robust power source to drive a humidity sensor, with a potential for self-powered devices.

  3. ZnO nanotube-based dye-sensitized solar cell and its application in self-powered devices

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jingbin

    2010-09-10

    Abstract High-density vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays were fabricated on FTO substrates by a simple and facile chemical etching process from electrodeposited ZnO nanorods. The nanotube formation was rationalized in terms of selective dissolution of the (001) polar face. The morphology of the nanotubes can be readily controlled by electrodeposition parameters for the nanorod precursor. By employing the 5.1 μm-length nanotubes as the photoanode for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), a full-sun conversion efficiency of 1.18% was achieved. Furthermore, we show that the DSSC unit can serve as a robust power source to drive a humidity sensor, with a potential for self-powered devices. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günay, E. [Gazi University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 06570, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-04-21

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  5. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  6. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  7. PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes activate neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasova, Irina I., E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vakhrusheva, Tatyana V. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sokolov, Alexey V.; Kostevich, Valeria A. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Research Institute for Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Science, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gusev, Alexandr A.; Gusev, Sergey A. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Melnikova, Viktoriya I. [Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lobach, Anatolii S. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-01

    Perspectives for the use of carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications depend largely on their ability to degrade in the body into products that can be easily cleared out. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWCNTs) were shown to be degraded by oxidants generated by peroxidases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study we demonstrated that conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to c-SWCNTs does not interfere with their degradation by peroxidase/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system or by hypochlorite. Comparison of different heme-containing proteins for their ability to degrade PEG-SWCNTs has led us to conclude that the myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the major oxidant that may be responsible for biodegradation of PEG-SWCNTs in vivo. MPO is secreted mainly by neutrophils upon activation. We hypothesize that SWCNTs may enhance neutrophil activation and therefore stimulate their own biodegradation due to MPO-generated HOCl. PEG-SWCNTs at concentrations similar to those commonly used in in vivo studies were found to activate isolated human neutrophils to produce HOCl. Both PEG-SWCNTs and c-SWCNTs enhanced HOCl generation from isolated neutrophils upon serum-opsonized zymosan stimulation. Both types of nanotubes were also found to activate neutrophils in whole blood samples. Intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of PEG-SWCNTs into mice induced an increase in percentage of circulating neutrophils and activation of neutrophils and macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting the evolution of an inflammatory response. Activated neutrophils can produce high local concentrations of HOCl, thereby creating the conditions favorable for degradation of the nanotubes. -- Highlights: ► Myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid is able to degrade CNTs. ► PEGylated SWCNTs stimulate isolated neutrophils to produce hypochlorous acid. ► SWCNTs are capable of activating neutrophils in blood samples. ► Activation of

  8. Enrichment Mechanism of Semiconducting Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Surfactant Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sang-Yong; Utz, Marcel; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2009-01-01

    Utilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in high-end applications hinges on separating metallic (met-) from semiconducting (sem-) SWNTs. Surfactant amines, like octadecylamine (ODA) have proven instrumental for the selective extraction of sem-SWNTs from tetrahydrofuran (THF) nanotube suspensions. The chemical shift differences along the tail of an asymmetric, diacetylenic surfactant amine were used to probe the molecular dynamics in the presence and absence of nanotubes via NMR. The results suggest that the surfactant amine head is firmly immobilized onto the nanotube surface together with acidic water, while the aliphatic tail progressively gains larger mobility as it gets farther from the SWNT. X-ray and high-resolution TEM studies indicate that the sem-enriched sample is populated mainly by small nanotube bundles containing ca. three SWNTs. Molecular simulations in conjunction with previously determined HNO3/H2SO4 oxidation depths for met- and sem-SWNTs indicate that the strong pinning of the amine surfactants on the sem-enriched SWNTs bundles is a result of a well-ordered arrangement of nitrate/amine salts separated with a monomolecular layer of H2O. Such continuous 2D arrangement of nitrate/amine salts shields the local environment adjacent to sem-enriched SWNTs bundles and maintains an acidic pH that preserves nanotube oxidation (i.e. SWNTn+). This, in turn, results in strong interactions with charge-balancing NO3- counter ions that through their association with neutralized surfactant amines provide effective THF dispersion and consequent sem-enrichment. PMID:19397291

  9. Single Molecule Detection in Living Biological Cells using Carbon Nanotube Optical Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nanoscale sensing elements offer promise for single molecule analyte detection in physically or biologically constrained environments. Molecular adsorption can be amplified via modulation of sharp singularities in the electronic density of states that arise from 1D quantum confinement [1]. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), as single molecule optical sensors [2-3], offer unique advantages such as photostable near-infrared (n-IR) emission for prolonged detection through biological media, single-molecule sensitivity and, nearly orthogonal optical modes for signal transduction that can be used to identify distinct classes of analytes. Selective binding to the SWNT surface is difficult to engineer [4]. In this lecture, we will briefly review the immerging field of fluorescent diagnostics using band gap emission from SWNT. In recent work, we demonstrate that even a single pair of SWNT provides at least four optical modes that can be modulated to uniquely fingerprint chemical agents by the degree to which they alter either the emission band intensity or wavelength. We validate this identification method in vitro by demonstrating detection and identification of six genotoxic analytes, including chemotherapeutic drugs and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are spectroscopically differentiated into four distinct classes. We also demonstrate single-molecule sensitivity in detecting hydrogen peroxide, one of the most common genotoxins and an important cellular signal. Finally, we employ our sensing and fingerprinting method of these analytes in real time within live 3T3 cells, demonstrating the first multiplexed optical detection from a nanoscale biosensor and the first label-free tool to optically discriminate between genotoxins. We will also discuss our recent efforts to fabricate biomedical sensors for real time detection of glucose and other important physiologically relevant analytes in-vivo. The response of embedded SWNT in a swellable hydrogel construct to

  10. Buckling of ZnS-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes – The influence of aspect ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, André O.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Cachim, Paulo B.; Holec, David

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) filled with crystalline zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanowires under uniaxial compression is studied using classical molecular dynamics. These simulations were used to analyse the behaviour

  11. Accelerated reliability testing of highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotube networks subjected to DC electrical stressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strus, Mark C; Chiaramonti, Ann N; Kim, Young Lae; Jung, Yung Joon; Keller, Robert R

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the electrical reliability of nanoscale lines of highly aligned, networked, metallic/semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) fabricated through a template-based fluidic assembly process. We find that these SWCNT networks can withstand DC current densities larger than 10 MA cm(-2) for several hours and, in some cases, several days. We develop test methods that show that the degradation rate, failure predictability and total device lifetime can be linked to the initial resistance. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy suggest that fabrication variability plays a critical role in the rate of degradation, and we offer an empirical method of quickly determining the long-term performance of a network. We find that well-fabricated lines subject to constant electrical stress show a linear accumulation of damage reminiscent of electromigration in metallic interconnects, and we explore the underlying physical mechanisms that could cause such behavior.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotube/metalloporphyrin composites for the chemiresistive detection of amines and meat spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sophie F; Petty, Alexander R; Sazama, Graham T; Swager, Timothy M

    2015-05-26

    Chemiresistive detectors for amine vapors were made from single-walled carbon nanotubes by noncovalent modification with cobalt meso-arylporphyrin complexes. We show that through changes in the oxidation state of the metal, the electron-withdrawing character of the porphyrinato ligand, and the counteranion, the magnitude of the chemiresistive response to ammonia could be improved. The devices exhibited sub-ppm sensitivity and high selectivity toward amines as well as good stability to air, moisture, and time. The application of these chemiresistors in the detection of various biogenic amines (i.e. putrescine, cadaverine) and in the monitoring of spoilage in raw meat and fish samples (chicken, pork, salmon, cod) over several days was also demonstrated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Ajai, E-mail: ajai.iyer@aalto.fi; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Aalto University, POB 15100, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16400, 00076 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  14. A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kohei; Ishii, Juntaro; Kishida, Hideo; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Futaba, Don N.; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Among all known materials, we found that a forest of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes behaves most similarly to a black body, a theoretical material that absorbs all incident light. A requirement for an object to behave as a black body is to perfectly absorb light of all wavelengths. This important feature has not been observed for real materials because materials intrinsically have specific absorption bands because of their structure and composition. We found a material that can absorb light almost perfectly across a very wide spectral range (0.2–200 μm). We attribute this black body behavior to stem from the sparseness and imperfect alignment of the vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:19339498

  15. Electrochemical impedance-based DNA sensor using a modified single walled carbon nanotube electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Jessica E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Pillai, Shreekumar [Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL (United States); Ram, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: mkram@usf.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Kumar, Ashok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Singh, Shree R. [Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    2011-07-20

    Carbon nanotubes have become promising functional materials for the development of advanced electrochemical biosensors with novel features which could promote electron-transfer with various redox active biomolecules. This paper presents the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using chemically modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with single stranded DNA (ssDNA) on a polished glassy carbon electrode. Hybridization with the corresponding complementary ssDNA has shown a shift in the impedance studies due to a higher charge transfer in ssDNA. The developed biosensor has revealed an excellent specificity for the appropriate targeted DNA strand. The methodologies to prepare and functionalize the electrode could be adopted in the development of DNA hybridization biosensor.

  16. Non-radiative Exciton Decay in Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, Mark; Swan, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Experiments have shown step-wise changes in the fluorescence intensity from single-walled carbon nanotubes [1,2]. It has been proposed that the underlying mechanism for the step-wise changes is diffusion-limited quenching of excitons at defects [1]. This property has been used to demonstrate single-molecule detection for biological applications [3]. We perform a Monte-Carlo simulation of nanotube fluorescence with a diffusion-limited quenching model. The fluorescence intensity is seen to depend on the mean-square distance between defects, implying a nonlinear dependence on the number of defects. The intensity for consecutive defect counts can overlap depending on the positions of the defects. [4pt] [1] Cognet, L. et al. Science 316, 1465-1468 (2007).[0pt] [2] Jin, H. et al. Nano Lett. 8, 4299-4304 (2008).[0pt] [3] Heller, D. A. et al. Nature Nanotech. 4, 114-120 (2009).

  17. Collapse and stability of single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, J; Liu, B; Huang, Y; Zuo, J; Hwang, K-C; Yu, M-F

    2007-01-01

    The collapse and stability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important implications for their synthesis and applications. While nanotube collapse has been observed experimentally, the conditions for the collapse, especially its dependence on tube structures, are not clear. We have studied the energetics of the collapse of single- and multi-wall CNTs via atomistic simulations. The collapse is governed by the number of walls and the radius of the inner-most wall. The collapsed structure is energetically favored about a certain diameter, which is 4.12, 4.96 and 5.76 nm for single-, double- and triple-wall CNTs, respectively. The CNT chirality also has a strong influence on the collapsed structure, leading to flat, warped and twisted CNTs, depending on the chiral angle

  18. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  19. Spin-curvature interaction from curved Dirac equation: Application to single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Erhu; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-06-01

    The spin-curvature interaction (SCI) and its effects are investigated based on curved Dirac equation. Through the low-energy approximation of curved Dirac equation, the Hamiltonian of SCI is obtained and depends on the geometry and spinor structure of manifold. We find that the curvature can be considered as field strength and couples with spin through Zeeman-like term. Then, we use dimension reduction to derive the local Hamiltonian of SCI for cylinder surface, which implies that the effective Hamiltonian of single-wall carbon nanotubes results from the geometry and spinor structure of lattice and includes two types of interactions: one does not break any symmetries of the lattice and only shifts the Dirac points for all nanotubes, while the other one does and opens the gaps except for armchair nanotubes. At last, analytical expressions of the band gaps and the shifts of their positions induced by curvature are given for metallic nanotubes. These results agree well with experiments and can be verified experimentally.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Suspended in Different Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Dong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antibacterial activity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs dispersed in surfactant solutions of sodium cholate, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Among the three surfactants, sodium cholate demonstrated the weakest antibacterial activity against Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecium and thereby was used to disperse bundled SWCNTs in order to study nanotube antibiotic activity. SWCNTs exhibited antibacterial characteristics for both S. enterica and E. coli. With the increase of nanotube concentrations from 0.3 mg/mL to 1.5 mg/mL, the growth curves had plateaus at lower absorbance values whereas the absorbance value was not obviously affected by the incubation ranging from 5 min to 2 h. Our findings indicate that carbon nanotubes could become an effective alternative to antibiotics in dealing with drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant bacterial strains because of the physical mode of bactericidal action that SWCNTs display.

  1. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  2. Dissociation of single-strand DNA: single-walled carbon nanotube hybrids by Watson-Crick base-pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seungwon; Cha, Misun; Park, Jiyong; Jeong, Namjo; Kim, Gunn; Park, Changwon; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2010-08-18

    It has been known that single-strand DNA wraps around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by pi-stacking. In this paper it is demonstrated that such DNA is dissociated from the SWNT by Watson-Crick base-pairing with a complementary sequence. Measurement of field effect transistor characteristics indicates a shift of the electrical properties as a result of this "unwrapping" event. We further confirm the suggested process through Raman spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Experimental results are verified in view of atomistic mechanisms with molecular dynamics simulations and binding energy analyses.

  3. Preferential growth of short aligned, metallic-rich single-walled carbon nanotubes from perpendicular layered double hydroxide film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Nie, Jing-Qi; Wei, Fei

    2012-04-07

    Direct bulk growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with required properties, such as diameter, length, and chirality, is the first step to realize their advanced applications in electrical and optical devices, transparent conductive films, and high-performance field-effect transistors. Preferential growth of short aligned, metallic-rich SWCNTs is a great challenge to the carbon nanotube community. We report the bulk preferential growth of short aligned SWCNTs from perpendicular Mo-containing FeMgAl layered double hydroxide (LDH) film by a facile thermal chemical vapor deposition with CH(4) as carbon source. The growth of the short aligned SWCNTs showed a decreased growth velocity with an initial value of 1.9 nm s(-1). Such a low growth velocity made it possible to get aligned SWCNTs shorter than 1 μm with a growth duration less than 15 min. Raman spectra with different excitation wavelengths indicated that the as-grown short aligned SWCNTs showed high selectivity of metallic SWCNTs. Various kinds of materials, such as mica, quartz, Cu foil, and carbon fiber, can serve as the substrates for the growth of perpendicular FeMoMgAl LDH films and also the growth of the short aligned SWCNTs subsequently. These findings highlight the easy route for bulk preferential growth of aligned metallic-rich SWCNTs with well defined length for further bulk characterization and applications. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  4. Behavior of a single nitrogen molecule on the pentagon at a carbon nanotube tip: a first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganji, M D

    2008-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to investigate the adsorption properties of nitrogen on the pentagon at the tip of a capped (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube. The adsorption of N 2 outside the carbon nanotube with a parallel orientation with respect to the plane of the pentagon is found to be the most stable state of adsorption. Its binding energy of -0.318 eV is very small, with a large C-N equilibrium distance of 2.94 A. We have also investigated the number and the position of adsorption sites in the pentagon for the parallel configuration. This knowledge can lead to the precise control of adsorption states, and consequently may bring about a novel multistate monomolecular device. We find two stable configurations of the molecule that have only a small difference in energy, while the other configurations are energetically unfavorable. Our results support previous experimental predictions that the nitrogen molecule transits between two states with a small current pulse. The predicted position sites for the transient states are in reasonable agreement with experimental observations

  5. Electronic properties of pristine and modified single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlamova, M V

    2013-01-01

    The current status of research on the electronic properties of filled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is reviewed. SWCNT atomic structure and electronic properties are described, and their correlation is discussed. Methods for modifying the electronic properties of SWCNTs are considered. SWCNT filling materials are systematized. Experimental and theoretical data on the electronic properties of filled SWCNTs are analyzed. Possible application areas for filled SWCNTs are explored. (reviews of topical problems)

  6. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  7. Plasmon excitation in single wall carbon nanotubes by penetrating charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segui, Silvina; Gervasoni, Juana L; Arista, Néstor R; Mowbray, Duncan J; Mišković, Zoran L

    2012-01-01

    In this work we study the excitation of plasmons due to the incidence of a charged particle passing through a single wall carbon nanotube. We use a quantized hydrodynamic, in which the σ and π electrons characteristic of these carbonaceous structures are depicted as two interacting 2-dimensional fluids, to calculate the average number of plasmons excited. We analyze the contribution of the different plasmon modes in a variety of configurations, and study the energy lost by the incident particle.

  8. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, F.; Morant, C.; Elizalde, E.; Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lopez, V.; Zamora, F.; Domingo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Arrays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800 degree C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.

  9. The Kinetics of Chirality Assignment in Catalytic Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Ding, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Chirality-selected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) ensure a great potential of building ~1 nm sized electronics. However, the reliable method for chirality-selected SWCNT is still pending. Here we present a theoretical study on the SWCNT's chirality assignment and control during the catalytic growth. This study reveals that the chirality of a SWCNT is determined by the kinetic incorporation of the pentagon formation during SWCNT nucleation. Therefore, chirality is randomly assigned on...

  10. Transport properties of a potassium-doped single-wall carbon nanotube rope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R. S.; Kim, H. J.; Fischer, J. E.; Lefebvre, J.; Radosavljevic, M.; Hone, J.; Johnson, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Four-probe resistance vs temperature and gate voltage are reported for an individual single-wall carbon nanotube rope before and after doping in situ with potassium. All the features in R(T) from unoriented bulk material, before and after doping, are qualitatively reproduced by the rope data. The 5.3 K conductance of the pristine rope decreases with positive gate voltage, while G vs V g becomes featureless after K doping. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Alignment characterization of single-wall carbon nanotubes by Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pijun; Liu Liyue; Zhang Yafei

    2003-01-01

    A novel method for identifying the Raman modes of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) based on the symmetry of the vibration modes has been studied. The Raman intensity of each vibration mode varies with polarization direction, and the relationship can be expressed as analytical functions. This method avoids troublesome numerical calculation and easily gives clear relations between Raman intensity and polarization direction. In this way, one can distinguish each Raman-active mode of SWNT through the polarized Raman spectrum

  12. Hydrostatic-pressure induced phase transition of phonons in single-walled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Peng; Meng Qingchao

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on the phonons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a magnetic field. We calculate the magnetic moments of the phonons using a functional integral technique, and find that the phonons in SWNTs undergo a pressure-induced phase transition from the paramagnetic phase to the diamagnetic phase under hydrostatic pressure 2 GPa. We explain the mechanism of generating this phase transition.

  13. Transport mirages in single-molecule devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenzi, R.; Misiorny, M.; Burzurí, E.; Wegewijs, M. R.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular systems can exhibit a complex, chemically tailorable inner structure which allows for targeting of specific mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. At the single-molecule level, two major complementary ways to explore these properties are molecular quantum-dot structures and scanning probes. This article outlines comprehensive principles of electron-transport spectroscopy relevant to both these approaches and presents a new, high-resolution experiment on a high-spin single-molecule junction exemplifying these principles. Such spectroscopy plays a key role in further advancing our understanding of molecular and atomic systems, in particular, the relaxation of their spin. In this joint experimental and theoretical analysis, particular focus is put on the crossover between the resonant regime [single-electron tunneling] and the off-resonant regime [inelastic electron (co)tunneling spectroscopy (IETS)]. We show that the interplay of these two processes leads to unexpected mirages of resonances not captured by either of the two pictures alone. Although this turns out to be important in a large fraction of the possible regimes of level positions and bias voltages, it has been given little attention in molecular transport studies. Combined with nonequilibrium IETS—four-electron pump-probe excitations—these mirages provide crucial information on the relaxation of spin excitations. Our encompassing physical picture is supported by a master-equation approach that goes beyond weak coupling. The present work encourages the development of a broader connection between the fields of molecular quantum-dot and scanning probe spectroscopy.

  14. The characteristics of carbon nanotubes grown at low temperature for electronic device application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Seob [Department of Photoelectronics Information, Chosun College of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaehyeong, E-mail: jaehyeong@skku.edu [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    For the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in flexible electronic devices, the CNTs were grown on Corning 1737 glass substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. To deposit the catalyst layer, TiN buffer layer of 200 nm thickness and Ni catalyst layer of 60 nm were first deposited on the glass by r.f. magnetron sputtering method. The CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} gases are used as the synthesis gas of CNTs and the working pressure was about 2.13 kPa, and the substrate bias was about − 200 V. The growth time was from 2 min to 5 min and the microwave power was about 800 W. The substrate temperature as the main parameter was changed from 400 °C to 550 °C. The structural properties of CNTs synthesized with the substrate temperature were investigated using Raman, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy methods. The surface and electrical properties of CNTs grown by MPECVD method were studied by scanning probe microscopy and four-point probe methods. We obtained the multi-walled CNTs (MW-CNTs). Multi-walled CNTs were vertically grown on Ni/TiN/glass substrates below 500 °C without any glass deformations. As the substrate temperature was increased, the crystallinity of CNTs was improved. Ni catalyst was found at the tip of CNT by the TEM observation and the grown CNTs were found to have a multi-walled with bamboo like structure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Effects of substrate temperature on carbon nanotubes properties. • Improvement of the crystallinity with increasing substrate temperature. • Reduction of sheet resistance with increasing substrate temperature.

  15. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  16. Single and competitive adsorption of OMPs by carbon nanotubes - mechanism and fitting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Gabriela; Dudziak, Mariusz; Bohdziewicz, Jolanta; Kudlek, Edyta

    2017-11-01

    The adsorption of three organic micropollutants (diclofenac - DFN, pentachlorophenol - PCP and octylphenol - OP) on two kinds of carbon nanotubes (single walled carbon nanotubes - SWCNT and single walled carbon nanotubes with amine group - SWCNT-NH2) was investigated, in single and bicomponent solution at pH 5. SWCNT-NH2 had three times lower specific surface area than SWCNT. Significant differences were observed in sorption capacity of SWCNT and SWCNT-NH2 for given chemicals. The sorption uptake changes in the following order: OP > PCP > DFN for SWCNT and DFN > PCP > OP for SWCNT-NH2. A few times higher adsorption of OP on SWCNT came from low OP solubility in water in comparison to PCP and DFN. While, higher adsorption of DFN and PCP on SWCNT-NH2 was a result of electrostatic attraction between dissociated form of these chemicals and positively charged SWCNT-NH2 at pH 5. In adsorption from bicomponent solution, significant competition was observed between PCP and DFN due to similar adsorption mechanism on SWCNT-NH2. Opposite tendency was observed for SWCNT, DFN did not greatly affect adsorption of PCP and OP since they were very easily absorbable by sigma-sigma interaction.

  17. Single and competitive adsorption of OMPs by carbon nanotubes – mechanism and fitting models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamińska Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of three organic micropollutants (diclofenac – DFN, pentachlorophenol – PCP and octylphenol – OP on two kinds of carbon nanotubes (single walled carbon nanotubes – SWCNT and single walled carbon nanotubes with amine group – SWCNT-NH2 was investigated, in single and bicomponent solution at pH 5. SWCNT-NH2 had three times lower specific surface area than SWCNT. Significant differences were observed in sorption capacity of SWCNT and SWCNT-NH2 for given chemicals. The sorption uptake changes in the following order: OP > PCP > DFN for SWCNT and DFN > PCP > OP for SWCNT-NH2. A few times higher adsorption of OP on SWCNT came from low OP solubility in water in comparison to PCP and DFN. While, higher adsorption of DFN and PCP on SWCNT-NH2 was a result of electrostatic attraction between dissociated form of these chemicals and positively charged SWCNT-NH2 at pH 5. In adsorption from bicomponent solution, significant competition was observed between PCP and DFN due to similar adsorption mechanism on SWCNT-NH2. Opposite tendency was observed for SWCNT, DFN did not greatly affect adsorption of PCP and OP since they were very easily absorbable by sigma-sigma interaction.

  18. A Hydrogel/Carbon-Nanotube Needle-Free Device for Electrostimulated Skin Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Jean-François; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Golzio, Muriel

    2017-10-06

    The permeability of skin allows passive diffusion across the epidermis to reach blood vessels but this is possible only for small molecules such as nicotine. In order to achieve transdermal delivery of large molecules such as insulin or plasmid DNA, permeability of the skin and mainly the permeability of the stratum corneum skin layer has to be increased. Moreover, alternative routes that avoid the use of needles will improve the quality of life of patients. A method known as electropermeabilisation has been shown to increase skin permeability. Herein, we report the fabrication of an innovative hydrogel made of a nanocomposite material. This nanocomposite device aims to permeabilise the skin and deliver drug molecules at the same time. It includes a biocompatible polymer matrix (hydrogel) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) in order to bring electrical conductivity and improve mechanical properties. Carbon nanotubes and especially DWCNTs are ideal candidates, combining high electrical conductivity with a very high specific surface area together with a good biocompatibility when included into a material. The preparation and characterization of the nanocomposite hydrogel as well as first results of electrostimulated transdermal delivery using an ex vivo mouse skin model are presented. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Doped Halloysite Nanotubes for Use in the 3D Printing of Medical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A. Weisman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have established halloysite nanotubes (HNTs as viable nanocontainers capable of sustained release of a variety of antibiotics, corrosion agents, chemotherapeutics and growth factors either from their lumen or in outer surface coatings. Accordingly, halloysite nanotubes (HNTs hold great promise as drug delivery carriers in the fields of pharmaceutical science and regenerative medicine. This study explored the potential of 3D printing drug doped HNT constructs. We used a model drug, gentamicin (GS and polylactic acid (PLA to fabricate GS releasing disks, beads, and pellets. Gentamicin was released from 3D printed constructs in a sustained manner and had a superior anti-bacterial growth inhibition effect that was dependent on GS doping concentration. While this study focused on a model drug, gentamicin, combination therapy is possible through the fabrication of medical devices containing HNTs doped with a suite of antibiotics or antifungals. Furthermore, tailored dosage levels, suites of antimicrobials, delivered locally would reduce the toxicity of individual agents, prevent the emergence of resistant strains, and enable the treatment of mixed infections.

  20. Reduced graphene oxide and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes superhydrophilic films for supercapacitors devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, H., E-mail: hudsonzanin@gmail.com [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil); Saito, E., E-mail: esaito135@gmail.com [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Ceragioli, H.J., E-mail: helderjc@gmail.com [Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil); Baranauskas, V., E-mail: vitor@dsif.fee.unicamp.br [Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil); Corat, E.J., E-mail: corat@las.inpe.br [Associated Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the National Institute for Space Research, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos CEP 12227-010, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene nanosheets were produced onto wire rods. • RGO and VACNT-O were evaluated and compared as supercapacitor electrode. • RGO and VACNT-O have structural and electrochemical properties quite similars. • The materials present good specific capacitance, energy storage and power delivery. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT) superhydrophilic films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques for electrical energy storage investigations. These electrodes were characterized in terms of their material and electrochemical properties by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface wettability, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive and Raman spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge–discharge. We observed several physical structural and electrochemical similarities between these carbon-based materials with particular attention to very good specific capacitance, ultra-high energy storage and fast power delivery. Our results showed that the main difference between specific capacitance values is attributed to pseudocapacitive contribution and high density of multiwall nanotubes tips. In this work we have tested a supercapacitor device using the VACNT electrodes.

  1. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays Bonded to Solid Graphite Substrates: Thermal Analysis for Future Device Cooling Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are known for high thermal conductivity and have potential use as nano-radiators or heat exchangers. This paper focuses on the thermal performance of carpet-like arrays of vertically aligned CNTs on solid graphite substrates with the idea of investigating their behavior as a function of carpet dimensions and predicting their performance as thermal interface material (TIM for electronic device cooling. Vertically aligned CNTs were grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG substrate, which creates a robust and durable all-carbon hierarchical structure. The multi-layer thermal analysis approach using Netzsch laser flash analysis system was used to evaluate their performance as a function of carpet height, from which their thermal properties can be determined. It was seen that the thermal resistance of the CNT array varies linearly with CNT carpet height, providing a unique way of decoupling the properties of the CNT carpet from its interface. This data was used to estimate the thermal conductivity of individual multi-walled nanotube strands in this carpet, which was about 35 W/m-K. The influence of CNT carpet parameters (aerial density, diameter, and length on thermal resistance of the CNT carpet and its potential advantages and limitations as an integrated TIM are discussed.

  2. Fiber Optic Chemical Nanosensors Based on Engineered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Consales

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, a review of the development of high-performance optochemical nanosensors based on the integration of carbon nanotubes with the optical fiber technology is presented. The paper first provide an overview of the amazing features of carbon nanotubes and their exploitation as highly adsorbent nanoscale materials for gas sensing applications. Successively, the attention is focused on the operating principle, fabrication, and characterization of fiber optic chemosensors in the Fabry-Perot type reflectometric configuration, realized by means of the deposition of a thin layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs upon the distal end of standard silica optical fibers. This is followed by an extensive review of the excellent sensing capabilities of the realized SWCNTs-based chemical nanosensors against volatile organic compounds and other pollutants in different environments (air and water and operating conditions (room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The experimental results reported here reveal that ppm and sub-ppm chemical detection limits, low response times, as well as fast and complete recovery of the sensor responses have been obtained in most of the investigated cases. This evidences the great potentialities of the proposed photonic nanosensors based on SWCNTs to be successfully employed for practical environmental monitoring applications both in liquid and vapor phase as well as for space. Furthermore, the use of novel SWCNTs-based composites as sensitive fiber coatings is proposed to enhance the sensing performance and to improve the adhesion of carbon nanotubes to the fiber surface. Finally, new advanced sensing configurations based on the use of hollow-core optical fibers coated and partially filled by carbon nanotubes are also presented.

  3. A novel drug delivery of 5-fluorouracil device based on TiO{sub 2}/ZnS nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça Faria, Henrique Antonio, E-mail: henrique.fisica@ifsc.usp.br [Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Federal University of Itajubá (UNIFEI), Av. BPS, 1303, Pinheirinho, Itajubá, MG, PO Box 50, CEP: 37500-903 (Brazil); Nanomedicine and Nanotoxicology Laboratory, São Carlos Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo. Av. Trabalhador São-carlense, 400, Arnold Schimidt, São Carlos, SP CEP: 13566-590 (Brazil); Alencar de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio, E-mail: alencar@unifei.edu.br [Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Federal University of Itajubá (UNIFEI), Av. BPS, 1303, Pinheirinho, Itajubá, MG, PO Box 50, CEP: 37500-903 (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    The structural and electronic properties of titanium oxide nanotubes (TiO{sub 2}) have attracted considerable attention for the development of therapeutic devices and imaging probes for nanomedicine. However, the fluorescence response of TiO{sub 2} has typically been within ultraviolet spectrum. In this study, the surface modification of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with ZnS quantum dots was found to produce a red shift in the ultra violet emission band. The TiO{sub 2} nanotubes used in this work were obtained by sol–gel template synthesis. The ZnS quantum dots were deposited onto TiO{sub 2} nanotube surface by a micelle-template inducing reaction. The structure and morphology of the resulting hybrid TiO{sub 2}/ZnS nanotubes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. According to the results of fluorescence spectroscopy, pure TiO{sub 2} nanotubes exhibited a high emission at 380 nm (3.26 eV), whereas TiO{sub 2}/ZnS exhibited an emission at 410 nm (3.02 eV). The TiO{sub 2}/ZnS nanotubes demonstrated good bio-imaging ability on sycamore cultured plant cells. The biocompatibility against mammalian cells (Chinese Hamster Ovarian Cells—CHO) suggesting that TiO{sub 2}/ZnS may also have suitable optical properties for use as biological markers in diagnostic medicine. The drug release characteristic of TiO{sub 2}/ZnS nanotubes was explored using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an anticancer drug used in photodynamic therapy. The results show that the TiO{sub 2}/ZnS nanotubes are a promising candidate for anticancer drug delivery systems. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}/ZnS nanotubes showed a redshift in fluorescence spectrum. • Cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revealed biocompatibility of the nanotubes. • TiO{sub 2}/ZnS proved an efficient delivery system for anti-tumor 5-fluorouracil.

  4. Long-term stability of superhydrophilic oxygen plasma-modified single-walled carbon nanotube network surfaces and the influence on ammonia gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Sungjoon [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonhyub [Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, 2511 Sejong-ro, Sejong City 339-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chanwon [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Joon-Hyung, E-mail: jj1023@chol.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyonggi University, 154-42 Gwanggyosan-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16227 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Nam Ki, E-mail: nkmin@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube obtained by O{sub 2} plasma treatment voluntarily and non-reversibly reverts to a metastable state. This aerobic aging is an essential process to develop a stable carbon nanotube-based sensor. - Highlights: • Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube network can be obtained by O{sub 2} plasma-based surface modification. • The modified carbon nanotube surface invariably reverts to a metastable state in a non-reversible manner. • Aerobic aging is essential to stabilize the modified carbon nanotube and the carbon nanotube-based sensing device due to minimized sensor-to-sensor variation. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks are subjected to a low-powered oxygen plasma for the surface modification. Changes in the surface chemical composition and the stability of the plasma-treated SWCNT (p-SWCNT) with aging in air for up to five weeks are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis. The contact angle decreases from 120° of the untreated hydrophobic SWCNT to 0° for the superhydrophilic p-SWCNT. Similarly, the ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C) based on the XPS spectra increases from 0.25 to 1.19, indicating an increase in surface energy of the p-SWCNT. The enhanced surface energy is gradually dissipated and the p-SWCNT network loses the superhydrophilic surface property. However, it never revert to the original hydrophobic surface state but to a metastable hydrophilic state. The aging effect on sensitivity of the p-SWCNT network-based ammonia sensor is investigated to show the importance of the aging process for the stabilization of the p-SWCNT. The best sensitivity for monitoring NH{sub 3} gas is observed with the as-prepared p-SWCNT, and the sensitivity decreases as similar as the p-SWCNT loses its hydrophilicity with time goes by. After a large performance degradation during the aging time for about two weeks, the response

  5. Scaling of ion implanted Si:P single electron devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escott, C C; Hudson, F E; Chan, V C; Petersson, K D; Clark, R G; Dzurak, A S

    2007-01-01

    We present a modelling study on the scaling prospects for phosphorus in silicon (Si:P) single electron devices using readily available commercial and free-to-use software. The devices comprise phosphorus ion implanted, metallically doped (n + ) dots (size range 50-500 nm) with source and drain reservoirs. Modelling results are compared to measurements on fabricated devices and discussed in the context of scaling down to few-electron structures. Given current fabrication constraints, we find that devices with 70-75 donors per dot should be realizable. We comment on methods for further reducing this number

  6. Device simulation of charge collection and single-event upset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the author reviews the current status of device simulation of ionizing-radiation-induced charge collection and single-event upset (SEU), with an emphasis on significant results of recent years. The author presents an overview of device-modeling techniques applicable to the SEU problem and the unique challenges this task presents to the device modeler. He examines unloaded simulations of radiation-induced charge collection in simple p/n diodes, SEU in dynamic random access memories (DRAM's), and SEU in static random access memories (SRAM's). The author concludes with a few thoughts on future issues likely to confront the SEU device modeler

  7. Spiking neuron devices consisting of single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Tetsuya; Asai, Tetsuya; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    2006-01-01

    Single-flux-quantum (SFQ) circuits can be used for making spiking neuron devices, which are useful elements for constructing intelligent, brain-like computers. The device we propose is based on the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron (IFN) model and uses a SFQ pulse as an action signal or a spike of neurons. The operation of the neuron device is confirmed by computer simulator. It can operate with a short delay of 100 ps or less and is the highest-speed neuron device ever reported

  8. Scaling of ion implanted Si:P single electron devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escott, C C [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Hudson, F E [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Chan, V C [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersson, K D [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Clark, R G [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Physics, UNSW, Sydney, 2052 (Australia); Dzurak, A S [Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2007-06-13

    We present a modelling study on the scaling prospects for phosphorus in silicon (Si:P) single electron devices using readily available commercial and free-to-use software. The devices comprise phosphorus ion implanted, metallically doped (n{sup +}) dots (size range 50-500 nm) with source and drain reservoirs. Modelling results are compared to measurements on fabricated devices and discussed in the context of scaling down to few-electron structures. Given current fabrication constraints, we find that devices with 70-75 donors per dot should be realizable. We comment on methods for further reducing this number.

  9. Macroscopic charge quantization in single-electron devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Pruisken, A.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper by the authors [I. S. Burmistrov and A. M. M. Pruisken, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 056801 (2008)] it was shown that single-electron devices (single-electron transistor or SET) display "macroscopic charge quantization" which is completely analogous to the quantum Hall effect observed on

  10. Immunosensors Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT for the Detection of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondes BOURIGUA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their properties, Single-Walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT open a new way to the fabrication of Immunosensors with the particularity to amplify the response signal from antibody–antigen interaction and to improve the Immunosensors characteristics. In this context, two new impedimetric immunosensors were developed by immobilizing antibody on Single-Walled carbon, the later was immobilized following two ways the first consist of immobilizing the carbon nanotubes on a polypyrrole layer by adsorption and the second consist of functionalized gold with amino thiol and then immobilizing the carbon nanotubes with covalent binding. The electrical properties and the morphology of the immunosensors have been characterized respectively by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and Atomic Force Spectroscopy. A low detection limit for both immunosensors was determined as 1 pg/ml and linear ranges up to 10 ng/ml with polypyrrole and up to 100 ng/ml with amino thiol were obtained. Moreover, the studied Immunosensors exhibited high sensitivity, stability and reproducibility.

  11. Remarkable influence of slack on the vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhiyuan; Fu, Mengqi; Wu, Gongtao; Qiu, Chenguang; Shu, Jiapei; Guo, Yao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing

    2016-04-01

    We for the first time quantitatively investigate experimentally the remarkable influence of slack on the vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) resonator with a changeable channel length fabricated in situ inside a scanning electron microscope, compare the experimental results with the theoretical predictions calculated from the measured geometric and mechanical parameters of the same SWCNT, and find the following novel points. We demonstrate experimentally that as the slack s is increased from about zero to 1.8%, the detected vibration transforms from single-mode to multimode vibration, and the gate-tuning ability gradually attenuates for all the vibration modes. The quadratic tuning coefficient α decreases linearly with when the gate voltage Vdcg is small and the nanotube resonator operates in the beam regime. The linear tuning coefficient γ decreases linearly with when Vdcg has an intermediate value and the nanotube resonator operates in the catenary regime. The calculated α and γ fit the experimental values of the even in-plane mode reasonably well. As the slack is increased, the quality factor Q of the resonator linearly goes up, but the increase is far less steep than that predicted by the previous theoretical study. Our results are important to understand and design resonators based on CNT and other nanomaterials.

  12. Extinction properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The extinction spectra of a single-walled carbon nanotube are investigated, within the framework of the vector wave function method in conjunction with the hydrodynamic model. Both polarizations of the incident plane wave (TE and TM with respect to the x-z plane) are treated. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a two-dimensional electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account the different nature of the σ and π electrons. Numerical results show that strong interaction between the fluids gives rise to the splitting of the extinction spectra into two peaks in quantitative agreement with the π and σ + π plasmon energies.

  13. Band Gap Changes Of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Under Uniaxial Strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dereli, G.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the band gap variation with mechanical deformation is important in manipulations of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT). In this study we investigated the electronic band structure and the mechanical properties of (12,0) and (13,0) SWCNTs under the effect of uniaxial strain. Electronic and mechanical properties are studied using a parallel, order N, tight-binding molecular dynamics (O(N) TBMD) simulation code designed by G. Dereli et. al. We showed the effect of uniaxial strain on the variations of band gaps and the total energy per atom of (12,0) and (13,0) SWCNTs. We calculated Young's modulus and the Poisson ratio of these SWCNTs. The research reported here was supported through the Yildiz Technical University Research Found Project No: 24-01-01-04. Simulations are performed in parallel environment at Carbon Nanotube Simulation Laboratory of Yildiz Technical University.

  14. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Properties of Vertically-Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, K.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Hivin, Q.; Ducournau, G.; Teo, E.; Coquet, P.; Tay, B. K.; Lepilliet, S.; Avramovic, V.; Chazelas, J.; Decoster, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present the experimental determination of the complex permittivity of vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films grown on quartz substrates in the microwave regime from 10 MHz up to 67 GHz, with the electrical field perpendicular to the main axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), based on coplanar waveguide transmission line approach together with the measurement of the microwave impedance of top metalized vertically—aligned SWCNTs grown on conductive silicon substrates up to 26 GHz. From coplanar waveguide measurements, we obtain a real part of the permittivity almost equal to unity, which is interpreted in terms of low carbon atom density (3 × 1019 at/cm3) associated with a very low imaginary part of permittivity (vertically aligned CNTs bundle equivalent to a low resistance reveals a good conductivity (3 S/cm) parallel to the CNTs axis. From these two kinds of data, we experimentally demonstrate the tensor nature of the vertically grown CNTs bundles.

  15. CVD-grown horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis routes and growth mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-07-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attractive electrical and physical properties, which make them very promising for use in various applications. For some applications however, in particular those involving electronics, SWCNTs need to be synthesized with a high degree of control with respect to yield, length, alignment, diameter, and chirality. With this in mind, a great deal of effort is being directed to the precision control of vertically and horizontally aligned nanotubes. In this review the focus is on the latter, horizontally aligned tubes grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The reader is provided with an in-depth review of the established vapor deposition orientation techniques. Detailed discussions on the characterization routes, growth parameters, and growth mechanisms are also provided. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Si-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes under axial loads: An atomistic simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haiyang; Zha Xinwei

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the Si-coated imperfect (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), the imperfect (5, 5) SWCNT and several perfect armchair SWCNTs under axial loads were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The interactions between atoms were modeled using the empirical Tersoff potential and the Tersoff-Brenner potential coupled with the Lennard-Jones potential. We get Young's modulus of the defective (5, 5) nanotube with and without the Si coating under axial tension 1107.92 and 1076.02 GPa, respectively. The results also show that the structure failure of the Si-coated imperfect (5, 5) SWCNT under axial compression occurs at a slightly higher strain than for the perfect (5, 5) SWCNT. Therefore, we can confirm the protective effect of Si as a coating material for defective SWCNTs. We also obtain the critical buckling strains of perfect SWCNTs

  17. Optical properties of graphene nanoribbons encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander I; Fedotov, Pavel V; Talyzin, Alexandr V; Suarez Lopez, Inma; Anoshkin, Ilya V; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Obraztsova, Elena D

    2013-07-23

    We report the photoluminescence (PL) from graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). New PL spectral features originating from GNRs have been detected in the visible spectral range. PL peaks from GNRs have resonant character, and their positions depend on the ribbon geometrical structure in accordance with the theoretical predictions. GNRs were synthesized using confined polymerization and fusion of coronene molecules. GNR@SWCNTs material demonstrates a bright photoluminescence both in infrared (IR) and visible regions. The photoluminescence excitation mapping in the near-IR spectral range has revealed the geometry-dependent shifts of the SWCNT peaks (up to 11 meV in excitation and emission) after the process of polymerization of coronene molecules inside the nanotubes. This behavior has been attributed to the strain of SWCNTs induced by insertion of the coronene molecules.

  18. Retracted-Enhanced X-Ray Absorption Property of Gold-Doped Single Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimin Alimin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced X-ray absorption property of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT through gold (Au doping (Au@SWCNT has been studied. Mass attenuation coefficient of SWCNT increased 5.2-fold after Au doping treatment. The use of ethanol in the liquid phase adsorption could produce Au nanoparticles as confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD patterns. The possibility of gold nanoparticles encapsulated in the internal tube space of SWCNT was observed by transmission electron microscope technique. A significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes and upshifts of Radial Breathing Mode (RBM of Au@SWCNT specimen suggest that the nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. In addition, a decrease intensity of XRD pattern of Au@SWCNT at around 2θ ≈ 2.6° supports the suggestion that Au nanoparticles are really encapsulated into SWCNT.

  19. Structural and electronic properties of chiral single-wall copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, YingNi; Zhang, JianMin; Xu, KeWei

    2014-04-01

    The structural, energetic and electronic properties of chiral ( n, m) (3⩽ n⩽6, n/2⩽ m⩽ n) single-wall copper nanotubes (CuNTs) have been investigated by using projector-augmented wave method based on density-functional theory. The (4, 3) CuNT is energetically stable and should be observed experimentally in both free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, whereas the (5, 5) and (6, 4) CuNTs should be observed in free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, respectively. The number of conductance channels in the CuNTs does not always correspond to the number of atomic strands comprising the nanotube. Charge density contours show that there is an enhanced interatomic interaction in CuNTs compared with Cu bulk. Current transporting states display different periods and chirality, the combined effects of which lead to weaker chiral currents on CuNTs.

  20. Spectroscopic study of the diameter distribution of B-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Soria, G.; Pichler, T.; Ayala, P. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Daothong, S. [Chiang Mai University, Faculty of Science, 50200 Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, we report on the diameter distribution of boron-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes grown from triethyl borate with high vacuum chemical vapor deposition, using multi-frequency Raman resonance spectroscopy. The nanotube yield is higher than in previously reported material produced with the same method. Our results suggest that the amount of as-grown material and the range of diameters are directly correlated with feedstock used in the synthesis. The I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio shows that the morphology of the samples is critically affected by the temperature. The population of diameters in the optimal conditions shows a Poisson distribution with a mean value at {proportional_to}1.15 nm. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Atomic scale mass delivery driven by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Biao; Ding Jianning; Ling Zhiyong; Yuan Ningyi; Cheng Guanggui

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of atomic scale mass delivery by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube was investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics simulation. By keeping the bending angle while moving the tube end, the encapsulated atomic scale mass such as atom, molecule and atom group were successfully delivered through the nanotube. The van der Waals interaction between the encapsulated mass and the tube wall provided the driving force for the delivery. There were no dramatic changes in the van der Waals interaction, and a smooth and steady delivery was achieved when constant loading rate was applied. The influence of temperature on the atom group delivery was also analyzed. It is found raising temperature is harmful to the smooth movement of the atom group. However, the delivery rate can be promoted under higher temperature when the atom group is situated before the kink during the delivery.

  2. Effect of increased crystallinity of single-walled carbon nanotubes used as field emitters on their electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoi, Norihiro, E-mail: shimoi@mail.kankyo.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-20 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE) properties at a low driving voltage. We used a coating containing homogeneously dispersed highly crystalline SWCNTs produced by a high-temperature annealing process to fabricate an FE device by a wet-coating process at a low cost. Using the coating, we succeeded in reducing the power consumption of field emitters for planar lighting devices. SWCNTs synthesized by arc discharge have crystal defects in the carbon network, which are considered to induce inelastic electron tunneling that deteriorates the electrical conductivity of the SWCNTs. In this study, the blocking of the transport of electrons in SWCNTs with crystal defects is simulated using an inelastic electron tunneling model. We succeeded in clarifying the mechanism underlying the electrical conductivity of SWCNTs by controlling their crystallinity. In addition, it was confirmed that field emitters using highly crystalline SWCNTs can lead to new applications operating with low power consumption and new devices that may change our daily lives in the future.

  3. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, Brahim, E-mail: brahim.aissa@mpbc.ca [University of Quebec, Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS-EMT (Canada); Nedil, Mourad [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT (Canada); Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J. [Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (Qatar); Bentouaf, Ali [University Hassiba Ben Bouali, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Algeria); Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics (LM2), Mechanical Engineering Department (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO{sub 2} laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p–n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I–V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm{sup −2}, and a fill factor of ∼35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  4. Current-Fluctuation Mechanism of Field Emitters Using Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Crystallinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Shimoi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field emitters can be used as a cathode electrode in a cathodoluminescence device, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs that are synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE properties. However, a cathodoluminescence device that uses field emitters radiates rays whose intensity considerably fluctuates at a low frequency, and the radiant fluctuation is caused by FE current fluctuation. To solve this problem, is very important to obtain a stable output for field emitters in a cathodoluminescence device. The authors consider that the electron-emission fluctuation is caused by Fowler–Nordheim electron tunneling and that the electrons in the Fowler–Nordheim regime pass through an inelastic potential barrier. We attempted to develop a theoretical model to analyze the power spectrum of the FE current fluctuation using metallic SWCNTs as field emitters, owing to their electrical conductivity by determining their FE properties. Field emitters that use metallic SWCNTs with high crystallinity were successfully developed to achieve a fluctuating FE current from field emitters at a low frequency by employing inelastic electron tunneling. This paper is the first report of the successful development of an inelastic-electron-tunneling model with a Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation for metallic SWCNTs based on the evaluation of FE properties.

  5. High-performance thin-film-transistors based on semiconducting-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes processed by electrical-breakdown strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1" è" r" e Avenue, Val d’Or, Québec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Habib, M.A. [Computer Sciences and Engineering Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Abdul-Hafidh, E.H. [High Energy Physics Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Rosei, F. [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We selectively burn metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by electrical breakdown. • We successfully achieve a semiconducting enriched-SWCNT in TFT configuration. • High performance, like On/Off of 10{sup 5} and a subthreshold swing of 165 mV/decades were obtained. • After PMMA coating, the SWCNT–TFTs were found stables for more than 4 months. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, among remarkable variety of nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) remain the most intriguing and uniquely well suited materials for applications in high-performance electronics. The most advanced technologies require the ability to form purely semiconducting SWCNTs. Here, we report on our strategy based on the well known progressive electrical breakdown process that offer this capability and serves as highly efficient means for selectively removing metallic carbon nanotubes from electronically heterogeneous random networks, deposited on silicon substrates in a thin film transistor (TFT) configuration. We demonstrate the successful achievement of semiconducting enriched-SWCNT networks in TFT scheme that reach On/Off switching ratios of ∼100,000, on-conductance of 20 μS, and a subthreshold swing of less than 165 mV/decades. The obtained TFT devices were then protected with thin film poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to keep the percolation level of the SWCNTs network spatially and temporally stable, while protecting it from atmosphere exchanges. TFT devices were found to be air-stable and maintained their excellent characteristics in ambient atmosphere for more than 4 months. This approach could work as a platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics.

  6. Controlling Structural Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) by Tailoring Catalyst Composition and Synthesis Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  7. Catalyst Design Using Nanoporous Iron for the Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Abdel-Fattah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs have been synthesized via a novel chemical vapor deposition (CVD approach utilizing nanoporous, iron-supported catalysts. Stable aqueous dispersions of the CVD-grown nanotubes using an anionic surfactant were also obtained. The properties of the as-produced SWNTs were characterized through atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy and compared with purified SWNTs produced via the high-pressure CO (HiPCO method as a reference, and the nanotubes were observed with greater lengths than those of similarly processed HiPCO SWNTs.

  8. Towards sustainable design for single-use medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jacob J; Hitchcock, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Despite their sophistication and value, single-use medical devices have become commodity items in the developed world. Cheap raw materials along with large scale manufacturing and distribution processes have combined to make many medical devices more expensive to resterilize, package and restock than to simply discard. This practice is not sustainable or scalable on a global basis. As the petrochemicals that provide raw materials become more expensive and the global reach of these devices continues into rapidly developing economies, there is a need for device designs that take into account the total life-cycle of these products, minimize the amount of non-renewable materials consumed and consider alternative hybrid reusable / disposable approaches. In this paper, we describe a methodology to perform life cycle and functional analyses to create additional design requirements for medical devices. These types of sustainable approaches can move the medical device industry even closer to the "triple bottom line"--people, planet, profit.

  9. The effect of amine protonation on the electrical properties of spin-assembled single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opatkiewicz, Justin P; LeMieux, Melburne C; Bao Zhenan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Patil, Nishant P; Wei Hai; Mitra, Subhasish, E-mail: zbao@stanford.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-03-25

    Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been shown to selectively adsorb semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWNTs). Previous studies have shown that when deposited by spin coating, the resulting nanotube networks (SWNTnts) can be strongly influenced by the charge state of the amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary). When the amine surfaces were exposed to varying pH solutions, the conductivity and overall quality of the resulting fabricated networks were altered. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography had shown that the density of the SWNTnts was reduced as the amine protonation decreased, indicating that the electrostatic attraction between the SWNTs in solution and the surface influenced the adsorption. Simultaneously, {mu}-Raman analysis had suggested that when exposed to more basic conditions, the resulting networks were enhanced with sc-SWNTs. To directly confirm this enhancement, Ti/Pd contacts were deposited and devices were tested in air. Key device characteristics were found to match the enhancement trends previously observed by spectroscopy. For the primary and secondary amines, on/off current ratios were commensurate with the Raman trends in metallic contribution, while no trends were observed on the tertiary amine (due to weaker interactions). Finally, differing SWNT solution volumes were used to compensate for adsorption differences and yielded identical SWNTnt densities on the various pH-treated samples to eliminate the influence of network density. These results further the understanding of the amine-SWNT interaction during the spin coating process. Overall, we provide a convenient route to provide SWNT-based TFTs with highly tunable electronic charge transport through better understanding of the influence of these specific interactions.

  10. The effect of amine protonation on the electrical properties of spin-assembled single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opatkiewicz, Justin P; LeMieux, Melburne C; Bao Zhenan; Patil, Nishant P; Wei Hai; Mitra, Subhasish

    2011-01-01

    Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been shown to selectively adsorb semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWNTs). Previous studies have shown that when deposited by spin coating, the resulting nanotube networks (SWNTnts) can be strongly influenced by the charge state of the amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary). When the amine surfaces were exposed to varying pH solutions, the conductivity and overall quality of the resulting fabricated networks were altered. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography had shown that the density of the SWNTnts was reduced as the amine protonation decreased, indicating that the electrostatic attraction between the SWNTs in solution and the surface influenced the adsorption. Simultaneously, μ-Raman analysis had suggested that when exposed to more basic conditions, the resulting networks were enhanced with sc-SWNTs. To directly confirm this enhancement, Ti/Pd contacts were deposited and devices were tested in air. Key device characteristics were found to match the enhancement trends previously observed by spectroscopy. For the primary and secondary amines, on/off current ratios were commensurate with the Raman trends in metallic contribution, while no trends were observed on the tertiary amine (due to weaker interactions). Finally, differing SWNT solution volumes were used to compensate for adsorption differences and yielded identical SWNTnt densities on the various pH-treated samples to eliminate the influence of network density. These results further the understanding of the amine-SWNT interaction during the spin coating process. Overall, we provide a convenient route to provide SWNT-based TFTs with highly tunable electronic charge transport through better understanding of the influence of these specific interactions.

  11. Empirical Equation Based Chirality (n, m Assignment of Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Resonant Raman Scattering Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shamsul Arefin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a technique for the chirality (n, m assignment of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes by solving a set of empirical equations of the tight binding model parameters. The empirical equations of the nearest neighbor hopping parameters, relating the term (2n, m with the first and second optical transition energies of the semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes, are also proposed. They provide almost the same level of accuracy for lower and higher diameter nanotubes. An algorithm is presented to determine the chiral index (n, m of any unknown semiconducting tube by solving these empirical equations using values of radial breathing mode frequency and the first or second optical transition energy from resonant Raman spectroscopy. In this paper, the chirality of 55 semiconducting nanotubes is assigned using the first and second optical transition energies. Unlike the existing methods of chirality assignment, this technique does not require graphical comparison or pattern recognition between existing experimental and theoretical Kataura plot.

  12. Empirical Equation Based Chirality (n, m) Assignment of Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Resonant Raman Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefin, Md Shamsul

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a technique for the chirality (n, m) assignment of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes by solving a set of empirical equations of the tight binding model parameters. The empirical equations of the nearest neighbor hopping parameters, relating the term (2n− m) with the first and second optical transition energies of the semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes, are also proposed. They provide almost the same level of accuracy for lower and higher diameter nanotubes. An algorithm is presented to determine the chiral index (n, m) of any unknown semiconducting tube by solving these empirical equations using values of radial breathing mode frequency and the first or second optical transition energy from resonant Raman spectroscopy. In this paper, the chirality of 55 semiconducting nanotubes is assigned using the first and second optical transition energies. Unlike the existing methods of chirality assignment, this technique does not require graphical comparison or pattern recognition between existing experimental and theoretical Kataura plot. PMID:28348319

  13. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga Aj, Gehan

    2012-08-19

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  14. Strategic Functionalization of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Manipulate Their Electronic and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Brendan Joel

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are unique materials that exhibit chirality-specific properties due to their one-dimensional confinement. As a result, they are explored for a wide range of applications including single-photon sources in communications devices. Despite progress in this area, SWCNTs still suffer from a relatively narrow range of energies of emission features that fall short of the 1500 nm desired for long-distance lossless data transfer. One approach that is frequently used to resolve this involves chemical functionalization with aryl groups. However, this approach is met with a number of fundamental issues. First, chirality-specific SWCNTs must be acquired for subsequent functionalization. Synthesis of such samples has thus far eluded experimental efforts. As such, post-synthetic non-covalent functionalization is required to break bundles and create disperse SWCNTs that can undergo further separation, processing, and functionalization. Second, a number of low-energy emission features are introduced upon functionalization across a 200 nm range. The origin of such diverse emission features remains unknown. The research presented here focuses on computationally addressing these issues. A series of polyfluorene polymers possessing sidechains of varying length are explored using molecular mechanics to determine the impact of alkyl sidechains on SWCNT-conjugated polymer interaction strength and morphology. Additionally, density functional theory (DFT) and linear-response time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to explore the effect of functionalization on emission features. A prerequisite to these calculations involves constructing finite-length SWCNT systems with similar electronic structure to their infinite counterparts: a methodological approach for the formation of such systems is presented. The optical features for aryl-functionalized SWCNTs are then explored. It is shown that the predominant effect on the energies of emission features involves

  15. Electrochemically-gated single-molecule electrical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shaoyin; Artés, Juan Manuel; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, single-molecule electrical contacts have emerged as a new experimental platform that allows exploring charge transport phenomena in individual molecular blocks. This novel tool has evolved into an essential element within the Molecular Electronics field to understand charge transport processes in hybrid (bio)molecule/electrode interfaces at the nanoscale, and prospect the implementation of active molecular components into functional nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Within this area, three-terminal single-molecule devices have been sought, provided that they are highly desired to achieve full functionality in logic electronic circuits. Despite the latest experimental developments offer consistent methods to bridge a molecule between two electrodes (source and drain in a transistor notation), placing a third electrode (gate) close to the single-molecule electrical contact is still technically challenging. In this vein, electrochemically-gated single-molecule devices have emerged as an experimentally affordable alternative to overcome these technical limitations. In this review, the operating principle of an electrochemically-gated single-molecule device is presented together with the latest experimental methodologies to built them and characterize their charge transport characteristics. Then, an up-to-date comprehensive overview of the most prominent examples will be given, emphasizing on the relationship between the molecular structure and the final device electrical behaviour

  16. Elemental Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Certified Reference Material by Neutron and Prompt gamma Activation Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Bennett, J. W.; Oflaz, R.; Paul, R. L.; De Nadai Fernandes, E. A.; Kubešová, Marie; Bacchi, M. A.; Stopic, A. J.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Grinberg, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 7 (2015), s. 3699-3705 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Neutron Activation Analyses * nanotechnology * Carbon nanotubes * Chemical activation * Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN) Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.886, year: 2015

  17. Role of adsorbed surfactant in the reaction of aryl diazonium salts with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmer, Andrew J; McNicholas, Thomas P; Lin, Shangchao; Zhang, Jingqing; Wang, Qing Hua; Mendenhall, Jonathan D; Song, Changsik; Heller, Daniel A; Barone, Paul W; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2012-01-17

    Because covalent chemistry can diminish the optical and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), there is significant interest in developing methods of controllably functionalizing the nanotube sidewall. To date, most attempts at obtaining such control have focused on reaction stoichiometry or strength of oxidative treatment. Here, we examine the role of surfactants in the chemical modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes with aryl diazonium salts. The adsorbed surfactant layer is shown to affect the diazonium derivatization of carbon nanotubes in several ways, including electrostatic attraction or repulsion, steric exclusion, and direct chemical modification of the diazonium reactant. Electrostatic effects are most pronounced in the cases of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, where differences in surfactant charge can significantly affect the ability of the diazonium ion to access the SWCNT surface. For bile salt surfactants, with the exception of sodium cholate, we find that the surfactant wraps tightly enough such that exclusion effects are dominant. Here, sodium taurocholate exhibits almost no reactivity under the explored reaction conditions, while for sodium deoxycholate and sodium taurodeoxycholate, we show that the greatest extent of reaction is observed among a small population of nanotube species, with diameters between 0.88 and 0.92 nm. The anomalous reaction of nanotubes in this diameter range seems to imply that the surfactant is less effective at coating these species, resulting in a reduced surface coverage on the nanotube. Contrary to the other bile salts studied, sodium cholate enables high selectivity toward metallic species and small band gap semiconductors, which is attributed to surfactant-diazonium coupling to form highly reactive diazoesters. Further, it is found that the rigidity of anionic surfactants can significantly influence the ability of the surfactant layer to

  18. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  19. Pressure-sensing properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes covered with a corona-poled piezoelectric polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikawa, Takeshi; Tabata, Hiroshi, E-mail: tabata@eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yoshizawa, Takeshi; Utaka, Ken; Kubo, Osamu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-07-18

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied extensively as sensing elements for chemical and biochemical sensors because of their excellent electrical properties, their ultrahigh ratio of surface area to volume, and the consequent extremely high sensitivity of their surface to the surrounding environment. The extremely high sensitivity indicates that SWNTs can operate as excellent transducers when combined with piezoelectric materials. In this paper, we present a touch sensor based on SWNT thin-film transistors (SWNT-TFTs) covered with a thin film of the piezoelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)). Devices were fabricated by spin-coating a P(VDF-TrFE) layer on an SWNT-TFT, which was followed by in situ corona poling to polarize the P(VDF-TrFE) layer. We studied the effect of the corona polarity on the device characteristics and revealed that poling with a negative corona discharge induced a large amount of hole doping in the SWNTs and improved the touch-sensing performance of the devices, while a positive discharge had a negligible effect. The poled devices exhibited regular, stable, and positive drain current modulation in response to intermittent pressing, and the response was proportional to the magnitude of the applied pressure, suggesting that it was caused by the piezoelectric effect of the polarized P(VDF-TrFE) layer. Furthermore, we also fabricated a device using horizontally aligned SWNTs with a lower SWNT density as an alternative transducer to an SWNT thin film, which demonstrated sensitivity as high as 70%/MPa.

  20. Substrate-Wrapped, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Probes for Hydrolytic Enzyme Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallmyer, Nathaniel E; Musielewicz, Joseph; Sutter, Joel; Reuel, Nigel F

    2018-04-17

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a topic of continual study and improvement due to their industrial impact and biological implications; however, the ability to measure the activity of these enzymes, especially in high-throughput assays, is limited to an established, few enzymes and often involves the measurement of secondary byproducts or the design of a complex degradation probe. Herein, a versatile single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based biosensor that is straightforward to produce and measure is described. The hydrolytic enzyme substrate is rendered as an amphiphilic polymer, which is then used to solubilize the hydrophobic nanotubes. When the target enzyme degrades the wrapping, the SWNT fluorescent signal is quenched due to increased solvent accessibility and aggregation, allowing quantitative measurement of hydrolytic enzyme activity. Using (6,5) chiral SWNT suspended with polypeptides and polysaccharides, turnover frequencies are estimated for cellulase, pectinase, and bacterial protease. Responses are recorded for concentrations as low as 5 fM using a well-characterized protease, Proteinase K. An established trypsin-based plate reader assay is used to compare this nanotube probe assay with standard techniques. Furthermore, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles and elevated temperature on enzyme activity is measured, suggesting freezing to have minimal impact even after 10 cycles and heating to be detrimental above 60 °C. Finally, rapid optimization of enzyme operating conditions is demonstrated by generating a response surface of cellulase activity with respect to temperature and pH to determine optimal conditions within 2 h of serial scans.

  1. Effects of temperature and torsion speed on torsional properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoei, A.R.; Ban, E.; Banihashemi, P.; Abdolhosseini Qomi, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are excellent candidates for torsional elements used in nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS). Simulations show that after being twisted to a certain angle, they buckle and lose their mechanical strength. In this paper, classical molecular dynamics simulations are performed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to investigate the effects of torsion speed and temperature on CNT torsional properties. The AIREBO potential is employed to describe the bonded interactions between carbon atoms. The MD simulations clearly show that the buckling of CNTs in torsion is a reversible process, in which by unloading the buckled CNT in opposite direction, it returns to its original configuration. In addition, the numerical results reveal that the torsional shear modulus of CNTs increases by increasing the temperature and decreasing the torsion speed. Furthermore, the buckling torsion angle of CNTs increases by increasing the torsion speed and decreasing the temperature. Finally, it is observed that torsional properties of CNTs are highly affected by speed of twist and temperature of the nanotubes.

  2. Theoretical studies on lattice-oriented growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengwei; Meng, Xianhong; Xiao, Jianliang

    2017-09-01

    Due to their excellent mechanical and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can find broad applications in many areas, such as field-effect transistors, logic circuits, sensors and flexible electronics. High-density, horizontally aligned arrays of SWNTs are essential for high performance electronics. Many experimental studies have demonstrated that chemical vapor deposition growth of nanotubes on crystalline substrates such as sapphire offers a promising route to achieve such dense, perfectly aligned arrays. In this work, a theoretical study is performed to quantitatively understand the van der Waals interactions between SWNTs and sapphire substrates. The energetically preferred alignment directions of SWNTs on A-, R- and M-planes and the random alignment on the C-plane predicted by this study are all in good agreement with experiments. It is also shown that smaller SWNTs have better alignment than larger SWNTs due to their stronger interaction with sapphire substrate. The strong vdW interactions along preferred alignment directions can be intuitively explained by the nanoscale ‘grooves’ formed by atomic lattice structures on the surface of sapphire. This study provides important insights to the controlled growth of nanotubes and potentially other nanomaterials.

  3. Assembly and melting of DNA nanotubes from single-sequence tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobey, T L; Renner, S; Simmel, F C

    2009-01-01

    DNA melting and renaturation studies are an extremely valuable tool to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex dissociation and reassociation reactions. These are important not only in a biological or biotechnological context, but also for DNA nanotechnology which aims at the construction of molecular materials by DNA self-assembly. We here study experimentally the formation and melting of a DNA nanotube structure, which is composed of many copies of an oligonucleotide containing several palindromic sequences. This is done using temperature-controlled UV absorption measurements correlated with atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. In the melting studies, important factors such as DNA strand concentration, hierarchy of assembly and annealing protocol are investigated. Assembly and melting of the nanotubes are shown to proceed via different pathways. Whereas assembly occurs in several hierarchical steps related to the formation of tiles, lattices and tubes, melting of DNA nanotubes appears to occur in a single step. This is proposed to relate to fundamental differences between closed, three-dimensional tube-like structures and open, two-dimensional lattices. DNA melting studies can lead to a better understanding of the many factors that affect the assembly process which will be essential for the assembly of increasingly complex DNA nanostructures.

  4. Single- and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Phosphorus Based Flame Retardants for Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wesolek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to growing popularity of composites, modification methods to obtain the best properties are searched for. The aim of the study is to reduce the flammability of textile materials using nanocomposite polymer back-coating. Different types of carbon nanotubes (single- and multiwalled and different phosphorus flame retardants (ammonium polyphosphates and melamine polyphosphate were introduced into the resin and then the fabrics were covered by the obtained composites. Homogeneous dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the polyurethane resin was obtained by sonification, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Flammability tests of fabrics coated by modified polyurethane resin were carried out using pyrolysis combustion flow calorimeter (PCFC and thermal stability of textiles was evaluated. Also, organoleptic estimation of coatings was conducted (flexibility and fragility. The use of polymer nanocomposites with phophorus flame retardants as a back-coating for textiles effectively reduces flammability and improves thermal stability of the fabric. Furthermore, the synergistic effect beetwen carbon nanotubes and phosphorous compound occurs. The resulting coatings are flexible and do not crack or change the feel of fabrics.

  5. Properties of Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes investigated by 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance. We show that there are two types of Cs cations depending on the insertion level. Indeed, at low concentrations, Static spectra analysis shows that the Cs (α)+ species are fully ionized, i.e. α equal ca.1, while at higher concentrations a second paramagnetically shifted line appears, indicating the formation of Cs (β)+ ions with β < α ∼ +1. At low concentrations and low temperatures the Cs (α)+ ions exhibit a weak hyperfine coupling to the SWCNT conduction electrons, whereas, at higher temperatures, a thermally activated slow-motion diffusion process of the Cs (α)+ ions occurs along the interstitial channels present within the carbon nanotube bundles. At high concentrations, the Cs (β)+ ions seem to occupy well defined positions relative to the carbon lattice. As a matter of fact, the Korringa relaxation behavior suggests a strong hyperfine coupling between Cs nuclei and conduction electrons in the carbon nanotubes and a partial charge transfer, which suggest a plausible Cs(6s)-C(2p) hybridization. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Organic photovoltaic devices with a single layer geometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesov, Vladimir A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Aizawa, Naoya; Larrain, Felipe A.; Chou, Wen-Fang; Perrotta, Alberto; Graham, Samuel; Kippelen, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) can lead to a low cost and short energy payback time alternative to existing photovoltaic technologies. However, to fulfill this promise, power conversion efficiencies must be improved and simultaneously the architecture of the devices and their processing steps need to be further simplified. In the most efficient devices to date, the functions of photocurrent generation, and hole/electron collection are achieved in different layers adding complexity to the device fabrication. In this talk, we present a novel approach that yields devices in which all these functions are combined in a single layer. Specifically, we report on bulk heterojunction devices in which amine-containing polymers are first mixed in the solution together with the donor and acceptor materials that form the active layer. A single-layer coating yields a self-forming bottom electron-collection layer comprised of the amine-containing polymer (e.g. PEIE). Hole-collection is achieved by subsequent immersion of this single layer in a solution of a polyoxometalate (e.g. phosphomolybdic acid (PMA)) leading to an electrically p-doped region formed by the diffusion of the dopant molecules into the bulk. The depth of this doped region can be controlled with values up to tens of nm by varying the immersion time. Devices with a single 500 nm-thick active layer of P3HT:ICBA processed using this method yield power conversion efficiency (PCE) values of 4.8 ± 0.3% at 1 sun and demonstrate a performance level superior to that of benchmark three-layer devices with separate layers of PEIE/P3HT:ICBA/MoOx (4.1 ± 0.4%). Devices remain stable after shelf lifetime experiments carried-out at 60 °C over 280 h.

  7. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2016-01-28

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels).

  8. Nucleation Mechanisms of Aromatic Polyesters, PET, PBT, and PEN, on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Early Nucleation Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Espinoza-Martínez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation mechanisms of poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET, poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT, and poly(ethylene naphthalate (PEN on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs are proposed, based on experimental evidence, theoretical epitaxy analysis, and semiempirical quantum chemical calculations. In order to elucidate early nucleation stages polyester-coated nanotubes were obtained from highly diluted solutions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM revealed helical morphologies for PET/SWNTs and PEN/SWNTs and the formation of lobules with different orientations for PBT/SWNTs. To explain the morphological behavior one model was proposed based on crystallographic interactions, that is, epitaxy. Theoretical epitaxy calculations indicated that epitaxy is not possible from the strict epitaxy point of view. Instead, aromatic self-assembly mechanism was proposed based on π-π interactions and the chirality of the nanotube. It was proposed that the mechanism implies two steps to produce helical or lobular morphologies with different orientations. In the first step polymer chains were approached, aligned parallel to the nanotube axis and adsorbed due to electrostatic interactions and the flexibility of the molecule. However, due to π-π interactions between the aromatic rings of the polymer and the nanotube, in the second step chains reoriented on the nanotube surface depending on the chirality of the nanotube. The mechanism was supported by semi-empirical calculations.

  9. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marana, Naiara L. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Albuquerque, Anderson R. [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sertão Pernambucano, 56400-000 Floresta, PE (Brazil); La Porta, Felipe A. [Chemistry Department, Federal Technological University of Paraná, 86036-370 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Longo, Elson [São Paulo State University, Chemistry Institute, UNESP, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Sambrano, Julio R. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors. - Graphical abstract: DFT/B3LYP were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of SWZnONTs and SWCNTs with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. - Highlights: • The energies of SWZnONTs converge for chirality with diameters up 20 Å. • SWCNTs electronic properties depend on the chirality. • The properties of SWZnONTs are very similar to those of monolayer surface.

  10. Powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide adsorption onto intrinsic and Pd doped Single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of the adsorption of Nitrous oxide on SWCNT and Pd/SWCNT. • Nitrous oxide adsorbed on Pd/SWCNT system demonstrates a strong adsorption. • The Pd/SWCNT is potential sensor for the Nitrous oxide gaseous molecule detection. - Abstract: Density functional studies on the adsorption behavior of nitrous oxide (N_2O) onto intrinsic carbon nanotube (CNT) and Pd-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (Pd-CNT) have been reported. Introduction of Pd dopant facilitates in adsorption of N_2O on the otherwise inert nanotube as observed from the adsorption energies and global reactivity descriptor values. Among three adsorption features of N_2O onto CNT, the horizontal adsorption with E_a_d_s = −0.16 eV exhibits higher adsorption energy. On the other hand the Pd-CNT exhibit strong affinity toward gas molecule and would cause a huge increase in N_2O adsorption energies. Chemical and electronic properties of CNT and Pd-CNT in the absence and presence of N_2O were investigated. Adsorption of N_2O gas molecule would affect the electronic conductance of Pd-CNT that can serve as a signal of gas sensors and the increased energy gaps demonstrate the formation of more stable systems. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to get more details about the nature and charge transfers in intermolecular interactions within adsorption process. As a final point, the density of states (DOSs) calculations was achieved to confirm previous results. According to our results, intrinsic CNT cannot act as a suitable adsorbent while Pd-CNT can be introduced as novel detectable complex for designing high sensitive, fast response and high efficient carbon nanotube based gas sensor to detect N_2O gas as an air pollutant. Our results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the N_2O sensors.

  11. Finite element modeling of single-walled carbon nanotubes with introducing a new wall thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalalahmadi, B; Naghdabadi, R

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for armchair, zigzag and chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is proposed. By considering the covalent bonds as connecting elements between carbon atoms, a nanotube is simulated as a space frame-like structure. Here, the carbon atoms act as joints of the connecting elements. To create the FE models, nodes are placed at the locations of carbon atoms and the bonds between them are modeled using three-dimensional elastic beam elements. Using Morse atomic potential, the elastic moduli of beam elements are obtained via considering a linkage between molecular and continuum mechanics. Also, a new wall thickness ( bond diameter) equal to 0.1296 nm is introduced. In order to demonstrate the applicability of FE model and new wall thickness, the influence of tube wall thickness, diameter and chirality on the Young's modulus of SWCNTs is investigated. It is found that the choice of wall thickness significantly affects the calculation of Young's modulus. For the values of wall thickness used in the literature, the Young's moduli are estimated which agree very well with the corresponding theoretical results and experimental measurements. We also investigate the dependence of elastic moduli on diameter and chirality of the nanotube. The larger tube diameter, the higher Young's modulus of SWCNT. The Young's modulus of chiral SWCNTs is found to be generally larger than that of armchair and zigzag SWCNTs. The presented results demonstrate that the proposed FE model and wall thickness may provide a valuable tool for studying the mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes and their application in nano-composites

  12. Phosphatidylserine targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for photothermal ablation of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Needa A.; Davis, Carole; McKernan, Patrick; Hauser, Paul; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel; Silvy, Ricardo P.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2018-01-01

    Bladder cancer has a 60%-70% recurrence rate most likely due to any residual tumour left behind after a transurethral resection (TUR). Failure to completely resect the cancer can lead to recurrence and progression into higher grade tumours with metastatic potential. We present here a novel therapy to treat superficial tumours with the potential to decrease recurrence. The therapy is a heat-based approach in which bladder tumour specific single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are delivered intravesically at a very low dose (0.1 mg SWCNT per kg body weight) followed 24 h later by a short 30 s treatment with a 360° near-infrared light that heats only the bound nanotubes. The energy density of the treatment was 50 J cm-2, and the power density that this treatment corresponds to is 1.7 W cm-2, which is relatively low. Nanotubes are specifically targeted to the tumour via the interaction of annexin V (AV) and phosphatidylserine, which is normally internalised on healthy tissue but externalised on tumours and the tumour vasculature. SWCNTs are conjugated to AV, which binds specifically to bladder cancer cells as confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Due to this specific localisation, NIR light can be used to heat the tumour while conserving the healthy bladder wall. In a short-term efficacy study in mice with orthotopic MB49 murine bladder tumours treated with the SWCNT-AV conjugate and NIR light, no tumours were visible on the bladder wall 24 h after NIR light treatment, and there was no damage to the bladder. In a separate survival study in mice with the same type of orthotopic tumours, there was a 50% cure rate at 116 days when the study was ended. At 116 days, no treatment toxicity was observed, and no nanotubes were detected in the clearance organs or bladder.

  13. Theoretical prediction of high carrier mobility in single-walled black phosphorus nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q. F.; Wang, H. F.; Yang, C. H.; Li, Q. Q.; Rao, W. F.

    2018-05-01

    One-dimensional semiconductors are promising materials for high-performance nanoscale devices. Using the first-principles calculations combined with deformation potential approximation, we study the electronic structures and carrier transport properties of black phosphorus nanotubes (BPNTs). It is found that both armchair and zigzag BPNTs with diameter 13.5-18.5 Å are direct bandgap semiconductors. At a similar diameter, the carrier mobility of zigzag BPNT is one order of magnitude larger than that of armchair BPNT. For armchair BPNTs, the electron mobility is about 90.70-155.33 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature, which is about three times of its hole counterpart. For zigzag BPNTs, the maximum mobility can reach 2.87 ×103 cm2 V-1 s-1. Furthermore, the electronic properties can be effectively tuned by the strain. For zigzag (0,13) nanotube, there is a direct-to-indirect band gap transition at a tensile strain of about 6%. Moreover, the electron mobility is boosted sharply by one order of magnitude by applying the compressive or tensile strain. The electron mobility increases to 14.05 ×103 cm2 V-1 s-1 at a tensile strain of 9%. Our calculations highlight the tunable electronic properties and superior carrier mobility of BPNTs that are promising for interesting applications in future nano-electronic devices.

  14. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  15. Defects in Individual Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Raman Spectroscopic and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemical Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Hsieh, Y. P.; Farhat, H.; Kavan, Ladislav; Hofmann, M.; Kong, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 11 (2010), s. 4619-4626 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk ME09060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : single wall carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroscopy * defects Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 12.186, year: 2010

  16. Equivalent elastic moduli of a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube given by uniform radial deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Qiu Xinming; Yin Yajun; Yang Fan; Fan Qinshan

    2009-01-01

    Under hydrostatic pressure, the equivalent elastic moduli of a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) are analytically determined by energy conservation, with the consideration of the covalent bond deformation. The theoretical predictions on the transverse mechanical properties of a zigzag SWNT agree reasonably well with those given by the molecular structures mechanics simulations and also the ab initio calculations. From the simple geometry calculation, the circumferential strain is about 2-3 times of the axial strain of a zigzag SWNT under hydrostatic pressure. The bulk modulus of a zigzag SWNT is found to be 3/7 times of its radial Young's modulus.

  17. The reaction of lithium metal vapor with single walled carbon nanotubes of large diameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 246, 11-12 (2009), s. 2428-2431 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : lithium * single walled carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.150, year: 2009

  18. Fabrication and electrochemical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube/graphite-based electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam, Abdolmajid Bayandori; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Razavi, Taherehsadat; Riahi, Siavash; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Norouzi, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical method for determining the dihydroxybenzene derivatives on glassy carbon (GC) has been developed. In this method, the performance of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/graphite-based electrode, prepared by mixing SWCNTs and graphite powder, was described. The resulting electrode shows an excellent behavior for redox of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DBA). SWCNT/graphite-based electrode presents a significant decrease in the overvoltage for DBA oxidation as well as a dramatic improvement in the reversibility of DBA redox behavior in comparison with graphite-based and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) procedures performed for used SWCNTs

  19. Improving the conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes films by heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jiaping [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Superfine Microstructures, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Sun Jing, E-mail: jingsun@mail.sic.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Superfine Microstructures, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Gao Lian, E-mail: liangaoc@online.sh.c [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Superfine Microstructures, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu Yangqiao; Wang Yan; Zhang Jing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Superfine Microstructures, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Kajiura, Hisashi; Li Yongming; Noda, Kazuhiro [Advanced Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, Atsugi Tec. No. 2, 4-16-1 Okata Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan)

    2009-10-19

    A simple heat treatment method was applied to remove surfactants remaining in the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) films at 300 deg. C for 5 h in air. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflected light interference microscope (RLIM) were employed to verify the elimination of surfactants. The comprehensive performance, especially the conductivity, could be improved by more than one order after heat treatment. For example, using SDBS as dispersant, the sheet resistance decreased from 782,600 OMEGA/square to 40,460 OMEGA/square with the transmittance of about 99.5% at 550 nm.

  20. Structural profiling and biological performance of phospholipid-hyaluronan functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvash, Ram; Khatchatouriants, Artium; Solmesky, Leonardo J

    2013-01-01

    In spite of significant insolubility and toxicity, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) erupt into the biomedical research, and create an increasing interest in the field of nanomedicine. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to be toxic while systemically administrated. Thus...... an inflammatory response in macrophages as evidenced by the cytokine profiling and the use of image-based high-content analysis approach in contrast to non-modified CNTs. In addition, systemic administration of CNT-PL-HA into healthy C57BL/6 mice did not alter the total number of leukocytes nor increased liver...

  1. Inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yuki; Nobusa, Yuki; Gocho, Shota; Kudou, Hikaru; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Takenobu, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    We report a method for the inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) films by combining inkjet technology with the strong wettability contrast between hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas based on the patterning of self-assembled monolayers. Both the drying process control using the strong wettability boundary and the coffee-stain effect strongly promote the aggregation of SWCNTs along the contact line of a SWCNT ink droplet, thereby demonstrating our achievement of inkjet-printed aligned SWCNT films. This method could open routes for developing high-performance and environmentally friendly SWCNT printed electronics.

  2. Transparent and conductive polyethylene oxide film by the introduction of individualized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Park, Ki Chul; Shimamoto, Daisuke; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Song, Sung Moo; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2009-12-16

    It is demonstrated that an optically transparent and electrically conductive polyethylene oxide (PEO) film is fabricated by the introduction of individualized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The incorporated SWNTs in the PEO film sustain their intrinsic electronic and optical properties and, in addition, the intrinsic properties of the polymer matrix are retained. The individualized SWNTs with smaller diameter provide high transmittance as well as good electrical conductivity in PEO films. Copyright © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Observation and Characterization of Fragile Organometallic Molecules Encapsulated in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ogawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally fragile tris(η5-cyclopentadienylerbium (ErCp3 molecules are encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with high yield. We realized the encapsulation of ErCp3 with high filling ratio by using high quality SWCNTs at an optimized temperature under higher vacuum. Structure determination based on high-resolution transmission electron microscope observations together with the image simulations reveals the presence of almost free rotation of each ErCp3 molecule in SWCNTs. The encapsulation is also confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Trivalent character of Er ions (i.e., Er3+ is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectrum.

  4. Laser-induced forward transfer of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work is the application of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) for the fabrication of chemiresistor sensors. The receiver substrate is an array with metal electrodes and the active materials placed by LIFT are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The functionality of such sensors depends on the geometry of the active material onto the metallic electrodes. First the best geometry for the sensing materials and electrodes was determined, including the optimization of the process parameters for printing uniform pixels of SWCNT onto the sensor electrodes. The sensors were characterized in terms of their sensing characteristics, i.e., upon exposure to ammonia, proving the feasibility of LIFT.

  5. Surprising synthesis of nanodiamond from single-walled carbon nanotubes by the spark plasma sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Ham, Heon; Na, Han Gil; Kwon, Yong Jung; Kang, Sung Yong; Choi, Myung Sik; Bang, Jae Hoon; Park, No-Hyung; Kang, Inpil; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2016-10-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) was successfully synthesized using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a pure solid carbon source by means of a spark plasma sintering process. Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns revealed the generation of the cubic diamond phase by means of the SPS process. Lattice-resolved TEM images confirmed that diamond nanoparticles with a diameter of about ˜10 nm existed in the products. The NDs were generated mainly through the gas-phase nucleation of carbon atoms evaporated from the SWCNTs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Investigating interfacial contact configuration and behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube-based nanodevice with atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jianlei, E-mail: cjlxjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jianwei [Xi’an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering (China); He, Xiaoqiao, E-mail: bcxqhe@cityu.edu.hk [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering (Hong Kong); Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun [Xi’an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering (China); Yang, Xinju [Fudan University, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics (China); Xie, Hui; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Yang [Harbin Institute of Technology, State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems (China)

    2017-03-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), are considered to be the promising candidates for next-generation interconnects with excellent physical and chemical properties ranging from ultrahigh mechanical strength, to electrical properties, to thermal conductivity, to optical properties, etc. To further study the interfacial contact configurations of SWNT-based nanodevice with a 13.56-Å diameter, the corresponding simulations are carried out with the molecular dynamic method. The nanotube collapses dramatically into the surface with the complete collapse on the Au/Ag/graphite electrode surface and slight distortion on the Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate surface, respectively. The related dominant mechanism is studied and explained. Meanwhile, the interfacial contact configuration and behavior, depended on other factors, are also analyzed in this article.

  7. Multifractal characterization of single wall carbon nanotube thin films surface upon exposure to optical parametric oscillator laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Marković, Zoran; Stach, Sebastian; Todorović Marković, B.; Ţălu, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a multifractal approach, obtained with atomic force microscopy analysis, to characterize the structural evolution of single wall carbon nanotube thin films upon exposure to optical parametric oscillator laser irradiation at wavelength of 430 nm. Microstructure and morphological changes of carbon nanotube films deposited on different substrates (mica and TGX grating) were recorded by atomic force microscope. A detailed methodology for surface multifractal characterization, which may be applied for atomic force microscopy data, was presented. Multifractal analysis of surface roughness revealed that carbon nanotube films surface has a multifractal geometry at various magnifications. The generalized dimension D q and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of carbon nanotube films surface morphology at nanometer scale. Multifractal analysis provides different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters.

  8. Transport properties of field effect transistors with randomly networked single walled carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-01-01

    The transport properties of randomly networked single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors with different channel lengths of L c = 2-10 μm were investigated. Randomly networked SWNTs were directly grown for the two different densities of ρ ∼ 25 μm -2 and ρ ∼ 50 μm -2 by water plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The field effect transport is governed mainly by formation of the current paths that is related to the nanotube density. On the other hand, the off-state conductivity deviates from linear dependence for both nanotube density and channel length. The field effect mobility of holes is estimated as 4-13 cm 2 V -1 s -1 for the nanotube transistors based on the simple MOS theory. The mobility is increased for the higher density without meaningful dependence on the channel lengths.

  9. Selective detection of SO2 at room temperature based on organoplatinum functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cid, C.C.; Jimenez-Cadena, G.; Riu, J.; Maroto, A.; Rius, F.X.; Batema, G.D.; van Koten, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that for the first time can selectively detect a single gaseous molecule in air by chemically functionalizing the SWCNTs with a selective molecular receptor. As a target model we used SO2. The

  10. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of E i I i , d, and γ, where E i I i and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates

  11. Single Event Effects in FPGA Devices 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of single event effects in FPGA devices 2015-2016 including commercial Xilinx V5 heavy ion accelerated testing, Xilinx Kintex-7 heavy ion accelerated testing, mitigation study, and investigation of various types of triple modular redundancy (TMR) for commercial SRAM based FPGAs.

  12. Enhancement of heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics tuning single-walled carbon nanotube forest height and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberti, Francesco; Ferraro, Davide; Giomo, Monica; Elvassore, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors are growing in number and importance. Surface modifications could enhance charge transfer properties occurring at the interfaces and carbon nanoassemblies is one of the most used strategy to improve sensitivity to measurements. However, well defined protocols of surface modification are needed in order to fabricate electrochemically effective nanostructured sensors. Therefore, we aim at investigating the electrochemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) forests as a function of height and nanotube surface density. Height of the forests is accurately controlled tuning the oxidation temperatures in the range of 293–313 K of SWCNTs. The surface density of carbon nanotubes was adjusted developing cysteamine/2-mercaptoethanol (CYS/ME) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces at different ratios (1:0, 1:3, 1:10, 1:100, 0:1). Apparent electron transfer rate was analyzed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and experimental data show that transfer rate constant, k app , increases from 1 × 10 −4 cm/s to 6 × 10 −4 cm/s rising oxidation temperatures (i.e. lowering forest height); therefore forests with reduced height show higher electron transfer rate without significant difference in electrodic reversibility. On the other hand, tuning SWCNT surface density, forests obtained with no ME show optimal Δ peak value of 0.087 ± 0.015 V and highest k app value of 9.15 × 10 −3 cm/s. Surprisingly, electrochemical surface area analysis shows that samples with lower amount of cysteamine have an active surface area three times bigger than samples with 1:3 CYS/ME ratio. Low electrochemical efficiency associated with high active surface may be related to unwanted SWCNT bundles adsorbed on the surface for 1:10 and 1:100 CYS/ME ratio samples as confirmed by AFM morphological characterization. Further investigation shows that a transition from a semi-infinite planar diffusion mechanism to a radial diffusion one takes

  13. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  14. Interactions of phospholipid monolayer with single-walled carbon nanotube wrapped by lysophospholipid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Siwool; Kim, Hyungsu, E-mail: hkim@dku.edu

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we prepared single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) wrapped by 1-stearoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1 Prime -rac-glycerol) (LPG), leading to a complex of SWNT-LPG. In an attempt to investigate the interactions of SWNT-LPG with a mimicked cell surface, SWNT-LPG solution was injected into the sub-phase of Langmuir trough to form a mixed monolayer with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), respectively. In addition to the measurement of typical surface pressure-area isotherms under compression mode, area changes occurring during insertion of SWNT-LPG into the monolayer were recorded at various surface pressures. Changes in surface potential were also measured for evident tracing of the degree of interactions between sub-phase and monolayer. A systematic comparison of relaxation patterns and insertion behavior along with surface potential data provided a rational basis to distinguish the degree of interactions between SWNT-LPG and the designated monolayer. The observed tendencies were found to be in accordance with the surface topography as revealed by the tapping mode atomic force microscopy. It was consistently observed that SWNT-LPG interacted with DPPC to a greater extent than with DPPG, when the sufficient coverage of nanotube surface by LPG molecules was assured. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex of single-walled carbon nanotubes and lysophospholipid (SWNT-LPG) is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composite monolayer is formed by inserting SWNT-LPG into the phospholipid monolayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measure area-pressure responses and dipole potentials during the insertion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Properties of composite monolayer depend on the kind of phospholipid and LPG content.

  15. Growth of nanotubes and chemical sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, James; Kim, Philip; Huang, X. M. H.; Chandra, B.; Caldwell, R.; Small, J.; Hong, B. H.; Someya, T.; Huang, L.; O'Brien, S.; Nuckolls, Colin P.

    2004-12-01

    We have used a number of methods to grow long aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Geometries include individual long tubes, dense parallel arrays, and long freely suspended nanotubes. We have fabricated a variety of devices for applications such as multiprobe resistance measurement and high-current field effect transistors. In addition, we have measured conductance of single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes in field-effect transistor geometry and investigated the device response to water and alcoholic vapors. We observe significant changes in FET drain current when the device is exposed to various kinds of different solvent. These responses are reversible and reproducible over many cycles of vapor exposure. Our experiments demonstrate that carbon nanotube FETs are sensitive to a wide range of solvent vapors at concentrations in the ppm range.

  16. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  17. Effects of residual aberrations explored on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biskupek, Johannes; Hartel, Peter; Haider, Maximilian; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-01-01

    The effects of geometric residual aberrations such as coma B 2 and two-fold astigmatism A 1 on the contrast in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images are investigated on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The individual aberrations are adjusted and set up manually using an imaging C S -corrector. We demonstrate how coma B 2 can be recognized by an experienced user directly in the image and how it blurs the contrast. Even with uncorrected (resolution limiting) spherical aberration C S the coma B 2 has to be considered and must be minimized. Limits for a tolerable coma are given. The experiments are confirmed by image simulations. -- Highlights: ► Individual effects of residual aberrations such as B 2 , A 1 , and C S are demonstrated. ► Experimental HRTEM and simulated images of carbon nanotubes are compared. ► A detection limit of 50 nm B 2 in a single HRTEM image is determined.

  18. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R.; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1-25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure.

  19. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M; Mutter, George L; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-19

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1-25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure.

  20. Giant Magnetoresistance in Carbon Nanotubes with Single-Molecule Magnets TbPc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainov, Igor V; Klier, Janina; Dmitriev, Alexander P; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Gornyi, Igor V

    2017-07-25

    We present experimental results and a theoretical model for the gate-controlled spin-valve effect in carbon nanotubes with side-attached single-molecule magnets TbPc 2 (Terbium(III) bis-phthalocyanine). These structures show a giant magnetoresistance up to 1000% in experiments on single-wall nanotubes that are tunnel-coupled to the leads. The proposed theoretical model combines the spin-dependent Fano effect with Coulomb blockade and predicts a spin-spin interaction between the TbPc 2 molecules, mediated by conducting electrons via the charging effect. This gate-tuned interaction is responsible for the stable magnetic ordering of the inner spins of the molecules in the absence of magnetic field. In the case of antiferromagnetic arrangement, electrons with either spin experience the scattering by the molecules, which results in blocking the linear transport. In strong magnetic fields, the Zeeman energy exceeds the effective antiferromagnetic coupling and one species of electrons is not scattered by molecules, which leads to a much lower total resistance at the resonant values of gate voltage, and hence to a supramolecular spin-valve effect.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Benard, P.; Lafi, L.; Dorval-Douville, G.; Chandonia, P.-A. [Univ. du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: Lyubov.Lafi@uqtr.ca

    2006-07-01

    'Full text:' In recent years, several novel carbon-based microporous materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been proposed as promising adsorbents for hydrogen. Hydrogen adsorption measurements on Al-, Cr- and Zn-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are presented. The measurements were performed at temperatures ranging from 77 to 300K and pressures up to 50 atm using a volumetric approach. The maximum excess adsorption at 77K ranges from 2,8 to 3,9 wt % for the MOFs and from 1,5 to 2,5 wt % for the SWNTs. These values are reached at pressures below 40 atm. At room temperature and 40 atm, modest amounts of hydrogen are adsorbed (< 0,4 wt %). A Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) approach is used to investigate the measured adsorption isotherms and retrieve energetic and structural parameters. The adsorption enthalpy averaged over filling is found to be about 2,9 kJ/mol for the MOF-5 and about 3,6 - 4,2 kJ/mol for SWNTs. The uptake of hydrogen on SWNTs and MOF-5 appears to be due to physisorption and can be described, through the DA-model, by a traditional theory of micropore filling. (author)

  2. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta...... a low toxicity of the conjugates in the THP-1 cells. The low toxicity and the cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotube–folic acid by cancer cells suggest their potential use in carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems and in the diagnosis of cancer or tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis....

  3. Tunable color parallel tandem organic light emitting devices with carbon nanotube and metallic sheet interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, Jorge; Desirena, Haggeo; De la Rosa, Elder [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, A.P. 1-948, León, Guanajuato 37160 (Mexico); Papadimitratos, Alexios [Solarno Inc., Coppell, Texas 75019 (United States); University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zakhidov, Anvar A., E-mail: Zakhidov@utdallas.edu [Solarno Inc., Coppell, Texas 75019 (United States); University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Energy Efficiency Center, National University of Science and Technology, MISiS, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-21

    Parallel tandem organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) were fabricated with transparent multiwall carbon nanotube sheets (MWCNT) and thin metal films (Al, Ag) as interlayers. In parallel monolithic tandem architecture, the MWCNT (or metallic films) interlayers are an active electrode which injects similar charges into subunits. In the case of parallel tandems with common anode (C.A.) of this study, holes are injected into top and bottom subunits from the common interlayer electrode; whereas in the configuration of common cathode (C.C.), electrons are injected into the top and bottom subunits. Both subunits of the tandem can thus be monolithically connected functionally in an active structure in which each subunit can be electrically addressed separately. Our tandem OLEDs have a polymer as emitter in the bottom subunit and a small molecule emitter in the top subunit. We also compared the performance of the parallel tandem with that of in series and the additional advantages of the parallel architecture over the in-series were: tunable chromaticity, lower voltage operation, and higher brightness. Finally, we demonstrate that processing of the MWCNT sheets as a common anode in parallel tandems is an easy and low cost process, since their integration as electrodes in OLEDs is achieved by simple dry lamination process.

  4. On-chip mitochondrial assay microfluidic devices and protein nanopore/nanotube hybrid transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taesun

    Tremendous efforts to understand the cause, mechanism of development and the way to treat various diseases as well as an early diagnosis have been made so far and people are still working hardly on these researches. Even now, countless people are suffering from diseases such as Alzhemer's disease, Parkinson's disease, diabetes and cancer without knowing clues to cure their diseases completely. Generally speaking, we still have a long way to go through to comprehensively figure out these our long-lasting homeworks. One of possible solutions is to merge current advanced technology and science together to find a powerful synergetic effect for a specific purpose that can be tailored depending on user's need. Here this research tried to put nanotechnology and biological science together to find a way to resolve current challenges by developing a new generation of the analytical sensing device. Mitochondrial functions and biological roles in regulating life and death control will be discussed indicating mitochondrion is a crucial organism to monitor to obtain important information regarding degenerative diseases and aging process. On-chip mitochondrial functional assay microsensor that could facilitate the mitochondrial evaluation will be extensively demonstrated and discussed in both technical and biological perspectives. The novel fusion technological approach will be demonstrated by combining artificial cell membrane with carbon nanotube electronics to interrogate interactions between biomolecules and electronic circuitries. In addition, molecular dynamics at the cell membrane could be investigated closely which can help understand the cell-cell communication and the regulation of ion transport.

  5. AC-conductance and capacitance measurements for ethanol vapor detection using carbon nanotube-polyvinyl alcohol composite based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenshields, Márcia W C C; Meruvia, Michelle S; Hümmelgen, Ivo A; Coville, Neil J; Mhlanga, Sabelo D; Ceragioli, Helder J; Quispe, Jose C Rojas; Baranauskas, Vitor

    2011-03-01

    We report the preparation of inexpensive ethanol sensor devices using multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyvinyl alcohol composite films deposited onto interdigitated electrodes patterned on phenolite substrates. We investigate the frequency dependent response of the device conductance and capacitance showing that higher sensitivity is obtained at higher frequency if the conductance is used as sensing parameter. In the case of capacitance measurements, higher sensitivity is obtained at low frequency. Ethanol detection at a concentration of 300 ppm in air is demonstrated. More than 80% of the sensor conductance and capacitance variation response occurs in less than 20 s.

  6. Photon antibunching in single-walled carbon nanotubes at telecommunication wavelengths and room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Takumi, E-mail: endou@az.appi.keio.ac.jp; Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Maki, Hideyuki, E-mail: maki@appi.keio.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2015-03-16

    We investigated the photoluminescence of individual air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from 6 to 300 K. Time-resolved and antibunching measurements over the telecommunication wavelength range were performed using a superconducting single-photon detector. We detected moderate temperature independent antibunching behavior over the whole temperature range studied. To investigate the exciton dynamics, which is responsible for the antibunching behavior, we measured excitation-power and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence spectra and lifetime decay curves. These measurements suggested an exciton confinement effect that is likely caused by high-dielectric amorphous carbon surrounding the SWNTs. These results indicate that SWNTs are good candidates for light sources in quantum communication technologies operating in the telecommunication wavelength range and at room temperature.

  7. Magnetoexcitons and Faraday rotation in single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Have, Jonas; Pedersen, Thomas G.

    2018-03-01

    The magneto-optical response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is studied theoretically, including excitonic effects. Both diagonal and nondiagonal response functions are obtained and employed to compute Faraday rotation spectra. For single-walled CNTs in a parallel field, the results show field-dependent splitting of the exciton absorption peaks caused by brightening a dark exciton state. Similarly, for GNRs in a perpendicular magnetic field, we observe a field-dependent shift of the exciton peaks and the emergence of an absorption peak above the energy gap. Results show that excitonic effects play a significant role in the optical response of both materials, particularly for the off-diagonal tensor elements.

  8. Fabrication of an artificial nanosucker device with a large area nanotube array of metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Manivannan, Karthikeyan; Yu, Chia-Chi; Chu, Jinn P; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2018-01-18

    The concurrent attachment and detachment movements of geckos on virtually any type of surface via their foot pads have inspired us to develop a thermal device with numerous arrangements of a multi-layer thin film together with electrodes that can help modify the temperature of the surface via application of a voltage. A sequential fabrication process was employed on a large-scale integration to generate well-defined contact hole arrays of photoresist for use as templates on the electrode-based device. The photoresist templates were then subjected to sputter deposition of the metallic glass Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 . Consequently, a metallic glass nanotube (MGNT) array having a nominal wall thickness of 100 nm was obtained after removal of the photoresist template. When a water droplet was placed on the MGNT array, close nanochambers of metallic glass were formed. By applying voltage, the surface was heated to increase the pressure inside the nanochambers; this generated an expanding force that raised the droplet; thus, the static water contact angle (SWCA) was increased. In contrast, a sucking force was generated during surface cooling, which decreased the SWCA. Our fabrication strategy exploits the MGNT array surface as nanosuckers, which can mimic the climbing aptitude of geckos as they attach to (>10 N m -2 ) and detach from (0.26 N m -2 ) surfaces at 0.5 and 3 V of applied voltage, respectively. Thus, the climbing aptitude of geckos can be mimicked by employing the processing strategy presented herein for the development of artificial foot pads.

  9. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-10-17

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  10. Improving the Sound Pressure Level of Two-Dimensional Audio Actuators by Coating Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Piezoelectric Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Keehong

    2015-10-01

    As devices for amplifying or transforming electronic signals into audible signals through electromechanical operations, acoustic actuators in the form of loudspeakers are usually solid structures in three dimensional space. Recently there has been increasing demand for mobile electronic devices, such as mobile phones, to become smaller, thinner, and lighter. In contrast to a three dimensional audio system with magnets, we have invented a new type of flexible two dimensional device by utilizing the reverse piezoelectric effect in certain piezoelectric materials. Crystalline piezoelectric materials show electromechanical interaction between the mechanical state and the electrically-charged state. The piezoelectric effect is a reversible process in that materials exhibiting the direct piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of electrical charge resulting from an applied mechanical force) also exhibit the reverse piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of a mechanical strain resulting from an applied electrical field). We have adopted the plasma surface treatment in order to put coating materials on the surface of piezoelectric film. We compared two kinds of coating material, indium tin oxide and single-walled carbon nanotube, and found that single-walled carbon nanotube shows better performance. The results showed improvement of output power in a wider range of operating frequency; for the surface resistance of 0.5 kΩ/square, the single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.75-17.5 kHz, but ITO shows 2.5-13.4 kHz. For the surface resistance of 1 kΩ/square, single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.81-17 kHz, but ITO shows it cannot generate audible sound.

  11. Optimization of single-walled carbon nanotube solubility by noncovalent PEGylation using experimental design methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadidi N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Naghmeh Hadidi1, Farzad Kobarfard2, Nastaran Nafissi-Varcheh3, Reza Aboofazeli11Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: In this study, noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with phospholipid-polyethylene glycols (Pl-PEGs was performed to improve the solubility of SWCNTs in aqueous solution. Two kinds of PEG derivatives, ie, Pl-PEG 2000 and Pl-PEG 5000, were used for the PEGylation process. An experimental design technique (D-optimal design and second-order polynomial equations was applied to investigate the effect of variables on PEGylation and the solubility of SWCNTs. The type of PEG derivative was selected as a qualitative parameter, and the PEG/SWCNT weight ratio and sonication time were applied as quantitative variables for the experimental design. Optimization was performed for two responses, aqueous solubility and loading efficiency. The grafting of PEG to the carbon nanostructure was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Aqueous solubility and loading efficiency were determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and measurement of free amine groups, respectively. Results showed that Pl-PEGs were grafted onto SWCNTs. Aqueous solubility of 0.84 mg/mL and loading efficiency of nearly 98% were achieved for the prepared Pl-PEG 5000-SWCNT conjugates. Evaluation of functionalized SWCNTs showed that our noncovalent functionalization protocol could considerably increase aqueous solubility, which is an essential criterion in the design of a carbon nanotube-based drug delivery system and its biodistribution.Keywords: phospholipid-PEG, D-optimal design, loading efficiency, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, theromogravimetric analysis, carbon nanotubes

  12. Plasma-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, R; Kaneko, T; Kato, T; Li, Y F

    2011-01-01

    Plasma-based nanotechnology is a rapidly developing area of research ranging from physics of gaseous and liquid plasmas to material science, surface science and nanofabrication. In our case, nanoscopic plasma processing is performed to grow single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controlled chirality distribution and to further develop SWNT-based materials with new functions corresponding to electronic and biomedical applications. Since SWNTs are furnished with hollow inner spaces, it is very interesting to inject various kinds of atoms and molecules into their nanospaces based on plasma nanotechnology. The encapsulation of alkali-metal atoms, halogen atoms, fullerene or azafullerene molecules inside the carbon nanotubes is realized using ionic plasmas of positive and negative ions such as alkali-fullerene, alkali-halogen, and pair or quasipair ion plasmas. Furthermore, an electrolyte solution plasma with DNA negative ions is prepared in order to encapsulate DNA molecules into the nanotubes. It is found that the electronic and optical properties of various encapsulated SWNTs are significantly changed compared with those of pristine ones. As a result, a number of interesting transport phenomena such as air-stable n- and p-type behaviour, p-n junction characteristic, and photoinduced electron transfer are observed. Finally, the creation of an emerging SWNTs-based nanobioelectronics system is challenged. Specifically, the bottom-up electric-field-assisted reactive ion etching is proposed to control the chirality of SWNTs, unexplored SWNT properties of magnetism and superconductivity are aimed at being pioneered, and innovative biomedical-nanoengineering with encapsulated SWNTs of higher-order structure are expected to be developed by applying advanced gas-liquid interfacial plasmas.

  13. Thread-Like CMOS Logic Circuits Enabled by Reel-Processed Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors via Selective Doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae Sang; Kim, Taehoon; Ban, Seok-Gyu; Kim, Daesik; Lee, Jun Ho; Jur, Jesse S; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hong, Yongtaek; Park, Sung Kyu

    2017-08-01

    The realization of large-area electronics with full integration of 1D thread-like devices may open up a new era for ultraflexible and human adaptable electronic systems because of their potential advantages in demonstrating scalable complex circuitry by a simply integrated weaving technology. More importantly, the thread-like fiber electronic devices can be achieved using a simple reel-to-reel process, which is strongly required for low-cost and scalable manufacturing technology. Here, high-performance reel-processed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits are reported on 1D fiber substrates by using selectively chemical-doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transistors. With the introduction of selective n-type doping and a nonrelief photochemical patterning process, p- and n-type SWCNT transistors are successfully implemented on cylindrical fiber substrates under air ambient, enabling high-performance and reliable thread-like CMOS inverter circuits. In addition, it is noteworthy that the optimized reel-coating process can facilitate improvement in the arrangement of SWCNTs, building uniformly well-aligned SWCNT channels, and enhancement of the electrical performance of the devices. The p- and n-type SWCNT transistors exhibit field-effect mobility of 4.03 and 2.15 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , respectively, with relatively narrow distribution. Moreover, the SWCNT CMOS inverter circuits demonstrate a gain of 6.76 and relatively good dynamic operation at a supply voltage of 5.0 V. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  15. Sensors based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors and molecular recognition approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Cid Salavert, Cristina Carlota

    2009-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis is to develop chemical sensors whose sensing capacities are based on the principle of molecular recognition and where the transduction is carried out by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT).The sensing device used is the carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET). The new structure of the CNTFET allows nanotubes to be integrated at the surface of the devices, thus exploiting SWCNTs' sensitivity to changes in their environment. The functionalization...

  16. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  17. Powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide adsorption onto intrinsic and Pd doped Single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi, E-mail: m.yoosefian@kgut.ac.ir

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of the adsorption of Nitrous oxide on SWCNT and Pd/SWCNT. • Nitrous oxide adsorbed on Pd/SWCNT system demonstrates a strong adsorption. • The Pd/SWCNT is potential sensor for the Nitrous oxide gaseous molecule detection. - Abstract: Density functional studies on the adsorption behavior of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) onto intrinsic carbon nanotube (CNT) and Pd-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (Pd-CNT) have been reported. Introduction of Pd dopant facilitates in adsorption of N{sub 2}O on the otherwise inert nanotube as observed from the adsorption energies and global reactivity descriptor values. Among three adsorption features of N{sub 2}O onto CNT, the horizontal adsorption with E{sub ads} = −0.16 eV exhibits higher adsorption energy. On the other hand the Pd-CNT exhibit strong affinity toward gas molecule and would cause a huge increase in N{sub 2}O adsorption energies. Chemical and electronic properties of CNT and Pd-CNT in the absence and presence of N{sub 2}O were investigated. Adsorption of N{sub 2}O gas molecule would affect the electronic conductance of Pd-CNT that can serve as a signal of gas sensors and the increased energy gaps demonstrate the formation of more stable systems. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to get more details about the nature and charge transfers in intermolecular interactions within adsorption process. As a final point, the density of states (DOSs) calculations was achieved to confirm previous results. According to our results, intrinsic CNT cannot act as a suitable adsorbent while Pd-CNT can be introduced as novel detectable complex for designing high sensitive, fast response and high efficient carbon nanotube based gas sensor to detect N{sub 2}O gas as an air pollutant. Our results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the N{sub 2}O sensors.

  18. Process for derivatizing carbon nanotubes with diazonium species and compositions thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods for the chemical modification of carbon nanotubes involve the derivatization of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes, including small diameter (ca. 0.7 nm) single-wall carbon nanotubes, with diazonium species. The method allows the chemical attachment of a variety of organic compounds to the side and ends of carbon nanotubes. These chemically modified nanotubes have applications in polymer composite materials, molecular electronic applications, and sensor devices. The methods of derivatization include electrochemical induced reactions, thermally induced reactions, and photochemically induced reactions. Moreover, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the derivatized nanotubes are chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as, mechanical strength or electrical conductivity) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. Furthermore, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the groups can be polymerized to form a polymer that includes carbon nanotubes.

  19. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Nitze, F; Schmid, M; Aznar, R; Mehring, M; Wå gberg, T

    2011-01-01

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  20. Feeding Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes or Graphene to Silkworms for Reinforced Silk Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chunya; Zhang, Mingchao; Jian, Muqiang; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-10-12

    Silkworm silk is gaining significant attention from both the textile industry and research society because of its outstanding mechanical properties and lustrous appearance. The possibility of creating tougher silks attracts particular research interest. Carbon nanotubes and graphene are widely studied for their use as reinforcement. In this work, we report mechanically enhanced silk directly collected by feeding Bombyx mori larval silkworms with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene. We found that parts of the fed carbon nanomaterials were incorporated into the as-spun silk fibers, whereas the others went into the excrement of silkworms. Spectroscopy study indicated that nanocarbon additions hindered the conformation transition of silk fibroin from random coil and α-helix to β-sheet, which may contribute to increased elongation at break and toughness modules. We further investigated the pyrolysis of modified silk, and a highly developed graphitic structure with obviously enhanced electrical conductivity was obtained through the introduction of SWNTs and graphene. The successful generation of these SWNT- or graphene-embedded silks by in vivo feeding is expected to open up possibilities for the large-scale production of high-strength silk fibers.

  1. Chemi- vs physisorption in the radical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes under microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Mamane

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of microwaves on the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs by the diazonium method was studied. The usage of a new approach led to the identification of the strength of the interaction (physical or chemical between the functional groups and the carbon nanotube surface. Moreover, the nature (chemical formula of the adsorbed/grafted functional groups was determined. According to thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, the optimal functionalization level was reached after 5 min of reaction. Prolonged reaction times can lead to undesired reactions such as defunctionalization, solvent addition and polymerization of the grafted functions. The strength (chemi- vs physisorption of the bonds between the grafted functional groups and the SWNTs is discussed showing the occurrence of physical adsorption as a consequence of defunctionalization after 15 min of reaction under microwaves. Several chemical mechanisms of grafting could be identified, and it was possible to distinguish conditions leading to the desired chemical grafting from those leading to undesired reactions such as physisorption and polymerization.

  2. Spin wave dynamics in Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou, E-mail: mbzfjerry2008@126.com [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China); Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The spin wave dynamics, including the magnetization, spin wave dispersion relation, and energy level splitting, of Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green’s function method within the random phase approximation. The role of temperature, diameter of the tube, and wave vector on spin wave energy spectrum and energy level splitting are carefully analyzed. There are two categories of spin wave modes, which are quantized and degenerate, and the total number of independent magnon branches is dependent on diameter of the tube, caused by the physical symmetry of nanotubes. Moreover, the number of flat spin wave modes increases with diameter of the tube rising. The spin wave energy and the energy level splitting decrease with temperature rising, and become zero as temperature reaches the critical point. At any temperature, the energy level splitting varies with wave vector, and for a larger wave vector it is smaller. When pb=π, the boundary of first Brillouin zone, spin wave energies are degenerate, and the energy level splittings are zero.

  3. Ultrafast Mid-Infrared Intra-Excitonic Response of Individualized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jigang; Graham, Matt W.; Ma, Yingzhong; Fleming, Graham R.; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The quasi-1D confinement and reduced screening of photoexcited charges in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) entails strongly-enhanced Coulomb interactions and exciton binding energies. Such amplified electron-hole (e-h) correlations have important implications for both fundamental physics and optoelectronic applications of nanotubes. The availability of 'individualized' SWNT ensembles with bright and structured luminescence has rendered specific tube chiralities experimentally accessible. In these samples, evidence for excitonic behavior was found in absorption-luminescence maps, two-photon excited luminescence, or ultrafast carrier dynamics. Here, we report ultrafast mid-infrared (mid-IR) studies of individualized SWNTs, evidencing strong photoinduced absorption around 200 meV in semiconducting tubes of (6,5) and (7,5) chiralities. This manifests the observation of quasi-1D intra-excitonic transitions between different relative-momentum states, in agreement with the binding energy and calculated oscillator strength. Our measurements further reveal a saturation of the photoinduced absorption with increasing phase-space filling of the correlated e-h pairs. The transient mid-IR response represents a new tool, unhindered by restrictions of momentum or interband dipole moment, to investigate the density and dynamics of SWNT excitons.

  4. Synthesis of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Coated with Thiol-reactive Gel via Emulsion Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yukiko; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Nakashima, Naotoshi; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko

    2018-06-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have unique near-infrared absorption and photoemission properties that are attractive for in vivo biological applications such as photothermal cancer treatment and bioimaging. Therefore, a smart functionalization strategy for SWNTs to create biocompatible surfaces and introduce various ligands to target active cancer cells without losing the unique optical properties of the SWNTs is strongly desired. This paper reports the de-sign and synthesis of a SWNT/gel hybrid containing maleimide groups, which react with various thiol compounds through Michael addition reactions. In this hybrid, the method called carbon nanotube micelle polymerization was used to non-covalently modify the surface of SWNTs with a cross-linked polymer gel layer. This method can form an extremely stable gel layer on SWNTs; such stability is essential for in vivo biological applications. The monomer used to form the gel layer contained a maleimide group, which was protected with furan in endo-form. The resulting hybrid was treated in water to induce deprotection via retro Diels-Alder reaction and then functionalized with thiol com-pounds through Michael addition. The functionalization of the hybrid was explored using a thiol-containing fluores-cent dye as a model thiol and the formation of the SWNT-dye conjugate was confirmed by energy transfer from the dye to SWNTs. Our strategy offers a promising SWNT-based platform for biological functionalization for cancer targeting, imaging, and treatment.

  5. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  6. Electronic properties of prismatic modifications of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, O. B.; Muryumin, E. E.; Rodionova, E. V.; Ryskina, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    The article shows the possibility of target modifying the prismatic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by regular chemisorption of fluorine atoms in the graphene surface. It is shown that the electronic properties of prismatic SWCNT modifications are determined by the interaction of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation in the carbon-conjugated subsystems (tracks) formed in the faces. The contributions of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation depend on the structural characteristics of the tracks. It was found that the minimum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of the track width ensure the maximum contribution of the π-electron conjugation, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the hydrocarbon analog of the carbon track. It is established that the maximum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of track width ensure the maximum contribution of the ρ(in-plane) electron interface, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the unmodified carbon nanotube. The calculation of the model systems has been carried out using an ab initio Hartree-Fock method in the 3-21G basis.

  7. Electrical Transport and Magnetoresistance in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly KSENEVICH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical transport properties and magnetoresistance of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT films were investigated within temperature range (2 – 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 T. A crossover between metallic (dR/dT > 0 and non-metallic (dR/dT < 0 temperature dependence of the resistance as well as low-temperature saturation of the resistance in high bias regime indicated on the diminishing of role of the contact barriers between individual nanotubes essential for the charge transport in SWCNT arrays. The magnetoresistance (MR data demonstrated influence of weak localization and electron-electron interactions on charge transport properties in SWCNT films. The low-field negative MR with positive upturn was observed at low temperatures. At T > 10 K only negative MR was observed in the whole range of available magnetic fields. The negative MR can be approximated using 1D weak localization (WL model. The low temperature positive MR is induced by contribution from electron-electron interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.6311

  8. Distribution and clearance of PEG-single-walled carbon nanotube cancer drug delivery vehicles in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhirde, Ashwin A; Patel, Sachin; Sousa, Alioscka A; Patel, Vyomesh; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Ji, Youngmi; Leapman, Richard D; Gutkind, J Silvio; Rusling, James F

    2010-12-01

    To study the distribution and clearance of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) as drug delivery vehicles for the anticancer drug cisplatin in mice. PEG layers were attached to SWCNTs and dispersed in aqueous media and characterized using dynamic light scattering, scanning transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity was assessed in vitro using Annexin-V assay, and the distribution and clearance pathways in mice were studied by histological staining and Raman spectroscopy. Efficacy of PEG-SWCNT-cisplatin for tumor growth inhibition was studied in mice. PEG-SWCNTs were efficiently dispersed in aqueous media compared with controls, and did not induce apoptosis in vitro. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, and Raman bands for SWCNTs in tissues from several vital organs from mice injected intravenously with nanotube bioconjugates revealed that control SWCNTs were lodged in lung tissue as large aggregates compared with the PEG-SWCNTs, which showed little or no accumulation. Characteristic SWCNT Raman bands in feces revealed the presence of bilary or renal excretion routes. Attachment of cisplatin on bioconjugates was visualized with Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy. PEG-SWCNT-cisplatin with the attached targeting ligand EGF successfully inhibited growth of head and neck tumor xenografts in mice. PEG-SWCNTs, as opposed to control SWCNTs, form more highly dispersed delivery vehicles that, when loaded with both cisplatin and EGF, inhibit growth of squamous cell tumors.

  9. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  10. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielejec, E; Seamons, J A; Carroll, M S

    2010-01-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 μm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ∼600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of -1 and 10 -4 for operation temperatures of ∼300 K and ∼77 K, respectively. Low temperature operation and reduced false, 'dark', counts are critical to achieving high confidence in single ion arrival. For the device performance in this work, the confidence is calculated as a probability of >98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10 -4 at an average ion number per gated window of 0.015.

  11. Electrode property of single-walled carbon nanotubes in all-solid-state lithium ion battery using polymer electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrode properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery were investigated using poly-ethylene oxide (PEO) solid electrolyte. Charge-discharge curves of SWCNTs in the solid electrolyte cell were successfully observed. It was found that PEO electrolyte decomposes on the surface of SWCNTs.

  12. Fermi energy dependence of the G-band resonance Raman spectra of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Park, J. S.; Sasaki, K.; Saito, R.; Izumida, W.; Kalbáč, Martin; Farhat, H.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 8 (2009), 081402-1-081402-4 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk ME09060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Fermi energy dependence * Raman spectroscopy * single waled carbon nanotubes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  13. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the bioavailability of PCBs in field-contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to black carbon is a well studied phenomenon. One emerging class of engineered black carbon materials are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Little research has investigated the potential of SWNT to adsorb and sequester HO...

  14. Electrode property of single-walled carbon nanotubes in all-solid-state lithium ion battery using polymer electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S., E-mail: kawasaki.shinji@nitech.ac.jp [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2016-07-06

    Electrode properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery were investigated using poly-ethylene oxide (PEO) solid electrolyte. Charge-discharge curves of SWCNTs in the solid electrolyte cell were successfully observed. It was found that PEO electrolyte decomposes on the surface of SWCNTs.

  15. Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Benthic Organisms at the Base of the Marine Food Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) increases over time, so does the potential for environmental release. This research aimed to determine the toxicity, bioavailability, and bioaccumulation of SWNTs in marine benthic organisms at the base of the food chain. The t...

  16. Formation of transition metal cluster adducts on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes: HRTEM studies

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.; Bekyarova, Elena B.; Wang, Qingxiao; Al-Hadeethi, Yas Fadel; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Agel, Faisel; Al-Marzouki, Fahad M.; Yaghmour, Saud Jamil; Haddon, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation of chromium clusters on the outer walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The clusters were obtained by reacting purified SWNTs with chromium hexacarbonyl in dibutyl ether at 100°C. The functionalized SWNTs were

  17. Control of unidirectional transport of single-file water molecules through carbon nanotubes in an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2011-01-25

    The transport of water molecules through nanopores is not only crucial to biological activities but also useful for designing novel nanofluidic devices. Despite considerable effort and progress that has been made, a controllable and unidirectional water flow is still difficult to achieve and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood. In this paper, using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically investigate the effects of an external electric field on the transport of single-file water molecules through a carbon nanotube (CNT). We find that the orientation of water molecules inside the CNT can be well-tuned by the electric field and is strongly coupled to the water flux. This orientation-induced water flux is energetically due to the asymmetrical water-water interaction along the CNT axis. The wavelike water density profiles are disturbed under strong field strengths. The frequency of flipping for the water dipoles will decrease as the field strength is increased, and the flipping events vanish completely for the relatively large field strengths. Most importantly, a critical field strength E(c) related to the water flux is found. The water flux is increased as E is increased for E ≤ E(c), while it is almost unchanged for E > E(c). Thus, the electric field offers a level of governing for unidirectional water flow, which may have some biological applications and provides a route for designing efficient nanopumps.

  18. Membrane/mediator-free rechargeable enzymatic biofuel cell utilizing graphene/single-wall carbon nanotube cogel electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alan S; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Geier, Steven M; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J; Islam, Mohammad F

    2015-02-25

    Enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs) utilize enzymes to convert chemical energy present in renewable biofuels into electrical energy and have shown much promise in the continuous powering of implantable devices. Currently, however, EBFCs are greatly limited in terms of power and operational stability with a majority of reported improvements requiring the inclusion of potentially toxic and unstable electron transfer mediators or multicompartment systems separated by a semipermeable membrane resulting in complicated setups. We report on the development of a simple, membrane/mediator-free EBFC utilizing novel electrodes of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotube cogel. These cogel electrodes had large surface area (∼ 800 m(2) g(-1)) that enabled high enzyme loading, large porosity for unhindered glucose transport and moderate electrical conductivity (∼ 0.2 S cm(-1)) for efficient charge collection. Glucose oxidase and bilirubin oxidase were physically adsorbed onto these electrodes to form anodes and cathodes, respectively, and the EBFC produced power densities up to 0.19 mW cm(-2) that correlated to 0.65 mW mL(-1) or 140 mW g(-1) of GOX with an open circuit voltage of 0.61 V. Further, the electrodes were rejuvenated by a simple wash and reloading procedure. We postulate these porous and ultrahigh surface area electrodes will be useful for biosensing applications, and will allow reuse of EBFCs.

  19. Visible-Blind UV Photodetector Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin Film/ZnO Vertical Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Suja, Mohammad; Chen, Mingguang; Bekyarova, Elena; Haddon, Robert C; Liu, Jianlin; Itkis, Mikhail E

    2017-10-25

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors based on heterojunctions of conventional (Ge, Si, and GaAs) and wide bandgap semiconductors have been recently demonstrated, but achieving high UV sensitivity and visible-blind photodetection still remains a challenge. Here, we utilized a semitransparent film of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SC-SWNTs) with an energy gap of 0.68 ± 0.07 eV in combination with a molecular beam epitaxy grown n-ZnO layer to build a vertical p-SC-SWNT/n-ZnO heterojunction-based UV photodetector. The resulting device shows a current rectification ratio of 10 3 , a current photoresponsivity up to 400 A/W in the UV spectral range from 370 to 230 nm, and a low dark current. The detector is practically visible-blind with the UV-to-visible photoresponsivity ratio of 10 5 due to extremely short photocarrier lifetimes in the one-dimensional SWNTs because of strong electron-phonon interactions leading to exciton formation. In this vertical configuration, UV radiation penetrates the top semitransparent SC-SWNT layer with low losses (10-20%) and excites photocarriers within the n-ZnO layer in close proximity to the p-SC-SWNT/n-ZnO interface, where electron-hole pairs are efficiently separated by a high built-in electric field associated with the heterojunction.

  20. A First-Principle Theoretical Study of Mechanical and Electronic Properties in Graphene Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The new three-dimensional structure that the graphene connected with SWCNTs (G-CNTs, Graphene Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes can solve graphene and CNTs′ problems. A comprehensive study of the mechanical and electrical performance of the junctions was performed by first-principles theory. There were eight types of junctions that were constituted by armchair and zigzag graphene and (3,3, (4,0, (4,4, and (6,0 CNTs. First, the junction strength was investigated. Generally, the binding energy of armchair G-CNTs was stronger than that of zigzag G-CNTs, and it was the biggest in the armchair G-CNTs (6,0. Likewise, the electrical performance of armchair G-CNTs was better than that of zigzag G-CNTs. Charge density distribution of G-CNTs (6,0 was the most homogeneous. Next, the impact factors of the electronic properties of armchair G-CNTs were investigated. We suggest that the band gap is increased with the length of CNTs, and its value should be dependent on the combined effect of both the graphene’s width and the CNTs’ length. Last, the relationship between voltage and current (U/I were studied. The U/I curve of armchair G-CNTs (6,0 possessed a good linearity and symmetry. These discoveries will contribute to the design and production of G-CNT-based devices.

  1. Increasing the luminous efficiency of an MEH-PPV based PLED using salmon DNA and single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhwal, Devinder; Singh, Inderpreet; Kumar, Jitender; Bhatia, C.S.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Mathur, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of a salmon deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based electron blocking layer and a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite-based electron transport layer on the performance of a poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) polymer light emitting diode (PLED) has been examined. The SWCNT network in the composite layer improves electron injection from cathode and the DNA blocks these high mobility electrons at the electron blocking layer-polymer interface, leading to high luminance from the device. The luminous efficiency of the PLED is increased ∼20 times compared to that of a PLED using only MEH-PPV. - Highlights: → We report fabrication of a high luminous efficiency MEH-PPV based polymer LED. → Salmon DNA-CTMA layer is used to block injected electrons in the polymer layer. → MEH-PPV-SWCNT composite is used to transport electrons in the polymer layer. → The luminous efficiency of the polymer LED thereby improves about 20 times.

  2. Tailoring crystallinity and configuration of silica nanotubes by electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tomitsugu, E-mail: taguchi.tomitsugu@jaea.go.jp; Yamaguchi, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: •Single-crystal SiO{sub 2} nanotubes were successfully synthesized for the first time. •The single-crystal SiO{sub 2} was α-crystobalite. •Desired area of single-crystal nanotube can be changed to amorphous by electron irradiation. •The configuration of nanotube can be controlled using the focused electron irradiation technique. -- Abstract: SiO{sub 2} nanotubes show potential in applications such as nanoscale electronic and optical devices, bioseparation, biocatalysis, and nanomedicine. As-grown SiO{sub 2} nanotubes in the previous studies always have an amorphous wall, and here we demonstrate the successful synthesis of single-crystal nanotubes for the first time by the heat treatment of SiC nanotubes at 1300 °C for 10 h under low-vacuum conditions. According to TEM observations, the single-crystal SiO{sub 2} was α-cristobalite. We also demonstrate that single-crystal SiO{sub 2} nanotubes can be transformed into amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanotubes by electron beam irradiation. Moreover, we synthesized a crystalline/amorphous SiO{sub 2} composite nanotube, in which crystalline and amorphous SiO{sub 2} coexisted in different localized regions. In addition, for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, controlling the configuration of the open end, the diameter, and capsulation of SiO{sub 2} nanotubes is crucial. We can also obturate, capsulate, and cut a SiO{sub 2} nanotube, as well as modify the inner diameter of the nanotube at a specific, nanometer-sized region using the focused electron beam irradiation technique.

  3. Impact of cell-voltage on energy and power performance of supercapacitors with single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izadi-Najafabadi, Ali; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N.; Iijima, Sumio [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Hatori, Hiroaki [Project Headquarters, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Hata, Kenji [Japan Science and Technology Agency JST, Kawaguchi (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We report the energy and power voltage-dependencies of supercapacitors using single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes. The energy density was dependent on the cell-voltage cubed (up to 4 V: E = 1.43 x V{sup 3}). The cubic relationship was attributed to the linear increase of the capacitance as a function of voltage, enabled by electrochemical doping. Furthermore, while up to 3.5 V, the maximum power rating of the nanotube electrodes increased as a function of the cell-voltage squared, beyond 3.5 V, a decline in power was observed as a result of depletion of the electrolyte's ions. (author)

  4. Local stabilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si(100)-2 x 1:H via nanoscale hydrogen desorption with an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Peter M; Lyding, Joseph W

    2007-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope (UHV-STM) was used to modify the interface between isolated ∼10 A-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the hydrogen-passivated Si(100) surface. Room-temperature UHV-STM desorption of hydrogen at the SWNT/H-Si(100) interface resulted in the local mechanical stabilization of tubes originally perturbed by the rastered STM tip under nominal imaging conditions. For the section of the SWNT contacted by depassivated Si, a topographic depression of 1.5 A (1 A) was measured in the case of parallel (nearly perpendicular) alignment between the tube axis and the Si dimer rows, in agreement with existing first-principles calculations. The compatibility of hydrogen-resist UHV-STM nanolithography with SWNTs adsorbed on H-Si(100) would enable the atomically precise placement of single molecules in proximity to the tube for the bottom-up fabrication of molecular electronic devices

  5. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burblies, Niklas; Schulze, Jennifer; Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes.

  6. The electrochemical signature of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes bearing electroactive groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Floch, Fabien; Thuaire, Aurelie; Simonato, Jean-Pierre; Bidan, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    We report the modification and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in view of molecular sensing applications. We found that ultrasonicated SWCNTs present sticking properties that make them adhere on electrode surfaces. This allows excellent characterization of SWCNTs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) before and after chemical functionalization with diazonium salts bearing electroactive groups. Bare SWCNTs presented distinct invariant shapes in CV, used as control curves, in comparison with functionalized SWCNTs for which specific signatures corresponding to the presence of grafted molecules were identified. According to the electronic substituents in the para position of the diazonium salts, divergent behaviours were observed for the grafting reactions. Diazonium salts having electrowithdrawing groups could be grafted without electrochemical induction whereas those bearing electron donating groups required a cathodic potential to generate the formation of the radical species.

  7. The electrochemical signature of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes bearing electroactive groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Floch, Fabien; Thuaire, Aurelie; Simonato, Jean-Pierre [LITEN/DTNM/LCRE, CEA-Grenoble 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Bidan, Gerard [INAC/DIR, CEA-Grenoble 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: jean-pierre.simonato@cea.fr

    2009-04-08

    We report the modification and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in view of molecular sensing applications. We found that ultrasonicated SWCNTs present sticking properties that make them adhere on electrode surfaces. This allows excellent characterization of SWCNTs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) before and after chemical functionalization with diazonium salts bearing electroactive groups. Bare SWCNTs presented distinct invariant shapes in CV, used as control curves, in comparison with functionalized SWCNTs for which specific signatures corresponding to the presence of grafted molecules were identified. According to the electronic substituents in the para position of the diazonium salts, divergent behaviours were observed for the grafting reactions. Diazonium salts having electrowithdrawing groups could be grafted without electrochemical induction whereas those bearing electron donating groups required a cathodic potential to generate the formation of the radical species.

  8. Novel strategy for diameter-selective separation and functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, R M; Afzali, A; Freitag, M; Mitzi, D B; Chen, Zh

    2008-02-01

    The problem of separating single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by diameter and/or chirality is one of the greatest impediments toward the widespread application of these promising materials in nanoelectronics. In this paper, we describe a novel physical-chemical method for diameter-selective CNT separation that is both simple and effective and that allows up-scaling to large volumes at modest cost. Separation is based on size-selective noncovalent matching of an appropriate anchor molecule to the wall of the CNT, enabling suspension of the CNTs in solvents in which they would otherwise not be soluble. We demonstrate size-selective separation in the 1-2 nm diameter range using easily synthesized oligo-acene adducts as a diameter-selective molecular anchor. CNT field effect transistors fabricated from diameter-selected CNTs show markedly improved electrical properties as compared to nonselected CNTs.

  9. Debundling of single-walled carbon nanotubes by using natural polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yangqiao; Gao Lian; Zheng Shan; Wang Yan; Sun Jing; Kajiura, Hisashi; Li Yongming; Noda, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Natural polyelectrolytes (NPs), including sodium lignosulfonate, humic acid and so forth, are reported for the first time to solubilize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water through a noncovalent interaction. A variety of methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), visible-near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectra, Raman spectra and zeta potential measurements, were used to characterize the NP-dispersed SWNT solutions. It is found that the SWNTs can be exfoliated into thin bundles or individual tubes, even at NP concentrations as low as 0.15 mg ml -1 . Their high performance is attributed to the abundance of aromatic groups and ionized groups in the NP molecules. This method of solubilization opens the way for exploiting new natural materials as SWNT solubilizers and may find applications in nanocomposites, self-assembly, and so forth

  10. Debundling of single-walled carbon nanotubes by using natural polyelectrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yangqiao [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Gao Lian [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zheng Shan [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang Yan [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Sun Jing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Kajiura, Hisashi [Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, Atsugi Tec. No. 2, 4-16-1 Okata Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan); Li Yongming [Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, Atsugi Tec. No. 2, 4-16-1 Okata Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan); Noda, Kazuhiro [Materials Laboratories, Sony Corporation, Atsugi Tec. No. 2, 4-16-1 Okata Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan)

    2007-09-12

    Natural polyelectrolytes (NPs), including sodium lignosulfonate, humic acid and so forth, are reported for the first time to solubilize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water through a noncovalent interaction. A variety of methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), visible-near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectra, Raman spectra and zeta potential measurements, were used to characterize the NP-dispersed SWNT solutions. It is found that the SWNTs can be exfoliated into thin bundles or individual tubes, even at NP concentrations as low as 0.15 mg ml{sup -1}. Their high performance is attributed to the abundance of aromatic groups and ionized groups in the NP molecules. This method of solubilization opens the way for exploiting new natural materials as SWNT solubilizers and may find applications in nanocomposites, self-assembly, and so forth.

  11. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda García-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  12. Diameter-Sensitive Breakdown of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes upon KOH Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianglin; Wu, Shuilin; Ni, Kun; Tan, Ziqi; Xu, Jin; Tao, Zhuchen; Zhu, Yanwu

    2017-07-19

    While potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation has been used to create pores in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improved energy-storage performance, the KOH activation mechanism of CNTs has been rarely investigated. In this work, the reaction between single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and KOH is studied in situ by thermogravimetric analysis coupled to infrared (IR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (MS). The IR and MS results clearly demonstrate the sequential evolution of CO, hydrocarbons, CO 2 , and H 2 O in the activation process. By using the radial breathing mode of Raman spectroscopy, a diameter-sensitive selectivity is observed in the reaction between SWCNTs and KOH, leading to a preferential distribution of SWCNTs with diameters larger than 1 nm after activation at 900 °C and a preferential removal of SWCNTs with diameters below 1 nm upon activation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Selective Growth of Metallic and Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Textured Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mira; Lee, Jongtaek; Park, Teahee; Lee, Junyoung; Yang, Jonghee; Yi, Whikun

    2016-03-01

    We fabricated the etched Si substrate having the pyramidal pattern size from 0.5 to 4.2 μm by changing the texturing process parameters, i.e., KOH concentration, etching time, and temperature. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were then synthesized on the etched Si substrates with different pyramidal pattern by chemical vapor deposition. We investigated the optical and electronic properties of SWNT film grown on the etched Si substrates of different morphology by using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. We confirmed that the morphology of substrate strongly affected the selective growth of the SWNT film. Semiconducting SWNTs were formed on larger pyramidal sized Si wafer with higher ratio compared with SWNTs on smaller pyramidal sized Si.

  14. Diameter Tuning of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Diffusion Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have realized a diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs by adjusting process gas pressures with plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Detailed photoluminescence measurements reveal that the diameter distribution of SWNTs clearly shifts to a large-diameter region with an increase in the pressure during plasma CVD, which is also confirmed by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Based on the systematical investigation, it is found that the main diameter of SWNTs is determined by the pressure during the heating in an atmosphere of hydrogen and the diameter distribution is narrowed by adjusting the pressure during the plasma generation. Our results could contribute to an application of SWNTs to high-performance thin-film transistors, which requires the diameter-controlled semiconductor-rich SWNTs.

  15. Vertical single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes grown from modified porous anodic alumina templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschmann, Matthew R; Franklin, Aaron D; Amama, Placidus B; Zakharov, Dmitri N; Stach, Eric A; Sands, Timothy D; Fisher, Timothy S

    2006-01-01

    Vertical single-walled and double-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT and DWNT) arrays have been grown using a catalyst embedded within the pore walls of a porous anodic alumina (PAA) template. The initial film structure consisted of a SiO x adhesion layer, a Ti layer, a bottom Al layer, a Fe layer, and a top Al layer deposited on a Si wafer. The Al and Fe layers were subsequently anodized to create a vertically oriented pore structure through the film stack. CNTs were synthesized from the catalyst layer by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The resulting structure is expected to form the basis for development of vertically oriented CNT-based electronics and sensors

  16. Light radiation through a transparent cathode plate with single-walled carbon nanotube field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, E.S.; Goak, J.C.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Han, J.H.; Lee, C.S.; Sok, J.H.; Seo, Y.H.; Park, K.S.; Lee, N.S.

    2010-01-01

    In the conventional carbon nanotube backlight units (CNT-BLUs), light passes through the phosphor-coated anode glass plate, which thus faces closely the thin film transistor (TFT) backplate of a liquid crystal display panel. This configuration makes heat dissipation structurally difficult because light emission and heat generation occur simultaneously at the anode. We propose a novel configuration of a CNT-BLU where the cathode rather than the anode faces the TFT backplate by turning it upside down. In this design, light passes through the transparent cathode glass plate while heating occurs at the anode. We demonstrated a novel design of CNT-BLU by fabricating transparent single-walled CNT field emitters on the cathode and by coating a reflecting metal layer on the anode. This study hopefully provides a clue to solve the anode-heating problem which would be inevitably confronted for high-luminance and large-area CNT-BLUs.

  17. Quantitative study of bundle size effect on thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; An, Hua; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-05-01

    Compared with isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), thermal conductivity is greatly impeded in SWNT bundles; however, the measurement of the bundle size effect is difficult. In this study, the number of SWNTs in a bundle was determined based on the transferred horizontally aligned SWNTs on a suspended micro-thermometer to quantitatively study the effect of the bundle size on thermal conductivity. Increasing the bundle size significantly degraded the thermal conductivity. For isolated SWNTs, thermal conductivity was approximately 5000 ± 1000 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature, three times larger than that of the four-SWNT bundle. The logarithmical deterioration of thermal conductivity resulting from the increased bundle size can be attributed to the increased scattering rate with neighboring SWNTs based on the kinetic theory.

  18. Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical assembly--methodology, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Peng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2010-04-06

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), as one of the most promising one-dimension nanomaterials due to its unique structure, peculiar chemical, mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties, have long been considered as an important building block to construct ordered alignments. Vertically aligned SWNTs (v-SWNTs) have been successfully prepared by using direct growth and chemical assembly strategies. In this review, we focus explicitly on the v-SWNTs fabricated via chemical assembly strategy. We provide the readers with a full and systematic summary covering the advances in all aspects of this area, including various approaches for the preparation of v-SWNTs using chemical assembly techniques, characterization, assembly kinetics, and electrochemical properties of v-SWNTs. We also review the applications of v-SWNTs in electrochemical and bioelectrochemical sensors, photoelectric conversion, and scanning probe microscopy.

  19. Growth mechanism and internal structure of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, Erik; Kadowaki, Masayuki; Ogura, Kazuaki; Okawa, Jun; Xiang, Rong; Zhang, Zhengyi; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    An in situ optical absorbance technique was used to monitor the growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) at various temperatures and pressures. The effects of the growth temperature and ethanol pressure on the initial growth rate and catalyst lifetime were investigated. It was found that the ideal pressure for VA-SWNT synthesis changes with the growth temperature, shifting toward higher pressure as the growth temperature increases. It was also found that the growth reaction is first-order below this ideal pressure. Additionally, the internal structure of the VA-SWNT film was observed at different depths into the film by transmission electron microscopy. The absence of large bundles was confirmed, and little change in the structure was observed to a depth of approximately 1 microm.

  20. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  1. Nonlinear free vibration of single walled Carbone NanoTubes conveying fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrar A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs conveying fluid are modeled and numerically simulated based on von Kármán geometric nonlinearity and Eringen’s nonlocal elasticity theory. The CNTs are modelled as nanobeams where the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are considered within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions are derived using the Hamilton’s principle and the nonlinear equation of motion is solved by the Galerkin’s method. The small scale parameter and the fluid-tube interaction effects on the dynamic behaviours of the CNT-fluid system as well as the instabilities induced by the fluid-velocity can be investigated. The critical fluid-velocity and frequency-amplitude relationships as well as the flutter and divergence instability types and the associated time responses are obtained based on the presented methodological approach.

  2. Fabrication and electrochemical properties of free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube film electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Zhi-Qiang; Ma Wen-Jun; Dong Hai-Bo; Li Jin-Zhu; Zhou Wei-Ya

    2011-01-01

    An easily manipulative approach was presented to fabricate electrodes using free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films grown directly by chemical vapor deposition. Electrochemical properties of the electrodes were investigated. In comparison with the post-deposited SWCNT papers, the directly grown SWCNT film electrodes manifested enhanced electrochemical properties and sensitivity of sensors as well as excellent electrocatalytic activities. A transition from macroelectrode to nanoelectrode behaviours was observed with the increase of scan rate. The heat treatment of the SWCNT film electrodes increased the current signals of electrochemical analyser and background current, because the heat-treatment of the SWCNTs in air could create more oxide defects on the walls of the SWCNTs and make the surfaces of SWCNTs more hydrophilic. The excellent electrochemical properties of the directly grown and heat-treated free-standing SWCNT film electrodes show the potentials in biological and electrocatalytic applications. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  3. Electrical transport through single-wall carbon nanotube-anodic aluminum oxide-aluminum heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukkola, Jarmo; Rautio, Aatto; Sala, Giovanni; Pino, Flavio; Toth, Geza; Leino, Anne-Riikka; Maeklin, Jani; Jantunen, Heli; Uusimaeki, Antti; Kordas, Krisztian; Gracia, Eduardo; Terrones, Mauricio; Shchukarev, Andrey; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum foils were anodized in sulfuric acid solution to form thick porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films of thickness ∼6 μm. Electrodes of carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films were inkjet printed on the anodic oxide layer and the electrical characteristics of the as-obtained SWCNT-AAO-Al structures were studied. Nonlinear current-voltage transport and strong temperature dependence of conduction through the structure was measured. The microstructure and chemical composition of the anodic oxide layer was analyzed using transmission and scanning electron microscopy as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Schottky emission at the SWCNT-AAO and AAO-Al interfaces allowed by impurity states in the anodic aluminum oxide film together with ionic surface conduction on the pore walls of AAO gives a reasonable explanation for the measured electrical conduction. Calcined AAO is proposed as a dielectric material for SWCNT-field effect transistors.

  4. Hardness of high-pressure high-temperature treated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Nojima, Y.; Yokomae, T.; Okino, F.; Touhara, H.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) treatments of high quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) over a wide pressure-temperature range up to 13 GPa-873 K and have investigated the hardness of the HPHT-treated SWCNTs using a nanoindentation technique. It was found that the hardness of the SWCNTs treated at pressures greater than 11 GPa and at temperatures higher than 773 K is about 10 times greater than that of the SWCNTs treated at low temperature. It was also found that the hardness change of the SWCNTs is related to the structural change by the HPHT treatments which was based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements

  5. Curvature dependence of single-walled carbon nanotubes for SO2 adsorption and oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqiu; Yin, Shi; Li, Yueli; Cen, Wanglai; Li, Jianjun; Yin, Huaqiang

    2017-05-01

    Porous carbon-based catalysts showing high catalytic activity for SO2 oxidation to SO3 is often used in flue gas desulfurization. Their catalytic activity has been ascribed in many publications to the microporous structure and the effect of its spatial confinement. First principles method was used to investigate the adsorption and oxidation of SO2 on the inner and outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameters. It is interesting to found that there is a direct correlation: the barrier for the oxidation O_SWCNT + SO2 → SO3 + SWCNT monotonically decreases with the increase of SWCNTs' curvature. The oxygen functional located at the inner wall of SWCNTs with small radius is of higher activity for SO2 oxidation, which is extra enhanced by the spatial confinement effects of SWCNTs. These findings can be useful for the development of carbon-based catalysts and provide clues for the optimization and design of porous carbon catalysts.

  6. Vibration analysis of viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes resting on a viscoelastic foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Da Peng; Lei, Yong Jun; Shen, Zhi Bin; Wang, Cheng Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Vibration responses were investigated for a viscoelastic Single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) resting on a viscoelastic foundation. Based on the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model, velocity-dependent external damping and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations were derived. The Transfer function method (TFM) was then used to compute the natural frequencies for general boundary conditions and foundations. In particular, the exact analytical expressions of both complex natural frequencies and critical viscoelastic parameters were obtained for the Kelvin-Voigt visco-SWCNTs with full foundations and certain boundary conditions, and several physically intuitive special cases were discussed. Substantial nonlocal effects, the influence of geometric and physical parameters of the SWCNT and the viscoelastic foundation were observed for the natural frequencies of the supported SWCNTs. The study demonstrates the efficiency and robustness of the developed model for the vibration of the visco-SWCNT-viscoelastic foundation coupling system

  7. Influence of the microstructure on the supercapacitive behavior of polyaniline/single-wall carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Vinay; Miura, Norio [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Environment and Energy, KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2006-06-19

    Polyaniline/single-wall carbon nanotube (PANI/SWCNT) composites were prepared by in situ potentiostatic deposition of PANI onto SWCNTs at the potential of 0.75V versus SCE, with the aim to investigate the influence of microstructure on the specific capacitance of PANI/SWCNT composites. It was found that the specific capacitance of the PANI/SWCNT composites is strongly influenced by their microstructure, which is correlated to the wt.% of the PANI deposited onto the SWCNTs. The optimum condition, corresponding to the highest specific capacitance, 463Fg{sup -1} (at 10mAcm{sup -2}), was obtained for 73wt.% PANI deposited onto SWCNTs. The specific capacitance of the PANI/SWCNT composite electrode was highly stable, with a capacitive decrease of 5% during the first 500 cycles and just 1% during the next 1000 cycles, indicative of the excellent cyclic stability of the composite for supercapacitor applications. (author)

  8. Raman spectroscopic investigations of swift heavy ion irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejniczak, A.; Skuratov, V.A.; Lukaszewicz, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report the results on swift heavy ion irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Buckypapers, prepared of CVD grown, SWNTs were irradiated at room temperature with 167 MeV Xe ions to fluences in the range of 6×10 11 - 6.5×10 13 cm -2 and investigated using Raman spectroscopy. We observed a rich set of features in the intermediate frequency mode region. Some of them, being defect-induced, resembled fairly well the phonon density of states (DOS) of nanocrystalline glassy carbon. Analysis of the RBM modes has shown that the broader metallic tubes are characterized by higher radiation stability than thinner semiconducting ones. (authors)

  9. Hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes: methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Tessier, A.; Cossement, D.; Lafi, L.; Bose, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    We present high sensitivity gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen sorption measurement systems adapted for in situ conditioning under high temperature and high vacuum. These systems, which allow for precise measurements on small samples and thorough degassing, are used for sorption measurements on carbon nanostructures. We developed one volumetric system for the pressure range 0-1 bar, and two gravimetric systems for 0-1 bar and 0-100 bars. The use of both gravimetric and volumetric methods allows for the cross-checking of the results. The accuracy of the systems has been determined from hydrogen absorption measurements on palladium. The accuracies of the 0-1 bar volumetric and gravimetric systems are about 10 μg and 20 μg respectively. The accuracy of the 0-100 bars gravimetric system is about 20 μg. Hydrogen sorption measurements on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal-incorporated- SWNTs are presented. (author)

  10. Controlling the growth of vertically aligned single walled carbon nanotubes from ethanol for electrochemical supercapacitor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M.A.; Mohamed, M.A.; Shikoh, E.; Fujiwara, A.; Shimoda, T. [Japan Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been proven suitable for use as electrodes in electrochemical capacitors (EC). In this study, alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD) was used to grow vertically-aligned SWCNTs (VASWCNTs). An aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-supported cobalt (Co) catalyst and high purity ethanol carbon feedstock was used for the growth process. The Al layer and Co thin films were deposited using an electron beam evaporator. CNT growth was optimized using Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates. An atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to characterize the synthesis of the catalyst nanoparticles and their subsequent growth. Raman spectrum of the samples demonstrated peaks of radial breathing mode (RBM) from 100 to 250 per cm. Results demonstrated that the CNTs were successfully grown on the conducting metal substrate using the ACCVD process. 4 refs.

  11. Surface tailored single walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeti, Kota V. M. K.; Jha, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    A strategy for tuning the surface property of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for enhanced methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) along with methanol tolerance is presented. The surface functionality is tailored using controlled acid and base treatment. Acid treatment leads to the attachment of carboxylic carbon (CC) fragments to SWNT making it hydrophilic (P3-SWNT). Base treatment of P3-SWNT with 0.05 M NaOH reduces the CCs and makes it hydrophobic (P33-SWNT). Pt catalyst supported on the P3-SWNT possesses enhanced MOR whereas that supported on P33-SWNT not only enhances ORR kinetics but also possess good tolerance towards methanol oxidation as verified by the electrochemical technique.

  12. Purity Evaluation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Thermogravimetric Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goak, Jeung Choon; Kim, Tae Yang; Jung, Jongwan; Seo, Young-Soo; Lee, Naesung; Sok, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the purity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the arc-synthesized SWCNT samples by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The as-produced SWCNT samples were heat-treated in air for 20 h at 275-475°C and characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopes and TGA to establish oxidation temperature ranges of SWCNTs and carbonaceous impurities comprising the samples. Based on these oxidation temperature ranges, derivative thermogravimetric curves were deconvoluted, and differentiated peaks were assigned to SWCNTs and carbonaceous impurities. The compositions and the SWCNT purities of the samples were obtained simply by calculating the areal ratios under the deconvoluted curves. TGA studies on purity evaluation and thermal stabilities of SWCNTs and carbonaceous impurities are likely to provide us with a simple route of thermal oxidation purification to acquire high-purity SWCNT samples.

  13. Purity and Defect Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumitsu Miyata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the purity and defects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced by various synthetic methods including chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge, and laser ablation. The SWCNT samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Raman spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of SEM images suggested that the G-band Raman intensity serves as an index for the purity. By contrast, the intensity ratio of G-band to D-band (G/D ratio reflects both the purity and the defect density of SWCNTs. The combination of G-band intensity and G/D ratio is useful for a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the purity and defect density of a SWCNT sample.

  14. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili; Abdurahman, Ayjamal; Gü lseren, Oğuz; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  15. Interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes: Role of surfactant contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larciprete, R.; Goldoni, A.; Lizzit, S.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes in the form of a commercial bucky paper was investigated by high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. Sodium contamination was found in the sample, which was completely removed only after prolonged heating at 1250 K. The C 1s core level spectrum measured on the sample annealed to 1020 K dramatically changed upon exposure to molecular oxygen. On the contrary, when exposing the Na-free SWNTs to several KL of O 2 , the sample remained oxygen free and no modification in the C 1s core level was observed. Therefore the observed sensitivity of the sample to O 2 was due to a Na mediated oxidation, determining a charge transfer from the C tubes to the Na-O complex

  16. Ion mass dependence for low energy channeling in single-wall nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liping; Zhu Zhiyuan; Li Yong; Zhu Dezhang; Xia Huihao

    2008-01-01

    An Monte Carlo (MC) simulation program has been used to study ion mass dependence for the low energy channeling of natural- and pseudo-Ar ions in single-wall nanotubes. The MC simulations show that the channeling critical angle Ψ C obeys the (E) -1/2 and the (M 1 ) -1/2 rules, where E is the incident energy and M 1 is the ion mass. The reason for this may be that the motion of the channeled (or de-channeled) ions should be correlated with both the incident energy E and the incident momentum (2M 1 E) 1/2 , in order to obey the conservation of energy and momentum

  17. The adsorption of L-phenylalanine on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Lingyu; Liu, Quanrun; Li, Yongdan; Wang, Chen

    2009-02-01

    A simple and green approach was proceeded to obtain a stable single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/L-phenylalanine (Phe) solution. The oxidized SWNTs (OSWNT) were used in this work. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectrometer, Fourier transform-infrared resonance (FT-IR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were joined together to investigate the interaction between OSWNT and Phe. The OSWNT became soluble in the water and formed a stable solution since the Phe was adsorbed. The absorbed amount of Phe on the OSWNT is around 33 wt%. Adsorption of the Phe was mainly carried out on the OSWNT with smaller diameters. The Phe molecules were absorbed on the OSWNT by conjunct interaction of the pi-pi stacking, hydrogen bond and part of covalent bond.

  18. Process for derivatizing carbon nanotubes with diazonium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention incorporates new processes for the chemical modification of carbon nanotubes. Such processes involve the derivatization of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes, including small diameter (ca. 0.7 nm) single-wall carbon nanotubes, with diazonium species. The method allows the chemical attachment of a variety of organic compounds to the side and ends of carbon nanotubes. These chemically modified nanotubes have applications in polymer composite materials, molecular electronic applications and sensor devices. The methods of derivatization include electrochemical induced reactions thermally induced reactions (via in-situ generation of diazonium compounds or pre-formed diazonium compounds), and photochemically induced reactions. The derivatization causes significant changes in the spectroscopic properties of the nanotubes. The estimated degree of functionality is ca. 1 out of every 20 to 30 carbons in a nanotube bearing a functionality moiety. Such electrochemical reduction processes can be adapted to apply site-selective chemical functionalization of nanotubes. Moreover, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the derivatized nanotubes are chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as, mechanical strength or electrical conductivity) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. Furthermore, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the groups can be polymerized to form a polymer that includes carbon nanotubes ##STR00001##.

  19. Charge calculation studies done on a single walled carbon nanotube using MOPAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, S.; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Chaturvedi, S.

    2018-04-01

    Dipole symmetry of induced charges on DWNTs are required for their application as a nanomotor. Earlier a molecular dynamics analysis was performed for a double-walled carbon-nanotube based motor driven by an externally applied sinusoidally varying electric field. One of the ways to get such a system is chemical or end functionalization, which promises to accomplish this specific and rare configuration of the induced charges on the surface of the carbon nanotube (CNT). CNTs are also a promising system for attaching biomolecules for bio-related applications. In an earlier work, ab initio calculations were done to study the electronic and structural properties of the groups -COOH, -OH, -NH2 and -CONH2 functionalized to an (8, 0) SWNT. The systems were shown to have a very stable interaction with the CNTs. The exterior surface of the SWNT is found to be reactive to NH2 (amidogen). In this work, charge calculations are done on a CNT using MOPAC, which is a semi empirical quantum chemistry software package. As a first step, we calculate the effect of NH2 functionalization to a (5,0) SWNT of infinite length. The symmetric charge distribution of the bare SWNT is observed to be disturbed on addition of a single NH2 in the close proximity of the SWNT. A net positive and opposite charge is observed to be induced on the opposite sides of the nanotube circumference, which is, in turn, imperative for the nanomotor applications. The minimum and maximum value of the charge on any atom is observed to increase from - 0.3 to 0.6 and from - 0.3 to - 1.8 electronic charge as compared to the bare SWNT. This fluctuation of the surface charge to larger values than bare CNT, can be attributed to the coulomb repulsion between NH2 and the rest of the charge on the surface which results into minimizing the total energy of the system. No such opposite polarity of charges are observed on adding NH2 to each ring of the SWNT implying addition of a single amidogen to be the most appropriate

  20. Interaction of amidated single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by multiple spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lili [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); The Nursing College of Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Lin, Rui [Yancheng Health Vocational and Technical College, Yancheng 224005 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Sun, Meiling, E-mail: sml-nir@sohu.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Jiang, Li; Gao, Mengmeng [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the detailed interaction between BSA and amidated single walled carbon nanotubes (e-SWNTs) in vitro. Ethylenediamine (EDA) was successfully linked on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via acylation to improve their dispersion and to introduce active groups. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as the template protein to inspect the interaction of e-SWNTs with protein. Decreases in fluorescence intensity of BSA induced by e-SWNTs demonstrated the occurrence of interaction between BSA and e-SWNTs. Quenching parameters and different absorption spectra for e-SWNTs–BSA show that the quenching effect of e-SWNTs was static quenching. Hydrophobic force had a leading contribution to the binding roles of BSA on e-SWNTs, which was confirmed by positive enthalpy change and entropy change. The interference of Na{sup +} with the quenching effect of e-SWNTs authenticated that electrostatic force existed in the interactive process simultaneously. The hydrophobicity of amino acid residues markedly increased with the addition of e-SWNTs viewed from UV spectra of BSA. The content of α-helix structure in BSA decreased by 6.8% due to the addition of e-SWNTs, indicating that e-SWNTs have an effect on the secondary conformation of BSA. -- Highlights: • The interaction between e-SWNTs and BSA was investigated by multiple spectroscopic methods. • Quenching mechanism was static quenching. • Changes in structure of BSA were inspected by synchronous fluorescence, UV–vis and CD spectrum.