WorldWideScience

Sample records for single molecular level

  1. Molecular Processes Studied at a Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Nanostructures and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilko Bald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA origami nanostructures allow for the arrangement of different functionalities such as proteins, specific DNA structures, nanoparticles, and various chemical modifications with unprecedented precision. The arranged functional entities can be visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM which enables the study of molecular processes at a single-molecular level. Examples comprise the investigation of chemical reactions, electron-induced bond breaking, enzymatic binding and cleavage events, and conformational transitions in DNA. In this paper, we provide an overview of the advances achieved in the field of single-molecule investigations by applying atomic force microscopy to functionalized DNA origami substrates.

  2. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  3. Molecular electronics--resonant transport through single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörtscher, Emanuel; Riel, Heike

    2010-01-01

    The mechanically controllable break-junction technique (MCBJ) enables us to investigate charge transport through an individually contacted and addressed molecule in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment at variable temperature ranging from room temperature down to 4 K. Using a statistical measurement and analysis approach, we acquire current-voltage (I-V) characteristics during the repeated formation, manipulation, and breaking of a molecular junction. At low temperatures, voltages accessing the first molecular orbitals in resonance can be applied, providing spectroscopic information about the junction's energy landscape, in particular about the molecular level alignment in respect to the Fermi energy of the electrodes. Thereby, we can investigate the non-linear transport properties of various types of functional molecules and explore their potential use as functional building blocks for future nano-electronics. An example will be given by the reversible and controllable switching between two distinct conductive states of a single molecule. As a proof-of-principle for functional molecular devices, a single-molecule memory element will be demonstrated.

  4. Molecular-level chemistry of model single-crystal oxide surfaces with model halogenated compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Kaveh

    Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) have been used to investigate, at a molecular level, the chemistry of different terminations of single crystal iron-oxide surfaces with probe molecules (CCl4 and D2O). Comparisons of the reactivity of these surfaces towards CCl4, indicate that the presence of an uncapped surface Fe cation (strong Lewis acid site) and an adjacent oxygen site capped by that cation can effect the C-Cl bond cleavage in CCl4, resulting in dissociatively adsorbed Cl-adatoms and carbon-containing fragments. If in addition to these sites, an uncapped surface oxygen (Lewis base) site is also available, the carbon-containing moiety can then move that site, coordinate itself with that uncapped oxygen, and stabilize itself. At a later step, the carbon-containing fragment may form a strong covalent bond with the uncapped oxygen and may even abstract that surface oxygen. On the other hand, if an uncapped oxygen is not available to stabilize the carbon-containing fragment, the surface coordination will not occur and upon the subsequent thermal annealing of the surface the Cl-adatoms and the carbon-containing fragments will recombine and desorb as CCl4. Finally, the presence of surface deuteroxyls blocking the strong Lewis acid and base sites of the reactive surface, passivates this surface. Such a deuteroxylated surface will be unreactive towards CCl 4. Such a molecular level understanding of the surface chemistry of metal-oxides will have applications in the areas of selective catalysis, including environmental catalysis, and chemical sensor technology.

  5. Tuning electron transport through a single molecular junction by bridge modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Qiu, Qi; Luo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of controlling electron transport in a single molecular junction represents the ultimate goal of molecular electronics. Here, we report that the modification of bridging group makes it possible to improve the performance and obtain new functions in a single cross-conjugated molecular junction, designed from a recently synthesized bipolar molecule bithiophene naphthalene diimide. Our first principles results show that the bipolar characteristic remains after the molecule was modified and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. Rectifying is the intrinsic characteristic of the molecular junction and its performance can be enhanced by replacing the saturated bridging group with an unsaturated group. A further improvement of the rectifying and a robust negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior can be achieved by the modification of unsaturated bridge. It is revealed that the modification can induce a deviation angle about 4° between the donor and the acceptor π-conjugations, making it possible to enhance the communication between the two π systems. Meanwhile, the low energy frontier orbitals of the junction can move close to the Fermi level and encounter in energy at certain biases, thus a transport channel with a considerable transmission can be formed near the Fermi level only at a narrow bias regime, resulting in the improvement of rectifying and the robust NDR behavior. This finding could be useful for the design of single molecular devices.

  6. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  7. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... and single-molecule levels.We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized...... electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...

  8. Single-molecule electron tunnelling through multiple redox levels with environmental relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    represent the substrate and tip in electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. An equivalent three-electrode configuration represents a molecular single-electron transistor in which the enclosing electrodes constitute source and drain, and the reference electrode the gate. Current-bias voltage...... relations at fixed electrochemical overpotential or gate voltage, and current-overpotential or current-gate voltage relations at fixed bias voltage are equivalent in the two systems. Due to the activation-less nature of the processes, electron flow between the electrodes through the molecular redox levels...... level(s) subsequent to electron transfer. Several physical mechanisms can be distinguished and distinctive current-overpotential/gate voltage or current-bias voltage relations obtained. These reflect electronic level separation, environmental nuclear reorganisation, and coherent or incoherent multi...

  9. Fermi level alignment in molecular nanojunctions and its relation to charge transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, Robert; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    The alignment of the Fermi level of a metal electrode within the gap of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of a molecule is a key quantity in molecular electronics, which can vary the electron transparency of a single-molecule junction...... by orders of magnitude. We present a quantitative analysis of the relation between this level alignment (which can be estimated from charging free molecules) and charge transfer for bipyridine and biphenyl dithiolate (BPDT) molecules attached to gold leads based on density functional theory calculations...... end of the gap in the transmission function for bipyridine and at its lower end for BPDT....

  10. Nonlinear and Nonsymmetric Single-Molecule Electronic Properties Towards Molecular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-09-05

    This review highlights molecular design for nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronic properties such as rectification, negative differential resistance, and switching, which are important components of future single-molecule information processing devices. Perspectives on integrated "molecular circuits" are also provided. Nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronics can be designed by utilizing (1) asymmetric molecular cores, (2) asymmetric anchoring groups, (3) an asymmetric junction environment, and (4) asymmetric electrode materials. This review mainly focuses on the design of molecular cores.

  11. Molecular spintronics using single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Lapo; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    A revolution in electronics is in view, with the contemporary evolution of the two novel disciplines of spintronics and molecular electronics. A fundamental link between these two fields can be established using molecular magnetic materials and, in particular, single-molecule magnets. Here, we review the first progress in the resulting field, molecular spintronics, which will enable the manipulation of spin and charges in electronic devices containing one or more molecules. We discuss the advantages over more conventional materials, and the potential applications in information storage and processing. We also outline current challenges in the field, and propose convenient schemes to overcome them.

  12. Experimental thermodynamics of single molecular motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor is a nano-sized chemical engine that converts chemical free energy to mechanical motions. Hence, the energetics is as important as kinetics in order to understand its operation principle. We review experiments to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of a rotational F1-ATPase motor (F1-motor) at a single-molecule level. We show that the F1-motor achieves 100% thermo dynamic efficiency at the stalled state. Furthermore, the motor reduces the internal irreversible heat inside the motor to almost zero and achieves a highly-efficient free energy transduction close to 100% during rotations far from quasistatic process. We discuss the mechanism of how the F1-motor achieves such a high efficiency, which highlights the remarkable property of the nano-sized engine F1-motor.

  13. Spin models for the single molecular magnet Mn12-AC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saqer, Mohamad A.

    2005-11-01

    The single molecular magnet (SMM) Mn12-AC attracted the attention of scientists since the discovery of its magnetic hystereses which are accompanied by sudden jumps in magnetic moments at low temperature. Unlike conventional bulk magnets, hysteresis in SMMs is of molecular origin. This qualifies them as candidates for next generation of high density storage media where a molecule which is at most few nanometers in size can be used to store a bit of information. However, the jumps in these hystereses, due to spin tunneling, can lead to undesired loss of information. Mn12-AC molecule contains twelve magnetic ions antiferromagnetically coupled by exchanges leading to S = 10 ground state manifold. The magnetic ions are surrounded by ligands which isolate them magnetically from neighboring molecules. The lowest state of S = 9 manifold is believed to lie at about 40 K above the ground state. Therefore, at low temperatures, the molecule is considered as a single uncoupled moment of spin S = 10. Such model has been used widely to understand phenomena exhibited by the molecule at low temperatures including the tunneling of its spin, while a little attention has been paid for the multi-spin nature of the molecule. Using the 8-spin model, we demonstrate that in order to understand the phenomena of tunneling, a full spin description of the molecule is required. We utilized a calculation scheme where a fraction of energy levels are used in the calculations and the influence of levels having higher energy is neglected. From the dependence of tunnel splittings on the number of states include, we conclude that models based on restricting the number of energy levels (single-spin and 8-spin models) lead to unreliable results of tunnel splitting calculations. To attack the full 12-spin model, we employed the Davidson algorithm to calculated lowest energy levels produced by exchange interactions and single ion anisotropies. The model reproduces the anisotropy properties at low

  14. Kondo peak splitting and Kondo dip in single molecular magnet junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Pengbin, E-mail: 120233951@qq.com [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Shi, Yunlong; Sun, Zhu [Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Nie, Yi-Hang [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Luo, Hong-Gang [Center for Interdisciplinary Studies & Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the MoE, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Many factors containing bias, spin–orbit coupling, magnetic fields applied, and so on can strongly influence the Kondo effect, and one of the consequences is Kondo peak splitting (KPS). It is natural that KPS should also appear when another spin degree of freedom is involved. In this work we study the KPS effects of single molecular magnets (SMM) coupled with two metallic leads in low-temperature regime. It is found that the Kondo transport properties are strongly influenced by the exchange coupling and anisotropy of the magnetic core. By employing Green's function method in Hubbard operator representation, we give an analytical expression for local retarded Green's function of SMM and discussed its low-temperature transport properties. We find that the anisotropy term behaves as a magnetic field and the splitting behavior of exchange coupling is quite similar to the spin–orbit coupling. These splitting behaviors are explained by introducing inter-level or intra-level transitions, which account for the seven-peak splitting structure. Moreover, we find a Kondo dip at Fermi level under proper parameters. These Kondo peak splitting behaviors in SMM deepen our understanding to Kondo physics and should be observed in the future experiments. - Highlights: • We study Kondo peak splitting in single molecular magnets. • We study Kondo effect by Hubbard operator Green's function method. • We find Kondo peak splitting structures and a Kondo dip at Fermi level. • The exchange coupling and magnetic anisotropy induce fine splitting structure. • The splitting structures are explained by inter-level or intra-level transitions.

  15. Protein Expression Analyses at the Single Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masae Ohno

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level.

  16. Extracting physics of life at the molecular level: A review of single-molecule data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, Warren; Sarkar, Susanta K

    2015-06-01

    Studying individual biomolecules at the single-molecule level has proved very insightful recently. Single-molecule experiments allow us to probe both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties as well as make quantitative connections with ensemble experiments and equilibrium thermodynamics. However, it is important to be careful about the analysis of single-molecule data because of the noise present and the lack of theoretical framework for processes far away from equilibrium. Biomolecular motion, whether it is free in solution, on a substrate, or under force, involves thermal fluctuations in varying degrees, which makes the motion noisy. In addition, the noise from the experimental setup makes it even more complex. The details of biologically relevant interactions, conformational dynamics, and activities are hidden in the noisy single-molecule data. As such, extracting biological insights from noisy data is still an active area of research. In this review, we will focus on analyzing both fluorescence-based and force-based single-molecule experiments and gaining biological insights at the single-molecule level. Inherently nonequilibrium nature of biological processes will be highlighted. Simulated trajectories of biomolecular diffusion will be used to compare and validate various analysis techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular analysis of single oocyst of Eimeria by whole genome amplification (WGA) based nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunzhou; Tao, Geru; Cui, Yujuan; Lv, Qiyao; Xie, Li; Li, Yuan; Suo, Xun; Qin, Yinghe; Xiao, Lihua; Liu, Xianyong

    2014-09-01

    PCR-based molecular tools are widely used for the identification and characterization of protozoa. Here we report the molecular analysis of Eimeria species using combined methods of whole genome amplification (WGA) and nested PCR. Single oocyst of Eimeria stiedai or Eimeriamedia was directly used for random amplification of the genomic DNA with either primer extension preamplification (PEP) or multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and then the WGA product was used as template in nested PCR with species-specific primers for ITS-1, 18S rDNA and 23S rDNA of E. stiedai and E. media. WGA-based PCR was successful for the amplification of these genes from single oocyst. For the species identification of single oocyst isolated from mixed E. stiedai or E. media, the results from WGA-based PCR were exactly in accordance with those from morphological identification, suggesting the availability of this method in molecular analysis of eimerian parasites at the single oocyst level. WGA-based PCR method can also be applied for the identification and genetic characterization of other protists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes: Role of surfactant contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larciprete, R.; Goldoni, A.; Lizzit, S.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of molecular oxygen with single wall nanotubes in the form of a commercial bucky paper was investigated by high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. Sodium contamination was found in the sample, which was completely removed only after prolonged heating at 1250 K. The C 1s core level spectrum measured on the sample annealed to 1020 K dramatically changed upon exposure to molecular oxygen. On the contrary, when exposing the Na-free SWNTs to several KL of O 2 , the sample remained oxygen free and no modification in the C 1s core level was observed. Therefore the observed sensitivity of the sample to O 2 was due to a Na mediated oxidation, determining a charge transfer from the C tubes to the Na-O complex

  19. Single Molecular Level Probing of Structure and Dynamics of Papain Under Denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Chaudhury, Apala; Das, Nilimesh; Sen, Pratik

    2017-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease enzyme present in papaya and known to help in digesting peptide. Thus the structure and function of the active site of papain is of interest. The objective of present study is to unveil the overall structural transformation and the local structural change around the active site of papain as a function of chemical denaturant. Papain has been tagged at Cys-25 with a thiol specific fluorescence probe N-(7- dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA). Guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) has been used as the chemical denaturant. Steady state, time-resolved, and single molecular level fluorescence techniques was applied to map the change in the local environment. It is found that papain undergoes a two-step denaturation in the presence of GnHCl. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) data indicate that the size (hydrodynamic diameter) of native papain is ~36.8 Å, which steadily increases to ~53 Å in the presence of 6M GnHCl. FCS study also reveals that the conformational fluctuation time of papain is 6.3 µs in its native state, which decreased to 2.7 µs in the presence of 0.75 M GnHCl. Upon further increase in GnHCl concentration the conformational fluctuation time increase monotonically till 6 M GnHCl, where the time constant is measured as 14 µs. On the other hand, the measurement of ellipticity, hence the helical structure, by circular dichroism spectroscopy is found to be incapable to capture such structural transformation. It is concluded that in the presence of small amount of GnHCl the active site of papain takes up a more compact structure (although the overall size increases) than in the native state, which has been designated as the intermediate state. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Size-dependent single electron transfer and semi-metal-to-insulator transitions in molecular metal oxide electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliou, Angelika; Bouroushian, Mirtat; Douvas, Antonios M.; Skoulatakis, George; Kennou, Stella; Glezos, Nikos

    2018-07-01

    All-inorganic self-arranged molecular transition metal oxide hyperstructures based on polyoxometalate molecules (POMs) are fabricated and tested as electronically tunable components in emerging electronic devices. POM hyperstructures reveal great potential as charging nodes of tunable charging level for molecular memories and as enhancers of interfacial electron/hole injection for photovoltaic stacks. STM, UPS, UV–vis spectroscopy and AFM measurements show that this functionality stems from the films’ ability to structurally tune their HOMO–LUMO levels and electron localization length at room temperature. By adapting POM nanocluster size in solution, self-doping and current modulation of four orders of magnitude is monitored on a single nanocluster on SiO2 at voltages as low as 3 Volt. Structurally driven insulator-to-semi-metal transitions and size-dependent current regulation through single electron tunneling are demonstrated and examined with respect to the stereochemical and electronic structure of the molecular entities. This extends the value of self-assembly as a tool for correlation length and electronic properties tuning and demonstrate POM hyperstructures’ plausibility for on-chip molecular electronics operative at room temperature.

  1. Size-dependent single electron transfer and semi-metal-to-insulator transitions in molecular metal oxide electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliou, Angelika; Bouroushian, Mirtat; Douvas, Antonios M; Skoulatakis, George; Kennou, Stella; Glezos, Nikos

    2018-07-06

    All-inorganic self-arranged molecular transition metal oxide hyperstructures based on polyoxometalate molecules (POMs) are fabricated and tested as electronically tunable components in emerging electronic devices. POM hyperstructures reveal great potential as charging nodes of tunable charging level for molecular memories and as enhancers of interfacial electron/hole injection for photovoltaic stacks. STM, UPS, UV-vis spectroscopy and AFM measurements show that this functionality stems from the films' ability to structurally tune their HOMO-LUMO levels and electron localization length at room temperature. By adapting POM nanocluster size in solution, self-doping and current modulation of four orders of magnitude is monitored on a single nanocluster on SiO 2 at voltages as low as 3 Volt. Structurally driven insulator-to-semi-metal transitions and size-dependent current regulation through single electron tunneling are demonstrated and examined with respect to the stereochemical and electronic structure of the molecular entities. This extends the value of self-assembly as a tool for correlation length and electronic properties tuning and demonstrate POM hyperstructures' plausibility for on-chip molecular electronics operative at room temperature.

  2. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  3. Studies of G-quadruplex DNA structures at the single molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Sofie Louise

    2015-01-01

    Folding of G-quaduplex structures adopted by the human telomeric repeat is here studied by single molecule FRET microscopy. This method allows for the investigation of G-quadruplex structures and their conformational dynamic. Telomeres are located at the ends of our chromosomes and end in a single...... with human telomeric repeat adopt several different G-quadruplex conformations in the presence of K+ ions. G-quadruplexes inhibit telomerase activity and are therefore potential targets for anti-cancer drugs, which can be small molecule ligands capable of stabilizing G-quadruplex structures. Understanding...... range. FRET spectroscopy can be performed on an ensemble of molecules, or on the single molecule level. In single molecule FRET experiments it is possible to follow the behaviour in time for each molecule independently, allowing insight into both dynamically and statistically heterogeneous molecular...

  4. Preparation and coherent manipulation of pure quantum states of a single molecular ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Kurz, Christoph; Hume, David B.; Plessow, Philipp N.; Leibrandt, David R.; Leibfried, Dietrich

    2017-05-01

    Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and atomic ions has led to advances including the observation of exotic phases of matter, the development of precision sensors and state-of-the-art atomic clocks. The same level of control in molecules could also lead to important developments such as controlled chemical reactions and sensitive probes of fundamental theories, but the vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom in molecules pose a challenge for controlling their quantum mechanical states. Here we use quantum-logic spectroscopy, which maps quantum information between two ion species, to prepare and non-destructively detect quantum mechanical states in molecular ions. We develop a general technique for optical pumping and preparation of the molecule into a pure initial state. This enables us to observe high-resolution spectra in a single ion (CaH+) and coherent phenomena such as Rabi flopping and Ramsey fringes. The protocol requires a single, far-off-resonant laser that is not specific to the molecule, so many other molecular ions, including polyatomic species, could be treated using the same methods in the same apparatus by changing the molecular source. Combined with the long interrogation times afforded by ion traps, a broad range of molecular ions could be studied with unprecedented control and precision. Our technique thus represents a critical step towards applications such as precision molecular spectroscopy, stringent tests of fundamental physics, quantum computing and precision control of molecular dynamics.

  5. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh eHaghighatpanah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube – polyethylene and single walled carbon nanotube – polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the single walled carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1% to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the single walled carbon nanotube wall.

  6. From supramolecular electrochemistry to molecular-level devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Credi, Alberto; Ferrer Ribera, Belen; Venturi, Margherita

    2004-09-15

    Supramolecular (multi-component) systems can perform complex functions which result from the cooperation of actions performed by suitably selected molecular components. Looking at supramolecular systems, from the viewpoint of the functions, shows that the concept of macroscopic device can be extended to molecular level. Nature exploits very complex molecular-level devices to substain life, and, in the last twenty years, the development of supramolecular chemistry has allowed the construction of simple molecular-level devices, that are of interest not only for basic research, but also for the growth of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Molecular-level devices operate via electronic and/or nuclear rearrangements, and like macroscopic devices, they need energy to operate and signals to communicate with the operator. Electrochemistry can provide the answer to this dual requirement, since electrons/holes, besides supplying the energy needed to make a devices work, can also be useful to 'read' the state of the system and thus to control and monitor the operation of the device. In this article, some examples of molecular-level devices investigated in our laboratory will be reviewed.

  7. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  8. Diffracted X-ray tracking: new system for single molecular detection with X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, Y C; Adachi, S; Suzuki, Y; Yagi, N

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new X-ray methodology for direct observations of the behaviors of single molecular units in real time and real space. This new system, which we call Diffracted X-ray Tracking (DXT), monitors the Brownian motions of a single molecular unit by observations of X-ray diffracted spots from a nanocrystal, tightly bound to the individual single molecular unit in bio-systems. DXT does not determine any translational movements, but only orientational movements.

  9. Diffracted X-ray tracking: new system for single molecular detection with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.C.; Okumura, Y.; Adachi, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Yagi, N.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new X-ray methodology for direct observations of the behaviors of single molecular units in real time and real space. This new system, which we call Diffracted X-ray Tracking (DXT), monitors the Brownian motions of a single molecular unit by observations of X-ray diffracted spots from a nanocrystal, tightly bound to the individual single molecular unit in bio-systems. DXT does not determine any translational movements, but only orientational movements

  10. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  11. Effect of Chain Conformation on the Single-Molecule Melting Force in Polymer Single Crystals: Steered Molecular Dynamics Simulations Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenke

    2017-02-28

    Understanding the relationship between polymer chain conformation as well as the chain composition within the single crystal and the mechanical properties of the corresponding single polymer chain will facilitate the rational design of high performance polymer materials. Here three model systems of polymer single crystals, namely poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), polyethylene (PE), and nylon-66 (PA66) have been chosen to study the effects of chain conformation, helical (PEO) versus planar zigzag conformation (PE, PA66), and chain composition (PE versus PA66) on the mechanical properties of a single polymer chain. To do that, steered molecular dynamics simulations were performed on those polymer single crystals by pulling individual polymer chains out of the crystals. Our results show that the patterns of force-extension curve as well as the chain moving mode are closely related to the conformation of the polymer chain in the single crystal. In addition, hydrogen bonds can enhance greatly the force required to stretch the polymer chain out of the single crystal. The dynamic breaking and reformation of multivalent hydrogen bonds have been observed for the first time in PA66 at the single molecule level.

  12. Charge transport in single photochromic molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsang; Pietsch, T.; Scheer, Elke; Hellmuth, T.; Pauly, F.; Sysoiev, D.; Huhn, T.; Exner, T.; Groth, U.; Steiner, U.; Erbe, A.

    2012-02-01

    Recently, photoswitchable molecules, i.e. diarylethene, gained significant interest due to their applicability in data storage media, as optical switches, and in novel logic circuits [1]. Diarylethene-derivative molecules are the most promising candidates to design electronic functional elements, because of their excellent thermal stability, high fatigue resistance, and negligible change upon switching [1]. Here, we present the preferential conductance of specifically designed sulfur-free diarylethene molecules [2] bridging the mechanically controlled break-junctions at low temperatures [3]. The molecular energy levels and electrode couplings are obtained by evaluating the current-voltage characteristics using the single-level model [4]. The charge transport mechanism of different types of diarylethene molecules is investigated, and the results are discussed within the framework of novel theoretical predictions. [4pt] [1] M. Del Valle etal., Nat Nanotechnol 2, 176 (2007) S. J. van der Molen etal., Nano. Lett. 9, 76 (2009).[0pt] [2] D. Sysoiev etal., Chem. Eur. J. 17, 6663 (2011).[0pt] [3] Y. Kim etal., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 196804 (2011).[0pt] [4] Y. Kim etal., Nano Lett. 11, 3734 (2011). L. Zotti etal., Small 6, 1529 (2010).

  13. Molecular single photon double K-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penent, F.; Nakano, M.; Tashiro, M.; Grozdanov, T.P.; Žitnik, M.; Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Shigemasa, E.; Iwayama, H.; Hikosaka, Y.; Soejima, K.; Suzuki, I.H.; Kouchi, N.; Ito, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied single photon double K-shell ionization of small molecules (N 2 , CO, C 2 H 2n (n = 1–3), …) and the Auger decay of the resulting double core hole (DCH) molecular ions thanks to multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. The relative cross-sections for single-site (K −2 ) and two-site (K −1 K −1 ) double K-shell ionization with respect to single K-shell (K −1 ) ionization have been measured that gives important information on the mechanisms of single photon double ionization. The spectroscopy of two-site (K −1 K −1 ) DCH states in the C 2 H 2n (n = 1–3) series shows important chemical shifts due to a strong dependence on the C-C bond length. In addition, the complete cascade Auger decay following single site (K −2 ) ionization has been obtained

  14. Electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry towards the single-molecule level: Theoretical notions and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingdong; Chi Qijin; Albrecht, Tim; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Welinder, Anne C.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Surface structures controlled at the nanometer and single-molecule levels, with functions crucially determined by interfacial electron transfer (ET) are broadly reported in recent years, with different kinds of electrochemically controlled nanoscale/single molecule systems. One is the broad class of metallic and semiconductor-based nanoparticles, nano-arrays, nanotubes, and nanopits. Others are based on self-assembled molecular monolayers. The latter extend to bioelectrochemical systems with redox metalloproteins and DNA-based molecules as targets. We overview here some recent achievements in areas of interfacial electrochemical ET systems, mapped to the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Focus is on both experimental and theoretical studies in our group. Systems addressed are organized monolayers of redox active transition metal complexes, and metalloproteins and metalloenzymes on single-crystal Au(1 1 1)-electrode surfaces. These systems have been investigated by voltammetry, spectroscopy, microcantilever technology, and scanning probe microscopy. A class of Os-complexes has shown suitable as targets for electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), with close to single-molecule scanning tunnelling spectroscopic (STS) features. Mapping of redox metalloproteins from the three major classes, i.e. blue copper proteins, heme proteins, and iron-sulfur proteins, at the monolayer and single-molecule levels have also been achieved. In situ STM and spectroscopy of redox molecules and biomolecules have been supported by new theoretical frames, which extend established theory of interfacial electrochemical ET. The electrochemical nanoscale and single-molecule systems discussed are compared with other recent nanoscale and single-molecule systems with conspicuous device-like properties, particularly unimolecular rectifiers and single-molecule transistors. Both of these show analogies to electrochemical in situ STM features of redox molecules and

  15. Phase behaviour of macromolecular liquid crystalline materials. Computational studies at the molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimson, Lorna M.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular simulations provide an increasingly useful insight into the static and dynamic characteristics of materials. In this thesis molecular simulations of macro-molecular liquid crystalline materials are reported. The first liquid crystalline material that has been investigated is a side chain liquid crystal polymer (SCLCP). In this study semi-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted at a range of temperatures and an aligning potential has been applied to mimic the effect of a magnetic field. In cooling the SCLCP from an isotropic melt, microphase separation was observed yielding a domain structure. The application of a magnetic field to this structure aligns the domains producing a stable smectic mesophase. This is the first study in which mesophases have been observed using an off-lattice model of a SCLCP. The second material that has been investigated is a dendrimer with terminal mesogenic functionalization. Here, a multi-scale approach has been taken with Monte Carlo studies of a single dendrimer molecule in the gas phase at the atomistic level, semi-atomistic molecular dynamics of a single molecule in liquid crystalline solvents and a coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of the dendrimer in the bulk. The coarse-grained model has been developed and parameterized using the results of the atomistic and semi-atomistic work. The single molecule studies showed that the liquid crystalline dendrimer was able to change its structure by conformational changes in the flexible chains that link the mesogenic groups to the core. Structural change was seen under the application of a mean field ordering potential in the gas phase, and in the presence of liquid crystalline solvents. No liquid crystalline phases were observed for the bulk phase studies of the coarse-grained model. However, when the length of the mesogenic units was increased there was some evidence for microphase separation in these systems. (author)

  16. Conformational Smear Characterization and Binning of Single-Molecule Conductance Measurements for Enhanced Molecular Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshoj, Lee E; Afsari, Sepideh; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-11-01

    Electronic conduction or charge transport through single molecules depends primarily on molecular structure and anchoring groups and forms the basis for a wide range of studies from molecular electronics to DNA sequencing. Several high-throughput nanoelectronic methods such as mechanical break junctions, nanopores, conductive atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling break junctions, and static nanoscale electrodes are often used for measuring single-molecule conductance. In these measurements, "smearing" due to conformational changes and other entropic factors leads to large variances in the observed molecular conductance, especially in individual measurements. Here, we show a method for characterizing smear in single-molecule conductance measurements and demonstrate how binning measurements according to smear can significantly enhance the use of individual conductance measurements for molecular recognition. Using quantum point contact measurements on single nucleotides within DNA macromolecules, we demonstrate that the distance over which molecular junctions are maintained is a measure of smear, and the resulting variance in unbiased single measurements depends on this smear parameter. Our ability to identify individual DNA nucleotides at 20× coverage increases from 81.3% accuracy without smear analysis to 93.9% with smear characterization and binning (SCRIB). Furthermore, merely 7 conductance measurements (7× coverage) are needed to achieve 97.8% accuracy for DNA nucleotide recognition when only low molecular smear measurements are used, which represents a significant improvement over contemporary sequencing methods. These results have important implications in a broad range of molecular electronics applications from designing robust molecular switches to nanoelectronic DNA sequencing.

  17. Quantum Dot Platform for Single-Cell Molecular Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel S.

    In-depth understanding of the nature of cell physiology and ability to diagnose and control the progression of pathological processes heavily rely on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. Therefore, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of their natural tissue or cell culture microenvironment is essential. In principle, this goal can be achieved by tagging each molecular target with a unique reporter probe and detecting its localization with high sensitivity at sub-cellular resolution, primarily via microscopy-based imaging. Yet, neither widely used conventional methods nor more advanced nanoparticle-based techniques have been able to address this task up to date. High multiplexing potential of fluorescent probes is heavily restrained by the inability to uniquely match probes with corresponding molecular targets. This issue is especially relevant for quantum dot probes---while simultaneous spectral imaging of up to 10 different probes is possible, only few can be used concurrently for staining with existing methods. To fully utilize multiplexing potential of quantum dots, it is necessary to design a new staining platform featuring unique assignment of each target to a corresponding quantum dot probe. This dissertation presents two complementary versatile approaches towards achieving comprehensive single-cell molecular profiling and describes engineering of quantum dot probes specifically tailored for each staining method. Analysis of expanded molecular profiles is achieved through augmenting parallel multiplexing capacity with performing several staining cycles on the same specimen in sequential manner. In contrast to other methods utilizing quantum dots or other nanoparticles, which often involve sophisticated probe synthesis, the platform technology presented here takes advantage of simple covalent bioconjugation and non-covalent self-assembly mechanisms for straightforward probe

  18. Single amino acid substitution in important hemoglobinopathies does not disturb molecular function and biological process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Viroj WiwanitkitDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: Hemoglobin is an important protein found in the red cells of many animals. In humans, the hemoglobin is mainly distributed in the red blood cell. Single amino acid substitution is the main pathogenesis of most hemoglobin disorders. Here, the author used a new gene ontology technology to predict the molecular function and biological process of four important hemoglobin disorders with single substitution. The four studied important abnormal hemoglobins (Hb with single substitution included Hb S, Hb E, Hb C, and Hb J-Baltimore. Using the GoFigure server, the molecular function and biological process in normal and abnormal hemoglobins was predicted. Compared with normal hemoglobin, all studied abnormal hemoglobins had the same function and biological process. This indicated that the overall function of oxygen transportation is not disturbed in the studied hemoglobin disorders. Clinical findings of oxygen depletion in abnormal hemoglobin should therefore be due to the other processes rather than genomics, proteomics, and expression levels.Keywords: hemoglobin, amino acid, substitution, function

  19. Turning randomness into meaning at the molecular level using Muller's morphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Kathleen; Cooper, Melanie M; Klymkowsky, Michael W

    2012-04-15

    While evolutionary theory follows from observable facts and logical inferences (Mayr, 1985), historically, the origin of novel inheritable variations was a major obstacle to acceptance of natural selection (Bowler, 1992; Bowler, 2005). While molecular mechanisms address this issue (Jablonka and Lamb, 2005), analysis of responses to the Biological Concept Inventory (BCI) (Klymkowsky et al., 2010), revealed that molecular biology majors rarely use molecular level ideas in their discourse, implying that they do not have an accessible framework within which to place evolutionary variation. We developed a "Socratic tutorial" focused on Muller's categorization of mutations' phenotypic effects (Muller, 1932). Using a novel vector-based method to analyzed students' essay responses, we found that a single interaction with this tutorial led to significant changes in thinking toward a clearer articulation of the effects of mutational change. We suggest that Muller's morphs provides an effective framework for facilitating student learning about mutational effects and evolutionary mechanisms.

  20. Turning randomness into meaning at the molecular level using Muller's morphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Henson

    2012-02-01

    While evolutionary theory follows from observable facts and logical inferences (Mayr, 1985, historically, the origin of novel inheritable variations was a major obstacle to acceptance of natural selection (Bowler, 1992; Bowler, 2005. While molecular mechanisms address this issue (Jablonka and Lamb, 2005, analysis of responses to the Biological Concept Inventory (BCI (Klymkowsky et al., 2010, revealed that molecular biology majors rarely use molecular level ideas in their discourse, implying that they do not have an accessible framework within which to place evolutionary variation. We developed a “Socratic tutorial” focused on Muller's categorization of mutations' phenotypic effects (Muller, 1932. Using a novel vector-based method to analyzed students' essay responses, we found that a single interaction with this tutorial led to significant changes in thinking toward a clearer articulation of the effects of mutational change. We suggest that Muller's morphs provides an effective framework for facilitating student learning about mutational effects and evolutionary mechanisms.

  1. Single particle and molecular assembly analysis of polyribosomes by single- and double-tilt cryo electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G. [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Afonina, Zhanna A. [Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142290 Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-03-15

    Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) can provide cellular and molecular structural information on various biological samples. However, the detailed interpretation of tomograms reconstructed from single-tilt data tends to suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and artefacts caused by some systematically missing angular views. While these can be overcome by sub-tomogram averaging, they remain limiting for the analysis of unique structures. Double-tilt ET can improve the tomogram quality by acquiring a second tilt series after an in-plane rotation, but its usage is not widespread yet because it is considered technically demanding and it is rarely used under cryo conditions. Here we show that double-tilt cryo-ET improves the quality of 3D reconstructions so significantly that even single particle analysis can be envisaged despite of the intrinsically low image contrast obtained from frozen-hydrated specimens. This is illustrated by the analysis of eukaryotic polyribosomes in which individual ribosomes were reconstructed using single-tilt, partial and full double-tilt geometries. The improved tomograms favour the faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging and allow a better 3D classification using multivariate statistical analysis. Our study of single particles and molecular assemblies within polysomes illustrates that the dual-axis approach is particularly useful for cryo applications of ET, both for unique objects and for structures that can be classified and averaged. - Highlights: ► Double-tilt cryo-ET improves 3D reconstructions thus making single particle analysis possible. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET data favour a faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging. ► Individual ribosomes were reconstructed from single-tilt, partial/ full double-tilt geometries. ► Double-tilt cryo-ET facilitates analysis of larger molecular assemblies such as in cell sections. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET is applicable to unique objects and to structures that can be

  2. A tight-binding model of the transmission probability through a molecular junction; a single molecule vs. a molecular layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, A.; Nitzan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text: Molecular electronics, one of the major fields of the current effort in nano-science, may be de ed as the study of electronic behaviors, devices and applications that depend on the properties of matter at the molecular scale. If the miniaturization trend of microelectronic devices is to continue, elements such as transistors and contacts will soon shrink to single molecules. The promise of these new technological breakthroughs has been major driving force in this ld. Moreover, the consideration of molecular systems as electronic devices has raised new fundamental questions. In particular, while traditional quantum chemistry deals with electronically closed systems, we now face problems involving molecular systems that are open to their electronic environment, moreover, function in far from equilibrium situations. A generic molecular junction is made of two electrodes connected by a molecular spacer that takes the form of a molecular chain of varying length or a molecular layer of varying thickness. We use a simple nearest-neighbors tight-biding model with the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method to investigate and compare between a self-assembled monolayer (SAM), finite molecular layer (FML), and single molecule (SM) chemisorption to a surface of a metal substrate. In addition, we examine the difference in the transmission probability through a SAM, FML and SM sandwiched between two metallic electrodes. Dramatic differences are observed between the SM, FML and SAM density of electronic states and transmission functions. In addition, we analyze the effects of changing different physical parameters such as molecule-substrate interaction, molecule-molecule interactions, etc; interesting effects that pertain to the conduction properties of single molecules and molecular layers are observed. Intriguing results are attained when we investigate the commensurability of the SAM with the metallic surface

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of a DNA containing a single strand break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Siebers, G.; Furukawa, A.; Otagiri, N.; Osman, R

    2002-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a dodecamer DNA containing a single strand break (SSB), which has been represented by a 3'-OH deoxyribose and 5'-OH phosphate in the middle of the strand. Molecular force field parameters of the 5'-OH phosphate region were determined from an ab initio calculation at the HF/6-31G level using the program package GAMESS. The DNA was placed in a periodic boundary box with water molecules and Na+ counter-ions to produce a neutralised system. After minimisation, the system was heated to 300 K, equilibrated and a production run at constant NTP was executed for 1 ns using AMBER 4.1. Snapshots of the SSB-containing DNA and a detailed analysis of the equilibriated average structure revealed surprisingly small conformational changes compared to normal DNA. However, dynamic properties calculated using the essential dynamics method showed some features that may be important for the recognition of this damage by repair enzymes. (author)

  4. Transcending the biomarker mindset: deciphering disease mechanisms at the single cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, Erika A; Nolan, Garry P

    2006-02-01

    The application of proteomics to disease research promises to enhance the understanding and treatment of many human maladies through the identification of molecular profiles associated with each disease. However, although much is made of the utility of molecular signatures as markers of disease state, insufficient emphasis is often placed on the simultaneous need for biological mechanism inquiry. Focused and detailed analyses of disease-associated signaling networks have the potential to be more mechanistically informative than large-scale proteomic profiling approaches, providing insight into the cellular processes involved in pathogenesis, disease progression and therapeutic resistance; while still providing diagnostic or clinical management direction. Phospho-specific flow cytometry provides a method for the analysis of pathological signaling networks, enabling the investigation of disease mechanisms at the single-cell level.

  5. Nanoscale heterostructures with molecular-scale single-crystal metal wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Paromita; Halder, Aditi; Viswanath, B; Kundu, Dipan; Ramanath, Ganpati; Ravishankar, N

    2010-01-13

    Creating nanoscale heterostructures with molecular-scale (synthesis of nanoscale heterostructures with single-crystal molecular-scale Au nanowires attached to different nanostructure substrates. Our method involves the formation of Au nanoparticle seeds by the reduction of rocksalt AuCl nanocubes heterogeneously nucleated on the substrates and subsequent nanowire growth by oriented attachment of Au nanoparticles from the solution phase. Nanoscale heterostructures fabricated by such site-specific nucleation and growth are attractive for many applications including nanoelectronic device wiring, catalysis, and sensing.

  6. [Prediction of the molecular response to pertubations from single cell measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, Françoise; Levine, Raphael D

    2014-12-01

    The response of protein signalization networks to perturbations is analysed from single cell measurements. This experimental approach allows characterizing the fluctuations in protein expression levels from cell to cell. The analysis is based on an information theoretic approach grounded in thermodynamics leading to a quantitative version of Le Chatelier principle which allows to predict the molecular response. Two systems are investigated: human macrophages subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, analogous to the immune response against Gram-negative bacteria and the response of the proteins involved in the mTOR signalizing network of GBM cancer cells to changes in partial oxygen pressure. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  7. Single-Level and Multilevel Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Davood; Thoemmes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a statistical approach used to examine how the effect of an independent variable on an outcome is transmitted through an intervening variable (mediator). In this article, we provide a gentle introduction to single-level and multilevel mediation analyses. Using single-level data, we demonstrate an application of structural…

  8. Diffusion of Supercritical Fluids through Single-Layer Nanoporous Solids: Theory and Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulebsir, Fouad; Vermorel, Romain; Galliero, Guillaume

    2018-01-16

    With the advent of graphene material, membranes based on single-layer nanoporous solids appear as promising devices for fluid separation, be it liquid or gaseous mixtures. The design of such architectured porous materials would greatly benefit from accurate models that can predict their transport and separation properties. More specifically, there is no universal understanding of how parameters such as temperature, fluid loading conditions, or the ratio of the pore size to the fluid molecular diameter influence the permeation process. In this study, we address the problem of pure supercritical fluids diffusing through simplified models of single-layer porous materials. Basically, we investigate a toy model that consists of a single-layer lattice of Lennard-Jones interaction sites with a slit gap of controllable width. We performed extensive equilibrium and biased molecular dynamics simulations to document the physical mechanisms involved at the molecular scale. We propose a general constitutive equation for the diffusional transport coefficient derived from classical statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, which can be further simplified in the ideal gas limit. This transport coefficient relates the molecular flux to the fluid density jump across the single-layer membrane. It is found to be proportional to the accessible surface porosity of the single-layer porous solid and to a thermodynamic factor accounting for the inhomogeneity of the fluid close to the pore entrance. Both quantities directly depend on the potential of mean force that results from molecular interactions between solid and fluid atoms. Comparisons with the simulations data show that the kinetic model captures how narrowing the pore size below the fluid molecular diameter lowers dramatically the value of the transport coefficient. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our general constitutive equation allows for a consistent interpretation of the intricate effects of temperature and fluid loading

  9. Manipulation and control of a single molecular rotor on Au (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai-Gang, Zhang; Jin-Hai, Mao; Qi, Liu; Nan, Jiang; Hai-Tao, Zhou; Hai-Ming, Guo; Dong-Xia, Shi; Hong-Jun, Gao

    2010-01-01

    Three different methods are used to manipulate and control phthalocyanine based single molecular rotors on Au (111) surface: (1) changing the molecular structure to alter the rotation potential; (2) using the tunnelling current of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to change the thermal equilibrium of the molecular rotor; (3) artificial manipulation of the molecular rotor to switch the rotation on or off by an STM tip. Furthermore, a molecular 'gear wheel' is successfully achieved with two neighbouring molecules. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  10. Surface Functionalization of g-C 3 N 4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin; Lin, Bin; Yu, Weili; Yang, Yong; Bashir, Shahid M.; Wang, Hong; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Idriss, Hicham; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site

  11. Single Turnover at Molecular Polymerization Catalysts Reveals Spatiotemporally Resolved Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2017-10-23

    Multiple active individual molecular ruthenium catalysts have been pinpointed within growing polynorbornene, thereby revealing information on the reaction dynamics and location that is unavailable through traditional ensemble experiments. This is the first single-turnover imaging of a molecular catalyst by fluorescence microscopy and allows detection of individual monomer reactions at an industrially important molecular ruthenium ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) catalyst under synthetically relevant conditions (e.g. unmodified industrial catalyst, ambient pressure, condensed phase, ca. 0.03 m monomer). These results further establish the key fundamentals of this imaging technique for characterizing the reactivity and location of active molecular catalysts even when they are the minor components. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  13. Innovative molecular-based fluorescent nanoparticles for multicolor single particle tracking in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Godin, Antoine G; Palayret, Matthieu; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Based on an original molecular-based design, we present bright and photostable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) showing excellent colloidal stability in various aqueous environments. Complementary near-infrared emitting and green emitting FONs were prepared using a simple, fast and robust protocol. Both types of FONs could be simultaneously imaged at the single-particle level in solution as well as in biological environments using a monochromatic excitation and a dual-color fluorescence microscope. No evidence of acute cytotoxicity was found upon incubation of live cells with mixed solutions of FONs, and both types of nanoparticles were found internalized in the cells where their motion could be simultaneously tracked at video-rate up to minutes. These fluorescent organic nanoparticles open a novel non-toxic alternative to existing nanoparticles for imaging biological structures, compatible with live-cell experiments and specially fitted for multicolor single particle tracking. (paper)

  14. Using Single-Protein Tracking to Study Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orré, Thomas; Mehidi, Amine; Massou, Sophie; Rossier, Olivier; Giannone, Grégory

    2018-01-01

    To get a complete understanding of cell migration, it is critical to study its orchestration at the molecular level. Since the recent developments in single-molecule imaging, it is now possible to study molecular phenomena at the single-molecule level inside living cells. In this chapter, we describe how such approaches have been and can be used to decipher molecular mechanisms involved in cell migration.

  15. A molecular quantum spin network controlled by a single qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlipf, Lukas; Oeckinghaus, Thomas; Xu, Kebiao; Dasari, Durga Bhaktavatsala Rao; Zappe, Andrea; de Oliveira, Felipe Fávaro; Kern, Bastian; Azarkh, Mykhailo; Drescher, Malte; Ternes, Markus; Kern, Klaus; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2017-08-01

    Scalable quantum technologies require an unprecedented combination of precision and complexity for designing stable structures of well-controllable quantum systems on the nanoscale. It is a challenging task to find a suitable elementary building block, of which a quantum network can be comprised in a scalable way. We present the working principle of such a basic unit, engineered using molecular chemistry, whose collective control and readout are executed using a nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond. The basic unit we investigate is a synthetic polyproline with electron spins localized on attached molecular side groups separated by a few nanometers. We demonstrate the collective readout and coherent manipulation of very few (≤ 6) of these S = 1/2 electronic spin systems and access their direct dipolar coupling tensor. Our results show that it is feasible to use spin-labeled peptides as a resource for a molecular qubit-based network, while at the same time providing simple optical readout of single quantum states through NV magnetometry. This work lays the foundation for building arbitrary quantum networks using well-established chemistry methods, which has many applications ranging from mapping distances in single molecules to quantum information processing.

  16. Soft matter interactions at the molecular scale: interaction forces and energies between single hydrophobic model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Philipp; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2017-02-08

    In all realms of soft matter research a fundamental understanding of the structure/property relationships based on molecular interactions is crucial for developing a framework for the targeted design of soft materials. However, a molecular picture is often difficult to ascertain and yet essential for understanding the many different competing interactions at play, including entropies and cooperativities, hydration effects, and the enormous design space of soft matter. Here, we characterized for the first time the interaction between single hydrophobic molecules quantitatively using atomic force microscopy, and demonstrated that single molecular hydrophobic interaction free energies are dominated by the area of the smallest interacting hydrophobe. The interaction free energy amounts to 3-4 kT per hydrophobic unit. Also, we find that the transition state of the hydrophobic interactions is located at 3 Å with respect to the ground state, based on Bell-Evans theory. Our results provide a new path for understanding the nature of hydrophobic interactions at the single molecular scale. Our approach enables us to systematically vary hydrophobic and any other interaction type by utilizing peptide chemistry providing a strategic advancement to unravel molecular surface and soft matter interactions at the single molecular scale.

  17. Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Corey; Fardad, Shima; Sincore, Alex; Vangheluwe, Marie; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Optical trapping of single biological cells has become an established technique for controlling and studying fundamental behavior of single cells with their environment without having "many-body" interference. The development of such an instrument for optical diagnostics (including Raman and fluorescence for molecular diagnostics) via laser spectroscopy with either the "trapping" beam or secondary beams is still in progress. This paper shows the development of modular multi-spectral imaging optical tweezers combining Raman and Fluorescence diagnostics of biological cells.

  18. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  19. Molecular fountain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  20. Stress Level and Adversity Quotient among Single Working Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Bautista Solis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study identified the profile of the single working mothers in terms of number of children, number of years as a single parent and reason for being a single parent; assessed the single mothers’ stress level and adversity quotient; determined the significant difference of stress level and adversity quotient of single mothers when grouped according to profile variables; determined the best predictor of stress level and adversity quotient. Moreover this research endeavoured to test significant relationship between the adversity quotient and stress level of single working mothers. Lastly, it proposed a stress management program for single working mothers for them to cope with their stress and adversities in life. The researcher employed quantitative method using standardized questionnaires namely Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS and Adversity Response Profile (ARP. The respondents were twenty five (25 single working mothers of the students of Batangas State University. From the results, majority of the respondents have 3 children, widow and in early years as single parent; with a normal level of stress and an average adversity quotient.. There are no significant differences on the stress level and adversity quotient of the respondents when grouped according to profile variables. Finally, stress level has no significant effect on adversity quotient of single working mothers. From the findings, the researcher further recommends that the Office of Guidance and Counseling should update the student information database to determine students with a single working mother. The Parent-Teacher Association may form a single-parent subgroup for the single working mothers to be able to identify to other mothers with same situation. Moreover, the proposed stress management program may be reviewed and implemented by the Office of Guidance and Counseling in coordination with the Parent-Teacher Association of Batangas State University. Future researchers

  1. Molecular discriminators using single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Ray, Nihar Ranjan; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and amphiphilic molecules has been studied in a solid phase. SWNTs are allowed to interact with different amphiphilic probes (e.g. lipids) in a narrow capillary interface. Contact between strong hydrophobic and amphiphilic interfaces leads to a molecular restructuring of the lipids at the interface. The geometry of the diffusion front and the rate and the extent of diffusion of the interface are dependent on the structure of the lipid at the interface. Lecithin having a linear tail showed greater mobility of the interface as compared to a branched tail lipid like dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, indicating the hydrophobic interaction between single wall carbon nanotube core and the hydrophobic tail of the lipid. Solid phase interactions between SWNT and lipids can thus become a very simple but efficient means of discriminating amphiphilic molecules in general and lipids in particular. (paper)

  2. Simulation of the single-vibronic-level emission spectrum of HPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, Daniel K. W., E-mail: bcdaniel@polyu.edu.hk, E-mail: epl@soton.ac.uk; Chau, Foo-tim [Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom (Hong Kong); Lee, Edmond P. F., E-mail: bcdaniel@polyu.edu.hk, E-mail: epl@soton.ac.uk [Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom (Hong Kong); School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Dyke, John M. [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-21

    We have computed the potential energy surfaces of the X{sup ~1}A{sup ′} and A{sup ~1}A{sup ′′} states of HPS using the explicitly correlated multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI-F12) method, and Franck–Condon factors between the two states, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, with the aim of testing the assignment of the recently reported single-vibronic-level (SVL) emission spectrum of HPS [R. Grimminger, D. J. Clouthier, R. Tarroni, Z. Wang, and T. J. Sears, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174306 (2013)]. These are the highest level calculations on these states yet reported. It is concluded that our spectral simulation supports the assignments of the molecular carrier, the electronic states involved and the vibrational structure of the experimental laser induced fluorescence, and SVL emission spectra proposed by Grimminger et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174306 (2013)]. However, there remain questions unanswered regarding the relative electronic energies of the two states and the geometry of the excited state of HPS.

  3. Simulation of the single-vibronic-level emission spectrum of HPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, Daniel K. W.; Chau, Foo-tim; Lee, Edmond P. F.; Dyke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We have computed the potential energy surfaces of the X ~1 A ′ and A ~1 A ′′ states of HPS using the explicitly correlated multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI-F12) method, and Franck–Condon factors between the two states, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, with the aim of testing the assignment of the recently reported single-vibronic-level (SVL) emission spectrum of HPS [R. Grimminger, D. J. Clouthier, R. Tarroni, Z. Wang, and T. J. Sears, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174306 (2013)]. These are the highest level calculations on these states yet reported. It is concluded that our spectral simulation supports the assignments of the molecular carrier, the electronic states involved and the vibrational structure of the experimental laser induced fluorescence, and SVL emission spectra proposed by Grimminger et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174306 (2013)]. However, there remain questions unanswered regarding the relative electronic energies of the two states and the geometry of the excited state of HPS

  4. Simulation of the single-vibronic-level emission spectrum of HPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Chau, Foo-tim; Dyke, John M

    2014-05-21

    We have computed the potential energy surfaces of the X¹A' and ùA" states of HPS using the explicitly correlated multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI-F12) method, and Franck-Condon factors between the two states, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, with the aim of testing the assignment of the recently reported single-vibronic-level (SVL) emission spectrum of HPS [R. Grimminger, D. J. Clouthier, R. Tarroni, Z. Wang, and T. J. Sears, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174306 (2013)]. These are the highest level calculations on these states yet reported. It is concluded that our spectral simulation supports the assignments of the molecular carrier, the electronic states involved and the vibrational structure of the experimental laser induced fluorescence, and SVL emission spectra proposed by Grimminger et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174306 (2013)]. However, there remain questions unanswered regarding the relative electronic energies of the two states and the geometry of the excited state of HPS.

  5. Exploring the energy landscape of biopolymers using single molecule force spectroscopy and molecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hyeon, Changbong

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, single molecule force techniques have opened a new avenue to decipher the folding landscapes of biopolymers by allowing us to watch and manipulate the dynamics of individual proteins and nucleic acids. In single molecule force experiments, quantitative analyses of measurements employing sound theoretical models and molecular simulations play central role more than any other field. With a brief description of basic theories for force mechanics and molecular simulation techniqu...

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of single siloxane dendrimers: Molecular structure and intramolecular mobility of terminal groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatov, A. O.; Balabaev, N. K.; Mazo, M. A.; Kramarenko, E. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of two types of isolated siloxane dendrimers of various generations (from the 2nd to the 8th) have been performed for temperatures ranging from 150 K to 600 K. The first type of dendrimer molecules has short spacers consisting of a single oxygen atom. In the dendrimers of the second type, spacers are longer and comprised of two oxygen atoms separated by a single silicon atom. A comparative analysis of molecular macroscopic parameters such as the gyration radius and the shape factor as well as atom distributions within dendrimer interior has been performed for varying generation number, temperature, and spacer length. It has been found that the short-spacer dendrimers of the 7th and 8th generations have a stressed central part with elongated bonds and deformed valence angles. Investigation of the time evolution of radial displacements of the terminal Si atoms has shown that a fraction of the Si groups have a reduced mobility. Therefore, rather long time trajectories (of the order of tens of nanoseconds) are required to study dendrimer intramolecular dynamics.

  7. Towards Controlled Single-Molecule Manipulation Using “Real-Time” Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A GPU Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyon van Vreumingen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular electronics saw its birth with the idea to build electronic circuitry with single molecules as individual components. Even though commercial applications are still modest, it has served an important part in the study of fundamental physics at the scale of single atoms and molecules. It is now a routine procedure in many research groups around the world to connect a single molecule between two metallic leads. What is unknown is the nature of this coupling between the molecule and the leads. We have demonstrated recently (Tewari, 2018, Ph.D. Thesis our new setup based on a scanning tunneling microscope, which can be used to controllably manipulate single molecules and atomic chains. In this article, we will present the extension of our molecular dynamic simulator attached to this system for the manipulation of single molecules in real time using a graphics processing unit (GPU. This will not only aid in controlled lift-off of single molecules, but will also provide details about changes in the molecular conformations during the manipulation. This information could serve as important input for theoretical models and for bridging the gap between the theory and experiments.

  8. Computational exploration of single-protein mechanics by steered molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotomayor, Marcos [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Hair cell mechanotransduction happens in tens of microseconds, involves forces of a few picoNewtons, and is mediated by nanometer-scale molecular conformational changes. As proteins involved in this process become identified and their high resolution structures become available, multiple tools are being used to explore their “single-molecule responses” to force. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy offer exquisite force and extension resolution, but cannot reach the high loading rates expected for high frequency auditory stimuli. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can reach these fast time scales, and also provide a unique view of the molecular events underlying protein mechanics, but its predictions must be experimentally verified. Thus a combination of simulations and experiments might be appropriate to study the molecular mechanics of hearing. Here I review the basics of MD simulations and the different methods used to apply force and study protein mechanics in silico. Simulations of tip link proteins are used to illustrate the advantages and limitations of this method.

  9. Electrochemistry of single molecules and biomolecules, molecular scale nanostructures, and low-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemistry at ultra-small scales, where even the single molecule or biomolecule can be characterized and manipulated, is on the way to a consolidated status. At the same time molecular electrochemistry is expanding into other areas of sophisticated nano- and molecular scale systems includin...... molecular scale metal and semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and other nanostructures, e.g. nanotubes, “nanoflowers” etc.. The new structures offer both new electronic properties and highly confined novel charge transfer environments....

  10. Central dogma at the single-molecule level in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gene-Wei; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-07-20

    Gene expression originates from individual DNA molecules within living cells. Like many single-molecule processes, gene expression and regulation are stochastic, that is, sporadic in time. This leads to heterogeneity in the messenger-RNA and protein copy numbers in a population of cells with identical genomes. With advanced single-cell fluorescence microscopy, it is now possible to quantify transcriptomes and proteomes with single-molecule sensitivity. Dynamic processes such as transcription-factor binding, transcription and translation can be monitored in real time, providing quantitative descriptions of the central dogma of molecular biology and the demonstration that a stochastic single-molecule event can determine the phenotype of a cell.

  11. Modelling molecular mechanisms: a framework of scientific reasoning to construct molecular-level explanations for cellular behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mil, M.H.W.; Boerwinkel, D.J.; Waarlo, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular-level details are part of the upper-secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the level of cells, organs and organisms. Recent studies suggest that students lack a framework to reason about

  12. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napitu, B.D.; Thijssen, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts

  13. Variable contact gap single-molecule conductance determination for a series of conjugated molecular bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haiss, W.; Wang, Christian; Jitchati, R.

    2008-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that the characteristics of the whole junction are important in determining the conductance of single molecules bound between two metal contacts. This paper shows through measurements on a series of seven conjugated molecular bridges that contact separation is an importan...... that conductance increases rather dramatically at higher tilt angle away from the normal for conformationally rigid molecular wires and that this increase in conductance arises from increased electronic coupling between the molecular bridge and the gold contacts.......It is now becoming clear that the characteristics of the whole junction are important in determining the conductance of single molecules bound between two metal contacts. This paper shows through measurements on a series of seven conjugated molecular bridges that contact separation is an important......-distance curves and knowledge of the terminal to terminal length of the molecular wire. The contact gap separation dependence is interpreted as arising from tilting of these molecules in the junction and this model is underpinned by ab initio transport computations. In this respect we make the general observation...

  14. Molecular assembly and electro polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene on Au(100) single crystal electrode using in-situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Jonyl L.; Tongol, Bernard John V.; ShuehLin Yau

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (Ec-STM) is a powerful technique that can provide molecular-level information regarding electrode surface processes in-situ in electrolyte solvent under ambient conditions. In this study, the adsorption and electro polymerization of an industrially important conducting polymer precursor, 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene (EDOT), on Au (100) single crystal was probed using Ec-STM. The Au (100) single crystal electrode substrate used for this study was fabricated using the well-known Clavilier's flame melting procedure. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used along with Ec-STM to characterize the bare, EDOT-modified, and poly(EDOT)-modified Au (100) single crystal electrode. Time-dependent Ec-STM imaging at 0.550 V showed the formation of an EDOT self-assembled monolayer through 2-D surface dillusion. The resulting EDOT molecular assembly on Au (100) single crystal electrode was found to fit in a 4√2χ3√2 unit cell. Difference in apparent corrugation between molecular rows was attributed to different angular orientation with respect to the substrate. The electro polymerization of EDOT on Au (100) single crystal electrode was done by potentiostatic and potentiodynamic methods. Both methods suggested a solution-process mechanism for EDOT electro polymerization. (author)

  15. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  16. Modelling Molecular Mechanisms: A Framework of Scientific Reasoning to Construct Molecular-Level Explanations for Cellular Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular-level details are part of the upper-secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the level of cells, organs and organisms. Recent studies suggest that students lack a framework to reason about complex systems to make this connection. In this…

  17. Laser synthesis of a copper–single-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposite via molecular-level mixing and non-equilibrium solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Jay F; Rajule, Nilesh; Molian, Pal; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    A copper–single-walled carbon nanotube (Cu–SWCNT) metal nanocomposite could be an ideal material if it can substantially improve the strength of copper while preserving the metal’s excellent thermal and electrical properties. However, synthesis of such a nanocomposite is highly challenging, because copper and SWCNTs do not form intermetallic compounds and are insoluble; as a result, there are serious issues regarding wettability and fine dispersion of SWCNTs within the copper matrix. In this paper we present a novel wet process, called the laser surface implantation process (LSI), to synthesize Cu–SWCNT nanocomposites by mixing SWCNTs into molten copper. The LSI process includes drilling several microholes on a copper substrate, filling the microholes with SWCNTs suspended in solution, and melting the copper substrate to create a micro-well of molten copper. The molten copper advances radially outward to engulf the microholes with pre-deposited SWCNTs to form the Cu–SWCNT implant upon solidification. Rapid and non-equilibrium solidification is achieved due to copper’s excellent heat conductivity, so that SWCNTs are locked in position within the copper matrix without agglomerating into large clusters. This wet process is very different from the typical dry processes used in powder metallurgy. Very high hardness improvement, up to 527% over pure copper, was achieved, confirmed by micro-indentation tests, with only a 0.23% SWCNT volume fraction. The nanostructure of the nanocomposite was characterized by TEM imaging, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and spectroscopy measurements. The SWCNTs were found to be finely dispersed within the copper matrix with cluster sizes in the range of nanometers, achieving the goal of molecular-level mixing. (paper)

  18. Elucidation of polymer induced DNA condensation. Visualisation at the single molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Alison Laura

    2002-01-01

    DNA condensation is a phenomenon that has stimulated interest from biologists, physicists, and polymer chemists for decades. At the cellular level, this process is key to the packing of DNA within the nuclear envelope, and the exposure of the appropriate nucleic acid sequences in order for transcription to occur, and proteins to be produced. The advent of gene therapy has led to an invigoration of this subject area. In order to successfully deliver to, and transfect target cells, many delivery vectors condense the therapeutic DNA into small compact particles. The nature of these particles have a considerable influence on the ultimate expression of the administered nucleic acid material. In addition, at its most fundamental, DNA itself is a classical polyelectrolyte polymer, the behaviour of which has applicability to other charged polymeric systems. There are two core interwound themes to this investigation; the visualisation of DNA condensate morphology at ultra-resolution, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of formation of these structures. The technique of atomic force microscopy is central to these investigations. Methodologies have been devised allowing the visualisation of the tertiary structure and conformational behaviour of individual DNA condensates in near in situ conditions. Condensation of the nucleic acid material has been induced by two classes of cation; small molecular cations, like those found within eukaryotic cells, and a range of cationic polymers. The cationic polymers investigated all have considerable potential as gene delivery vectors. The resultant DNA condensates have been assessed and contrasted in terms of their tertiary morphology, lateral dimensions, and structural volume. Assessments have also been made regarding the influence of the molecular architecture of the cationic moiety and the nature of the input nucleic acid material on the resultant DNA condensates. With regard to the elucidation of the mechanisms of DNA condensate

  19. Positron-attachment to small molecules: Vibrational enhancement of positron affinities with configuration interaction level of multi-component molecular orbital approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Masanori [Quantum Chemistry Division, Graduate School of NanoBioScience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    To theoretically demonstrate the binding of a positron to small polarized molecules, we have calculated the vibrational averaged positron affinity (PA) values along the local vibrational contribution with the configuration interaction level of multi-component molecular orbital method. This method can take the electron-positron correlation contribution into account through single electronic - single positronic excitation configurations. The PA values are enhanced by including the local vibrational contribution from vertical PA values due to the anharmonicity of the potential.

  20. Molecular-dynamic simulations of the thermophysical properties of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane single crystal at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, S. A.; Gubin, S. A.; Maklashova, I. V.; Selezenev, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations of isothermal compression parameters are performed for a hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane single crystal (C6H6O12N12) using a modified ReaxFF-log reactive force field. It is shown that the pressure-compression ratio curve for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal at constant temperature T = 300 K in pressure range P = 0.05-40 GPa is in satisfactory agreement with experimental compression isotherms obtained for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal. Hugoniot molecular-dynamic simulations of the shock-wave hydrostatic compression of a single C6H6O12N12 crystal are performed. Along with Hugoniot temperature-pressure curves, calculated shock-wave pressure-compression ratios for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal are obtained for a wide pressure range of P = 1-40 GPa. It is established that the percussive adiabat obtained for a single C6H6O12N12 crystal is in a good agreement with the experimental data. All calculations are performed using a LAMMPS molecular dynamics simulation software package that provides a ReaxFF-lg reactive force field to support the approach.

  1. Multi-level molecular modelling for plasma medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Khosravian, Narjes; Van der Paal, Jonas; Verlackt, Christof C W; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Kamaraj, Balu; Neyts, Erik C

    2016-01-01

    Modelling at the molecular or atomic scale can be very useful for obtaining a better insight in plasma medicine. This paper gives an overview of different atomic/molecular scale modelling approaches that can be used to study the direct interaction of plasma species with biomolecules or the consequences of these interactions for the biomolecules on a somewhat longer time-scale. These approaches include density functional theory (DFT), density functional based tight binding (DFTB), classical reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) and united-atom or coarse-grained MD, as well as hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Specific examples will be given for three important types of biomolecules, present in human cells, i.e. proteins, DNA and phospholipids found in the cell membrane. The results show that each of these modelling approaches has its specific strengths and limitations, and is particularly useful for certain applications. A multi-level approach is therefore most suitable for obtaining a global picture of the plasma–biomolecule interactions. (paper)

  2. Manipulating localized molecular orbitals by single-atom contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihua; Shi, Xingqiang; Lin, Chensheng; Zhang, Rui Qin; Minot, Christian; Van Hove, Michel A; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong; Lin, Nian

    2010-09-17

    We have fabricated atom-molecule contacts by attachment of single Cu atoms to terpyridine side groups of bis-terpyridine tetra-phenyl ethylene molecules on a Cu(111) surface. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy, and density functional calculations, we have found that, due to the localization characteristics of molecular orbitals, the Cu-atom contact modifies the state localized at the terpyridine side group which is in contact with the Cu atom but does not affect the states localized at other parts of the molecule. These results illustrate the contact effects at individual orbitals and offer possibilities to manipulate orbital alignments within molecules.

  3. Molecular-Level Simulations of the Turbulent Taylor-Green Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, M. A.; Bitter, N. P.; Koehler, T. P.; Plimpton, S. J.; Torczynski, J. R.; Papadakis, G.

    2017-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, a statistical, molecular-level technique that provides accurate solutions to the Boltzmann equation, is applied to the turbulent Taylor-Green vortex flow. The goal of this work is to investigate whether DSMC can accurately simulate energy decay in a turbulent flow. If so, then simulating turbulent flows at the molecular level can provide new insights because the energy decay can be examined in detail from molecular to macroscopic length scales, thereby directly linking molecular relaxation processes to macroscopic transport processes. The DSMC simulations are performed on half a million cores of Sequoia, the 17 Pflop platform at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the kinetic-energy dissipation rate and the energy spectrum are computed directly from the molecular velocities. The DSMC simulations are found to reproduce the Kolmogorov -5/3 law and to agree with corresponding Navier-Stokes simulations obtained using a spectral method. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  4. Single molecular biology: coming of age in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Lou, Hui-Qiang

    2017-09-20

    DNA replication is an essential process of the living organisms. To achieve precise and reliable replication, DNA polymerases play a central role in DNA synthesis. Previous investigations have shown that the average rates of DNA synthesis on the leading and lagging strands in a replisome must be similar to avoid the formation of significant gaps in the nascent strands. The underlying mechanism has been assumed to be coordination between leading- and lagging-strand polymerases. However, Kowalczykowski's lab members recently performed single molecule techniques in E. coli and showed the real-time behavior of a replisome. The leading- and lagging-strand polymerases function stochastically and independently. Furthermore, when a DNA polymerase is paused, the helicase slows down in a self-regulating fail-safe mechanism, akin to a ''dead-man's switch''. Based on the real-time single-molecular observation, the authors propose that leading- and lagging-strand polymerases synthesize DNA stochastically within a Gaussian distribution. Along with the development and application of single-molecule techniques, we will witness a new age of DNA replication and other biological researches.

  5. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD. The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes. Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form. PMID:26512583

  6. Estimating single molecule conductance from spontaneous evolution of a molecular contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, M.; Malinowski, T.; Iazykov, M.; Klein, H. R.

    2018-03-01

    We present an original method to estimate the conductivity of a single molecule anchored to nanometric-sized metallic electrodes, using a Mechanically Controlled Break Junction operated at room temperature in the liquid. We record the conductance through the metal/molecules/metal nanocontact while keeping the metallic electrodes at a fixed distance. Taking advantage of thermal diffusion and electromigration, we let the contact naturally explore the more stable configurations around a chosen conductance value. The conductance of a single molecule is estimated from a statistical analysis of raw conductance and conductance standard deviation data for molecular contacts containing up to 14 molecules. The single molecule conductance values are interpreted as time-averaged conductance of an ensemble of conformers at thermal equilibrium.

  7. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  8. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G. E. Jr.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals

  9. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  10. Practical γ-Ray Level for Low Molecular Weight Chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoksan, Rangrong; Chirachanchai, Suwabun; Biramontri, Siriratana

    2003-06-01

    The present work proposes a practical level of γ-Ray to lower the molecular weigh of chitosan irradiated in solid state and water. The molecular weight reduction is up to 80% at γ-ray amount of 50 kGy. The same level of reduction can be achieved by only 20 kGy in the presence of initiator (K 2 S 2 O 8 or H 2 O 2 ). The structure is significantly changed in the case of chitosan-acetic acid solution or chitosan dispersed in water with 2% aq. K 2 S 2 O 8 solution

  11. 27-Level DC–AC inverter with single energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.M.; Chan, W.L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper reports a novel 27-level DC–AC inverter using only single renewable energy source. ► The efficiency of the inverter is very high. The output waveform is almost sinusoidal. ► The cost is low as the number of power switches required is only 12. - Abstract: A novel design of multilevel DC–AC inverter using only single renewable energy source is presented in this paper. The proposed approach enables multilevel output to be realised by a few cascaded H-bridges and a single energy source. As an illustration, a 27-level inverter has been implemented based on three cascaded H-bridges with a single energy source and two capacitors. Using the proposed novel switching strategy, 27 levels can be realized and the two virtual energy sources can be well regulated. Experimental results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed inverter.

  12. Single-cell transcriptomics uncovers distinct molecular signatures of stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustacchini, Alice; Thongjuea, Supat; Barkas, Nikolaos; Woll, Petter S; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Booth, Christopher A G; Sopp, Paul; Norfo, Ruggiero; Rodriguez-Meira, Alba; Ashley, Neil; Jamieson, Lauren; Vyas, Paresh; Anderson, Kristina; Segerstolpe, Åsa; Qian, Hong; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Mustjoki, Satu; Sandberg, Rickard; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Mead, Adam J

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in single-cell transcriptomics are ideally placed to unravel intratumoral heterogeneity and selective resistance of cancer stem cell (SC) subpopulations to molecularly targeted cancer therapies. However, current single-cell RNA-sequencing approaches lack the sensitivity required to reliably detect somatic mutations. We developed a method that combines high-sensitivity mutation detection with whole-transcriptome analysis of the same single cell. We applied this technique to analyze more than 2,000 SCs from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) throughout the disease course, revealing heterogeneity of CML-SCs, including the identification of a subgroup of CML-SCs with a distinct molecular signature that selectively persisted during prolonged therapy. Analysis of nonleukemic SCs from patients with CML also provided new insights into cell-extrinsic disruption of hematopoiesis in CML associated with clinical outcome. Furthermore, we used this single-cell approach to identify a blast-crisis-specific SC population, which was also present in a subclone of CML-SCs during the chronic phase in a patient who subsequently developed blast crisis. This approach, which might be broadly applied to any malignancy, illustrates how single-cell analysis can identify subpopulations of therapy-resistant SCs that are not apparent through cell-population analysis.

  13. Possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single benzene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2018-02-01

    This work focused on possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single and two benzene rings, respectively. The benzene rings were threaded by a magnetic flux that changes over time. The quantum interference effect was considered as the basic idea in the rectification action, the para and meta configurations were investigated. All the calculations are performed by using steady-state theoretical model, which is based on the time-dependent Hamiltonian model. The electrical conductance and the electric current are considered as DC output signals of half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers. The finding in this work opens up the exciting potential to use these molecular rectifiers in molecular electronics.

  14. Experimental techniques for single cell and single molecule biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.T.; Zhou, E.H.; Li, A.; Vedula, S.R.K.; Fu, H.X.

    2006-01-01

    Stresses and strains that act on the human body can arise either from external physical forces or internal physiological environmental conditions. These biophysical interactions can occur not only at the musculoskeletal but also cellular and molecular levels and can determine the health and function of the human body. Here, we seek to investigate the structure-property-function relationship of cells and biomolecules so as to understand their important physiological functions as well as establish possible connections to human diseases. With the recent advancements in cell and molecular biology, biophysics and nanotechnology, several innovative and state-of-the-art experimental techniques and equipment have been developed to probe the structural and mechanical properties of biostructures from the micro- down to picoscale. Some of these experimental techniques include the optical or laser trap method, micropipette aspiration, step-pressure technique, atomic force microscopy and molecular force spectroscopy. In this article, we will review the basic principles and usage of these techniques to conduct single cell and single molecule biomechanics research

  15. On the combination of molecular replacement and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing for automated structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panjikar, Santosh; Parthasarathy, Venkataraman; Lamzin, Victor S.; Weiss, Manfred S.; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of molecular replacement and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction improves the performance of automated structure determination with Auto-Rickshaw. A combination of molecular replacement and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing has been incorporated into the automated structure-determination platform Auto-Rickshaw. The complete MRSAD procedure includes molecular replacement, model refinement, experimental phasing, phase improvement and automated model building. The improvement over the standard SAD or MR approaches is illustrated by ten test cases taken from the JCSG diffraction data-set database. Poor MR or SAD phases with phase errors larger than 70° can be improved using the described procedure and a large fraction of the model can be determined in a purely automatic manner from X-ray data extending to better than 2.6 Å resolution

  16. Effect of the substitution of F on the photoswitching behavior in single molecular device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Baoan; Zheng, Yapeng; Yuan, Peipei; Liao, Bin; Chen, Wei; An, Xiuhua; Mo, Xiaotong; Ding, Yuqiang

    2017-09-01

    We carry out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function to investigate the electronic transport properties of a 5-arylidenehydantoin molecule sandwiched between two Au electrodes. A reversible switching behavior between E and Z isomerization can be observed in the device through light irradiation, and their currents display different characteristic. Furthermore, it is found that the substitution of F in the molecule enlarges the switching ratio of device. The different characteristics of currents for E/Z forms and E/Z with the substitution of F are discussed by the transmission spectra and the molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian states. We discuss the change of Fermi level alignment due to the substitution of F, and the polarization effect under bias. We find the negative differential resistance effect in the E form with the substitution of F, which is explained by change of molecule-electrode coupling with the varied bias. The results suggest that the 5-arylidenehydantoin molecule with the substitution of F that improves the performance of device, becoming one of the methods for improving single molecular photoswitching performance in the future.

  17. Occupation number dependence of molecular energy levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Ferreira, R.

    1977-08-01

    The Roothaan expression for the energy of a closed-shell molecular system is generalized in order to apply to open shells. A continuous variation from 0 to 2 is supposed for each level's occupation number, extending to this range tbe correction due to the spurious repulsion appearing in the half-electron method. The characteristic equations of the Xα method are applied to the energy expressions. The one level case is discussed in detail. Ionic and excited states of the 1,3 transbutadiene π system are analyzed

  18. High Molecular Weight Adiponectin Levels are Neither Influenced by Adiponectin Polymorphisms Nor Associated with Insulin Resistance in Mixed-Ancestry Hyperglycemic Subjects from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemlin Annalise E

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: High molecular weight (HMW adiponectin has antiatherogenic, antiinflammatory and antidiabetic properties and these effects have been linked to its effect on high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the adiponectin gene influence adiponectin levels. We examined the relationship between HMW-adiponectin levels and cardiometabolic traits in normo- and hyperglycemic mixed ancestry South Africans and correlated these levels to two common polymorphisms.

  19. Identification of single-copy orthologous genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and analysis of genetic diversity in Physalis using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yang, Jingjing; Yang, Wencai

    2012-01-01

    The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG) Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40) discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2%) of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei's genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis.

  20. Molecular perspective on diazonium adsorption for controllable functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shangchao; Hilmer, Andrew J; Mendenhall, Jonathan D; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2012-05-16

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using diazonium salts allows modification of their optical and electronic properties for a variety of applications, ranging from drug-delivery vehicles to molecular sensors. However, control of the functionalization process remains a challenge, requiring molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of diazonium ions onto heterogeneous, charge-mobile SWCNT surfaces, which are typically decorated with surfactants. In this paper, we combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, experiments, and equilibrium reaction modeling to understand and model the extent of diazonium functionalization of SWCNTs coated with various surfactants (sodium cholate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide). We show that the free energy of diazonium adsorption, determined using simulations, can be used to rank surfactants in terms of the extent of functionalization attained following their adsorption on the nanotube surface. The difference in binding affinities between linear and rigid surfactants is attributed to the synergistic binding of the diazonium ion to the local "hot/cold spots" formed by the charged surfactant heads. A combined simulation-modeling framework is developed to provide guidance for controlling the various sensitive experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired extent of SWCNT functionalization.

  1. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim; Siripatana, Adil; Sun, Shuyu; Knio, Omar; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard

  2. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  3. Molecular imaging and optical diagnosis from single molecule to human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    The combination of molecular biology and optelectronics has given rise to open a new field, bio-photonics, in the 21st century. In this review, recent advances in several in vitro and in vivo single-molecule detection methods for animals are discussed. The possible applications of optical diagnosis are also included, which are optical mammography, diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence endoscopy. The potential of the light use of in diagnosis is emphasized. (author)

  4. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  5. Improving Single-Carbon-Nanotube-Electrode Contacts Using Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittayavathananon, Atiweena; Ngamchuea, Kamonwad; Li, Xiuting; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Chaisiwamongkhol, Korbua; Sawangphruk, Montree; Compton, Richard G

    2017-08-17

    We report the use of an electroactive species, acetaminophen, to modify the electrical connection between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and an electrode. By applying a potential across two electrodes, some of the CNTs in solution occasionally contact the electrified interface and bridge between two electrodes. By observing a single CNT contact between two microbands of an interdigitated Au electrode in the presence and absence of acetaminophen, the role of the molecular species at the electronic junction is revealed. As compared with the pure CNT, the current magnitude of the acetaminophen-modified CNTs significantly increases with the applied potentials, indicating that the molecule species improves the junction properties probably via redox shuttling.

  6. Multi-scale Modeling of Compressible Single-phase Flow in Porous Media using Molecular Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    potential model that accounts for the molecular quadrupole moment of fluids with non-spherical molecules such as CO2. The potential model was used to simulate the thermodynamic equilibrium properties for single-phase and two-phase systems using the canonical

  7. Spatially Extended and High-Velocity Dispersion Molecular Component in Spiral Galaxies: Single-Dish Versus Interferometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of the molecular medium in nearby galaxies have provided mounting evidence that the molecular gas can exist in two phases: one that is clumpy and organized as molecular clouds and another one that is more diffuse. This last component has a higher velocity dispersion than the clumpy one. In order to investigate these two molecular components further, we compare the fluxes and line widths of CO in NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, two nearby spiral galaxies for which high-quality interferometric as well as single-dish data sets are available. Our analysis leads to two main results: (1) employing three different methods, we determine the flux recovery of the interferometer as compared to the single-dish to be within a range of 35%-74% for NGC 4736 and 81%-92% for NGC 5055, and (2) when focusing on high (S/N ≥ 5) lines of sight (LOSs), the single-dish line widths are larger by ˜(40 ± 20)% than the ones derived from interferometric data, which is in agreement with stacking all LOSs. These results point to a molecular gas component that is distributed over spatial scales larger than 30″(˜1 kpc), and is therefore filtered out by the interferometer. The available observations do not allow us to distinguish between a truly diffuse gas morphology and a uniform distribution of small clouds that are separated by less than the synthesized beam size (˜3″ or ˜100 pc), as they would both be invisible for the interferometer. This high velocity dispersion component has a dispersion similar to what is found in the atomic medium, as traced through observations of the H i line.

  8. Ultrahigh-throughput exfoliation of graphite into pristine ‘single-layer’ graphene using microwaves and molecularly engineered ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michio; Saito, Yusuke; Park, Chiyoung; Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-09-01

    Graphene has shown much promise as an organic electronic material but, despite recent achievements in the production of few-layer graphene, the quantitative exfoliation of graphite into pristine single-layer graphene has remained one of the main challenges in developing practical devices. Recently, reduced graphene oxide has been recognized as a non-feasible alternative to graphene owing to variable defect types and levels, and attention is turning towards reliable methods for the high-throughput exfoliation of graphite. Here we report that microwave irradiation of graphite suspended in molecularly engineered oligomeric ionic liquids allows for ultrahigh-efficiency exfoliation (93% yield) with a high selectivity (95%) towards ‘single-layer’ graphene (that is, with thicknesses oligomeric ionic liquids up to ~100 mg ml-1, and form physical gels in which an anisotropic orientation of graphene sheets, once induced by a magnetic field, is maintained.

  9. Edge-on gating effect in molecular wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wai-Yip; Bi, Wuguo; Li, Lianwei; Jung, In Hwan; Yu, Luping

    2015-02-11

    This work demonstrates edge-on chemical gating effect in molecular wires utilizing the pyridinoparacyclophane (PC) moiety as the gate. Different substituents with varied electronic demands are attached to the gate to simulate the effect of varying gating voltages similar to that in field-effect transistor (FET). It was observed that the orbital energy level and charge carrier's tunneling barriers can be tuned by changing the gating group from strong electron acceptors to strong electron donors. The single molecule conductance and current-voltage characteristics of this molecular system are truly similar to those expected for an actual single molecular transistor.

  10. Electronic properties of single-molecule junction: Effect of the molecular distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    For a model system consisting of a benzenedithio (BDT) molecule sandwiched between two Au plates, the electronic properties as a function of different BDT geometry are investigated using density functional theory. The distorted BDT structures are got through stretching the electrode distance. The corresponding electronic properties, including the spatial distribution of the frontier orbits, the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and density of states at the Fermi energy are determined. It reveals that the molecular distortion essentially determines electronic structures. The result should be beneficial to understand the stress-dependent or structure-dependent transport mechanism of electrons of the BDT junction.

  11. Transport mirages in single-molecule devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenzi, R.; Misiorny, M.; Burzurí, E.; Wegewijs, M. R.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular systems can exhibit a complex, chemically tailorable inner structure which allows for targeting of specific mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. At the single-molecule level, two major complementary ways to explore these properties are molecular quantum-dot structures and scanning probes. This article outlines comprehensive principles of electron-transport spectroscopy relevant to both these approaches and presents a new, high-resolution experiment on a high-spin single-molecule junction exemplifying these principles. Such spectroscopy plays a key role in further advancing our understanding of molecular and atomic systems, in particular, the relaxation of their spin. In this joint experimental and theoretical analysis, particular focus is put on the crossover between the resonant regime [single-electron tunneling] and the off-resonant regime [inelastic electron (co)tunneling spectroscopy (IETS)]. We show that the interplay of these two processes leads to unexpected mirages of resonances not captured by either of the two pictures alone. Although this turns out to be important in a large fraction of the possible regimes of level positions and bias voltages, it has been given little attention in molecular transport studies. Combined with nonequilibrium IETS—four-electron pump-probe excitations—these mirages provide crucial information on the relaxation of spin excitations. Our encompassing physical picture is supported by a master-equation approach that goes beyond weak coupling. The present work encourages the development of a broader connection between the fields of molecular quantum-dot and scanning probe spectroscopy.

  12. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    be considered. We have developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion by force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface by approaching a tipless AFM...... cantilever coated with the commercial cell adhesive CellTakTM. We applied the method to study adhesion of living cells to abiotic surfaces at the single-cell level. Immobilisation of single bacterial cells to the cantilever was stable for several hours, and viability was confirmed by Live/Dead staining...... on the adhesion force, we explored the bond formation and adhesive strength of four different bacterial strains towards three abiotic substrates with variable hydrophobicity and surface roughness. The adhesion force and final rupture length were dependent on bacterial strains, surfaces properties, and time...

  13. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Chundong

    2016-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F_i and the nonspecific force F_0 between a single Aβ–Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F_i between a single Aβ–Aβ pair in the presence of Cu"2"+, Zn"2"+, Ca"2"+ and Al"3"+ increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  14. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Chundong

    2016-09-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer's disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F i and the nonspecific force F 0 between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F i between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in the presence of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Al3+ increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  15. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua, E-mail: wjh@cqu.edu.cn; Liu, Chundong [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering (China)

    2016-09-15

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F{sub i} and the nonspecific force F{sub 0} between a single Aβ–Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F{sub i} between a single Aβ–Aβ pair in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  16. A Multi-step and Multi-level approach for Computer Aided Molecular Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The problem formulation step incorporates a knowledge base for the identification and setup of the design criteria. Candidate compounds are identified using a multi-level generate and test CAMD solution algorithm capable of designing molecules having a high level of molecular detail. A post solution step...... using an Integrated Computer Aided System (ICAS) for result analysis and verification is included in the methodology. Keywords: CAMD, separation processes, knowledge base, molecular design, solvent selection, substitution, group contribution, property prediction, ICAS Introduction The use of Computer...... Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) for the identification of compounds having specific physic...

  17. Identification of single-copy orthologous genes between Physalis and Solanum lycopersicum and analysis of genetic diversity in Physalis using molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Wei

    Full Text Available The genus Physalis includes a number of commercially important edible and ornamental species. Its high nutritional value and potential medicinal properties leads to the increased commercial interest in the products of this genus worldwide. However, lack of molecular markers prevents the detailed study of genetics and phylogeny in Physalis, which limits the progress of breeding. In the present study, we compared the DNA sequences between Physalis and tomato, and attempted to analyze genetic diversity in Physalis using tomato markers. Blasting 23180 DNA sequences derived from Physalis against the International Tomato Annotation Group (ITAG Release2.3 Predicted CDS (SL2.40 discovered 3356 single-copy orthologous genes between them. A total of 38 accessions from at least six species of Physalis were subjected to genetic diversity analysis using 97 tomato markers and 25 SSR markers derived from P. peruviana. Majority (73.2% of tomato markers could amplify DNA fragments from at least one accession of Physalis. Diversity in Physalis at molecular level was also detected. The average Nei's genetic distance between accessions was 0.3806 with a range of 0.2865 to 0.7091. These results indicated Physalis and tomato had similarity at both molecular marker and DNA sequence levels. Therefore, the molecular markers developed in tomato can be used in genetic study in Physalis.

  18. Spatially extended and high-velocity dispersion molecular component in spiral galaxies: Single-dish versus interferometric observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of the molecular medium in nearby galaxies have provided mounting evidence that the molecular gas can exist in two phases: one that is clumpy and organized as molecular clouds and another one that is more diffuse. This last component has a higher velocity dispersion than the clumpy one. In order to investigate these two molecular components further, we compare the fluxes and line widths of CO in NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, two nearby spiral galaxies for which high-quality interferometric as well as single-dish data sets are available. Our analysis leads to two main results: (1) employing three different methods, we determine the flux recovery of the interferometer as compared to the single-dish to be within a range of 35%–74% for NGC 4736 and 81%–92% for NGC 5055, and (2) when focusing on high (S/N ≥ 5) lines of sight (LOSs), the single-dish line widths are larger by ∼(40 ± 20)% than the ones derived from interferometric data, which is in agreement with stacking all LOSs. These results point to a molecular gas component that is distributed over spatial scales larger than 30″(∼1 kpc), and is therefore filtered out by the interferometer. The available observations do not allow us to distinguish between a truly diffuse gas morphology and a uniform distribution of small clouds that are separated by less than the synthesized beam size (∼3″ or ∼100 pc), as they would both be invisible for the interferometer. This high velocity dispersion component has a dispersion similar to what is found in the atomic medium, as traced through observations of the H i line.

  19. A Comprehensive Experiment for Molecular Biology: Determination of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human REV3 Gene Using PCR-RFLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of…

  20. Atomically precise graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions from a single molecular precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang D.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Omrani, Arash A.; Marangoni, Tomas; Wu, Meng; Rizzo, Daniel J.; Rodgers, Griffin F.; Cloke, Ryan R.; Durr, Rebecca A.; Sakai, Yuki; Liou, Franklin; Aikawa, Andrew S.; Chelikowsky, James R.; Louie, Steven G.; Fischer, Felix R.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2017-11-01

    The rational bottom-up synthesis of atomically defined graphene nanoribbon (GNR) heterojunctions represents an enabling technology for the design of nanoscale electronic devices. Synthetic strategies used thus far have relied on the random copolymerization of two electronically distinct molecular precursors to yield GNR heterojunctions. Here we report the fabrication and electronic characterization of atomically precise GNR heterojunctions prepared through late-stage functionalization of chevron GNRs obtained from a single precursor. Post-growth excitation of fully cyclized GNRs induces cleavage of sacrificial carbonyl groups, resulting in atomically well-defined heterojunctions within a single GNR. The GNR heterojunction structure was characterized using bond-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy, which enables chemical bond imaging at T = 4.5 K. Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy reveals that band alignment across the heterojunction interface yields a type II heterojunction, in agreement with first-principles calculations. GNR heterojunction band realignment proceeds over a distance less than 1 nm, leading to extremely large effective fields.

  1. Excess electron is trapped in a large single molecular cage C60F60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Li, Zhi-Ru; Wu, Di; Sun, Chia-Chung; Gu, Feng-Long

    2010-01-15

    A new kind of solvated electron systems, sphere-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (I(h)) and capsule-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (D6h), in contrast to the endohedral complex M@C60, is represented at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) + dBF (diffusive basis functions) density functional theory. It is proven, by examining the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) and the spin density map of e(-)@C60F60, that the excess electron is indeed encapsulated inside the C60F60 cage. The shape of the electron cloud in SOMO matches with the shape of C60F60 cage. These cage-like single molecular solvated electrons have considerably large vertical electron detachment energies VDE of 4.95 (I(h)) and 4.67 eV (D6h) at B3LYP/6-31+G(3df) + dBF level compared to the VDE of 3.2 eV for an electron in bulk water (Coe et al., Int Rev Phys Chem 2001, 20, 33) and that of 3.66 eV for e(-)@C20F20 (Irikura, J Phys Chem A 2008, 112, 983), which shows their higher stability. The VDE of the sphere-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (I(h)) is greater than that of the capsule-shaped e(-)@C60F60 (D6h), indicating that the excess electron prefers to reside in the cage with the higher symmetry to form the more stable solvated electron. It is also noticed that the cage size [7.994 (I(h)), 5.714 and 9.978 A (D6h) in diameter] is much larger than that (2.826 A) of (H2O)20- dodecahedral cluster (Khan, Chem Phys Lett 2005, 401, 85). Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Plant Systems Biology at the Single-Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libault, Marc; Pingault, Lise; Zogli, Prince; Schiefelbein, John

    2017-11-01

    Our understanding of plant biology is increasingly being built upon studies using 'omics and system biology approaches performed at the level of the entire plant, organ, or tissue. Although these approaches open new avenues to better understand plant biology, they suffer from the cellular complexity of the analyzed sample. Recent methodological advances now allow plant scientists to overcome this limitation and enable biological analyses of single-cells or single-cell-types. Coupled with the development of bioinformatics and functional genomics resources, these studies provide opportunities for high-resolution systems analyses of plant phenomena. In this review, we describe the recent advances, current challenges, and future directions in exploring the biology of single-cells and single-cell-types to enhance our understanding of plant biology as a system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of Venus at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Charlotte C; Dedecker, Peter; De Cremer, Gert; Verstraeten, Natalie; Kint, Cyrielle; Michiels, Jan; Hofkens, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Venus is a recently developed, fast maturating, yellow fluorescent protein that has been used as a probe for in vivo applications. In the present work the photophysical characteristics of Venus were analyzed spectroscopically at the bulk and single molecule level. Through time-resolved single molecule measurements we found that single molecules of Venus display pronounced fluctuations in fluorescence emission, with clear fluorescence on- and off-times. These fluorescence intermittencies were found to occupy a broad range of time scales, ranging from milliseconds to several seconds. Such long off-times can complicate the analysis of single molecule counting experiments or single-molecule FRET experiments. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  4. Evaluation of the molecular level visualisation approach for teaching and learning chemistry in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenglengdi, Butsari

    This research evaluates the use of a molecular level visualisation approach in Thai secondary schools. The goal is to obtain insights about the usefulness of this approach, and to examine possible improvements in how the approach might be applied in the future. The methodology used for this research used both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data were collected in the form of pre- and post-intervention multiple choice questions, open-ended-questions, drawing exercises, one-to-one interviews and video recordings of class activity. The research was conducted in two phases, involving a total of 261 students from the 11th Grade in Thailand. The use of VisChem animations in three studies was evaluated in Phase I. Study 1 was a pilot study exploring the benefits of incorporating VisChem animations to portray the molecular level. Study 2 compared test results between students exposed to these animations of molecular level events, and those not. Finally, in Study 3, test results were gathered from different types of schools (a rural school, a city school, and a university school). The results showed that students (and teachers) had misconceptions at the molecular level, and VisChem animations could help students understand chemistry concepts at the molecular level across all three types of schools. While the animation treatment group had a better score on the topic of states of water, the non-animation treatment group had a better score on the topic of dissolving sodium chloride in water than the animation group. The molecular level visualisation approach as a learning design was evaluated in Phase II. This approach involved a combination of VisChem animations, pictures, and diagrams together with the seven-step VisChem learning design. The study involved three classes of students, each with a different treatment, described as Class A - Traditional approach; Class B - VisChem animations with traditional approach; and Class C - Molecular level visualisation approach

  5. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten; Luka-Guth, Katharina; Wieser, Matthias; Lokamani; Wolf, Jannic Sebastian; Helm, Manfred; Gemming, Sibylle; Kerbusch, Jochen; Scheer, Elke; Huhn, Thomas; Erbe, Artur

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  6. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  7. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  8. Single and double charge transfer in Be/sup 4+/+He collisions: A molecular (Feshbach) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-01-01

    In recent articles, we pointed out the fundamental difference between the molecular treatment of processes involving a multicharged ion and hydrogen or helium atoms, which is the (formal) autoionizing character of the molecular channels, and we reported a (new) implementation of the Feshbach method to calculate the molecular energies and couplings. In the present work we use the wave functions calculated with this Feshbach method for the BeHe/sup 4+/ quasimolecule, introduce a common translation factor in the formalism, and calculate the single and double charge-exchange cross sections in Be/sup 4+/+He(1s 2 ) collisions for impact energies 0.2--20 keV/amu. The mechanisms of the processes are discussed in detail

  9. Single and double charge transfer in Be/sup 4+/+He collisions: A molecular (Feshbach) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-12-01

    In recent articles, we pointed out the fundamental difference between the molecular treatment of processes involving a multicharged ion and hydrogen or helium atoms, which is the (formal) autoionizing character of the molecular channels, and we reported a (new) implementation of the Feshbach method to calculate the molecular energies and couplings. In the present work we use the wave functions calculated with this Feshbach method for the BeHe/sup 4+/ quasimolecule, introduce a common translation factor in the formalism, and calculate the single and double charge-exchange cross sections in Be/sup 4+/+He(1s/sup 2/) collisions for impact energies 0.2--20 keV/amu. The mechanisms of the processes are discussed in detail.

  10. Pumping $ac$ Josephson current in the Single Molecular Magnets by spin nutation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahipour, B.; Abouie, J.; Rostami, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that an {\\it ac} Josephson current is pumped through the Single Molecular Magnets (SMM) by the spin nutation. The spin nutation is generated by applying a time dependent magnetic field to the SMM. We obtain the flowing charge current through the junction by working in the tunneling limit and employing Green's function technique. At the resonance conditions some discontinuities and divergencies are appeared in the normal and Josephson currents, respectively. Such discontinuities...

  11. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single

  12. Uncovering molecular processes in crystal nucleation and growth by using molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Jamshed; Zahn, Dirk

    2011-02-25

    Exploring nucleation processes by molecular simulation provides a mechanistic understanding at the atomic level and also enables kinetic and thermodynamic quantities to be estimated. However, whilst the potential for modeling crystal nucleation and growth processes is immense, there are specific technical challenges to modeling. In general, rare events, such as nucleation cannot be simulated using a direct "brute force" molecular dynamics approach. The limited time and length scales that are accessible by conventional molecular dynamics simulations have inspired a number of advances to tackle problems that were considered outside the scope of molecular simulation. While general insights and features could be explored from efficient generic models, new methods paved the way to realistic crystal nucleation scenarios. The association of single ions in solvent environments, the mechanisms of motif formation, ripening reactions, and the self-organization of nanocrystals can now be investigated at the molecular level. The analysis of interactions with growth-controlling additives gives a new understanding of functionalized nanocrystals and the precipitation of composite materials. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of AFM studies of a single polymer chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenhai; Kistler, Kurt A.; Sadeghipour, Keya; Baran, George

    2008-01-01

    Single polymer chain force-extension behavior measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was interpreted by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation performed by applying a bead-spring (coarse-graining) model in which the bond potential function between adjacent beads is described by a worm-like chain (WLC) model. Simulation results indicate that caution should be applied when interpreting experimental AFM data, because the data vary depending on the point of AFM tip-polymer chain attachment. This approach offers an effective way for eventual analysis of the mechanical behavior of complex polymer networks

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of AFM studies of a single polymer chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wenhai [Center for Bioengineering and Biomaterials, College of Engineering, Temple University, 1947 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Kistler, Kurt A. [Department of Chemistry, Temple University, 1901 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Sadeghipour, Keya [Center for Bioengineering and Biomaterials, College of Engineering, Temple University, 1947 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Baran, George [Center for Bioengineering and Biomaterials, College of Engineering, Temple University, 1947 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States)], E-mail: grbaran@temple.edu

    2008-11-24

    Single polymer chain force-extension behavior measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was interpreted by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation performed by applying a bead-spring (coarse-graining) model in which the bond potential function between adjacent beads is described by a worm-like chain (WLC) model. Simulation results indicate that caution should be applied when interpreting experimental AFM data, because the data vary depending on the point of AFM tip-polymer chain attachment. This approach offers an effective way for eventual analysis of the mechanical behavior of complex polymer networks.

  15. IMMEDIATE RECIPROCAL CHANGES AT ADJACENT LEVEL FOLLOWING SINGLE-LEVEL ALIF

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe, Enrique Vargas; Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Jensen, Rubens; Oliveira, Leonardo; Fortti, Fernanda; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective : To assess the segmental sagittal parameters and the adjacent mobile segment after interbody fusion by anterior approach in single-level L5-S1. Methods : Retrospective study. Inclusion: Interbody fusion by anterior approach (10°/15° angle), due to DDD, low-grade spondylolisthesis and/or stenosis without prior lumbar fusion. Thirty-five cases were included (25 women; mean age 47±15 years). Analysis of lumbar radiographs were performed preoperatively and 3 months after surgery. The ...

  16. Simulation of aerosol flow interaction with a solid body on molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelyushkin, Ivan A.; Stasenko, Albert L.

    2018-05-01

    Physico-mathematical models and numerical algorithm of two-phase flow interaction with a solid body are developed. Results of droplet motion and its impingement upon a rough surface in real gas boundary layer simulation on the molecular level obtained via molecular dynamics technique are presented.

  17. Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen the development of a number of novel biophysical methods that allow the manipulation and study of individual biomolecules. The ability to monitor biological processes at this fundamental level of sensitivity has given rise to an improved understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Through the removal of ensemble averaging, distributions and fluctuations of molecular properties can be characterized, transient intermediates identified, and catalytic mechanisms elucidated. By applying forces on biomolecules while monitoring their activity, important information can be obtained on how proteins couple function to structure. The Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics provides an introduction to these techniques and presents an extensive discussion of the new biological insights obtained from them. Coverage includes: Experimental techniques to monitor and manipulate individual biomolecules The use of single-molecule techniques in super-resolution and functional imaging Single-molec...

  18. Investigating Alkylsilane Monolayer Tribology at a Single-Asperity Contact with Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Andrew Z; Iacovella, Christopher R; Cummings, Peter T; McCabe, Clare

    2017-10-24

    Chemisorbed monolayer films are known to possess favorable characteristics for nanoscale lubrication of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS). Prior studies have shown that the friction observed for monolayer-coated surfaces features a strong dependence on the geometry of contact. Specifically, tip-like geometries have been shown to penetrate into monolayer films, inducing defects in the monolayer chains and leading to plowing mechanisms during shear, which result in higher coefficients of friction (COF) than those observed for planar geometries. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the tribology of model silica single-asperity contacts under shear with monolayer-coated substrates featuring various film densities. It is observed that lower monolayer densities lead to reduced COFs, in contrast to results for planar systems where COF is found to be nearly independent of monolayer density. This is attributed to a liquid-like response to shear, whereby fewer defects are imparted in monolayer chains from the asperity, and chains are easily displaced by the tip as a result of the higher free volume. This transition in the mechanism of molecular plowing suggests that liquid-like films should provide favorable lubrication at single-asperity contacts.

  19. Fluctuation in Interface and Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Investigated by Current versus Bias Voltage Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-14

    Structural and electronic detail at the metal-molecule interface has a significant impact on the charge transport across the molecular junctions, but its precise understanding and control still remain elusive. On the single-molecule scale, the metal-molecule interface structures and relevant charge transport properties are subject to fluctuation, which contain the fundamental science of single-molecule transport and implication for manipulability of the transport properties in electronic devices. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to investigate the fluctuation in the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage ( I- V) measurements in combination with first-principles simulation. Contrary to conventional molecular conductance studies, this I- V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface and the molecular orbital energy level. This statistical approach was employed to study fluctuation in single-molecule junctions of 1,4-butanediamine (DAB), pyrazine (PY), 4,4'-bipyridine (BPY), and fullerene (C 60 ). We demonstrate that molecular-dependent fluctuation of σ-, π-, and π-plane-type interfaces can be captured by analyzing the molecular orbital (MO) energy level under mechanical perturbation. While the MO level of DAB with the σ-type interface shows weak distance dependence and fluctuation, the MO level of PY, BPY, and C 60 features unique distance dependence and molecular-dependent fluctuation against the mechanical perturbation. The MO level of PY and BPY with the σ+π-type interface increases with the increase in the stretch distance. In contrast, the MO level of C 60 with the π-plane-type interface decreases with the increase in the stretching perturbation. This study provides an approach to resolve the structural and electronic fluctuation in the single-molecule junctions and insight into the molecular-dependent fluctuation in

  20. Electrochemical proton relay at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Medvedev, I. G.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    A scheme for the experimental study of single-proton transfer events, based on proton-coupled two-electron transfer between a proton donor and a proton acceptor molecule confined in the tunneling gap between two metal leads in electrolyte solution is suggested. Expressions for the electric current...... are derived and compared with formalism for electron tunneling through redox molecules. The scheme allows studying the kinetics of proton and hydrogen atom transfer as well as kinetic isotope effects at the single-molecule level under electrochemical potential control....

  1. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Single Molecular Magnets Coupled to Ferromagnetic Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2006-01-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction with tunneling electrons is shown to affect the spin reversal due to QTM. ...

  2. Magnetic Switching of a Single Molecular Magnet due to Spin-Polarized Current

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet (SMM) due to spin-polarized current flowing between ferromagnetic metallic electrodes is investigated theoretically. Magnetic moments of the electrodes are assumed to be collinear and parallel to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule. Electrons tunneling through a barrier between magnetic leads are coupled to the SMM via exchange interaction. The current flowing through the system as well as the spin relaxation times of the SMM are calculated f...

  3. Site-Selection in Single-Molecule Junction for Highly Reproducible Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Murai, Daigo; Marqués-González, Santiago; Nakamura, Hisao; Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-02-03

    Adsorption sites of molecules critically determine the electric/photonic properties and the stability of heterogeneous molecule-metal interfaces. Then, selectivity of adsorption site is essential for development of the fields including organic electronics, catalysis, and biology. However, due to current technical limitations, site-selectivity, i.e., precise determination of the molecular adsorption site, remains a major challenge because of difficulty in precise selection of meaningful one among the sites. We have succeeded the single site-selection at a single-molecule junction by performing newly developed hybrid technique: simultaneous characterization of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The I-V response of 1,4-benzenedithiol junctions reveals the existence of three metastable states arising from different adsorption sites. Notably, correlated SERS measurements show selectivity toward one of the adsorption sites: "bridge sites". This site-selectivity represents an essential step toward the reliable integration of individual molecules on metallic surfaces. Furthermore, the hybrid spectro-electric technique reveals the dependence of the SERS intensity on the strength of the molecule-metal interaction, showing the interdependence between the optical and electronic properties in single-molecule junctions.

  4. Engineering Molecular Immunity Against Plant Viruses

    KAUST Repository

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali; Tashkandi, Manal; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-01-01

    Genomic engineering has been used to precisely alter eukaryotic genomes at the single-base level for targeted gene editing, replacement, fusion, and mutagenesis, and plant viruses such as Tobacco rattle virus have been developed into efficient vectors for delivering genome-engineering reagents. In addition to altering the host genome, these methods can target pathogens to engineer molecular immunity. Indeed, recent studies have shown that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) systems that target the genomes of DNA viruses can interfere with viral activity and limit viral symptoms in planta, demonstrating the utility of this system for engineering molecular immunity in plants. CRISPR/Cas9 can efficiently target single and multiple viral infections and confer plant immunity. Here, we discuss the use of site-specific nucleases to engineer molecular immunity against DNA and RNA viruses in plants. We also explore how to address the potential challenges encountered when producing plants with engineered resistance to single and mixed viral infections.

  5. Engineering Molecular Immunity Against Plant Viruses

    KAUST Repository

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali

    2017-04-26

    Genomic engineering has been used to precisely alter eukaryotic genomes at the single-base level for targeted gene editing, replacement, fusion, and mutagenesis, and plant viruses such as Tobacco rattle virus have been developed into efficient vectors for delivering genome-engineering reagents. In addition to altering the host genome, these methods can target pathogens to engineer molecular immunity. Indeed, recent studies have shown that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) systems that target the genomes of DNA viruses can interfere with viral activity and limit viral symptoms in planta, demonstrating the utility of this system for engineering molecular immunity in plants. CRISPR/Cas9 can efficiently target single and multiple viral infections and confer plant immunity. Here, we discuss the use of site-specific nucleases to engineer molecular immunity against DNA and RNA viruses in plants. We also explore how to address the potential challenges encountered when producing plants with engineered resistance to single and mixed viral infections.

  6. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Level crossing in a molecular Cr8 ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affronte, M.; Guidi, T.; Caciuffo, R.; Carretta, S.; Amoretti, G.; Hinderer, J.; Sheikin, I.; Smith, A.A.; Winpenny, R.E.P.; Slageren, J. van; Gatteschi, D.

    2004-01-01

    The heat capacity of a molecular Cr 8 ring was measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field in order to follow the evolution of the Schottky anomaly through the first (S=0 to |1,-1>) level crossing occurring at B c1 =6.9 T. The results are interpreted within the framework of a spin Hamiltonian approach and they nicely fit the pattern of the energy levels derived by inelastic neutron spectroscopy. At B c1 , the Schottky anomaly almost vanishes suggesting that a true crossing occurs in Cr 8 in contrast to what was observed for ferric wheels

  8. DNA detection and single nucleotide mutation identification using SERS for molecular diagnostics and global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoan T.; Gandra, Naveen; Fales, Andrew M.; Taylor, Steve M.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2017-02-01

    Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) and in resource-limited settings is still a challenge. We present a sensitive yet simple DNA detection method with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification capability. The detection scheme involves sandwich hybridization of magnetic beads conjugated with capture probes, target sequences, and ultrabright surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) nanorattles conjugated with reporter probes. Upon hybridization, the sandwich probes are concentrated at the detection focus controlled by a magnetic system for SERS measurements. The ultrabright SERS nanorattles, consisting of a core and a shell with resonance Raman reporters loaded in the gap space between the core and the shell, serve as SERS tags for ultrasensitive signal detection. Specific DNA sequences of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and dengue virus 1 (DENV1) were used as the model marker system. Detection limit of approximately 100 attomoles was achieved. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination of wild type malaria DNA and mutant malaria DNA, which confers resistance to artemisinin drugs, was also demonstrated. The results demonstrate the molecular diagnostic potential of the nanorattle-based method to both detect and genotype infectious pathogens. The method's simplicity makes it a suitable candidate for molecular diagnosis at the POC and in resource-limited settings.

  9. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Kaname [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamashita, Kenichi, E-mail: yamasita@kit.ac.jp [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yanagi, Hisao [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2016-08-08

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  10. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-08-01

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ˜100 meV even in the "half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing" microcavity structure.

  11. Strong exciton-photon coupling in organic single crystal microcavity with high molecular orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yanagi, Hisao; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Strong exciton-photon coupling has been observed in a highly oriented organic single crystal microcavity. This microcavity consists of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) single crystal laminated on a high-reflection distributed Bragg reflector. In the TPCO crystal, molecular transition dipole was strongly polarized along a certain horizontal directions with respect to the main crystal plane. This dipole polarization causes significantly large anisotropies in the exciton transition and optical constants. Especially the anisotropic exciton transition was found to provide the strong enhancement in the coupling with the cavity mode, which was demonstrated by a Rabi splitting energy as large as ∼100 meV even in the “half-vertical cavity surface emitting lasing” microcavity structure.

  12. Light and redox switchable molecular components for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2010-01-01

    The field of molecular and organic electronics has seen rapid progress in recent years, developing from concept and design to actual demonstration devices in which both single molecules and self-assembled monolayers are employed as light-responsive components. Research in this field has seen numerous unexpected challenges that have slowed progress and the initial promise of complex molecular-based computers has not yet been realised. Primarily this has been due to the realisation at an early stage that molecular-based nano-electronics brings with it the interface between the hard (semiconductor) and soft (molecular) worlds and the challenges which accompany working in such an environment. Issues such as addressability, cross-talk, molecular stability and perturbation of molecular properties (e.g., inhibition of photochemistry) have nevertheless driven development in molecular design and synthesis as well as our ability to interface molecular components with bulk metal contacts to a very high level of sophistication. Numerous groups have played key roles in progressing this field not least teams such as those led by Whitesides, Aviram, Ratner, Stoddart and Heath. In this short review we will however focus on the contributions from our own group and those of our collaborators, in employing diarylethene based molecular components.

  13. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references

  14. Molecular investigation of evaporation of biodroplets containing single-strand DNA on graphene surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Fahimeh; Foroutan, Masumeh

    2018-02-14

    In this study, the water droplet behaviour of four different types of single-strand DNA with homogeneous base sequence on a graphene substrate during evaporation of the droplet was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation results indicated that the evaporation depended on the DNA sequence. The observed changes can be divided into four parts: (i) vaporization mode, (ii) evaporation flux, (iii) mechanism of single-strand placement on the surface, and (iv) consideration of remaining single strands after evaporation. Our simulation observations indicated different evaporation modes for thymine biodroplets as compared to those for other biodroplets. The evaporation of the thymine biodroplets occurred with an increase in the contact angle, while that of the other biodroplets occur in a constant contact angle mode. Moreover, thymine biodroplets generate the lowest contact line compared to other single strands, and it is always placed far away from the centre of the droplets during evaporation. Investigating variations in the evaporation flux shows that thymine has the highest evaporation flux and guanine has the lowest. Moreover, during initial evaporation, the flux of evaporation increases at the triple point of the biodroplets containing thymine single strands, while it decreases in the other biodroplets. The following observation was obtained from the study of the placement of single strands on the substrate: guanine and thymine interacted slower than other single strands during evaporation with graphene, adenine single strand had a higher folding during evaporation, and guanine single strand showed the lowest end-to-end distance. The investigation of single-strand DNA after evaporation shows that adenine produces the most stable structure at the end of evaporation. In addition, cytosine is the most stretched single-strand DNA due to its lack of internal π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding. Therefore, cytosine single strand is more

  15. Elevated levels of high-molecular-weight adiponectin in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, H.; Andersen, K.K.; Frystyk, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that type 1 diabetic patients have elevated total levels of the adipocyte-derived adipocytokine adiponectin. However, adiponectin circulates in three different subforms, and the high-molecular-weight (HMW) subform is believed to be the primary biologically...... active form. The effects of the medium-molecular-weight (MMW) subform and the low-molecular-weight (LMW) subform are still unresolved. PURPOSE: The objective of the study was to investigate the distribution of the three molecular subforms of adiponectin in well-characterized groups of type 1 diabetics...... with varying degrees of nephropathy as well as in healthy control subjects. STUDY POPULATION: Two hundred seven individuals were included: 58 type 1 diabetics with normoalbuminuria, 46 with microalbuminuria, 46 with macroalbuminuria, and 57 matched controls. METHODS: The HMW, MMW, and LMW subforms were...

  16. Single intra-articular injection of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid for hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    Intra-articular (IA) injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) into the hip joint appears to be safe and well tolerated but only a small number of randomized clinical trials in humans has been published. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single IA injection of high-molecular-weight (2800 kDa) HA (Coxarthrum) for hip osteoarthritis. All patients received a single IA administration of 2.5 % sodium hyaluronate (75 mg/3 mL) of high molecular weight. Fluoroscopy requires an iodized contrast medium (iopamidol, 1 ml) which highlights the capsule before administering HA. Patients were evaluated before IA injection (T0), after 3 months, after 6 months and after 1 year from injection. Results were evaluated by the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI II), Harris Hip Score and a visual analog scale of pain (pain VAS). All treated patients were considered for statistical analysis. Two hundred seven patients were included at T0. The mean age was 67 years (range 46-81). Regarding BPI severity score, changes in pain between T0 and the three following visits were statistically highly significant (p injection of Coxarthrum is effective from the third month and that the results are stable or continue to improve up to 1 year. IV.

  17. Nonequilibrium Chemical Effects in Single-Molecule SERS Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sean A.; Apra, Edoardo; Govind, Niranjan; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-02-03

    Recent developments in nanophotonics have paved the way for achieving significant advances in the realm of single molecule chemical detection, imaging, and dynamics. In particular, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful analytical technique that is now routinely used to identify the chemical identity of single molecules. Understanding how nanoscale physical and chemical processes affect single molecule SERS spectra and selection rules is a challenging task, and is still actively debated. Herein, we explore underappreciated chemical phenomena in ultrasensitive SERS. We observe a fluctuating excited electronic state manifold, governed by the conformational dynamics of a molecule (4,4’-dimercaptostilbene, DMS) interacting with a metallic cluster (Ag20). This affects our simulated single molecule SERS spectra; the time trajectories of a molecule interacting with its unique local environment dictates the relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states. Ab initio molecular dynamics of a model Ag20-DMS system are used to illustrate both concepts in light of recent experimental results.

  18. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...... constants display tunneling features with distance-decay factors of 0.83 and 0.91 angstrom(-1) in H2O and D2O, respectively. Redox-gated tunneling resonance is observed in situ at the single-molecule level by using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, exhibiting an asymmetric dependence...

  19. Counting constituents in molecular complexes by fluorescence photon antibunching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fore, S; Laurence, T; Hollars, C; Huser, T

    2007-04-17

    Modern single molecule fluorescence microscopy offers new, highly quantitative ways of studying the systems biology of cells while keeping the cells healthy and alive in their natural environment. In this context, a quantum optical technique, photon antibunching, has found a small niche in the continuously growing applications of single molecule techniques to small molecular complexes. Here, we review some of the most recent applications of photon antibunching in biophotonics, and we provide a guide for how to conduct photon antibunching experiments at the single molecule level by applying techniques borrowed from time-correlated single photon counting. We provide a number of new examples for applications of photon antibunching to the study of multichromophoric molecules and small molecular complexes.

  20. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) Dispersed in Bile Salt Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Frederick, Jr.; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNCTs) are materials with structural, electronic and optical properties that make them attractive for a myriad of advanced technology applications. A practical barrier to their use is that SWCNT synthesis techniques produce heterogeneous mixtures of varying lengths and chirality, whereas applications generally require tubes with narrow size distributions and individual type. Most separation techniques currently in use to obtain monodisperse tube fractions rely on dispersion of these materials in aqueous solution using surfactants. The dispersion process results in a mixture of colloidal structures in which individual tubes are dispersed and contained in a surfactant shell. Understanding the structure and properties of the SWCNT-surfactant complex at the molecular level, and how this is affected by chirality, is key to understanding and improving separations processes. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the structure and properties of SWCNT-surfactant colloidal complexes. We tested a number of methods and protocols in order to build an accurate model for simulating SWCNT systems for a variety of bile salt surfactants as well as anionic co-surfactants, components that are widely used and important in experimental separation studies at NIST. The custom force field parameters used here will be stored in WebFF, a Web-hosted smart force-field repository for polymeric and organic materials being developed at NIST for the Materials Genome Initiative.

  1. Effect of Internal Heteroatoms on Level Alignment at Metal/Molecular Monolayer/Si Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alon, Hadas; Garrick, Rachel; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Toledano, Tal; Sinai, Ofer; Kedem, Nir; Bendikov, Tatyana; Baio, Joe E.; Weidner, Tobias; Zuilhof, Han; Cahen, David; Kronik, Leeor; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Vilan, Ayelet

    2018-01-01

    Molecular monolayers at metal/semiconductor heterointerfaces affect electronic energy level alignment at the interface by modifying the interface's electrical dipole. On a free surface, the molecular dipole is usually manipulated by means of substitution at its external end. However, at an interface

  2. new topology for single-phase, three-level, spwm vsi with lc filter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    level PWM inverter. However, this is not the case with single-phase PWM inverters. In these days, the popular single-phase inverters adopt the full-bridge type using approximate sinusoidal modulation technique. The output voltage in them has two values: zero and pos- itive supply dc voltage levels in the positive half cycle.

  3. experimental implementation of single-phase, three-level, sinusoidal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Page 1 ... of many multilevel inverter configurations. This paper presents an experimental report of a simplified topology for single-phase, SPWM, three-level voltage source inverter wit R-L load. To keep the power circuit ... employed in many industrial applications such as variable speed drives, uninterruptible power sup-.

  4. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  5. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2016-06-01

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. The main advantage of such surrogates, once generated, is the capability of accurately computing the needed thermodynamic quantities in a few seconds, thus efficiently replacing the computationally expensive MC molecular simulations. Benefiting from the tremendous computational time reduction, the PC surrogates were used to conduct large-scale optimization in order to propose single-site LJ models for several simple molecules. Experimental data, a set of supercritical isotherms, and part of the two-phase envelope, of several pure components were used for tuning the LJ parameters (ε, σ). Based on the conducted optimization, excellent fit was obtained for different noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) and other small molecules (CH4, N2, and CO). On the other hand, due to the simplicity of the LJ model used, dramatic deviations between simulation and experimental data were observed, especially in the two-phase region, for more complex molecules such as CO2 and C2 H6.

  6. Observation of molecular level behavior in molecular electronic junction device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitani, Masato

    In this dissertation, I utilize AFM based scanning probe measurement and surface enhanced Raman scattering based vibrational spectroscopic analysis to directly characterize topographic, electronic, and chemical properties of molecules confined in the local area of M3 junction to elucidate the molecular level behavior of molecular junction electronic devices. In the introduction, the characterization of molecular electronic devices with different types of metal-molecule-metal (M3) structures based upon self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is reviewed. A background of the characterization methods I use in this dissertation, conducting probe atomic force microscopy (cp-AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), is provided in chapter 1. Several attempts are performed to create the ideal top metal contacts on SAMs by metal vapor phase deposition in order to prevent the metal penetration inducing critical defects of the molecular electronic devices. The scanning probe microscopy (SPM), such as cp-AFM, contact mode (c-) AFM and non-contact mode (nc-) AFM, in ultra high vacuum conditions are utilized to study the process of the metal-SAM interface construction in terms of the correlation between the morphological and electrical properties including the metal nucleation and filament generation as a function of the functionalization of long-chain alkane thiolate SAMs on Au. In chapter 2, the nascent condensation process of vapor phase Al deposition on inert and reactive SAMs are studied by SPM. The results of top deposition, penetration, and filament generation of deposited Al are discussed and compared to the results previously observed by spectroscopic measurements. Cp-AFM was shown to provide new insights into Al filament formation which has not been observed by conventional spectroscopic analysis. Additionally, the electronic characteristics of individual Al filaments are measured. Chapter 3 reveals SPM characterization of Au deposition onto --COOH terminated SAMs

  7. Exploring Biomolecular Interactions Through Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy and Computational Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Molecular interactions between cellular components such as proteins and nucleic acids govern the fundamental processes of living systems. Technological advancements in the past decade have allowed the characterization of these molecular interactions at the single-molecule level with high temporal and spatial resolution. Simultaneously, progress in computer simulation has enabled theoretical research at the atomistic level, assisting in the interpretation of experimental results. This thesi...

  8. Renormalized molecular levels in a Sc3N@C-80 molecular electronic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larade, Brian; Taylor, Jeremy Philip; Zheng, Q. R.

    2001-01-01

    We address several general questions about quantum transport through molecular systems by an ab initio analysis of a scandium-nitrogen doped C-80 metallofullerene device. Charge transfer from the Sc3N is found to drastically change the current-voltage characteristics: the current through the Sc3N...... levels and main transmission features shift in energy corresponding to half the applied bias voltage. This is also consistent with our finding that the voltage drops by V-b/2 at each molecule/electrode contact....

  9. Multi-scale Modeling of Compressible Single-phase Flow in Porous Media using Molecular Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an efficient coupling between Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Darcy-scale flow in porous media is presented. The cell-centered finite difference method with a non-uniform rectangular mesh were used to discretize the simulation domain and solve the governing equations. To speed up the MC simulations, we implemented a recently developed scheme that quickly generates MC Markov chains out of pre-computed ones, based on the reweighting and reconstruction algorithm. This method astonishingly reduces the required computational time by MC simulations from hours to seconds. In addition, the reweighting and reconstruction scheme, which was originally designed to work with the LJ potential model, is extended to work with a potential model that accounts for the molecular quadrupole moment of fluids with non-spherical molecules such as CO2. The potential model was used to simulate the thermodynamic equilibrium properties for single-phase and two-phase systems using the canonical ensemble and the Gibbs ensemble, respectively. Comparing the simulation results with the experimental data showed that the implemented model has an excellent fit outperforming the standard LJ model. To demonstrate the strength of the proposed coupling in terms of computational time efficiency and numerical accuracy in fluid properties, various numerical experiments covering different compressible single-phase flow scenarios were conducted. The novelty in the introduced scheme is in allowing an efficient coupling of the molecular scale and Darcy scale in reservoir simulators. This leads to an accurate description of the thermodynamic behavior of the simulated reservoir fluids; consequently enhancing the confidence in the flow predictions in porous media.

  10. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron......, however, was obtained by a study of a single molecular transistor. The investigated OPE5-TTF compound was captured in a three-terminal experiment, whereby manipulation of the molecule’s electronic spin was possible in different charge states. Thus, we demonstrated how the cruciform molecules could...

  11. Revised energy levels of singly ionized lanthanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzelçimen, Feyza; Tonka, Mehdi; Uddin, Zaheer; Bhatti, Naveed Anjum; Windholz, Laurentius; Kröger, Sophie; Başar, Gönül

    2018-05-01

    Based on the experimental wavenumbers of 344 spectral lines from calibrated Fourier transform (FT) spectra as well as wavenumbers of 81 lines from the wavelength tables from literature, the energy of 115 fine structure levels of singly ionized lanthanum has been revised by weighted global fits. The classifications of the lines are provided by numerous previous investigations of lanthanum by different spectroscopic methods and authors. For the high accurate determination of the center of gravity wavenumbers from the experimental spectrum, the hyperfine constants of the involved levels have been taken into account, if possible. For the 94 levels with known hyperfine constants the accuracy of energy values is better than 0.01 cm-1. For 34 levels the magnetic dipole hyperfine constants A have been determined from FT spectra as part of this work. For four of these 34 levels even electric quadrupole hyperfine constants B could be estimated. For levels, which have experimentally unknown hyperfine constants and which are connected only by lines not found in the FT spectra but taken from literature, the uncertainties of energy values are about a factor of 10 higher. A list of all revised level energies together with a compilation of hyperfine structure data is given as well as a list of all lines used.

  12. Single particle level density in a finite depth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Kolomietz, V.M.; Dejbakhsh, H.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the single particle level density g(ε) of a realistic finite depth potential well, concentrating on the continuum (ε>0) region. We carry out quantum-mechanical calculations of the partial level density g l (ε), associated with a well-defined orbital angular momentum l≤40, using the phase-shift derivative method and the Greens-function method and compare the results with those obtained using the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We also numerically calculate g(ε) as a l sum of g l (ε) up to a certain value of scr(l) max ≤40 and determine the corresponding smooth level densities using the Strutinsky smoothing procedure. We demonstrate, in accordance with Levinson close-quote s theorem, that the partial contribution g l (ε) to the single particle level density from continuum states has positive and negative values. However, g(ε) is nonnegative. We also point out that this is not the case for an energy-dependent potential well. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Synthesis of a molecularly defined single-active site heterogeneous catalyst for selective oxidation of N-heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujing; Pang, Shaofeng; Wei, Zhihong; Jiao, Haijun; Dai, Xingchao; Wang, Hongli; Shi, Feng

    2018-04-13

    Generally, a homogeneous catalyst exhibits good activity and defined active sites but it is difficult to recycle. Meanwhile, a heterogeneous catalyst can easily be reused but its active site is difficult to reveal. It is interesting to bridge the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis via controllable construction of a heterogeneous catalyst containing defined active sites. Here, we report that a molecularly defined, single-active site heterogeneous catalyst has been designed and prepared via the oxidative polymerization of maleimide derivatives. These polymaleimide derivatives can be active catalysts for the selective oxidation of heterocyclic compounds to quinoline and indole via the recycling of -C=O and -C-OH groups, which was confirmed by tracing the reaction with GC-MS using maleimide as the catalyst and by FT-IR analysis with polymaleimide as the catalyst. These results might promote the development of heterogeneous catalysts with molecularly defined single active sites exhibiting a comparable activity to homogeneous catalysts.

  14. Evaluation of the Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current-Voltage and Thermopower Measurements: Application to C60 Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Yuki; Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-16

    The electronic structure of molecular junctions has a significant impact on their transport properties. Despite the decisive role of the electronic structure, a complete characterization of the electronic structure remains a challenge. This is because there is no straightforward way of measuring electron spectroscopy for an individual molecule trapped in a nanoscale gap between two metal electrodes. Herein, a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the electronic structure in single-molecule junctions based on the analysis of current-voltage (I-V) and thermoelectric characteristics is described. It is shown that the electronic structure of the prototypical C 60 single-molecule junction can be resolved by analyzing complementary results of the I-V and thermoelectric measurement. This combined approach confirmed that the C 60 single-molecule junction was highly conductive with molecular electronic conductances of 0.033 and 0.003 G 0 and a molecular Seebeck coefficient of -12 μV K -1 . In addition, we revealed that charge transport was mediated by a LUMO whose energy level was located 0.5≈0.6 eV above the Fermi level of the Au electrode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Quantum level structure of molecular magnets, Fe12 and V15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajiro, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Itoh, H.; Asano, T.; Narumi, Y.; Kindo, K.; Sakon, T.; Nojiri, H.; Motokawa, M.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Mueller, A.; Barbara, B

    2003-05-01

    We review our recent work on molecular magnets, Fe12 and V15 with focus on the determination of low-lying quantum energy levels which have permanent importance in understanding their unique quantum magnetism.

  16. Quantum level structure of molecular magnets, Fe12 and V15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajiro, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Itoh, H.; Asano, T.; Narumi, Y.; Kindo, K.; Sakon, T.; Nojiri, H.; Motokawa, M.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Mueller, A.; Barbara, B.

    2003-01-01

    We review our recent work on molecular magnets, Fe12 and V15 with focus on the determination of low-lying quantum energy levels which have permanent importance in understanding their unique quantum magnetism

  17. Hemodynamics of hepatocellular carcinoma with single-level dynamic computed tomography during hepatic arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Hirohiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the hemodynamics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to explore the draining pathway using single-level dynamic computed tomography during hepatic arteriography (single-level dynamic CTHA). One hundred one patients with 131 nodules of HCC underwent single level dynamic CTHA. Forty seven nodules were diagnosed by histological specimen and the other eighty four nodules by clinical findings of elevation in AFP and/or PIVKA II and hypervascular tumor in angiography. Single-level dynamic CTHA was performed under insertion of a catheter into proper hepatic artery or the more peripheral hepatic artery with a slice thickness of 3 mm at the same level. Each image of single level dynamic CTHA was continuously taken in a second for 40 seconds during injection of contrast medium at of 2 ml/sec for 10 seconds. The images of single-level dynamic CTHA were differentiated into three phases, as early phase 1 to 10 seconds, middle phase 11 to 20 seconds and late phase 21 to 40 seconds. After the analysis of the vascular pattern in each phase, the hemodynamics of HCC was classified into three patterns; hypovascular pattern in the 24 nodules whose average size was 13.4±4.2 mm, intermediate pattern in the 21 nodules whose average size was 20.8±7.8 mm and hypervascular pattern in 86 nodules whose average size was 31.6±16.3 mm. There were significant correlations between the tumor size and the vascular pattern. In the groups of hypovascular and intermediate pattern, the draining pathways were sinusoids. Of the 86 nodules of the group with hypervascular pattern, blood flow drained into portal vein including bright branch structure in 20 nodules, into portal vein and hepatic vein in 2 nodules, into portal vein and extrahepatic vein in 1 nodule, into hepatic vein in 11 nodules, into extrahepatic vein in 4 nodules and into sinusoids in 48 nodules. In conclusion, from a viewpoint of hemodynamics using single-level dynamic CTHA, I proposed the new

  18. Controlling the formation process and atomic structures of single pyrazine molecular junction by tuning the strength of the metal-molecule interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Takahashi, Ryoji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-04-12

    The formation process and atomic structures were investigated for single pyrazine molecular junctions sandwiched by three different Au, Ag, and Cu electrodes using a mechanically controllable break junction technique in ultrahigh vacuum conditions at 300 K. We demonstrated that the formation process of the single-molecule junction crucially depended on the choice of the metal electrodes. While single-molecule junction showing two distinct conductance states were found for the Au electrodes, only the single conductance state was evident for the Ag electrodes, and there was no junction formation for the Cu electrodes. These results suggested that metal-molecule interaction dominates the formation process and probability of the single-molecule junction. In addition to the metal-molecule interaction, temperature affected the formation process of the single-molecule junction. The single pyrazine molecular junction formed between Au electrodes exhibited significant temperature dependence where the junction-formation probability was about 8% at 300 K, while there was no junction-formation at 100 K. Instead of the junction formation, an Au atomic wire was formed at the low temperature. This study provides insight into the tuning of the junction-forming process for single-molecule junctions, which is needed to construct device structures on a single molecule scale.

  19. A new instrument of VUV laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging with micrometer spatial resolution and low level of molecular fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Liu, Feng; Mo, Yuxiang; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2017-11-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has important applications in material research, biology, and medicine. The MSI method based on UV laser desorption/ionization (UVLDI) can obtain images of intact samples, but has a high level of molecular fragmentation. In this work, we report a new MSI instrument that uses a VUV laser (125.3 nm) as a desorption/ionization source to exploit its advantages of high single photon energy and small focus size. The new instrument was tested by the mass spectra of Nile red and FGB (Fibrinogen beta chain) samples and mass spectrometric images of a fly brain section. For the tested samples, the VUVDI method offers lower levels of molecular fragmentations and higher sensitivities than those of the UVLDI method and second ion mass spectrometry imaging method using a Bi 3 + beam. The ablation crater produced by the focused VUV laser on a quartz plate has an area of 10 μm 2 . The VUV laser is prepared based on the four-wave mixing method using three collimated laser beams and a heated Hg cell.

  20. A new instrument of VUV laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging with micrometer spatial resolution and low level of molecular fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Liu, Feng; Mo, Yuxiang; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2017-11-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has important applications in material research, biology, and medicine. The MSI method based on UV laser desorption/ionization (UVLDI) can obtain images of intact samples, but has a high level of molecular fragmentation. In this work, we report a new MSI instrument that uses a VUV laser (125.3 nm) as a desorption/ionization source to exploit its advantages of high single photon energy and small focus size. The new instrument was tested by the mass spectra of Nile red and FGB (Fibrinogen beta chain) samples and mass spectrometric images of a fly brain section. For the tested samples, the VUVDI method offers lower levels of molecular fragmentations and higher sensitivities than those of the UVLDI method and second ion mass spectrometry imaging method using a Bi3+ beam. The ablation crater produced by the focused VUV laser on a quartz plate has an area of 10 μm2. The VUV laser is prepared based on the four-wave mixing method using three collimated laser beams and a heated Hg cell.

  1. Single-mode glass waveguide technology for optical interchip communication on board level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusberg, Lars; Neitz, Marcel; Schröder, Henning

    2012-01-01

    The large bandwidth demand in long-distance telecom networks lead to single-mode fiber interconnects as result of low dispersion, low loss and dense wavelength multiplexing possibilities. In contrast, multi-mode interconnects are suitable for much shorter lengths up to 300 meters and are promising for optical links between racks and on board level. Active optical cables based on multi-mode fiber links are at the market and research in multi-mode waveguide integration on board level is still going on. Compared to multi-mode, a single-mode waveguide has much more integration potential because of core diameters of around 20% of a multi-mode waveguide by a much larger bandwidth. But light coupling in single-mode waveguides is much more challenging because of lower coupling tolerances. Together with the silicon photonics technology, a single-mode waveguide technology on board-level will be the straight forward development goal for chip-to-chip optical interconnects integration. Such a hybrid packaging platform providing 3D optical single-mode links bridges the gap between novel photonic integrated circuits and the glass fiber based long-distance telecom networks. Following we introduce our 3D photonic packaging approach based on thin glass substrates with planar integrated optical single-mode waveguides for fiber-to-chip and chip-to-chip interconnects. This novel packaging approach merges micro-system packaging and glass integrated optics. It consists of a thin glass substrate with planar integrated singlemode waveguide circuits, optical mirrors and lenses providing an integration platform for photonic IC assembly and optical fiber interconnect. Thin glass is commercially available in panel and wafer formats and characterizes excellent optical and high-frequency properties. That makes it perfect for microsystem packaging. The paper presents recent results in single-mode waveguide technology on wafer level and waveguide characterization. Furthermore the integration in a

  2. Manipulating molecular quantum states with classical metal atom inputs: demonstration of a single molecule NOR logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, We-Hyo; Manzano, Carlos; Renaud, Nicolas; de Mendoza, Paula; De Sarkar, Abir; Ample, Francisco; Hliwa, Mohamed; Echavarren, Antonio M; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan; Joachim, Christian

    2011-02-22

    Quantum states of a trinaphthylene molecule were manipulated by putting its naphthyl branches in contact with single Au atoms. One Au atom carries 1-bit of classical information input that is converted into quantum information throughout the molecule. The Au-trinaphthylene electronic interactions give rise to measurable energy shifts of the molecular electronic states demonstrating a NOR logic gate functionality. The NOR truth table of the single molecule logic gate was characterized by means of scanning tunnelling spectroscopy.

  3. Towards single molecule biosensors using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xun; Nicovich, Philip R; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2017-07-15

    Conventional immunosensors require many binding events to give a single transducer output which represents the concentration of the analyte in the sample. Because of the requirements to selectively detect species in complex samples, immunosensing interfaces must allow immobilisation of antibodies while repelling nonspecific adsorption of other species. These requirements lead to quite sophisticated interfacial design, often with molecular level control, but we have no tools to characterise how well these interfaces work at the molecular level. The work reported herein is an initial feasibility study to show that antibody-antigen binding events can be monitored at the single molecule level using single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM). The steps to achieve this first requires showing that indium tin oxide surfaces can be used for SMLM, then that these surfaces can be modified with self-assembled monolayers using organophosphonic acid derivatives, that the amount of antigens and antibodies on the surface can be controlled and monitored at the single molecule level and finally antibody binding to antigen modified surfaces can be monitored. The results show the amount of antibody that binds to an antigen modified surface is dependent on both the concentration of antigen on the surface and the concentration of antibody in solution. This study demonstrates the potential of SMLM for characterising biosensing interfaces and as the transducer in a massively parallel, wide field, single molecule detection scheme for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-Level Wavelet Shannon Entropy-Based Method for Single-Sensor Fault Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoning Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In actual application, sensors are prone to failure because of harsh environments, battery drain, and sensor aging. Sensor fault location is an important step for follow-up sensor fault detection. In this paper, two new multi-level wavelet Shannon entropies (multi-level wavelet time Shannon entropy and multi-level wavelet time-energy Shannon entropy are defined. They take full advantage of sensor fault frequency distribution and energy distribution across multi-subband in wavelet domain. Based on the multi-level wavelet Shannon entropy, a method is proposed for single sensor fault location. The method firstly uses a criterion of maximum energy-to-Shannon entropy ratio to select the appropriate wavelet base for signal analysis. Then multi-level wavelet time Shannon entropy and multi-level wavelet time-energy Shannon entropy are used to locate the fault. The method is validated using practical chemical gas concentration data from a gas sensor array. Compared with wavelet time Shannon entropy and wavelet energy Shannon entropy, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve accurate location of a single sensor fault and has good anti-noise ability. The proposed method is feasible and effective for single-sensor fault location.

  5. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in single molecular magnets coupled to ferromagnetic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Barnas, J.

    2007-04-01

    The role of spin polarized reservoirs in quantum tunneling of magnetization and relaxation processes in a single molecular magnet (SMM) is investigated theoretically. The SMM is exchange-coupled to the reservoirs and also subjected to a magnetic field varying in time, which enables the quantum tunneling of magnetization. The spin relaxation times are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. The exchange interaction of SMM and electrons in the leads is shown to affect the spin reversal due to quantum tunneling of magnetization. It is shown that the switching is associated with transfer of a certain charge between the leads.

  6. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoura, Ahmad, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa; Sun, Shuyu, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa [Computational Transport Phenomena Laboratory, The Earth Sciences and Engineering Department, The Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Siripatana, Adil, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa; Hoteit, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.hoteit@kaust.edu.sa [Earth Fluid Modeling and Predicting Group, The Earth Sciences and Engineering Department, The Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Knio, Omar, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa [Uncertainty Quantification Center, The Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Department, The Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-07

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. The main advantage of such surrogates, once generated, is the capability of accurately computing the needed thermodynamic quantities in a few seconds, thus efficiently replacing the computationally expensive MC molecular simulations. Benefiting from the tremendous computational time reduction, the PC surrogates were used to conduct large-scale optimization in order to propose single-site LJ models for several simple molecules. Experimental data, a set of supercritical isotherms, and part of the two-phase envelope, of several pure components were used for tuning the LJ parameters (ε, σ). Based on the conducted optimization, excellent fit was obtained for different noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) and other small molecules (CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, and CO). On the other hand, due to the simplicity of the LJ model used, dramatic deviations between simulation and experimental data were observed, especially in the two-phase region, for more complex molecules such as CO{sub 2} and C{sub 2} H{sub 6}.

  7. Studies on the self-catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation, characterization, DPPH radical scavenging activity, cytotoxicity, and molecular properties of 5-arylidene-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-diones using single crystal XRD and DFT techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, G. S.; Antony Muthu Prabhu, A.; Bhuvanesh, N.

    2014-10-01

    We have studied the self-catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation, spectral characterization, DPPH radical scavenging activity, cytotoxicity, and molecular properties of 5-arylidene-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-diones using single crystal XRD and DFT techniques. In the absence of any catalyst, a series of novel 5-arylidene-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-diones were synthesized using Meldrum’s acid and formylphenoxyaliphatic acid(s) in water. These molecules are arranged in the dimer form through intermolecular H-bonding in the single crystal XRD structure. Compounds have better DPPH radical scavenging activity and cytotoxicity against A431 cancer cell line. The optimized molecular structure, natural bond orbital analysis, electrostatic potential map, HOMO-LUMO energies, molecular properties, and atomic charges of these molecules have been studied by performing DFT/B3LYP/3-21G(*) level of theory in gas phase.

  8. Stretching single fibrin fibers hampers their lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Lucioni, Tomas; Li, Rongzhong; Bonin, Keith; Cho, Samuel S; Guthold, Martin

    2017-09-15

    Blood clots, whose main structural component is a mesh of microscopic fibrin fibers, experience mechanical strain from blood flow, clot retraction and interactions with platelets and other cells. We developed a transparent, striated and highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue (a styrenic block copolymer) to investigate how mechanical strain affects lysis of single, suspended fibrin fibers. In this suspended fiber assay, lysis manifested itself by fiber elongation, thickening (disassembly), fraying and collapse. Stretching single fibrin fibers significantly hampered their lysis. This effect was seen in uncrosslinked and crosslinked fibers. Crosslinking (without stretching) also hampered single fiber lysis. Our data suggest that strain is a novel mechanosensitive factor that regulates blood clot dissolution (fibrinolysis) at the single fiber level. At the molecular level of single fibrin molecules, strain may distort, or hinder access to, plasmin cleavage sites and thereby hamper lysis. Fibrin fibers are the major structural component of a blood clot. We developed a highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue and a suspended fibrin fiber lysis assay to investigate the effect of stretching on single fibrin fibers lysis. The key findings from our experiments are: 1) Fibers thicken and elongate upon lysis; 2) stretching strongly reduces lysis; 3) this effect is more pronounced for uncrosslinked fibers; and 4) stretching fibers has a similar effect on reducing lysis as crosslinking fibers. At the molecular level, strain may distort plasmin cleavage sites, or restrict access to those sites. Our results suggest that strain may be a novel mechanobiological factor that regulates fibrinolysis. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Charge Transport Processes in Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Eugene

    Molecular electronics (ME) has evolved into a rich area of exploration that combines the fields of chemistry, materials, electronic engineering and computational modeling to explore the physics behind electronic conduction at the molecular level. Through studying charge transport properties of single molecules and nanoscale molecular materials the field has gained the potential to bring about new avenues for the miniaturization of electrical components where quantum phenomena are utilized to achieve solid state molecular device functionality. Molecular junctions are platforms that enable these studies and consist of a single molecule or a small group of molecules directly connected to electrodes. The work presented in this thesis has built upon the current understanding of the mechanisms of charge transport in ordered junctions using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecular thin films. Donor and acceptor compounds were synthesized and incorporated into SAMs grown on metal substrates then the transport properties were measured with conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). In addition to experimentally measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, the transport properties were addressed computationally and modeled theoretically. The key objectives of this project were to 1) investigate the impact of molecular structure on hole and electron charge transport, 2) understand the nature of the charge carriers and their structure-transport properties through long (chemically gated to modulate the transport. These results help advance our understanding of transport behavior in semiconducting molecular thin films, and open opportunities to engineer improved electronic functionality into molecular devices.

  10. Impact of Anchoring Groups on Ballistic Transport: Single Molecule vs Monolayer Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Tuning the transport properties of molecular junctions by chemically modifying the molecular structure is one of the key challenges for advancing the field of molecular electronics. In the present contribution, we investigate current–voltage characteristics of differently linked metal–molecule–metal systems that comprise either a single molecule or a molecular assembly. This is achieved by employing density functional theory in conjunction with a Green’s function approach. We show that the conductance of a molecular system with a specific anchoring group is fundamentally different depending on whether a single molecule or a continuous monolayer forms the junction. This is a consequence of collective electrostatic effects that arise from dipolar elements contained in the monolayer and from interfacial charge rearrangements. As a consequence of these collective effects, the “ideal” choice for an anchoring group is clearly different for monolayer and single molecule devices. A particularly striking effect is observed for pyridine-docked systems. These are subject to Fermi-level pinning at high molecular packing densities, causing an abrupt increase of the junction current already at small voltages. PMID:26401191

  11. Studies of quantum levels in GaInNAs single quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakata, Sho; Kondow, Masahiko; Kitatani, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies have been carried out on the quantum levels in GaInNAs/GaAs single quantum wells (SQWs). Photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation (PLE), photoreflectance (PR), and high-density-excited PL (HDE-PL) were measured on high quality GaInNAs SQWs, Ga 0.65 In 0.35 N 0.01 As 0.99 /GaAs (well thickness: l z =10 nm) and Ga 0.65 In 0.35 N 0.005 As 0.995 /GaAs (l z =3∝10 nm), grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. For Ga 0.65 In 0.35 N 0.01 As 0.99 /GaAs (l z =10 nm), PL at 8 K exhibited a peak at 1.07 eV due to the exciton-related transition between quantum levels of ground states (e1-hh1). Both PR and PLE exhibited three transitions (1.17, 1.20 and 1.32 eV), and the former two transitions were assigned to as either of e1-lh1 and e2-hh2 transitions, while the transition at 1.32 eV was assigned to as the e2-lh2 transition. For HDE-PL, a new PL peak was observed at about 1.2 eV, and it was assigned to the unresolved e1-lh1 and e2-hh2 transitions. Similar optical measurements have been done on the Ga 0.65 In 0.35 N 0.005 As 0.995 /GaAs with various l z (3∝10 nm). Dependence of optical spectra and energies of quantum levels on l z have been studied. It has been found that HDE-PL in combination with PLE is a good tool for the study of the quantum level of GaInNAs SQW. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Surface Functionalization of g-C 3 N 4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2015-06-12

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3N4. This catalyst family (with less than 0.1 wt% of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3 wt% platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24h. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The Influence of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray-Based Molecular Karyotype on Preimplantation Embryonic Development Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the influence of the molecular karyotype based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarray on embryonic development potential in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical data generated by PGD using embryos retrieved from parents with chromosome rearrangements in our center. In total, 929 embryos from 119 couples had exact diagnosis and development status. The blastocyst formation rate of balanced molecular karyotype embryos was 56.6% (276/488, which was significantly higher than that of genetic imbalanced embryos 24.5% (108/441 (P35 respectively. Blastocyst formation rates of male and female embryos were 44.5% (183/411 and 38.8% (201/518 respectively, with no significant difference between them (P>0.05. The rates of balanced molecular karyotype embryos vary from groups of embryos with different cell numbers at 68 hours after insemination. The blastocyst formation rate of embryos with 6-8 cells (48.1% was significantly higher than that of embryos with 8 cells (42.9% (P8 cells, embryos with 6-8 blastomeres have higher rate of balanced molecular karyotype and blastocyst formation.

  14. Level crossing in a molecular Cr{sub 8} ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affronte, M. E-mail: affronte@unimore.it; Guidi, T.; Caciuffo, R.; Carretta, S.; Amoretti, G.; Hinderer, J.; Sheikin, I.; Smith, A.A.; Winpenny, R.E.P.; Slageren, J. van; Gatteschi, D

    2004-05-01

    The heat capacity of a molecular Cr{sub 8} ring was measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field in order to follow the evolution of the Schottky anomaly through the first (S=0 to |1,-1>) level crossing occurring at B{sub c1}=6.9 T. The results are interpreted within the framework of a spin Hamiltonian approach and they nicely fit the pattern of the energy levels derived by inelastic neutron spectroscopy. At B{sub c1}, the Schottky anomaly almost vanishes suggesting that a true crossing occurs in Cr{sub 8} in contrast to what was observed for ferric wheels.

  15. Design and synthesis of single-source molecular precursors to homogeneous multi-component oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujdala, Kyle Lee

    This dissertation describes the syntheses of single-source molecular precursors to multi-component oxide materials. These molecules possess a core metal or element with various combinations of -OSi(O tBu)3, -O2P(OtBu) 2, and -OB[OSi(OtBu)3] 2 ligands. Such molecules decompose under mild thermolytic conditions (models for oxide-supported metal species and multi-component oxides. Significantly, the first complexes to contain three or more heteroelements suitable for use in the TMP method have been synthesized. Compounds for use as single-source molecular precursors have been synthesized containing Al, B, Cr, Hf, Mo, V, W, and Zr, and their thermal transformations have been examined. Heterogeneous catalytic reactions have been examined for selected materials. Also, cothermolyses of molecular precursors and additional molecules (i.e., metal alkoxides) have been utilized to provide materials with several components for potential use as catalysts or catalyst supports. Reactions of one and two equivs of HOSi(OtBu) 3 with Cr(OtBu)4 afforded the first Cr(IV) alkoxysiloxy complexes (tBuO) 3CrOSi(OtBu)3 and ( tBuO)2Cr[OSi(OtBu) 3]2, respectively. The high-yielding, convenient synthesis of (tBuO)3CrOSi(O tBu)3 make this complex a useful single-source molecular precursor, via the TMP method, to Cr/Si/O materials. The thermal transformations of (tBuO)3CrOSi(O tBu)3 and (tBuO) 2Cr[OSi(OtBu)3]2 to chromia-silica materials occurr at low temperatures (≤180°C), to give isobutene as the major carbon-containing product. The material generated from the solid-state conversion of (tBuO) 3CrOSi(OtBu)3 (CrOS ss) has an unexpectedly high surface area of 315 m2 g-1 that is slightly reduced to 275 m2 g-1 after calcination at 500°C in O2. The xerogel obtained by the thermolysis of an n-octane solution of (tBuO)3CrOSi(O tBu)3 (CrOSixg) has a surface area of 315 m2 g-1 that is reduced to 205 m2 g-1 upon calcination at 500°C. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis revealed that Cr2O 3 is

  16. Deep level transient spectroscopic investigation of phosphorus-doped silicon by self-assembled molecular monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejiao; Guan, Bin; Mesli, Abdelmadjid; Chen, Kaixiang; Dan, Yaping

    2018-01-09

    It is known that self-assembled molecular monolayer doping technique has the advantages of forming ultra-shallow junctions and introducing minimal defects in semiconductors. In this paper, we report however the formation of carbon-related defects in the molecular monolayer-doped silicon as detected by deep-level transient spectroscopy and low-temperature Hall measurements. The molecular monolayer doping process is performed by modifying silicon substrate with phosphorus-containing molecules and annealing at high temperature. The subsequent rapid thermal annealing drives phosphorus dopants along with carbon contaminants into the silicon substrate, resulting in a dramatic decrease of sheet resistance for the intrinsic silicon substrate. Low-temperature Hall measurements and secondary ion mass spectrometry indicate that phosphorus is the only electrically active dopant after the molecular monolayer doping. However, during this process, at least 20% of the phosphorus dopants are electrically deactivated. The deep-level transient spectroscopy shows that carbon-related defects are responsible for such deactivation.

  17. IMMEDIATE RECIPROCAL CHANGES AT ADJACENT LEVEL FOLLOWING SINGLE-LEVEL ALIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Vargas Uribe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To assess the segmental sagittal parameters and the adjacent mobile segment after interbody fusion by anterior approach in single-level L5-S1. Methods : Retrospective study. Inclusion: Interbody fusion by anterior approach (10°/15° angle, due to DDD, low-grade spondylolisthesis and/or stenosis without prior lumbar fusion. Thirty-five cases were included (25 women; mean age 47±15 years. Analysis of lumbar radiographs were performed preoperatively and 3 months after surgery. The following parameters were evaluated: lumbar lordosis; segmental lordosis L4-L5 and L5-S1; sacral and L5 slope. Two independent evaluators made the measurements. Student's t test was used. Results : There was correction of lordosis at the L5-S1 level, from an average of 19° prior to surgery to 28° three months after surgery (p<0.001. It was observed reduction of the L4-L5 angle from 17° to 14° (p <0.001. Moreover, there was a small, but statistically significant, reduction of L5 inclination from 17 ° to 13 ° (p=0.007 and increase in the sacral slope from 37° to 40° (p=0.002. The change of total lumbar lordosis was not significant: 52° versus 53° (p=0.461. Before surgical correction, lordosis of the L5-S1 level contributed, on average, 37% of lumbar lordosis, and after, 54% (p<0.001. The L4-L5 level accounted for 34% and decreased to 24% (p<0.001. Conclusion : In the group studied, it was observed a decrease in lordosis of the adjacent mobile level following the treatment of the degenerate level by anterior interbody fusion and concomitant increase in lordosis.

  18. Single Cell Oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin

    It is believed that cancer originates from a single cell that has gone through generations of evolution of genetic and epigenetic changes that associate with the hallmarks of cancer. In some cancers such as various types of leukemia, cancer is clonal. Yet in other cancers like glioblastoma (GBM), there is tremendous tumor heterogeneity that is likely to be caused by simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones within the same tissue. It is obvious that understanding how a single cell develops into a clonal tumor upon genetic alterations, at molecular and cellular levels, holds the key to the real appreciation of tumor etiology and ultimate solution for therapeutics. Surprisingly very little is known about the process of spontaneous tumorigenesis from single cells in human or vertebrate animal models. The main reason is the lack of technology to track the natural process of single cell changes from a homeostatic state to a progressively cancerous state. Recently, we developed a patented compound, photoactivatable (''caged'') tamoxifen analogue 4-OHC and associated technique called optochemogenetic switch (OCG switch), which we believe opens the opportunity to address this urgent biological as well as clinical question about cancer. We propose to combine OCG switch with genetically engineered mouse models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and high grade astrocytoma (including GBM) to study how single cells, when transformed through acute loss of tumor suppressor genes PTEN and TP53 and gain of oncogenic KRAS, can develop into tumor colonies with cellular and molecular heterogeneity in these tissues. The abstract is for my invited talk in session ``Beyond Darwin: Evolution in Single Cells'' 3/18/2016 11:15 AM.

  19. Electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry towards the single-molecule level: Theoretical notions and systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Albrecht, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Surface structures controlled at the nanometer and single-molecule levels, with functions crucially determined by interfacial electron transfer (ET) are broadly reported in recent years, with different kinds of electrochemically controlled nanoscale/single molecule systems. One is the broad class...

  20. Single-Event Transgene Product Levels Predict Levels in Genetically Modified Breeding Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gampala, Satyalinga Srinivas; Fast, Brandon J; Richey, Kimberly A; Gao, Zhifang; Hill, Ryan; Wulfkuhle, Bryant; Shan, Guomin; Bradfisch, Greg A; Herman, Rod A

    2017-09-13

    The concentration of transgene products (proteins and double-stranded RNA) in genetically modified (GM) crop tissues is measured to support food, feed, and environmental risk assessments. Measurement of transgene product concentrations in breeding stacks of previously assessed and approved GM events is required by many regulatory authorities to evaluate unexpected transgene interactions that might affect expression. Research was conducted to determine how well concentrations of transgene products in single GM events predict levels in breeding stacks composed of these events. The concentrations of transgene products were compared between GM maize, soybean, and cotton breeding stacks (MON-87427 × MON-89034 × DAS-Ø15Ø7-1 × MON-87411 × DAS-59122-7 × DAS-40278-9 corn, DAS-81419-2 × DAS-44406-6 soybean, and DAS-21023-5 × DAS-24236-5 × SYN-IR102-7 × MON-88913-8 × DAS-81910-7 cotton) and their component single events (MON-87427, MON-89034, DAS-Ø15Ø7-1, MON-87411, DAS-59122-7, and DAS-40278-9 corn, DAS-81419-2, and DAS-44406-6 soybean, and DAS-21023-5, DAS-24236-5, SYN-IR102-7, MON-88913-8, and DAS-81910-7 cotton). Comparisons were made within a crop and transgene product across plant tissue types and were also made across transgene products in each breeding stack for grain/seed. Scatter plots were generated comparing expression in the stacks to their component events, and the percent of variability accounted for by the line of identity (y = x) was calculated (coefficient of identity, I 2 ). Results support transgene concentrations in single events predicting similar concentrations in breeding stacks containing the single events. Therefore, food, feed, and environmental risk assessments based on concentrations of transgene products in single GM events are generally applicable to breeding stacks composed of these events.

  1. Josephson current through a molecular transistor in a dissipative environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotny, T; Rossini, Gianpaolo; Flensberg, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    We study the Josephson coupling between two superconductors through a single correlated molecular level, including Coulomb interaction on the level and coupling to a bosonic environment. All calculations are done to the lowest, i.e., the fourth, order in the tunneling coupling and we find...

  2. Tools for Genomic and Transcriptomic Analysis of Microbes at Single-Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixi Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbiologists traditionally study population rather than individual cells, as it is generally assumed that the status of individual cells will be similar to that observed in the population. However, the recent studies have shown that the individual behavior of each single cell could be quite different from that of the whole population, suggesting the importance of extending traditional microbiology studies to single-cell level. With recent technological advances, such as flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing (NGS, and microspectroscopy, single-cell microbiology has greatly enhanced the understanding of individuality and heterogeneity of microbes in many biological systems. Notably, the application of multiple ‘omics’ in single-cell analysis has shed light on how individual cells perceive, respond, and adapt to the environment, how heterogeneity arises under external stress and finally determines the fate of the whole population, and how microbes survive under natural conditions. As single-cell analysis involves no axenic cultivation of target microorganism, it has also been demonstrated as a valuable tool for dissecting the microbial ‘dark matter.’ In this review, current state-of-the-art tools and methods for genomic and transcriptomic analysis of microbes at single-cell level were critically summarized, including single-cell isolation methods and experimental strategies of single-cell analysis with NGS. In addition, perspectives on the future trends of technology development in the field of single-cell analysis was also presented.

  3. Electrochemical Control of Single-Molecule Conductance by Fermi- Level Tuning and Conjugation Switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baghernejad, Masoud; Zhao, Xiaotao; Ørnsø, Kristian Baruël

    2014-01-01

    ) centers, over >1 order of magnitude. For electrode potentials outside the redox-active region, the effect of the gate is simply to shift the molecular energy levels relative to the metal Fermi level. At the redox potential, the conductance changes abruptly as the AQ unit is oxidized...

  4. Probing Intranuclear Environments at the Single-Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünwald, David; Martin, Robert M.; Buschmann, Volker; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Genome activity and nuclear metabolism clearly depend on accessibility, but it is not known whether and to what extent nuclear structures limit the mobility and access of individual molecules. We used fluorescently labeled streptavidin with a nuclear localization signal as an average-sized, inert protein to probe the nuclear environment. The protein was injected into the cytoplasm of mouse cells, and single molecules were tracked in the nucleus with high-speed fluorescence microscopy. We analyzed and compared the mobility of single streptavidin molecules in structurally and functionally distinct nuclear compartments of living cells. Our results indicated that all nuclear subcompartments were easily and similarly accessible for such an average-sized protein, and even condensed heterochromatin neither excluded single molecules nor impeded their passage. The only significant difference was a higher frequency of transient trappings in heterochromatin, which lasted only tens of milliseconds. The streptavidin molecules, however, did not accumulate in heterochromatin, suggesting comparatively less free volume. Interestingly, the nucleolus seemed to exclude streptavidin, as it did many other nuclear proteins, when visualized by conventional fluorescence microscopy. The tracking of single molecules, nonetheless, showed no evidence for repulsion at the border but relatively unimpeded passage through the nucleolus. These results clearly show that single-molecule tracking can provide novel insights into mobility of proteins in the nucleus that cannot be obtained by conventional fluorescence microscopy. Our results suggest that nuclear processes may not be regulated at the level of physical accessibility but rather by local concentration of reactants and availability of binding sites. PMID:18065482

  5. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    vibrational effects have a profound influence on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule contact and play therefore a fundamental role in this transport problem. Our findings demonstrate that vibrationally coupled electron transport through a molecular junction involves two types of processes: (i) transport processes, where an electron tunnels through the molecular bridge from one lead to the other, and (ii) electron-hole pair creation processes, where an electron tunnels from one of the leads onto the molecular bridge and back to the same lead again. Transport processes directly contribute to the electrical current flowing through a molecular contact and involve both excitation and deexcitation processes of the vibrational modes of the junction. Electron-hole pair creation processes do not directly contribute to the electrical current and typically involve only deexcitation processes. Nevertheless, they constitute a cooling mechanism for the vibrational modes of a single-molecule junction that is as important as cooling by transport processes. As the level of vibrational excitation determines the efficiency of electron transport processes, they have an indirect influence on the electrical current flowing through the junction. As we show, however, this influence can be substantial, in particular, if the molecule is coupled asymmetrically to the leads. Accounting for all these processes and their complex interrelationship, we analyze a number of intriguing transport phenomena, including rectification, negative differential resistance, anomalous peak broadening, mode-selective vibrational excitation and vibrationally induced decoherence. Moreover, we show that higher levels of vibrational excitation are obtained for weaker electronic-vibrational coupling. Thus, based on physical grounds, we establish a relation between the weak electronic-vibrational coupling limit and the limit of large bias voltages, where the level of vibrational excitation in a molecular junction

  6. Yeast cytochrome c integrated with electronic elements: a nanoscopic and spectroscopic study down to single-molecule level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, I; Bonanni, B; Andolfi, L; Baldacchini, C; Bizzarri, A R; Cannistraro, S

    2007-01-01

    Various aspects of redox protein integration with nano-electronic elements are addressed by a multi-technique investigation of different yeast cytochrome c (YCC)-based hybrid systems. Three different immobilization strategies on gold via organic linkers are explored, involving either covalent bonding or electrostatic interaction. Specifically, Au surfaces are chemically modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) exposing thiol-reactive groups, or by acid-oxidized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy are employed to characterize the morphology and the electronic properties of single YCC molecules adsorbed on the modified gold surfaces. In each hybrid system, the protein molecules are stably assembled, in a native configuration. A standing-up arrangement of YCC on SAMs is suggested, together with an enhancement of the molecular conduction, as compared to YCC directly assembled on gold. The electrostatic interaction with functionalized SWNTs allows several YCC adsorption geometries, with a preferential high-spin haem configuration, as outlined by Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the conduction properties of YCC, explored in different YCC nanojunctions by conductive atomic force microscopy, indicate the effectiveness of electrical conduction through the molecule and its dependence on the electrode material. The joint employment of several techniques confirms the key role of a well-designed immobilization strategy, for optimizing biorecognition capabilities and electrical coupling with conductive substrates at the single-molecule level, as a starting point for advanced applications in nano-biotechnology

  7. Cell biochemistry studied by single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanov, G I; Nenasheva, T A; Peckham, M; Molloy, J E

    2006-11-01

    Over the last decade, there have been remarkable developments in live-cell imaging. We can now readily observe individual protein molecules within living cells and this should contribute to a systems level understanding of biological pathways. Direct observation of single fluorophores enables several types of molecular information to be gathered. Temporal and spatial trajectories enable diffusion constants and binding kinetics to be deduced, while analyses of fluorescence lifetime, intensity, polarization or spectra give chemical and conformational information about molecules in their cellular context. By recording the spatial trajectories of pairs of interacting molecules, formation of larger molecular complexes can be studied. In the future, multicolour and multiparameter imaging of single molecules in live cells will be a powerful analytical tool for systems biology. Here, we discuss measurements of single-molecule mobility and residency at the plasma membrane of live cells. Analysis of diffusional paths at the plasma membrane gives information about its physical properties and measurement of temporal trajectories enables rates of binding and dissociation to be derived. Meanwhile, close scrutiny of individual fluorophore trajectories enables ideas about molecular dimerization and oligomerization related to function to be tested directly.

  8. Latent Membrane Protein 1 as a molecular adjuvant for single-cycle lentiviral vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmberg Andrew R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular adjuvants are a promising method to enhance virus-specific immune responses and protect against HIV-1 infection. Immune activation by ligands for receptors such as CD40 can induce dendritic cell activation and maturation. Here we explore the incorporation of two CD40 mimics, Epstein Barr Virus gene LMP1 or an LMP1-CD40 chimera, into a strain of SIV that was engineered to be limited to a single cycle of infection. Results Full length LMP1 or the chimeric protein LMP1-CD40 was cloned into the nef-locus of single-cycle SIV. Human and Macaque monocyte derived macrophages and DC were infected with these viruses. Infected cells were analyzed for activation surface markers by flow cytometry. Cells were also analyzed for secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p70 and TNF by cytometric bead array. Conclusions Overall, single-cycle SIV expressing LMP1 and LMP1-CD40 produced a broad and potent TH1-biased immune response in human as well as rhesus macaque macrophages and DC when compared with control virus. Single-cycle SIV-LMP1 also enhanced antigen presentation by lentiviral vector vaccines, suggesting that LMP1-mediated immune activation may enhance lentiviral vector vaccines against HIV-1.

  9. Multi-region and single-cell sequencing reveal variable genomic heterogeneity in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingshan; Liu, Yang; Di, Jiabo; Su, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Beihai; Wang, Zaozao; Zhuang, Meng; Bai, Fan; Su, Xiangqian

    2017-11-23

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with complex molecular subtypes. While colon cancer has been widely investigated, studies on rectal cancer are very limited. Here, we performed multi-region whole-exome sequencing and single-cell whole-genome sequencing to examine the genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of rectal tumors. We sequenced nine tumor regions and 88 single cells from two rectal cancer patients with tumors of the same molecular classification and characterized their mutation profiles and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) at the multi-region and the single-cell levels. A variable extent of genomic heterogeneity was observed between the two patients, and the degree of ITH increased when analyzed on the single-cell level. We found that major SCNAs were early events in cancer development and inherited steadily. Single-cell sequencing revealed mutations and SCNAs which were hidden in bulk sequencing. In summary, we studied the ITH of rectal cancer at regional and single-cell resolution and demonstrated that variable heterogeneity existed in two patients. The mutational scenarios and SCNA profiles of two patients with treatment naïve from the same molecular subtype are quite different. Our results suggest each tumor possesses its own architecture, which may result in different diagnosis, prognosis, and drug responses. Remarkable ITH exists in the two patients we have studied, providing a preliminary impression of ITH in rectal cancer.

  10. Molecular Mechanistic Reasoning: Toward Bridging the Gap between the Molecular and Cellular Levels in Life Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mil, Marc H. W.; Postma, Paulien A.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Klaassen, Kees; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2016-01-01

    Although learning about DNA, RNA, and proteins is part of the upper secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the higher level of cells, organs, and organisms. As a result, many students use memorization and rote learning as a coping strategy when presented…

  11. Deuteron NMR resolved mesogen vs. crosslinker molecular order and reorientational exchange in liquid single crystal elastomers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milavec, J.; Domenici, V.; Zupančič, B.; Rešetič, A.; Bubnov, Alexej; Zalar, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2016), s. 4071-4077 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02843S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14007 Grant - others:EU - ICT(XE) COST Action IC1208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid single crystal elastomer * NMR * liquid crystal * molecular order * monomers Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  12. Complex formation and vectorization of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide with an amphipathic leucine- and lysine-rich peptide: study at molecular and cellular levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhalfa-Heniche, Fatima-Zohra; Hernández, Belén; Gaillard, Stéphane; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Huynh-Dinh, Tam; Lecouvey, Marc; Seksek, Olivier; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2004-04-15

    Optical spectroscopic techniques such as CD, Raman scattering, and fluorescence imaging allowed us to analyze the complex formation and vectorization of a single-stranded 20-mer phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide with a 15-mer amphipathic peptide at molecular and cellular levels. Different solvent mixtures (methanol and water) and molecular ratios of peptide/oligodeoxynucleotide complexes were tested in order to overcome the problems related to solubility. Optimal conditions for both spectroscopic and cellular experiments were obtained with the molecular ratio peptide/oligodeoxynucleotide equal to 21:4, corresponding to a 7:5 ratio for their respective +/- charge ratio. At the molecular level, CD and Raman spectra were consistent with a alpha-helix conformation of the peptide in water or in a methanol-water mixture. The presence of methanol increased considerably the solubility of the peptide without altering its alpha-helix conformation, as evidenced by CD and Raman spectroscopies. UV absorption melting profile of the oligodeoxynucleotide gave rise to a flat melting profile, corresponding to its random structure in solution. Raman spectra of oligodeoxynucleotide/peptide complexes could only be studied in methanol/water mixture solutions. Drastic changes observed in Raman spectra have undoubtedly shown: (a) the perturbation occurred in the peptide secondary structure, and (b) possible interaction between the lysine residues of the peptide and the oligodeoxynucleotide. At the cellular level, the complex was prepared in a mixture of 10% methanol and 90% cell medium. Cellular uptake in optimal conditions for the oligodeoxynucleotide delivery with low cytotoxicity was controlled by fluorescence imaging allowing to specifically locate the compacted oligonucleotide labeled with fluorescein at its 5'-terminus with the peptide into human glioma cells after 1 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A new vibrational level of the H2+ molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Lazauskas, R.; Delande, D.; Hilico, L.; Kilic, S.; Hilico, L.; Kilic, S.

    2003-01-01

    A new vibrational level of the molecular ion H 2 + with binding energy of 1.09 x 10 -9 a.u. ∼ 30 neV below the first dissociation limit is predicted, using highly accurate numerical non-relativistic quantum calculations, which go beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. It is the first-excited vibrational level v=1 of the 2pσ u electronic state, antisymmetric with respect to the exchange of the two protons, with orbital angular momentum L=0. It manifests itself as a huge p - H scattering length of a = 750 ± 5 Bohr radii. (authors)

  14. Temperature sensitivity of void nucleation and growth parameters for single crystal copper: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, S; Chavan, V M; Warrier, M; Chaturvedi, S

    2011-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the void nucleation and growth is studied using the molecular dynamics (MD) code LAMMPS (Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). Single crystal copper is triaxially expanded at 5 × 10 9  s −1 strain rate keeping the temperature constant. It is shown that the nucleation and growth of voids at these atomistic scales follows a macroscopic nucleation and growth (NAG) model. As the temperature increases there is a steady decrease in the nucleation and growth thresholds. As the melting point of copper is approached, a double-dip in the pressure–time profile is observed. Analysis of this double-dip shows that the first minimum corresponds to the disappearance of the long-range order due to the creation of stacking faults and the system no longer has a FCC structure. There is no nucleation of voids at this juncture. The second minimum corresponds to the nucleation and incipient growth of voids. We present the sensitivity of NAG parameters to temperature and the analysis of double-dip in the pressure–time profile for single crystal copper at 1250 K

  15. Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet due to spin-polarized current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnaś, Józef

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet (SMM) due to spin-polarized current flowing between ferromagnetic metallic leads (electrodes) is investigated theoretically. Magnetic moments of the leads are assumed to be collinear and parallel to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule. Electrons tunneling through the barrier between magnetic leads are coupled to the SMM via exchange interaction. The current flowing through the system, as well as the spin relaxation times of the SMM, are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. It is shown that spin of the SMM can be reversed by applying a certain voltage between the two magnetic electrodes. Moreover, the switching may be visible in the corresponding current-voltage characteristics.

  16. Community-Level Characteristics Associated With Variation in Rates of Homelessness Among Families and Single Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargo, Jamison D.; Munley, Ellen A.; Byrne, Thomas H.; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Culhane, Dennis P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We modeled rates of family and single-adult homelessness in the United States in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan regions and as a function of community-level demographic, behavioral, health, economic, and safety net characteristics. Methods. We entered community-level characteristics and US Department of Housing and Urban Development point-in-time counts for a single night in January 2009 into separate mixed-effects statistical analyses that modeled homelessness rates for 4 subpopulations: families and single adults in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan regions. Results. Community-level factors accounted for 25% to 50% of the variance in homelessness rates across models. In metropolitan regions, alcohol consumption, social support, and several economic indicators were uniquely associated with family homelessness, and drug use and homicide were uniquely associated with single-adult homelessness. In nonmetropolitan regions, life expectancy, religious adherence, unemployment, and rent burden were uniquely associated with family homelessness, and health care access, crime, several economic indicators, and receipt of Supplemental Security Income were uniquely associated with single-adult homelessness. Conclusions. Considering homeless families and single adults separately enabled more precise modeling of associations between homelessness rates and community-level characteristics, indicating targets for interventions to reduce homelessness among these subpopulations. PMID:24148057

  17. Community-level characteristics associated with variation in rates of homelessness among families and single adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargo, Jamison D; Munley, Ellen A; Byrne, Thomas H; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Culhane, Dennis P

    2013-12-01

    We modeled rates of family and single-adult homelessness in the United States in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan regions and as a function of community-level demographic, behavioral, health, economic, and safety net characteristics. We entered community-level characteristics and US Department of Housing and Urban Development point-in-time counts for a single night in January 2009 into separate mixed-effects statistical analyses that modeled homelessness rates for 4 subpopulations: families and single adults in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan regions. Community-level factors accounted for 25% to 50% of the variance in homelessness rates across models. In metropolitan regions, alcohol consumption, social support, and several economic indicators were uniquely associated with family homelessness, and drug use and homicide were uniquely associated with single-adult homelessness. In nonmetropolitan regions, life expectancy, religious adherence, unemployment, and rent burden were uniquely associated with family homelessness, and health care access, crime, several economic indicators, and receipt of Supplemental Security Income were uniquely associated with single-adult homelessness. Considering homeless families and single adults separately enabled more precise modeling of associations between homelessness rates and community-level characteristics, indicating targets for interventions to reduce homelessness among these subpopulations.

  18. Level-set simulations of buoyancy-driven motion of single and multiple bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcázar, Néstor; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Jofre, Lluís; Oliva, Assensi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A conservative level-set method is validated and verified. • An extensive study of buoyancy-driven motion of single bubbles is performed. • The interactions of two spherical and ellipsoidal bubbles is studied. • The interaction of multiple bubbles is simulated in a vertical channel. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical study of buoyancy-driven motion of single and multiple bubbles by means of the conservative level-set method. First, an extensive study of the hydrodynamics of single bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid is performed, including its shape, terminal velocity, drag coefficients and wake patterns. These results are validated against experimental and numerical data well established in the scientific literature. Then, a further study on the interaction of two spherical and ellipsoidal bubbles is performed for different orientation angles. Finally, the interaction of multiple bubbles is explored in a periodic vertical channel. The results show that the conservative level-set approach can be used for accurate modelling of bubble dynamics. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the present method is numerically stable for a wide range of Morton and Reynolds numbers.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid tau levels are a marker for molecular subtype in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, André; Hermann, Peter; Ponto, Claudia; Schmitz, Matthias; Arora, Amandeep; Zafar, Saima; Llorens, Franc; Müller-Heine, Annika; Zerr, Inga

    2015-05-01

    The molecular subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is an important prognostic marker for patient survival. However, subtype determination is not possible during lifetime. Because the rate of disease progression is associated with the molecular subtype, this study aimed at investigating if total tau, a marker of neuronal death, allows premortem diagnosis of molecular subtype when codon 129 genotype is known. Two hundred ninety-six sCJD patients were tested for their cerebrospinal fluid total tau level at the time of diagnosis and were investigated for their sCJD subtype postmortem. There was a significant association between tau levels and the prion protein type in patients with codon 129 MM (p disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A comprehensive experiment for molecular biology: Determination of single nucleotide polymorphism in human REV3 gene using PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-07-08

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ and SNPs in this gene are associated with altered susceptibility to cancer. This newly designed experiment is composed of three parts, including genomic DNA extraction, gene amplification by PCR, and genotyping by RFLP. By combining these activities, the students are not only able to learn a series of biotechniques in molecular biology, but also acquire the ability to link the learned knowledge with practical applications. This comprehensive experiment will help the medical students improve the conceptual understanding of SNP and the technical understanding of SNP detection. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):299-304, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging technique. Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; Principle and role of functional or molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, main emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Single photon emission computed tomography: gamma cameras and their components, gamma camera specifications, planar single photon imaging characteristics, gamma camera and tomography; 4 - Quantification in single photon emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution, partial volume effect, movements, others; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  2. An all-electric single-molecule motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldenthuis, Johannes S; Prins, Ferry; Thijssen, Joseph M; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2010-11-23

    Many types of molecular motors have been proposed and synthesized in recent years, displaying different kinds of motion, and fueled by different driving forces such as light, heat, or chemical reactions. We propose a new type of molecular motor based on electric field actuation and electric current detection of the rotational motion of a molecular dipole embedded in a three-terminal single-molecule device. The key aspect of this all-electronic design is the conjugated backbone of the molecule, which simultaneously provides the potential landscape of the rotor orientation and a real-time measure of that orientation through the modulation of the conductivity. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we show that this approach provides full control over the speed and continuity of motion, thereby combining electrical and mechanical control at the molecular level over a wide range of temperatures. Moreover, chemistry can be used to change all key parameters of the device, enabling a variety of new experiments on molecular motors.

  3. Molecular structure descriptors in the computer-aided design of biologically active compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raevsky, Oleg A

    1999-01-01

    The current state of description of molecular structure in computer-aided molecular design of biologically active compounds by means of descriptors is analysed. The information contents of descriptors increases in the following sequence: element-level descriptors-structural formulae descriptors-electronic structure descriptors-molecular shape descriptors-intermolecular interaction descriptors. Each subsequent class of descriptors normally covers information contained in the previous-level ones. It is emphasised that it is practically impossible to describe all the features of a molecular structure in terms of any single class of descriptors. It is recommended to optimise the number of descriptors used by means of appropriate statistical procedures and characteristics of structure-property models based on these descriptors. The bibliography includes 371 references.

  4. Trends Analysis of rhBMP Utilization in Single-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Lifeng; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Buser, Zorica; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C; Meisel, Hans-Joerg

    2017-10-01

    Retrospective study. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) has been widely used in spinal fusion surgery, but there is little information on rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the trends and demographics of rhBMP-2 utilization in single-level PLIF. Patients who underwent single-level PLIF from 2005 to 2011 were identified by searching ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes in the PearlDiver Patient Records Database, a national database of orthopedic insurance records. The year of procedure, age, gender, and region of the United States were recorded for each patient. Results were reported for each variable as the incidence of procedures identified per 100 000 patients searched in the database. A total of 2735 patients had single-level PLIF. The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 maintained at a relatively stable level (28% to 31%) from 2005 to 2009, but decreased in 2010 (9.9%) and 2011 (11.8%). The overall incidence of single-level PLIF without rhBMP-2 (0.68 cases per 100 000 patients) was statistically higher ( P level PLIF with rhBMP-2 (0.21 cases per 100 000 patients). The average rate of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 utilization was the highest in West (30.1%), followed by Midwest (26.9%), South (20.5%), and Northeast (17.8%). The highest incidence of single-level PLIF with rhBMP-2 was observed in the age group level PLIF. There was a 3-fold increase in the rate of PLIF without rhBMP-2 compared to PLIF with rhBMP-2, with both procedures being mainly done in patients less than 65 years of age.

  5. Base-Stock Level yang Meminimasi Biaya pada Permasalahan Single Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanti Octavia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to conduct an analysis on demand characteristic and inventory cost which might potentially influence the determination of base-stock level. Appropriate base-stock level will determine the maximum profit and also reduce the stockout cost for fashion products which has high demand uncertainty and single order problem. Case study is applied on a garment company with eight fashion product types that can be classified into short and long lifetime. The effect of coefficient variation, salvage price and stockout cost is analyzed towards profits and base stock level. It can be concluded that demand variability does not affect base stock level, while stockout cost and salvage price does.

  6. Quantum private comparison with d-level single-particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chao-Hua; Guo, Gong-De; Lin, Song

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a quantum private comparison protocol with d-level single-particle states is proposed. In the protocol, a semi-honest third party is introduced to help two participants compare the size relationship of their secrets without revealing them to any other people. It is shown that the protocol is secure in theory. Moreover, the security of the protocol in real circumstance is also discussed. (paper)

  7. Room-Temperature Single-photon level Memory for Polarization States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupchak, Connor; Mittiga, Thomas; Jordaan, Bertus; Namazi, Mehdi; Nölleke, Christian; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-01-01

    An optical quantum memory is a stationary device that is capable of storing and recreating photonic qubits with a higher fidelity than any classical device. Thus far, these two requirements have been fulfilled for polarization qubits in systems based on cold atoms and cryogenically cooled crystals. Here, we report a room-temperature memory capable of storing arbitrary polarization qubits with a signal-to-background ratio higher than 1 and an average fidelity surpassing the classical benchmark for weak laser pulses containing 1.6 photons on average, without taking into account non-unitary operation. Our results demonstrate that a common vapor cell can reach the low background noise levels necessary for polarization qubit storage using single-photon level light, and propels atomic-vapor systems towards a level of functionality akin to other quantum information processing architectures.

  8. Magneto-transport in the zero-energy Landau level of single-layer and bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitler, U; Giesbers, A J M; Elferen, H J van; Kurganova, E V; McCollam, A; Maan, J C

    2011-01-01

    We present recent low-temperature magnetotransport experiments on single-layer and bilayer graphene in high magnetic field up to 33 T. In single layer graphene the fourfold degeneracy of the zero-energy Landau level is lifted by a gap opening at filling factor ν = 0. In bilayer graphene, we observe a partial lifting of the degeneracy of the eightfold degenerate zero-energy Landau level.

  9. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  10. Mechanisms of molecular electronic rectification through electronic levels with strong vibrational coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2002-01-01

    We present a new view and an analytical formalism of electron flow through a donor-acceptor molecule inserted between a pair of metal electrodes. The donor and acceptor levels are strongly coupled to an environmental nuclear continuum. The formalism applies to molecular donor-acceptor systems bot...

  11. Energy level alignment and molecular conformation at rubrene/Ag interfaces: Impact of contact contaminations on the interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sumona, E-mail: sumona.net.09@gmail.com [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Wang, C.-H. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Mukherjee, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Impact of contact contaminations on the energy level alignment and molecular conformation at rubrene/Ag interfaces. • Adventitious contamination layer was acted as a spacer layer between Ag substrate surface and rubrene molecular layer. • Hole injection barrier height and interface dipole at rubrene/Ag interfaces depend on the cleanliness of Ag substrate. • Molecular conformation as well as orientation controlled by the cleanliness of Ag surface. • Resulted different surface morphology of rubrene thin films on unclean and clean Ag substrate. - Abstract: This paper addresses the impact of electrode contaminations on the interfacial energy level alignment, the molecular conformation, orientation and surface morphology deposited organic film at organic semiconductor/noble metal interfaces by varying of film thickness from sub-monolayer to multilayer, which currently draws significant attention with regard to its application in organic electronics. The UHV clean Ag and unclean Ag were employed as substrate whereas rubrene was used as an organic semiconducting material. The photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) was engaged to investigate the evolution of interfacial energetics; polarization dependent near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) was employed to understand the molecular conformation as well as orientation whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the films. The adventitious contamination layer was acted as a spacer layer between clean Ag substrate surface and rubrene molecular layer. As a consequence, hole injection barrier height, interface dipole as well as molecular-conformation, molecular-orientation and surface morphology of rubrene thin films were found to depend on the cleanliness of Ag substrate. The results have important inferences about the understanding of the impact of substrate contamination on the energy level alignment, the molecular conformation

  12. Intravital imaging of cardiac function at the single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Aaron D; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matt; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-08-05

    Knowledge of cardiomyocyte biology is limited by the lack of methods to interrogate single-cell physiology in vivo. Here we show that contracting myocytes can indeed be imaged with optical microscopy at high temporal and spatial resolution in the beating murine heart, allowing visualization of individual sarcomeres and measurement of the single cardiomyocyte contractile cycle. Collectively, this has been enabled by efficient tissue stabilization, a prospective real-time cardiac gating approach, an image processing algorithm for motion-artifact-free imaging throughout the cardiac cycle, and a fluorescent membrane staining protocol. Quantification of cardiomyocyte contractile function in vivo opens many possibilities for investigating myocardial disease and therapeutic intervention at the cellular level.

  13. Kinetic proofreading at single molecular level: aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile and the role of water as an editor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantu Santra

    Full Text Available Proofreading/editing in protein synthesis is essential for accurate translation of information from the genetic code. In this article we present a theoretical investigation of efficiency of a kinetic proofreading mechanism that employs hydrolysis of the wrong substrate as the discriminatory step in enzyme catalytic reactions. We consider aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile which is a crucial step in protein synthesis and for which experimental results are now available. We present an augmented kinetic scheme and then employ methods of stochastic simulation algorithm to obtain time dependent concentrations of different substances involved in the reaction and their rates of formation. We obtain the rates of product formation and ATP hydrolysis for both correct and wrong substrates (isoleucine and valine in our case, respectively, in single molecular enzyme as well as ensemble enzyme kinetics. The present theoretical scheme correctly reproduces (i the amplitude of the discrimination factor in the overall rates between isoleucine and valine which is obtained as (1.8×10(2.(4.33×10(2 = 7.8×10(4, (ii the rates of ATP hydrolysis for both Ile and Val at different substrate concentrations in the aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile. The present study shows a non-michaelis type dependence of rate of reaction on tRNA(Ile concentration in case of valine. The overall editing in steady state is found to be independent of amino acid concentration. Interestingly, the computed ATP hydrolysis rate for valine at high substrate concentration is same as the rate of formation of Ile-tRNA(Ile whereas at intermediate substrate concentration the ATP hydrolysis rate is relatively low. We find that the presence of additional editing domain in class I editing enzyme makes the kinetic proofreading more efficient through enhanced hydrolysis of wrong product at the editing CP1 domain.

  14. Understanding nanocellulose chirality and structure–properties relationship at the single fibril level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, Ivan; Nyström, Gustav; Adamcik, Jozef; Handschin, Stephan; Schütz, Christina; Fall, Andreas; Bergström, Lennart; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Nanocellulose fibrils are ubiquitous in nature and nanotechnologies but their mesoscopic structural assembly is not yet fully understood. Here we study the structural features of rod-like cellulose nanoparticles on a single particle level, by applying statistical polymer physics concepts on electron and atomic force microscopy images, and we assess their physical properties via quantitative nanomechanical mapping. We show evidence of right-handed chirality, observed on both bundles and on single fibrils. Statistical analysis of contours from microscopy images shows a non-Gaussian kink angle distribution. This is inconsistent with a structure consisting of alternating amorphous and crystalline domains along the contour and supports process-induced kink formation. The intrinsic mechanical properties of nanocellulose are extracted from nanoindentation and persistence length method for transversal and longitudinal directions, respectively. The structural analysis is pushed to the level of single cellulose polymer chains, and their smallest associated unit with a proposed 2 × 2 chain-packing arrangement. PMID:26108282

  15. Understanding nanocellulose chirality and structure-properties relationship at the single fibril level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, Ivan; Nyström, Gustav; Adamcik, Jozef; Handschin, Stephan; Schütz, Christina; Fall, Andreas; Bergström, Lennart; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Nanocellulose fibrils are ubiquitous in nature and nanotechnologies but their mesoscopic structural assembly is not yet fully understood. Here we study the structural features of rod-like cellulose nanoparticles on a single particle level, by applying statistical polymer physics concepts on electron and atomic force microscopy images, and we assess their physical properties via quantitative nanomechanical mapping. We show evidence of right-handed chirality, observed on both bundles and on single fibrils. Statistical analysis of contours from microscopy images shows a non-Gaussian kink angle distribution. This is inconsistent with a structure consisting of alternating amorphous and crystalline domains along the contour and supports process-induced kink formation. The intrinsic mechanical properties of nanocellulose are extracted from nanoindentation and persistence length method for transversal and longitudinal directions, respectively. The structural analysis is pushed to the level of single cellulose polymer chains, and their smallest associated unit with a proposed 2 × 2 chain-packing arrangement.

  16. GaN Schottky diodes with single-crystal aluminum barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, H. Y.; Yang, W. C.; Lee, P. Y.; Lin, C. W.; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, K. C.; Cheng, K. Y., E-mail: kycheng@ee.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hsu, C.-H. [Division of Scientific Research, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-22

    GaN-based Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) with single-crystal Al barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are fabricated. Examined using in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffractions, ex-situ high-resolution x-ray diffractions, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, it is determined that epitaxial Al grows with its [111] axis coincident with the [0001] axis of the GaN substrate without rotation. In fabricated SBDs, a 0.2 V barrier height enhancement and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in leakage current are observed in single crystal Al/GaN SBDs compared to conventional thermal deposited Al/GaN SBDs. The strain induced piezoelectric field is determined to be the major source of the observed device performance enhancements.

  17. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering in Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwane, Madoka; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-08-18

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy that allows Raman spectroscopy on a single molecular scale. Here, we present a review of SERS from molecular junctions, in which a single molecule or molecules are made to have contact from the top to the bottom of metal surfaces. The molecular junctions are nice platforms for SERS as well as transport measurement. Electronic characterization based on the transport measurements of molecular junctions has been extensively studied for the development of miniaturized electronic devices. Simultaneous SERS and transport measurement of the molecular junctions allow both structural (geometrical) and electronic information on the single molecule scale. The improvement of SERS measurement on molecular junctions open the door toward new nanoscience and nanotechnology in molecular electronics.

  18. Trends Analysis of rhBMP2 Utilization in Single-Level Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Lifeng; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Buser, Zorica; Brodke, Darrel S; Yoon, S Tim; Youssef, Jim A; Park, Jong-Beom; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2018-04-01

    Retrospective case study. To evaluate the trends and demographics of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP2) utilization in single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) in the United States. Patients who underwent single-level ALIF from 2005 to 2011 were identified by searching ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes in the PearlDiver Patient Records Database (PearlDiver Technologies, Fort Wayne, IN), a national database of orthopedic insurance records. The year of procedure, age, gender, and region of the United States were analyzed for each patient. A total of 921 patients were identified who underwent a single-level ALIF in this study. The average rate of single-level ALIF with rhBMP2 utilization increased (35%-48%) from 2005 to 2009, but sharply decreased to 16.7% in 2010 and 15.0% in 2011. The overall incidence of single-level ALIF without rhBMP2 (0.20 cases per 100 000 patients) was more than twice of the incidence of single-level ALIF with rhBMP2 (0.09 cases per 100 000 patients). The average rate of single-level ALIF with rhBMP2 utilization is highest in West (41.4%), followed by Midwest (33.3%), South (26.5%) and Northeast (22.2%). The highest incidence of single-level ALIF with rhBMP2 was observed in the group aged less than 65 years (compared with any other age groups, P level ALIF increased from 2006 to 2009, but decreased in 2010 and 2011. The Northeast region had the lowest incidence of rhBMP2 utilization. The group aged less than 65 years trended to have the higher incidence of single-level ALIF with rhBMP2 utilization.

  19. Polymorphic transitions in single crystals: A new molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1981-12-01

    A new Lagrangian formulation is introduced. It can be used to make molecular dynamics (MD) calculations on systems under the most general, externally applied, conditions of stress. In this formulation the MD cell shape and size can change according to dynamical equations given by this Lagrangian. This new MD technique is well suited to the study of structural transformations in solids under external stress and at finite temperature. As an example of the use of this technique we show how a single crystal of Ni behaves under uniform uniaxial compressive and tensile loads. This work confirms some of the results of static (i.e., zero temperature) calculations reported in the literature. We also show that some results regarding the stress-strain relation obtained by static calculations are invalid at finite temperature. We find that, under compressive loading, our model of Ni shows a bifurcation in its stress-strain relation; this bifurcation provides a link in configuration space between cubic and hexagonal close packing. It is suggested that such a transformation could perhaps be observed experimentally under extreme conditions of shock.

  20. Polymorphic transitions in single crystals: A new molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1981-01-01

    A new Lagrangian formulation is introduced. It can be used to make molecular dynamics (MD) calculations on systems under the most general, externally applied, conditions of stress. In this formulation the MD cell shape and size can change according to dynamical equations given by this Lagrangian. This new MD technique is well suited to the study of structural transformations in solids under external stress and at finite temperature. As an example of the use of this technique we show how a single crystal of Ni behaves under uniform uniaxial compressive and tensile loads. This work confirms some of the results of static (i.e., zero temperature) calculations reported in the literature. We also show that some results regarding the stress-strain relation obtained by static calculations are invalid at finite temperature. We find that, under compressive loading, our model of Ni shows a bifurcation in its stress-strain relation; this bifurcation provides a link in configuration space between cubic and hexagonal close packing. It is suggested that such a transformation could perhaps be observed experimentally under extreme conditions of shock

  1. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes. [Electron promotion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references.

  2. Temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide: Molecular dynamics nanoindentation simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Junhua, E-mail: junhua.zhao@uni-weimar.de [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Equipment and Technology of Food, Jiangnan University, 214122 Wuxi (China); Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Jiang, Jin-Wu, E-mail: jwjiang5918@hotmail.com [Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Rabczuk, Timon, E-mail: timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de [Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, 136-701 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-02

    The temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) are obtained using molecular dynamics (MD) nanoindentation simulations. The Young's moduli, maximum load stress, and maximum loading strain decrease with increasing temperature from 4.2 K to 500 K. The obtained Young's moduli are in good agreement with those using our MD uniaxial tension simulations and the available experimental results. The tendency of maximum loading strain with different temperature is opposite with that of metal materials due to the short range Stillinger-Weber potentials in MoS{sub 2}. Furthermore, the indenter tip radius and fitting strain effect on the mechanical properties are also discussed.

  3. How to get more from less. Comments on "Extracting physics of life at the molecular level: A review of single-molecule data analyses" by W. Colomb and S.K. Sarkar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Frederick; Flomenbom, Ophir

    2015-06-01

    Measuring individual entities at room temperature has become routine due to improvements in technology. We can study ion channels (since the 70s), quantum dots (since the 80s), and receptors, molecular engines and enzymes (since the 90s). The inherent nature of these small systems is that the standard deviation of the measurement is comparable to the mean - the definition of a small system [1]. Individual probes are detected, measured, and the trajectories are then analyzed to extract the mean properties of the system. The review [2] provides links to many examples of single molecule studies, mostly those using optical probes.

  4. GOTHIC memory management : a multiprocessor shared single level store

    OpenAIRE

    Michel , Béatrice

    1990-01-01

    Gothic purpose is to build an object-oriented fault-tolerant distributed operating system for a local area network of multiprocessor workstations. This paper describes Gothic memory manager. It realizes the sharing of the secondary memory space between any process running on the Gothic system. Processes on different processors can communicate by sharing permanent information. The manager implements a shared single level storage with an invalidation protocol working on disk-pages to maintain s...

  5. COPRED: prediction of fold, GO molecular function and functional residues at the domain level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel; Pazos, Florencio

    2013-07-15

    Only recently the first resources devoted to the functional annotation of proteins at the domain level started to appear. The next step is to develop specific methodologies for predicting function at the domain level based on these resources, and to implement them in web servers to be used by the community. In this work, we present COPRED, a web server for the concomitant prediction of fold, molecular function and functional sites at the domain level, based on a methodology for domain molecular function prediction and a resource of domain functional annotations previously developed and benchmarked. COPRED can be freely accessed at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/copred. The interface works in all standard web browsers. WebGL (natively supported by most browsers) is required for the in-line preview and manipulation of protein 3D structures. The website includes a detailed help section and usage examples. pazos@cnb.csic.es.

  6. Drift correction for single-molecule imaging by molecular constraint field, a distance minimum metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Renmin; Wang, Liansan; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Yongdeng; Zhang, Mingshu; Liu, Zhiyong; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Fa

    2015-01-01

    The recent developments of far-field optical microscopy (single molecule imaging techniques) have overcome the diffraction barrier of light and improve image resolution by a factor of ten compared with conventional light microscopy. These techniques utilize the stochastic switching of probe molecules to overcome the diffraction limit and determine the precise localizations of molecules, which often requires a long image acquisition time. However, long acquisition times increase the risk of sample drift. In the case of high resolution microscopy, sample drift would decrease the image resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel metric based on the distance between molecules to solve the drift correction. The proposed metric directly uses the position information of molecules to estimate the frame drift. We also designed an algorithm to implement the metric for the general application of drift correction. There are two advantages of our method: First, because our method does not require space binning of positions of molecules but directly operates on the positions, it is more natural for single molecule imaging techniques. Second, our method can estimate drift with a small number of positions in each temporal bin, which may extend its potential application. The effectiveness of our method has been demonstrated by both simulated data and experiments on single molecular images

  7. Synthetic lethality between gene defects affecting a single non-essential molecular pathway with reversible steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Zinovyev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Systematic analysis of synthetic lethality (SL constitutes a critical tool for systems biology to decipher molecular pathways. The most accepted mechanistic explanation of SL is that the two genes function in parallel, mutually compensatory pathways, known as between-pathway SL. However, recent genome-wide analyses in yeast identified a significant number of within-pathway negative genetic interactions. The molecular mechanisms leading to within-pathway SL are not fully understood. Here, we propose a novel mechanism leading to within-pathway SL involving two genes functioning in a single non-essential pathway. This type of SL termed within-reversible-pathway SL involves reversible pathway steps, catalyzed by different enzymes in the forward and backward directions, and kinetic trapping of a potentially toxic intermediate. Experimental data with recombinational DNA repair genes validate the concept. Mathematical modeling recapitulates the possibility of kinetic trapping and revealed the potential contributions of synthetic, dosage-lethal interactions in such a genetic system as well as the possibility of within-pathway positive masking interactions. Analysis of yeast gene interaction and pathway data suggests broad applicability of this novel concept. These observations extend the canonical interpretation of synthetic-lethal or synthetic-sick interactions with direct implications to reconstruct molecular pathways and improve therapeutic approaches to diseases such as cancer.

  8. Clinical and molecular sub-classification of hepatocellular carcinoma relative to alpha-fetoprotein level in an Asia-Pacific island cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Scott T; Sato, Miles M; Wong, Linda L; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Kwee, Sandi A

    2018-01-01

    Increased serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels are associated with specific molecular sub-classes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), supporting AFP as a predictive or therapeutic biomarker for precision treatment of this disease. Considering recent efforts to validate HCC molecular classification systems across different populations, we applied existing signature-based classification templates to Hawaii cohorts and examined whether associations between HCC molecular sub-class, AFP levels, and clinical features found elsewhere can also be found in Hawaii, a region with a unique demographic and risk factor profile for HCC. Whole-genome expression profiling was performed on HCC tumors collected from 40 patients following partial hepatectomy. Tumors underwent transcriptome-based categorization into 3 molecular sub-classes (S1, S2, and S3). Patient groups based on molecular sub-class and AFP level were then compared with regards to clinical features and survival. Differences associated with AFP level and other clinical parameters were also examined at the gene signature level by gene set enrichment analysis. Statistically confident (false discovery rate 400 ng/mL predicted significant tumor enrichment for genes corresponding to MYC target activation, high cell proliferation, poor clinical prognosis, and the S2 sub-class. AFP > 400 ng/mL and non-S3 tumor classification were found to be significant predictors of overall survival. Distinct sub-classes of HCC associated with different molecular features and survival outcomes can be detected with statistical confidence in a Pacific Island cohort. Molecular classification signatures and other predictive markers for HCC that are valid for all patient populations are needed to support multi-center efforts to develop targeted therapies for HCC.

  9. Nonperturbative theory of single/multiphoton processes in atoms and molecules induced by intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, A.M.F.

    1975-04-01

    A quantum nonperturbative theory is given for the problem of a general n discrete-level atomic/molecular system interacting with a strong single-mode/multimode radiation field. The atomic/molecular energy-level structures are modified due to interaction with the laser field. These energy level shifts are derived in the rigorous solution to the adiabatic eigenvalue problem of the charge--field system, involving a simple iterative procedure. The task of solution is simplified by recurrence relations between matrices connecting probability amplitudes of successive photon numbers. New formulae for calculating probability of single/multiphoton transitions between three resonant shifted levels and between some cases of two near-resonant shifted levels are derived. This general formalism can be applied to calculate transition probabilities of various atomic/molecular photo processes of interest. Numerical values are obtained for the inelastic cross section of the slow-collisional process Li + H and for dissociation cross section of LiH molecule. The transition probabilities of Na (3s → 5s by absorption of two photon of lambda = 0.60233μ -- 0.602396 μ) and of Li (2s → 3s by absorption of eight photons of lambda = 2.9406 μ -- 2.945 μ) irradiated by a strong pulse are calculated. Finally, a parametric study is carried out for the process where a molecular system is interacting with two intense radiation fields of different wavelengths. Owing to potential barrier shift due to the much more intense field, the molecular system penetrates into an otherwise inaccessible region in the potential level where it is allowed to radiate to a lower level by emitting photons at a second wavelength. (12 figures, 6 tables) (U.S.)

  10. Solid-state molecular organometallic chemistry. Single-crystal to single-crystal reactivity and catalysis with light hydrocarbon substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, F Mark; McKay, Alasdair I; Martinez-Martinez, Antonio J; Rees, Nicholas H; Krämer, Tobias; Macgregor, Stuart A; Weller, Andrew S

    2017-08-01

    0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 CHCD 3 , using [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(η 2 η 2 -NBA)][BAr F 4 ] scrambles the D-label into all possible positions of the propene, as shown by isotopic perturbation of equilibrium measurements for the agostic interaction. Periodic DFT calculations show a low barrier to H/D exchange (10.9 kcal mol -1 , PBE-D3 level), and GIPAW chemical shift calculations guide the assignment of the experimental data. When synthesized using solution routes a bis-propene complex, [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(propene) 2 ][BAr F 4 ] , is formed. [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(butene)][BAr F 4 ] ( x = 1) is characterized as having 2-butene bound as the cis -isomer and a single Rh···H 3 C agostic interaction. In the solid-state two low-energy fluxional processes are proposed. The first is a simple libration of the 2-butene that exchanges the agostic interaction, and the second is a butene isomerization process that proceeds via an allyl-hydride intermediate with a low computed barrier of 14.5 kcal mol -1 . [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(η 2 η 2 -NBA)][BAr F 4 ] and the polymorphs of [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(ethene) 2 ][BAr F 4 ] are shown to be effective in solid-state molecular organometallic catalysis (SMOM-Cat) for the isomerization of 1-butene to a mixture of cis - and trans -2-butene at 298 K and 1 atm, and studies suggest that catalysis is likely dominated by surface-active species. [Rh(Cy 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PCy 2 )(η 2 η 2 -NBA

  11. Level-statistics in Disordered Systems: A single parametric scaling and Connection to Brownian Ensembles

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Pragya

    2004-01-01

    We find that the statistics of levels undergoing metal-insulator transition in systems with multi-parametric Gaussian disorders and non-interacting electrons behaves in a way similar to that of the single parametric Brownian ensembles \\cite{dy}. The latter appear during a Poisson $\\to$ Wigner-Dyson transition, driven by a random perturbation. The analogy provides the analytical evidence for the single parameter scaling of the level-correlations in disordered systems as well as a tool to obtai...

  12. Unraveling the physics of nanofluidic phenomena at the single-molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasiero, Francesco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Despite groundbreaking potential in a broad application space, several nanofluidic phenomena remain poorly understood. Toward advancing the understanding of fluid behavior under nanoscale confinement, we developed a novel, ideal platform for fundamental molecular transport studies, in which the fluidic channel is a single carbon nanotube (CNT). CNTs offer the advantage of simple chemistry and structure, which can be synthetically tuned with nanometer precision and accurately modeled. With combined experimental and computational approaches, we demonstrated that CNT pores with 1-5 nm diameters conduct giant ionic currents that follow an unusual sublinear electrolyte concentration dependence. The large magnitude of the ionic conductance appears to originate from a strong electro-osmotic flow in smooth CNT pores. First-principle simulations suggest that electro-osmotic flow arises from localized negative polarization charges on carbon atoms near a potassium (K+) ion and from the strong cation-graphitic wall interactions, which drive K+ ions much closer to the wall than chlorides (Cl-). Single-molecule translocation studies reveal that charged molecules may be distinguished from neutral species on the basis of the sign of the transient current change during their passage through the nanopore. Together with shedding light on a few controversial questions in the CNT nanofluidics area, these results may benefit LLNL’s Security Mission by providing the foundation for the development of advanced single-molecule detection system for bio/chem/explosive analytes. In addition, these experimental and computational platforms can be applied to advance fundamental knowledge in other fields, from energy storage and membrane separation to superfluid physics.

  13. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Single molecule approaches to biology, July 15-20 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Julio M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-20

    Single molecule techniques are rapidly occupying a central role in biological research at all levels. This transition was made possible by the availability and dissemination of robust techniques that use fluorescence and force probes to track the conformation of molecules one at a time, in vitro as well as in live cells. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are studied. These novel techniques provide previously unobtainable data on fundamental biochemical processes that are essential for all forms of life. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of the molecular systems that underpin the functioning of living cells. Hence, our conference seeks to disseminate the implementation and use of single molecule techniques in the pursuit of new biological knowledge. Topics covered include: Molecular Motors on the Move; Origin And Fate Of Proteins; Physical Principles Of Life; Molecules and Super-resolution Microscopy; Nanoswitches In Action; Active Motion Or Random Diffusion?; Building Blocks Of Living Cells; From Molecular Mechanics To Physiology; Tug-of-war: Force Spectroscopy Of Single Proteins.

  14. Light-controlled supramolecular helicity of a liquid crystalline phase using a helical polymer functionalized with a single chiroptical molecular switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijper, Dirk; Jongejan, Mahthild G. M.; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Control over the preferred helical sense of a poly(n-hexyl isocyanate) (PHIC) by using a single light-driven molecular motor, covalently attached at the polymer's terminus, has been accomplished in solution via a combination of photochemical and thermal isomerizations. Here, we report that after

  15. The long tail of molecular alterations in non-small cell lung cancer: a single-institution experience of next-generation sequencing in clinical molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Caterina; Vacirca, Davide; Rappa, Alessandra; Passaro, Antonio; Guarize, Juliana; Rafaniello Raviele, Paola; de Marinis, Filippo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Casadio, Chiara; Viale, Giuseppe; Barberis, Massimo; Guerini-Rocco, Elena

    2018-03-13

    Molecular profiling of advanced non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) is essential to identify patients who may benefit from targeted treatments. In the last years, the number of potentially actionable molecular alterations has rapidly increased. Next-generation sequencing allows for the analysis of multiple genes simultaneously. To evaluate the feasibility and the throughput of next-generation sequencing in clinical molecular diagnostics of advanced NSCLC. A single-institution cohort of 535 non-squamous NSCLC was profiled using a next-generation sequencing panel targeting 22 actionable and cancer-related genes. 441 non-squamous NSCLC (82.4%) harboured at least one gene alteration, including 340 cases (63.6%) with clinically relevant molecular aberrations. Mutations have been detected in all but one gene ( FGFR1 ) of the panel. Recurrent alterations were observed in KRAS , TP53 , EGFR , STK11 and MET genes, whereas the remaining genes were mutated in <5% of the cases. Concurrent mutations were detected in 183 tumours (34.2%), mostly impairing KRAS or EGFR in association with TP53 alterations. The study highlights the feasibility of targeted next-generation sequencing in clinical setting. The majority of NSCLC harboured mutations in clinically relevant genes, thus identifying patients who might benefit from different targeted therapies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Protein logic: a statistical mechanical study of signal integration at the single-molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, Wiet; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter; Mugler, Andrew

    2012-09-05

    Information processing and decision-making is based upon logic operations, which in cellular networks has been well characterized at the level of transcription. In recent years, however, both experimentalists and theorists have begun to appreciate that cellular decision-making can also be performed at the level of a single protein, giving rise to the notion of protein logic. Here we systematically explore protein logic using a well-known statistical mechanical model. As an example system, we focus on receptors that bind either one or two ligands, and their associated dimers. Notably, we find that a single heterodimer can realize any of the 16 possible logic gates, including the XOR gate, by variation of biochemical parameters. We then introduce what to our knowledge is a novel idea: that a set of receptors with fixed parameters can encode functionally unique logic gates simply by forming different dimeric combinations. An exhaustive search reveals that the simplest set of receptors (two single-ligand receptors and one double-ligand receptor) can realize several different groups of three unique gates, a result for which the parametric analysis of single receptors and dimers provides a clear interpretation. Both results underscore the surprising functional freedom readily available to cells at the single-protein level. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    the finite IC formation time affects charge transport through a molecule suspended between two electrodes. For a single-level model, an analytical treatment shows that the conductance is suppressed by a factor Z(2), where Z is the quasiparticle renormalization factor, compared to the static IC approximation...... that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels....

  18. Calculated single-proton levels for nuclei with N equal to 152, 154, 156, 158, 160 and 162

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.

    1986-09-01

    The decay properties of nuclei in many cases depend strongly on the quantum numbers of the single-particle levels in the vicinity of the Fermi surface. A striking illustration is the prolonged fission half-lives of odd nuclei relative to their even neighbors. The hindrance factor depends on the spin of unpaired odd particle and increases with increasing spin of the odd particle. The effect has been studied theoretically. For 257 Fm the hindrance factor is almost ten orders of magnitude. The computer code for calculating nuclear masses calculates single-particle levels at the deformations considered as one step in the calculations. We have run this code at the ground state deformation of all nuclei considered in the 1981 mass study and stored the calculated single-particle levels on permanent mass storage. A computer code has been constructed for extracting levels of nuclei that are specified to the program and plotting them. In this report we consider single-proton levels for even-N nuclei in the range 152 ≤ N ≤ 162. Six such plots are included in this report. The levels are plotted relative to the Fermi surface of each nucleus. We also include tables of the plotted single-particle levels since it is not always possible to determine the spin from an inspection of the plots, when levels are overlapping. 6 figs

  19. Single stage three level grid interactive MPPT inverter for PV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, Saban; Altin, Necmi; Sefa, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A three phase three-level NPC inverter for grid interactive PV systems is proposed. • A novel MPPT algorithm is introduced for single stage systems. • The proposed algorithm is robust with respect to parameter variations of PV system. • THD level is measured as 3.45% and it meets the international standards (<5%). • Total system efficiency is measured as 93.08%. - Abstract: In this study, three-phase, single stage neutral point clamped grid interactive inverter is designed and implemented. The reference current of the voltage source inverter is determined by maximum power point tracking sub-program in order to obtain maximum power from photovoltaic modules instantaneously. Proposed control is realized via TMS320F28335 32-bit floating point processor. The modified incremental conductance method is applied for maximum power point tracking; the PI regulator is used to control the inverter output current shape and level. Galvanic isolation is provided by a line frequency transformer that matches inverter output voltage to the grid voltage level and prevents DC current injection into the grid. Experimental results show that the designed inverter imports energy to the grid with unity power factor, total harmonic distortion level is 3.45% and this value is in the limits of the international standards. In addition, the total efficiency of the system is measured as 93.08%. The proposed system gets the maximum power from photovoltaic module and dispatches into the grid without using additional DC/DC converter

  20. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd=9.6 nM and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device.

  1. Broadening the horizon – level 2.5 of the HUPO-PSI format for molecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cusick Michael E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular interaction Information is a key resource in modern biomedical research. Publicly available data have previously been provided in a broad array of diverse formats, making access to this very difficult. The publication and wide implementation of the Human Proteome Organisation Proteomics Standards Initiative Molecular Interactions (HUPO PSI-MI format in 2004 was a major step towards the establishment of a single, unified format by which molecular interactions should be presented, but focused purely on protein-protein interactions. Results The HUPO-PSI has further developed the PSI-MI XML schema to enable the description of interactions between a wider range of molecular types, for example nucleic acids, chemical entities, and molecular complexes. Extensive details about each supported molecular interaction can now be captured, including the biological role of each molecule within that interaction, detailed description of interacting domains, and the kinetic parameters of the interaction. The format is supported by data management and analysis tools and has been adopted by major interaction data providers. Additionally, a simpler, tab-delimited format MITAB2.5 has been developed for the benefit of users who require only minimal information in an easy to access configuration. Conclusion The PSI-MI XML2.5 and MITAB2.5 formats have been jointly developed by interaction data producers and providers from both the academic and commercial sector, and are already widely implemented and well supported by an active development community. PSI-MI XML2.5 enables the description of highly detailed molecular interaction data and facilitates data exchange between databases and users without loss of information. MITAB2.5 is a simpler format appropriate for fast Perl parsing or loading into Microsoft Excel.

  2. SCELib2: the new revision of SCELib, the parallel computational library of molecular properties in the single center approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, N.; Morelli, G.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we present the new version of the SCELib program (CPC Catalogue identifier ADMG) a full numerical implementation of the Single Center Expansion (SCE) method. The physics involved is that of producing the SCE description of molecular electronic densities, of molecular electrostatic potentials and of molecular perturbed potentials due to a point negative or positive charge. This new revision of the program has been optimized to run in serial as well as in parallel execution mode, to support a larger set of molecular symmetries and to permit the restart of long-lasting calculations. To measure the performance of this new release, a comparative study has been carried out on the most powerful computing architectures in serial and parallel runs. The results of the calculations reported in this paper refer to real cases medium to large molecular systems and they are reported in full details to benchmark at best the parallel architectures the new SCELib code will run on. Program summaryTitle of program: SCELib2 Catalogue identifier: ADGU Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADGU Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Reference to previous versions: Comput. Phys. Commun. 128 (2) (2000) 139 (CPC catalogue identifier: ADMG) Does the new version supersede the original program?: Yes Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: HP ES45 and rx2600, SUN ES4500, IBM SP and any single CPU workstation based on Alpha, SPARC, POWER, Itanium2 and X86 processors Installations: CASPUR, local Operating systems under which the program has been tested: HP Tru64 V5.X, SUNOS V5.8, IBM AIX V5.X, Linux RedHat V8.0 Programming language used: C Memory required to execute with typical data: 10 Mwords. Up to 2000 Mwords depending on the molecular system and runtime parameters No. of bits in a word: 64 No. of processors used: 1 to 32 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes

  3. Renormalization of Molecular Quasiparticle Levels at Metal-Molecule Interfaces: Trends across Binding Regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Rubio, Angel

    2009-01-01

    a microscopic model of the metal-molecule interface, we illustrate the basic features of this renormalization mechanism through systematic GW, Hartree-Fock, and Kohn-Sham calculations for the molecular energy levels as function of the model parameters. We identify two different polarization mechanisms: (i...

  4. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  5. Evidence for systems-level molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capellá Gabriel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer arises from the consecutive acquisition of genetic alterations. Increasing evidence suggests that as a consequence of these alterations, molecular interactions are reprogrammed in the context of highly connected and regulated cellular networks. Coordinated reprogramming would allow the cell to acquire the capabilities for malignant growth. Results Here, we determine the coordinated function of cancer gene products (i.e., proteins encoded by differentially expressed genes in tumors relative to healthy tissue counterparts, hereafter referred to as "CGPs" defined as their topological properties and organization in the interactome network. We show that CGPs are central to information exchange and propagation and that they are specifically organized to promote tumorigenesis. Centrality is identified by both local (degree and global (betweenness and closeness measures, and systematically appears in down-regulated CGPs. Up-regulated CGPs do not consistently exhibit centrality, but both types of cancer products determine the overall integrity of the network structure. In addition to centrality, down-regulated CGPs show topological association that correlates with common biological processes and pathways involved in tumorigenesis. Conclusion Given the current limited coverage of the human interactome, this study proposes that tumorigenesis takes place in a specific and organized way at the molecular systems-level and suggests a model that comprises the precise down-regulation of groups of topologically-associated proteins involved in particular functions, orchestrated with the up-regulation of specific proteins.

  6. Single-Handed Helical Polybissilsesquioxane Nanotubes and Mesoporous Nanofibers Prepared by an External Templating Approach Using Low-Molecular-Weight Gelators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiral low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs derived from amino acids can self-assemble into helical fibers and twisted/coiled nanoribbons by H-bonding and π–π interaction. Silica nanotubes with single-handed helices have been prepared using chiral LMWGs through sol–gel transcription. Molecular-scale chirality exists at the inner surfaces. Here, we discuss single-handed helical aromatic ring-bridged polybissilsesquioxane nanotubes and mesoporous nanofibers prepared using chiral LMWGs. This review aims at describing the formation mechanisms of the helical nanostructures, the origination of optical activity, and the applications for other helical nanomaterial preparation, mainly based on our group’s results. The morphology and handedness can be controlled by changing the chirality and kinds of LMWGs and tuning the reaction conditions. The aromatic rings arrange in a partially crystalline structure. The optical activity of the polybissilsesquioxane nanotubes and mesoporous nanofibers originates from chiral defects, including stacking and twisting of aromatic groups, on the inner surfaces. They can be used as the starting materials for preparation of silica, silicon, carbonaceous, silica/carbon, and silicon carbide nanotubes.

  7. Molecular sensors and molecular logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, N.; Bojinov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The rapid grow of nanotechnology field extended the concept of a macroscopic device to the molecular level. Because of this reason the design and synthesis of (supra)-molecular species capable of mimicking the functions of macroscopic devices are currently of great interest. Molecular devices operate via electronic and/or nuclear rearrangements and, like macroscopic devices, need energy to operate and communicate between their elements. The energy needed to make a device work can be supplied as chemical energy, electrical energy, or light. Luminescence is one of the most useful techniques to monitor the operation of molecular-level devices. This fact determinates the synthesis of novel fluorescence compounds as a considerable and inseparable part of nanoscience development. Further miniaturization of semiconductors in electronic field reaches their limit. Therefore the design and construction of molecular systems capable of performing complex logic functions is of great scientific interest now. In semiconductor devices the logic gates work using binary logic, where the signals are encoded as 0 and 1 (low and high current). This process is executable on molecular level by several ways, but the most common are based on the optical properties of the molecule switches encoding the low and high concentrations of the input guest molecules and the output fluorescent intensities with binary 0 and 1 respectively. The first proposal to execute logic operations at the molecular level was made in 1988, but the field developed only five years later when the analogy between molecular switches and logic gates was experimentally demonstrated by de Silva. There are seven basic logic gates: AND, OR, XOR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XNOR and all of them were achieved by molecules, the fluorescence switching as well. key words: fluorescence, molecular sensors, molecular logic gates

  8. Molecular level in silico studies for oncology. Direct models review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psakhie, S. G.; Tsukanov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The combination of therapy and diagnostics in one process "theranostics" is a trend in a modern medicine, especially in oncology. Such an approach requires development and usage of multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles with a hierarchical structure. Numerical methods and mathematical models play a significant role in the design of the hierarchical nanoparticles and allow looking inside the nanoscale mechanisms of agent-cell interactions. The current position of in silico approach in biomedicine and oncology is discussed. The review of the molecular level in silico studies in oncology, which are using the direct models, is presented.

  9. Realization of a four-step molecular switch in scanning tunneling microscope manipulation of single chlorophyll-a molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Violeta; Hla, Saw-Wai

    2006-01-01

    Single chlorophyll-a molecules, a vital resource for the sustenance of life on Earth, have been investigated by using scanning tunneling microscope manipulation and spectroscopy on a gold substrate at 4.6 K. Chlorophyll-a binds on Au(111) via its porphyrin unit while the phytyl-chain is elevated from the surface by the support of four CH3 groups. By injecting tunneling electrons from the scanning tunneling microscope tip, we are able to bend the phytyl-chain, which enables the switching of four molecular conformations in a controlled manner. Statistical analyses and structural calculations reveal that all reversible switching mechanisms are initiated by a single tunneling-electron energy-transfer process, which induces bond rotation within the phytyl-chain. PMID:16954201

  10. Nanobody: the "magic bullet" for molecular imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Goel, Shreya; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging involves the non-invasive investigation of biological processes in vivo at the cellular and molecular level, which can play diverse roles in better understanding and treatment of various diseases. Recently, single domain antigen-binding fragments known as 'nanobodies' were bioengineered and tested for molecular imaging applications. Small molecular size (~15 kDa) and suitable configuration of the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of nanobodies offer many desirable features suitable for imaging applications, such as rapid targeting and fast blood clearance, high solubility, high stability, easy cloning, modular nature, and the capability of binding to cavities and difficult-to-access antigens. Using nanobody-based probes, several imaging techniques such as radionuclide-based, optical and ultrasound have been employed for visualization of target expression in various disease models. This review summarizes the recent developments in the use of nanobody-based probes for molecular imaging applications. The preclinical data reported to date are quite promising, and it is expected that nanobody-based molecular imaging agents will play an important role in the diagnosis and management of various diseases.

  11. Supramolecular Systems and Chemical Reactions in Single-Molecule Break Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Hu, Duan; Tan, Zhibing; Bai, Jie; Xiao, Zongyuan; Yang, Yang; Shi, Jia; Hong, Wenjing

    2017-04-01

    The major challenges of molecular electronics are the understanding and manipulation of the electron transport through the single-molecule junction. With the single-molecule break junction techniques, including scanning tunneling microscope break junction technique and mechanically controllable break junction technique, the charge transport through various single-molecule and supramolecular junctions has been studied during the dynamic fabrication and continuous characterization of molecular junctions. This review starts from the charge transport characterization of supramolecular junctions through a variety of noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bond, π-π interaction, and electrostatic force. We further review the recent progress in constructing highly conductive molecular junctions via chemical reactions, the response of molecular junctions to external stimuli, as well as the application of break junction techniques in controlling and monitoring chemical reactions in situ. We suggest that beyond the measurement of single molecular conductance, the single-molecule break junction techniques provide a promising access to study molecular assembly and chemical reactions at the single-molecule scale.

  12. Structure-based molecular simulations reveal the enhancement of biased Brownian motions in single-headed kinesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Ryo; Kuwata, Takeshi; Kenzaki, Hiroo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin is a family of molecular motors that move unidirectionally along microtubules (MT) using ATP hydrolysis free energy. In the family, the conventional two-headed kinesin was experimentally characterized to move unidirectionally through "walking" in a hand-over-hand fashion by coordinated motions of the two heads. Interestingly a single-headed kinesin, a truncated KIF1A, still can generate a biased Brownian movement along MT, as observed by in vitro single molecule experiments. Thus, KIF1A must use a different mechanism from the conventional kinesin to achieve the unidirectional motions. Based on the energy landscape view of proteins, for the first time, we conducted a set of molecular simulations of the truncated KIF1A movements over an ATP hydrolysis cycle and found a mechanism exhibiting and enhancing stochastic forward-biased movements in a similar way to those in experiments. First, simulating stand-alone KIF1A, we did not find any biased movements, while we found that KIF1A with a large friction cargo-analog attached to the C-terminus can generate clearly biased Brownian movements upon an ATP hydrolysis cycle. The linked cargo-analog enhanced the detachment of the KIF1A from MT. Once detached, diffusion of the KIF1A head was restricted around the large cargo which was located in front of the head at the time of detachment, thus generating a forward bias of the diffusion. The cargo plays the role of a diffusional anchor, or cane, in KIF1A "walking."

  13. Structure-based molecular simulations reveal the enhancement of biased Brownian motions in single-headed kinesin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kanada

    Full Text Available Kinesin is a family of molecular motors that move unidirectionally along microtubules (MT using ATP hydrolysis free energy. In the family, the conventional two-headed kinesin was experimentally characterized to move unidirectionally through "walking" in a hand-over-hand fashion by coordinated motions of the two heads. Interestingly a single-headed kinesin, a truncated KIF1A, still can generate a biased Brownian movement along MT, as observed by in vitro single molecule experiments. Thus, KIF1A must use a different mechanism from the conventional kinesin to achieve the unidirectional motions. Based on the energy landscape view of proteins, for the first time, we conducted a set of molecular simulations of the truncated KIF1A movements over an ATP hydrolysis cycle and found a mechanism exhibiting and enhancing stochastic forward-biased movements in a similar way to those in experiments. First, simulating stand-alone KIF1A, we did not find any biased movements, while we found that KIF1A with a large friction cargo-analog attached to the C-terminus can generate clearly biased Brownian movements upon an ATP hydrolysis cycle. The linked cargo-analog enhanced the detachment of the KIF1A from MT. Once detached, diffusion of the KIF1A head was restricted around the large cargo which was located in front of the head at the time of detachment, thus generating a forward bias of the diffusion. The cargo plays the role of a diffusional anchor, or cane, in KIF1A "walking."

  14. Scattering of atomic and molecular ions from single crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoest, J.M. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with analysis of crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe with Low Energy Ion scattering Spectroscopy (LEIS). Different atomic and molecular ions with fixed energies below 7 keV are scattered by a metal single crystal (with adsorbates). The energy and direction of the scattered particles are analysed for different selected charge states. In that way information can be obtained concerning the composition and atomic and electronic structure of the single crystal surface. Energy spectra contain information on the composition of the surface, while structural atomic information is obtained by direction measurements (photograms). In Ch.1 a description is given of the experimental equipment, in Ch.2 a characterization of the LEIS method. Ch.3 deals with the neutralization of keV-ions in surface scattering. Two different ways of data interpretation are presented. First a model is treated in which the observed directional dependence of neutralization action of the first atom layer of the surface is presented by a laterally varying thickness of the neutralizing layer. Secondly it is shown that the data can be reproduced by a more realistic, physical model based on atomic transition matrix elements. In Ch.4 the low energy hydrogen scattering is described. The study of the dissociation of H 2 + at an Ag surface r0230ted in a model based on electronic dissociation, initialized by electron capture into a repulsive (molecular) state. In Ch.5 finally the method is applied to the investigation of the surface structure of oxidized Fe. (Auth.)

  15. When biomolecules meet graphene: from molecular level interactions to material design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Wensi; Yu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhenping; Su, Zhiqiang; Wei, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Graphene-based materials have attracted increasing attention due to their atomically-thick two-dimensional structures, high conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, and large specific surface areas. The combination of biomolecules with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene-biomolecule hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biology, medicine, nanotechnology, and materials science. In this review, we focus on a summarization of the recent studies in functionalizing graphene-based materials using different biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and viruses. The different interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level are demonstrated and discussed in detail. In addition, the potential applications of the created graphene-biomolecule nanohybrids in drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering, biosensors, bioimaging, energy materials, and other nanotechnological applications are presented. This review will be helpful to know the modification of graphene with biomolecules, understand the interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level, and design functional graphene-based nanomaterials with unique properties for various applications.

  16. Dialkylthio Substitution: An Effective Method to Modulate the Molecular Energy Levels of 2D-BDT Photovoltaic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huifeng; Zhang, Hao; Ye, Long; Zhao, Wenchao; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2016-02-17

    Dialkylthio-substituted thienyl-benzodithiophene (BDT-DST) was designed and synthesized as a building block to modulate the molecular levels of the conjugated polymers, and three copolymers named PDST-BDD, PDST-TT and PDST-DPP were prepared and applied in polymer solar cells (PSCs). Theoretical calculations and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement suggested that the dialkylthio group could decrease the molecular energy levels of the resulting polymers distinctly. The open-circuit voltage (VOC) of PSC devices based on PDST-BDD, PDST-TT, and PDST-DPP are as high as 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 V, respectively, which are ∼0.15 V higher than those of the corresponding alky-substituted analogues. Moreover, the influence of the dialkylthio group on the absorption spectra, crystalline properties, hole mobilities, and blend morphologies of the polymers was also investigated. The results indicate that the dialkythio substitution is an effective method to modulate the molecular energy levels and that the BDT-DST unit has potential for constructing high-efficiency photovoltaic polymers.

  17. The validity of sedimentation data from high molecular weight DNA and the effects of additives on radiation-induced single-strand breakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugle, D.L.

    1979-10-01

    The optimization of many of the factors governing reproducible sedimentation behaviour of high molecular weight single-strand DNA in a particular alkaline sucrose density gradient system is described. A range of angular momenta is defined for which a constant strand breakage efficiency is required, despite a rotor speed effect which increases the measured molecular weights at decreasing rotor speeds for larger DNA molecules. The possibility is discussed that the bimodal control DNA profiles obtained after sedimentation at 11 500 rev/min (12 400 g) or less represent structural subunits of the chromatid. The random induction of single-strand DNA breaks by ionizing radiation is demonstrated by the computer-derived fits to the experimental profiles. The enhancement of single-strand break (SSB) yields in hypoxic cells by oxygen, para-nitroacetophenone (PNAP), or any of the three nitrofuran derivatives used was well correlated with increased cell killing. Furthermore, reductions in SSB yields for known hydroxyl radical (OH.) scavengers correlates with the reactivities of these compounds toward OH.. This supports the contention that some type of OH.-induced initial lesion, which may ultimately be expressed as an unrepaired or misrepaired double-strand break, constitutes a lethal event. (author)

  18. Molecular-level mechanisms of vibrational frequency shifts in a polar liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Christine M; Thompson, Ward H

    2011-06-16

    A molecular-level analysis of the origins of the vibrational frequency shifts of the CN stretching mode in neat liquid acetonitrile is presented. The frequency shifts and infrared spectrum are calculated using a perturbation theory approach within a molecular dynamics simulation and are in good agreement with measured values reported in the literature. The resulting instantaneous frequency of each nitrile group is decomposed into the contributions from each molecule in the liquid and by interaction type. This provides a detailed picture of the mechanisms of frequency shifts, including the number of surrounding molecules that contribute to the shift, the relationship between their position and relative contribution, and the roles of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. These results provide insight into what information is contained in infrared (IR) and Raman spectra about the environment of the probed vibrational mode. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Single-step reinitialization and extending algorithms for level-set based multi-phase flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lin; Hu, Xiangyu Y.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2017-12-01

    We propose efficient single-step formulations for reinitialization and extending algorithms, which are critical components of level-set based interface-tracking methods. The level-set field is reinitialized with a single-step (non iterative) "forward tracing" algorithm. A minimum set of cells is defined that describes the interface, and reinitialization employs only data from these cells. Fluid states are extrapolated or extended across the interface by a single-step "backward tracing" algorithm. Both algorithms, which are motivated by analogy to ray-tracing, avoid multiple block-boundary data exchanges that are inevitable for iterative reinitialization and extending approaches within a parallel-computing environment. The single-step algorithms are combined with a multi-resolution conservative sharp-interface method and validated by a wide range of benchmark test cases. We demonstrate that the proposed reinitialization method achieves second-order accuracy in conserving the volume of each phase. The interface location is invariant to reapplication of the single-step reinitialization. Generally, we observe smaller absolute errors than for standard iterative reinitialization on the same grid. The computational efficiency is higher than for the standard and typical high-order iterative reinitialization methods. We observe a 2- to 6-times efficiency improvement over the standard method for serial execution. The proposed single-step extending algorithm, which is commonly employed for assigning data to ghost cells with ghost-fluid or conservative interface interaction methods, shows about 10-times efficiency improvement over the standard method while maintaining same accuracy. Despite their simplicity, the proposed algorithms offer an efficient and robust alternative to iterative reinitialization and extending methods for level-set based multi-phase simulations.

  20. Status of Safeguards and Separations Model Development at Plant and Molecular Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL

    2009-10-01

    A primary goal of the Safeguards and Separations IPSC effort is the development of process modeling tools that allow dynamic simulations of separations plant operations under various configurations and conditions, and integration of relevant safeguards analyses. A requirement of the effort is to develop codes on modern, expandable architectures, with flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options. During FY09, efforts at ORNL have been focused on two priority tasks toward achieving the IPSC goal: (1) a top-down exploration of architecture - Subtask 1: Explore framework for code development and integration for plant-level simulation; and (2) a bottom-up fundamental modeling effort - Subtask 2: Development of molecular-level agent design code. Subtask 1 is important because definition and development of architecture is a key issue for the overall effort, as selection of an overall approach and code/data requirements is a necessary first step in the organization, design and development of separations and safeguards codes that will be incorporated. The agent design effort of Subtask 2 is a molecular-level modeling effort that has a direct impact on a near-term issue of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. A current focus of experimental efforts is the development of robust agents and processes for separation of Am/Cm. Development of enhanced agent-design codes will greatly accelerate discovery and experimental testing.

  1. Status of Safeguards and Separations Model Development at Plant and Molecular Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Almeida, Valmor F.; Hay, Benjamin; DePaoli, David W.

    2009-01-01

    A primary goal of the Safeguards and Separations IPSC effort is the development of process modeling tools that allow dynamic simulations of separations plant operations under various configurations and conditions, and integration of relevant safeguards analyses. A requirement of the effort is to develop codes on modern, expandable architectures, with flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options. During FY09, efforts at ORNL have been focused on two priority tasks toward achieving the IPSC goal: (1) a top-down exploration of architecture - Subtask 1: Explore framework for code development and integration for plant-level simulation; and (2) a bottom-up fundamental modeling effort - Subtask 2: Development of molecular-level agent design code. Subtask 1 is important because definition and development of architecture is a key issue for the overall effort, as selection of an overall approach and code/data requirements is a necessary first step in the organization, design and development of separations and safeguards codes that will be incorporated. The agent design effort of Subtask 2 is a molecular-level modeling effort that has a direct impact on a near-term issue of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. A current focus of experimental efforts is the development of robust agents and processes for separation of Am/Cm. Development of enhanced agent-design codes will greatly accelerate discovery and experimental testing.

  2. Spectrally resolved single-molecule electrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, F.; Krishnan, M.

    2018-03-01

    Escape-time electrometry is a recently developed experimental technique that offers the ability to measure the effective electrical charge of a single biomolecule in solution with sub-elementary charge precision. The approach relies on measuring the average escape-time of a single charged macromolecule or molecular species transiently confined in an electrostatic fluidic trap. Comparing the experiments with the predictions of a mean-field model of molecular electrostatics, we have found that the measured effective charge even reports on molecular conformation, e.g., folded or disordered state, and non-uniform charge distribution in disordered proteins or polyelectrolytes. Here we demonstrate the ability to use the spectral dimension to distinguish minute differences in electrical charge between individual molecules or molecular species in a single simultaneous measurement, under identical experimental conditions. Using one spectral channel for referenced measurement, this kind of photophysical distinguishability essentially eliminates the need for accurate knowledge of key experimental parameters, otherwise obtained through intensive characterization of the experimental setup. As examples, we demonstrate the ability to detect small differences (˜5%) in the length of double-stranded DNA fragments as well as single amino acid exchange in an intrinsically disordered protein, prothymosin α.

  3. Synergistic influence of phosphorylation and metal ions on tau oligomer formation and coaggregation with α-synuclein at the single molecule level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nübling Georg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibrillar amyloid-like deposits and co-deposits of tau and α-synuclein are found in several common neurodegenerative diseases. Recent evidence indicates that small oligomers are the most relevant toxic aggregate species. While tau fibril formation is well-characterized, factors influencing tau oligomerization and molecular interactions of tau and α-synuclein are not well understood. Results We used a novel approach applying confocal single-particle fluorescence to investigate the influence of tau phosphorylation and metal ions on tau oligomer formation and its coaggregation with α-synuclein at the level of individual oligomers. We show that Al3+ at physiologically relevant concentrations and tau phosphorylation by GSK-3β exert synergistic effects on the formation of a distinct SDS-resistant tau oligomer species even at nanomolar protein concentration. Moreover, tau phosphorylation and Al3+ as well as Fe3+ enhanced both formation of mixed oligomers and recruitment of α-synuclein in pre-formed tau oligomers. Conclusions Our findings provide a new perspective on interactions of tau phosphorylation, metal ions, and the formation of potentially toxic oligomer species, and elucidate molecular crosstalks between different aggregation pathways involved in neurodegeneration.

  4. Carbon Electrode-Molecule Junctions: A Reliable Platform for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Bangjun; Xin, Na; Guo, Xuefeng

    2015-09-15

    The development of reliable approaches to integrate individual or a small collection of molecules into electrical nanocircuits, often termed "molecular electronics", is currently a research focus because it can not only overcome the increasing difficulties and fundamental limitations of miniaturization of current silicon-based electronic devices, but can also enable us to probe and understand the intrinsic properties of materials at the atomic- and/or molecular-length scale. This development might also lead to direct observation of novel effects and fundamental discovery of physical phenomena that are not accessible by traditional materials or approaches. Therefore, researchers from a variety of backgrounds have been devoting great effort to this objective, which has started to move beyond simple descriptions of charge transport and branch out in different directions, reflecting the interdisciplinarity. This Account exemplifies our ongoing interest and great effort in developing efficient lithographic methodologies capable of creating molecular electronic devices through the combination of top-down micro/nanofabrication with bottom-up molecular assembly. These devices use nanogapped carbon nanomaterials (such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene), with a particular focus on graphene, as point contacts formed by electron beam lithography and precise oxygen plasma etching. Through robust amide linkages, functional molecular bridges terminated with diamine moieties are covalently wired into the carboxylic acid-functionalized nanogaps to form stable carbon electrode-molecule junctions with desired functionalities. At the macroscopic level, to improve the contact interface between electrodes and organic semiconductors and lower Schottky barriers, we used SWCNTs and graphene as efficient electrodes to explore the intrinsic properties of organic thin films, and then build functional high-performance organic nanotransistors with ultrahigh responsivities

  5. LEARNING CURVE IN SINGLE-LEVEL MINIMALLY INVASIVE TLIF: EXPERIENCE OF A NEUROSURGEON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Romano-Feinholz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the learning curve that shows the progress of a single neurosurgeon when performing single-level MI-TLIF. Methods: We included 99 consecutive patients who underwent single-level MI-TLIF by the same neurosurgeon (JASS. Patient’s demographic characteristics were analyzed. In addition, surgical time, intraoperative blood loss and hospital stay were evaluated. The learning curves were calculated with a piecewise regression model. Results: The mean age was 54.6 years. The learning curves showed an inverse relationship between the surgical experience and the variable analyzed, reaching an inflection point for surgical time in case 43 and for blood loss in case 48. The mean surgical time was 203.3 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] 150-240 minutes, intraoperative bleeding was 97.4ml (IQR 40-100ml and hospital stay of four days (IQR 3-5 days. Conclusions: MI-TLIF is a very frequent surgical procedure due to its effectiveness and safety, which has shown similar results to open procedure. According to this study, the required learning curve is slightly higher than for open procedures, and is reached after about 45 cases.

  6. Single particle level scheme for alpha decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirea, M.

    1998-01-01

    The fine structure phenomenon in alpha decay was evidenced by Rosenblum. In this process the kinetic energy of the emitted particle has several determined values related to the structure of the parent and the daughter nucleus. The probability to find the daughter in a low lying state was considered strongly dependent on the spectroscopic factor defined as the square of overlap between the wave function of the parent in the ground state and the wave functions of the specific excited states of the daughter. This treatment provides a qualitative agreement with the experimental results if the variations of the penetrability between different excited states are neglected. Based on single particle structure during fission, a new formalism explained quantitatively the fine structure of the cluster decay. It was suggested that this formalism can be applied also to alpha decay. For this purpose, the first step is to construct the level scheme of this type of decay. Such a scheme, obtained with the super-asymmetric two-center potential, is plotted for the alpha decay of 223 Ra. It is interesting to note that, diabatically, the level with spin 3/2 emerging from 1i 11/2 (ground state of the parent) reaches an excited state of the daughter in agreement with the experiment. (author)

  7. Stochastic thermodynamics, fluctuation theorems and molecular machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic thermodynamics as reviewed here systematically provides a framework for extending the notions of classical thermodynamics such as work, heat and entropy production to the level of individual trajectories of well-defined non-equilibrium ensembles. It applies whenever a non-equilibrium process is still coupled to one (or several) heat bath(s) of constant temperature. Paradigmatic systems are single colloidal particles in time-dependent laser traps, polymers in external flow, enzymes and molecular motors in single molecule assays, small biochemical networks and thermoelectric devices involving single electron transport. For such systems, a first-law like energy balance can be identified along fluctuating trajectories. For a basic Markovian dynamics implemented either on the continuum level with Langevin equations or on a discrete set of states as a master equation, thermodynamic consistency imposes a local-detailed balance constraint on noise and rates, respectively. Various integral and detailed fluctuation theorems, which are derived here in a unifying approach from one master theorem, constrain the probability distributions for work, heat and entropy production depending on the nature of the system and the choice of non-equilibrium conditions. For non-equilibrium steady states, particularly strong results hold like a generalized fluctuation–dissipation theorem involving entropy production. Ramifications and applications of these concepts include optimal driving between specified states in finite time, the role of measurement-based feedback processes and the relation between dissipation and irreversibility. Efficiency and, in particular, efficiency at maximum power can be discussed systematically beyond the linear response regime for two classes of molecular machines, isothermal ones such as molecular motors, and heat engines such as thermoelectric devices, using a common framework based on a cycle decomposition of entropy production. (review article)

  8. Single Molecule Nanoelectrochemistry in Electrical Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2016-11-15

    It is now possible to reliably measure single molecule conductance in a wide variety of environments including organic liquids, ultrahigh vacuum, water, ionic liquids, and electrolytes. The most commonly used methods deploy scanning probe microscopes, mechanically formed break junctions, or lithographically formed nanogap contacts. Molecules are generally captured between a pair of facing electrodes, and the junction current response is measured as a function of bias voltage. Gating electrodes can also be added so that the electrostatic potential at the molecular bridge can be independently controlled by this third noncontacting electrode. This can also be achieved in an electrolytic environment using a four-electrode bipotentiostatic configuration, which allows independent electrode potential control of the two contacting electrodes. This is commonly realized using an electrochemical STM and enables single molecule electrical characterization as a function of electrode potential and redox state of the molecular bridge. This has emerged as a powerful tool in modern interfacial electrochemistry and nanoelectrochemistry for studying charge transport across single molecules as a function of electrode potential and the electrolytic environments. Such measurements are possible in electrolytes ranging from aqueous buffers to nonaqueous ionic liquids. In this Account, we illustrate a number of examples of single molecule electrical measurements under electrode potential control use a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and demonstrate how these can help in the understanding of charge transport in single molecule junctions. Examples showing charge transport following phase coherent tunneling to incoherent charge hopping across redox active molecular bridges are shown. In the case of bipyridinium (or viologen) molecular wires, it is shown how electrochemical reduction leads to an increase of the single molecule conductance, which is controlled by the liquid electrochemical

  9. Computation of Hydration Free Energies Using the Multiple Environment Single System Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Gerhard; Mei, Ye; Pickard, Frank C; Simmonett, Andrew C; Miller, Benjamin T; Herbert, John M; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Shao, Yihan

    2016-01-12

    A recently developed MESS-E-QM/MM method (multiple-environment single-system quantum mechanical molecular/mechanical calculations with a Roothaan-step extrapolation) is applied to the computation of hydration free energies for the blind SAMPL4 test set and for 12 small molecules. First, free energy simulations are performed with a classical molecular mechanics force field using fixed-geometry solute molecules and explicit TIP3P solvent, and then the non-Boltzmann-Bennett method is employed to compute the QM/MM correction (QM/MM-NBB) to the molecular mechanical hydration free energies. For the SAMPL4 set, MESS-E-QM/MM-NBB corrections to the hydration free energy can be obtained 2 or 3 orders of magnitude faster than fully converged QM/MM-NBB corrections, and, on average, the hydration free energies predicted with MESS-E-QM/MM-NBB fall within 0.10-0.20 kcal/mol of full-converged QM/MM-NBB results. Out of five density functionals (BLYP, B3LYP, PBE0, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D), the BLYP functional is found to be most compatible with the TIP3P solvent model and yields the most accurate hydration free energies against experimental values for solute molecules included in this study.

  10. Molecular Level Investigation of Staphylococci’s Resistance Mechanisms to Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Lorena PRUTEANU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques development allows elaboration of many assays for identification of bacteria’s resistance mechanisms to antibiotics. Following this idea, the results of molecular level investigation of bacteria’s resistance mechanisms to antibiotics may give many opportunities to find more rapid methods for identifying the genes which are responsible for antibiotic resistance induction. The aim of this study was to investigate antibiotic resistance genes in Staphylococcus bacteria on molecular level. As classes of antibiotics it was used macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLSB and beta-lactams. In the proposed study the bacterial strains are represented by 50 isolates of Staphylococcus. The bacterial strains were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction to identify the nuc, tuf, tst, sea, pathogenic activity genes. After this, the bacteria were tested for ermA, ermB, ermC genes and for mecA, femA which are involved in resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramin B and to beta-lactams, respectively. The presence or the absence of these genes confirms that tested strains are resistant to specific antibiotic or not. Bacteria pathogenic activity was emphasized by genes as follows: sea (enterotoxin which was found at all isolates, tst (toxic shock toxin gene was not detected in any of isolates and tuf gene (elongation factor was obtained with one pair of primers. Resistance to beta-lactams was evidenced by the presence of mecA in all isolates and femA in some strains. Each of ermC, ermA and ermB, macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B resistance genes, were detected.

  11. Grid Integration of Single Stage Solar PV System using Three-level Voltage Source Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ikhlaq; Kandpal, Maulik; Singh, Bhim

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a single stage solar PV (photovoltaic) grid integrated power generating system using a three level voltage source converter (VSC) operating at low switching frequency of 900 Hz with robust synchronizing phase locked loop (RS-PLL) based control algorithm. To track the maximum power from solar PV array, an incremental conductance algorithm is used and this maximum power is fed to the grid via three-level VSC. The use of single stage system with three level VSC offers the advantage of low switching losses and the operation at high voltages and high power which results in enhancement of power quality in the proposed system. Simulated results validate the design and control algorithm under steady state and dynamic conditions.

  12. Toward The Reconstitution of the Maturation of Okazaki Fragments Multiprotein Complex in Human At The Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Joudeh, Luay

    2017-04-01

    The maturation of Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand in eukaryotes is mediated by a highly coordinated multistep process involving several proteins that ensure the accurate and efficient replication of genomic DNA. Human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) that slides on double-stranded DNA is the key player that coordinates the access of various proteins to the different intermediary steps in this process. In this study, I am focusing on characterizing how PCNA recruits and stimulates the structure specific flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) to process the aberrant double flap (DF) structures that are produced during maturation of Okazaki fragments. FEN1 distorts the DF structures into a bent conformer to place the scissile phosphate into the active site for cleavage. The product is a nick substrate that can be sealed by DNA ligase I whose recruitment is also mediated by its interaction with PCNA. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements that simultaneously monitored bending and cleavage of various DF substrates by FEN1 alone or in the presence of PCNA, we found that FEN1 and PCNA bends cognate and non-cognate substrates but display remarkable selectivity to stabilize the bent conformer in cognate substrate while promoting the dissociation of non-cognate substrates. This mechanism provides efficiency and accuracy for FEN1 and PCNA to cleave the correct substrate while avoiding the deleterious cleavage of incorrect substrates. This work provides a true molecular level understanding of the key step during the maturation of Okazaki fragment and contributes towards the reconstitution of its entire activity at the single molecule level.

  13. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Henrry M.; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids....... These data are rationalized in terms of a two-step electrochemical model for charge transport across the redox bridge. In this model the gate coupling in the ionic liquid is found to be fully effective with a modeled gate coupling parameter, ξ, of unity. This compares to a much lower gate coupling parameter...

  14. Molecular-level architectural design using benzothiadiazole-based polymers for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vinila N; Rao, Arun D; Pandey, Upendra K; Kesavan, Arul Varman; Ramamurthy, Praveen C

    2017-01-01

    A series of low band gap, planar conjugated polymers, P1 (PFDTBT), P2 (PFDTDFBT) and P3 (PFDTTBT), based on fluorene and benzothiadiazole, was synthesized. The effect of fluorine substitution and fused aromatic spacers on the optoelectronic and photovoltaic performance was studied. The polymer, derived from dithienylated benzothiodiazole and fluorene, P1 , exhibited a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level at -5.48 eV. Density functional theory (DFT) studies as well as experimental measurements suggested that upon substitution of the acceptor with fluorine, both the HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels of the resulting polymer, P2 , were lowered, leading to a higher open circuit voltage and short circuit current with an overall improvement of more than 110% for the photovoltaic devices. Moreover, a decrease in the torsion angle between the units was also observed for the fluorinated polymer P2 due to the enhanced electrostatic interaction between the fluorine substituents and sulfur atoms, leading to a high hole mobility. The use of a fused π-bridge in polymer P3 for the enhancement of the planarity as compared to the P1 backbone was also studied. This enhanced planarity led to the highest observed mobility among the reported three polymers as well as to an improvement in the device efficiency by more than 40% for P3 .

  15. Molecular-level architectural design using benzothiadiazole-based polymers for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vinila N; Rao, Arun D; Pandey, Upendra K; Kesavan, Arul Varman

    2017-01-01

    A series of low band gap, planar conjugated polymers, P1 (PFDTBT), P2 (PFDTDFBT) and P3 (PFDTTBT), based on fluorene and benzothiadiazole, was synthesized. The effect of fluorine substitution and fused aromatic spacers on the optoelectronic and photovoltaic performance was studied. The polymer, derived from dithienylated benzothiodiazole and fluorene, P1, exhibited a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level at −5.48 eV. Density functional theory (DFT) studies as well as experimental measurements suggested that upon substitution of the acceptor with fluorine, both the HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels of the resulting polymer, P2, were lowered, leading to a higher open circuit voltage and short circuit current with an overall improvement of more than 110% for the photovoltaic devices. Moreover, a decrease in the torsion angle between the units was also observed for the fluorinated polymer P2 due to the enhanced electrostatic interaction between the fluorine substituents and sulfur atoms, leading to a high hole mobility. The use of a fused π-bridge in polymer P3 for the enhancement of the planarity as compared to the P1 backbone was also studied. This enhanced planarity led to the highest observed mobility among the reported three polymers as well as to an improvement in the device efficiency by more than 40% for P3. PMID:28546844

  16. Method for preparation and readout of polyatomic molecules in single quantum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David

    2018-03-01

    Polyatomic molecular ions contain many desirable attributes of a useful quantum system, including rich internal degrees of freedom and highly controllable coupling to the environment. To date, the vast majority of state-specific experimental work on molecular ions has concentrated on diatomic species. The ability to prepare and read out polyatomic molecules in single quantum states would enable diverse experimental avenues not available with diatomics, including new applications in precision measurement, sensitive chemical and chiral analysis at the single-molecule level, and precise studies of Hz-level molecular tunneling dynamics. While cooling the motional state of a polyatomic ion via sympathetic cooling with a laser-cooled atomic ion is straightforward, coupling this motional state to the internal state of the molecule has proven challenging. Here we propose a method for readout and projective measurement of the internal state of a trapped polyatomic ion. The method exploits the rich manifold of technically accessible rotational states in the molecule to realize robust state preparation and readout with far less stringent engineering than quantum logic methods recently demonstrated on diatomic molecules. The method can be applied to any reasonably small (≲10 atoms) polyatomic ion with an anisotropic polarizability.

  17. Molecular-level removal of proteinaceous contamination from model surfaces and biomedical device materials by air plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, K K; Kumar, S; Bremmell, K E; Griesser, H J

    2010-11-01

    Established methods for cleaning and sterilising biomedical devices may achieve removal of bioburden only at the macroscopic level while leaving behind molecular levels of contamination (mainly proteinaceous). This is of particular concern if the residue might contain prions. We investigated at the molecular level the removal of model and real-life proteinaceous contamination from model and practical surfaces by air plasma (ionised air) treatment. The surface-sensitive technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to assess the removal of proteinaceous contamination, with the nitrogen (N1s) photoelectron signal as its marker. Model proteinaceous contamination (bovine serum albumin) adsorbed on to a model surface (silicon wafer) and the residual proteinaceous contamination resulting from incubating surgical stainless steel (a practical biomaterial) in whole human blood exhibited strong N1s signals [16.8 and 18.5 atomic percent (at.%), respectively] after thorough washing. After 5min air plasma treatment, XPS detected no nitrogen on the sample surfaces, indicating complete removal of proteinaceous contamination, down to the estimated XPS detection limit 10ng/cm(2). Applying the same plasma treatment, the 7.7at.% nitrogen observed on a clinically cleaned dental bur was reduced to a level reflective of new, as-received burs. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy also indicated complete molecular-level removal of the proteinaceous contamination upon air plasma treatment. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of air plasma treatment for removing proteinaceous contamination from both model and practical surfaces and offers a method for ensuring that no molecular residual contamination such as prions is transferred upon re-use of surgical and dental instruments. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fano Description of Single-Hydrocarbon Fluorescence Excited by a Scanning Tunneling Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Jörg; Doppagne, Benjamin; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schull, Guillaume

    2018-06-13

    The detection of fluorescence with submolecular resolution enables the exploration of spatially varying photon yields and vibronic properties at the single-molecule level. By placing individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules into the plasmon cavity formed by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a NaCl-covered Ag(111) surface, molecular light emission spectra are obtained that unravel vibrational progression. In addition, light spectra unveil a signature of the molecule even when the tunneling current is injected well separated from the molecular emitter. This signature exhibits a distance-dependent Fano profile that reflects the subtle interplay between inelastic tunneling electrons, the molecular exciton and localized plasmons in at-distance as well as on-molecule fluorescence. The presented findings open the path to luminescence of a different class of molecules than investigated before and contribute to the understanding of single-molecule luminescence at surfaces in a unified picture.

  19. Piezoelectric sensors based on molecular imprinted polymers for detection of low molecular mass analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludağ, Yildiz; Piletsky, Sergey A; Turner, Anthony P F; Cooper, Matthew A

    2007-11-01

    Biomimetic recognition elements employed for the detection of analytes are commonly based on proteinaceous affibodies, immunoglobulins, single-chain and single-domain antibody fragments or aptamers. The alternative supra-molecular approach using a molecularly imprinted polymer now has proven utility in numerous applications ranging from liquid chromatography to bioassays. Despite inherent advantages compared with biochemical/biological recognition (which include robustness, storage endurance and lower costs) there are few contributions that describe quantitative analytical applications of molecularly imprinted polymers for relevant small molecular mass compounds in real-world samples. There is, however, significant literature describing the use of low-power, portable piezoelectric transducers to detect analytes in environmental monitoring and other application areas. Here we review the combination of molecularly imprinted polymers as recognition elements with piezoelectric biosensors for quantitative detection of small molecules. Analytes are classified by type and sample matrix presentation and various molecularly imprinted polymer synthetic fabrication strategies are also reviewed.

  20. Progress Toward Single-Photon-Level Nonlinear Optics in Crystalline Microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowligy, Abijith S.

    Over the last two decades, the emergence of quantum information science has uncovered many practical applications in areas such as communications, imaging, and sensing where harnessing quantum features of Nature provides tremendous benefits over existing methods exploiting classical physical phenomena. In this effort, one of the frontiers of research has been to identify and utilize quantum phenomena that are not susceptible to environmental and parasitic noise processes. Quantum photonics has been at the forefront of these studies because it allows room-temperature access to its inherently quantum-mechanical features, and allows leveraging the mature telecommunication industry. Accompanying the weak environmental influence, however, are also weak optical nonlinearities. Efficient nonlinear optical interactions are indispensible for many of the existing protocols for quantum optical computation and communication, e.g. high-fidelity entangling quantum logic gates rely on large nonlinear responses at the one- or few-photon-level. While this has been addressed to a great extent by interfacing photons with single quantum emitters and cold atomic gases, scalability has remained elusive. In this work, we identify the macroscopic second-order nonlinear polarization as a robust platform to address this challenge, and utilize the recent advances in the burgeoning field of optical microcavities to enhance this nonlinear response. In particular, we show theoretically that by using the quantum Zeno effect, low-noise, single-photon-level optical nonlinearities can be realized in lithium niobate whispering-gallery-mode microcavities, and present experimental progress toward this goal. Using the measured strength of the second-order nonlinear response in lithium niobate, we modeled the nonlinear system in the strong coupling regime using the Schrodinger picture framework and theoretically demonstrated that the single-photon-level operation can be observed for cavity lifetimes in

  1. Nanobody: The “Magic Bullet” for Molecular Imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Goel, Shreya; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging involves the non-invasive investigation of biological processes in vivo at the cellular and molecular level, which can play diverse roles in better understanding and treatment of various diseases. Recently, single domain antigen-binding fragments known as 'nanobodies' were bioengineered and tested for molecular imaging applications. Small molecular size (~15 kDa) and suitable configuration of the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of nanobodies offer many desirable features suitable for imaging applications, such as rapid targeting and fast blood clearance, high solubility, high stability, easy cloning, modular nature, and the capability of binding to cavities and difficult-to-access antigens. Using nanobody-based probes, several imaging techniques such as radionuclide-based, optical and ultrasound have been employed for visualization of target expression in various disease models. This review summarizes the recent developments in the use of nanobody-based probes for molecular imaging applications. The preclinical data reported to date are quite promising, and it is expected that nanobody-based molecular imaging agents will play an important role in the diagnosis and management of various diseases. PMID:24578722

  2. EFFICACY OF CAGE PLACEMENT WITHOUT PLATE IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL MYELOPATHY WITH SINGLE-LEVEL AFFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS ALBERTO ZUÑIGA-MAZÓN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of PEEK (Poly-ether-ether-ketone cage without plate for the treatment of single-level cervical spondylosis. Methods: Ten patients with cervical myelopathy data, with a single-level root condition, seen at the outpatient clinic of the Neurosurgery Service, operated in 2016, mean age 53 years, 6 (60% female, 4 (40% obese, 3 (30% smokers. The Cloward technique was used by anterior approach, discectomy, and PEEK cage placement. Results: At six months of surgery, 100% of the patients had increased intervertebral space, with a 100% reduction in osteophytes; only one patient had dysphagia, no patient had lesion of the adjacent segment and 10% had persistent root pathology. Cervical lordosis was observed in 90% of the patients and arthrodesis in 100% of the cases. Conclusions: Anterior approach arthrodesis using PEEK cage without cervical plate is effective as a treatment of cervical myelopathy in a single level.

  3. Electrochemically-gated single-molecule electrical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shaoyin; Artés, Juan Manuel; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, single-molecule electrical contacts have emerged as a new experimental platform that allows exploring charge transport phenomena in individual molecular blocks. This novel tool has evolved into an essential element within the Molecular Electronics field to understand charge transport processes in hybrid (bio)molecule/electrode interfaces at the nanoscale, and prospect the implementation of active molecular components into functional nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Within this area, three-terminal single-molecule devices have been sought, provided that they are highly desired to achieve full functionality in logic electronic circuits. Despite the latest experimental developments offer consistent methods to bridge a molecule between two electrodes (source and drain in a transistor notation), placing a third electrode (gate) close to the single-molecule electrical contact is still technically challenging. In this vein, electrochemically-gated single-molecule devices have emerged as an experimentally affordable alternative to overcome these technical limitations. In this review, the operating principle of an electrochemically-gated single-molecule device is presented together with the latest experimental methodologies to built them and characterize their charge transport characteristics. Then, an up-to-date comprehensive overview of the most prominent examples will be given, emphasizing on the relationship between the molecular structure and the final device electrical behaviour

  4. SCELib3.0: The new revision of SCELib, the parallel computational library of molecular properties in the Single Center Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, N.; Baccarelli, I.; Morelli, G.

    2009-12-01

    SCELib is a computer program which implements the Single Center Expansion (SCE) method to describe molecular electronic densities and the interaction potentials between a charged projectile (electron or positron) and a target molecular system. The first version (CPC Catalog identifier ADMG_v1_0) was submitted to the CPC Program Library in 2000, and version 2.0 (ADMG_v2_0) was submitted in 2004. We here announce the new release 3.0 which presents additional features with respect to the previous versions aiming at a significative enhance of its capabilities to deal with larger molecular systems. SCELib 3.0 allows for ab initio effective core potential (ECP) calculations of the molecular wavefunctions to be used in the SCE method in addition to the standard all-electron description of the molecule. The list of supported architectures has been updated and the code has been ported to platforms based on accelerating coprocessors, such as the NVIDIA GPGPU and the new parallel model adopted is able to efficiently run on a mixed many-core computing system. Program summaryProgram title: SCELib3.0 Catalogue identifier: ADMG_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADMG_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 018 862 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 955 014 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Compilers used: xlc V8.x, Intel C V10.x, Portland Group V7.x, nvcc V2.x Computer: All SMP platforms based on AIX, Linux and SUNOS operating systems over SPARC, POWER, Intel Itanium2, X86, em64t and Opteron processors Operating system: SUNOS, IBM AIX, Linux RedHat (Enterprise), Linux SuSE (SLES) Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. 1 to 32 (CPU or GPU) used RAM: Up to 32 GB depending on the molecular

  5. Current rectification in a single molecule diode: the role of electrode coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Siya; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Coronado, Eugenio; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Agraït, Nicolás

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate large rectification ratios (> 100) in single-molecule junctions based on a metal-oxide cluster (polyoxometalate), using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) both at ambient conditions and at low temperature. These rectification ratios are the largest ever observed in a single-molecule junction, and in addition these junctions sustain current densities larger than 10(5) A cm(-2). By following the variation of the I-V characteristics with tip-molecule separation we demonstrate unambiguously that rectification is due to asymmetric coupling to the electrodes of a molecule with an asymmetric level structure. This mechanism can be implemented in other type of molecular junctions using both organic and inorganic molecules and provides a simple strategy for the rational design of molecular diodes.

  6. Molecular pathways associated with blood pressure and hexadecanedioate levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Menni

    Full Text Available The dicarboxylic acid hexadecanedioate is associated with increased blood pressure (BP and mortality in humans and feeding it to rats raises BP. Here we aim to characterise the molecular pathways that influence levels of hexadecanedioate linked to BP regulation, using genetic and transcriptomic studies. The top associations for hexadecanedioate in a genome-wide association scan (GWAS conducted on 6447 individuals from the TwinsUK and KORA cohorts were tested for association with BP and hypertension in the International Consortium for BP and in a GWAS of BP extremes. Transcriptomic analyses correlating hexadecanedioate with gene expression levels in adipose tissue in 740 TwinsUK participants were further performed. GWAS showed 242 SNPs mapping to two independent loci achieving genome-wide significance. In rs414056 in the SCLO1B1 gene (Beta(SE = -0.088(0.006P = 1.65 x 10-51, P < 1 x 10-51, the allele previously associated with increased risk of statin associated myopathy is associated with higher hexadecanedioate levels. However this SNP did not show association with BP or hypertension. The top SNP in the second locus rs6663731 mapped to the intronic region of CYP4Z2P on chromosome 1 (0.045(0.007, P = 5.49x10-11. Hexadecanedioate levels also correlate with adipose tissue gene-expression of the 3 out of 4 CYP4 probes (P<0.05 and of alcohol dehydrogenase probes (Beta(SE = 0.12(0.02; P = 6.04x10-11. High circulating levels of hexadecanedioate determine a significant effect of alcohol intake on BP (SBP: 1.12(0.34, P = 0.001; DBP: 0.70(0.22, P = 0.002, while no effect is seen in the lower hexadecanedioate level group. In conclusion, levels in fat of ADH1A, ADH1B and CYP4 encoding enzymes in the omega oxidation pathway, are correlated with hexadecanedioate levels. Hexadecanedioate appears to regulate the effect of alcohol on BP.

  7. Kinetics of molecular transformations in connective tissue hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.O.

    1990-01-01

    When exposed to ionizing radiations or inflammatory disease, the glycosaminolycan component of connective tissue is preferentially degraded, probably by a free-radical mediate pathway. The resulting changes in molecular structure adversely change the properties of the matrix. Rooster comb hyaluronic acid of high molecular weight was used to investigate the mechanisms of these structural changes at macro and molecular level. Intrinsic viscosity and gel permeation chromatography measurements are suitable for demonstrating that random chain session occurs. Fast kinetic techniques are necessary to identify the mechanisms of single strand breaks. Pulse conductivity and low-angle laser light scattering pulse radiolysis can quantify the rate and yield of strand breaks. Competitive radical scavenging methods have also allowed the quantification of the rate of spontaneous and alkali-catalyzed hydrolysis of a-hydroxy radicals on polysaccharide chains, which control molecular structure changes

  8. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  9. Molecular imaging: current status and emerging strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pysz, M.A.; Gambhir, S.S.; Willmann, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases in early stages (screening), identifying extent of disease, selecting disease- and patient-specific treatment (personalized medicine), applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current clinical molecular imaging approaches primarily use positron-emission tomography (PET) or single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based techniques. In ongoing preclinical research, novel molecular targets of different diseases are identified and, sophisticated and multifunctional contrast agents for imaging these molecular targets are developed along with new technologies and instrumentation for multi-modality molecular imaging. Contrast-enhanced molecular ultrasound (US) with molecularly-targeted contrast microbubbles is explored as a clinically translatable molecular imaging strategy for screening, diagnosing, and monitoring diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with fluorescent molecular probes and US imaging with molecularly-targeted microbubbles are attractive strategies as they provide real-time imaging, are relatively inexpensive, produce images with high spatial resolution, and do not involve exposure to ionizing irradiation. Raman spectroscopy/microscopy has emerged as a molecular optical imaging strategy for ultrasensitive detection of multiple biomolecules/biochemicals with both in vivo and ex vivo versatility. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid of optical and US techniques involving optically-excitable molecularly-targeted contrast agents and quantitative detection of resulting oscillatory contrast agent movement with US. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation, such as endoscopes and microcatheters, suggest that these molecular imaging methods have numerous potential clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future.

  10. Electrochemical gate-controlled electron transport of redox-active single perylene bisimide molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C; Mishchenko, A; Li, Z; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, Th; Li, X Q; Wuerthner, F; Bagrets, A; Evers, F

    2008-01-01

    We report a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiment in an electrochemical environment which studies a prototype molecular switch. The target molecules were perylene tetracarboxylic acid bisimides modified with pyridine (P-PBI) and methylthiol (T-PBI) linker groups and with bulky tert-butyl-phenoxy substituents in the bay area. At a fixed bias voltage, we can control the transport current through a symmetric molecular wire Au|P-PBI(T-PBI)|Au by variation of the electrochemical 'gate' potential. The current increases by up to two orders of magnitude. The conductances of the P-PBI junctions are typically a factor 3 larger than those of T-PBI. A theoretical analysis explains this effect as a consequence of shifting the lowest unoccupied perylene level (LUMO) in or out of the bias window when tuning the electrochemical gate potential VG. The difference in on/off ratios reflects the variation of hybridization of the LUMO with the electrode states with the anchor groups. I T -E S(T) curves of asymmetric molecular junctions formed between a bare Au STM tip and a T-PBI (P-PBI) modified Au(111) electrode in an aqueous electrolyte exhibit a pronounced maximum in the tunneling current at -0.740, which is close to the formal potential of the surface-confined molecules. The experimental data were explained by a sequential two-step electron transfer process

  11. Effect of tomato consumption on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level: a randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas-Ramos D

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Cuevas-Ramos,1 Paloma Almeda-Valdés,1 Emma Chávez-Manzanera,1 Clara Elena Meza-Arana,2 Griselda Brito-Córdova,1 Roopa Mehta,1 Oscar Pérez-Méndez,3 Francisco J Gómez-Pérez1 1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Department of Molecular Biology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico Introduction: Epidemiologic evidence suggests that tomato-based products could reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. One of the main cardiovascular risk factors is low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. This study aimed to prospectively evaluate the effect of tomato consumption on HDL-C levels. Subject and methods: We conducted a randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. We screened 432 subjects with a complete lipid profile. Those individuals with low HDL-C (men 40 mg/dL. A linear regression model that adjusted for those parameters that impact HDL-C levels (age, gender, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting triglyceride concentration, simple sugars, alcohol, physical activity, and omega-3 consumption showed an independent association between tomato consumption and the increase in HDL-C (r2 = 0.69; P > 0.0001. Conclusion: Raw tomato consumption produced a favorable effect on HDL-C levels in overweight women. Keywords: lycopene, hypoalphalipoproteinemia, dyslipidemia, overweight, cardiovascular diseases

  12. Low-molecular weight heparin increases circulating sFlt-1 levels and enhances urinary elimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Hagmann

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Preeclampsia is a devastating medical complication of pregnancy which leads to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. While the etiology of preeclampsia is unclear, human and animal studies suggest that excessive circulating levels of soluble fms-like tyrosine-kinase-1 (sFlt-1, an alternatively spliced variant of VEGF-receptor1, contribute to the signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. Since sFlt-1 binds to heparin and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, we hypothesized that the anticoagulant heparin, which is often used in pregnancy, may interfere with the levels, distribution and elimination of sFlt-1 in vivo. OBJECTIVE: We systematically determined serum and urine levels of angiogenic factors in preeclamptic women before and after administration of low molecular weight heparin and further characterized the interaction with heparin in biochemical studies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Serum and urine samples were used to measure sFlt-1 levels before and after heparin administration. Serum levels of sFlt-1 increased by 25% after heparin administration in pregnant women. The magnitude of the increase in circulating sFlt-1 correlated with initial sFlt-1 serum levels. Urinary sFlt-1 levels were also elevated following heparin administration and levels of elimination were dependent on the underlying integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. Biochemical binding studies employing cation exchange chromatography revealed that heparin bound sFlt-1 had decreased affinity to negatively charged surfaces when compared to sFlt-1 alone. CONCLUSION: Low molecular weight heparin administration increased circulating sFlt1 levels and enhanced renal elimination. We provide evidence that both effects may be due to heparin binding to sFlt1 and masking the positive charges on sFlt1 protein.

  13. Spin dynamics at level crossing in molecular AF rings probed by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.-H.; Micotti, E.; Furukawa, Y.; Jang, Z.H.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Horvatic, M.; Van Slageren, J.

    2004-01-01

    The low-temperature spin dynamics in molecular rings with a finite number (N≤10) of magnetic ions was studied by means of 1 H NMR. When an external magnetic field (B) induces a crossing between energy levels, peaks are observed in the spin-lattice relaxation rate of protons, 1/T 1 (B), at constant temperature. We discuss similarities and differences in the data from three different rings: Fe10, Fe6:Li and Cr8

  14. NIR-emitting molecular-based nanoparticles as new two-photon absorbing nanotools for single particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J.; Godin, A. G.; Clermont, G.; Lounis, B.; Cognet, L.; Blanchard-Desce, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to provide a green alternative to QDs for bioimaging purposes and aiming at designing bright nanoparticles combining both large one- and two-photon brightness, a bottom-up route based on the molecular engineering of dedicated red to NIR emitting dyes that spontaneously form fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) has been implemented. These fully organic nanoparticles built from original quadrupolar dyes are prepared using a simple, expeditious and green protocol that yield very small molecular-based nanoparticles (radius ~ 7 nm) suspension in water showing a nice NIR emission (λem=710 nm). These FONs typically have absorption coefficient more than two orders larger than popular NIR-emitting dyes (such as Alexa Fluor 700, Cy5.5 ….) and much larger Stokes shift values (i.e. up to over 5500 cm-1). They also show very large two-photon absorption response in the 800-1050 nm region (up to about 106 GM) of major promise for two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy. Thanks to their brightness and enhanced photostability, these FONs could be imaged as isolated nanoparticles and tracked using wide-field imaging. As such, thanks to their size and composition (absence of heavy metals), they represent highly promising alternatives to NIR-emitting QDs for use in bioimaging and single particle tracking applications. Moreover, efficient FONs coating was achieved by using a polymeric additive built from a long hydrophobic (PPO) and a short hydrophilic (PEO) segment and having a cationic head group able to interact with the highly negative surface of FONs. This electrostatically-driven interaction promotes both photoluminescence and two-photon absorption enhancement leading to an increase of two-photon brightness of about one order of magnitude. This opens the way to wide-field single particle tracking under two-photon excitation

  15. Comparison of single-ion molecular dynamics in common solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Chaudhari, M. I.; Rempe, S. B.

    2018-06-01

    Laying a basis for molecularly specific theory for the mobilities of ions in solutions of practical interest, we report a broad survey of velocity autocorrelation functions (VACFs) of Li+ and PF6- ions in water, ethylene carbonate, propylene carbonate, and acetonitrile solutions. We extract the memory function, γ(t), which characterizes the random forces governing the mobilities of ions. We provide comparisons controlling for the effects of electrolyte concentration and ion-pairing, van der Waals attractive interactions, and solvent molecular characteristics. For the heavier ion (PF6-), velocity relaxations are all similar: negative tail relaxations for the VACF and a clear second relaxation for γ (t ), observed previously also for other molecular ions and with n-pentanol as the solvent. For the light Li+ ion, short time-scale oscillatory behavior masks simple, longer time-scale relaxation of γ (t ). But the corresponding analysis of the solventberg Li+(H2O)4 does conform to the standard picture set by all the PF6- results.

  16. A Molecular-Level View of the Physical Stability of Amorphous Solid Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoda

    Many pharmaceutical compounds being developed in recent years are poorly soluble in water. This has led to insufficient oral bioavailability of many compounds in vitro. The amorphous formulation is one of the promising techniques to increase the oral bioavailability of these poorly water-soluble compounds. However, an amorphous drug substance is inherently unstable because it is a high energy form. In order to increase the physical stability, the amorphous drug is often formulated with a suitable polymer to form an amorphous solid dispersion. Previous research has suggested that the formation of an intimately mixed drug-polymer mixture contributes to the stabilization of the amorphous drug compound. The goal of this research is to better understand the role of miscibility, molecular interactions and mobility on the physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions. Methods were developed to detect different degrees of miscibility on nanometer scale and to quantify the extent of hydrogen-bonding interactions between the drug and the polymer. Miscibility, hydrogen-bonding interactions and molecular mobility were correlated with physical stability during a six-month period using three model systems. Overall, this research provides molecular-level insights into many factors that govern the physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions which can lead to a more effective design of stable amorphous formulations.

  17. Magnetoresistance effect of heat generation in a single-molecular spin-valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Feng; Yan, Yonghong; Wang, Shikuan; Yan, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Based on non-equilibrium Green's functions' theory and small polaron transformation's technology, we study the heat generation by current through a single-molecular spin-valve. Numerical results indicate that the variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively, the spin-valve effect happens not only in electrical current but also in heat generation when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is smaller than phonon frequency and interestingly, when Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, the inverse spin-valve effect appears by sweeping gate voltage and is enlarged with bias increasing. The inverse spin-valve effect will induce the unique heat magnetoresistance effect, which can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily. - Highlights: • Spin-valve effect of heat generation happens when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is less than phonon frequency. • When Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, inverse spin-valve effect appears and is enlarged with bias increasing. • The variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively. • The heat magnetoresistance can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily.

  18. Single Pilot Workload Management During Cruise in Entry Level Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Barbara K.; Pruchnicki, Shawn; Christopher, Bonny; Silverman, Evan; Hackworth, Carla; Rogers, Jason; Williams, Kevin; Drechsler, Gena; Runnels, Barry; Mead, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Advanced technologies and automation are important facilitators of single pilot operations, but they also contribute to the workload management challenges faced by the pilot. We examined task completion, workload management, and automation use in an entry level jet (ELJ) flown by single pilots. Thirteen certificated Cessna Citation Mustang (C510-S) pilots flew an instrument flight rules (IFR) experimental flight in a Cessna Citation Mustang simulator. At one point participants had to descend to meet a crossing restriction prior to a waypoint and prepare for an instrument approach into an un-towered field while facilitating communication from a lost pilot who was flying too low for ATC to hear. Four participants experienced some sort of difficulty with regard to meeting the crossing restriction and almost half (n=6) had problems associated with the instrument approach. Additional errors were also observed including eight participants landing at the airport with an incorrect altimeter setting.

  19. Immune and individual level effects of environmental pollutants in North-Atlantic top predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desforges, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    techniques can be used to assess effects on specific health endpoints. To date, however, most studies focus on single compound exposures, rather than realistic complex mixtures, and little has been done to extrapolate molecular effects to higher levels of biological organization. The aim of my PhD was to use...... a unique combination of approaches, namely statistical meta-analyses, in vitro experimentation, analytical chemistry, and ecological modeling, to gain further insight into pollutant accumulation and effects at molecular and organism levels in North-Atlantic top predators....

  20. Energy level alignment and electron transport through metal/organic contacts. From interfaces to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    A new calculational approach to describing metal/organic interfaces. A valuable step towards a better understanding of molecular electronics. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, ever more electronic devices have started to exploit the advantages of organic semiconductors. The work reported in this thesis focuses on analyzing theoretically the energy level alignment of different metal/organic interfaces, necessary to tailor devices with good performance. Traditional methods based on density functional theory (DFT), are not appropriate for analyzing them because they underestimate the organic energy gap and fail to correctly describe the van der Waals forces. Since the size of these systems prohibits the use of more accurate methods, corrections to those DFT drawbacks are desirable. In this work a combination of a standard DFT calculation with the inclusion of the charging energy (U) of the molecule, calculated from first principles, is presented. Regarding the dispersion forces, incorrect long range interaction is substituted by a van der Waals potential. With these corrections, the C60, benzene, pentacene, TTF and TCNQ/Au(111) interfaces are analyzed, both for single molecules and for a monolayer. The results validate the induced density of interface states model.

  1. Pairing in the BCS and LN approximations using continuum single particle level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Id Betan, R.M.; Repetto, C.E.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the properties of drip line nuclei requires to take into account the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy of the system. This paper has the purpose to show that the continuum single particle level density is a convenient way to consider the pairing correlation in the continuum. Isospin mean-field and isospin pairing strength are used to find the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) and Lipkin–Nogami (LN) approximate solutions of the pairing Hamiltonian. Several physical properties of the whole chain of the Tin isotope, as gap parameter, Fermi level, binding energy, and one- and two-neutron separation energies, were calculated and compared with other methods and with experimental data when they exist. It is shown that the use of the continuum single particle level density is an economical way to include explicitly the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy in large scale mass calculation. It is also shown that the computed properties are in good agreement with experimental data and with more sophisticated treatment of the pairing interaction.

  2. Role of intrinsic molecular dipole in energy level alignment at organic interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindell, L.; Cakir, Deniz; Brocks, G.; Fahlman, M.; Braun, S.

    2013-01-01

    The energy level alignment in metal-organic and organic-organic junctions of the widely used materials tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq3) and 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTCDA) is investigated. The measured alignment schemes for single and bilayer films of Alq3 and NTCDA

  3. Water models based on a single potential energy surface and different molecular degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Martin, Humberto; Hernández-Cobos, Jorge; Ortega-Blake, Iván

    2005-06-01

    field improves by the quality of the molecular calculations, all levels of modeling can be improved.

  4. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  5. Pathological mechanisms underlying single large‐scale mitochondrial DNA deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Mariana C.; Rosa, Hannah S.; Grady, John P.; Blakely, Emma L.; He, Langping; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Newman, Jane; McFarland, Robert; Ng, Yi Shiau; Gorman, Grainne S.; Schaefer, Andrew M.; Tuppen, Helen A.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Single, large‐scale deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are a common cause of mitochondrial disease. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the genetic defect and molecular phenotype to improve understanding of pathogenic mechanisms associated with single, large‐scale mtDNA deletions in skeletal muscle. Methods We investigated 23 muscle biopsies taken from adult patients (6 males/17 females with a mean age of 43 years) with characterized single, large‐scale mtDNA deletions. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in skeletal muscle biopsies was quantified by immunoreactivity levels for complex I and complex IV proteins. Single muscle fibers with varying degrees of deficiency were selected from 6 patient biopsies for determination of mtDNA deletion level and copy number by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results We have defined 3 “classes” of single, large‐scale deletion with distinct patterns of mitochondrial deficiency, determined by the size and location of the deletion. Single fiber analyses showed that fibers with greater respiratory chain deficiency harbored higher levels of mtDNA deletion with an increase in total mtDNA copy number. For the first time, we have demonstrated that threshold levels for complex I and complex IV deficiency differ based on deletion class. Interpretation Combining genetic and immunofluorescent assays, we conclude that thresholds for complex I and complex IV deficiency are modulated by the deletion of complex‐specific protein‐encoding genes. Furthermore, removal of mt‐tRNA genes impacts specific complexes only at high deletion levels, when complex‐specific protein‐encoding genes remain. These novel findings provide valuable insight into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with these mutations. Ann Neurol 2018;83:115–130 PMID:29283441

  6. Spin dynamics at level crossing in molecular AF rings probed by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, A. E-mail: lascialfari@fisicavolta.unipv.it; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.-H.; Micotti, E.; Furukawa, Y.; Jang, Z.H.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Horvatic, M.; Van Slageren, J

    2004-05-01

    The low-temperature spin dynamics in molecular rings with a finite number (N{<=}10) of magnetic ions was studied by means of {sup 1}H NMR. When an external magnetic field (B) induces a crossing between energy levels, peaks are observed in the spin-lattice relaxation rate of protons, 1/T{sub 1}(B), at constant temperature. We discuss similarities and differences in the data from three different rings: Fe10, Fe6:Li and Cr8.

  7. Selected materials of the international workshop on radiation risk and its origin at molecular and cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2003-11-01

    The workshop ''International Workshop on Radiation Risk and its Origin at Molecular and Cellular Level'' was held at The Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the 6th and 7th of February 2003. The Laboratory of Radiation Risk Analysis of JAERI organized it. This international workshop attracted scientists from several different scientific areas, including radiation physics, radiation biology, molecular biology, crystallography of biomolecules, modeling and bio-informatics. Several foreign and domestic keynote speakers addresses the very fundamental areas of radiation risk and tried to establish a link between the fundamental studies at the molecular and cellular level and radiation damages at the organism. The symposium consisted of 13 oral lectures, 10 poster presentations and panel discussion. The 108 participants attended the workshop. This publication comprises of proceedings of oral and poster presentations where available. For the rest of contributions the abstracts or/and selections of presentation materials are shown instead. The 5 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. The merger of electrochemistry and molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Molecular Electronics has the potential to greatly enhance existing silicon-based microelectronics to realize new functions, higher device density, lower power consumption, and lower cost. Although the investigation of electron transport through single molecules and molecular monolayers in "molecular junctions" is a recent development, many of the relevant concepts and phenomena are derived from electrochemistry, as practiced for the past several decades. The past 10+ years have seen an explosion of research activity directed toward how the structure of molecules affects electron transport in molecular junctions, with the ultimate objective of "rational design" of molecular components with new electronic functions, such as chemical sensing, interactions with light, and low-cost, low-power consumer electronics. In order to achieve these scientifically and commercially important objectives, the factors controlling charge transport in molecules "connected" to conducting contacts must be understood, and methods for massively parallel manufacturing of molecular circuits must be developed. This Personal Account describes the development of reproducible and robust molecular electronic devices, starting with modified electrodes used in electrochemistry and progressing to manufacturable molecular junctions. Although the field faced some early difficulties in reliability and characterization, the pieces are now in place for rapid advances in understanding charge transport at the molecular level. Inherent in the field of Molecular Electronics are many electrochemical concepts, including tunneling, redox exchange, activated electron transfer, and electron coupling between molecules and conducting contacts. Copyright © 2012 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Synthesis of single-molecule nanocars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Guillaume; Tour, James M

    2009-03-17

    The drive to miniaturize devices has led to a variety of molecular machines inspired by macroscopic counterparts such as molecular motors, switches, shuttles, turnstiles, barrows, elevators, and nanovehicles. Such nanomachines are designed for controlled mechanical motion and the transport of nanocargo. As researchers miniaturize devices, they can consider two complementary approaches: (1) the "top-down" approach, which reduces the size of macroscopic objects to reach an equivalent microscopic entity using photolithography and related techniques and (2) the "bottom-up" approach, which builds functional microscopic or nanoscopic entities from molecular building blocks. The top-down approach, extensively used by the semiconductor industry, is nearing its scaling limits. On the other hand, the bottom-up approach takes advantage of the self-assembly of smaller molecules into larger networks by exploiting typically weak molecular interactions. But self-assembly alone will not permit complex assembly. Using nanomachines, we hope to eventually consider complex, enzyme-like directed assembly. With that ultimate goal, we are currently exploring the control of nanomachines that would provide a basis for the future bottom-up construction of complex systems. This Account describes the synthesis of a class of molecular machines that resemble macroscopic vehicles. We designed these so-called nanocars for study at the single-molecule level by scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The vehicles have a chassis connected to wheel-terminated axles and convert energy inputs such as heat, electric fields, or light into controlled motion on a surface, ultimately leading to transport of nanocargo. At first, we used C(60) fullerenes as wheels, which allowed the demonstration of a directional rolling mechanism of a nanocar on a gold surface by STM. However, because of the low solubility of the fullerene nanocars and the incompatibility of fullerenes with photochemical processes, we developed new

  10. Abseq: Ultrahigh-throughput single cell protein profiling with droplet microfluidic barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Payam; Kim, Samuel C.; Haliburton, John R.; Gartner, Zev J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-03-01

    Proteins are the primary effectors of cellular function, including cellular metabolism, structural dynamics, and information processing. However, quantitative characterization of proteins at the single-cell level is challenging due to the tiny amount of protein available. Here, we present Abseq, a method to detect and quantitate proteins in single cells at ultrahigh throughput. Like flow and mass cytometry, Abseq uses specific antibodies to detect epitopes of interest; however, unlike these methods, antibodies are labeled with sequence tags that can be read out with microfluidic barcoding and DNA sequencing. We demonstrate this novel approach by characterizing surface proteins of different cell types at the single-cell level and distinguishing between the cells by their protein expression profiles. DNA-tagged antibodies provide multiple advantages for profiling proteins in single cells, including the ability to amplify low-abundance tags to make them detectable with sequencing, to use molecular indices for quantitative results, and essentially limitless multiplexing.

  11. Comparison of atomic-level and coarse-grained models for liquid hydrocarbons from molecular dynamics configurational entropy estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, R; de Vries, AH; Hunenberger, PH; van Gunsteren, WF

    2006-01-01

    Molecular liquids can be modeled at different levels of spatial resolution. In atomic-level (AL) models, all (heavy) atoms can be explicitly simulated. In coarse-grained (CG) models, particles (beads) that represent groups of covalently bound atoms are used as elementary units. Ideally, a CG model

  12. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Horng, Jim-Tong; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Tseng, You-Chen; Lin, Shiming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Localization of single virus particle. ► Force measurements. ► Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  13. Single molecule detection, thermal fluctuation and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANAGIDA, Toshio; ISHII, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    Single molecule detection has contributed to our understanding of the unique mechanisms of life. Unlike artificial man-made machines, biological molecular machines integrate thermal noises rather than avoid them. For example, single molecule detection has demonstrated that myosin motors undergo biased Brownian motion for stepwise movement and that single protein molecules spontaneously change their conformation, for switching to interactions with other proteins, in response to thermal fluctuation. Thus, molecular machines have flexibility and efficiency not seen in artificial machines. PMID:28190869

  14. Molecular-level insights into aging processes of skin elastin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora Huertas, Angela C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is characterized by different features including wrinkling, atrophy of the dermis and loss of elasticity associated with damage to the extracellular matrix protein elastin. The aim of this study was to investigate the aging process of skin elastin at the molecular level by evaluating...... the influence of intrinsic (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (sun exposure) on the morphology and susceptibility of elastin towards enzymatic degradation. Elastin was isolated from biopsies derived from sun-protected or sun-exposed skin of differently aged individuals. The morphology of the elastin...... pronounced in sun-exposed tissue. Marker peptides were identified, which showed an age-related increase or decrease in their abundances and provide insights into the progression of the aging process of elastin fibers. Strong age-related cleavage occurs in hydrophobic tropoelastin domains 18, 20, 24 and 26...

  15. Ultra-fast optical manipulation of single proteins binding to the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Marco; Gardini, Lucia; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-02-01

    In the last decade, forces and mechanical stresses acting on biological systems are emerging as regulatory factors essential for cell life. Emerging evidences indicate that factors such as applied forces or the rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) determine the shape and function of cells and organisms1. Classically, the regulation of biological systems is described through a series of biochemical signals and enzymatic reactions, which direct the processes and cell fate. However, mechanotransduction, i.e. the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical and biomolecular signals, is at the basis of many biological processes fundamental for the development and differentiation of cells, for their correct function and for the development of pathologies. We recently developed an in vitro system that allows the investigation of force-dependence of the interaction of proteins binding the actin cytoskeleton, at the single molecule level. Our system displays a delay of only ~10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. Our assay allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds and conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  16. Single-layered graphene oxide nanosheet/polyaniline hybrids fabricated through direct molecular exfoliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guan-Liang; Shau, Shi-Min; Juang, Tzong-Yuan; Lee, Rong-Ho; Chen, Chih-Ping; Suen, Shing-Yi; Jeng, Ru-Jong

    2011-12-06

    In this study, we used direct molecular exfoliation for the rapid, facile, large-scale fabrication of single-layered graphene oxide nanosheets (GOSs). Using macromolecular polyaniline (PANI) as a layered space enlarger, we readily and rapidly synthesized individual GOSs at room temperature through the in situ polymerization of aniline on the 2D GOS platform. The chemically modified GOS platelets formed unique 2D-layered GOS/PANI hybrids, with the PANI nanorods embedded between the GO interlayers and extended over the GO surface. X-ray diffraction revealed that intergallery expansion occurred in the GO basal spacing after the PANI nanorods had anchored and grown onto the surface of the GO layer. Transparent folding GOSs were, therefore, observed in transmission electron microscopy images. GOS/PANI nanohybrids possessing high conductivities and large work functions have the potential for application as electrode materials in optoelectronic devices. Our dispersion/exfoliation methodology is a facile means of preparing individual GOS platelets with high throughput, potentially expanding the applicability of nanographene oxide materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Nucleation of single GaN nanorods with diameters smaller than 35 nm by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Araki, Tsutomu; Palisaitis, Justinas; Persson, Per O. Å.; Olof Holtz, Per; Birch, Jens; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nucleation mechanism of catalyst-free GaN nanorod grown on Si(111) is investigated by the fabrication of uniform and narrow (<35 nm) nanorods without a pre-defined mask by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct evidences show that the nucleation of GaN nanorods stems from the sidewall of the underlying islands down to the Si(111) substrate, different from commonly reported ones on top of the island directly. Accordingly, the growth and density control of the nanorods is exploited by a “narrow-pass” approach that only narrow nanorod can be grown. The optimal size of surrounding non-nucleation area around single nanorod is estimated as 88 nm

  18. Nucleation of single GaN nanorods with diameters smaller than 35 nm by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yen-Ting [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan); Palisaitis, Justinas; Persson, Per O. Å.; Olof Holtz, Per; Birch, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Chen, Li-Chyong [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuei-Hsien [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nanishi, Yasushi [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)

    2013-11-11

    Nucleation mechanism of catalyst-free GaN nanorod grown on Si(111) is investigated by the fabrication of uniform and narrow (<35 nm) nanorods without a pre-defined mask by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct evidences show that the nucleation of GaN nanorods stems from the sidewall of the underlying islands down to the Si(111) substrate, different from commonly reported ones on top of the island directly. Accordingly, the growth and density control of the nanorods is exploited by a “narrow-pass” approach that only narrow nanorod can be grown. The optimal size of surrounding non-nucleation area around single nanorod is estimated as 88 nm.

  19. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the MSH2 and MLH1 Genes, Potential Molecular Markers for Susceptibility to the Development of Basal Cell Carcinoma in the Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Calixto, Poliane; Lopes, Otávio Sérgio; Dos Santos Maia, Mayara; Herrero, Sylvia Satomi Takeno; Longui, Carlos Alberto; Melo, Cynthia Germoglio Farias; de Carvalho Filho, Ivan Rodrigues; Soares, Leonardo Ferreira; de Medeiros, Arnaldo Correia; Delatorre, Plínio; Khayat, André Salim; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Lima, Eleonidas Moura

    2018-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma - BCC is considered a multifactorial neoplasm involving genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Where UVB radiation is considered the main physical agent involved in BCC carcinogenesis. The Brazil and state of Paraíba are exposed to high levels of UVB rays. The mismatch repair - MMR is important DNA repair mechanisms to maintain replication fidelity. Therefore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding proteins involved in MMR may be potential molecular markers of susceptibility to BCC. The objective of this study was to evaluate and describe for the first time the SNPs rs560246973, rs2303425 and rs565410865 and risk of developing BCC. The present study analyzed 100 samples of paraffin-embedded tissue from patients with histopathological diagnosis of BCC and 100 control samples. The results were obtained by genotyping method, Dideoxy Unique Allele Specific - PCR (DSASP). The SNPs rs2303425 were not associated with Basal Cell Carcinoma. However, the SNPs rs560246973 and rs565410865 was shown to be associated with the development of BCC when compared to control samples (P molecular markers for BCC.

  20. Nonlinear microrheology and molecular imaging to map microscale deformations of entangled DNA networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Anderson, Rae

    We use active microrheology coupled to single-molecule fluorescence imaging to elucidate the microscale dynamics of entangled DNA. DNA naturally exists in a wide range of lengths and topologies, and is often confined in cell nucleui, forming highly concentrated and entangled biopolymer networks. Thus, DNA is the model polymer for understanding entangled polymer dynamics as well as the crowded environment of cells. These networks display complex viscoelastic properties that are not well understood, especially at the molecular-level and in response to nonlinear perturbations. Specifically, how microscopic stresses and strains propagate through entangled networks, and what molecular deformations lead to the network stress responses are unknown. To answer these important questions, we optically drive a microsphere through entangled DNA, perturbing the system far from equilibrium, while measuring the resistive force the DNA exerts on the bead during and after bead motion. We simultaneously image single fluorescent-labeled DNA molecules throughout the network to directly link the microscale stress response to molecular deformations. We characterize the deformation of the network from the molecular-level to the mesoscale, and map the stress propagation throughout the network. We further study the impact of DNA length (11 - 115 kbp) and topology (linear vs ring DNA) on deformation and propagation dynamics, exploring key nonlinear features such as tube dilation and power-law relaxation.

  1. Multi-level Bayesian analyses for single- and multi-vehicle freeway crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rongjie; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    This study presents multi-level analyses for single- and multi-vehicle crashes on a mountainous freeway. Data from a 15-mile mountainous freeway section on I-70 were investigated. Both aggregate and disaggregate models for the two crash conditions were developed. Five years of crash data were used in the aggregate investigation, while the disaggregate models utilized one year of crash data along with real-time traffic and weather data. For the aggregate analyses, safety performance functions were developed for the purpose of revealing the contributing factors for each crash type. Two methodologies, a Bayesian bivariate Poisson-lognormal model and a Bayesian hierarchical Poisson model with correlated random effects, were estimated to simultaneously analyze the two crash conditions with consideration of possible correlations. Except for the factors related to geometric characteristics, two exposure parameters (annual average daily traffic and segment length) were included. Two different sets of significant explanatory and exposure variables were identified for the single-vehicle (SV) and multi-vehicle (MV) crashes. It was found that the Bayesian bivariate Poisson-lognormal model is superior to the Bayesian hierarchical Poisson model, the former with a substantially lower DIC and more significant variables. In addition to the aggregate analyses, microscopic real-time crash risk evaluation models were developed for the two crash conditions. Multi-level Bayesian logistic regression models were estimated with the random parameters accounting for seasonal variations, crash-unit-level diversity and segment-level random effects capturing unobserved heterogeneity caused by the geometric characteristics. The model results indicate that the effects of the selected variables on crash occurrence vary across seasons and crash units; and that geometric characteristic variables contribute to the segment variations: the more unobserved heterogeneity have been accounted, the better

  2. Vectorization for Molecular Dynamics on Intel Xeon Phi Corpocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongsuk

    2014-03-01

    Many modern processors are capable of exploiting data-level parallelism through the use of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) execution. The new Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor supports 512 bit vector registers for the high performance computing. In this paper, we have developed a hierarchical parallelization scheme for accelerated molecular dynamics simulations with the Terfoff potentials for covalent bond solid crystals on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor systems. The scheme exploits multi-level parallelism computing. We combine thread-level parallelism using a tightly coupled thread-level and task-level parallelism with 512-bit vector register. The simulation results show that the parallel performance of SIMD implementations on Xeon Phi is apparently superior to their x86 CPU architecture.

  3. Switching behavior of double-decker single molecule magnets on a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yingshuang; Schwoebel, Joerg; Hoffmann, Germar; Brede, Jens; Wiesendanger, Roland [University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Dillulo, Andrew [Ohio University, Athens (United States); Klyatskaya, Svetlana [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ruben, Mario [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-07-01

    Single molecule magnets (SMM) are most promising materials for spin based molecular electronics. Due to their large magnetic anisotropy stabilized by inside chemical bonds, SMM can potentially be used for information storage at the single molecule level. For applications, it is of importance to adsorb the SMM onto surfaces and to study their subsequent conformational, electronic and magnetic properties. We have investigated the adsorption behavior of Tb and Dy based double-decker SMM on an Ir(111) surface with low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. It is found that Tb double-decker molecules bind tightly to the Ir(111) surface. By resonantly injecting tunneling electrons into its LUMO or HOMO state, the Tb double-decker molecule can be switched from a four-lobed structure to an eight-lobed structure. After switching, energy positions of the HOMO and LUMO states both shift closer to the Fermi level. Dy double-decker molecules also exhibit the same switching properties on the Ir(111) surface. The switching behavior of the molecules is tentatively attributed to a conformational change of the double-decker molecular frame.

  4. Antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state in the single-component molecular material Pd(tmdt)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Rina; Sari, Dita Puspita; Mohd-Tajudin, Saidah Sakinah; Ashi, Retno; Watanabe, Isao; Ishibashi, Shoji; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Ogura, Satomi; Zhou, Biao; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2017-12-01

    A family of compounds built by a single molecular species, M (tmdt) 2, with a metal ion, M , and organic ligands, tmdt, affords diverse electronic phases due to M -dependent interplays between d electrons in M , and π electrons in tmdt. We investigated the spin state in Pd (tmdt) 2 , a π -electron system without a d -electron contribution, through 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and muon-spin resonance experiments. The temperature profiles of the NMR linewidth, relaxation rate, and asymmetry parameter in muon decay show an inhomogeneous antiferromagnetic order with moments distributed around ˜0.1 μB that onsets at above 100 K. This result provides an example of the antiferromagnetic order in a pure π -electron system in M (tmdt) 2, and it demonstrates that correlation among the π electrons is so strong as to give the Néel temperature over 100 K. The small and inhomogeneous moments are understandable as the crucial disorder effect in correlated electrons situated near the Mott transition.

  5. Molecular level biodegradation of phenol and its derivatives through dmp operon of Pseudomonas putida: A bio-molecular modeling and docking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sujay; Banerjee, Arundhati

    2015-10-01

    Participation of Pseudomonas putida-derived methyl phenol (dmp) operon and DmpR protein in the biodegradation of phenol or other harmful, organic, toxic pollutants was investigated at a molecular level. Documentation documents that P. putida has DmpR protein which positively regulates dmp operon in the presence of inducers; like phenols. From the operon, phenol hydroxylase encoded by dmpN gene, participates in degrading phenols after dmp operon is expressed. For the purpose, the 3-D models of the four domains from DmpR protein and of the DNA sequences from the two Upstream Activation Sequences (UAS) present at the promoter region of the operon were demonstrated using discrete molecular modeling techniques. The best modeled structures satisfying their stereo-chemical properties were selected in each of the cases. To stabilize the individual structures, energy optimization was performed. In the presence of inducers, probable interactions among domains and then the two independent DNA structures with the fourth domain were perused by manifold molecular docking simulations. The complex structures were made to be stable by minimizing their overall energy. Responsible amino acid residues, nucleotide bases and binding patterns for the biodegradation, were examined. In the presence of the inducers, the biodegradation process is initiated by the interaction of phe50 from the first protein domain with the inducers. Only after the interaction of the last domain with the DNA sequences individually, the operon is expressed. This novel residue level study is paramount for initiating transcription in the operon; thereby leading to expression of phenol hydroxylase followed by phenol biodegradation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Advance of Mechanically Controllable Break Junction for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Xiang, Dong

    2017-06-01

    Molecular electronics stands for the ultimate size of functional elements, keeping up with an unstoppable trend over the past few decades. As a vital component of molecular electronics, single molecular junctions have attracted significant attention from research groups all over the world. Due to its pronounced superiority, the mechanically controllable break junctions (MCBJ) technique has been widely applied to characterize the dynamic performance of single molecular junctions. This review presents a system analysis for single-molecule junctions and offers an overview of four test-beds for single-molecule junctions, thus offering more insight into the mechanisms of electron transport. We mainly focus on the development of state-of-the-art mechanically controlled break junctions. The three-terminal gated MCBJ approaches are introduced to manipulate the electron transport of molecules, and MCBJs are combined with characterization techniques. Additionally, applications of MCBJs and remarkable properties of single molecules are addressed. Finally, the challenges and perspective for the mechanically controllable break junctions technique are provided.

  7. F F1-ATPase as biosensor to detect single virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, XiaoLong; Zhang, Yun; Yue, JiaChang; Jiang, PeiDong; Zhang, ZhenXi

    2006-01-01

    F F 1 -ATPase within chromatophore was constructed as a biosensor (immuno-rotary biosensor) for the purpose of capturing single virus. Capture of virus was based on antibody-antigen reaction. The detection of virus based on proton flux change driven by ATP-synthesis of F F 1 -ATPase, which was indicated by F1300, was directly observed by a fluorescence microscope. The results demonstrate that the biosensor loading of virus particles has remarkable signal-to-noise ratio (3.8:1) compared to its control at single molecular level, and will be convenient, quick, and even super-sensitive for detecting virus particles

  8. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness: Its Association With Pigmentary Disorders and Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD.The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes.Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS).We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form.

  9. Decreased dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels in adolescents with post-traumatic stress disorder after single sexual trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Mirac Baris; Tuncel, Ozgur Korhan; Akbas, Seher; Aydin, Berna; Say, Gokce Nur

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis can be dysregulated in chronic sexual abuse victims with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We hypothesized that PTSD in adolescents exposed to a single sexual trauma may function as a chronic stressor leading to HPA-axis dysregulation. The objective of this study was to assess dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) and cortisol levels in female adolescents |with single sexual trauma-related PTSD compared to healthy controls. We assessed 20 female adolescent (age 12-18) single sexual trauma victims with PTSD from the Ondokuz Mayis University Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry between December 2013 and December 2014. PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Child Depression Inventory (CDI) and Child Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Index (CPSRI). Blood cortisol and DHEA-S were measured in 20 female adolescent sexual abuse victims with PTSD and 20 healthy adolescents after 12-h fasting using the chemiluminescence method. Compared to age-matched controls, female adolescent sexual abuse victims with PTSD had significantly lower DHEA-S levels (U = 70.00, Z = - 3.517, p = 0.01, r = 0.55). There was also a significant negative correlation between DHEA-S and CDI scores (Spearman r = - 0.522, p < 0.01). Decreased DHEA-S levels and correlation with depressive symptoms are evidence for a dysregulated HPA-axis in female adolescent single sexual trauma victims with PTSD. Further research is now recommended with large patient groups in order to maximize generalizations.

  10. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chih-Hao [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Horng, Jim-Tong [Department of Biochemistry, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jeng-Shian [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Chung-Fan [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tseng, You-Chen [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shiming, E-mail: til@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Nation Taiwan University, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Center for Optoelectronic Biomedicine, College of Medicine, Nation Taiwan University, 1-1 Jen-Ai Road, Taipei 10051, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localization of single virus particle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  11. Reassessing molecular sieving by kinked carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhongqiang; Ding, Jianning; Cheng, Guanggui; Ling, Zhiyong; Zhang, Hongwu; Zheng, Yonggang; Ye, Hongfei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jinbao; Liu, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations for the transport of pure nitrogen (N 2 ), oxygen (O 2 ) and their mixture in kinked single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), molecular sieving by the kinked model of SWCNTs is presented. The influences of gas pressure, temperature and the component ratio of N 2 in the mixture on gas separation are investigated. Considering the tradeoff between the permeability and the purity of O 2 , the results show that a large gas pressure, 300–500 K of gas temperature and a low component ratio of N 2 in the N 2 –O 2 mixture can be advantageous to the efficiency of gas separation. The purity of O 2 can be kept higher than 80% when the component ratio of N 2 is lower than 3/4, which will be advantageous to the design of multi-level gas separation mechanisms. The findings may provide theoretical references for the design and manufacture of molecular sieving devices in engineering applications

  12. Numerical Study on Open-Circuit Voltage of Single Layer Organic Solar Cells with Schottky Contacts: Effects of Molecular Energy Levels, Temperature and Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong-Hua, Li; Ying-Quan, Peng; Chao-Zhu, Ma; Run-Sheng, Wang; Hong-Wei, Xie; Ying, Wang; Wei-Min, Meng

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the effects of the exciton generation rate G, temperature T, the active layer thickness d and the position of LUMO level E L related to the cathode work function W c at a given energy gap on the open-circuit voltage V oc of single layer organic solar cells with Schottky contact. It is demonstrated that open-circuit voltage increases concomitantly with the decreasing cathode work function W c for given anode work functions and exciton generation rates. In the case of given cathode and anode work functions, the open-circuit voltage first increases with the exciton generation rate and then reaches a saturation value, which equals to the built-in voltage. Additionally, it is worth noting that a significant improvement to V oc could be made by selecting an organic material which has a relative high LUMO level (low |E L | value). However, V oc decreases as the temperature increases, and the decreasing rate reduces with the enhancement of exciton generation rate. Our study also shows that it is of no benefit to improve the open-circuit voltage by increasing the device thickness because of an enhanced charge recombination in thicker devices. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  13. The molecular basis of low activity levels of coagulation factor VII: a Brazilian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, F Y; Jardim, L L; Landau, M B; Gadelha, T; Corrêa, M F B; Pereira, I F M; Rezende, S M

    2015-09-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is the most common among the rare bleeding disorders. It is transmitted as an autosomal recessive inheritance, due to mutations in the FVII gene (F7). Molecular studies of FVII deficiency are rare in non-Caucasian populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the molecular basis behind low levels of FVII activity (FVII:C) levels in a cohort of Brazilian patients. A total of 34 patients with low FVII levels were clinically evaluated and submitted to laboratory tests, among these, prothrombin time and FVII:C, with different thromboplastins. All exons and intron/exon boundaries of F7 were amplified and sequenced. A total of 14 genetic alterations were identified, of which six were described previously, c.1091G>A, c.1151C>T, c.-323_-313insCCTATATCCT, c.285G>A, c.525C>T, c.1238G>A and eight (54.0%) and eight were new, c.128G>A, c.252C>T, c.348G>A, c.417G>A, c.426G>A, c.745_747delGTG, c.843G>A and c.805+52C>T. In addition to the mutation c.1091G>A, known as FVII Padua, the mutation c.1151C>T also presented discrepant FVII:C levels when tested with human and rabbit brain thromboplastin. There was no association between phenotype and genotype. Most of the identified genetic alterations found were polymorphisms. Low levels of FVII:C in this population were mostly related to polymorphisms in F7 and associated with a mild clinical phenotype. Mutation c.1151C>T was associated with discrepant levels of FVII:C using different thromboplastins, such as reported with FVII Padua. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Auditory comprehension: from the voice up to the single word level

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Anna Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Auditory comprehension, the ability to understand spoken language, consists of a number of different auditory processing skills. In the five studies presented in this thesis I investigated both intact and impaired auditory comprehension at different levels: voice versus phoneme perception, as well as single word auditory comprehension in terms of phonemic and semantic content. In the first study, using sounds from different continua of ‘male’-/pæ/ to ‘female’-/tæ/ and ‘male’...

  15. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    In nature, molecules exploit interaction with their environment to realize complex functionalities on the nanometer length scale. Physical, chemical and/or biological specificity is frequently achieved by the switching of molecules between microscopically different states. Paradigmatic examples are the energy production in proton pumps of bacteria or the signal conversion in human vision, which rely on switching molecules between different configurations or conformations by external stimuli. The remarkable reproducibility and unparalleled fatigue resistance of these natural processes makes it highly desirable to emulate nature and develop artificial systems with molecular functionalities. A promising avenue towards this goal is to anchor the molecular switches at surfaces, offering new pathways to control their functional properties, to apply electrical contacts, or to integrate switches into larger systems. Anchoring at surfaces allows one to access the full range from individual molecular switches to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined geometry and to customize the coupling between molecules and substrate or between adsorbed molecules. Progress in this field requires both synthesis and preparation of appropriate molecular systems and control over suitable external stimuli, such as light, heat, or electrical currents. To optimize switching and generate function, it is essential to unravel the geometric structure, the electronic properties and the dynamic interactions of the molecular switches on surfaces. This special section, Molecular Switches at Surfaces, collects 17 contributions describing different aspects of this research field. They analyze elementary processes, both in single molecules and in ensembles of molecules, which involve molecular switching and concomitant changes of optical, electronic, or magnetic properties. Two topical reviews summarize the current status, including both challenges and achievements in the field of molecular switches on

  16. Single-molecule imaging and manipulation of biomolecular machines and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Ryota; Iida, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Akihiko; Saita, Ei-Ichiro; You, Huijuan; Sako, Yasushi

    2018-02-01

    Biological molecular machines support various activities and behaviors of cells, such as energy production, signal transduction, growth, differentiation, and migration. We provide an overview of single-molecule imaging methods involving both small and large probes used to monitor the dynamic motions of molecular machines in vitro (purified proteins) and in living cells, and single-molecule manipulation methods used to measure the forces, mechanical properties and responses of biomolecules. We also introduce several examples of single-molecule analysis, focusing primarily on motor proteins and signal transduction systems. Single-molecule analysis is a powerful approach to unveil the operational mechanisms both of individual molecular machines and of systems consisting of many molecular machines. Quantitative, high-resolution single-molecule analyses of biomolecular systems at the various hierarchies of life will help to answer our fundamental question: "What is life?" This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rovibrational coupling in molecular nitrogen at high temperature: An atomic-level study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Paolo, E-mail: vale0142@umn.edu; Norman, Paul, E-mail: norma198@umn.edu; Zhang, Chonglin, E-mail: zhang993@umn.edu; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E., E-mail: schwart@aem.umn.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, College of Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    This article contains an atomic-level numerical investigation of rovibrational relaxation in molecular nitrogen at high temperature (>4000 K), neglecting dissociation. We conduct our study with the use of pure Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Classical Trajectory Calculations (CTC) Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), verified to produce statistically identical results at the conditions of interest here. MD and CTC DSMC solely rely on the specification of a potential energy surface: in this work, the site-site Ling-Rigby potential. Additionally, dissociation is prevented by modeling the N–N bond either as a harmonic or an anharmonic spring. The selected molecular model was shown to (i) recover the shear viscosity (obtained from equilibrium pure MD Green-Kubo calculations) of molecular nitrogen over a wide range of temperatures, up to dissociation; (ii) predict well the near-equilibrium rotational relaxation behavior of N{sub 2}; (iii) reproduce vibrational relaxation times in excellent accordance with the Millikan-White correlation and previous semi-classical trajectory calculations in the low temperature range, i.e., between 4000 K and 10 000 K. By simulating isothermal relaxations in a periodic box, we found that the traditional two-temperature model assumptions become invalid at high temperatures (>10 000 K), due to a significant coupling between rotational and vibrational modes for bound states. This led us to add a modification to both the Jeans and the Landau-Teller equations to include a coupling term, essentially described by an additional relaxation time for internal energy equilibration. The degree of anharmonicity of the N{sub 2} bond determines the strength of the rovibrational coupling. Although neglecting N{sub 2} dissociation only provides a partial description of a nitrogen system at very high temperatures, high-energy trends for bound-bound transitions are essential to understand nonequilibrium gas flows, with possible implications on rovibration

  18. Rovibrational coupling in molecular nitrogen at high temperature: An atomic-level study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Paolo; Norman, Paul; Zhang, Chonglin; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This article contains an atomic-level numerical investigation of rovibrational relaxation in molecular nitrogen at high temperature (>4000 K), neglecting dissociation. We conduct our study with the use of pure Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Classical Trajectory Calculations (CTC) Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), verified to produce statistically identical results at the conditions of interest here. MD and CTC DSMC solely rely on the specification of a potential energy surface: in this work, the site-site Ling-Rigby potential. Additionally, dissociation is prevented by modeling the N–N bond either as a harmonic or an anharmonic spring. The selected molecular model was shown to (i) recover the shear viscosity (obtained from equilibrium pure MD Green-Kubo calculations) of molecular nitrogen over a wide range of temperatures, up to dissociation; (ii) predict well the near-equilibrium rotational relaxation behavior of N 2 ; (iii) reproduce vibrational relaxation times in excellent accordance with the Millikan-White correlation and previous semi-classical trajectory calculations in the low temperature range, i.e., between 4000 K and 10 000 K. By simulating isothermal relaxations in a periodic box, we found that the traditional two-temperature model assumptions become invalid at high temperatures (>10 000 K), due to a significant coupling between rotational and vibrational modes for bound states. This led us to add a modification to both the Jeans and the Landau-Teller equations to include a coupling term, essentially described by an additional relaxation time for internal energy equilibration. The degree of anharmonicity of the N 2 bond determines the strength of the rovibrational coupling. Although neglecting N 2 dissociation only provides a partial description of a nitrogen system at very high temperatures, high-energy trends for bound-bound transitions are essential to understand nonequilibrium gas flows, with possible implications on rovibration

  19. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  20. Spin-polarized transport through single-molecule magnet Mn6 complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Cremades, Eduard; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Sanvito, Stefano; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2013-01-01

    The coherent transport properties of a device, constructed by sandwiching a Mn6 single-molecule magnet between two gold surfaces, are studied theoretically by using the non-equilibrium Green's function approach combined with density functional theory. Two spin states of such Mn6 complexes are explored, namely the ferromagnetically coupled configuration of the six MnIII cations, leading to the S = 12 ground state, and the low S = 4 spin state. For voltages up to 1 volt the S = 12 ground state shows a current one order of magnitude larger than that of the S = 4 state. Furthermore this is almost completely spin-polarized, since the Mn6 frontier molecular orbitals for S = 12 belong to the same spin manifold. As such the high-anisotropy Mn6 molecule appears as a promising candidate for implementing, at the single molecular level, both spin-switches and low-temperature spin-valves. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Spin-polarized transport through single-molecule magnet Mn6 complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Cremades, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    The coherent transport properties of a device, constructed by sandwiching a Mn6 single-molecule magnet between two gold surfaces, are studied theoretically by using the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function approach combined with density functional theory. Two spin states of such Mn6 complexes are explored, namely the ferromagnetically coupled configuration of the six MnIII cations, leading to the S = 12 ground state, and the low S = 4 spin state. For voltages up to 1 volt the S = 12 ground state shows a current one order of magnitude larger than that of the S = 4 state. Furthermore this is almost completely spin-polarized, since the Mn6 frontier molecular orbitals for S = 12 belong to the same spin manifold. As such the high-anisotropy Mn6 molecule appears as a promising candidate for implementing, at the single molecular level, both spin-switches and low-temperature spin-valves. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Lifetimes of metastable levels of singly ionized titanium: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmeri, P; Quinet, P; Biemont, E; Gurell, J; Lundin, P; Royen, P; Mannervik, S; Norlin, L-O; Blagoev, K

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents new theoretical lifetimes of metastable levels in singly ionized titanium, Ti II. Along with the lifetimes, transition probabilities for several decay channels from these metastable levels are presented. The calculations are supported by experimental lifetime determinations of the 3d 3 b 2 D 5/2 and 3d 2 ( 3 P)4s b 2 P 3/2 levels along with revised values of the previously published lifetimes of the 3d 2 ( 3 P)4s b 4 P 5/2 and 3d 2 ( 3 P)4s b 2 P 1/2 levels originating partly from a reanalysis utilizing a recently developed method applied on the previously recorded data and partly from new measurements. The presented theoretical investigation of lifetimes of metastable levels in Ti II shows that the HFR calculations are in general compatible with measurements performed using the ion storage ring CRYRING of Stockholm University. The transition probabilities of forbidden lines derived from the new lifetime values will be useful for the diagnostics of low density laboratory or astrophysical plasmas, particularly those encountered in the strontium filament found in the ejecta of η Carinae

  3. Modulation and Control of Charge Transport Through Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2017-02-01

    The ability to modulate and control charge transport though single-molecule junction devices is crucial to achieving the ultimate goal of molecular electronics: constructing real-world-applicable electronic components from single molecules. This review aims to highlight the progress made in single-molecule electronics, emphasizing the development of molecular junction electronics in recent years. Among many techniques that attempt to wire a molecule to metallic electrodes, the single-molecule break junction (SMBJ) technique is one of the most reliable and tunable experimental platforms for achieving metal-molecule-metal configurations. It also provides great freedom to tune charge transport through the junction. Soon after the SMBJ technique was introduced, it was extensively used to measure the conductances of individual molecules; however, different conductances were obtained for the same molecule, and it proved difficult to interpret this wide distribution of experimental data. This phenomenon was later found to be mainly due to a lack of precise experimental control and advanced data analysis methods. In recent years, researchers have directed considerable effort into advancing the SMBJ technique by gaining a deeper physical understanding of charge transport through single molecules and thus enhancing its potential applicability in functional molecular-scale electronic devices, such as molecular diodes and molecular transistors. In parallel with that research, novel data analysis methods and approaches that enable the discovery of hidden yet important features in the data are being developed. This review discusses various aspects of molecular junction electronics, from the initial goal of molecular electronics, the development of experimental techniques for creating single-molecule junctions and determining single-molecule conductance, to the characterization of functional current-voltage features and the investigation of physical properties other than charge

  4. Single crystal EPR determination of the quantum energy level structure for Fe8 molecular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccagnano, S.; Hill, S.; Negusse, E.; Lussier, A.; Mola, M. M.; Achey, R.; Dalal, N. S.

    2001-05-01

    Using a high sensitivity resonance cavity technique,^1 we are able to obtain high field/frequency (up to 9 tesla/210 GHz) EPR spectra for oriented single crystals of [Fe_8O_2(OH)_12(tacn)_6]Br_8.9H_2O (or Fe8 for short). Extrapolating the frequency dependence of transitions to zero-field (for any orientation of the field) allows us to directly, and accurately (to within 0.5 percent), determine the first five zero-field splittings, which are in reasonable agreement with recent inelastic neutron studies.^2 The dependence of these splittings on the applied field strength, and its orientation with respect to the crystal, enables us to identify (to within 1^o) the easy, intermediate and hard magnetic axes. Subsequent analysis of EPR spectra for field parallel to the easy axis yields a value of for gz which is appreciably different from the value assumed in a recent high field EPR study by Barra et al.^3 ^1 M.M. Mola, S. Hill, P. Goy, and M. Gross, Rev. Sci. Inst. 71, 186 (2000). ^2 R. Caciuffo, G. Amoretti, R. Sessoli, A. Caneschi, and D. Gatteschi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4744 (1998). ^3 A. L. Barra, D. Gatteschi, and R. Sessoli, cond?mat/0002386 (Feb, 2000).

  5. Interplay of single particle and collective response in molecular dynamics simulation of dusty plasma system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Srimanta; Das, Amita; Kumar, Sandeep; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    2018-04-01

    The collective response of the plasma medium is well known and has been explored extensively in the context of dusty plasma medium. On the other hand, the individual particle response associated with the collisional character giving rise to the dissipative phenomena has not been explored adequately. In this paper, two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of dust particles interacting via Yukawa potential has been considered. It has been shown that disturbances induced in a dust crystal elicit both collective and single particle responses. Generation of a few particles moving at speeds considerably higher than acoustic and/or shock speed (excited by the external disturbance) is observed. This is an indication of a single particle response. Furthermore, as these individual energetic particles propagate, the dust crystal is observed to crack along their path. Initially when the energy is high, these particles generate secondary energetic particles by the collisional scattering process. However, ultimately as these particles slow down they excite a collective response in the dust medium at secondary locations in a region which is undisturbed by the primary external disturbance. The condition when the cracking of the crystal stops and collective excitations get initiated has been identified quantitatively. The trailing collective primary disturbances would thus often encounter a disturbed medium with secondary and tertiary collective perturbations, thereby suffering significant modification in its propagation. It is thus clear that there is an interesting interplay (other than mere dissipation) between the single particle and collective response which governs the dynamics of any disturbance introduced in the medium.

  6. EPR and optical absorption studies of paramagnetic molecular ion (VO2+) in Lithium Sodium Acid Phthalate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbulakshmi, N.; Kumar, M. Saravana; Sheela, K. Juliet; Krishnan, S. Radha; Shanmugam, V. M.; Subramanian, P.

    2017-12-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies of VO2+ ions as paramagnetic impurity in Lithium Sodium Acid Phthalate (LiNaP) single crystal have been done at room temperature on X-Band microwave frequency. The lattice parameter values are obtained for the chosen system from Single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Among the number of hyperfine lines in the EPR spectra only two sets are reported from EPR data. The principal values of g and A tensors are evaluated for the two different VO2+ sites I and II. They possess the crystalline field around the VO2+ as orthorhombic. Site II VO2+ ion is identified as substitutional in place of Na1 location and the other site I is identified as interstitial location. For both sites in LiNaP, VO2+ are identified in octahedral coordination with tetragonal distortion as seen from the spin Hamiltonian parameter values. The ground state of vanadyl ion in the LiNaP single crystal is dxy. Using optical absorption data the octahedral and tetragonal parameters are calculated. By correlating EPR and optical data, the molecular orbital bonding parameters have been discussed for both sites.

  7. Photopicking : In Situ Approach for Site-Specific Attachment of Single Multiprotein Nanoparticles to Atomic Force Microscopy Tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liashkovich, Ivan; Rosso, Gonzalo; Rangl, Martina; Ebner, Andreas; Hafezi, Wali; Kühn, Joachim; Schön, Peter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Shahin, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Ligand–receptor interactions are fundamental in life sciences and include hormone–receptor, protein–protein, pathogen–host, and cell–cell interactions, among others. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) proved to be invaluable for scrutinizing ligand–receptor interactions at the single molecular level.

  8. Measuring Conductance of Phenylenediamine as a Molecular Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekyeong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report experimental measurements of molecular conductance as a single molecular sensor by using scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction (STM-BJ technique. The gap was created after Au atomic point contact was ruptured, and the target molecule was inserted and bonded to the top and bottom electrodes. We successfully measured the conductance for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecules by forming the molecular junctions with Au electrodes. The measured conductance decays exponentially with molecular backbone length, enabling us to detect the type of molecules as a molecular sensor. Furthermore, we demonstrated reversible binary switching in a molecular junction by mechanical control of the gap between the electrodes. Since our method allows us to measure the conductance of a single molecule in ambient conditions, it should open up various practical molecular sensing applications.

  9. Inversion of single-particle levels in nuclear Hartree-Fock and Brueckner-HF calculations with broken symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.L.; Svenne, J.P.

    1975-12-01

    Energy levels of states connected by a symmetry of the Hamiltonian normally should be degenerate. In self-consistent field theories, when only one of a pair of single-particle levels connected by a symmetry of the full Hamiltonian is occupied, the degeneracy is split and the unoccupied level often lies below the occupied one. Inversions of neutron-proton (charge) and time-reversal doublets in odd nuclei, charge doublets in even nuclei with a neutron excess, and spin-orbit doublets in spherical configurations with spin-unsaturated shells are examined. The origin of the level inversion is investigated, and the following explanation offered. Unoccupied single-particle levels, from a calculation in an A-particle system, should be interpreted as levels of the (A + 1)-particle system. When the symmetry-related level, occupied in the A-particle system, is also calculated in the (A + 1)-particle system it is degenerate with or lies lower than the other. That is, when both levels are calculated in the (A + 1)-particle system, they are not inverted. It is demonstrated that the usual prescription to occupy the lowest-lying orbitals should be modified to refer to the single-particle energies calculated in the (A + 1)- or the (A - 1)-particle system. This observation is shown to provide a justification for avoiding an oscillation of occupancy between symmetry-related partners in successive iterations leading to a self-consistency. It is pointed out that two degenerate determinants arise from occupying one or the other partner of an initially degenerate pair of levels and then iterating to self-consistency. The existence of the degenerate determinants indicates the need for introducing correlations, either by mixing the two configurations or by allowing additional symmetry-breaking (resulting in a more highly deformed non-degenerate configuration). 2 figures, 3 tables, 43 references

  10. Towards molecular electronics with large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, HB; Blom, PWM; de Leeuw, DM; de Boer, B

    2006-01-01

    Electronic transport through single molecules has been studied extensively by academic(1-8) and industrial(9,10) research groups. Discrete tunnel junctions, or molecular diodes, have been reported using scanning probes(11,12), break junctions(13,14), metallic crossbars(6) and nanopores(8,15). For

  11. Do intraoperative radiographs predict final lumbar sagittal alignment following single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khalid M I; Eranki, Aditya P; Paquette, Scott; Boyd, Michael; Street, John; Kwon, Brian K; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The study aimed to determine if the intraoperative segmental lordosis (as calculated on a cross-table lateral radiograph following a single-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion [TLIF] for degenerative spondylolisthesis/low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis) is maintained at discharge and at 6 months postsurgery. METHODS The authors reviewed images and medical records of patients ≥ 16 years of age with a diagnosis of an isolated single-level, low-grade spondylolisthesis (degenerative or isthmic) with symptomatic spinal stenosis treated between January 2008 and April 2014. Age, sex, surgical level, surgical approach, and facetectomy (unilateral vs bilateral) were recorded. Upright standardized preoperative, early, and 6-month postoperative radiographs, as well as intraoperative lateral radiographs, were analyzed for the pelvic incidence, segmental lumbar lordosis (SLL) at the TILF level, and total LL (TLL). In addition, the anteroposterior position of the cage in the disc space was documented. Data are presented as the mean ± SD; a p value level using a bullet-shaped cage. A bilateral facetectomy was performed in 17 patients (20.2%), and 89.3% of procedures were done at the L4-5 and L5-S1 segments. SLL significantly improved intraoperatively from 15.8° ± 7.5° to 20.9° ± 7.7°, but the correction was lost after ambulation. Compared with preoperative values, at 6 months the change in SLL was modest at 1.8° ± 6.7° (p = 0.025), whereas TLL increased by 4.3° ± 9.6° (p level of surgery, and use of a bilateral facetectomy did not significantly affect postoperative LL. CONCLUSIONS Following a single-level TLIF procedure using a bullet-shaped cage, the intraoperative improvement in SLL is largely lost after ambulation. The improvement in TLL over time is probably due to the decompression part of the procedure. The approach, level of surgery, bilateral facetectomy, and position of the cage do not seem to have a significant effect on LL achieved

  12. The low single nucleotide polymorphism heritability of plasma and saliva cortisol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Alexander; Direk, Nese; Crawford, Andrew A; Mirza, Saira; Adams, Hieab; Bolton, Jennifer; Hayward, Caroline; Strachan, David P; Payne, Erin K; Smith, Jennifer A; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda; Hottenga, Jouke J; de Geus, Eco; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; van der Most, Peter J; de Rijke, Yolanda; Walker, Brian R; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-11-01

    Cortisol is an important stress hormone affected by a variety of biological and environmental factors, such as the circadian rhythm, exercise and psychological stress. Cortisol is mostly measured using blood or saliva samples. A number of genetic variants have been found to contribute to cortisol levels with these methods. While the effects of several specific single genetic variants is known, the joint genome-wide contribution to cortisol levels is unclear. Our aim was to estimate the amount of cortisol variance explained by common single nucleotide polymorphisms, i.e. the SNP heritability, using a variety of cortisol measures, cohorts and analysis approaches. We analyzed morning plasma (n=5705) and saliva levels (n=1717), as well as diurnal saliva levels (n=1541), in the Rotterdam Study using genomic restricted maximum likelihood estimation. Additionally, linkage disequilibrium score regression was fitted on the results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) performed by the CORNET consortium on morning plasma cortisol (n=12,597) and saliva cortisol (n=7703). No significant SNP heritability was detected for any cortisol measure, sample or analysis approach. Point estimates ranged from 0% to 9%. Morning plasma cortisol in the CORNET cohorts, the sample with the most power, had a 6% [95%CI: 0-13%] SNP heritability. The results consistently suggest a low SNP heritability of these acute and short-term measures of cortisol. The low SNP heritability may reflect the substantial environmental and, in particular, situational component of these cortisol measures. Future GWAS will require very large sample sizes. Alternatively, more long-term cortisol measures such as hair cortisol samples are needed to discover further genetic pathways regulating cortisol concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Commissioning of the ATLAS High Level Trigger with single beam and cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mattia, A

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the two general-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The trigger system is responsible for making the online selection of interesting collision events. At the LHC design luminosity of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 it will need to achieve a rejection factor of the order of 10 -7 against random proton-proton interactions, while selecting with high efficiency events that are needed for physics analyses. After a first processing level using custom electronics based on FPGAs and ASICs, the trigger selection is made by software running on two processor farms, containing a total of around two thousand multi-core machines. This system is known as the High Level Trigger (HLT). To reduce the network data traffic and the processing time to manageable levels, the HLT uses seeded, step-wise reconstruction, aiming at the earliest possible rejection of background events. The recent LHC startup and short single-beam run provided a 'stress test' of the system and some initial calibration data. Following this period, ATLAS continued to collect cosmic-ray events for detector alignment and calibration purposes. After giving an overview of the trigger design and its innovative features, this paper focuses on the experience gained from operating the ATLAS trigger with single LHC beams and cosmic-rays.

  14. Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-07-02

    Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

  15. Organization of lipids in the tear film: a molecular-level view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Wizert

    Full Text Available Biophysical properties of the tear film lipid layer are studied at the molecular level employing coarse grain molecular dynamics (MD simulations with a realistic model of the human tear film. In this model, polar lipids are chosen to reflect the current knowledge on the lipidome of the tear film whereas typical Meibomian-origin lipids are included in the thick non-polar lipids subphase. Simulation conditions mimic those experienced by the real human tear film during blinks. Namely, thermodynamic equilibrium simulations at different lateral compressions are performed to model varying surface pressure, and the dynamics of the system during a blink is studied by non-equilibrium MD simulations. Polar lipids separate their non-polar counterparts from water by forming a monomolecular layer whereas the non-polar molecules establish a thick outermost lipid layer. Under lateral compression, the polar layer undulates and a sorting of polar lipids occurs. Moreover, formation of three-dimensional aggregates of polar lipids in both non-polar and water subphases is observed. We suggest that these three-dimensional structures are abundant under dynamic conditions caused by the action of eye lids and that they act as reservoirs of polar lipids, thus increasing stability of the tear film.

  16. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Mutagenesis Using a Highly Sensitive Single-Stranded DNA Reporter System in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kin

    2018-01-01

    Mutations are permanent alterations to the coding content of DNA. They are starting material for the Darwinian evolution of species by natural selection, which has yielded an amazing diversity of life on Earth. Mutations can also be the fundamental basis of serious human maladies, most notably cancers. In this chapter, I describe a highly sensitive reporter system for the molecular genetic analysis of mutagenesis, featuring controlled generation of long stretches of single-stranded DNA in budding yeast cells. This system is ~100- to ~1000-fold more susceptible to mutation than conventional double-stranded DNA reporters, and is well suited for generating large mutational datasets to investigate the properties of mutagens.

  17. Radiation damage at the molecular level: Nanodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Munoz, A.; Lagares, J. I.; Nunez, L.; Garcia, G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main practical use of the model is its use as a tool of nanodosimetry which basically consists in characterizing the effect of radiation on nano volumes (comparable to the DNA of volumes) in terms of link breaks and molecular dissociations. (Author)

  18. Next-generation mammalian genetics toward organism-level systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaki, Etsuo A; Ukai, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2017-01-01

    Organism-level systems biology in mammals aims to identify, analyze, control, and design molecular and cellular networks executing various biological functions in mammals. In particular, system-level identification and analysis of molecular and cellular networks can be accelerated by next-generation mammalian genetics. Mammalian genetics without crossing, where all production and phenotyping studies of genome-edited animals are completed within a single generation drastically reduce the time, space, and effort of conducting the systems research. Next-generation mammalian genetics is based on recent technological advancements in genome editing and developmental engineering. The process begins with introduction of double-strand breaks into genomic DNA by using site-specific endonucleases, which results in highly efficient genome editing in mammalian zygotes or embryonic stem cells. By using nuclease-mediated genome editing in zygotes, or ~100% embryonic stem cell-derived mouse technology, whole-body knock-out and knock-in mice can be produced within a single generation. These emerging technologies allow us to produce multiple knock-out or knock-in strains in high-throughput manner. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts and related technologies as well as current challenges and future opportunities for next-generation mammalian genetics in organism-level systems biology.

  19. In silico predictions of LH2 ring sizes from the crystal structure of a single subunit using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosi, Lorant; Keer, Harindar; Cogdell, Richard J; Ritz, Thorsten; Kosztin, Ioan

    2011-07-01

    Most of the currently known light-harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) rings are formed by 8 or 9 subunits. As of now, questions like "what factors govern the LH2 ring size?" and "are there other ring sizes possible?" remain largely unanswered. Here, we investigate by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and stochastic modeling the possibility of predicting the size of an LH2 ring from the sole knowledge of the high resolution crystal structure of a single subunit. Starting with single subunits of two LH2 rings with known size, that is, an 8-ring from Rs. moliscianum (MOLI) and a 9-ring from Rps. acidophila (ACI), and one with unknown size (referred to as X), we build atomic models of subunit dimers corresponding to assumed 8-, 9-, and 10-ring geometries. After inserting each of the dimers into a lipid-water environment, we determine the preferred angle between the corresponding subunits by three methods: (1) energy minimization, (2) free MD simulations, and (3) potential of mean force calculations. We find that the results from all three methods are consistent with each other, and when taken together, it allows one to predict with reasonable level of confidence the sizes of the corresponding ring structures. One finds that X and ACI very likely form a 9-ring, while MOLI is more likely to form an 8-ring than a 9-ring. Finally, we discuss both the merits and limitations of all three prediction methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Molecular magnetism, status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatteschi, Dante; Bogani, Lapo; Cornia, Andrea; Mannini, Matteo; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2008-12-01

    A short review is made of molecular magnetism, trying to discuss what is alive and well, with perspectives for the future. All the main fields of activity are mentioned, ranging from the so-called spin cross-over systems to the quest for organic (molecular) ferromagnets. Particular attention is devoted to some of the recent advances in these fields, highlighting also the opportunities for the development of applications. Low dimensional magnets are perhaps the best opportunity to use molecules, and the status of single-molecule and single chain magnets is discussed. The last part is devoted to the organization of magnetic molecules and to the development of techniques which allow to measure the magnetic properties of thin layers and, in perspective, of single molecules.

  1. Molecular Clock of Neutral Mutations in a Fitness-Increasing Evolutionary Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Toshihiko; Ying, Bei-Wen; Tsuru, Saburo; Iijima, Leo; Suzuki, Shingo; Hashimoto, Tomomi; Oyake, Ayana; Kobayashi, Hisaka; Someya, Yuki; Narisawa, Dai; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    The molecular clock of neutral mutations, which represents linear mutation fixation over generations, is theoretically explained by genetic drift in fitness-steady evolution or hitchhiking in adaptive evolution. The present study is the first experimental demonstration for the molecular clock of neutral mutations in a fitness-increasing evolutionary process. The dynamics of genome mutation fixation in the thermal adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli were evaluated in a prolonged evolution experiment in duplicated lineages. The cells from the continuously fitness-increasing evolutionary process were subjected to genome sequencing and analyzed at both the population and single-colony levels. Although the dynamics of genome mutation fixation were complicated by the combination of the stochastic appearance of adaptive mutations and clonal interference, the mutation fixation in the population was simply linear over generations. Each genome in the population accumulated 1.6 synonymous and 3.1 non-synonymous neutral mutations, on average, by the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate, while only a single genome in the population occasionally acquired an adaptive mutation. The neutral mutations that preexisted on the single genome hitchhiked on the domination of the adaptive mutation. The successive fixation processes of the 128 mutations demonstrated that hitchhiking and not genetic drift were responsible for the coincidence of the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate in the genome with the fixation rate of neutral mutations in the population. The molecular clock of neutral mutations to the fitness-increasing evolution suggests that the numerous neutral mutations observed in molecular phylogenetic trees may not always have been fixed in fitness-steady evolution but in adaptive evolution.

  2. Molecular Clock of Neutral Mutations in a Fitness-Increasing Evolutionary Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Kishimoto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The molecular clock of neutral mutations, which represents linear mutation fixation over generations, is theoretically explained by genetic drift in fitness-steady evolution or hitchhiking in adaptive evolution. The present study is the first experimental demonstration for the molecular clock of neutral mutations in a fitness-increasing evolutionary process. The dynamics of genome mutation fixation in the thermal adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli were evaluated in a prolonged evolution experiment in duplicated lineages. The cells from the continuously fitness-increasing evolutionary process were subjected to genome sequencing and analyzed at both the population and single-colony levels. Although the dynamics of genome mutation fixation were complicated by the combination of the stochastic appearance of adaptive mutations and clonal interference, the mutation fixation in the population was simply linear over generations. Each genome in the population accumulated 1.6 synonymous and 3.1 non-synonymous neutral mutations, on average, by the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate, while only a single genome in the population occasionally acquired an adaptive mutation. The neutral mutations that preexisted on the single genome hitchhiked on the domination of the adaptive mutation. The successive fixation processes of the 128 mutations demonstrated that hitchhiking and not genetic drift were responsible for the coincidence of the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate in the genome with the fixation rate of neutral mutations in the population. The molecular clock of neutral mutations to the fitness-increasing evolution suggests that the numerous neutral mutations observed in molecular phylogenetic trees may not always have been fixed in fitness-steady evolution but in adaptive evolution.

  3. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I–V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed. PMID:29342091

  4. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun

    2018-01-17

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I-V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed.

  5. Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation Strategy for Single-Phase Three-Level CIC T-source Inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shults, Tatiana E.; Husev, Oleksandr O.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel space vector pulse-width modulation strategy for a single-phase three-level buck-boost inverter based on an impedance-source network. The case study system is based on T-source inverter with continuous input current. To demonstrate the improved performance of the inver......This paper presents a novel space vector pulse-width modulation strategy for a single-phase three-level buck-boost inverter based on an impedance-source network. The case study system is based on T-source inverter with continuous input current. To demonstrate the improved performance...... of the inverter, the strategy was compared the traditional pulse-width modulation. It is shown that the approach proposed has fewer switching states and does not suffer from neutral point misbalance....

  6. Single-Cell Memory Regulates a Neural Circuit for Sensory Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kyogo; Nakano, Shunji; Amano, Mutsuki; Tsuboi, Daisuke; Nishioka, Tomoki; Ikeda, Shingo; Yokoyama, Genta; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Mori, Ikue

    2016-01-05

    Unveiling the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying memory has been a challenge for the past few decades. Although synaptic plasticity is proven to be essential for memory formation, the significance of "single-cell memory" still remains elusive. Here, we exploited a primary culture system for the analysis of C. elegans neurons and show that a single thermosensory neuron has an ability to form, retain, and reset a temperature memory. Genetic and proteomic analyses found that the expression of the single-cell memory exhibits inter-individual variability, which is controlled by the evolutionarily conserved CaMKI/IV and Raf pathway. The variable responses of a sensory neuron influenced the neural activity of downstream interneurons, suggesting that modulation of the sensory neurons ultimately determines the behavioral output in C. elegans. Our results provide proof of single-cell memory and suggest that the individual differences in neural responses at the single-cell level can confer individuality. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Torque Measurement at the Single Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Scott; Sheinin, Maxim Y.; Inman, James; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    Methods for exerting and measuring forces on single molecules have revolutionized the study of the physics of biology. However, it is often the case that biological processes involve rotation or torque generation, and these parameters have been more difficult to access experimentally. Recent advances in the single molecule field have led to the development of techniques which add the capability of torque measurement. By combining force, displacement, torque, and rotational data, a more comprehensive description of the mechanics of a biomolecule can be achieved. In this review, we highlight a number of biological processes for which torque plays a key mechanical role. We describe the various techniques that have been developed to directly probe the torque experienced by a single molecule, and detail a variety of measurements made to date using these new technologies. We conclude by discussing a number of open questions and propose systems of study which would be well suited for analysis with torsional measurement techniques. PMID:23541162

  8. Optical characteristics of the nanoparticle coupled to a quantum molecular aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropakova, I. Yu.; Zvyagin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Optical characteristics of a single nanoparticle, coupled to the one-dimensional quantum molecular aggregate is studied. Depending on the values of the coupling of the particle and its own frequency, with respect to the own frequency of the aggregated molecules, and the strength of the aggregation, the dynamical relative permittivity of the nanoparticle manifests the contribution from the exciton band, or/and the ones from the local level(s) caused by the particle. The refractive index and the extinction coefficient of the nanoparticle is also calculated.

  9. Far-infrared spectroscopy of lanthanide-based molecular magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Sabrina

    2015-05-13

    This thesis demonstrates the applicability of far-infrared spectroscopy for the study of the crystal-field splitting of lanthanides in single-molecular magnetic materials. The far-infrared studies of three different kinds of single-molecular-magnetic materials, a single-ion magnet, a single-chain magnet and an exchange-coupled cluster, yielded a deeper understanding of the crystal-field splitting of the lanthanides in these materials. In addition, our results offered the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into the relaxation processes of these materials.

  10. Investigation on single carbon atom transporting through the single-walled carbon nanotube by MD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yinfeng; Zhang Zhibin; Ke Xuezhi; Zhu Zhiyuan; Zhu Dezhang; Wang Zhenxia; Xu Hongjie

    2005-01-01

    The single carbon atom transporting through the single-walled carbon nanotube has been studied by molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. We got different trajectories of the carbon atom by changing the input parameters. The simulation results indicate that the single carbon atom with low energy can transport through the carbon nanotube under some input conditions and result in different trajectories being straight line or 'rosette' or circular. (authors)

  11. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  12. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian M; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts at stratifying medulloblastomas based on their molecular features have revolutionized our understanding of this morbidity. Collective efforts by multiple independent groups have subdivided medulloblastoma from a single disease into four distinct molecular subgroups characterized by disparate transcriptional signatures, mutational spectra, copy number profiles and, most importantly, clinical features. We present a summary of recent studies that have contributed to our understand...

  13. Novel approaches for single molecule activation and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Benfenati, Fabio; Torre, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    How can we obtain tools able to process and exchange information at the molecular scale In order to do this, it is necessary to activate and detect single molecules under controlled conditions. This book focuses on the generation of biologically-inspired molecular devices. These devices are based on the developments of new photonic tools able to activate and stimulate single molecule machines. Additionally, new light sensitive molecules can be selectively activated by photonic tools. These technological innovations will provide a way to control activation of single light-sensitive molecules, a

  14. Studies on liposomes with Chlorophyll for monitoring the electromagnetic influence at molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugulea, Laura; Miclaus, Simona; Iacovache, Ioan

    2001-01-01

    The liposomes with Chlorophyll are excellent model membranes and could be successfully used to study the electromagnetic influence at molecular level. The strong visible absorption and fluorescence of Chlorophyll allow its use as sensor for the interactions at molecular level and as a fluorescence marker; it reflects certain aspects of the supramolecular structure of the lipid phase: fluidity, lipid and liposomes aggregation. The objective of our work was to evidence athermal effect of low level, pulsed microwave (MW) fields on liposomes and to evidence the possible mechanism of interaction at molecular level. Unilamellar liposomes were obtained from multilamellar vesicles by the hand-shaken method and sonication for 30 minutes. The multilamellar vesicles were prepared using Chla /lipid films with specific molar ratio (lipid/Chla 1/10 and 1/100) and different lipids (Dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, Dimirystoyl Phosphatidylcholine and Dioleoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Sigma). The films were dispersed in buffer solutions of different pH (6.2 - 7.6). The Chlorophyll was freshly extracted from spinach leaves and separated by the chromatographic method. Portions of liposome suspension (0.6 ml) were inserted into Teflon cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in series, for periods of 5-30 minutes. The exposure system was: MW generator + adapted load (shortened rectangular waveguide) + Teflon cuvette filled with sample liquid. The effect of MW irradiation is not observable on multilamellar vesicles, but only on small unilamellar vesicles. The MW effect is athermal, verified by conventional heating in the same range of temperatures and results in enlarging the size of vesicles. The enlarging effect of MW is opposed to the effect of ultrasounds exposure. It is not clear if effects due to MW are proportional with exposure duration; it seems that this mostly depends on the type of lipid in vesicles. The UV and VIS spectra were recorded to observe the oxidation state of the

  15. Advances Towards Synthetic Machines at the Molecular and Nanoscale Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Konstas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of increasingly smaller machines to the nanometer scale can be achieved by either a “top-down” or “bottom-up” approach. While the former is reaching its limits of resolution, the latter is showing promise for the assembly of molecular components, in a comparable approach to natural systems, to produce functioning ensembles in a controlled and predetermined manner. In this review we focus on recent progress in molecular systems that act as molecular machine prototypes such as switches, motors, vehicles and logic operators.

  16. Low-Complexity Model Predictive Control of Single-Phase Three-Level Rectifiers with Unbalanced Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Junpeng; Song, Wensheng; Wang, Xiongfei

    2018-01-01

    The fluctuation of the neutral-point potential in single-phase three-level rectifiers leads to coupling between the line current regulation and dc-link voltage balancing, deteriorating the quality of line current. For addressing this issue, this paper proposes a low-complexity model predictive...

  17. Molecular dynamics study on heat transport from single-walled carbon nanotubes to Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ya; Zhu, Jie, E-mail: zhujie@iet.cn; Tang, Da-Wei

    2015-02-06

    In this paper, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the heat transport between a vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and Si substrate, to find out the influence of temperature and system sizes, including diameter and length of SWNT and measurements of substrate. Results revealed that high temperature hindered heat transport in SWNT itself but was a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at interface of SWNT and Si. Furthermore, the system sizes strongly affected the peaks in vibrational density of states of Si, which led to interfacial thermal conductance dependent on system sizes. - Highlights: • NEMD is performed to simulate the heat transport from SWNT to Si substrate. • We analyze both interfacial thermal conductance and thermal conductivity of SWNT. • High temperature is a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at the interface. • Interfacial thermal conductance strongly depends on the sizes of SWNT and substrate. • We calculate VDOS of C and Si atoms to analyze phonon couplings between them.

  18. Single Cell Confocal Raman Spectroscopy of Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of effort has been focused on exploring the underlying molecular mechanism of osteoarthritis (OA especially at the cellular level. We report a confocal Raman spectroscopic investigation on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The objective of this investigation is to identify molecular features and the stage of OA based on the spectral signatures corresponding to bio-molecular changes at the cellular level in chondrocytes. In this study, we isolated chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage and acquired Raman spectra from single cells. Major spectral differences between the cells obtained from different International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS grades of osteoarthritic cartilage were identified. During progression of OA, a decrease in protein content and an increase in cell death were observed from the vibrational spectra. Principal component analysis and subsequent cross-validation was able to associate osteoarthritic chondrocytes to ICRS Grade I, II and III with specificity 100.0%, 98.1%, and 90.7% respectively, while, sensitivity was 98.6%, 82.8%, and 97.5% respectively. The overall predictive efficiency was 92.2%. Our pilot study encourages further use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive and label free technique for revealing molecular features associated with osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

  19. Three-Level Z-Source Inverters Using a Single LC Impedance Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poh Chiang; Lim, Sok Wei; Gao, Feng

    2007-01-01

    two LC impedance networks and two isolated dc sources, which can significantly increase the overall system cost and require a more complex modulator for balancing the network inductive voltage boosting. Offering a number of less costly alternatives, this letter presents the design and control of two...... three-level Z-source inverters, whose output voltage can be stepped down or up using only a single LC impedance network connected between the dc input source and either a neutral-point-clamped (NPC) or dc-link cascaded inverter circuitry. Through careful design of their modulation scheme, both inverters...

  20. Comparison of radiographic changes after ACDF versus Bryan disc arthroplasty in single and bi-level cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Marc Anthony; Kim, Soo-Bum; Arbatin, Jose Joefrey F.; Chang, Kee-Young; Park, Moon-Soo; Shin, Jae-hyuk; Ju, Yeong-Su

    2009-01-01

    The object of this study is to compare radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) versus cervical disc replacement using the Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) in terms of range of motion (ROM), Functional spinal unit (FSU), overall sagittal alignment (C2–C7), anterior intervertebral height (AIH), posterior intervertebral height (PIH) and radiographic changes at the implanted and adjacent levels. The study consisted of 105 patients. A total of 63 Bryan disc were placed in 51 patients. A single level procedure was performed in 39 patients and a two-level procedure in the other 12. Fifty-four patients underwent ACDF, 26 single level cases and 28 double level cases. The Bryan group had a mean follow-up 19 months (12–38). Mean follow-up for the ACDF group was 20 months (12–40 months). All patients were evaluated using static and dynamic cervical spine radiographs as well as MR imaging. All patients underwent anterior cervical discectomy followed by autogenous bone graft with plate (or implantation of a cage) or the Bryan artificial disc prosthesis. Clinical evaluation included the visual analogue scale (VAS), and neck disability index (NDI). Radiographic evaluation included static and dynamic flexion-extension radiographs using the computer software (Infinitt PiviewSTAR 5051) program. ROM, disc space angle, intervertebral height were measured at the operative site and adjacent levels. FSU and overall sagittal alignment (C2–C7) were also measured pre-operatively, postoperatively and at final follow-up. Radiological change was analyzed using χ2 test (95% confidence interval). Other data were analyzed using the mixed model (SAS enterprises guide 4.1 versions). There was clinical improvement within each group in terms of VAS and NDI scores from pre-op to final follow-up but not significantly between the two groups for both single (VAS p = 0.8371, NDI p = 0.2872) and double (VAS p = 0

  1. Measurement and control of detailed electronic properties in a single molecule break junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Hamill, Joseph; Zhou, Jianfeng; Guo, Cunlan; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-01-01

    The lack of detailed experimental controls has been one of the major obstacles hindering progress in molecular electronics. While large fluctuations have been occurring in the experimental data, specific details, related mechanisms, and data analysis techniques are in high demand to promote our physical understanding at the single-molecule level. A series of modulations we recently developed, based on traditional scanning probe microscopy break junctions (SPMBJs), have helped to discover significant properties in detail which are hidden in the contact interfaces of a single-molecule break junction (SMBJ). For example, in the past we have shown that the correlated force and conductance changes under the saw tooth modulation and stretch-hold mode of PZT movement revealed inherent differences in the contact geometries of a molecular junction. In this paper, using a bias-modulated SPMBJ and utilizing emerging data analysis techniques, we report on the measurement of the altered alignment of the HOMO of benzene molecules with changing the anchoring group which coupled the molecule to metal electrodes. Further calculations based on Landauer fitting and transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) demonstrated the effects of modulated bias on the location of the frontier molecular orbitals. Understanding the alignment of the molecular orbitals with the Fermi level of the electrodes is essential for understanding the behaviour of SMBJs and for the future design of more complex devices. With these modulations and analysis techniques, fruitful information has been found about the nature of the metal-molecule junction, providing us insightful clues towards the next step for in-depth study.

  2. Probing correlated quantum many-body systems at the single-particle level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, Manuel

    2013-02-27

    The detection of correlation and response functions plays a crucial role in the experimental characterization of quantum many-body systems. In this thesis, we present novel techniques for the measurement of such functions at the single-particle level. Specifically, we show the single-atom- and single-site-resolved detection of an ultracold quantum gas in an optical lattice. The quantum gas is described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which features a zero temperature phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott-insulating state, a paradigm example of a quantum phase transition. We used the aforementioned detection techniques to study correlation and response properties across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. The single-atom sensitivity of our method is achieved by fluorescence detection of individual atoms with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A high-resolution objective collects the fluorescence light and yields in situ 'snapshots' of the quantum gas that allow for a single-site-resolved reconstruction of the atomic distribution. This allowed us to measure two-site and non-local correlation-functions across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. Non-local correlation functions are based on the information of an extended region of the system and play an important role for the characterization of low-dimensional quantum phases. While non-local correlation functions were so far only theoretical tools, our results show that they are actually experimentally accessible. Furthermore, we used a new thermometry scheme, based on the counting of individual thermal excitations, to measure the response of the system to lattice modulation. Using this method, we studied the excitation spectrum of the system across the two-dimensional superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. In particular, we detected a 'Higgs' amplitude mode in the strongly-interacting superfluid close to the transition point where the system is described by an effectively Lorentz

  3. Probing correlated quantum many-body systems at the single-particle level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The detection of correlation and response functions plays a crucial role in the experimental characterization of quantum many-body systems. In this thesis, we present novel techniques for the measurement of such functions at the single-particle level. Specifically, we show the single-atom- and single-site-resolved detection of an ultracold quantum gas in an optical lattice. The quantum gas is described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which features a zero temperature phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott-insulating state, a paradigm example of a quantum phase transition. We used the aforementioned detection techniques to study correlation and response properties across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. The single-atom sensitivity of our method is achieved by fluorescence detection of individual atoms with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A high-resolution objective collects the fluorescence light and yields in situ 'snapshots' of the quantum gas that allow for a single-site-resolved reconstruction of the atomic distribution. This allowed us to measure two-site and non-local correlation-functions across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. Non-local correlation functions are based on the information of an extended region of the system and play an important role for the characterization of low-dimensional quantum phases. While non-local correlation functions were so far only theoretical tools, our results show that they are actually experimentally accessible. Furthermore, we used a new thermometry scheme, based on the counting of individual thermal excitations, to measure the response of the system to lattice modulation. Using this method, we studied the excitation spectrum of the system across the two-dimensional superfluid-Mott-insulator transition. In particular, we detected a 'Higgs' amplitude mode in the strongly-interacting superfluid close to the transition point where the system is described by an effectively Lorentz-invariant low-energy theory

  4. Nanogap Electrodes towards Solid State Single-Molecule Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ajuan; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2015-12-01

    With the establishment of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-based integrated circuit technology, it has become more difficult to follow Moore's law to further downscale the size of electronic components. Devices based on various nanostructures were constructed to continue the trend in the minimization of electronics, and molecular devices are among the most promising candidates. Compared with other candidates, molecular devices show unique superiorities, and intensive studies on molecular devices have been carried out both experimentally and theoretically at the present time. Compared to two-terminal molecular devices, three-terminal devices, namely single-molecule transistors, show unique advantages both in fundamental research and application and are considered to be an essential part of integrated circuits based on molecular devices. However, it is very difficult to construct them using the traditional microfabrication techniques directly, thus new fabrication strategies are developed. This review aims to provide an exclusive way of manufacturing solid state gated nanogap electrodes, the foundation of constructing transistors of single or a few molecules. Such single-molecule transistors have the potential to be used to build integrated circuits. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Stereoelectronic Effect-Induced Conductance Switching in Aromatic Chain Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Na; Wang, Jinying; Jia, Chuancheng; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Xisha; Yu, Chenmin; Li, Mingliang; Wang, Shuopei; Gong, Yao; Sun, Hantao; Zhang, Guanxin; Liu, Zhirong; Zhang, Guangyu; Liao, Jianhui; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2017-02-08

    Biphenyl, as the elementary unit of organic functional materials, has been widely used in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, over decades little has been fundamentally understood regarding how the intramolecular conformation of biphenyl dynamically affects its transport properties at the single-molecule level. Here, we establish the stereoelectronic effect of biphenyl on its electrical conductance based on the platform of graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions, where a specifically designed hexaphenyl aromatic chain molecule is covalently sandwiched between nanogapped graphene point contacts to create stable single-molecule junctions. Both theoretical and temperature-dependent experimental results consistently demonstrate that phenyl twisting in the aromatic chain molecule produces different microstates with different degrees of conjugation, thus leading to stochastic switching between high- and low-conductance states. These investigations offer new molecular design insights into building functional single-molecule electrical devices.

  6. Light and Redox Switchable Molecular Components for Molecular Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The field of molecular and organic electronics has seen rapid progress in recent years, developing from concept and design to actual demonstration devices in which both single molecules and self-assembled monolayers are employed as light-responsive components. Research in this field has seen

  7. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  8. Commissioning of the ATLAS High Level Trigger with single beam and cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Mattia, A, E-mail: dimattia@mail.cern.c [Michigan State University - Department of Physics and Astronomy 3218 Biomedical Physical Science - East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ATLAS is one of the two general-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The trigger system is responsible for making the online selection of interesting collision events. At the LHC design luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} it will need to achieve a rejection factor of the order of 10{sup -7} against random proton-proton interactions, while selecting with high efficiency events that are needed for physics analyses. After a first processing level using custom electronics based on FPGAs and ASICs, the trigger selection is made by software running on two processor farms, containing a total of around two thousand multi-core machines. This system is known as the High Level Trigger (HLT). To reduce the network data traffic and the processing time to manageable levels, the HLT uses seeded, step-wise reconstruction, aiming at the earliest possible rejection of background events. The recent LHC startup and short single-beam run provided a 'stress test' of the system and some initial calibration data. Following this period, ATLAS continued to collect cosmic-ray events for detector alignment and calibration purposes. After giving an overview of the trigger design and its innovative features, this paper focuses on the experience gained from operating the ATLAS trigger with single LHC beams and cosmic-rays.

  9. Technical aspects and recommendations for single-cell qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Kubista, Mikael

    2018-02-01

    Single cells are basic physiological and biological units that can function individually as well as in groups in tissues and organs. It is central to identify, characterize and profile single cells at molecular level to be able to distinguish different kinds, to understand their functions and determine how they interact with each other. During the last decade several technologies for single-cell profiling have been developed and used in various applications, revealing many novel findings. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is one of the most developed methods for single-cell profiling that can be used to interrogate several analytes, including DNA, RNA and protein. Single-cell qPCR has the potential to become routine methodology but the technique is still challenging, as it involves several experimental steps and few molecules are handled. Here, we discuss technical aspects and provide recommendation for single-cell qPCR analysis. The workflow includes experimental design, sample preparation, single-cell collection, direct lysis, reverse transcription, preamplification, qPCR and data analysis. Detailed reporting and sharing of experimental details and data will promote further development and make validation studies possible. Efforts aiming to standardize single-cell qPCR open up means to move single-cell analysis from specialized research settings to standard research laboratories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Single Molecules as Optical Probes for Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrit, Michel

    Single molecules and single nanoparticles are convenient links between the nanoscale world and the laboratory. We discuss the limits for their optical detection by three different methods: fluorescence, direct absorption, and photothermal detection. We briefly review some recent illustrations of qualitatively new information gathered from single-molecule signals: intermittency of the fluorescence intensity, acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles (1-100 GHz) or of extended defects in molecular crystals (0.1-1 MHz), and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming molecular liquids. We conclude with an outlook of future uses of single-molecule methods in physical chemistry, soft matter, and material science.

  11. Enhanced mechanical properties of graphene/copper nanocomposites using a molecular-level mixing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jaewon; Yoon, Taeshik; Jin, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jinsup; Kim, Taek-Soo; Hong, Soon Hyung; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2013-12-10

    RGO flakes are homogeneously dispersed in a Cu matrix through a molecular-level mixing process. This novel fabrication process prevents the agglomeration of the RGO and enhances adhesion between the RGO and the Cu. The yield strength of the 2.5 vol% RGO/Cu nanocomposite is 1.8 times higher than that of pure Cu. The strengthening mechanism of the RGO is investigated by a double cantilever beam test using the graphene/Cu model structure. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. C-C Coupling on Single-Atom-Based Heterogeneous Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Zaicheng; Wang, Bin; Tang, Yu; Nguyen, Luan; Li, Yuting; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2018-01-24

    Compared to homogeneous catalysis, heterogeneous catalysis allows for ready separation of products from the catalyst and thus reuse of the catalyst. C-C coupling is typically performed on a molecular catalyst which is mixed with reactants in liquid phase during catalysis. This homogeneous mixing at a molecular level in the same phase makes separation of the molecular catalyst extremely challenging and costly. Here we demonstrated that a TiO 2 -based nanoparticle catalyst anchoring singly dispersed Pd atoms (Pd 1 /TiO 2 ) is selective and highly active for more than 10 Sonogashira C-C coupling reactions (R≡CH + R'X → R≡R'; X = Br, I; R' = aryl or vinyl). The coupling between iodobenzene and phenylacetylene on Pd 1 /TiO 2 exhibits a turnover rate of 51.0 diphenylacetylene molecules per anchored Pd atom per minute at 60 °C, with a low apparent activation barrier of 28.9 kJ/mol and no cost of catalyst separation. DFT calculations suggest that the single Pd atom bonded to surface lattice oxygen atoms of TiO 2 acts as a site to dissociatively chemisorb iodobenzene to generate an intermediate phenyl, which then couples with phenylacetylenyl bound to a surface oxygen atom. This coupling of phenyl adsorbed on Pd 1 and phenylacetylenyl bound to O ad of TiO 2 forms the product molecule, diphenylacetylene.

  13. Multi-Scale Molecular Deconstruction of the Serotonin Neuron System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaty, Benjamin W; Freret, Morgan E; Rood, Benjamin D; Brust, Rachael D; Hennessy, Morgan L; deBairos, Danielle; Kim, Jun Chul; Cook, Melloni N; Dymecki, Susan M

    2015-11-18

    Serotonergic (5HT) neurons modulate diverse behaviors and physiology and are implicated in distinct clinical disorders. Corresponding diversity in 5HT neuronal phenotypes is becoming apparent and is likely rooted in molecular differences, yet a comprehensive approach characterizing molecular variation across the 5HT system is lacking, as is concomitant linkage to cellular phenotypes. Here we combine intersectional fate mapping, neuron sorting, and genome-wide RNA-seq to deconstruct the mouse 5HT system at multiple levels of granularity-from anatomy, to genetic sublineages, to single neurons. Our unbiased analyses reveal principles underlying system organization, 5HT neuron subtypes, constellations of differentially expressed genes distinguishing subtypes, and predictions of subtype-specific functions. Using electrophysiology, subtype-specific neuron silencing, and conditional gene knockout, we show that these molecularly defined 5HT neuron subtypes are functionally distinct. Collectively, this resource classifies molecular diversity across the 5HT system and discovers sertonergic subtypes, markers, organizing principles, and subtype-specific functions with potential disease relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Topoisomerase I as a Biomarker: Detection of Activity at the Single Molecule Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proszek, Joanna; Roy, Amit; Jakobsen, Ann-Katrine

    2014-01-01

    in hTopI have been reported to result in CPT resistance. Therefore, hTOPI gene copy number, mRNA level, protein amount, and enzyme activity have been studied to explain differences in cellular response to CPT. We show that Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD), allowing measurement...... of hTopI cleavage-religation activity at the single molecule level, may be used to detect posttranslational enzymatic differences influencing CPT response. These differences cannot be detected by analysis of hTopI gene copy number, mRNA amount, or protein amount, and only become apparent upon measuring...

  15. Molecular Level Investigation of CH 4 and CO 2 Adsorption in Hydrated Calcium–Montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mal-Soon [Physical; McGrail, B. Peter [Physical; Rousseau, Roger [Physical; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra [Physical

    2017-11-17

    We have studied the mechanism of intercalation and methane adsorption from a H2O/CH4/CO2 mixture on a prototypical shale component, Ca-montmorillonite. We employed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at 323 K and 90 bar to obtain molecular level information of adsorption energetics, speciation, and structural and thermodynamic properties. Interaction of CH4 with surface Lewis acidic sites (Ca2+, surface OH) results in large induced dipoles (~1 D) that lead to relatively strong adsorption energies that level off once a full CH4 layer is formed. Intercalated CH4, also exhibits induced dipoles at low hydration levels, when the interaction with Ca2+ cations are less hindered. CO2 displaces CH4 in the coordination sphere of the cations (in the interlayer) or in the surface, thereby driving CH4 extraction. Our simulations indicate that there is a Goldilocks pressure range (~60-100 bar) where scCO2 –facilitated CH4 extraction will be maximized.

  16. Molecular design of photovoltaic materials for polymer solar cells: toward suitable electronic energy levels and broad absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfang

    2012-05-15

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs) sandwich a blend layer of conjugated polymer donor and fullerene derivative acceptor between a transparent ITO positive electrode and a low work function metal negative electrode. In comparison with traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, PSCs offer a simpler device structure, easier fabrication, lower cost, and lighter weight, and these structures can be fabricated into flexible devices. But currently the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs is not sufficient for future commercialization. The polymer donors and fullerene derivative acceptors are the key photovoltaic materials that will need to be optimized for high-performance PSCs. In this Account, I discuss the basic requirements and scientific issues in the molecular design of high efficiency photovoltaic molecules. I also summarize recent progress in electronic energy level engineering and absorption spectral broadening of the donor and acceptor photovoltaic materials by my research group and others. For high-efficiency conjugated polymer donors, key requirements are a narrower energy bandgap (E(g)) and broad absorption, relatively lower-lying HOMO (the highest occupied molecular orbital) level, and higher hole mobility. There are three strategies to meet these requirements: D-A copolymerization for narrower E(g) and lower-lying HOMO, substitution with electron-withdrawing groups for lower-lying HOMO, and two-dimensional conjugation for broad absorption and higher hole mobility. Moreover, better main chain planarity and less side chain steric hindrance could strengthen π-π stacking and increase hole mobility. Furthermore, the molecular weight of the polymers also influences their photovoltaic performance. To produce high efficiency photovoltaic polymers, researchers should attempt to increase molecular weight while maintaining solubility. High-efficiency D-A copolymers have been obtained by using benzodithiophene (BDT), dithienosilole

  17. Chasing the precursor of functional hematopoietic stem cells at the single cell levels in mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Gong, Yuemin; Ema, Hideo

    2016-07-22

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the ideal system for regenerative research, were isolated at single cell levels decades ago, whereas studies on embryonic HSCs are much more difficult. Zhou et al identified a new pre-HSC cell surface marker, CD201, by which they isolated pre-HSCs at single cell levels for further analyses. The novel expression pattern of HSC development is revealed, including the fundamental role of mammalian targets of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in HSCs emergence, and the repopulation potential of S/G2/M phase pre-HSCs. Deeper understandings of the cellular origin and developmental regulatory network of HSCs are essential to develop new strategies of generating HSCs in vitro for clinical application.

  18. Calibration of denaturing agarose gels for molecular weight estimation of DNA: size determination of the single-stranded genomes of parvoviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, C.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Schmoyer, R.L.; Bates, R.C.; Mitra, S.

    1982-01-01

    Vertical slab gel electrophoresis of DNA with CH/sub 3/HgOH-containing agarose produces sharp bands whose mobilities are suitable for size estimation of single-stranded DNA containing 600 to 20,000 bases. The relationship of electrophoretic mobility to size of DNA over this range is a smooth, S-shaped function, and an empirical model was developed to express the relationship. The model involves terms in squared and reciprocal mobilities, and produced excellent fit of known standard markers to measured mobilities. It was used to estimate the sizes of six parvovirus DNAs: Kilham rat virus (KRV), H-1, LuIII, and minute virus of mice (MVM) DNAs had molecular weights of 1.66 to 1.70 x 10/sup 6/, while the molecular weight of bovine parvovirus (BPV) DNA was 1.84 x 10/sup 6/ and that of adenoassociated virus (AAV) DNA was 1.52 x 10/sup 6/.

  19. Investigation on Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current–Voltage Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Isshiki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the current through an electronic device and the voltage across its terminals is a current–voltage characteristic (I–V that determine basic device performance. Currently, I–V measurement on a single-molecule scale can be performed using break junction technique, where a single molecule junction can be prepared by trapping a single molecule into a nanogap between metal electrodes. The single-molecule I–Vs provide not only the device performance, but also reflect information on energy dispersion of the electronic state and the electron-molecular vibration coupling in the junction. This mini review focuses on recent representative studies on I–Vs of the single molecule junctions that cover investigation on the single-molecule diode property, the molecular vibration, and the electronic structure as a form of transmission probability, and electronic density of states, including the spin state of the single-molecule junctions. In addition, thermoelectronic measurements based on I–Vs and identification of the charged carriers (i.e., electrons or holes are presented. The analysis in the single-molecule I–Vs provides fundamental and essential information for a better understanding of the single-molecule science, and puts the single molecule junction to more practical use in molecular devices.

  20. A molecular-mechanics based finite element model for strength prediction of single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, M.; Rossi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a finite element model based on molecular mechanics to predict the ultimate strength and strain of single wallet carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The interactions between atoms was modelled by combining the use of non-linear elastic and torsional elastic spring. In particular, with this approach, it was tried to combine the molecular mechanics approach with finite element method without providing any not-physical data on the interactions between the carbon atoms, i.e. the CC-bond inertia moment or Young's modulus definition. Mechanical properties as Young's modulus, ultimate strength and strain for several CNTs were calculated. Further, a stress-strain curve for large deformation (up to 70%) is reported for a nanotube Zig-Zag (9,0). The results showed that good agreement with the experimental and numerical results of several authors was obtained. A comparison of the mechanical properties of nanotubes with same diameter and different chirality was carried out. Finally, the influence of the presence of defects on the strength and strain of a SWNT was also evaluated. In particular, the stress-strain curve a nanotube with one-vacancy defect was evaluated and compared with the curve of a pristine one, showing a reduction of the ultimate strength and strain for the defected nanotube. The FE model proposed demonstrate to be a reliable tool to simulate mechanical behaviour of carbon nanotubes both in the linear elastic field and the non-linear elastic field

  1. Lattice diffusion of a single molecule in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Francesca; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2017-12-01

    The ability to trap a single molecule in an electrostatic potential well in solution has opened up new possibilities for the use of molecular electrical charge to study macromolecular conformation and dynamics at the level of the single entity. Here we study the diffusion of a single macromolecule in a two-dimensional lattice of electrostatic traps in solution. We report the ability to measure both the size and effective electrical charge of a macromolecule by observing single-molecule transport trajectories, typically a few seconds in length, using fluorescence microscopy. While, as shown previously, the time spent by the molecule in a trap is a strong function of its effective charge, we demonstrate here that the average travel time between traps in the landscape yields its hydrodynamic radius. Tailoring the pitch of the lattice thus yields two different experimentally measurable time scales that together uniquely determine both the size and charge of the molecule. Since no information is required on the location of the molecule between consecutive departure and arrival events at lattice sites, the technique is ideally suited to measurements on weakly emitting entities such as single molecules.

  2. Artificial molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S.; Wilson, Miriam R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Leigh, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new

  3. Functionalization of gold and nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscope tips for single molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Michael E.

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has fueled interest in nanotechnology because of its ability to image surfaces at the nanometer level and act as a molecular force sensor. Functionalization of the surface of an AFM tip surface in a stable, controlled manner expands the capabilities of the AFM and enables additional applications in the fields of single molecule force spectroscopy and nanolithography. Two AFM tip functionalizations are described: the assembly of tripodal molecular tips onto gold AFM tips and the photochemical attachment of terminal alkenes to nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) AFM tips. Two separate tripodal molecules with different linker lengths and a monopodal molecule terminated with biotin were synthesized to attach to a gold AFM tip for single molecule force spectroscopy. The immobilization of these molecules was examined by contact angle measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. All three molecules displayed rupture forces that agreed with previously reported values for the biotin--avidin rupture. The tripodal molecular tip displayed narrower distribution in their force histograms than the monopodal molecular tip. The performance of the tripodal molecular tip was compared to the monopodal molecular tip in single molecule force spectroscopy studies. Over repeated measurements, the distribution of forces for the monopodal molecular tip shifted to lower forces, whereas the distribution for the tripodal molecular tip remained constant throughout. Loading rate dependence and control experiments further indicated that the rupture forces of the tripod molecular tips were specific to the biotin--NeutrAvidin interaction. The second functionalization method used the photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to NCD AFM tips. The photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to hydrogen-terminated NCD wafer surfaces was investigated by contact angle measurements, x

  4. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P

    2016-03-17

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise.

  5. Analysis of Molecular Variance Inferred from Metric Distances among DNA Haplotypes: Application to Human Mitochondrial DNA Restriction Data

    OpenAIRE

    Excoffier, L.; Smouse, P. E.; Quattro, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    We present here a framework for the study of molecular variation within a single species. Information on DNA haplotype divergence is incorporated into an analysis of variance format, derived from a matrix of squared-distances among all pairs of haplotypes. This analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) produces estimates of variance components and F-statistic analogs, designated here as φ-statistics, reflecting the correlation of haplotypic diversity at different levels of hierarchical subdivisi...

  6. Challenging the present definition of "normal" vitamin D levels obtained by a single blood test. Can we develop a formula to predict vitamin D levels in the 4 seasons from a single season's measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandeter, Howard

    2014-08-01

    Publications on the health effects of vitamin D (25(OH) D) had almost triplicate in the last 10years, not only for its known "calcemic effects" (calcium, phosphor, PTH), but for the more recent findings on its "non-calcemic effects" (all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and relation with certain types of cancer). Part of these publications deal with the definition of what is a "normal" circulating level of 25(OH) D that may distinguish between health and disease. The literature also deals with seasonal variations of vitamin D, showing levels that rise in summer and fall in winter and with DBP phenotypes and geographical location that affect seasonality of 25(OH) D measurements. Despite the knowledge of the existence of these phenomena many studies on vitamin D fail to acknowledge the time of the year the blood sample was extracted. Thus, when we compare results from different studies without defining the season that the samples were drawn, we compare incomparable figures. Furthermore, it is quite absurd to define "normal levels" as a static measure (over or under a certain value) using a single blood test when the value measured is known to change with seasons. Knowing that people have different vitamin D levels in different seasons of the year, we should ask ourselves which of these measurements should be used to define a "real" or "normal" level? Is it the lower one? Is there a "mean measure" that should be used for this matter? If yes, how do we obtain it? Do we have to make 4 seasonal measurements in each patient? Alternatively, might there be a possibility of developing a formula to help us obtain the mean from a single season's measure or one season's prediction from another season's measurement? And knowing that DBP phenotypes and geographical location affect seasonality of 25(OH) D measurements; shouldn't we include this in the equation? In this article I will discuss the hypothetical existence of an Individual Mean Annual vitamin D level that I will

  7. Proton NMR for Measuring Quantum Level Crossing in the Magnetic Molecular Ring Fe10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julien, M.; Jang, Z.H.; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Horvatic, M.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.

    1999-01-01

    The proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T 1 has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field (up to 15thinspthinspT) in the molecular magnetic ring Fe 10 ( OCH 3 ) 20 (O 2 CCH 2 Cl) 10 (Fe10). Striking enhancement of 1/T 1 is observed around magnetic field values corresponding to a crossing between the ground state and the excited states of the molecule. We propose that this is due to a cross-relaxation effect between the nuclear Zeeman reservoir and the reservoir of the Zeeman levels of the molecule. This effect provides a powerful tool to investigate quantum dynamical phenomena at level crossing. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  8. A grass molecular identification system for forensic botany: a critical evaluation of the strengths and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jodie; Gilmore, Simon R; Robertson, James; Peakall, Rod

    2009-11-01

    Plant material is frequently encountered in criminal investigations but often overlooked as potential evidence. We designed a DNA-based molecular identification system for 100 Australian grasses that consisted of a series of polymerase chain reaction assays that enabled the progressive identification of grasses to different taxonomic levels. The identification system was based on DNA sequence variation at four chloroplast and two mitochondrial loci. Seventeen informative indels and 68 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were utilized as molecular markers for subfamily to species-level identification. To identify an unknown sample to subfamily level required a minimum of four markers or nine markers for species identification. The accuracy of the system was confirmed by blind tests. We have demonstrated "proof of concept" of a molecular identification system for trace botanical samples. Our evaluation suggests that the adoption of a system that combines this approach with DNA sequencing could assist the morphological identification of grasses found as forensic evidence.

  9. Single-Molecule Analysis for RISC Assembly and Target Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi M; Tadakuma, Hisashi; Tomari, Yukihide

    2018-01-01

    RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is a small RNA-protein complex that mediates silencing of complementary target RNAs. Biochemistry has been successfully used to characterize the molecular mechanism of RISC assembly and function for nearly two decades. However, further dissection of intermediate states during the reactions has been warranted to fill in the gaps in our understanding of RNA silencing mechanisms. Single-molecule analysis with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful imaging-based approach to interrogate complex formation and dynamics at the individual molecule level with high sensitivity. Combining this technique with our recently established in vitro reconstitution system of fly Ago2-RISC, we have developed a single-molecule observation system for RISC assembly. In this chapter, we summarize the detailed protocol for single-molecule analysis of chaperone-assisted assembly of fly Ago2-RISC as well as its target cleavage reaction.

  10. Nucleon molecular orbitals and the transition mechanism between molecular orbitals in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, B.; Misono, S.; von Oertzen, W.; Voit, H.

    1988-08-01

    The molecular orbitals of the nucleon(s) in nucleus-nucleus collisions are dynamically defined as a linear combination of nucleon single-particle orbits (LCNO) in a rotating frame by using the coupled-reaction-channel (CRC) theory. Nucleon molecular orbitals and the promotions of nucleon, - especially due to the Landau-Zener radial coupling are discussed with the method above mentioned. (author)

  11. Synergistic effect of fluorination on molecular energy level modulation in highly efficient photovoltaic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Maojie; Guo, Xia; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2014-02-01

    The synergistic effect of fluorination on molecular energy level modulation is realized by introducing fluorine atoms onto both the donor and the acceptor moieties in a D-A polymer, and as a result, the polymer solar cell device based on the trifluorinated polymer, PBT-3F, shows a high efficiency of 8.6%, under illumination of AM 1.5G, 100 mW cm(-) (2) . © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of bioactive material: 2- Amino-1H-benzimidazolium pyridine-3-carboxylate single crystal- a proton transfer molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, K. Saiadali; Kavitha, P.; Anitha, K.

    2017-09-01

    The 1:1 molecular adducts 2- Amino-1H-benzimidazolium pyridine-3-carboxylate (2ABPC) was synthesized and grown as single crystal where 2-aminobenzimidazole (ABI) acts as a donor and nicotinic acid (NA) acts as an acceptor. The presence of proton and carbon were predicted using 1H and 13C NMR spectral analysis. The molecular structure of the crystal was elucidated by subjecting the grown crystals to the single crystal x-ray diffraction analysis and was refined by full matrix least-squares method to R = 0.038 for 2469 reflections. The vibrational modes of functional group have been studied using FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analysis. The UV-Vis spectrum exhibited a visible band at 246 nm for 2ABPC due to the nicotinate anion of the molecule. Further, the antimicrobial activity of 2ABPC complex against B. subtilis, klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas eruginos and E. coli pathogens was investigated. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for this crystal was obtained using UV spectrometer against MRSA pathogen. It was found that the benzimidazole with aminogroup at position 2 increases the general antimicrobial activities of 2ABPC crystal.

  13. Single-bacterium nanomechanics in biomedicine: unravelling the dynamics of bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, S; Bozec, L; Donos, N; Spratt, D

    2015-01-01

    The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in microbiology has progressed significantly throughout the years since its first application as a high-resolution imaging instrument. Modern AFM setups are capable of characterizing the nanomechanical behaviour of bacterial cells at both the cellular and molecular levels, where elastic properties and adhesion forces of single bacterium cells can be examined under different experimental conditions. Considering that bacterial and biofilm-mediated infections continue to challenge the biomedical field, it is important to understand the biophysical events leading towards bacterial adhesion and colonization on both biological and non-biological substrates. The purpose of this review is to present the latest findings concerning the field of single-bacterium nanomechanics, and discuss future trends and applications of nanoindentation and single-cell force spectroscopy techniques in biomedicine. (topical review)

  14. Applications of molecular markers in the discrimination of Panax species and Korean ginseng cultivars (Panax ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ick Hyun Jo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of molecular markers is one of the most useful methods for molecular breeding and marker-based molecular associated selections. Even though there is less information on the reference genome, molecular markers are indispensable tools for determination of genetic variation and identification of species with high levels of accuracy and reproducibility. The demand for molecular approaches for marker-based breeding and genetic discriminations in Panax species has greatly increased in recent times and has been successfully applied for various purposes. However, owing to the existence of diverse molecular techniques and differences in their principles and applications, there should be careful consideration while selecting appropriate marker types. In this review, we outline the recent status of different molecular marker applications in ginseng research and industrial fields. In addition, we discuss the basic principles, requirements, and advantages and disadvantages of the most widely used molecular markers, including restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, sequence tag sites, simple sequence repeats, and single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  15. Applications of molecular markers in the discrimination of Panax species and Korean ginseng cultivars (Panax ginseng).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ick Hyun; Kim, Young Chang; Kim, Dong Hwi; Kim, Kee Hong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Ryu, Hojin; Bang, Kyong Hwan

    2017-10-01

    The development of molecular markers is one of the most useful methods for molecular breeding and marker-based molecular associated selections. Even though there is less information on the reference genome, molecular markers are indispensable tools for determination of genetic variation and identification of species with high levels of accuracy and reproducibility. The demand for molecular approaches for marker-based breeding and genetic discriminations in Panax species has greatly increased in recent times and has been successfully applied for various purposes. However, owing to the existence of diverse molecular techniques and differences in their principles and applications, there should be careful consideration while selecting appropriate marker types. In this review, we outline the recent status of different molecular marker applications in ginseng research and industrial fields. In addition, we discuss the basic principles, requirements, and advantages and disadvantages of the most widely used molecular markers, including restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, sequence tag sites, simple sequence repeats, and single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  16. Molecular dynamics study on the evolution of interfacial dislocation network and mechanical properties of Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan-Lin; Wu, Wen-Ping; Nie, Kai

    2018-05-01

    The evolution of misfit dislocation network at γ /γ‧ phase interface and tensile mechanical properties of Ni-based single crystal superalloys at various temperatures and strain rates are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. From the simulations, it is found that with the increase of loading, the dislocation network effectively inhibits dislocations emitted in the γ matrix cutting into the γ‧ phase and absorbs the matrix dislocations to strengthen itself which increases the stability of structure. Under the influence of the temperature, the initial mosaic structure of dislocation network gradually becomes irregular, and the initial misfit stress and the elastic modulus slowly decline as temperature increasing. On the other hand, with the increase of the strain rate, it almost has no effect on the elastic modulus and the way of evolution of dislocation network, but contributes to the increases of the yield stress and tensile strength. Moreover, tension-compression asymmetry of Ni-based single crystal superalloys is also presented based on MD simulations.

  17. Matching of singly- and doubly-unresolved limits of tree-level QCD squared matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, Gabor [University of Debrecen and Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen, PO Box 51 (Hungary); Trocsanyi, Zoltan [University of Debrecen and Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen, PO Box 51 (Hungary); Duca, Vittorio Del [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria, 1 - 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2005-06-01

    We describe how to disentangle the singly- and doubly-unresolved (soft and/or collinear) limits of tree-level QCD squared matrix elements. Using the factorization formulae presented in this paper, we outline a viable general subtraction scheme for computing next-to-next-to-leading order corrections for electron-positron annihilation into jets.

  18. On the Wrapping of Polyglycolide, Poly(Ethylene Oxide), and Polyketone Polymer Chains Around Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, S.; Alizadeh, Y.; Ansari, R.

    2015-02-01

    By using molecular dynamics simulations, the interaction between a single-walled carbon nanotube and three different polymers has been studied in this work. The effects of various parameters such as the nanotube geometry and temperature on the interaction energy and radius of gyration of polymers have been explored. By studying the snapshots of polymers along the single-walled carbon nanotube, it has been shown that 50 ps can be considered as a suitable time after which the shape of polymer chains around the nanotube remains almost unchanged. It is revealed that the effect of temperature on the interaction energy and radius of gyration of polymers in the range of 250 to 500 K is not significant Also, it is shown that the interaction energy depends on the nanotube diameter.

  19. Integrated multiscale modeling of molecular computing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, Peter T; Leng Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    Molecular electronics, in which single organic molecules are designed to perform the functions of transistors, diodes, switches and other circuit elements used in current siliconbased microelecronics, is drawing wide interest as a potential replacement technology for conventional silicon-based lithographically etched microelectronic devices. In addition to their nanoscopic scale, the additional advantage of molecular electronics devices compared to silicon-based lithographically etched devices is the promise of being able to produce them cheaply on an industrial scale using wet chemistry methods (i.e., self-assembly from solution). The design of molecular electronics devices, and the processes to make them on an industrial scale, will require a thorough theoretical understanding of the molecular and higher level processes involved. Hence, the development of modeling techniques for molecular electronics devices is a high priority from both a basic science point of view (to understand the experimental studies in this field) and from an applied nanotechnology (manufacturing) point of view. Modeling molecular electronics devices requires computational methods at all length scales - electronic structure methods for calculating electron transport through organic molecules bonded to inorganic surfaces, molecular simulation methods for determining the structure of self-assembled films of organic molecules on inorganic surfaces, mesoscale methods to understand and predict the formation of mesoscale patterns on surfaces (including interconnect architecture), and macroscopic scale methods (including finite element methods) for simulating the behavior of molecular electronic circuit elements in a larger integrated device. Here we describe a large Department of Energy project involving six universities and one national laboratory aimed at developing integrated multiscale methods for modeling molecular electronics devices. The project is funded equally by the Office of Basic

  20. A Single Rod Multi-modality Multi-interface Level Sensor Using an AC Current Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulgader Hwili

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil separation is an important process in the oil industry. To make efficient use of the separators, it is important to know their internal behaviour, and to measure the levels of multi-interfaces between different materials, such as gas-foam, foam-oil, oil-emulsion, emulsion-water and water-solids. A single-rod multi-modality multi-interface level sensor is presented, which has a current source, and electromagnetic modalities. Some key issues have been addressed, including the effect of salt content and temperature i.e. conductivity on the measurement.

  1. Amorphous molecular junctions produced by ion irradiation on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhenxia; Yu Liping; Zhang Wei; Ding Yinfeng; Li Yulan; Han Jiaguang; Zhu Zhiyuan; Xu Hongjie; He Guowei; Chen Yi; Hu Gang

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and molecular dynamics have demonstrated that electron irradiation could create molecular junctions between crossed single-wall carbon nanotubes. Recently molecular dynamics computation predicted that ion irradiation could also join single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing carbon ion irradiation on multi-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that these nanotubes evolve into amorphous carbon nanowires, more importantly, during the process of which various molecular junctions of amorphous nanowires are formed by welding from crossed carbon nanotubes. It demonstrates that ion-beam irradiation could be an effective way not only for the welding of nanotubes but also for the formation of nanowire junctions

  2. Single beam pass migmacell method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglich, B.C.; Nering, J.E.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The invention provides improvements in migmacell apparatus and method by dispensing with the need for metastable confinement of injected molecular ions for multiple precession periods. Injected molecular ions undergo a 'single pass' through the reaction volume. By preconditioning the injected beam such that it contains a population distribution of molecules in higher vibrational states than in the case of a normal distribution, injected molecules in the single pass exper-ience collisionless dissociation in the migmacell under magnetic influence, i.e., so-called Lorentz dissociation. Dissociationions then form atomic migma

  3. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  4. Studies of the surface structures of molecular crystals and of adsorbed molecular monolayers on the (111) crystal faces of platinum and silver by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firment, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    The structures of molecular crystal surfaces were investigated for the first time by the use of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The experimental results from a variety of molecular crystals were examined and compared as a first step towards understanding the properties of these surfaces on a microscopic level. The method of sample preparation employed, vapor deposition onto metal single-crystal substrates at low temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum, allowed concurrent study of the structures of adsorbed monolayers on metal surfaces and of the growth processes of molecular films on metal substrates. The systems investigated were ice, ammonia, naphthalene, benzene, the n-paraffins (C 3 to C 8 ), cyclohexane, trioxane, acetic acid, propionic acid, methanol, and methylamine adsorbed and condensed on both Pt(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. Electron-beam-induced damage of the molecular surfaces was observed after electron exposures of 10 -4 A sec cm -2 at 20 eV. Aromatic molecular crystal samples were more resistant to damage than samples of saturated molecules. The quality and orientation of the grown molecular crystal films were influenced by substrate preparation and growth conditions. Forty ordered monolayer structures were observed. 110 figures, 22 tables, 162 references

  5. Crucial role of molecular planarity on the second order nonlinear optical property of pyridine based chalcone single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Anthoni Praveen; Jayarama, A.; Ng, Seik Weng

    2015-05-01

    An efficient nonlinear optical material 2E-3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(pyridin-3-yl) prop-2-en-1-one (BPP) was synthesized and single crystals were grown using slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Grown crystal had prismatic morphology and its structure was confirmed by various spectroscopic studies, elemental analysis, and single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The single crystal XRD of the crystal showed that BPP crystallizes in monoclinic system with noncentrosymmetric space group P21 and the cell parameters are a = 5.6428(7) Å, b = 3.8637(6) Å, c = 26.411(2) Å, β = 97.568(11) deg and v = 575.82(12) Å3. The UV-Visible spectrum reveals that the crystal is optically transparent and has high optical energy band gap of 3.1 eV. The powder second harmonic generation efficiency (SHG) of BPP is 6.8 times that of KDP. From thermal analysis it is found that the crystal melts at 139 °C and decomposes at 264 °C. High optical transparency down to blue region, higher powder SHG efficiency and better thermal stability than that of urea makes this chalcone derivative a promising candidate for SHG applications. Furthermore, effect of molecular planarity on SHG efficiency and role of pyridine ring adjacent to carbonyl group in forming noncentrosymmetric crystal systems of chalcone family is also discussed.

  6. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 ± 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of ∼ 10 5 M sun , rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A K > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H 2 ) ∼ a few x 10 4 cm -3 .

  7. A Brief Review of Molecular Techniques to Assess Plant Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A. Arif

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Massive loss of valuable plant species in the past centuries and its adverse impact on environmental and socioeconomic values has triggered the conservation of plant resources. Appropriate identification and characterization of plant materials is essential for the successful conservation of plant resources and to ensure their sustainable use. Molecular tools developed in the past few years provide easy, less laborious means for assigning known and unknown plant taxa. These techniques answer many new evolutionary and taxonomic questions, which were not previously possible with only phenotypic methods. Molecular techniques such as DNA barcoding, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP, microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP have recently been used for plant diversity studies. Each technique has its own advantages and limitations. These techniques differ in their resolving power to detect genetic differences, type of data they generate and their applicability to particular taxonomic levels. This review presents a basic description of different molecular techniques that can be utilized for DNA fingerprinting and molecular diversity analysis of plant species.

  8. A Brief Review of Molecular Techniques to Assess Plant Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Ibrahim A.; Bakir, Mohammad A.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Al Farhan, Ahmad H.; Al Homaidan, Ali A.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Sadoon, Mohammad Al; Shobrak, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Massive loss of valuable plant species in the past centuries and its adverse impact on environmental and socioeconomic values has triggered the conservation of plant resources. Appropriate identification and characterization of plant materials is essential for the successful conservation of plant resources and to ensure their sustainable use. Molecular tools developed in the past few years provide easy, less laborious means for assigning known and unknown plant taxa. These techniques answer many new evolutionary and taxonomic questions, which were not previously possible with only phenotypic methods. Molecular techniques such as DNA barcoding, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have recently been used for plant diversity studies. Each technique has its own advantages and limitations. These techniques differ in their resolving power to detect genetic differences, type of data they generate and their applicability to particular taxonomic levels. This review presents a basic description of different molecular techniques that can be utilized for DNA fingerprinting and molecular diversity analysis of plant species. PMID:20559503

  9. Heteroresistance at the single-cell level: adapting to antibiotic stress through a population-based strategy and growth-controlled interphenotypic coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaorong; Kang, Yu; Luo, Chunxiong; Zhao, Tong; Liu, Lin; Jiang, Xiangdan; Fu, Rongrong; An, Shuchang; Chen, Jichao; Jiang, Ning; Ren, Lufeng; Wang, Qi; Baillie, J Kenneth; Gao, Zhancheng; Yu, Jun

    2014-02-11

    -based strategy is thought to be at work, being assumed to be variable cell-to-cell resistance to be selected under antibiotic stress. Exact mechanisms of heteroresistance and its roles in adaptation to antibiotic stress have yet to be fully understood at the molecular and single-cell levels. In our study, we have not been able to detect any apparent subset of "resistant" cells selected by antibiotics; on the contrary, cell populations differentiate into phenotypic subsets with variable growth statuses and hydrolase expression. The growth rate appears to be sensitive to stress intensity and plays a key role in controlling hydrolase expression at both the bulk population and single-cell levels. We have shown here, for the first time, that phenotypic heterogeneity can be beneficial to a growing bacterial population through task allocation and interphenotypic collaboration other than partitioning cells into different categories of selective advantage.

  10. Real-time single-molecule co-immunoprecipitation analyses reveal cancer-specific Ras signalling dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Won; Kyung, Taeyoon; Yoo, Janghyun; Kim, Tackhoon; Chung, Chaeuk; Ryu, Ji Young; Lee, Hanki; Park, Kihyun; Lee, Sangkyu; Jones, Walton D.; Lim, Dae-Sik; Hyeon, Changbong; Do Heo, Won; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2013-01-01

    Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) has become a standard technique, but its protein-band output provides only static, qualitative information about protein–protein interactions. Here we demonstrate a real-time single-molecule co-IP technique that generates real-time videos of individual protein–protein interactions as they occur in unpurified cell extracts. By analysing single Ras–Raf interactions with a 50-ms time resolution, we have observed transient intermediates of the protein–protein interaction and determined all the essential kinetic rates. Using this technique, we have quantified the active fraction of native Ras proteins in xenograft tumours, normal tissue and cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the oncogenic Ras mutations selectively increase the active-Ras fraction by one order of magnitude, without affecting total Ras levels or single-molecule signalling kinetics. Our approach allows us to probe the previously hidden, dynamic aspects of weak protein–protein interactions. It also suggests a path forward towards precision molecular diagnostics at the protein–protein interaction level. PMID:23422673

  11. Photoacoustic bio-quantification of graphene based nanomaterials at a single cell level (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Nolan, Jacqueline; Biris, Alexandru S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-03-01

    Arkansas Nanomedicine Center at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in collaboration with other Arkansas Universities and the FDA-based National Center of Toxicological Research in Jefferson, AR is developing novel techniques for rapid quantification of graphene-based nanomaterials (GBNs) in various biological samples. All-carbon GBNs have wide range of potential applications in industry, agriculture, food processing and medicine; however, quantification of GBNs is difficult in carbon reach biological tissues. The accurate quantification of GBNs is essential for research on material toxicity and the development of GBNs-based drug delivery platforms. We have developed microscopy and cytometry platforms for detection and quantification of GBNs in single cells, tissue and blood samples using photoacoustic contrast of GBNs. We demonstrated PA quantification of individual graphene uptake by single cells. High-resolution PA microscopy provided mapping of GBN distribution within live cells to establish correlation with intracellular toxic phenomena using apoptotic and necrotic assays. This new methodology and corresponding technical platform provide the insight on possible toxicological risks of GBNs at singe cells levels. In addition, in vivo PA image flow cytometry demonstrated the capability to monitor of GBNs pharmacokinetics in mouse model and to map the resulting biodistribution of GBNs in mouse tissues. The integrated PA platform provided an unprecedented sensitivity toward GBNs and allowed to enhance conventional toxicology research by providing a direct correlation between uptake of GBNs at a single cell level and cell viability status.

  12. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  13. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F

    2006-08-16

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  14. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritort, F

    2006-01-01

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives. (topical review)

  15. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lanthanides in the frame of Molecular Magnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatteschi D.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular magnetism is producing new types of materials which cover up to date aspects of basic science together with possible applications. This article highlights recent results from the point of view of lanthanides which are now intensively used to produce single molecule magnets, single chain and single ion magnets. After a short introduction reminding the main steps of development of molecular magnetism, the basic properties of lanthanides will be covered highlighting important features which are enhanced by the electronic structure of lanthanides, like spin frustration and chirality, anisotropy and non collinear axes in zero and one dimensional materials. A paragraph of conclusions will discuss what has been done and theperspectives to be expected.

  17. Valence-band and core-level photoemission study of single-crystal Bi2CaSr2Cu2O8 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z.; Lindberg, P.A.P.; Wells, B.O.; Mitzi, D.B.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-quality single crystals of Bi 2 CaSr 2 Cu 2 O 8 superconductors have been prepared and cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum. Low-energy electron diffraction measurements show that the surface structure is consistent with the bulk crystal structure. Ultraviolet photoemission and x-ray photoemission experiments were performed on these well-characterized sample surfaces. The valence-band and the core-level spectra obtained from the single-crystal surfaces are in agreement with spectra recorded from polycrystalline samples, justifying earlier results from polycrystalline samples. Cu satellites are observed both in the valence band and Cu 2p core level, signaling the strong correlation among the Cu 3d electrons. The O 1s core-level data exhibit a sharp, single peak at 529-eV binding energy without any clear satellite structures

  18. Hyphenation of a carbon analyzer to photo-ionization mass spectrometry to unravel the organic composition of particulate matter on a molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowsky, Jana; Streibel, Thorsten; Sklorz, Martin; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Mamakos, Athanasios; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2011-12-01

    The carbonaceous fraction of airborne particulate matter (PM) is of increasing interest due to the adverse health effects they are linked to. Its analytical ascertainment on a molecular level is still challenging. Hence, analysis of carbonaceous fractions is often carried out by determining bulk parameters such as the overall content of organic compounds (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) as well as the total carbon content, TC (sum of OC and EC), however, no information about the individual substances or substance classes, of which the single fractions consist can be obtained. In this work, a carbon analyzer and a photo-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PI-TOF-MS) were hyphenated to investigate individual compounds especially from the OC fractions. The carbon analyzer enables the stepwise heating of particle samples and provides the bulk parameters. With the PI-TOF-MS, it is possible to detect the organic compounds released during the single-temperature steps due to soft ionization and fast detection of the molecular ions. The hyphenation was designed, built up, characterized by standard substances, and applied to several kinds of samples, such as ambient aerosol, gasoline, and diesel emission as well as wood combustion emission samples. The ambient filter sample showed a strong impact of wood combustion markers. This was revealed by comparison to the product pattern of the similar analysis of pure cellulose and lignin and the wood combustion PM. At higher temperatures (450 °C), a shift to smaller molecules occurred due to the thermal decomposition of larger structures of oligomeric or polymeric nature comparable to lignocelluloses and similar oxygenated humic-like substances. Finally, particulate matter from gasoline and diesel containing 10% biodiesel vehicle exhaust has been analyzed. Gasoline-derived PM exhibited large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas diesel PM showed a much higher total organic content. The detected pattern revealed a strong

  19. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  20. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  1. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  2. Investigation of a metal-organic interface. Realization and understanding of a molecular switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neucheva, Olga [Forschungszentrum Juelich (DE). Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN), Functional Nanostructures at Surfaces (IBN-3)

    2010-07-01

    The field of molecular organic electronics is an emerging and very dynamic area. The continued trend to miniaturisation, combined with increasing complexity and cost of production in conventional semiconductor electronics, forces companies to turn their attention to alternatives that promise the next levels of scale at significantly lower cost. After consumer electronic devices based on organic transistors, such as TVs and book readers, have already been presented, molecular electronics is expected to offer the next breakthrough in feature size. Unfortunately, most of the organic/metal interfaces contain intrinsic defects that break the homogeneity of the interface properties. In this thesis, the electronic and structural properties of such defects were examined in order to understand the influence of the inhomogeneities on the quality of the interface layer. However, the main focus of this work was the investigation of the local properties of a single molecule. Taking advantage of the Scanning Tunnelling Microscope's (STM's) ability to act as a local probe, a single molecular switch was realized and studied. Moreover, in close collaboration with theory groups, the underlying mechanism driving the switching process was identified and described. Besides the investigation of the switching process, the ability of the STM to build nanostructures of different shapes from large organic molecules was shown. Knowing the parameters for realization and control of the switching process and for building the molecular corrals, the results of this investigation enable the reconstruction of the studied molecular ensemble and its deployment in electric molecular circuits, constituting a next step towards further miniaturization of electronic devices. (orig.)

  3. Balanced cross-rate model for saturated molecular fluorescence in flames using a nanosecond pulse length laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucht, R.P.; Sweeney, D.W.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The balanced cross-rate model is proposed to analyze laser-induced molecular fluorescence signals when the laser pulse length is of the order of nanoseconds. Nanosecond pulse length lasers. specifically Q-switched Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers, are attractive for saturated molecular fluorescence spectroscopy because of their high peak power and because of their short pulse length minimizes the risk of laser-induced chemistry. In the balanced cross-rate model, single upper and lower rotational levels are assumed to be directly coupled by the laser radiation. Because the laser-induced processes which couple these levels are so fast at saturation intensities, a steady state is established between the two levels within picoseconds. Provided that the total population of the two laser-coupled rotational levels is constant during the laser pulse, the total molecular population can be calculated from the observed upper rotational level population using a two-level saturation model and Boltzmann statistics. Numerical simulation of the laser excitation dynamics of OH in an atmospheric pressure H 2 /O 2 /N 2 flame indicates that the balanced cross-rate model will give accurate results provided that the rotational relaxation rates in the upper and lower sets of rotational levels are approximately equal

  4. A multistep single-crystal-to-single-crystal bromodiacetylene dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, Tobias N.; Schrettl, Stephen; Marty, Roman; Todorova, Tanya K.; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Scopelliti, Rosario; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Frauenrath, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Packing constraints and precise placement of functional groups are the reason that organic molecules in the crystalline state often display unusual physical or chemical properties not observed in solution. Here we report a single-crystal-to-single-crystal dimerization of a bromodiacetylene that involves unusually large atom displacements as well as the cleavage and formation of several bonds. Density functional theory computations support a mechanism in which the dimerization is initiated by a [2 + 1] photocycloaddition favoured by the nature of carbon-carbon short contacts in the crystal structure. The reaction proceeded up to the theoretical degree of conversion without loss of crystallinity, and it was also performed on a preparative scale with good yield. Moreover, it represents the first synthetic pathway to (E)-1,2-dibromo-1,2-diethynylethenes, which could serve as synthetic intermediates for the preparation of molecular carbon scaffolds. Our findings both extend the scope of single-crystal-to-single-crystal reactions and highlight their potential as a synthetic tool for complex transformations.

  5. Evidence of G-protein-coupled receptor and substrate transporter heteromerization at a single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jana; Kleinau, Gunnar; Rutz, Claudia; Zwanziger, Denise; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Müller, Anne; Rehders, Maren; Brix, Klaudia; Worth, Catherine L; Führer, Dagmar; Krude, Heiko; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf; Biebermann, Heike

    2018-06-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can constitute complexes with non-GPCR integral membrane proteins, while such interaction has not been demonstrated at a single molecule level so far. We here investigated the potential interaction between the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) and the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). Both the proteins are expressed endogenously on the basolateral plasma membrane of the thyrocytes and are involved in stimulation of thyroid hormone production and release. Indeed, we demonstrate strong interaction between both the proteins which causes a suppressed activation of G q/11 by TSH-stimulated TSHR. Thus, we provide not only evidence for a novel interaction between the TSHR and MCT8, but could also prove this interaction on a single molecule level. Moreover, this interaction forces biased signaling at the TSHR. These results are of general interest for both the GPCR and the MFS research fields.

  6. Explicit hydration of ammonium ion by correlated methods employing molecular tailoring approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Verma, Rahul; Wagle, Swapnil; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2017-11-01

    Explicit hydration studies of ions require accurate estimation of interaction energies. This work explores the explicit hydration of the ammonium ion (NH4+) employing Møller-Plesset second order (MP2) perturbation theory, an accurate yet relatively less expensive correlated method. Several initial geometries of NH4+(H2O)n (n = 4 to 13) clusters are subjected to MP2 level geometry optimisation with correlation consistent aug-cc-pVDZ (aVDZ) basis set. For large clusters (viz. n > 8), molecular tailoring approach (MTA) is used for single point energy evaluation at MP2/aVTZ level for the estimation of MP2 level binding energies (BEs) at complete basis set (CBS) limit. The minimal nature of the clusters upto n ≤ 8 is confirmed by performing vibrational frequency calculations at MP2/aVDZ level of theory, whereas for larger clusters (9 ≤ n ≤ 13) such calculations are effected via grafted MTA (GMTA) method. The zero point energy (ZPE) corrections are done for all the isomers lying within 1 kcal/mol of the lowest energy one. The resulting frequencies in N-H region (2900-3500 cm-1) and in O-H stretching region (3300-3900 cm-1) are in found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental findings for 4 ≤ n ≤ 13. Furthermore, GMTA is also applied for calculating the BEs of these clusters at coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level of theory with aVDZ basis set. This work thus represents an art of the possible on contemporary multi-core computers for studying explicit molecular hydration at correlated level theories.

  7. Progress on molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Quan; Zhang Yongxue

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a new era of medical imaging,which can non-invasively monitor biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo, including molecular imaging of nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance molecular imaging, ultrasound molecular imaging,optical molecular imaging and molecular imaging with X-ray. Recently, with the development of multi-subjects amalgamation, multimodal molecular imaging technology has been applied in clinical imaging, such as PET-CT and PET-MRI. We believe that with development of molecular probe and multi-modal imaging, more and more molecular imaging techniques will be applied in clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  8. Charge transport through molecular rods with reduced pi-conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörtscher, Emanuel; Elbing, Mark; Tschudy, Meinrad; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weber, Heiko B; Mayor, Marcel; Riel, Heike

    2008-10-24

    A series of oligophenylene rods of increasing lengths is synthesized to investigate the charge-transport mechanisms. Methyl groups are attached to the phenyl rings to weaken the electronic overlap of the pi-subsystems along the molecular backbones. Out-of-plane rotation of the phenyl rings is confirmed in the solid state by means of X-ray analysis and in solution by using UV/Vis spectroscopy. The influence of the reduced pi-conjugation on the resonant charge transport is studied at the single-molecule level by using the mechanically controllable break-junction technique. Experiments are performed under ultra-high-vacuum conditions at low temperature (50 K). A linear increase of the conductance gap with increasing number of phenyl rings (from 260 meV for one ring to 580 meV for four rings) is revealed. In addition, the absolute conductance of the first resonant peaks does not depend on the length of the molecular wire. Resonant transport through the first molecular orbital is found to be dominated by charge-carrier injection into the molecule, rather than by the intrinsic resistance of the molecular wire length.

  9. Molecular responses during cadmium-induced stress in Daphnia magna: Integration of differential gene expression with higher-level effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soetaert, Anneleen [Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)]. E-mail: anneleen.soetaert@ua.ac.be; Vandenbrouck, Tine [Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Ven, Karlijn van der [Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Maras, Marleen [Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Remortel, Piet van [Department of Mathematics and Informatics, Intelligent Systems Laboratory, University of Antwerp, Middelheimlaan 1, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Coen, Wim M. de [Department of Biology, Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-07-20

    DNA microarrays offer great potential in revealing insight into mechanistic toxicity of contaminants. The aim of the present study was (i) to gain insight in concentration- and time-dependent cadmium-induced molecular responses by using a customized Daphnia magna microarray, and (ii) to compare the gene expression profiles with effects at higher levels of biological organization (e.g. total energy budget and growth). Daphnids were exposed to three cadmium concentrations (nominal value of 10, 50, 100 {mu}g/l) for two time intervals (48 and 96 h). In general, dynamic expression patterns were obtained with a clear increase of gene expression changes at higher concentrations and longer exposure duration. Microarray analysis revealed cadmium affected molecular pathways associated with processes such as digestion, oxygen transport, cuticula metabolism and embryo development. These effects were compared with higher-level effects (energy budgets and growth). For instance, next to reduced energy budgets due to a decline in lipid, carbohydrate and protein content, we found an up-regulated expression of genes related to digestive processes (e.g. {alpha}-esterase, cellulase, {alpha}-amylase). Furthermore, cadmium affected the expression of genes coding for proteins involved in molecular pathways associated with immune response, stress response, cell adhesion, visual perception and signal transduction in the present study.

  10. Serum tocopherol levels in very preterm infants after a single dose of vitamin E at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Edward F; Hansen, Nellie I; Brion, Luc P; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Walsh, Michele C; Shankaran, Seetha; Acarregui, Michael J; Johnson, Karen J; Hale, Ellen C; Messina, Lynn A; Crawford, Margaret M; Laptook, Abbot R; Goldberg, Ronald N; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Carlo, Waldemar A; Poindexter, Brenda B; Faix, Roger G; Carlton, David P; Watterberg, Kristi L; Ellsbury, Dan L; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to examine the impact of a single enteral dose of vitamin E on serum tocopherol levels. The study was undertaken to see whether a single dose of vitamin E soon after birth can rapidly increase the low α-tocopherol levels seen in very preterm infants. If so, this intervention could be tested as a means of reducing the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Ninety-three infants vitamin E or placebo by gastric tube within 4 hours of birth. The vitamin E group received 50 IU/kg of vitamin E as dl-α-tocopheryl acetate (Aquasol E). The placebo group received sterile water. Blood samples were taken for measurement of serum tocopherol levels by high-performance liquid chromatography before dosing and 24 hours and 7 days after dosing. Eighty-eight infants received the study drug and were included in the analyses. The α-tocopherol levels were similar between the groups at baseline but higher in the vitamin E group at 24 hours (median 0.63 mg/dL vs. 0.42 mg/dL, P = .003) and 7 days (2.21 mg/dL vs 1.86 mg/dL, P = .04). There were no differences between groups in γ-tocopherol levels. At 24 hours, 30% of vitamin E infants and 62% of placebo infants had α-tocopherol levels vitamin E raised serum α-tocopherol levels, but to consistently achieve α-tocopherol levels >0.5 mg/dL, a higher dose or several doses of vitamin E may be needed.

  11. DNA origami as biocompatible surface to match single-molecule and ensemble experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments on immobilized molecules allow unique insights into the dynamics of molecular machines and enzymes as well as their interactions. The immobilization, however, can invoke perturbation to the activity of biomolecules causing incongruities between single molecule and ensemble measurements. Here we introduce the recently developed DNA origami as a platform to transfer ensemble assays to the immobilized single molecule level without changing the nano-environment of the biomolecules. The idea is a stepwise transfer of common functional assays first to the surface of a DNA origami, which can be checked at the ensemble level, and then to the microscope glass slide for single-molecule inquiry using the DNA origami as a transfer platform. We studied the structural flexibility of a DNA Holliday junction and the TATA-binding protein (TBP)-induced bending of DNA both on freely diffusing molecules and attached to the origami structure by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This resulted in highly congruent data sets demonstrating that the DNA origami does not influence the functionality of the biomolecule. Single-molecule data collected from surface-immobilized biomolecule-loaded DNA origami are in very good agreement with data from solution measurements supporting the fact that the DNA origami can be used as biocompatible surface in many fluorescence-based measurements. PMID:22523083

  12. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-04-26

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  13. RNA-Seq and molecular docking reveal multi-level pesticide resistance in the bed bug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamidala Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous nocturnal parasites of humans that have attained high impact status due to their worldwide resurgence. The sudden and rampant resurgence of C. lectularius has been attributed to numerous factors including frequent international travel, narrower pest management practices, and insecticide resistance. Results We performed a next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq experiment to find differentially expressed genes between pesticide-resistant (PR and pesticide-susceptible (PS strains of C. lectularius. A reference transcriptome database of 51,492 expressed sequence tags (ESTs was created by combining the databases derived from de novo assembled mRNA-Seq tags (30,404 ESTs and our previous 454 pyrosequenced database (21,088 ESTs. The two-way GLMseq analysis revealed ~15,000 highly significant differentially expressed ESTs between the PR and PS strains. Among the top 5,000 differentially expressed ESTs, 109 putative defense genes (cuticular proteins, cytochrome P450s, antioxidant genes, ABC transporters, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and acetyl cholinesterase involved in penetration resistance and metabolic resistance were identified. Tissue and development-specific expression of P450 CYP3 clan members showed high mRNA levels in the cuticle, Malpighian tubules, and midgut; and in early instar nymphs, respectively. Lastly, molecular modeling and docking of a candidate cytochrome P450 (CYP397A1V2 revealed the flexibility of the deduced protein to metabolize a broad range of insecticide substrates including DDT, deltamethrin, permethrin, and imidacloprid. Conclusions We developed significant molecular resources for C. lectularius putatively involved in metabolic resistance as well as those participating in other modes of insecticide resistance. RNA-Seq profiles of PR strains combined with tissue-specific profiles and molecular docking revealed multi-level insecticide

  14. Analytical and molecular dynamics studies on the impact loading of single-layered graphene sheet by fullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Hashemi, Shahrokh; Sepahi-Boroujeni, Amin; Sepahi-Boroujeni, Saeid

    2018-04-01

    Normal impact performance of a system including a fullerene molecule and a single-layered graphene sheet is studied in the present paper. Firstly, through a mathematical approach, a new contact law is derived to describe the overall non-bonding interaction forces of the "hollow indenter-target" system. Preliminary verifications show that the derived contact law gives a reliable picture of force field of the system which is in good agreements with the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Afterwards, equation of the transversal motion of graphene sheet is utilized on the basis of both the nonlocal theory of elasticity and the assumptions of classical plate theory. Then, to derive dynamic behavior of the system, a set including the proposed contact law and the equations of motion of both graphene sheet and fullerene molecule is solved numerically. In order to evaluate outcomes of this method, the problem is modeled by MD simulation. Despite intrinsic differences between analytical and MD methods as well as various errors arise due to transient nature of the problem, acceptable agreements are established between analytical and MD outcomes. As a result, the proposed analytical method can be reliably used to address similar impact problems. Furthermore, it is found that a single-layered graphene sheet is capable of trapping fullerenes approaching with low velocities. Otherwise, in case of rebound, the sheet effectively absorbs predominant portion of fullerene energy.

  15. Image charge effects in single-molecule junctions: Breaking of symmetries and negative-differential resistance in a benzene single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Flensberg, K.

    2011-01-01

    and molecular symmetries remain unclear. Using a theoretical framework developed for semiconductor-nanostructure-based single-electron transistors (SETs), we demonstrate that the image charge interaction breaks the molecular symmetries in a benzene-based single-molecule transistor operating in the Coulomb...... blockade regime. This results in the appearance of a so-called blocking state, which gives rise to negative-differential resistance (NDR). We show that the appearance of NDR and its magnitude in the symmetry-broken benzene SET depends in a complicated way on the interplay between the many-body matrix...

  16. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the Indian Population. Single gene disorders. Complex eye diseases. Genotype-phenotype correlation. Molecular diagnostics.

  17. Comparison of Cervical Kinematics, Pain, and Functional Disability Between Single- and Two-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Andy; Lai, Dar-Ming; Wang, Shwu-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Li; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2016-08-01

    A prospective, time series design. The purpose of this study is two-fold: firstly, to investigate the impact of altered cervical alignment and range of motion (ROM) on patients' self-reported outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), and secondly, to comparatively differentiate the influence of single- and two-level ACDF on the cervical ROM and adjacent segmental kinematics up to 12-month postoperatively. ACDF is one of the most commonly employed surgical interventions to treat degenerative disc disease. However, there are limited in vivo data on the impact of ACDF on the cervical kinematics and its association with patient-reported clinical outcomes. Sixty-two patients (36 males; 55.63 ± 11.6 yrs) undergoing either a single- or consecutive two-level ACDF were recruited. The clinical outcomes were assessed with the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological results included cervical lordosis, global C2-C7 ROM, ROM of the Functional Spinal Unit (FSU), and its adjacent segments. The outcome measures were collected preoperatively and then at 3, 6, and 12-month postoperatively. A significant reduction of both VAS and NDI was found for both groups from the preoperative to 3-month period (P < 0.01). Pearson correlation revealed no significant correlation between global ROM with neither VAS (P = 0.667) nor NDI (P = 0.531). A significant reduction of global ROM was identified for the two-level ACDF group at 12 months (P = 0.017) but not for the single-level group. A significant interaction effect was identified for the upper adjacent segment ROM (P = 0.024) but not at the lower adjacent segment. Current study utilized dynamic radiographs to comparatively evaluate the biomechanical impact of single- and two-level ACDF. The results highlighted that the two-level group demonstrated a greater reduction of global ROM coupled with an increased upper adjacent segmental compensatory motions that

  18. Molecular Theory of the Living Cell Concepts, Molecular Mechanisms, and Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive molecular theory of the living cell based on over thirty concepts, principles and laws imported from thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, informatics, computer science, linguistics, semiotics, and philosophy. The author formulates physically, chemically and enzymologically realistic molecular mechanisms to account for the basic living processes such as ligand-receptor interactions, protein folding, single-molecule enzymic catalysis, force-generating mechanisms in molecular motors, signal transduction, regulation of the genome-wide RNA metabolism, morphogenesis, the micro-macro coupling in coordination dynamics, the origin of life, and the mechanisms of biological evolution itself. Possible solutions to basic and practical problems facing contemporary biology and biomedical sciences have been suggested, including pharmacotheragnostics and personalized medicine.

  19. Diverse Soil Carbon Dynamics Expressed at the Molecular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, T. S.; Zell, C. I.; Hagedorn, F.; Feng, X.; McIntyre, C. P.; Haghipour, N.; Graf Pannatier, E.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2017-12-01

    The stability and potential vulnerability of soil organic matter (SOM) to global change remain incompletely understood due to the complex processes involved in its formation and turnover. Here we combine compound-specific radiocarbon analysis with fraction-specific and bulk-level radiocarbon measurements in order to further elucidate controls on SOM dynamics in a temperate and subalpine forested ecosystem. Radiocarbon contents of individual organic compounds isolated from the same soil interval generally exhibit greater variation than those among corresponding operationally defined fractions. Notably, markedly older ages of long-chain plant leaf wax lipids (n-alkanoic acids) imply that they reflect a highly stable carbon pool. Furthermore, marked 14C variations among shorter- and longer-chain n-alkanoic acid homologues suggest that they track different SOM pools. Extremes in SOM dynamics thus manifest themselves within a single compound class. This exploratory study highlights the potential of compound-specific radiocarbon analysis for understanding SOM dynamics in ecosystems potentially vulnerable to global change.

  20. Tear film lipid layer: A molecular level view

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1858, č. 10 (2016), s. 2421-2430 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14292S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : tear film * tear film lipid layer * molecular dynamics simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  1. A Review of Structure Construction of Silk Fibroin Biomaterials from Single Structures to Multi-Level Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The biological performance of artificial biomaterials is closely related to their structure characteristics. Cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation are all strongly affected by the different scale structures of biomaterials. Silk fibroin (SF, extracted mainly from silkworms, has become a popular biomaterial due to its excellent biocompatibility, exceptional mechanical properties, tunable degradation, ease of processing, and sufficient supply. As a material with excellent processability, SF can be processed into various forms with different structures, including particulate, fiber, film, and three-dimensional (3D porous scaffolds. This review discusses and summarizes the various constructions of SF-based materials, from single structures to multi-level structures, and their applications. In combination with single structures, new techniques for creating special multi-level structures of SF-based materials, such as micropatterning and 3D-printing, are also briefly addressed.

  2. Synthesis, XRD single crystal structure analysis, vibrational spectral analysis, molecular dynamics and molecular docking studies of 2-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarau Devi, A.; Aswathy, V. V.; Sheena Mary, Y.; Yohannan Panicker, C.; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Ravindran, Reena; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2017-11-01

    The vibrational spectra and corresponding vibrational assignments of 2-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole is reported. Single crystal XRD data of the title compound is reported and the orientation of methoxy group is cis to nitrogen atom of the thiazole ring. The phenyl ring breathing modes of the title compound are assigned at 1042 and 731 cm-1 theoretically. The charge transfer within the molecule is studied using frontier molecular orbital analysis. The chemical reactivity descriptors are calculated theoretically. The NMR spectral data predicted theoretically are in good agreement with the experimental data. The strong negative region spread over the phenyl rings, nitrogen atom and oxygen atom of the hydroxyl group in the MEP plot is due to the immense conjugative and hyper conjugative resonance charge delocalization of π-electrons. Molecule sites prone to electrophilic attacks have been determined by analysis of ALIE surfaces, while Fukui functions provided further insight into the local reactivity properties of title molecule. Autoxidation properties have been investigated by calculation of bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of hydrogen abstraction, while BDEs of the rest of the single acyclic bonds were valuable for the further investigation of degradation properties. Calculation of radial distribution functions was performed in order to determine which atoms of the title molecule have pronounced interactions with water molecules. The title compound forms a stable complex with aryl hydrocarbon receptor and can be a lead compound for developing new anti-tumor drug. Antimicrobial properties of the title compound was screened against one bacterial culture Escherchia coli and four fungal cultures viz., Aspergillus niger, Pencillum chrysogenum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Rhyzopus stolonifer.

  3. Identifying EGFR-Expressed Cells and Detecting EGFR Multi-Mutations at Single-Cell Level by Microfluidic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ren; Zhou, Mingxing; Li, Jine; Wang, Zihua; Zhang, Weikai; Yue, Chunyan; Ma, Yan; Peng, Hailin; Wei, Zewen; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2018-03-01

    EGFR mutations companion diagnostics have been proved to be crucial for the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeted cancer therapies. To uncover multiple mutations occurred in minority of EGFR-mutated cells, which may be covered by the noises from majority of un-mutated cells, is currently becoming an urgent clinical requirement. Here we present the validation of a microfluidic-chip-based method for detecting EGFR multi-mutations at single-cell level. By trapping and immunofluorescently imaging single cells in specifically designed silicon microwells, the EGFR-expressed cells were easily identified. By in situ lysing single cells, the cell lysates of EGFR-expressed cells were retrieved without cross-contamination. Benefited from excluding the noise from cells without EGFR expression, the simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing, but not the expensive deep sequencing of the whole cell population, was used to discover multi-mutations. We verified the new method with precisely discovering three most important EGFR drug-related mutations from a sample in which EGFR-mutated cells only account for a small percentage of whole cell population. The microfluidic chip is capable of discovering not only the existence of specific EGFR multi-mutations, but also other valuable single-cell-level information: on which specific cells the mutations occurred, or whether different mutations coexist on the same cells. This microfluidic chip constitutes a promising method to promote simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing to be a routine test before performing targeted cancer therapy.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms on human N-acetyltransferase 2 structure and dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rajasekaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 is an important catalytic enzyme that metabolizes the carcinogenic arylamines, hydrazine drugs and chemicals. This enzyme is highly polymorphic in different human populations. Several polymorphisms of NAT2, including the single amino acid substitutions R64Q, I114T, D122N, L137F, Q145P, R197Q, and G286E, are classified as slow acetylators, whereas the wild-type NAT2 is classified as a fast acetylator. The slow acetylators are often associated with drug toxicity and efficacy as well as cancer susceptibility. The biological functions of these 7 mutations have previously been characterized, but the structural basis behind the reduced catalytic activity and reduced protein level is not clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations of these mutants as well as NAT2 to investigate the structural and dynamical effects throughout the protein structure, specifically the catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and the substrate binding pocket. None of these mutations induced unfolding; instead, their effects were confined to the inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region, where the flexibility was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type. Structural effects of these mutations propagate through space and cause a change in catalytic triad conformation, cofactor binding site, substrate binding pocket size/shape and electrostatic potential. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the dynamical properties of all the mutant structures, especially in inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region were affected in the same manner. Similarly, the electrostatic potential of all the mutants were altered and also the functionally important regions such as catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and substrate binding pocket adopted different orientation and/or conformation relative to the wild-type that may affect the functions of the mutants

  5. Early dynamic fate changes in haemogenic endothelium characterized at the single-cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiers, Gemma; Baumann, Claudia; O'Rourke, John; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Taylor, Stephen; Joshi, Anagha; Moignard, Victoria; Pina, Cristina; Bee, Thomas; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D.; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Yoder, Mervin C.; Frampton, Jon; Schroeder, Timm; Enver, Tariq; Göttgens, Berthold; de Bruijn, Marella F. T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the founding cells of the adult haematopoietic system, born during ontogeny from a specialized subset of endothelium, the haemogenic endothelium (HE) via an endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition (EHT). Although recently imaged in real time, the underlying mechanism of EHT is still poorly understood. We have generated a Runx1 +23 enhancer-reporter transgenic mouse (23GFP) for the prospective isolation of HE throughout embryonic development. Here we perform functional analysis of over 1,800 and transcriptional analysis of 268 single 23GFP+ HE cells to explore the onset of EHT at the single-cell level. We show that initiation of the haematopoietic programme occurs in cells still embedded in the endothelial layer, and is accompanied by a previously unrecognized early loss of endothelial potential before HSCs emerge. Our data therefore provide important insights on the timeline of early haematopoietic commitment.

  6. Study on electrical defects level in single layer two-dimensional Ta2O5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahai, Li; Xiongfei, Song; Linfeng, Hu; Ziyi, Wang; Rongjun, Zhang; Liangyao, Chen; David, Wei Zhang; Peng, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional atomic-layered material is a recent research focus, and single layer Ta2O5 used as gate dielectric in field-effect transistors is obtained via assemblies of Ta2O5 nanosheets. However, the electrical performance is seriously affected by electronic defects existing in Ta2O5. Therefore, spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to calculate the transition energies and corresponding probabilities for two different charged oxygen vacancies, whose existence is revealed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spectroscopic ellipsometry fitting also calculates the thickness of single layer Ta2O5, exhibiting good agreement with atomic force microscopy measurement. Nondestructive and noncontact spectroscopic ellipsometry is appropriate for detecting the electrical defects level of single layer Ta2O5. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174058 and 61376093), the Fund from Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission (Grant No. 13QA1400400), the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX02707), and the Innovation Program of Shanghai Municipal Education Commission (Grant No. 12ZZ010).

  7. Short-term dynamics of North Sea bacterioplankton-dissolved organic matter coherence on molecular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eLucas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Remineralisation and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM by marine microbes shape the DOM composition and thus, have large impact on global carbon and nutrient cycling. However, information on bacterioplankton-DOM interactions on a molecular level is limited. We examined the variation of bacterial community composition at Helgoland Roads (North Sea in relation to variation of molecular DOM composition and various environmental parameters on short-time scales. Surface water samples were taken daily over a period of twenty days. Bacterial community and molecular DOM composition were assessed via 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing and ultrahigh resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS, respectively. Environmental conditions were driven by a coastal water influx during the first half of the sampling period and the onset of a summer phytoplankton bloom towards the end of the sampling period. These phenomena led to a distinct grouping of bacterial communities and DOM composition which was particularly influenced by total dissolved nitrogen concentration, temperature and salinity, as revealed by distance-based linear regression analyses. Bacterioplankton-DOM interaction was demonstrated in strong correlations between specific bacterial taxa and particular DOM molecules, thus, suggesting potential specialization on particular substrates. We propose that a combination of high resolution techniques, as used in this study, may provide substantial information on substrate generalists and specialists and thus, contribute to prediction of bacterial community composition variation.

  8. Identification of innate lymphoid cells in single-cell RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffiotti, Madeleine; Carmona, Santiago J; Jandus, Camilla; Gfeller, David

    2017-07-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consist of natural killer (NK) cells and non-cytotoxic ILCs that are broadly classified into ILC1, ILC2, and ILC3 subtypes. These cells recently emerged as important early effectors of innate immunity for their roles in tissue homeostasis and inflammation. Over the last few years, ILCs have been extensively studied in mouse and human at the functional and molecular level, including gene expression profiling. However, sorting ILCs with flow cytometry for gene expression analysis is a delicate and time-consuming process. Here we propose and validate a novel framework for studying ILCs at the transcriptomic level using single-cell RNA-Seq data. Our approach combines unsupervised clustering and a new cell type classifier trained on mouse ILC gene expression data. We show that this approach can accurately identify different ILCs, especially ILC2 cells, in human lymphocyte single-cell RNA-Seq data. Our new model relies only on genes conserved across vertebrates, thereby making it in principle applicable in any vertebrate species. Considering the rapid increase in throughput of single-cell RNA-Seq technology, our work provides a computational framework for studying ILC2 cells in single-cell transcriptomic data and may help exploring their conservation in distant vertebrate species.

  9. Tip chip : Subcellular sampling from single cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quist, Jos; Sarajlic, Edin; Lai, Stanley C.S.; Lemay, Serge G.

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the molecular content of single cells, cell lysis is typically required, yielding a snapshot of cell behavior only. To follow complex molecular profiles over time, subcellular sampling methods potentially can be used, but to date these methods involve laborious offline analysis. Here we

  10. Hole hopping rates in single strand oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, Raffaele [Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Forestali e Alimentari, Università di Torino, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, I-10095 Grugliasco, TO (Italy); Capobianco, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Peluso, Andrea, E-mail: apeluso@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy)

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • DNA hole transfer rates have been computed. • Delocalized adenine domains significantly affect hole transfer rates in DNA. • Franck–Condon weighted density of state from DFT normal modes. • DNA application in molecular electronics. - Abstract: The rates of hole transfer between guanine and adenine in single strand DNA have been evaluated by using Fermi’s golden rule and Kubo’s generating function approach for the Franck–Condon weighted density of states. The whole sets of the normal modes and vibrational frequencies of the two nucleobases, obtained at DFT/B3LYP level of calculation, have been considered in computations. The results show that in single strand the pyramidalization/planarization mode of the amino groups of both nucleobases plays the major role. At room temperature, the Franck–Condon density of states extends over a wide range of hole site energy difference, 0–1 eV, giving some hints about the design of oligonucleotides of potential technological interest.

  11. Optical gain in an optically driven three-level ? system in atomic Rb vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmann, C. W.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we report experimentally achieved optical gain of a weak probe beam in a three-level ? system in a low density Rubidium vapor cell driven by a single pump beam. The maximum measured gain of the probe beam was about 0.12%. This work could lead to new approaches for enhancing molecular spectroscopy applications.

  12. Noncovalent Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryn'ova, G; Corminboeuf, C

    2018-05-03

    Molecular electronics covers several distinctly different conducting architectures, including organic semiconductors and single-molecule junctions. The noncovalent interactions, abundant in the former, are also often found in the latter, i.e., the dimer junctions. In the present work, we draw the parallel between the two types of noncovalent molecular electronics for a range of π-conjugated heteroaromatic molecules. In silico modeling allows us to distill the factors that arise from the chemical nature of their building blocks and from their mutual arrangement. We find that the same compounds are consistently the worst and the best performers in the two types of electronic assemblies, emphasizing the universal imprint of the underlying chemistry of the molecular cores on their diverse charge transport characteristics. The interplay between molecular and intermolecular factors creates a spectrum of noncovalent conductive architectures, which can be manipulated using the design strategies based upon the established relationships between chemistry and transport.

  13. Single-Molecule Electrochemical Gating in Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, Nicola J.; Higgins, Simon J.; Jeppesen, Jan O.

    2012-01-01

    The single-molecular conductance of a redox active molecular bridge has been studied in an electrochemical single-molecule transistor configuration in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). The redox active pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene (pTTF) moiety was attached to gold contacts at both ends through...... −(CH2)6S– groups, and gating of the redox state was achieved with the electrochemical potential. The water-free, room-temperature, ionic liquid environment enabled both the monocationic and the previously inaccessible dicationic redox states of the pTTF moiety to be studied in the in situ scanning...... and decreases again as the second redox process is passed. This is described as an “off–on–off–on–off” conductance switching behavior. This molecular conductance vs electrochemical potential relation could be modeled well as a sequential two-step charge transfer process with full or partial vibrational...

  14. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Rowan M; Caplan, David; Pomes, Regis [Molecular Structure and Function, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Fadda, Elisa, E-mail: pomes@sickkids.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Galway (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  15. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Rowan M; Caplan, David; Pomes, Regis; Fadda, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  16. Molecular basis of proton uptake