WorldWideScience

Sample records for single marital status

  1. Marital status, health and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robards, James; Evandrou, Maria; Falkingham, Jane; Vlachantoni, Athina

    2012-12-01

    Marital status and living arrangements, along with changes in these in mid-life and older ages, have implications for an individual's health and mortality. Literature on health and mortality by marital status has consistently identified that unmarried individuals generally report poorer health and have a higher mortality risk than their married counterparts, with men being particularly affected in this respect. With evidence of increasing changes in partnership and living arrangements in older ages, with rising divorce amongst younger cohorts offsetting the lower risk of widowhood, it is important to consider the implications of such changes for health in later life. Within research which has examined changes in marital status and living arrangements in later life a key distinction has been between work using cross-sectional data and that which has used longitudinal data. In this context, two key debates have been the focus of research; firstly, research pointing to a possible selection of less healthy individuals into singlehood, separation or divorce, while the second debate relates to the extent to which an individual's transitions earlier in the life course in terms of marital status and living arrangements have a differential impact on their health and mortality compared with transitions over shorter time periods. After reviewing the relevant literature, this paper argues that in order to fully account for changes in living arrangements as a determinant of health and mortality transitions, future research will increasingly need to consider a longer perspective and take into account transitions in living arrangements throughout an individual's life course rather than simply focussing at one stage of the life course. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of Marital Status and Marital Transition With Metabolic Syndrome: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinpour-Niazi, Somayeh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Fallah-ghohroudy, Arefeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Most existing reports indicate that body weight gradually increases following marital status and thereby enhances health status and decreases mortality; however, the association between marital status and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has not been thoroughly investigated in a longitudinal study. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of marital status and marital transition on MetS during a 9.6-year follow-up in Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. P...

  3. Marital status of people with epilepsy in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Kwon, Oh-Young; Cho, Yong-Won; Kim, Yosik; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Hoo-Won; Lee, Sang Kun; Jung, Ki-Young; Lee, Il Keun

    2010-11-01

    A multicentre face-to-face interview was conducted to identify factors contributing to the marital status of people with epilepsy (PWE) in Korea. The marriage rate of PWEs was only 80% and the divorce rate was more than double that in the general population. Among the single subjects, 34% replied that they were unmarried because of epilepsy, and 76% of divorced PWEs replied that epilepsy was the cause of the divorce. The factors affecting the single and divorced status in PWEs included gender, an earlier onset of seizure and seizure onset before marriage. Not informing the spouse of the disease before marriage for fear of discrimination was not related to disadvantage in marriage negotiation or to divorce. Social stigmatization of epilepsy continues and impacts on the marital status of PWEs in Korea. However, there is no correlation between the perceived and the enacted stigmas of epilepsy. Copyright © 2010 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 22 CFR 146.445 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.445 Marital or parental status. (a) Status..., or marital status that treats students differently on the basis of sex. (b) Pregnancy and related...

  5. 22 CFR 229.445 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.445 Marital or parental status. (a) Status..., or marital status that treats students differently on the basis of sex. (b) Pregnancy and related...

  6. Marital Status and Occupation versus Serum Total Cholesterol and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of marital status and occupation on serum total cholesterol (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL – CH) concentrations was studied in sixty one (61) adult male and female Hausa subjects aged 20 – 50 years. Irrespective of marital status and occupation, female subjects had higher mean serum ...

  7. 45 CFR 86.40 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.40 Marital or parental status... parental, family, or marital status which treats students differently on the basis of sex. (b) Pregnancy...

  8. 13 CFR 113.530 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marital or parental status. 113.530 Section 113.530 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs Or Activities Prohibited § 113.530 Marital...

  9. 13 CFR 113.445 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marital or parental status. 113.445 Section 113.445 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs Or Activities Prohibited § 113.445 Marital or parental...

  10. Marital Status and Survival in Patients with Carcinoid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K. Greenleaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Marital status is a known prognostic factor in overall and disease-specific survival in several types of cancer. The impact of marital status on survival in patients with carcinoid tumors remains unknown. We hypothesized that married patients have higher rates of survival than similar unmarried patients with carcinoid tumors. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, we identified 23,126 people diagnosed with a carcinoid tumor between 2000 and 2011 and stratified them according to marital status. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to compare the characteristics and outcomes between patient cohorts. Overall and cancer-related survival were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Multivariable survival analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards models (hazards ratio [HR], controlling for demographics and tumor-related and treatment-related variables. Propensity score analysis was performed to determine surgical intervention distributions among married and unmarried (ie, single, separated, divorced, widowed patients. Results Marital status was significantly related to both overall and cancer-related survival in patients with carcinoid tumors. Divorced and widowed patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.33 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.08–1.33] and 1.34 [95% CI, 1.22–1.46], respectively and cancer-related survival (HR, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.00–1.31] and 1.15 [95% CI, 1.03–1.29], respectively than married patients over five years. Single and separated patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.08–1.33] and 1.62 [95% CI, 1.25–2.11], respectively than married patients over five years, but not worse cancer-related survival. Unmarried patients were more likely than matched married patients to undergo definitive surgical intervention (62.67% vs 53.11%, respectively, P < 0.0001. Conclusions Even after controlling for other prognostic factors, married patients

  11. Marital Status and Persons With Dementia in Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Noelle L; Richardson, Virginia E; Schuman, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Despite the prevalence of dementia among residents in assisted living (AL), few researchers have focused on the length of stay (LOS) in AL among this population. Little is known about the factors that may contribute to LOS in these settings, particularly for residents with dementia. In the current study, a sub-set of AL residents with dementia (n = 112) was utilized to examine whether marital status was associated with LOS in AL as this has received sparse attention in previous research despite studies suggesting that marital status influences LOS in other health-care and long-term care settings. The Andersen-Newman behavioral model was used as a conceptual framework for the basis of this study of LOS, marital status, and dementia in AL. We hypothesized that persons with dementia who were married would have longer LOS than unmarried persons with dementia in AL. Cox regression was used to examine the association between marital status and LOS in AL of residents with dementia and whether activities of daily living were related to discharge from AL settings among married and unmarried residents with dementia. Main effects for marital status and the interaction between marital status and mobility with LOS were examined. Study findings provide information related to the psychosocial needs of AL residents with dementia and offer implications for assessing the on-going needs of vulnerable AL residents.

  12. Relationships between happiness and gender, age and marital status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Alarcón

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research examines the relationships between happiness and variables of gender, age and marital status as well as the degrees of happiness most frequently experienced by people. The sample was constituted by 163 males and females, between the ages of 20 and 60 years, single and married, and from middle class strata. They were administered the Scale of Satisfaction with Life, developed by Diener, with and added item to measure the degrees of happiness. There is no significan! statistically difference between genders; according to age the only significan contras! was between 30 and 50 years, with the notation that the highest means corresponded to ages 50 and 60 years old; married people were found to be happier than single ones. In general, the majority reported feeling happy, the other degrees contained very few frecuencies.

  13. 10 CFR 1042.445 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.445 Marital or parental status. (a) Status generally. A... status that treats students differently on the basis of sex. (b) Pregnancy and related conditions. (1) A...

  14. Gender Differences in Marital Status Moderation of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Subjective Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Deborah; Franz, Carol E; Horwitz, Briana; Christensen, Kaare; Gatz, Margaret; Johnson, Wendy; Kaprio, Jaako; Korhonen, Tellervo; Niederheiser, Jenae; Petersen, Inge; Rose, Richard J; Silventoinen, Karri

    2015-10-14

    From the IGEMS Consortium, data were available from 26,579 individuals aged 23 to 102 years on 3 subjective health items: self-rated health (SRH), health compared to others (COMP), and impact of health on activities (ACT). Marital status was a marker of environmental resources that may moderate genetic and environmental influences on subjective health. Results differed for the 3 subjective health items, indicating that they do not tap the same construct. Although there was little impact of marital status on variance components for women, marital status was a significant modifier of variance in all 3 subjective health measures for men. For both SRH and ACT, single men demonstrated greater shared and nonshared environmental variance than married men. For the COMP variable, genetic variance was greater for single men vs. married men. Results suggest gender differences in the role of marriage as a source of resources that are associated with subjective health.

  15. Gender Differences in Marital Status Moderation of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Subjective Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finkel, Deborah; Franz, Carol E; Horwitz, Briana

    2016-01-01

    genetic and environmental influences on subjective health. Results differed for the 3 subjective health items, indicating that they do not tap the same construct. Although there was little impact of marital status on variance components for women, marital status was a significant modifier of variance......From the IGEMS Consortium, data were available from 26,579 individuals aged 23 to 102 years on 3 subjective health items: self-rated health (SRH), health compared to others (COMP), and impact of health on activities (ACT). Marital status was a marker of environmental resources that may moderate...... in all 3 subjective health measures for men. For both SRH and ACT, single men demonstrated greater shared and nonshared environmental variance than married men. For the COMP variable, genetic variance was greater for single men vs. married men. Results suggest gender differences in the role of marriage...

  16. Impact of Marital Status on 20-Year Subjective Well-being Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yue; Krause, James S; Saunders, Lee L; Clark, Jillian M R

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that marital status has a significant impact on subjective well-being (SWB). However, research examining the long-term influence of marital status on SWB after spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited. To identify the relationship between marital status and SWB trajectories over time, using 20 years of longitudinal data. We conducted a cohort study, including 1,032 participants surveyed 5 times in 1993, 1998, 2003, 2008, and 2013. Participants were identified from outpatient records of 2 Midwestern hospitals and 1 Southeastern specialty hospital. The Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised (LSQ-R) was used to measure multiple aspects of SWB. A multilevel model was applied to analyze the 5 repeated measurements. The married or cohabitating participants enjoyed the best SWB at baseline, but their home satisfaction and global satisfaction declined over time and their social isolation increased slightly. For divorced, separated, or widowed people, the negative effects of marital loss attenuated over time. For single individuals, SWB, except for environmental barriers, did not change positively over time if they remained single. Using longitudinal data with 5 repeated measurements, our study showed a complicated relationship between marital and relationship status with SWB and how these relationships change over time for people with chronic SCI.

  17. Impacts of Marital Status and Parental Presence on the Material Hardship of Families with Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Robert I.

    This study investigated how marriage, cohabitation, single parenthood, and the presence of biological parents affected the incomes and material hardships of children. Data from the 1997 and 1999 National Survey of America's Families were used to examine recent changes in the marital status and household structure of families with children, how…

  18. Does Marital Status Influence the Parenting Styles Employed by Parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiono, Benard Litali; Mwoma, Teresa B.

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to establish whether parents' marital status, influence their use of specific parenting styles in Kisauni District, Kenya. A correlational research design was employed to carry out this study. Stratified sampling technique was used to select preschools while purposive sampling technique was used to select preschool…

  19. Racial and Marital Status Differences in Faculty Pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutkoushian, Robert K.

    1998-01-01

    Study estimated how pay disparity varied by race, marital status, gender, and field. Results show considerable differences overall, with unexplained wage gaps for racial/ethnic group, dramatic variations between men and women, and further by field. Earnings differences among racial/ethnic categories are not uniform. The return on marriage for men…

  20. The Effects of Occupational Prestige, Marital Status and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the perceptions of mothers as a function of their marital status, prestige and technological level of their jobs. 320 university students and civil servants participated in the study. Each subject rated a briefly described working woman as a stimulus person on a 24 seven-point bipolar scales that describe ...

  1. Effect of gender and marital status on perceived organizational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the influence of gender and marital status on perceived organizational justice and perceived organizational support. Design of this study is cross-sectional as data were collected at one point in time. The research instrument was self-administered questionnaires. Two hundred and three participants ...

  2. Age, Marital Status And Religion As Predictors Of Sexual Risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... individual's religion and marital status will have significant impact on the sexual risk cognition of such an individual. Psychologists, Teachers and Counselors should therefore pay attention to these variables in helping students improve their sexual risk cognition. African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues ...

  3. Influence of Age, Educational Achievement and Marital Status on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study therefore examined the influence of age, educational achievement and marital status on compliance behaviour of bank automobile drivers to traffic rules and regulations. The sample size consists of 555 randomly selected bank automobile drivers currently employed in 6 commercial banks in Lagos, Nigeria.

  4. 29 CFR 36.530 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.530 Marital or parental status. (a) General. A recipient... household or principal wage earner in such employee's or applicant's family unit. (b) Pregnancy. A recipient...

  5. Parental Marital Status Effects on Adolescent Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Susan; Udry, J. Richard

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed white virgin junior high school students in 1980 and again in 1982. Found effects of parental marital status on sexual behavior and on age-graded deviance, suggesting general loss of parental control. Control loss was associated with disruption of two-parent household for boys and with the state of living in a fatherless household for…

  6. 6 CFR 17.530 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marital or parental status. 17.530 Section 17.530 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY NONDISCRIMINATION ON... all job-related purposes, including commencement, duration, and extensions of leave, payment of...

  7. Parental marital status and peer influence as corelates of teenage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effects of parental marital status and peer influence on the occurrence of teenage pregnancy among 324 female teens in south-south, Nigeria. The participants responded to a valid scale. The Pearson correlation and Multiple Regression procedures were used to investigate the predictive capacity of ...

  8. Marriage Meets the Joneses: Relative Income, Identity, and Marital Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tara; McLanahan, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of relative income on marriage. Accounting flexibly for absolute income, the ratio between a man's income and a local reference group median is a strong predictor of marital status, but only for low-income men. Relative income affects marriage even among those living with a partner. A 10 percent higher reference…

  9. Using Marital Status and Continuous Marital Satisfaction Ratings to Predict Depressive Symptoms in Married and Unmarried Women With Systemic Sclerosis: A Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Brooke; Rice, Danielle B; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Steele, Russell J; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Hudson, Marie; Baron, Murray; Thombs, Brett D

    2016-08-01

    Married persons have, on average, better mental health than nonmarried persons. Among married persons, marital satisfaction is associated with better mental health. Studies on mental health in married and nonmarried persons that consider marital satisfaction have categorized patients as satisfied versus unsatisfied, which reduces statistical power and does not generate clinically useful information on mental health across the satisfaction spectrum. Our objective was to demonstrate a novel regression approach to evaluate mental health in women with systemic sclerosis (SSc), comparing married and unmarried women, accounting for continuously measured marital satisfaction. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and marital satisfaction with the Dyadic Adjustment Scale-7. A single multiple linear regression model was used to predict CES-D scores from marital status and, among married women, continuously measured marital satisfaction, controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. Of 725 women, 494 (68%) were married or living as married. On average, married women had mean CES-D scores that were 2.0 points (0.19 SDs) lower than unmarried women (P = 0.013). Among married women, a 1.0 SD increase in marital satisfaction was associated with a 2.2 point (0.21 SDs) decrease in CES-D scores (P marital satisfaction scores were below the 19th percentile had greater predicted depressive symptoms than unmarried women. Married women's predicted CES-D scores ranged from 6.7 points lower to 6.9 points higher than those of unmarried women, depending on marital satisfaction. Comparisons of mental health in married and unmarried patients with rheumatic diseases should include continuously measured marital satisfaction. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. 5 CFR 720.901 - Equal opportunity without regard to politics or marital status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equal opportunity without regard to politics or marital status. 720.901 Section 720.901 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Regard to Politics or Marital Status § 720.901 Equal opportunity without regard to politics or marital...

  11. Marital Status, Gender, and Home-to-Job Conflict Among Employed Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomaguchi, Kei M

    2012-03-01

    Although researchers argue that single parents perceive more work-family conflict than married parents, little research has examined nuances in such differences. Using data from the 2002 National Study of Changing Workforce (N = 1,430), this study examines differences in home-to-job conflict by marital status and gender among employed parents. Findings indicate that single mothers feel more home-to-job conflict than single fathers, married mothers, and married fathers. Some predictors of home-to-job conflict vary by marital status and gender. Job pressure is related to home-to-job conflict more for single parents than for married parents. Age of children is related to conflict for single fathers only. Whereas an unsupportive workplace culture is related to conflict, especially for married fathers, the lack of spouses' share of domestic responsibilities is related to conflict, especially for married mothers. These findings indicate that marital status and gender create distinct contexts that shape employed parents' perceived home-to-job conflict.

  12. Impact of marital status on health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2017-11-01

    The Farr-Bertillon law states that the mortality rate of single and widowed persons is about three times the rate of married people of same age. This excess mortality can be measured with good accuracy for all ages except for young widowers. The reason is that, at least nowadays, very few people become widowed under the age of 30. Here we show that disability data from census records can also be used as a reliable substitute for mortality rates. In fact excess-disability and excess-mortality go hand in hand. Moreover, as there are about ten times more cases of disability than deaths, the disability variable is able to offer more accurate measurements in all cases where the number of deaths is small. This allows a more accurate investigation of the young widower effect; it confirms that, as already suspected from death rate data, there is a huge spike between the ages of 20 and 30. By using disability rates we can also study additional features not accessible using death rate data. For example we can examine the health impact of a change in living place. The observed temporary inflated disability rate confirms what could be expected by invoking the ;Transient Shock; conjecture formuladted by the authors in a previous paper. Finally, in another observation it is shown that the disability rate of newly married persons is higher than for those who have been married for more than one year, a result which comes in confirmation of the ;newly married couple; effect reported in an earlier paper.

  13. Marital Status, Lifestyle and Dementia: A Nationwide Survey in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yun Fan

    Full Text Available Evidence of an association between lifestyle and marital status and risk of dementia is limited in Asia.In this nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey, participants were selected by computerized random sampling from all 19 counties in Taiwan. A total of 10432 residents were assessed by a door-to-door in-person survey, among whom 7035 were normal and 929 were diagnosed with dementia using the criteria recommended by National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association. Premorbid lifestyle habits and demographic data including marital status were compared between normal subjects and participants with dementia.After adjustment for age, gender, education, body mass index, smoking, drinking, marital status, sleep habits, exercise, social engagement and co-morbidities including hypertension, diabetes and cerebrovascular diseases, an increased risk for dementia was found in people with widow or widower status (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15-1.77 and people who used to take a nap in the afternoon (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.72. Decreased risk was found in people with the habit of regular exercise (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.09-0.16, adequate night sleep (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39-0.76 and regular social engagement (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.36-0.77.Our results provide preliminary evidence of possible risk-reduction effects for dementia, including regular exercise even in modest amounts, social engagement and adequate night sleep, whereas people with the widow/widower status or who used to take an afternoon nap might have increased risk of dementia.

  14. The effect of marital status on social and gender inequalities in diabetes mortality in Andalusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolar-Pujolar, Antonio; Córdoba Doña, Juan Antonio; Goicolea Julían, Isabel; Rodríguez, Gabriel Jesús; Santos Sánchez, Vanesa; Mayoral Sánchez, Eduardo; Aguilar Diosdado, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    To assess the modifying effect of marital status on social and gender inequalities in mortality from diabetes mellitus (DM) in Andalusia. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the Andalusian Longitudinal Population Database. DM deaths between 2002 and 2013 were analyzed by educational level and marital status. Age-adjusted rates (AARs) and mortality rate ratios (MRRs) were calculated using Poisson regression models, controlling for several social and demographic variables. The modifying effect of marital status on the association between educational level and DM mortality was evaluated by introducing an interaction term into the models. All analyses were performed separately for men and women. There were 18,158 DM deaths (10,635 women and 7,523 men) among the 4,229,791 people included in the study. The risk of death increased as the educational level decreased. Marital status modified social inequality in DM mortality in a different way in each sex. Widowed and separated/divorced women with the lowest educational level had the highest MRRs, 5,1 (95%CI: 3,6-7,3) and 5,6 (95% CI:3,6-8,5) respectively, while single men had the highest MRR, 3,1 (95%CI: 2,7-3,6). Educational level is a key determinant of DM mortality in both sexes, and is more relevant in women, while marital status also plays an outstanding role in men. Our results suggest that in order to address inequalities in DM mortality, the current focus on individual factors and self-care should be extended to interventions on the family, the community, and the social contexts closest to patients. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Acceptability of Marital Violence among College Men and Women: Does Gender and Current Relationship Status Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Michael J.; Williams, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of gender, current relationship status, and the interaction between gender and relationship status on the acceptability of marital violence among college men and women. Participants completed a questionnaire containing measures of marital violence acceptability and current relationship status.…

  16. An analysis of income differentials by marital status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Madalozzo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unmarried cohabitation has become a more frequently observed phenomenon over the last three decades, and not only in the United States. The objective of this work is to examine income differentials between married women and those who remain single or cohabitate. The empirical literature shows that, while the marriage premium is verified in different studies for men, the result for women is not conclusive. The main innovation of my study is the existence of controls for selection. In this study, we have two sources of selectivity: into the labor force and into a marital status category. The switching regressions and the Oaxaca decomposition results demonstrate the existence of a significant penalty for marriage. Correcting for both types of selection, the difference in wages varies between 49% and 53%, when married women are compared with cohabiting ones, and favors non-married women. This result points to the existence of a marriage penalty.O casamento não oficializado, coabitação, tem se tornado cada vez mais freqüente nas últimas décadas. O objetivo deste trabalho é examinar a relação entre os salários das mulheres casadas e das solteiras ou coabitantes. A literatura a este respeito mostra que, enquanto o prêmio financeiro para o casamento é verificado em diversos estudos e países quando o objeto de estudo são os homens, o resultado para mulheres não é conclusivo. A principal inovação do presente estudo é a existência de controles para seleção, tanto na escolha em participar da força de trabalho como de alterar seu estado civil. Regressões "switching" e decomposição de Oaxaca mostram a existência de uma penalização financeira para mulheres casadas. Corrigindo para ambos os tipos de seleção, a diferença nos salários das mulheres casadas com relação às coabitantes varia entre 49% e 53%, favorecendo as coabitantes. Este resultado aponta para a existência de uma penalidade ao casamento.

  17. 13 CFR 113.3-1 - Consideration of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin. 113.3-1 Section 113.3-1 Business Credit and... of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national origin. (a) This regulation does not prohibit the consideration of race, color, religion, sex, marital status, handicap, or national...

  18. LEADERSHIP POWER PERCEPTION OF AMATEUR AND PROFESSIONAL SOCCER COACHES ACCORDING TO THEIR MARITAL STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Konter

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse the leadership power perception of amateur and professional soccer coaches according to their marital status. Data were collected from 165 male soccer coaches (n=71 technical director-manager and A license, n=46 B license, n=48 amateur license. An adapted Turkish version of Power in Soccer Questionnaire-Self (PSQ-S for coaches and an information form were used for the data collection [21]. Cronbach reliability alphas of PSQ-S range between 0.65 and 0.84. Coaches’ data were analysed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Kruskal-Wallis analysis of PSQ-S revealed significant differences between leadership power perception of amateur and professional soccer coaches according to their marital status related to Referent Power (RP [χ[sup]2[/sup] (3 = 9.61, p0.05. The results indicated that married coaches have higher perception of RP than single coaches, irrespective of being an amateur or a professional. Comparison of professional and amateur coaches suggests that while single professional coaches have higher perception of EP than married professional coaches, the results are the reverse for amateur coaches; in other words, amateur married coaches have higher perception of EP than amateur single coaches. There is a lack of research to draw more certain conclusions. Future researchers should also take into consideration personality, psychological skills, sport experience, age, taking responsibility, attributions, expectations, emotions, perception of achievement, etc.

  19. Marital status behavior of women in the former Soviet Republics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherbov, S; Darsky, L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper uses the most recent data and life table analysis to describe the marital behaviour of women in the republics of the former USSR. For the first time a multistate life table analysis was used to describe the marital careers of women from all the 15 republics. In the near future, such a

  20. Marital status and body weight, weight perception, and weight management among U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Lori A; Sobal, Jeffery

    2013-12-01

    Married individuals often have higher body weights than unmarried individuals, but it is unclear how marital roles affect body weight-related perceptions, desires, and behaviors. This study analyzed cross-sectional data for 4,089 adult men and 3,989 adult women using multinomial logistic regression to examine associations between marital status, perceived body weight, desired body weight, and weight management approach. Controlling for demographics and current weight, married or cohabiting women and divorced or separated women more often perceived themselves as overweight and desired to weigh less than women who had never married. Marital status was unrelated to men's weight perception and desired weight change. Marital status was also generally unrelated to weight management approach, except that divorced or separated women were more likely to have intentionally lost weight within the past year compared to never married women. Additionally, never married men were more likely to be attempting to prevent weight gain than married or cohabiting men and widowed men. Overall, married and formerly married women more often perceived themselves as overweight and desired a lower weight. Men's marital status was generally unassociated with weight-related perceptions, desires, and behaviors. Women's but not men's marital roles appear to influence their perceived and desired weight, suggesting that weight management interventions should be sensitive to both marital status and gender differences. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Statistical Analysis of the Impact of Marital Status on Nuclear Submarine Officer Retention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phelps, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    This thesis develops multivariate logit models to estimate the impact of marital status and the independent effect of dependent children on nuclear submarine officer retention beyond the minimum service requirement (MSR...

  2. Influence of age, marital status and environment on sexism in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    05] and environment of living [t (777) = 3.21, p<.01] are significant factors influencing hostile sex discrimination (sexism) in Nigeria. Results also indicated that benevolent sex discriminations are not significantly influenced by age, marital status ...

  3. Association of Educational Level and Marital Status With Obesity: A Study of Chinese Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chunxiao; Gao, Wenjing; Cao, Weihua; Lv, Jun; Yu, Canqing; Wang, Shengfeng; Li, Chunxiao; Pang, Zengchang; Cong, Liming; Dong, Zhong; Wu, Fan; Wang, Hua; Wu, Xianping; Jiang, Guohong; Wang, Xiaojie; Wang, Binyou; Li, Liming

    2018-04-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is growing rapidly in many countries. Socioeconomic inequalities might be important for this increase. The aim of this study was to determine associations of body mass index (BMI), overweight and obesity with educational level and marital status in Chinese twins. Participants were adult twins recruited through the Chinese National Twin Registry (CNTR), aged 18 to 79 years, and the sample comprised 10,448 same-sex twin pairs. Current height, weight, educational attainment, and marital status were self-reported. Regression analyses and structural equation models were conducted to evaluate BMI, overweight, and obesity associated with educational level and marital status in both sexes. At an individual level, both educational level and marital status were associated with higher BMI and higher risk of being overweight and obesity in men, while in women the effects of educational level on BMI were in the opposite direction. In within-Monozygotic (MZ) twin-pair analyses, the effects of educational level on BMI disappeared in females. Bivariate structural equation models showed that genetic factors and shared environmental confounded the relationship between education and BMI in females, whereas marital status was associated with BMI on account of significant positive unique environmental correlation apart in both sexes. The present data suggested that marital status and BMI were associated, independent of familiar factors, for both sexes of this study population, while common genetic and shared environmental factors contributed to education-associated disparities in BMI in females.

  4. Infertile Individuals’ Marital Relationship Status, Happiness, and Mental Health: A Causal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Habiballah Ahmadi Forooshany

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examined the causal model of relation between marital relationship status, happiness, and mental health in infertile individuals. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 155 subjects (men: 52 and women: 78, who had been visited in one of the infertility Centers, voluntarily participated in a self-evaluation. Golombok Rust Inventory of Marital Status, Oxford Happiness Questionnaire, and General Health Questionnaire were used as instruments of the study. Data was analyzed by SPSS17 and Amos 5 software using descriptive statistics, independent sample t test, and path analysis. Results: Disregarding the gender factor, marital relationship status was directly related to happiness (p<0.05 and happiness was directly related to mental health, (p<0.05. Also, indirect relation between marital relationship status and mental health was significant (p<0.05. These results were confirmed in women participants but in men participants only the direct relation between happiness and mental health was significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Based on goodness of model fit in fitness indexes, happiness had a mediator role in relation between marital relationship status and mental health in infertile individuals disregarding the gender factor. Also, considering the gender factor, only in infertile women, marital relationship status can directly and indirectly affect happiness and mental health.

  5. Nutritional status, gender and marital status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odencrants, Sigrid; Bjuström, Tomas; Wiklund, Nils; Blomberg, Karin

    2013-10-01

    To describe and compare nutritional status, pulmonary function, gender and marital status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a chronic illness that can lead to poor nutritional status due to an increased energy requirements related to laboured breathing. Inadequate nutritional intake has often been described in this patient group. Nutritional support for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who suffer from nutritional problems is essential, both for their sense of well-being and for their survival with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study design was descriptive and comparative. Quantitative data collection was carried out among 81 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (47 women and 34 men) with an average age of 65 years (SD 3·5). The Mini Nutritional Assessment was used to assess nutritional status. Participants who lived alone had worse nutritional status than those who did not live alone, and female participants had worse nutritional status than their male counterparts. No significant correlation was found between pulmonary function and nutritional status. This study contributes knowledge of a potential correlation between nutritional status, gender and marital status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be at an increased risk of malnutrition. Despite the previous results showing malnutrition and underweight to be common, the present study found that many of the participants were overweight, which may reflect a global health trend regardless of disease. Early identification of patients at risk of malnutrition is important. Registered nurses should be aware that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are female or who live alone may be at an increased risk of nutritional problems. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be offered information and support

  6. Cohabitation and marital status as predictors of mortality--an eight year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Due, Pernille; Modvig, Jens

    2002-01-01

    In a follow-up study of 1265 women and men aged 50, 60 and 70 years, we analysed how mortality was associated with cohabitation status (living alone/not living alone), living with/without a partner, and marital status respectively. Data originate from a longitudinal questionnaire study of a random.......25(0.93-1.69), adjusted for the same covariates. Inclusion of the health behaviour variables--smoking, diet and physical activity--one by one to a model with functional ability, self-rated health and one of the three determinants (cohabitation status, living with/without partner, marital status) showed no effect....... We suggest that in future studies of social relations and mortality, cohabitation status is considered to replace marital status as this variable may account for more of the variation in mortality....

  7. Men's economic status and marital transitions of fragile families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Sassler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Men's ability to fill the provider role remains a consistent requirement for marriage across the class spectrum and cross-nationally. Fiscal concerns appear less salient for transitions to parenthood or to informal unions such as cohabitation. Objective: This paper evaluates whether marital expectations and marital transitions of new mothers are associated with the economic characteristics of father. Methods: Analyses are based on observed and imputed data on fathers from the first two waves of the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study. Logistic regression models assess factors predicting mothers' initial expectations of marrying their baby's father, and transitions into marital unions by the second interview. Results: Most women expect to marry their baby's father, although estimates are lower when men's data are repaired by imputation. Multivariate analyses find mother's marital expectations are most strongly associated with men's educational attainment, but not with men's earnings at the child's birth. Transitions to marriage are positively associated with men's earnings levels, although estimates are considerably lower than previously reported thresholds. Furthermore, the odds of marrying do not increase monotonically as men's income level rises once missing data are imputed. Conclusions: Theories regarding prerequisites for marriage must better account for growing heterogeneity in the unmarried population. Standard economic predictors of marriage for the overall population are less applicable for this sample of new parents. Ultimately, this study highlights the importance of including information on missing fathers. Excluding them may produce misleading statistical associations between men's economic measures and women's marriage.

  8. Mothers’ Employment, Marital Status and Educational Level on Students’ Academic Achievement in Business Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subuola Catherine Abosede

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mother’s personality is a build-up of demographic factors among which employment, marital status and educational level are prominent in shaping child’s abilities and aspirations. This study therefore, determines the influence of mothers’ employment, marital status and educational level on students’ academic achievement in Business studies. Ex-post facto survey design and stratified random sampling technique were adopted for the study.Structured Questionnaire (MEMSEL Scale, r= .76 and Business Studies Achievement Test (r=.80 with a section for demographic data were administered on a sample of Two Hundred and Fifty students from five (5 schools in Ijebu-Ode, Nigeria. Multiple regressionstatisticswas used for data analysisat 0.05 level of significance.The findings revealed thatthere was a significant but negative relationship between mothers' marital status and academic achievement of student's (r=-.195; p .05; academic achievement and educational level (r = .091; p >.05; employment status and marital status (r = -.033; p > .05 and marital status and educational level (r = .079; p > .05. However there was a significant combined contribution on the independent variables on students' academic achievement in Business Studies (Adj. R=.037; F(3,237=4.111;P <.05.Thus, it was recommended that parents should provide positive home environments for their children, while school operators should respond favourably and focus attention on the children’s needs.

  9. Marital status and twins' health and behavior: an analysis of middle-aged Danish twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; McGue, Matt; Lund, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To disentangle the influences on health of selection processes related to genetic and rearing environmental factors from factors related to marriage benefits. We compared health status among same-sex male and female twin pairs who lived together during childhood and were discordant...... or concordant on adult marital status. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of a random sample of middle-aged Danish twins was conducted in 1998 to 1999. This study included 1175 same-sex twin pairs (52.5% monozygotic (MZ) and 47.5% dizygotic (DZ)). Data were obtained on adult marital status and on height, body...

  10. Marital Status and Female and Male Contraceptive Sterilization in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeckhaut, Mieke Carine Wim

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine female and male sterilization patterns in the United States based on marital status, and to determine if sociodemographic characteristics explain these sterilization patterns. Design Survival analysis of cross-sectional data from the female and male samples of the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Setting A trained female interviewer conducted in-home interviews. Patient(s) The 2006–2010 NSFG is designed to be representative of the U.S. civilian non-institutionalized population ages 15–44. Intervention(s) None. Main outcome measure(s) Vasectomy and tubal sterilization. Result(s) In the United States, vasectomy is the near exclusive domain of married men. Never- and ever-married single men and never-married cohabiting men had a low relative risk of vasectomy (RRs=0.1, 0.3, and 0.0, respectively) when compared to men in first marriages. Tubal sterilization was not limited to currently married, or even to ever-married women, though it was less common among never-married single women (RR=0.2) and more common among women in higher-order marriages (RR=1.8), as compared to women in first marriages. In contrast to vasectomy, differential use of tubal sterilization by marital status was driven in large part by differences in parity. Conclusion(s) This study shows that being unmarried at sterilization—an important risk factor for post-sterilization regret—was much more common among women than men. In addition to contributing to the predominance of female versus male sterilization, this pattern highlights the importance of educating women on the permanency of sterilization, as well as an opportunity to increase reliance on long-acting reversible contraceptive methods. PMID:25881875

  11. Cohabitation and marital status as predictors of mortality--an eight year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Due, Pernille; Modvig, Jens

    2002-01-01

    In a follow-up study of 1265 women and men aged 50, 60 and 70 years, we analysed how mortality was associated with cohabitation status (living alone/not living alone), living with/without a partner, and marital status respectively. Data originate from a longitudinal questionnaire study of a rando...

  12. Marital Status, Relationship Distress, and Self-rated Health: What Role for "Sleep Problems"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Robert; Arber, Sara

    2015-09-01

    This paper analyzes data from a nationally representative survey of adults in the United Kingdom (Understanding Society, N = 37,253) to explore the marital status/health nexus (using categories that include a measure of relationship distress) and to assess the role that sleep problems play as a potential mediator. Findings indicate how it is not just the "form" marital status takes but also the absence or presence of relationship distress that is essential to self-rated health. We demonstrate two further findings that: (1) sleep problems act as a mediator of the link between marital status/relationship distress and self-rated health, most notably for those in cohabiting relationships with medium/high distress or who have a history of relationship loss, and (2) the mediating role of sleep problems differs for divorced men and women. © American Sociological Association 2015.

  13. Econometric analysis of the effect of marital status change on wages in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Rodionova, Lilia

    2013-01-01

    What effect does change of the marital status of the individual to his wages in Russia? We used matching estimators (simple matching estimator and propensity score matching) on RLMS data for 2000–2009. On the basis of estimates we analyzed different transitions of changing marital status («not married — registered marriage », «registered marriage — divorced», «divorced — civil marriage», «divorced — registered marriage», «registered marriage — widow (widower)», «registered marriage — civil ma...

  14. Marital status, education, and risk of acute myocardial infarction in Mainland China: the INTER-HEART study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Li, Wei; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Lisheng; Teo, Koon; Yusuf, Salim

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of marital status and education on the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a large-scale case-control study in China. This study was part of the INTER-HEART China case-control study. The main outcome measure was first AMI. Incident cases of AMI and control patients with no past history of heart disease were recruited. Controls were matching by age (±5 years) and sex. Marital status was combined into 2 categories: single and not single. Education level was classified into 2 categories: 8 years or less and more than 8 years. From 1999 to 2002, we recruited 2909 cases and 2947 controls from 17 cities. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, psychosocial factors, lifestyle, other factors, and mutually for other risk factors, the odds ratio (OR) for AMI associated with being single was 1.51 (95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.93) overall, 1.19 (0.84-1.68; P = 0.072) in men and 2.00 (1.39-2.86; P sex and marital status was statistically significant (P = 0.045). Compared with a high education level, a low education level increased the risk of AMI (1.45, 1.26-1.67); the odds ratios in men and women were 1.29 (1.09-1.52) and 1.55 (1.16-2.08), respectively. Single women with a low education level had a high risk of AMI (2.95, 1.99-4.37). Being single was consistently associated with an increased risk for AMI, particularly in women. In addition, as compared with high education level, low education level was associated with a higher risk of AMI in both men and women.

  15. An exploratory study of Japanese fathers' knowledge of and attitudes towards HPV and HPV vaccination: does marital status matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Sharon Janet Bruce; Yoshioka, Eiji; Ito, Yoshiya; Konno, Ryo; Sasaki, Yuri; Kishi, Reiko; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    No studies on male attitudes towards HPV and HPV vaccination have been conducted in Japan, and little is known globally whether attitudes of single fathers differ to those living with a female partner. This exploratory study assessed whether Japanese fathers were likely to have their daughter vaccinated against HPV in a publically funded program and whether any differences existed regarding attitudes and knowledge about HPV according to marital status. Subjects were 27 fathers (16 single; 11 married) who took part in a study on HPV vaccine acceptability aimed at primary caregivers of girls aged 11-14 yrs in three Japanese cities between July and December 2010. Knowledge about HPV was extremely poor (mean score out of 13 being 2.74 ± 3.22) with only one (3.7%) participant believing he had been infected with HPV and most (81.4%) believing they had no or low future risk. No difference existed regarding knowledge or awareness of HPV according to marital status. Concerning perceived risk for daughters, single fathers were significantly more likely to believe their daughter was at risk for both HPV (87.5% versus 36.4%; p=0.01) and cervical cancer (75.0% versus 27.3%; p=0.02). Acceptability of free HPV vaccination was high at 92% with no difference according to marital status, however single fathers were significantly more likely (p=0.01) to pay when vaccination came at a cost. Concerns specific to single fathers included explaining the sexual nature of HPV and taking a daughter to a gynecologist to be vaccinated. Knowledge about HPV among Japanese fathers is poor, but HPV vaccine acceptability is high and does not differ by marital status. Providing sexual health education in schools that addresses lack of knowledge about HPV as well as information preferences expressed by single fathers, may not only increase HPV vaccine acceptance, but also actively involve men in cervical cancer prevention strategies. However, further large-scale quantitative studies are needed.

  16. Marital status and work-related health limitation: a longitudinal study of young adult and middle-aged Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Celia C; Cheng, Tyrone C; Simpson, Gaynell M

    2016-01-01

    The literature establishes clearly the health benefit of marriage. Much less clear from published data is whether work-related health (dis)advantages accruing to marital transitions persist over time or are limited to the short term. Informed by the marital resources and marital crisis perspectives, this study sought links between marital status measured via three approaches and work-related health limitation, exploring these relationships across genders. The study employed data from eight recent waves (1996-2010) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. It applied generalized estimating equations to estimate the impacts, on work-related health limitation, of current marital status; of marital transition 2 years in the past; and of marital transition 8 years in the past. Our gender-specific results indicated that lower likelihood of work-related health limitation was associated with a married status, a stable married status, and an entry into marriage. Results are consistent overall with the marital resources perspective. The use of three different approaches to evaluate the relationship of marital status to work-related health limitation may explain the gender-specific results.

  17. Marital Status, Ethnicity, Academic Achievement, and Adjustment Strains: The Case of Graduate International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyrazli, Senel; Kavanaugh, Philip R.

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to empirically assess the relation of marital status, ethnicity and academic achievement in relation to the adjustment strains experienced by international graduate students. One hundred and forty nine international students attending five universities in the United States participated in the study. Correlational and multiple…

  18. Suicidal behaviour in adolescents: associations with parental marital status and perceived parent-adolescent relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponnet, K.; Vermeiren, R; Jespers, I.; Mussche, B.; Ruchkin, V.; Schwab-Stone, M.; Deboutte, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Because equivocal findings exist with regard to the relationship between adolescents' suicidal behaviour and parental marital status, the aim of this study was to investigate this relationship and in particular the effect of the perceived parent-adolescent relationship on this

  19. The Influence of Sex, Marital Status, and Tenure of Service on Job ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Olatunji, S.O.. Department of Psychology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, ... England (1967) were employed to assess job stress and satisfaction respectively. ... The study of. Tyler Ellison (1994) illustrated the effect of marital status on job satisfaction. They found out that married individuals experience less. Vol. 8 (1) Serial ...

  20. The influence of marital status on the social dysfunction of schizophrenia patients in community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-jie Li

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: This study confirmed that bad marital status is associated with higher odds of social dysfunction among patients with schizophrenia living in the community. These effects should be included in considerations of public health investments in preventing and treating mental disorders.

  1. Marital Status, the Economic Benefits of Marriage, and Days of Inactivity due to Poor Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim P. Stimpson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored whether the economic benefits of marriage mediate the association between marriage and health and if that relationship is conditional on the level of shared economic resources. Methods. Pooled, cross-sectional data from NHANES 2001–2006 were analyzed using multivariate zero-inflated negative binomial regression for the number of days of inactivity due to poor physical or mental health. Results. Persons that were divorced/separated reported the highest average number of days of inactivity (mean = 2.5 within a 30 day period, and married persons reported the lowest number of days of inactivity (mean = 1.4. Multivariate results indicated that widowed persons did not report significantly more days of inactivity than married persons. Income to poverty ratio reduced the size and eliminated statistical significance of the difference between divorced/separated and never married marital statuses compared to married persons. The interaction effect for marital status and income to poverty ratio was statistically significant suggesting that the relationship between marital status and inactivity is conditional on shared income. Conclusion. Marriage confers health protective benefits in part through pooled income relative to other marital statuses.

  2. Impact of job burnout, age and marital status on job involvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was aimed to explore the effect of job burnout, age and marital status on job involvement among banking personnel. The sample consists of 100 employees working in banks of Eritrea, Asmara, North East Africa, selected randomly. Job involvement scale developed by Lodhal and Kejner (1965) and ...

  3. Marital status and risk of HIV infection in slum settlements of Nairobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the association between marital status and risk of HIV infection in urban slums of Nairobi. Data were derived from a cross-sectional population-based survey nested in an ongoing Demographic Surveillance System in two urban slums in Nairobi. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression ...

  4. Marital Status, Home Environments, and Family Strain: Complex Effects on Preschool Children's School Readiness Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, SeungHee Claire; Peterson, Mieko Fuse

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined the complex associations among marital status, home environments, and family strain (i.e. income, maternal depressive symptoms, social support, and parenting stress), as they predict preschool children's pre-academic and social skills at 36 and 54 months. Findings from the [National Institute of Child Health and Human…

  5. Depressive symptoms among older adults: the impact of early and later life circumstances and marital status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Yumiko; Doyle, Martha; Henretta, John C; Timonen, Virpi

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to the literature on depression and the life course by examining the impact of both early and later life circumstances on depressive symptoms among men and women aged 65 and over in Ireland. Data are from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing, a nationally representative sample of 8504 community-dwelling adults aged 50 years and older. About 3507 respondents aged 65 years and over were included in the analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the childhood and early adult life circumstances associated with marital status. A series of nested models were estimated to evaluate which childhood and adulthood circumstances are associated with depressive symptoms. Models were estimated separately for men and women. Ill health in childhood and in later life has a strong and direct effect on depression in later life for both men and women. Other early stressors are mediated by later circumstances. Marital status is a significant independent predictor of depression in later life. Later life circumstances mediate between some marital statuses and depressive symptoms. When later life circumstances are included, widowhood and, for men, divorce, are directly associated with depression, but singlehood is not. Income in later life is strongly associated with depressive symptoms for women. Both early and later life circumstances affect late-life depressive symptoms. Our findings indicate that previous studies which did not consider both may have underestimated or overestimated the effect of marital status, education, current health and education on depressive symptoms.

  6. Is there something unique about marriage? The relative impact of marital status, relationship quality, and network social support on ambulatory blood pressure and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt-Lunstad, Julianne; Birmingham, Wendy; Jones, Brandon Q

    2008-04-01

    Having close social relationships and being married specifically have been reliably associated with health benefits including lower morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of marital status, relationship quality, and network support on measures of psychological and cardiovascular health. We examined ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) among 204 married and 99 single males and females (N = 303). We found that both marital status and marital quality were important. Married individuals had greater satisfaction with life (SWL) and blood pressure dipping than single individuals. High marital quality was associated with lower ABP, lower stress, less depression, and higher SWL. Importantly, contrasting those who are unmarried with those in low-quality marriages, we find that single individuals had lower ABP-suggesting that single individuals fare better than their unhappily married counterparts. Likewise, having a supportive network did not moderate (i.e., buffer) the effects of being single or unhappily married. Findings indicate being married per se is not universally beneficial, rather, the satisfaction and support associated with such a relationship is important. However, marriage may be distinctive, as evidence further suggests that support from one's network does not compensate for the effect of being single. These results highlight the complexities in understanding the influence of social relationships on long-term health, and they may help clarify the physiological pathways by which such associations exist.

  7. Marital status as a predictor of survival in patients with human papilloma virus-positive oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Samuel J; Kirke, Diana N; Ezzat, Waleed H; Truong, Minh T; Salama, Andrew R; Jalisi, Scharukh

    Determine whether marital status is a significant predictor of survival in human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. A single center retrospective study included patients diagnosed with human papilloma virus-positive oropharyngeal cancer at Boston Medical Center between January 1, 2010 and December 30, 2015, and initiated treatment with curative intent at Boston Medical Center. Demographic data and tumor-related variables were recorded. Univariate analysis was performed using a two-sample t-test, chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and Kaplan Meier curves with a log rank test. Multivariate survival analysis was performed using a Cox regression model. A total of 65 patients were included in the study with 24 patients described as married and 41 patients described as single. There was no significant difference in most demographic variables or tumor related variables between the two study groups, except single patients were significantly more likely to have government insurance (p=0.0431). Furthermore, there was no significant difference in 3-year overall survival between married patients and single patients (married=91.67% vs single=87.80%; p=0.6532) or 3-year progression free survival (married=79.17% vs single=85.37%; p=0.8136). After adjusting for confounders including age, sex, race, insurance type, smoking status, treatment, and AJCC combined pathologic stage, marital status was not a significant predictor of survival [HR=0.903; 95% CI (0.126,6.489); p=0.9192]. Although previous literature has demonstrated that married patients with head and neck cancer have a survival benefit compared to single patients with head and neck cancer, we were unable to demonstrate the same survival benefit in a cohort of patients with human papilloma virus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wife's employment status and marital duration in a population filing for divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R P; Maneker, J S

    1987-01-01

    This study analyzes data from a 2% random sample of all couples who filed for divorce/dissolution in California in each of the 6 years, 1966-1971, in order to examine the relationship between wife's employment status and marital duration to separation. Using exchange theory, anomie theory, and role conflict as basic theoretical perspectives, the elaboration analysis of the zero order relationship is discussed vis a vis the findings that housewives are likely to be married longer before separation than employed wives, except when they marry very young. The analysis shows the enhancement of our zero order relationship for housewives marrying in their 20's, having an education of high school or above, and having been previously married. Furthermore, a causal linkage is posited between wife's employment status, presence of children, and marital duration to separation, which shows the zero order relationship to be non-spurious through the interpretation that occurred when controlling on presence of children.

  9. Effect of marital status on duration of treatment for mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret J. Penning

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a well-established link between marital status and mental health, but previous research has produced mixed results about the reasons for this relationship. Some studies propose that marriage provides protection from stressors and increases personal coping abilities (the causation perspective, whereas other studies argue that marriage markets “weed out” individuals predisposed to illness (the selection perspective. This article addresses the causation-versus-selection debate by examining the effect of marital status on duration of treatment for mental illness. The empirical analysis uses longitudinal data and GEE models to estimate group-level differences in duration of treatment. The results suggest that marriage does not appear to confer a health advantage in terms of duration of treatment. However, the study demonstrates that the never-married experience longer treatment time than the married, divorced, and widowed.

  10. Effect of marital status on duration of treatment for mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a well-established link between marital status and mental health, but previous research has produced mixed results about the reasons for this relationship. Some studies propose that marriage provides protection from stressors and increases personal coping abilities (the causation perspective, whereas other studies argue that marriage markets “weed out” individuals predisposed to illness (the selection perspective. This article addresses the causation-versus-selection debate by examining the effect of marital status on duration of treatment for mental illness. The empirical analysis uses longitudinal data and GEE models to estimate group-level differences in duration of treatment. The results suggest that marriage does not appear to confer a health advantage in terms of duration of treatment. However, the study demonstrates that the never-married experience longer treatment time than the married, divorced, and widowed.

  11. The Rise in Female Participation in Colombia: Children, Education or Marital Status

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal, Raquel; Peña, Ximena; Amador, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Colombia has experienced a secular increase in female labor participation, which passed from nearly 47% in 1984 to 65% in 2006. We decompose the evolution of participation into changes in the composition of the population and changes in the participation rates by groups (defined according to the variables that appear most relevant: educational attainment, fertility and marital status). The increase in participation is driven by the increase in the participation rate of women who were married ...

  12. Marital status and survival in pancreatic cancer patients: a SEER based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Baine

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that marital status affects survival in patients with different types of cancer. However, its role in the survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether there was an association between marital status and overall survival (OS in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC.Adult patients diagnosed with PDAC between 1998 and 2003 with known marital statuses were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of the National Cancer Institute. OS for these patients was plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparative risks of mortality were evaluated by using univariate and multivariate-adjusted Cox regression models.Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, we found that the median overall survival of patients was 4 months and 3 months (p<0.001 for married and unmarried patients, respectively. Subgroup analysis on patients with cancer-directed surgery showed that the median survival was 16 months and 13 months (P<0.0005 for married and unmarried groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis adjusting for age, race, sex, stage, year of diagnosis, radiation therapy and cancer-directed surgery showed that patients who were married at the time of diagnosis had a significantly decreased risk of death at both 2 months (15% risk reduction and 3 years (13% risk reduction post diagnosis.Marital status is an independent prognostic factor of both perioperative and long-term survival in patients with PDAC. This observation may suggest a suboptimally met psychosocial need among PDAC patients that is partially fulfilled by the support system provided by marriage.

  13. Parents’ marital status and child physical abuse potential: the mediation of depression symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Lamela, Diogo; Figueiredo, Bárbara

    2017-01-01

    Informed by a social interactional framework of stress and parenting, the aim of this study was to examine the mediating effect of depression symptoms on the asso- ciation between parents’ marital status (married and divorced parents) and child physical abuse potential, in a Portuguese community sample. It was hypothesized that the possible observed differences between divorced and married parents in the child physical abuse potential would be explained by their depression symptoms. Parents (...

  14. Education, marital status, and risk of hip fractures in older men and women: the CHANCES project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, V; Orfanos, P; Feskanich, D; Michaëlsson, K; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Ahmed, L A; Peasey, A; Wolk, A; Brenner, H; Bobak, M; Wilsgaard, T; Schöttker, B; Saum, K-U; Bellavia, A; Grodstein, F; Klinaki, E; Valanou, E; Papatesta, E-M; Boffetta, P; Trichopoulou, A

    2015-06-01

    The role of socioeconomic status in hip fracture incidence is unclear. In a diverse population of elderly, higher education was found to be associated with lower, whereas living alone, compared to being married/cohabiting, with higher hip fracture risk. Educational level and marital status may contribute to hip fracture risk. The evidence on the association between socioeconomic status and hip fracture incidence is limited and inconsistent. We investigated the potential association of education and marital status with hip fracture incidence in older individuals from Europe and USA. A total of 155,940 participants (79 % women) aged 60 years and older from seven cohorts were followed up accumulating 6456 incident hip fractures. Information on education and marital status was harmonized across cohorts. Hip fractures were ascertained through telephone interviews/questionnaires or through record linkage with registries. Associations were assessed through Cox proportional hazard regression adjusting for several factors. Summary estimates were derived using random effects models. Individuals with higher education, compared to those with low education, had lower hip fracture risk [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.84, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.72-0.95]. Respective HRs were 0.97 (95 % CI 0.82-1.13) for men and 0.75 (95 % CI 0.65-0.85) for women. Overall, individuals living alone, especially those aged 60-69 years, compared to those being married/cohabiting, tended to have a higher hip fracture risk (HR = 1.12, 95 % CI 1.02-1.22). There was no suggestion for heterogeneity across cohorts (P heterogeneity > 0.05). The combined data from >150,000 individuals 60 years and older suggest that higher education may contribute to lower hip fracture risk. Furthermore, this risk may be higher among individuals living alone, especially among the age group 60-69 years, when compared to those being married/cohabiting.

  15. Workload and the trajectory of marital satisfaction in newlyweds: job satisfaction, gender, and parental status as moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steenbergen, Elianne F; Kluwer, Esther S; Karney, Benjamin R

    2011-06-01

    Stress, on average, is bad for relationships. Yet stress at work is not always associated with negative relationship outcomes. The premise of the current study was that associations between workload and trajectories of marital satisfaction depend on circumstances that may constrain or facilitate partners' ability to negotiate their multiple roles. We hypothesized that the covariance between changes in workload and marital satisfaction over time should be moderated by (a) the extent to which spouses like their work, (b) their parental status, and (c) their gender. Analyses drawing upon eight waves of data on workload, work satisfaction, and marital satisfaction from 169 newlywed couples assessed over four years confirmed these predictions. Specifically, across couples, demands at work covaried positively with marital satisfaction for spouses who were more satisfied with their jobs. For nonparent couples, increases in husbands' workload covaried with increases in marital satisfaction for both spouses. For parent couples, however, increases in husbands' workload covaried with declines in marital satisfaction for both spouses. Unexpectedly, for parent couples, increases in wives' workload corresponded with increased marital satisfaction. Finally, consistent with predictions, wives were more affected by their husbands' workload than vice versa. Thus, tension between work and marriage is not inevitable, instead depending on circumstances that facilitate or impair performance in multiple roles. Couples, employers, and practitioners should recognize the role that external circumstances play in determining how work and marital life interact. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Marital quality and loneliness as predictors for subjective health status in cardiac rehabilitation patients following percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roijers, Joost; Sunamura, Madoka; Utens, Elisabeth Mwj; Dulfer, Karolijn; Ter Hoeve, Nienke; van Geffen, Myrna; Draaijer, Jan; Steenaard, Rebecca; van Domburg, Ron T

    2016-08-01

    Low marital quality is associated with adverse health outcomes and lower personal well-being. Loneliness increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality and predicts poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between marital quality and loneliness and subjective health status in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) patients who underwent cardiac rehabilitation (CR). In a prospective cohort study, pPCI patients that followed CR were included between 2009-2011. A total of 223 patients responded to the Short Form 12 (SF-12) (subjective health status), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ-6) (marital quality) and University of California, Los Angeles - Revised (UCLA-R) questionnaires at baseline (pre-CR) and at three months (post-CR) or at 12 months follow-up. Subjective health status is displayed by a physical component summary (PCS) score and a mental component summary (MCS) score. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses were performed to test improvements in subjective health status. Changes over time in subjective health status scores were similar between patients with optimal marital quality vs patients with less optimal marital quality and non-lonely patients vs lonely patients. The MCS level at one-year follow-up of both patients with less optimal marital quality and lonely patients was lower compared with a healthy Dutch population (respectively; mean MCS score 47.3 (standard deviation (SD) 10.5); p = 0.013 and mean MCS score 46.1 (SD 11.2); p = 0.010). Both patients with less optimal marital quality and lonely patients did not reach the MCS level of a healthy Dutch population. Therefore, extra care and support should be given to these patients in a CR programme. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  17. Trends in total and cause-specific mortality by marital status among elderly Norwegian men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berntsen Kjersti

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown large and increasing relative differences in mortality by marital status in several countries, but few studies have considered trends in cause-specific mortality by marital status among elderly people. Methods The author uses discrete-time hazard regression and register data covering the entire Norwegian population to analyze how associations between marital status and several causes of death have changed for men and women of age 75-89 from 1971-2007. Educational level, region of residence and centrality are included as control variables. There are 804 243 deaths during the 11 102 306 person-years of follow-up. Results Relative to married persons, those who are never married, divorced or widowed have significantly higher mortality for most causes of death. The odds of death are highest for divorcees, followed by never married and widowed. Moreover, the excess mortality among the non-married is higher for men than for women, at least in the beginning of the time period. Relative differences in mortality by marital status have increased from 1971-2007. In particular, the excess mortality of the never married women and, to a lesser extent, men has been rising. The widening of the marital status differentials is most pronounced for mortality resulting from circulatory diseases, respiratory diseases (women, other diseases and external deaths (women. Differences in cancer mortality by marital status have been stable over time. Conclusions Those who are married may have lower mortality because of protective effects of marriage or selection of healthy individuals into marriage, and the importance of such mechanisms may have changed over time. However, with the available data it is not possible to identify the mechanisms responsible for the increasing relative differences in mortality by marital status in Norway.

  18. Breastfeeding Initiation in Mothers with Repeat Cesarean Section: The Impact of Marital Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenborn, Jordyn T; Graves, Whitney C; Masho, Saba W

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 90% of mothers with a primary C-section have a subsequent C-section. To date, research has demonstrated that primary C-sections are associated with breastfeeding noninitiation. However, it is unknown if this association persists after the primary C-section. Furthermore, literature has shown a differing relationship between breastfeeding initiations by marital status. Due to the high proportion of women who give birth while unmarried, investigating differences by marital status will add a significant contribution to breastfeeding literature. This study investigates the association between repeat C-section and breastfeeding initiation within marital status groups using a nationally representative cross-sectional survey. Data from the 2004 to 2011 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System were analyzed. The sample was restricted to women with a previous singleton live birth who had C-section and whose infant was alive at the time of interview (N = 34,854). Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to obtain crude and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After adjusting for potential confounders, married women who had a repeat C-section were 2.2 times (AOR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.69-2.77) more likely to never breastfeed compared to women with vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC). Similarly, the odds of breastfeeding noninitiation were 76% (AOR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.47-2.12) higher among women with a repeat C-section compared to women with VBAC. No significant associations were exhibited among nonmarried women. Enhanced educational programs and counseling support may be needed to help families cope with delivery challenges and resulting stressors that may reduce their desire to initiate breastfeeding in the postpartum period.

  19. Work and marital status in relation to depressive symptoms and social support among women with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, May; Georgiades, Anastasia; László, Krisztina D; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Janszky, Imre; Ahnve, Staffan

    2007-11-01

    Work and marital status have been shown to be associated with health outcome in women. However, the effect of employment and marriage on psychosocial functioning has been studied predominantly in healthy subjects. We investigated whether work and marital status are associated with depressive symptoms, social support, and daily stress behavior in women with coronary artery disease (CAD). Data of 105 women with CAD and of working age were analyzed. General linear models were used to determine the association between work and marital status and depressive symptoms, social support, and daily stress behavior. Women who were working at the time of measurement had lower levels of depressive symptoms (7.0 +/- 1.2 vs. 12.1 +/- 0.9, p women, whereas marital status was not related to any of the outcome variables. Results were similar after adjusting for potential confounders, that is, age, education, self-reported health, and risk factors for CAD. There was no significant interaction between marital status and working status on depressive symptoms, social support, or daily stress behavior. In women with CAD, all working had lower levels of depressive symptoms and a better social integration than those not working, regardless of reason for being nonemployed. Daily stress behavior, depression, and social support did not differ between cohabiting and not cohabiting women. Future interventions should take into consideration that women with CAD who are unemployed may have a higher risk for depression and social isolation and, therefore, poor clinical outcomes.

  20. The effect of marital status on breast cancer-related outcomes in women under 65: A SEER database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinyard, Leslie; Wirth, Lorinette Saphire; Clancy, Jennifer M; Schwartz, Theresa

    2017-04-01

    Marital status is strongly associated with improved health and longevity. Being married has been shown to be positively associated with survival in patients with multiple different types of malignancy; however, little is known about the relationship between marital status and breast cancer in younger women. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of marital status on diagnosis, and survival of women under the age of 65 with breast cancer. The SEER 18 regions database was used to identify women between the ages of 25-64 diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in the years 2004-2009. Logistic regression was used to predict later stage diagnosis by marital status and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare breast cancer-related and all-cause survival by marital status classification. Models were stratified by AJCC stage. After adjusting for age, race, and ER status, unmarried women were 1.18 times more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage than married women (95% CI 1.15, 1.20). In adjusted analysis unmarried women were more likely to die of breast cancer and more likely to die of all causes than married women across all AJCC stages. Younger unmarried women with breast cancer may benefit from additional counseling, psychosocial support and case management at the time of diagnosis to ensure their overall outcomes are optimized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Occupational group, educational level, marital status and deleterious habits among individuals with maxillofacial fractures: retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esses, Diego-Felipe-Silveira; Sá, Carlos-Diego-Lopes; Silva, Paulo-Goberlânio-de Barros; Bezerra, Thâmara-Manoela-Marinho; Carvalho, Francisco-Samuel-Rodrigues; de Medeiros, José-Rômulo; Soares, Eduardo-Costa-Studart

    2018-01-01

    Background To investigate the occupational profile, educational level, marital status and deleterious habits to the health of patients with maxillofacial fractures of a population of northeastern Brazil. Material and Methods A retrospective study of patients records admitted to the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Walter Cantídio University Hospital (Fortaleza, Brazil) who sustained maxillofacial fractures was conducted in the period between 2006 and 2015. Results A total of 338 patients rendered 355 fractures. Males were the most affected (pmaxillofacial fractures in a Brazilian population during the study period. Key words:Epidemiological studies, trauma, facial bones. PMID:29274150

  2. Effect of marital status on the outcome of patients undergoing elective or urgent coronary revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Israel M; Gaglia, Michael A; Torguson, Rebecca; Minha, Sa'ar; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2013-10-01

    Marriage confers various health advantages in the general population. However, the added value of marriage among patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) beyond the standard cardiovascular risk factors is not clear. This study aimed to assess the effects of marital status on outcomes of patients undergoing elective or urgent PCI. Clinical observational analysis of consecutive patients undergoing elective or urgent PCI from 1993 to 2011 was performed. Patients were stratified by marital status, comparing married to unmarried patients. Clinical outcome up to 12 months was obtained by telephone contact or office visit. A total of 11,216 patients were included in the present analysis; 55% were married and 45% unmarried. Significant differences in baseline characteristics were noted, including a lower prevalence of hypertension (86% vs 88%), diabetes (34% vs 38%), and smoking (19% vs 25%) among married vs unmarried patients, respectively (P < .001). However, married patients had a higher prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and family history of coronary artery disease. Early and late major adverse cardiac event rates were significantly lower for married vs unmarried patients up to 1 year (13.3% vs 8.2%, P < .001). Married status was independently associated with improved outcome in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.9). Married patients who undergo urgent or elective PCI have superior short- and long-term outcomes up to 1 year when compared with unmarried patients. These benefits persist after adjustment for multiple traditional cardiovascular risk factors. © 2013.

  3. The Possible Protective Effect of Marital Status in Quality of Life Among Elders in a U.S.-Mexico Border City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Vega, Marisela; Esparza-Del Villar, Oscar Armando; Carrillo-Saucedo, Irene Concepción; Montañez-Alvarado, Priscila

    2017-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to determine how marital status may have an impact on quality of life in a group of older adults living in a U.S.-Mexico border city. Two-hundred and seventy-six older adults completed the Spanish version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment, composed of four domains: physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment. Participants answered a measure of sociodemographic variables. In the psychological health component of quality of life, single and married older adults had the highest scores as compared to widowed and divorced. Similarly, married older adults had the highest quality of life in social relationships. Marital status may play an important role when analyzing quality of life among older adults, this study suggests that being married may offer a protective mechanism against depressive symptoms and therefore against mental illnesses during late adulthood.

  4. Psychiatric illness, socioeconomic status, and marital status in people committing suicide: a matched case-sibling-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben; Qin, Ping; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2006-01-01

    of these factors. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Information on causes of death, psychiatric admission, marital status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 985 suicide cases, 1104 sex-age (+/-3 years) matched siblings, and 16 619 controls......STUDY OBJECTIVE: Suicides cluster in both families and persons with psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages. This study compares these factors between suicide cases, their siblings, and population based controls in an attempt to evaluate both the familial and the individual element...... and controls in exposure to hospitalised psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages, although these factors contribute to the familial aggregation of suicides....

  5. Psychiatric illness, socioeconomic status, and marital status in people committing suicide: a matched case-sibling-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben; Qin, Ping; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2006-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Suicides cluster in both families and persons with psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages. This study compares these factors between suicide cases, their siblings, and population based controls in an attempt to evaluate both the familial and the individual element...... of these factors. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Information on causes of death, psychiatric admission, marital status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 985 suicide cases, 1104 sex-age (+/-3 years) matched siblings, and 16 619 controls...... and controls in exposure to hospitalised psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages, although these factors contribute to the familial aggregation of suicides....

  6. Marital Status and Problem Gambling Among Australian Older Adults: The Mediating Role of Loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botterill, Emma; Gill, Peter Richard; McLaren, Suzanne; Gomez, Rapson

    2016-09-01

    Problem gambling rates in older adults have risen dramatically in recent years and require further investigation. Limited available research has suggested that social needs may motivate gambling and hence problem gambling in older adults. Un-partnered older adults may be at greater risk of problem gambling than those with a partner. The current study explored whether loneliness mediated the marital status-problem gambling relationship, and whether gender moderated the mediation model. It was hypothesised that the relationship between being un-partnered and higher levels of loneliness would be stronger for older men than older women. A community sample of Australian men (n = 92) and women (n = 91) gamblers aged from 60 to 90 years (M = 69.75, SD = 7.28) completed the UCLA Loneliness Scale and the Problem Gambling Severity Index. The results supported the moderated mediation model, with loneliness mediating the relationship between marital status and problem gambling for older men but not for older women. It appears that felt loneliness is an important predictor of problem gambling in older adults, and that meeting the social and emotional needs of un-partnered men is important.

  7. Cohabitation and marital status as predictors of mortality - an eight year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Pernille; Modvig, Jens Simon; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2002-01-01

    on the association with mortality. Hereby, we found no evidence of an indirect effect of health behaviours on the association between living arrangements and mortality. In contrast to many previous studies, we found no significant gender and age differences in the association between living arrangement and mortality...... sample of people born in 1920, 1930 and 1940 with baseline in 1990. Survival time for all individuals were established during the next 8 years until May 1998. Multivariate Cox analysis stratified by age and gender showed that individuals living alone experienced a significantly increased mortality......In a follow-up study of 1265 women and men aged 50, 60 and 70 years, we analysed how mortality was associated with cohabitation status (living alone/not living alone), living with/without a partner, and marital status respectively. Data originate from a longitudinal questionnaire study of a random...

  8. The age structures and marital status differences of married and not married male suicide rates: 12 developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Phillips; Stack, Steven; Fernquist, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Male suicide rates, circa 1960, specific to age and marital status for 12 developed countries show married men with lower suicide rates than not married men. This results in differences in the age structures of married and not married suicide rates. We test three explanations of lower married than not married suicide rates: 1) Gibbs and Martin's (1964) marital status integration hypothesis; 2) marital status differences in norms regarding the acceptability of suicide; and 3) Durkheim's societal integration theory. All three explanations are supported by multivariate regressions. The strongest support is for societal integration. The models explain over 80% of the variance in both married and not married male age-specific suicide rates. These regression equations generate predicted suicide rates and these predicted rates are then used to see if they account for the observed age structures of married and not married men. They do in 19 of 24 tests.

  9. Marital Status, Career and Income as Indicators of Life Satisfaction Among Middle-aged Career Women in Hulu Langat, Selangor, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Marziah Zakaria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Life satisfaction is a subjective construct that varies according to gender, education level, age, income, marital status, and other demographic factors. Life satisfaction is an important issue among middle-aged women. They face various responsibilities, roles and expectation at this age. The objective of this article is to identify the differences in life satisfaction among middle-aged Malay women from different educational level, marital status, career and income. This study applied a survey technique, which is a set of questionnaire which consisted of socio-demographic scale and life satisfaction scale (based on Life Satisfaction Index - Short Form by Barrette and Murk, 2006. Simple random sampling and purposive sampling have been used to obtain the responses. A total of 410 middle-aged career women in Hulu Langat, Selangor have participated in this study. The finding showed that life satisfactions among middle-aged women are different depending on their marital status, career and income. This was based on the result of ANOVA. Single women and widower who are working in private sector and of low-income level reported to have the lowest life satisfaction. This finding may provide input to the planning of programs to enhance the well-being and life satisfaction among middle aged career women.

  10. A social work study on measuring the impact of gender and marital status on stress: A case study of hydro-power employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Iravani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study performs an empirical survey to measure the impact of stress among people with various gender and marital status in a hydropower unit located in city of Esfahan, Iran. The study performs the survey among all 81 people who were working for customer service section of this company and consists of two parts, in the first part; we gather all private information such as age, gender, education, job experience, etc. through seven important questions. In the second part of the survey, there were 66 questions, which included all the relevant factors impacting employees' stress. We implement two Levin and t-student tests to see whether gender or marital status has any meaningful influences on creating stress among people. The results indicate that gender has no meaningful impact on creating stress among employees who worked for this hydro plant except difficulty of job conditions. The other findings of this paper is that stress posed from management team had different impacts on employees with various marital status but there were no meaningful differences between married and single couples in terms of other factors posing stress such as unsuitable working conditions, fear of job stability or difficulty of job conditions.

  11. A social work study on impact of gender, marital status and employment status on internet addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, internet has penetrated into people’s personal lives, significantly. People communicate with each other through internet facilities such as email services, social web pages, etc. Internet has influenced so much of our lives that many people get addicted and it has become a serious issue among different societies. In this study, we perform an empirical study to find the relationship of three issues of age, gender and employment status on internet addiction behavior. The survey selects 190 men and 160 women from a city of NajafAbad located in province of Esfahan, Iran and a questionnaire consists of 35 questions are distributed among them. The survey uses Chi-Square statistics to examine the effects of three mentioned factors and the results indicate that internet addiction is more among singles than married (Chi-Square=19.94. The survey also indicates that internet addition is more on men than women do (Chi-Square=6.64. However, our survey does not find any evidence to believe job employment has any impact on internet addiction.

  12. Marital and cohabitation status as predictors of mortality: a 10-year follow-up of an Italian elderly cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafato, Emanuele; Galluzzo, Lucia; Gandin, Claudia; Ghirini, Silvia; Baldereschi, Marzia; Capurso, Antonio; Maggi, Stefania; Farchi, Gino; For The Ilsa Working Group

    2008-11-01

    The relationship between mortality and marital status has long been recognized, but only a small number of investigations consider also the association with cohabitation status. Moreover, age and gender differences have not been sufficiently clarified. In addition, little is known on this matter about the Italian elderly population. The aim of this study is to examine differentials in survival with respect to marital status and cohabitation status in order to evaluate their possible predictive value on mortality of an Italian elderly cohort. This paper employs data from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA), an extensive epidemiologic project on subjects aged 65-84 years. Of the 5376 individuals followed-up from 1992 to 2002, 1977 died, and 1492 were lost during follow-up period. The baseline interview was administered to 84% of the 5376 individuals and 65% of them underwent biological and instrumental examination. Relative risks of mortality for marital (married vs. non-married) and cohabitation (not living alone vs. living alone) categories are estimated through hazard ratios (HR), obtained by means of the Cox proportional hazards regression model, adjusting for age and several other potentially confounding variables. Non-married men (HR=1.25; 95% CI: 1.03-1.52) and those living alone (HR=1.42; 95% CI: 1.05-1.92) show a statistically significant increased mortality risk compared to their married or cohabiting counterparts. After age-adjustment, women's survival is influenced neither by marital status nor by cohabitation status. None of the other covariates significantly alters the observed differences in mortality, in either gender. Neither marital nor cohabitation status are independent predictors of mortality among Italian women 65+, while among men living alone is a predictor of mortality even stronger than not being married. These results suggest that Italian men benefit more than women from the protective effect of living with someone.

  13. Influence of Marital Status on Attitude of Midwives towards OSCE and Their Performance in the Examination in Akwa Ibom and Cross River States, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Emon Umoe; Mgbekem, Mary Achi; Nsemo, Alberta David; Ojong-Alacia, Mary Manyo; Nkwonta, Chigozie A.; Mobolaji-Olajide, O. M.

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the influence of marital status on the midwives' attitude towards OSCE and how this affects their performance in the examination. Two hypotheses guided the study. HO 1 sort to find out if there exist a significant influence of marital status of midwives on their attitude towards OSCE as well as performance in…

  14. The relationship of marital status and clinical characteristics in middle-aged and older patients with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyer, Maren; Kasckow, John; Fellows, Ian; Lawrence, Edith C; Golshan, Shah; Solorzano, Ellen; Zisook, Sidney

    2010-08-01

    This study examines the relationship of marital status to depression, positive and negative symptoms, quality of life, and suicidal ideation among 211 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and subsyndromal depressive symptoms. We hypothesized that single participants would have more severe symptomatology than married and cohabitating participants. Outpatients, age 40 or older, were diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders using the MINI Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis 1 Disorders. Participants exhibited a score of >8 on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression but did not meet criteria for a major depressive episode. Participants who were married or cohabitating had a later age of onset of first psychotic episode or hospitalization than those who were single (age, 29.35 vs 24.21). Married participants rated their quality of life higher than those who were single (mean Quality of Life Scale scores, 72.28 vs 53.87) and had less suicidal ideation than those who were divorced, widowed, or separated (7.4% vs 29.2%). In middle-aged and older individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and depressive symptoms, marriage appeared to enhance quality of life and protect against suicidal ideation. Efforts that focus on providing additional support for those who are experiencing divorce or separation could prove to be lifesaving for these individuals.

  15. Organizational Commitment of Teachers: A Meta-Analysis Study for the Effect of Gender and Marital Status in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çogaltay, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    This meta-analysis summarizes the influence of Turkish teacher's gender and marital status on their perception of organizational commitment. In total, 30 independent research studies conducted across the country are investigated to analyze the relations between gender and organizational commitment, i.e., a sample group of 11,724 participants. In…

  16. Influence of insurance and marital status on outcomes of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintel, Andrew E; Jamy, Omer; Martin, Mike G

    2015-06-01

    Although outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are worse when treated according to adult rather than pediatric protocols, one criticism is that this may be due to the emancipation of young adults. Using case listing session of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 (1973-2010), we examined outcomes for AYA with ALL defined similar to Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 10,403 criteria (age 18-30) predicated on marital and insurance status as surrogates for emancipation (limiting analysis to 2007-2010). Analyses were conducted with SEER*Stat 8.1.2, Microsoft Excel 2007, and GraphPad Prism 6. Comparisons were made by the Fisher exact test and log rank test (Mantel-Cox); all P values were 2-sided. Although age (24 and younger vs. 25 and older) was predictive of median overall survival (OS) (not reached vs. 33; P = .0029) (3-year OS 66% vs. 49%), social factors were not. Three-year OS for insured versus uninsured patients was 61% versus 50%, and median OS was not reached versus 30 months (P = .2334). Three-year OS for single versus married patients was 62% versus 55%, with median OS not reached for both groups (P = .1084). Insurance status and marriage did not influence outcomes for AYA with ALL, suggesting that intrinsic differences in disease and disease-specific therapies are more important than social issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sexual function, depressive symptoms and marital status in nonseminoma testicular cancer patients : a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinman, Marrit A.; Hoekstra, Harald J.; Vidrine, Damon J.; Gritz, Ellen R.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th.; Fleer, Joke; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.

    Goal: To longitudinally investigate sexual functioning in testicular cancer patients during the first year, and examine the effect of relationship status (with a partner or single) and depressive symptoms on sexual functioning. Patients and methods: 93 testicular cancer patients (39% single) treated

  18. Using marital status and continuous marital satisfaction ratings to predict depressive symptoms in married and unmarried women with systemic sclerosis: A Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levis, B.; Rice, D.B.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Steele, R.J.; Hagedoorn, M.; Hudson, M.; Baron, M.; Thombs, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Married persons have, on average, better mental health than nonmarried persons. Among married persons, marital satisfaction is associated with better mental health. Studies on mental health in married and nonmarried persons that consider marital satisfaction have categorized patients as

  19. Using Marital Status and Continuous Marital Satisfaction Ratings to Predict Depressive Symptoms in Married and Unmarried Women With Systemic Sclerosis : A Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levis, Brooke; Rice, Danielle B.; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Steele, Russell J.; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Hudson, Marie; Baron, Murray; Thombs, Brett D.

    Objective. Married persons have, on average, better mental health than nonmarried persons. Among married persons, marital satisfaction is associated with better mental health. Studies on mental health in married and nonmarried persons that consider marital satisfaction have categorized patients as

  20. Marital status, duration of cohabitation, and psychosocial well-being among childbearing women: a canadian nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquia, Marcelo L; O'Campo, Patricia J; Ray, Joel G

    2013-02-01

    We examined the joint associations of marital status and duration of cohabitation on self-reported intimate partner violence, substance use, and postpartum depression among childbearing women. We analyzed data from the 2006-2007 Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey, a cross-sectional nationwide sample of 6421 childbearing women. Cohabiting women were married or nonmarried women living with a partner; noncohabiters were single, divorced, or separated women. We further categorized cohabiters by their duration of cohabitation (≤ 2, 3-5, or > 5 years). We used logistic regression to generate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. About 92% of women were cohabiters. Compared with married women living with a husband more than 5 years, unmarried women cohabiting for 2 years or less were at higher odds of intimate partner violence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.85, 7.56), substance use (AOR = 5.36; 95% CI = 3.06, 9.39), and postpartum depression (AOR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.25, 2.80); these risk estimates declined with duration of cohabitation. Research on maternal and child health would benefit from distinguishing between married and unmarried cohabiting women, and their duration of cohabitation.

  1. The Relationship of Childhood Sexual Abuse to the Marital Attitudes and Readiness for Marriage of Single Young Adult Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jeffry H.; LaMont, Craig

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of childhood sexual abuse to marital attitudes and perceived readiness for marriage in single young adult women. A total of 622 women from three universities in the United States completed questionnaires on sexual abuse, attitudes and feelings about marriage, and readiness for marriage. After controlling…

  2. Marital status, childhood maltreatment, and family dysfunction: a controlled study of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald W; Shaw, Martha C; McCormick, Brett A; Allen, Jeff

    2012-10-01

    Pathological gambling is a prevalent public health problem associated with depression, substance misuse, crime, and suicide. Despite these challenges, little attention has been directed to examining its negative consequences on families and marriages, including divorce rates, childhood maltreatment, and family dysfunction. From February 2005 to June 2010, subjects with DSM-IV-defined pathological gambling and community controls were assessed for marital and family variables and indices of childhood maltreatment. The Family Assessment Device (FAD) was used to evaluate family functioning. Ninety-five subjects with DSM-IV pathological gambling and 91 control subjects without pathological gambling were recruited and assessed. They were similar in age, gender, and employment status. Persons with pathological gambling were more likely than controls to have ≥ 1 divorce (odds ratio [OR] = 2.56; 95% CI, 1.35-4.87; P = .004), to live alone (OR = 4.49; 95% CI, 1.97-10.25; P childhood maltreatment (OR = 4.02; 95% CI, 2.12-7.64; P divorce, childhood maltreatment, and the FAD roles subscale. People with pathological gambling are more likely than controls to have been divorced, to live alone, and to report having experienced childhood maltreatment than controls. They also report greater family dysfunction. © Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. The joint influence of marital status, interpregnancy interval, and neighborhood on small for gestational age birth: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuquan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpregnancy interval (IPI, marital status, and neighborhood are independently associated with birth outcomes. The joint contribution of these exposures has not been evaluated. We tested for effect modification between IPI and marriage, controlling for neighborhood. Methods We analyzed a cohort of 98,330 live births in Montréal, Canada from 1997–2001 to assess IPI and marital status in relation to small for gestational age (SGA birth. Births were categorized as subsequent-born with short (intermediate (12–35 months, or long (36+ months IPI, or as firstborn. The data had a 2-level hierarchical structure, with births nested in 49 neighborhoods. We used multilevel logistic regression to obtain adjusted effect estimates. Results Marital status modified the association between IPI and SGA birth. Being unmarried relative to married was associated with SGA birth for all IPI categories, particularly for subsequent births with short (odds ratio [OR] 1.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–1.95 and intermediate (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.26–1.74 IPIs. Subsequent births had a lower likelihood of SGA birth than firstborns. Intermediate IPIs were more protective for married (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.47–0.54 than unmarried mothers (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.56–0.76. Conclusion Being unmarried increases the likelihood of SGA birth as the IPI shortens, and the protective effect of intermediate IPIs is reduced in unmarried mothers. Marital status should be considered in recommending particular IPIs as an intervention to improve birth outcomes.

  4. Individual versus Household Migration Decision Rules: Gender and Marital Status Differences in Intentions to Migrate in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubhaju, Bina; De Jong, Gordon F

    2009-03-01

    This research tests the thesis that the neoclassical micro-economic and the new household economic theoretical assumptions on migration decision-making rules are segmented by gender, marital status, and time frame of intention to migrate. Comparative tests of both theories within the same study design are relatively rare. Utilizing data from the Causes of Migration in South Africa national migration survey, we analyze how individually held "own-future" versus alternative "household well-being" migration decision rules effect the intentions to migrate of male and female adults in South Africa. Results from the gender and marital status specific logistic regressions models show consistent support for the different gender-marital status decision rule thesis. Specifically, the "maximizing one's own future" neoclassical microeconomic theory proposition is more applicable for never married men and women, the "maximizing household income" proposition for married men with short-term migration intentions, and the "reduce household risk" proposition for longer time horizon migration intentions of married men and women. Results provide new evidence on the way household strategies and individual goals jointly affect intentions to move or stay.

  5. Influence of marital status on testosterone levels-A ten year follow-up of 1113 men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Stine A; Priskorn, Lærke; Jørgensen, Niels; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Linneberg, Allan; Juul, Anders; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2017-06-01

    Based on a large population of 1113 men aged 30-60 at baseline (mean: 44.1 years, standard deviation: 10.5), we investigated whether intra-individual changes in testosterone (T) and related reproductive hormones during a ten year period were dependent of marital status at baseline and follow-up. The studied men were part of a health survey in Denmark, conducted between 1982 and 1984 with a follow-up examination approximately ten years later. Data on reproductive hormones, measured in serum, and lifestyle and marital status were obtained at both time points. As expected, an age-related decline in testosterone was observed. However, independent of age and lifestyle, we observed that men who went from unmarried to married (n=81) during the study period experienced an accelerated age-related decline in testosterone (-6.6nmol/L) whereas men who went from married to unmarried (n=67) experienced an attenuated age-related decline (-2.3nmol/L). Men who were either married or unmarried at both time points (n=167, n=798, respectively) had a testosterone decline in between (-3.7nmol/L and -4.6nmol/L, respectively). Changes in T/LH ratio did not differ according to marital status indicating that the lowered T level is not compensated by increasing LH levels. This could suggest a modification of the gonadostat due to an adaptation to changing life circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Marital Alternatives and Marital Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, J. Richard

    1981-01-01

    Explores the usefulness of "marital alternatives" as a dimension in explaining marital stability, using longitudinal data from a panel of married, White, urban couples from 16 urban areas. Results indicated the dimension of marital alternatives appeared to be a better predictor of marital disruption than marital satisfaction. (Author/RC)

  7. Does Child Maltreatment Predict Adult Crime? Reexamining the Question in a Prospective Study of Gender Differences, Education, and Marital Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunzee; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Klika, J Bart; Lee, Jungeun Olivia; Brown, Eric C

    2015-08-01

    Bivariate analyses of adult crime and child maltreatment showed that individuals who had been maltreated as children, according to child welfare reports, subsequently committed more crime than others who had not been maltreated. Analyses of crimes by category-property, person, and society-provided further evidence of a link between child maltreatment and crime at the bivariate level. Tests of gender differences showed that crime generally is more prevalent among males, although females with a history of maltreatment were more likely than those in a no-maltreatment (comparison) group to report having had some prior involvement in crime. Surprisingly, multivariate analyses controlling for childhood socioeconomic status, gender, minority racial status, marital status, and education level showed that, with one exception (crimes against society), the significant association between child maltreatment and crime observed in bivariate tests was not maintained. Implications for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Education, Employment, Income, and Marital Status Among Adults Diagnosed With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases During Childhood or Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Matary, Wael; Dufault, Brenden; Moroz, Stan P; Schellenberg, Jeannine; Bernstein, Charles N

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to assess levels of education attained, employment, and marital status of adults diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) during childhood or adolescence, compared with healthy individuals in Canada. We performed a cross-sectional study of adults diagnosed with IBD in childhood or adolescence at Children's Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba from January 1978 through December 2007. Participants (n = 112) answered a semi-structured questionnaire on educational achievements, employment, and marital status. Patients were matched for age and sex with random healthy individuals from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (controls, 5 per patient). Conditional binary logistic regression and random-effects ordinal logistic regression models were used for analysis. Patients were followed for a mean duration of 14.3 years (range, 3.1-34.5 years). Persons with IBD were more likely to earn more money per annum and attain a post-secondary school degree or receive a diploma than controls (odds ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.60; P education levels than individuals without IBD. This observation should provide reassurance to children with IBD and their parents. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02152241. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of marital status on testosterone levels-A ten year follow-up of 1113 men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmboe, Stine A; Priskorn, Lærke; Jørgensen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Based on a large population of 1113 men aged 30-60 at baseline (mean: 44.1 years, standard deviation: 10.5), we investigated whether intra-individual changes in testosterone (T) and related reproductive hormones during a ten year period were dependent of marital status at baseline and follow...... in testosterone was observed. However, independent of age and lifestyle, we observed that men who went from unmarried to married (n=81) during the study period experienced an accelerated age-related decline in testosterone (-6.6nmol/L) whereas men who went from married to unmarried (n=67) experienced...... an attenuated age-related decline (-2.3nmol/L). Men who were either married or unmarried at both time points (n=167, n=798, respectively) had a testosterone decline in between (-3.7nmol/L and -4.6nmol/L, respectively). Changes in T/LH ratio did not differ according to marital status indicating that the lowered...

  10. Eating patterns may mediate the association between marital status, body mass index, and blood cholesterol levels in apparently healthy men and women from the ATTICA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannakoulia, Mary; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Pitsavos, Christos; Skoumas, Yannis; Stafanadis, Christodoulos

    2008-06-01

    Marital status has been recognized as a significant health-influencing factor, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The aim of the present paper was to evaluate whether eating habits mediate the relationship between marital status and levels of CVD risk factors among apparently healthy men and women from the ATTICA Study. During 2001-2002, we randomly enrolled 1514 men (18-87 years old) and 1528 women (18-89 years old) from the Attica area, Greece; the sampling was stratified by the age-gender distribution of the region. Participants underwent clinical, anthropometric and psychological assessment. Food consumption was assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Participants were classified as never married, married, divorced and widowed. Discriminant analysis revealed that vegetable consumption, followed by red meat, potatoes, poultry, and soft drinks were the factors with the higher discriminating ability among the food groups studied. In particular, dietary patterns of never married participants were characterized by the consumption of potatoes and red meat, those of married participants by nuts, legumes and fish, those of divorced participants by fruits, cereals and soft drinks, whereas those of widowed participants by dairy, vegetables, sweets and poultry. In addition, never married and divorced participants reported eating fast-foods more frequently and drink less alcohol compared to married or widowed participants. After controlling for potential confounders (i.e., age, gender, physical activity, anxiety score and smoking habits), the reported marital status of the participants was associated only with body mass index and total serum cholesterol levels. When the analysis was repeated after taking into account the information on dietary habits by creating four "new" dietary-adjusted marital status groups, no significant association was revealed between marital status and body mass index and blood cholesterol levels. This finding

  11. Racial, Income, and Marital Status Disparities in Hospital Readmissions Within a Veterans-Integrated Health Care Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Gao, Kelly; Shulan, Mollie

    2015-12-01

    Hospital readmission is an important indicator of health care quality and currently used in determining hospital reimbursement rates by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Given the important policy implications, a better understanding of factors that influence readmission rates is needed. Racial disparities in readmission have been extensively studied, but income and marital status (a postdischarge care support indicator) disparities have received limited attention. By employing three Poisson regression models controlling for different confounders on 8,718 patients in a veterans-integrated health care network, this study assessed racial, income, and martial disparities in relation to total number of readmissions. In contrast to other studies, no racial and income disparities were found, but unmarried patients experienced significantly more readmissions: 16%, after controlling for the confounders. These findings render unique insight into health care policies aimed to improve race and income disparities, while challenging policy makers to reduce readmissions for those who lack family support. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Incidence rates of in-hospital carpal tunnel syndrome in the general population and possible associations with marital status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani Carla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a socially relevant condition associated with biomechanical risk factors. We evaluated age-sex-specific incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS in central/northern Italy and explored relations with marital status. Methods Seven regions were considered (overall population, 14.9 million over 3–6-year periods between 1997 and 2002 (when out-of-hospital CTS surgery was extremely rare. Incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS were estimated based on 1 codified demographic, diagnostic and intervention data in obligatory discharge records from all Italian public/private hospitals, archived (according to residence on regional databases; 2 demographic general population data for each region. We compared (using the χscore test age-sex-specific rates between married, unmarried, divorced and widowed subsets of the general population. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for married/unmarried men and women. Results Age-standardized incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years of in-hospital cases of CTS were 166 in women and 44 in men (106 overall. Married subjects of both sexes showed higher age-specific rates with respect to unmarried men/women. SIRs were calculated comparing married vs unmarried rates of both sexes: 1.59 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.57–1.60 in women, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.40–1.45 in men. As compared with married women/men, widows/widowers both showed 2–3-fold higher incidence peaks during the fourth decade of life (beyond 50 years of age, widowed subjects showed similar trends to unmarried counterparts. Conclusion This large population-based study illustrates distinct age-related trends in men and women, and also raises the question whether marital status could be associated with CTS in the general population.

  13. An Exploration of How Marital Expectations and Socio-Economic Status Impact Post-Secondary Educational and Professional Goals of Northern California Asian Indian Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the impact of marital expectations and socio-economic status on post-secondary educational and professional goals of Northern California Asian Indian immigrant women both before and after marriage. For the purposes of this study, 15 Southeast Asian Indian immigrant women from the Sacramento metropolitan region…

  14. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  15. Marital status and living situation during a 5-year period are associated with a subsequent 10-year cognitive decline in older men: The FINE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, van B.M.; Tijhuis, M.; Kalmijn, S.; Giampaoli, S.; Nissinen, A.; Kromhout, D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the association between marital status and living situation (over 5 years) on 10-year subsequent cognitive decline. The study population consisted of 1,042 men aged 70-89 years in 1990, who participated in the longitudinal Finland, Italy, the Netherlands Elderly (known as FINE) Study.

  16. Live long and prosper? Childhood living conditions, marital status, social class in adulthood and mortality during mid-life: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Stefan; Lennartsson, Carin; Lundberg, Olle

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of childhood living conditions, marital status, and social class in adulthood on the risk of mortality during mid-life. Two questions were addressed: Is there an effect of childhood living conditions on mortality risk during mid-life and if so, is the effect mediated or modified by social class and/or marital status in adulthood? A nationally representative, Swedish, level of living survey from 1968 was used as baseline. The study included those aged 25-69 at baseline (n = 4082). Social conditions in childhood and adulthood were assessed using self-reports. These individuals were then followed for 39 years using registry data on mortality. The results showed associations between childhood living conditions, marital status, social class in adulthood and mortality during mid life. Social class and familial conditions during childhood as well as marital status and social class in adulthood all contributed to the risk of mortality during mid-life. Individuals whose father's were manual workers, who grew up in broken homes, who were unmarried, and/or were manual workers in adulthood had an increased risk of mortality during mid life. The effects of childhood conditions were, in part, both mediated and modified by social class in adulthood. The findings of this study suggest that there are structural, social conditions experienced at different stages of the life course that affect the risk of mortality during mid-life.

  17. Screening for distress, the 6th vital sign: common problems in cancer outpatients over one year in usual care: associations with marital status, sex, and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giese-Davis Janine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very few studies examine the longitudinal prevalence of problems and the awareness or use of clinical programs by patients who report these problems. Of the studies that examine age, gender and marital status as predictors of a range of patient outcomes, none examines the interactions between these demographic variables. This study examined the typical trajectory of common practical and psychosocial problems endorsed over 12 months in a usual-care sample of cancer outpatients. Specifically, we examined whether marital status, sex, age, and their interactions predicted these trajectories. We did not actively triage or refer patients in this study in order to examine the natural course of problem reports. Methods Patients completed baseline screening (N = 1196 of 1707 approached and the sample included more men (N = 696 than women (N = 498, average age 61.1 years. The most common diagnoses were gastrointestinal (27.1%, prostate (19.2%, skin (11.1% and gynecological (9.2%. Among other measures, patients completed a Common Problem Checklist and Psychosocial Resources Use questions at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months using paper and pencil surveys. Results Results indicated that patients reported psychosocial problems more often than practical and both decreased significantly over time. Younger single patients reported more practical problems than those in committed relationships. Younger patients and women of all ages reported more psychosocial problems. Among a number of interesting interactions, for practical problems, single older patients improved more; whereas among married people, younger patients improved more. For psychosocial problems we found that older female patients improved more than younger females, but among males, it was younger patients who improved more. Young single men and women reported the most past-and future-use of services. Conclusions Younger women are particularly vulnerable to experiencing

  18. Marital Biography, Social Security Receipt, and Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Fen; Brown, Susan L; Hammersmith, Anna M

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, older adults are unmarried, which could mean a larger share is at risk of economic disadvantage. Using data from the 2010 Health and Retirement Study, we chart the diverse range of marital biographies, capturing marital sequences and timing, of adults who are age eligible for Social Security and examine three indicators of economic well-being: Social Security receipt, Social Security benefit levels, and poverty status. Partnereds are disproportionately likely to receive Social Security and they enjoy relatively high Social Security benefits and very low poverty levels. Among singles, economic well-being varies by marital biography and gender. Gray divorced and never-married women face considerable economic insecurity. Their Social Security benefits are relatively low, and their poverty rates are quite high (over 25%), indicating Social Security alone is not sufficient to prevent these women from falling into poverty. By comparison, gray widoweds are the most advantaged singles.

  19. Marital Violence and Women's Employment and Property Status: Evidence from North Indian Villages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh); A. Chhachhi (Amrita); M. Bhattacharyya (Manasi)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDominant development policy approaches recommend women’s employment on the grounds that it facilitates their empowerment, which in turn is believed to be instrumental in enhancing women’s well-being. However, empirical work on the relationship between women’s employment status and

  20. Changes in Family Composition and Marital Status in Families with a Young Child with Cognitive Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Chris; Emerson, Eric; Graham, Hilary; Blacher, Jan; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2010-01-01

    Background: Few studies have investigated parental separation, partnering and re-partnering among population-based cohorts of children at risk of intellectual or developmental disabilities. Methods: Secondary analysis of data extracted from Waves 1-3 of the UK's Millennium Cohort Study. Information on the residence status of parents at Waves 1, 2…

  1. Relationships among Young Adults' Marital Messages Received, Marital Attitudes, and Relationship Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurts, W. Matthew; Myers, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined relationships among university students' marital messages received (MMR), marital attitudes, and romantic relationship self-efficacy (RSE). Results indicated that students' marital attitudes and romantic relationship status predicted their level of RSE. The authors found differences in MMR, marital attitudes, and RSE on the…

  2. A social work study on effects of pre-marriage relationship on long-term marital status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmael Mosavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is one of the most important events of people's lives and when it happens, it could have both positive and negative consequences. There are different types of marriage such as traditional and modern ones. In traditional marriage, there are some marriage arrangements where man and woman can meet and talk for a short time and in case both parties are interested, marriage is initiated. There is also another type of marriage where girl and boy meet each other for a while, in some events, they may have some limited or unlimited relationships, and once they are interested in each other, they may marry each other. This relatively new type of marriage is popular in many western countries but it is still a controversial type of marriage in eastern countries. In this paper, we perform an empirical study on the effect of pre-marriage relationship on long-term marital status. The results indicate that pre-marriage relationship can reduce after marriage conflicts. The people who had pre-marriage had less aggressive behavior compared with the people who did not.

  3. Exploring the Relationship Between Spiritual Well-Being and Death Anxiety in Survivors of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Moderating Role of Sex, Marital Status and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Mohammad Ali; Sharif, Saeed Pahlevan; Yaghoobzadeh, Ameneh; Yeoh, Ken Kyid; Panarello, Bianca

    2018-04-01

    Previous empirical studies have shown that both spiritual well-being (SWB) and death anxiety (DA) significantly affect the mental health of patients with acute diseases. In this regard, our paper contributes to the extant literature by scrutinizing the conditional relationship between SWB and DA as well as the various mechanisms underpinning such a relationship in patients with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). A descriptive, correlational methodology was utilized. Our main sample consisted of 300 patients with acute myocardial infraction who were hospitalized in a specialized medical institution in Iran throughout a two-month period (i.e. August-October 2015). Patients completed Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) and Templer's Death Anxiety Scale (TDAS). Even though our study showed that the relationship between SWB and DA in patients with AMI is non-significant, we found that (1) single patients with higher SWB have lower DA, (2) single patients with higher SWB as well as social support have significantly lower DA, and (3) for single men/men without social support, there is a negative relationship between SWB and DA. The relationship between SWB and DA is influenced by factors such as sex, marital status and social support. In addition, the specific nature of this relationship (i.e. strength and sign) is dependent upon the sociodemographic characteristics of patients as well as other contextual influences. Result revealed that although relationship between SWB and DA is non-significant, this is influenced by factors such as sex and social support. In addition, the specific nature of this relationship (i.e. strength and sign) is dependent upon the sociodemographic characteristics of patients as well as other contextual influences.

  4. Does marital status matter in an HIV hyperendemic country? Findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shisana, Olive; Risher, Kathryn; Celentano, David D; Zungu, Nompumelelo; Rehle, Thomas; Ngcaweni, Busani; Evans, Meredith G B

    2016-01-01

    South Africa has experienced declining marriage rates and the increasing practice of cohabitation without marriage. This study aims to improve the understanding of the relationship between marital status and HIV in South Africa, an HIV hyperendemic country, through an analysis of findings from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey. The nationally representative population-based cross-sectional survey collected data on HIV and socio-demographic and behavioural determinants in South Africa. This analysis considered respondents aged 16 years and older who consented to participate in the survey and provided dried blood spot specimens for HIV testing (N = 17,356). After controlling for age, race, having multiple sexual partners, condom use at last sex, urban/rural dwelling and level of household income, those who were married living with their spouse had significantly reduced odds of being HIV-positive compared to all other marital spouses groups. HIV incidence was 0.27% among respondents who were married living with their spouses; the highest HIV incidence was found in the cohabiting group (2.91%). Later marriage (after age 24) was associated with increased odds of HIV prevalence. Our analysis suggests an association between marital status and HIV prevalence and incidence in contemporary South Africa, where odds of being HIV-positive were found to be lower among married individuals who lived with their spouses compared to all other marital status groups. HIV prevention messages therefore need to be targeted to unmarried populations, especially cohabitating populations. As low socio-economic status, low social cohesion and the resulting destabilization of sexual relationships may explain the increased risk of HIV among unmarried populations, it is necessary to address structural issues including poverty that create an environment unfavourable to stable sexual relationships.

  5. The increase in cohabitation and the role of marital status in family policies: A comparison of 12 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez Gassen, N.; Perelli-Harris, B.

    2015-01-01

    The role of union status, or whether people are married, cohabiting or single, is seldom considered in welfare state research. This perspective, however, is important, since many welfare state policies focus on marriage and do not apply to unmarried cohabitants. This lack of legal regulation may

  6. Marital status, widowhood duration, gender and health outcomes: a cross-sectional study among older adults in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Perkins

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has demonstrated health benefits of marriage and the potential for worse outcomes during widowhood in some populations. However, few studies have assessed the relevance of widowhood and widowhood duration to a variety of health-related outcomes and chronic diseases among older adults in India, and even fewer have examined these relationships stratified by gender. Methods Using a cross-sectional representative sample of 9,615 adults aged 60 years or older from 7 states in diverse regions of India, we examine the relationship between widowhood and self-rated health, psychological distress, cognitive ability, and four chronic diseases before and after adjusting for demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, living with children, and rural–urban location for men and women, separately. We then assess these associations when widowhood accounts for duration. Results Being widowed as opposed to married was associated with worse health outcomes for women after adjusting for other explanatory factors. Widowhood in general was not associated with any outcomes for men except for cognitive ability, though men who were widowed within 0–4 years were at greater risk for diabetes compared to married men. Moreover, recently widowed women and women who were widowed long-term were more likely to experience psychological distress, worse self-rated health, and hypertension, even after adjusting for other explanatory variables, whereas women widowed 5–9 years were not, compared to married women. Conclusions Gender, the duration of widowhood, and type of outcome are each relevant pieces of information when assessing the potential for widowhood to negatively impact health. Future research should explore how the mechanisms linking widowhood to health vary over the course of widowhood. Incorporating information about marital relationships into the design of intervention programs may help better target potential

  7. Emotional eating, marital status and history of physical abuse predict 2-year weight loss in weight loss surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedin, Sharlene; Madan, Alok; Correll, Jennifer; Crowley, Nina; Malcolm, Robert; Karl Byrne, T; Borckardt, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    Weight loss surgery (WLS) is an effective weight loss treatment for individuals with severe obesity. Psychosocial factors can affect short-term WLS outcomes. This study sought to identify psychosocial predictors of medium-term outcomes. In this prospective study, 250 consecutive WLS candidates were evaluated between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010. Each completed baseline medical, surgical, and psychological evaluations as part of standard of care. Two hundred and four patients had surgery (81.6%). Successful surgical outcome was defined as ≥50% excess weight loss two years post-surgery. Comparison of study sample (n=80) and those lost to follow-up (n=124) revealed negligible differences across baseline characteristics. At follow-up, 60% (n=48) of the sample was classified as a success with an average of 72.58% (std dev=13.01%) excess weight lost. The remaining 40% (n=32) was classified as a failure with an average of 33.98% (std dev=13.19%) excess weight lost. Logistic regression revealed that pre-surgical marital status, emotional eating, and history of physical abuse were independently associated with outcome variables, pemotionally driven disordered eating patterns are associated with 7.4 times increased odds of medium-term WLS success. A history of physical abuse is associated with an 84% decreased odds of successful medium-term outcomes. Further research that studies both the quality and impact of spousal support on weight loss as well as longer-term effects of emotional eating on outcomes is needed. Addressing longer-standing consequence of abuse may improve WLS outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Systematic Approach to Marital Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkmeyer, Don; Carlson, Jon

    1986-01-01

    Presents a systematic approach to enriching marital relationships. The history and current status of marital enrichment is reviewed. An Adlerian approach to marital enrichment is described. Applications of the program in enrichment groups, marriage therapy and couple groups are included. (Author)

  9. Influence of education, marital status, occupation, and the place of living on skeletal status, fracture prevalence, and the course and effectiveness of osteoporotic therapy in women in the RAC-OST-POL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluskiewicz, Wojciech; Adamczyk, Piotr; Czekajło, Aleksandra; Grzeszczak, Władysław; Drozdzowska, Bogna

    2014-01-01

    The RAC-OST-POL population-based, epidemiological study provided data concerning the influence of education, marital status, occupation, and the place of living (residence) on skeletal status, fracture prevalence, and the course and effectiveness of osteoporotic therapy in 625 women older than 55 years, all of them recruited from the District of Raciborz in Poland. Their mean age was 66.4 ± 7.8 years. All the women completed a specially designed questionnaire. The skeletal status was assessed by femoral neck (FN) and total hip (TH) densitometry, using a Lunar DPX system (USA). In univariate analyses, taking into consideration the age differences, bone mineralization was dependent on marital status (Z score for FN and TH was significantly higher in widows than in divorcees; p education was associated with a more frequent use of vitamin D (χ(2) = 8.49, df = 3, p women (30%) and least commonly by divorcees (11.8%) (χ(2) = 11.7, df = 3, p = 0.01). Vitamin D was more often used among women from the urban area of Raciborz than by those from surrounding rural areas (χ(2) = 9.2, df = 1, p Women with sedentary jobs demonstrated the highest frequency of intake for vitamin D (χ(2) = 9.92, df = 3, p education, marital status, place of living, and type of occupation may have impacts on implementation of osteoporosis-preventing health programs.

  10. Does inclusion of education and marital status improve SCORE performance in central and eastern europe and former soviet union? findings from MONICA and HAPIEE cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vikhireva

    Full Text Available The SCORE scale predicts the 10-year risk of fatal atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD, based on conventional risk factors. The high-risk version of SCORE is recommended for Central and Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union (CEE/FSU, due to high CVD mortality rates in these countries. Given the pronounced social gradient in cardiovascular mortality in the region, it is important to consider social factors in the CVD risk prediction. We investigated whether adding education and marital status to SCORE benefits its prognostic performance in two sets of population-based CEE/FSU cohorts.The WHO MONICA (MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease cohorts from the Czech Republic, Poland (Warsaw and Tarnobrzeg, Lithuania (Kaunas, and Russia (Novosibirsk were followed from the mid-1980s (577 atherosclerotic CVD deaths among 14,969 participants with non-missing data. The HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol, and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe study follows Czech, Polish (Krakow, and Russian (Novosibirsk cohorts from 2002-05 (395 atherosclerotic CVD deaths in 19,900 individuals with non-missing data.In MONICA and HAPIEE, the high-risk SCORE ≥5% at baseline strongly and significantly predicted fatal CVD both before and after adjustment for education and marital status. After controlling for SCORE, lower education and non-married status were significantly associated with CVD mortality in some samples. SCORE extension by these additional risk factors only slightly improved indices of calibration and discrimination (integrated discrimination improvement <5% in men and ≤1% in women.Extending SCORE by education and marital status failed to substantially improve its prognostic performance in population-based CEE/FSU cohorts.

  11. Does inclusion of education and marital status improve SCORE performance in central and eastern europe and former soviet union? findings from MONICA and HAPIEE cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhireva, Olga; Broda, Grazyna; Kubinova, Ruzena; Malyutina, Sofia; Pająk, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Skodova, Zdena; Simonova, Galina; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek

    2014-01-01

    The SCORE scale predicts the 10-year risk of fatal atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), based on conventional risk factors. The high-risk version of SCORE is recommended for Central and Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union (CEE/FSU), due to high CVD mortality rates in these countries. Given the pronounced social gradient in cardiovascular mortality in the region, it is important to consider social factors in the CVD risk prediction. We investigated whether adding education and marital status to SCORE benefits its prognostic performance in two sets of population-based CEE/FSU cohorts. The WHO MONICA (MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) cohorts from the Czech Republic, Poland (Warsaw and Tarnobrzeg), Lithuania (Kaunas), and Russia (Novosibirsk) were followed from the mid-1980s (577 atherosclerotic CVD deaths among 14,969 participants with non-missing data). The HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol, and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe) study follows Czech, Polish (Krakow), and Russian (Novosibirsk) cohorts from 2002-05 (395 atherosclerotic CVD deaths in 19,900 individuals with non-missing data). In MONICA and HAPIEE, the high-risk SCORE ≥5% at baseline strongly and significantly predicted fatal CVD both before and after adjustment for education and marital status. After controlling for SCORE, lower education and non-married status were significantly associated with CVD mortality in some samples. SCORE extension by these additional risk factors only slightly improved indices of calibration and discrimination (integrated discrimination improvement <5% in men and ≤1% in women). Extending SCORE by education and marital status failed to substantially improve its prognostic performance in population-based CEE/FSU cohorts.

  12. Workload and the trajectory of marital satisfaction in newlyweds: Job satisfaction, gender, and parental status as moderators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, E.F. van; Kluwer, E.S.; Karney, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Stress, on average, is bad for relationships. Yet stress at work is not always associated with negative relationship outcomes. The premise of the current study was that associations between workload and trajectories of marital satisfaction depend on circumstances that may constrain or facilitate

  13. Marital status and cardiovascular risk in French and Swedish automotive industry workers--cross sectional results from the Renault-Volvo Coeur study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumlin, L; Latscha, G; Orth-Gomér, K; Dimberg, L; Lanoiselée, C; Simon, A; Eriksson, B

    2001-04-01

    To compare the coronary risk profiles in a sample of the French and Swedish automotive industry employees who were married/cohabitant, divorced or single (never married). A cross-sectional study comparison from biological and questionnaire data between the French and Swedish samples. Occupational health departments at Renault (employees from the north-west of France) and Volvo (employees from the south-west of Sweden). Two random samples of males aged between 45 and 50 years were examined in 1993, from Renault 1000, and from Volvo 1000. Biological data including cholesterol, blood pressure as well as the Framingham risk index. Self reported information regarding marital status, smoking, exercise, alcohol habits, and work stress assessed by the Karasek method, private social support indices, and type A behaviour according to the Bortner scale. More employees were married/cohabitant and fewer divorced or single at Renault. Apart from waist/hip ratio being marginally lower in Swedish single men, compared with married and divorced, no significant difference in biological cardiac risk factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure or Framingham risk index) was seen between the subgroups from any of the two countries. Compared with married/cohabitant men, it was shown that in men living alone smoking was more prevalent at Renault and Volvo. These men also showed less type A behaviour, a lower work control and a lower work support and fewer close friends. Alcohol consumption was reported in smaller amounts for Volvo employees living alone compared with married or divorced employees. Married/cohabitant and divorced staff showed similar values regarding all measured variables when compared within each country. Employees living alone in both France (Renault) and Sweden (Volvo) automotive companies seem to have increased nontraditional cardiac risk factors pertaining to life style and social network compared with married or divorced men. These results, in combination with the

  14. Factors affecting the physical and mental health of older adults in China: The importance of marital status, child proximity, and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindy Williams

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is accumulating about the association between strong family ties and the emotional and physical welfare of older adults, and researchers have identified negative consequences of being unmarried, being childless, and/or living alone. These associations have been recognized in multiple contexts, including in Asia where living with a spouse and/or grown children has been shown in some studies to improve elderly well-being. Social support, especially family support, is expected to continue to be important where populations are aging and social safety nets are weak. Using longitudinal data from the 2010 and 2012 waves of the China Family Panel Studies, we focus on the effects of marital status at times 1 and 2, changes in marital status between the two surveys, and other family-related indicators of social connectedness on ratings of depression, levels of life satisfaction, and self-reported physical health among those aged 50 and over. Our sample includes 9831 respondents who have valid data on wellbeing indicators for Wave 1 and Wave 2, as well as complete information on the other covariates controlled in our analysis. In analyses of the full sample, those who were married at both points in time reported lower depression scores than those who were never-married, divorced, or widowed at both time points, and those whose unions dissolved in the interval. Those who were married at both times also generally reported greater levels of life satisfaction than those who were never married at both time points and those who became divorced during the interval. Important underlying gender differences are observed both for life satisfaction and depression. In addition, those who were married at both time points reported being in better physical health than those who became widowed during the interval (significant primarily for women, and those who had never been married (significant primarily for men. Our study contributes to the literature on social

  15. Types of marital intimacy and prevalence of emotional illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, E M; Patton, D; Neron, C A; Linker, W

    1986-11-01

    Epidemiological research has demonstrated that married individuals generally experience better emotional health than the single, divorced and widowed. The married populations in these studies were not evaluated on the basis of the quality of their marital relationships. Research on the interpersonal quality of marital relationships in the general married population has rarely been reported in the psychiatric literature. A sample of the general married population (n = 250 couples) completed a self-report questionnaire which measures the quality and the quantity of intimacy in marriage. Four types of marital patterns were operationally defined by total intimacy score, pattern of scale profile, and social desirability scores. The relative frequencies of these types of marriages are reported. The prevalence of symptoms of non-psychotic emotional illness in one or both spouses in the four categories of marriage is reported. Thirty-one percent (31%) of the couples report marriages with absent and/or deficient intimacy. Couples with "absent and/or deficient" marital intimacy had a significantly higher proportion of spouses with symptoms of non-psychotic emotional illness. This study suggests that previous research may have confounded the variables of marital status and marital quality in the study of psychiatric disorder. These studies may have under-estimated the positive effect of an "optimally" intimate relationship.

  16. Investigation of quality of life in mothers of children withcerebral palsy in Iran: association with socio-economic status,marital satisfaction and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayatzadeh, Mohammad Mahani; Rostami, Hamid Reza; Amirsalari, Susan; Karimloo, Masood

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the quality of life (QOL) of Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy (MCCPs) with mothers of Typically Developing (TD) children as a Control Group (CG). The association of the mediating variables including socio-economic status (SES), marital satisfaction and fatigue with maternal QOL was also evaluated. The MCCPs group consisted of 120 mothers (mean age: 30.3 ± 5.5 years) of children with CP. The CG included 100 mothers (mean age: 29.9 ± 4.5 years) of TD children. Demographic characteristics of the participants were recorded and the data was collected by World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), SES Questionnaire, Index of Marital Satisfaction (IMS) and Fatigue Severity Scale-Persian (FSS-P). Data analysis was done by SPSS version 16.0. The QOL and SES were lower, while FSS-P and IMS were higher in MCCPs group than CG (p marital satisfaction and fatigue so, maternal empowerment in terms of these mediators and family-centered approach are recommended. • Improper activity of trapezius muscle motor units can be a reason of the cervicogenic headache. • Increased muscle tension at rest can lead to decrease of its contractile properties. • Rehabilitation of patients is effective when includes first postisometric relaxation procedures and myofascial mobilization of trigger points, then head protraction and retraction exercises according to McKenzie therapy and finally muscles strengthening exercises supplemented with self-control of the correct body posture.

  17. Women of the 1950s and the "normative" life course: the implications of childlessness, fertility timing, and marital status for psychological well-being in late midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koropeckyj-Cox, Tanya; Pienta, Amy Mehraban; Brown, Tyson H

    2007-01-01

    We explore women's psychological well-being in late midlife in relation to childlessness and timing of entry into motherhood. Using two U.S. surveys, Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (1992) and National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH) (Sweet, Bumpass, & Call, 1988), we assess the well-being of childless women in their 50s compared to mothers with early, delayed, or normatively timed first births. We focus on the cohorts born between 1928 and 1941, who experienced strong normative pressures during the baby boom with regard to marriage and child-bearing. We find few differences among childless women but lower well-being among early mothers, related to singlehood and poorer socioeconomic status. Unmarried mothers are significantly disadvantaged regardless of maternal timing, controlling for socioeconomic status. Current maternal demands are independently related to well-being and help to explain observed differences in family satisfaction. Overall, childlessness and off-time child-bearing are related to midlife well-being through their link with more proximate factors, particularly current marital status, health, and socioeconomic status.

  18. Enhanced solid waste management by understanding the effects of gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions on attitudes and practices related to street littering in Nablus - Palestinian territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A.; Arafat, Hassan A.; Daoud, Raeda; Shwahneh, Hadeel

    2009-01-01

    Litter is recognized as a form of street pollution and a key issue for solid waste managers. Nablus district (West Bank, Palestinian Territory), which has an established network of urban and rural roads, suffers from a wide-spread litter problem that is associated with these roads and is growing steadily with a well-felt negative impact on public health and the environment. The purpose of this research was to study the effects of four socio-economic characteristics (gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions) of district residents on their attitudes, practices, and behavior regarding street litter generation and to suggest possible remedial actions. All four characteristics were found to have strong correlations, not only with littering behavior and practices, but also with potential litter prevention strategies. In particular, the impact of religious convictions of the respondents on their littering habits and attitudes was very clear and interesting to observe

  19. Enhanced solid waste management by understanding the effects of gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions on attitudes and practices related to street littering in Nablus - Palestinian territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Arafat, Hassan A; Daoud, Raeda; Shwahneh, Hadeel

    2009-01-01

    Litter is recognized as a form of street pollution and a key issue for solid waste managers. Nablus district (West Bank, Palestinian Territory), which has an established network of urban and rural roads, suffers from a wide-spread litter problem that is associated with these roads and is growing steadily with a well-felt negative impact on public health and the environment. The purpose of this research was to study the effects of four socio-economic characteristics (gender, income, marital status, and religious convictions) of district residents on their attitudes, practices, and behavior regarding street litter generation and to suggest possible remedial actions. All four characteristics were found to have strong correlations, not only with littering behavior and practices, but also with potential litter prevention strategies. In particular, the impact of religious convictions of the respondents on their littering habits and attitudes was very clear and interesting to observe.

  20. Are Married Men Healthier than Single Women? A Gender Comparison of the Health Effects of Marriage and Marital Satisfaction in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woojin; Kim, Roeul

    2015-01-01

    Although Asian societies are remarkably different from Western societies in terms of sociocultural characteristics, little is known about the gender differences in the health effects of marriage and marital satisfaction in Asian countries. Using a randomly sampled dataset from the 2006 East Asian Social Survey comprising 8528 individuals from China, Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea, this study performs analyses using a multivariate logistic regression model to predict the probability for a man or a woman to report poor health. Our results differ quite significantly from those of most studies focusing on Western countries. Considering marital satisfaction, there may be no health benefits from marriage for a specific gender in a given country, because the health loss associated with a dissatisfied marriage usually supersedes the health benefits from marriage. Moreover, women may reap greater health benefits from marriage than men. Additionally, those most likely to report poor health are found to be married and dissatisfied men or women, rather than never-married individuals. The present study argues the need to design and carry out a gender- and country-specific social health policy approach to target individuals suffering from poor health, thereby reducing the gender differences in health status.

  1. Are Married Men Healthier than Single Women? A Gender Comparison of the Health Effects of Marriage and Marital Satisfaction in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woojin; Kim, Roeul

    2015-01-01

    Background Although Asian societies are remarkably different from Western societies in terms of sociocultural characteristics, little is known about the gender differences in the health effects of marriage and marital satisfaction in Asian countries. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a randomly sampled dataset from the 2006 East Asian Social Survey comprising 8528 individuals from China, Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea, this study performs analyses using a multivariate logistic regression model to predict the probability for a man or a woman to report poor health. Our results differ quite significantly from those of most studies focusing on Western countries. Considering marital satisfaction, there may be no health benefits from marriage for a specific gender in a given country, because the health loss associated with a dissatisfied marriage usually supersedes the health benefits from marriage. Moreover, women may reap greater health benefits from marriage than men. Additionally, those most likely to report poor health are found to be married and dissatisfied men or women, rather than never-married individuals. Conclusion/Significance The present study argues the need to design and carry out a gender- and country-specific social health policy approach to target individuals suffering from poor health, thereby reducing the gender differences in health status. PMID:26230841

  2. Current Status of Single-incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Irfan; Ciancio, Fabio; Ferrara, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in minimally invasive surgery have centered on reducing the number of incisions required, which has led to the development of the single-incision laparoscopic technique. A panel of European single-incision laparoscopy experts met to discuss the current status of, and the future ex...... to be published to confirm its value. An ideal training route for surgeons who are adopting the technique was agreed upon, as was the need for a single, large clinical registry of data....

  3. Marital and Life Satisfaction among Gifted Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone-McGovern, Kristin M.; Boo, Jenelle N.; Vannatter, Aarika

    2012-01-01

    Spousal giftedness, dual-career status, and gender were studied in relation to marital and life satisfaction among gifted adults. The data for the present study were collected twice over a 5-year period in order to examine the stability of the findings over time. Results indicated that marital satisfaction was significantly related to life…

  4. Breast cancer, sickness absence, income and marital status. A study on life situation 1 year prior diagnosis compared to 3 and 5 years after diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Eaker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Improved cancer survival poses important questions about future life conditions of the survivor. We examined the possible influence of a breast cancer diagnosis on subsequent working and marital status, sickness absence and income. MATERIALS: We conducted a matched cohort study including 4,761 women 40-59 years of age and registered with primary breast cancer in a Swedish population-based clinical register during 1993-2003, and 2,3805 women without breast cancer. Information on socioeconomic standing was obtained from a social database 1 year prior and 3 and 5 years following the diagnosis. In Conditional Poisson Regression models, risk ratios (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated to assess the impact of a breast cancer diagnosis. FINDINGS: Three years after diagnosis, women who had had breast cancer more often had received sickness benefits (RR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.40-1.58 or disability pension (RR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.37-1.58 than had women without breast cancer. We found no effect on income (RR = 0.99, welfare payments (RR = 0.98, or marital status (RR = 1.02. A higher use of sickness benefits and disability pension was evident in all stages of the disease, although the difference in use of sickness benefits decreased after 5 years, whereas the difference in disability pension increased. For woman with early stage breast cancer, the sickness absence was higher following diagnosis among those with low education, who had undergone mastectomy, and had received chemo- or hormonal therapy. Neither tumour size nor presence of lymph nodes metastasis was associated with sickness absence after adjustment for treatment. INTERPRETATION: Even in early stage breast cancer, a diagnosis negatively influences working capacity both 3 and 5 years after diagnosis, and it seems that the type of treatment received had the largest impact. A greater focus needs to be put on rehabilitation of breast cancer patients, work-place adaptations and

  5. Breast Cancer, Sickness Absence, Income and Marital Status. A Study on Life Situation 1 Year Prior Diagnosis Compared to 3 and 5 Years after Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaker, Sonja; Wigertz, Annette; Lambert, Paul C.; Bergkvist, Leif; Ahlgren, Johan; Lambe, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Background Improved cancer survival poses important questions about future life conditions of the survivor. We examined the possible influence of a breast cancer diagnosis on subsequent working and marital status, sickness absence and income. Materials We conducted a matched cohort study including 4,761 women 40–59 years of age and registered with primary breast cancer in a Swedish population-based clinical register during 1993–2003, and 2,3805 women without breast cancer. Information on socioeconomic standing was obtained from a social database 1 year prior and 3 and 5 years following the diagnosis. In Conditional Poisson Regression models, risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated to assess the impact of a breast cancer diagnosis. Findings Three years after diagnosis, women who had had breast cancer more often had received sickness benefits (RR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.40–1.58) or disability pension (RR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.37–1.58) than had women without breast cancer. We found no effect on income (RR = 0.99), welfare payments (RR = 0.98), or marital status (RR = 1.02). A higher use of sickness benefits and disability pension was evident in all stages of the disease, although the difference in use of sickness benefits decreased after 5 years, whereas the difference in disability pension increased. For woman with early stage breast cancer, the sickness absence was higher following diagnosis among those with low education, who had undergone mastectomy, and had received chemo- or hormonal therapy. Neither tumour size nor presence of lymph nodes metastasis was associated with sickness absence after adjustment for treatment. Interpretation Even in early stage breast cancer, a diagnosis negatively influences working capacity both 3 and 5 years after diagnosis, and it seems that the type of treatment received had the largest impact. A greater focus needs to be put on rehabilitation of breast cancer patients, work

  6. Nutritional status and health profile among single mothers in Kota ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... subjects have normal BMI, 6.0% of them fall in the category of underweight, 39.0% were overweight and 22.0% were obese. It is suggested that future intervention programs should focus on preventing obesity problems related to chronic diseases. Keywords: nutritional status; single mother; health profile; Kelantan; obesity ...

  7. Marital status as a candidate moderator variable of male-female differences in sexual jealousy: the need for representative population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, M

    2001-04-01

    Evolutionary psychological theories predict pronounced and universal male-female differences in sexual jealousy. Recent cross-cultural research, using the forced-choice jealousy items pioneered by Buss, et al., 1992, repeatedly found a large sex differential on these self-report measures: men significantly more often than women choose their mate's imagined sexual infidelity to be more distressing or upsetting to them than an imagined emotional infidelity. However, this body of evidence is solely based on undergraduate samples and does not take into account demographic factors. This study examined male-female differences in sexual jealousy in a community sample (N = 335, Eastern Austria). Within a logistic regression model, with other variables controlled for, marital status was a stronger predictor for sexual jealousy than respondents' sex. Contrary to previous research, the sex differential's effect size was only modest. These findings stress the pitfalls of prematurely generalizing evidence from undergraduate samples to the general population and the need for representative population samples in this research area.

  8. Effect of marital status on death rates. Part 1: High accuracy exploration of the Farr-Bertillon effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-05-01

    The Farr-Bertillon law says that for all age-groups the death rate of married people is lower than the death rate of people who are not married (i.e. single, widowed or divorced). Although this law has been known for over 150 years, it has never been established with well-controlled accuracy (e.g. error bars). This even let some authors argue that it was a statistical artifact. It is true that the data must be selected with great care, especially for age groups of small size (e.g. widowers under 25). The observations reported in this paper were selected in the way experiments are designed in physics, that is to say with the objective of minimizing error bars. Data appropriate for mid-age groups may be unsuitable for young age groups and vice versa. The investigation led to the following results. (1) The FB effect is very similar for men and women, except that (at least in western countries) its amplitude is 20% higher for men. (2) There is a marked difference between single/divorced persons on the one hand, for whom the effect is largest around the age of 40, and widowed persons on the other hand, for whom the effect is largest around the age of 25. (3) When different causes of death are distinguished, the effect is largest for suicide and smallest for cancer. For heart disease and cerebrovascular accidents, the fact of being married divides the death rate by 2.2 compared to non-married persons. (4) For young widowers the death rates are up to 10 times higher than for married persons of same age. This extreme form of the FB effect will be referred to as the ;young widower effect;. Chinese data are used to explore this effect more closely. A possible connection between the FB effect and Martin Raff's ;Stay alive; effect for the cells in an organism is discussed in the last section.

  9. Subjective health status of single homeless people in Sheffield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, L; George, S L

    1994-03-01

    A census of single homeless people was carried out over a single 12-hour period in Sheffield. Places of residence of homeless people were identified by local workers with homeless people. Participants completed a questionnaire designed to provide data relating to their demography, employment history, contact with welfare agencies, social status, prison history, past and family medical history, contact with health services, perceived health status as measured by the Nottingham Health Profile, and anxiety and depression measured using the Foulds Delusions Symptoms States Inventory/State of Anxiety and Depression DSSI/sAD. Three hundred and seventy-nine single homeless individuals were contacted. Reliable data were available on 340. The population was heterogeneous with respect to perceived health status, but it was significantly worse than a standard London population on all dimensions. Those with a self-reported history of psychiatric illness had a significantly worse perceived health status on all dimensions than those without such a history. Those reporting a history of admission to psychiatric hospital had a significantly worse status in two dimensions: mobility, reflecting greater age, and more significantly social isolation, consistent with findings in other de-institutionalised populations. Anxiety and depression, measured using the Foulds sAD scale, was raised in all groups in the study, but did not differentiate between those with and without a self-reported psychiatric history, or between those with and without a self-reported history of psychiatric admission. This suggests that these symptoms are a result rather than a cause of homelessness, and that a broad social solution to mental illness in homeless people is needed in addition to specific medical interventions.

  10. Mindfulness and Marital Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Langer, Ellen; Burpee, Leslie C.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships among mindfulness, marital satisfaction, and perceived spousal similarity. All 95 subjects responded to a questionnaire measuring each of these variables, and an additional series of demographic variables. A significant positive relationship was found between mindfulness and marital satisfaction, with no statistically significant relationship found between perceived spousal similarity and marital satisfaction. There was a stronger correlation between ...

  11. Sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior by education and marital status before and after admission to hospital. A register-based cohort study of the Danish population aged 50+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhn, Andreas; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Rau, Roland

    to hospital between 1999 and 2008. For this population, we identified all contacts with GPs between 1996 and 2011 to quantify the sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior within the 3-year periods before and after hospitalization, and to estimate the impact of the civil and educational status on the sex...... differentials in treatment-seeking. We found women having consistently more GP contacts across all ages, but a narrowing of the treatment-seeking behavior shortly before and after admission to hospital. We moreover found a gradient of the educational and the marital status, suggesting that groups with higher...

  12. The sexual division of labour within couples in France according to their marital status:A study based on time - use surveys from 1985-1986, 1998-1999, and 2009-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Kandil, Lamia; Périvier, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the division of domestic tasks within the couple according to their marital status as well as how this has changed since the 1980s based on three INSEE time-use surveys (1985-86, 1998-99 and 2009-10). The ordinary least squares (OLS) method is complemented by the matching method, which is used to account for the self-selection of the couples in terms of their observable characteristics in different forms of union (marriage, cohabitation an...

  13. Predicting Marital Therapy Dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Scot M.; Crane, D. Russell

    1991-01-01

    Attempted to predict therapy dropouts using data gathered at marital therapy intake with 474 couples seeking marital therapy who attended at least 1 session. Significant predictors of dropping out included having less than two children, having a male intake clinician, and presenting problem relating only to one spouse. (Author/ABL)

  14. Type T Marital Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Frank; Carlson, Jon

    1991-01-01

    Briefly reviews Farley's Type T theory of personality and then considers a range of issues in marital therapy from the perspective of Type T. Suggests that Type T theory may be relevant in dealing with infidelity, sexual problems, love, marital abuse, child rearing, drug and alcohol use, money, division of household labor, recreation, and…

  15. Sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior by education and marital status before and after admission to hospital. A register-based cohort study of the Danish population aged 50+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhn, Andreas; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Rau, Roland

    A large body of previous research has shown that men tend to seek medical help less than women, which can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, and might explain a portion of the female advantage in survival. Using Danish register data, we identified all individuals aged 50+ who were admitted...... to hospital between 1999 and 2008. For this population, we identified all contacts with GPs between 1996 and 2011 to quantify the sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior within the 3-year periods before and after hospitalization, and to estimate the impact of the civil and educational status on the sex...... differentials in treatment-seeking. We found women having consistently more GP contacts across all ages, but a narrowing of the treatment-seeking behavior shortly before and after admission to hospital. We moreover found a gradient of the educational and the marital status, suggesting that groups with higher...

  16. Trajectories of Conflict over Raising Adolescent Children and Marital Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined trajectories of marital satisfaction among couples with adolescent children and evaluated how changes in parents' conflict over raising adolescent children were associated with changes in marital satisfaction over 4 years. Using a prospective, longitudinal research design and controlling for family socioeconomic status,…

  17. Marriage Matters But How Much? Marital Centrality Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian J; Hall, Scott S; Goff, Saige

    2015-01-01

    Marriage, once a gateway to adulthood, is no longer as widely considered a requirement for achieving adult status. With declining marriage rates and delayed marital transitions, some have wondered whether current young adults have rejected the traditional notion of marriage. Utilizing a sample of 571 young adults, the present study explored how marital centrality (the expected importance to be placed on the marital role relative to other adult roles) functioned as a unique and previously unexplored marital belief among young adults. Results suggested that marriage remains an important role for many young adults. On average, young adults expected that marriage would be more important to their life than parenting, careers, or leisure activities. Marital centrality profiles were found to significantly differ based on both gender and religiosity. Marital centrality was also associated with various outcomes including binge-drinking and sexual activity. Specifically, the more central marriage was expected to be, the less young adults engaged in risk-taking or sexual behaviors.

  18. Female scarcity reduces women's marital ages and increases variance in men's marital ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Daniel J; Fitzgerald, Carey J; Peterson, Tom

    2010-08-05

    When women are scarce in a population relative to men, they have greater bargaining power in romantic relationships and thus may be able to secure male commitment at earlier ages. Male motivation for long-term relationship commitment may also be higher, in conjunction with the motivation to secure a prospective partner before another male retains her. However, men may also need to acquire greater social status and resources to be considered marriageable. This could increase the variance in male marital age, as well as the average male marital age. We calculated the Operational Sex Ratio, and means, medians, and standard deviations in marital ages for women and men for the 50 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United States with 2000 U.S Census data. As predicted, where women are scarce they marry earlier on average. However, there was no significant relationship with mean male marital ages. The variance in male marital age increased with higher female scarcity, contrasting with a non-significant inverse trend for female marital age variation. These findings advance the understanding of the relationship between the OSR and marital patterns. We believe that these results are best accounted for by sex specific attributes of reproductive value and associated mate selection criteria, demonstrating the power of an evolutionary framework for understanding human relationships and demographic patterns.

  19. Female Scarcity Reduces Women's Marital Ages and Increases Variance in Men's Marital Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kruger

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available When women are scarce in a population relative to men, they have greater bargaining power in romantic relationships and thus may be able to secure male commitment at earlier ages. Male motivation for long-term relationship commitment may also be higher, in conjunction with the motivation to secure a prospective partner before another male retains her. However, men may also need to acquire greater social status and resources to be considered marriageable. This could increase the variance in male marital age, as well as the average male marital age. We calculated the Operational Sex Ratio, and means, medians, and standard deviations in marital ages for women and men for the 50 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United States with 2000 U.S Census data. As predicted, where women are scarce they marry earlier on average. However, there was no significant relationship with mean male marital ages. The variance in male marital age increased with higher female scarcity, contrasting with a non-significant inverse trend for female marital age variation. These findings advance the understanding of the relationship between the OSR and marital patterns. We believe that these results are best accounted for by sex specific attributes of reproductive value and associated mate selection criteria, demonstrating the power of an evolutionary framework for understanding human relationships and demographic patterns.

  20. Declining health disadvantage of non-marital children: Explanation of the trend in the Czech Republic 1990-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Stipkova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been a rapid spread of non-marital childbearing in the Czech Republic during the last two decades. At the same time, the low birth weight rates of children born to married and unmarried mothers have converged. Objective: The goal is to explain the diminishing gap in low birth weight. Two explanations are assessed: the changing selection of unmarried mothers from disadvantaged socio-demographic groups, and increasing social support for unmarried mothers. Methods: Data from birth register are analysed. Marital status (married vs. unmarried disparities in low birth weight are modelled using logistic regression. Further analyses are then performed with a detailed measurement of partnership status. This detailed variable is partially missing and is thus supplemented with multiple imputation. Results: The main explanation for the narrowing gap between the outcomes of children born to married and unmarried mothers is the increasing social support for unmarried mothers. Unmarried motherhood has become less detrimental to a child's birth weight net of maternal demographic characteristics. The decline in selection from disadvantaged socio-demographic groups has also contributed to the convergence. However, the convergence of birth weight trends towards marital children seems to refer mostly to children of partnered mothers, with children of single mothers lagging behind. Conclusions: The positive trends in the health of non-marital children are interpreted as being the result of the increasing institutionalisation of parenthood in non-marital unions. However, this does not apply to unpartnered motherhood, which continues to represent a health disadvantage.

  1. Single Mothers by Choice and Inwedlock Mothers: Sex-Role Orientation, Locus of Control, and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holle, Kimberly Ann

    An emerging family constellation is the family headed by a "single mother by choice," a structure in which both single marital status and parental status are chosen. This study was conducted to determine whether single mothers by choice (N=12) differed significantly from inwedlock mothers (N=18) regarding their childbearing decisions.…

  2. Marital and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Hargun; Anand, Tanya; Suman, L N

    2018-02-01

    Substance abuse is a family disease that adversely impacts both the user and the user's family. The family can act as a risk factor for the development of substance abuse among children and adults. The family can also be involved in therapy to either help the recovery process or prevent substance abuse. Marital and family therapy have been found to be effective in reducing the severity of substance use, lowering marital and family conflict, improving family communication and cohesion as well as effective parenting practices. Behavioural Couples Therapy has been found to have good empirical support for bringing about the desired changes in both substance abuse and marital relationship. While targeting entire families, the most common evidenced based family interventions are Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, Family Behaviour Therapy, Functional Family Therapy and Community Reinforcement Programme. Marital and family therapy have to be sensitive to gender and culture. Effective use of marital and family therapy requires adequate training to equip practitioners in adequately treating not only substance use disorders and family pathology, but also in treating co-morbid mental health conditions.

  3. Marital Satisfaction Across the Transition to Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Erika; Cobb, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Alexia D.; Rothman, Michael T.; Bradbury, Thomas N.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to discriminate between the 2 dominant perspectives governing research on the nature of marital change over the transition to parenthood. Progress can be made in understanding this transition by recognizing the role of uncontrolled sources of variability in research designs, defining and using control groups, and timing of data collection around the child’s arrival, and the authors conducted a study incorporating these methodological refinements. Growth curve analyses were conducted on marital satisfaction data collected twice before and twice after the birth of the 1st child and at corresponding points for voluntarily childless couples (N = 156 couples). Spouses who were more satisfied prior to pregnancy had children relatively early in marriage, and parents experienced greater declines in marital satisfaction compared to nonparents. Couples with planned pregnancies had higher prepregnancy satisfaction scores, and planning slowed husbands’ (but not wives’) postpartum declines. In sum, parenthood hastens marital decline—even among relatively satisfied couples who select themselves into this transition—but planning status and prepregnancy marital satisfaction generally protect marriages from these declines. PMID:18266531

  4. Single-Molecule Plasmon Sensing: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Adam B; Zijlstra, Peter

    2017-08-25

    Single-molecule detection has long relied on fluorescent labeling with high quantum-yield fluorophores. Plasmon-enhanced detection circumvents the need for labeling by allowing direct optical detection of weakly emitting and completely nonfluorescent species. This review focuses on recent advances in single molecule detection using plasmonic metal nanostructures as a sensing platform, particularly using a single particle-single molecule approach. In the past decade two mechanisms for plasmon-enhanced single-molecule detection have been demonstrated: (1) by plasmonically enhancing the emission of weakly fluorescent biomolecules, or (2) by monitoring shifts of the plasmon resonance induced by single-molecule interactions. We begin with a motivation regarding the importance of single molecule detection, and advantages plasmonic detection offers. We describe both detection mechanisms and discuss challenges and potential solutions. We finalize by highlighting the exciting possibilities in analytical chemistry and medical diagnostics.

  5. Resolving Marital Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islami Hatixhe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Couple relations are characterized as relations of an intimate nature dominated by constant interaction or strong interdependence and mutual influence of intense feelings between spouses. In marriages where there is conflict, there are typical examples of interaction, which result in high proportion of negative communicative acts that affect the quality of marital relationships such as: loss of confidence, the emergence of frustration, feelings of anxiety, discomfort, leading to escalation of marital conflicts. Communication as a variable has a large impact on the resolution of marital conflicts. The obtained results of our research indicate that the choice of different strategies of behavior in conflict situations among our respondents primarily depend on: the degree of persistence in the pursuit of its own interests and level of cooperation in addressing the interests of others.

  6. Consequences of marital dissolution for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, J A

    1994-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of divorce in the US has had profound implications for the social, economic, and emotional needs of children. Central are the varying commitments to childrearing of divorced mothers and fathers. Women consider themselves responsible for their children's care regardless of marital status, whereas men tend to disengage from their offspring once a marriage is dissolved. At present, about 25% of US children will spend some time in a single-parent household as a result of divorce, while another 25% will live with a single mother due to nonmarital childbearing. Although children whose parents separate suffer disadvantages compared to those whose parents remain together, there is a lack of consensus on the magnitude and source of these differences and the profile of children at greatest risk of social and emotional problems. When the father moves out, household income declines by an average of 37% and child support transfers are too low to reduce the hardships of living in a single-mother family. Even when responsibility for children is shared with grandparents or the state (through welfare), the disparities between one- and two-parent households persist. The conflict between parents, loss of daily contact with one parent, and disruption of routines and place of residence associated with divorce jeopardize children's emotional security and deprive them of essential socialization experiences. To minimize the harmful effects of divorce on children, single mothers need institutional support, particularly to mitigate the economic liabilities associated with divorce and to ensure high-quality childcare when mothers are working.

  7. Marital Satisfaction and Its Influencing Factors in Fertile and Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine marital satisfaction and its influencing factors among fertile and infertile women in Shahroud.Materials and methods: In this comparative study, 1528 participants (511 infertile and1017 fertile women were evaluated using Enrich Marital Satisfaction Scale. Data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test.Results: A total of 1402 participants (78.7% had high marital satisfaction. The results show that no significant differences exist between marital satisfaction, marital communication, conflict resolution and idealistic distortion in fertile and infertile women. However, a significant difference was observed between marital satisfaction, and job, spouse’s job and income in fertile and infertile groups, but the place of residence, education, spouse's education and fertility status showed no significant difference.Conclusion: Results showed that infertility does not reduce marital satisfaction. Since marital satisfaction is moderate in both groups, sex education for people bound to marry and sexual counseling for couples can lead to improved sexual satisfaction.

  8. Marital Satisfaction and Its Influencing Factors in Fertile and Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad; Sadeqi, Zakieh; Hoseinpoor, Mohammad Hassan; Khosravi, Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Objective: To determine marital satisfaction and its influencing factors among fertile and infertile women in Shahroud. Materials and methods: In this comparative study, 1528 participants (511 infertile and1017 fertile women) were evaluated using Enrich Marital Satisfaction Scale. Data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test. Results: A total of 1402 participants (78.7%) had high marital satisfaction. The results show that no significant differences exist between marital satisfaction, marital communication, conflict resolution and idealistic distortion in fertile and infertile women. However, a significant difference was observed between marital satisfaction, and job, spouse's job and income in fertile and infertile groups, but the place of residence, education, spouse's education and fertility status showed no significant difference. Conclusion: Results showed that infertility does not reduce marital satisfaction. Since marital satisfaction is moderate in both groups, sex education for people bound to marry and sexual counseling for couples can lead to improved sexual satisfaction.

  9. Marital stability and repartnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Mariana V; Costa, Patrício; Peterson, Brennan D

    2014-01-01

    a second union have higher initial levels of stress in their original relationship and higher changes in stress levels over the course of treatments. These findings suggest that high infertility-related stress levels before entering fertility treatment can negatively affect the stability of marital...

  10. Affect in Marital Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie S.; Johnson, Susan M.

    1986-01-01

    Using a network theory of emotion, the role of the evocation of emotion in emotionally focused marital therapy to create intimacy and facilitate conflict resolution is discussed. Accessing underlying primary emotional responses in partners makes available adaptive action tendencies which promote problem solving and helps change self- and…

  11. Marital Happiness of Black Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Essie M.

    According to a study of 256 black married women between the ages of 26 and 60 living with their spouses, marital happiness is more common among black women than marital unhappiness. This finding is based on the secondary analysis of a sample of data collected in Detroit in 1968-1969. Variables statistically significant to the marital happiness of…

  12. Assessing Marital Adjustment and Satisfaction: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Evaluated five instruments of marital adjustment and satisfaction: Marital Adjustment Test, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Marital Satisfaction Index, Marital Satisfaction Scale, and the Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale. Discusses studies evaluating psychometric properties of each instrument. Recommends the Marital Satisfaction Index for assessing…

  13. The Relationship between Marital Characteristics, Marital Interaction Processes, and Marital Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen-Grandon, Jane R.; Myers, Jane E.; Hattie, John A.

    2004-01-01

    Structural Equation Modeling techniques were used to clarify the relationship between marital characteristics, marital processes, and the dependent variable--marital satisfaction--in a sample of 201 participants who were in 1st marriages. The Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS; G. B. Spanier, 1976) and the Enriching and Nurturing Relationship Issues,…

  14. Research status of large mode area single polarization active fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chun; Zhang, Ge; Yang, Bin-hua; Cheng, Wei-feng; Gu, Shao-yi

    2018-03-01

    As high power fiber laser used more and more widely, to increase the output power of fiber laser and beam quality improvement have become an important goal for the development of high power fiber lasers. The use of large mode fiber is the most direct and effective way to solve the nonlinear effect and fiber damage in the fiber laser power lifting process. In order to reduce the effect of polarization of the fiber laser system, the study found that when introduces a birefringence in the single-mode fiber, the polarization state changes caused by the birefringence is far greater than the random polarization state changes, then the external disturbance is completely submerged, finally the polarization can be controlled and stabilized. Through the fine design of the fiber structure, if the birefringence is high enough to achieve the separation of the two polarization states, the fiber will have a different cut-off mechanism to eliminate polarization which is not need, which will realize single mode single polarization transmission in a band. In this paper, different types of single polarization fiber design are presented and the application of these fibers are also discussed.

  15. Gender Ideologies, Marital Roles, and Marital Quality in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohe; Lai, Shu-Chuan

    2004-01-01

    This study uses the multidimensional measures included in the 1996 Taiwan Social Change Survey to examine the effects of gender ideologies and marital role sharing on marital quality among married Taiwanese men and women as reporting spouses. The authors' quantitative analyses indicate that (a) there is little direct relationship between gender…

  16. Effect of marital counselling on women's attitude towards marital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emeka Egbochuku

    This study investigated the effect of marital counselling on women's attitude towards marital stability. The study ... non-academic) staff of the Faculty of Education, University of Port-Harcourt,. Rivers State of Nigeria. 26 each ... issues, love and trust, socio-cultural factors, anti-social vices and lastly economic factors. Although ...

  17. Marital conflict and children's sleep: reciprocal relations and socioeconomic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan J; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2011-06-01

    We examined reciprocal relations between parental marital conflict and children's sleep disruptions over two years. The roles of ethnicity (African American and European American) and socioeconomic status were tested as moderators of the examined relations. A community sample of 176 school-age children (M age = 8.68 at T1) and their parents participated at T1 and T2 with a 2-year interval between waves. Mothers, fathers, and children reported on parental marital conflict, and children's sleep was measured via actigraphy and self-reports. Latent variable modeling indicated that T1 marital conflict predicted increases in children's sleep disruptions longitudinally; results were more pronounced for African American children and those from lower SES homes. Further, children's sleep disruptions at T1 predicted increases in marital conflict over time. Results demonstrate the importance of reciprocal relations between a prevalent familial stressor and a fundamental facet of children's health, especially when considering the sociocultural milieu. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  18. Marital Histories and Heavy Alcohol Use among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reczek, Corinne; Pudrovska, Tetyana; Carr, Deborah; Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Umberson, Debra

    2016-03-01

    We develop a gendered marital biography approach-which emphasizes the accumulating gendered experiences of singlehood, marriage, marital dissolution, and remarriage-to examine the relationship between marital statuses and transitions and heavy alcohol use. We test this approach using individual-level (n = 10,457) and couple-level (n = 2,170) longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study, and individual-level (n = 46) and couple-level (n = 42) in-depth interview data. Quantitative results show that marriage, including remarriage, reduces men's but increases women's drinking relative to being never married and previously married, whereas divorce increases men's but decrease women's drinking, with some variation by age. Our qualitative findings reveal that social control and convergence processes underlie quantitative results. We call attention to how men's and women's heavy drinking trajectories stop, start, and change direction as individuals move through their distinctive marital biography. © American Sociological Association 2016.

  19. The Relationship between Job Variables of Life Satisfaction and Marital Satisfaction of Lecturers

    OpenAIRE

    Metehan ÇELİK; Songül TÜMKAYA

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the job variables of life satisfaction and marital satisfaction of lecturers. It is descriptive study comparing the marital satisfaction and life satisfaction in terms of gender, academic status, working year and working hours. The sample of the study consisted of voluntary and married 119 lecturers (40 female, 79 male). Data collection instruments were Marital Adjustment Scale and Life Satisfaction Scale. In terms of gender va...

  20. Content Themes in Marital Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillars, Alan L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Suggests that prominent themes in the conversations of spouses are metacommunication about relationships. Compares content themes of different marital types (traditional, separate, and independent) and more or less satisfied spouses. Finds marital satisfaction tends to be positively associated with communal and impersonal themes and negatively…

  1. Therapeutic Handling of Marital Infidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Bruce B.

    1975-01-01

    Marital infidelity has two primary dimensions--on overt social-cultural facade and a covert, intense, emotional component. A therapy strategy, based on this formulation and on the presumption that both spouses were equally responsible for the marital fracture, is presented. (Author)

  2. Premarital Pregnancy and Marital Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furstenberg, Frank F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The marital histories of 203 young women who became premaritally pregnant in their early teens and 90 of their classmates most of whom married before pregnancy show that disruption in the courtship process and limited economic resources are the most important factors in marital dissolution. (Author/AM)

  3. The nutritional status and dietary adequacy of single homeless women and their children in shelters.

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, M A

    1992-01-01

    Data were collected on the nutrient intake and nutritional status of 96 single mothers and their 192 dependent children who had been displaced from their homes. The objective of the study was to provide information on the dietary adequacy of a newly identified subgroup of homeless persons, single women and their dependent children. Once situated in temporary housing, those participating in the study indicated that they believed that they were receiving sufficient food. However, a nutrient ana...

  4. On the Relationship between Marital Opportunity and Teen Pregnancy: The Sex Ratio Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nigel

    2001-01-01

    Used United Nations cross-national data to examine the relationship between low sex ratio, marital opportunity, and teen pregnancy. Geographical region, per capita gross national product, marital rate, and urban and rural status were used as control variables in analyses that utilized sex ratios to predict teen births. Overall, early childbearing…

  5. Parents' Marital Distress, Divorce, and Remarriage: Links with Daughters' Early Family Formation Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Paul R.; Kane, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used data from the Add Health study to estimate the effects of parents' marital status and relationship distress on daughters' early family formation transitions. Outcomes included traditional transitions (marriage and marital births) and nontraditional transitions (cohabitation and nonmarital births). Relationship distress among…

  6. Marital Quality and Divorce Decisions: How Do Premarital Cohabitation and Nonmarital Childbearing Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tach, Laura M.; Halpern-Meekin, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study used the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 3,481) to test whether the association between marital quality and divorce is moderated by premarital cohabitation or nonmarital childbearing status. Prior research identified lower marital quality as a key explanation for why couples who cohabit or have children…

  7. Analisis Pengaruh Jumlah Tanggungan Keluarga, Umur, Pendidikan Dan Status Pekerjaan Terhadap Pendapatan Keluarga Wanita Single Parent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabrina Umi Rahayu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Women have significant roles in development, such as women as human resources in development, women as a subject in development, and women as a family builder. This study focused on how women’s role as a family builder in a single parent status. The variables used in this study are number of dependents, age, education, and employment status to be analyzed its impact on income of single parent women. This research took a place in Sesetan Village, South Denpasar with the number of samples taken were 84 samples with the purposive sampling method. The data was collected by questionnaires and interviews. Multiple linear regression analysis with quantitative and qualitative independent variables was used as the analysis technique. Based on the analysis result had found that variables of number of dependents, age, education, and employment status had a positive impact as a partial to the income of single parent women. The government’s efforts for all the kinds of women coaching are important to be developed, with the aim to the community prosperity especially single parent women who have heavier burden of life. The attention of education, health, and economy is necessary to improved to ease the burden for the families of the single parent women.

  8. Marital Separation and Lethal Male Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Desmond

    2016-05-10

    Findings reported by many researchers indicate that the association between marital separation and intimate partner femicide has achieved the status of a sociological empirical generalization. The primary objective of this article is to contribute toward the cumulative development of a conflict theoretic explanation of separation- associated femicide by creating and testing a deductive conflict resolution theory that explains the empirical generalization. The causal mechanism identified in the theory is the intensity of conflict that increases with participation in adversarial and separation and divorce proceedings. Interventions logically derived from the theory are presented in the penultimate segment. Limitations are identified in the concluding segment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Types of marital closeness and mortality risk in older couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Roni Beth; Kasl, Stanislav V; Darefsky, Amy S

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the impact of marital closeness on survival over 6 years in a community-dwelling sample of 305 older couples. Closeness is defined as 1) naming one's spouse as a confidant or source of emotional support (vs. not naming) and 2) being named by spouse on at least one of the two dimensions (vs. not being named). The survival effects of both naming and being named are examined in Cox proportional hazard regressions, controlling for sociodemographic, health status, and behavioral variables. Husbands who were named by their wives but did not name them were least likely to have died after 6 years. Compared with them, husbands in marriages with the other three styles of closeness were from 3.30 to 4.68 times more likely to be dead. Wives' results showed the same pattern of effects, with the same marital style being most protective as for husbands, but the effects were weaker. However, wives' results were strongly moderated by parenting status: those who had ever had children who were in the marital closeness pattern of wife naming husband but not being named by him were highly protected. Compared with these wives, others who had had children were from 8.26 to 10.95 times less likely to be alive after 6 years. The same pattern of marital closeness most benefited husbands and those wives who had had children. These findings are not explained adequately by social support or marital role theory although they fit the latter more closely.

  10. Attributional Models of Depression and Marital Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneffer, Karen J.; Fincham, Frank D.

    1996-01-01

    Compares attributional models presented in depression and marital literatures by examining simultaneously their prediction of depressive symptoms and marital distress with 150 married couples. Findings show that a model including paths from depressogenic and distress-maintaining marital attributions to both depressive symptoms and marital distress…

  11. Influence of marital history over two and three generations on early death. A longitudinal study of Danish men born in 1953

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2006-01-01

    a random sample of all boys born in the the metropolitan area of Copenhagen with complete data from interviews and registers on two and three generation's marital status, socioeconomic position variables, and last generation's admission to psychiatric hospital, n = 2614. Among these 105 deaths occurred....... Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the effect of marital status on mortality. RESULTS: Never married sons showed a considerably increased mortality compared with their married counterparts in the adjusted analyses. Mother's marital status at childbirth was also associated...... with increased mortality among the sons. There was no independent effect of maternal grandparent's experience of divorce on third generation's mortality. Son's marital status was the strongest marital status predictor of mortality. Accumulation of both two and three generations' marital status was significantly...

  12. Adult Attachment and Relationship Status (Single vs. Partnered in Polish Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Bookwala

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined links between adult attachment and relationship status (single vs. partnered in Polish young adults. Three hundred and seventeen participants (173 females and 144 males aged 22-27 years old (M = 24.69, SD = 1.87, completed the Polish-language version of the Revised Adult Attachment Scale (RAAS used to measure adult attachment. All the respondents were heterosexual, unmarried and had no children. One hundred and fifty seven (49.50% students declared being in a romantic relationship at the time of the assessment whilst 160 students (50.50% were not. Results indicated that single participants reported higher levels of worry about being rejected or unloved (Anxiety dimension and lower levels of comfort with closeness (Close dimension, and comfort with depending on others (Depend dimension. In terms of attachment categories, analyses indicated that higher proportions of single participants were categorized into fearful and preoccupied attachment styles and a lower proportion of them were categorized into the secure attachment style compared to partnered individuals. Discriminant analysis revealed that worry of being rejected or unloved (Anxiety dimension was the strongest factor discriminating between single and partnered relationship status: the higher the anxiety dimension scores, the higher chances of being single. No gender differences were obtained on attachment dimensions and styles.

  13. Individual behavioural-cognitive therapy v marital therapy for depression in maritally distressed couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EmanuelsZuurveen, L; Emmelkamp, PMG

    Background. Depressed patients are often characterised by marital distress, but few studies investigate the effects of marital therapy on depressed mood and relationship dysfunction. Method. Twenty-seven depressed patients experiencing marital distress were randomly assigned to either individual

  14. Association of subjective social status and sociodemographic indicators in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamyla Thais Dias de Freitas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2016v18n5p591   Subjective social status comprises the perception of individuals about their social status. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between subjective social status and sociodemographic indicators (age, educational level, marital status and economic level in athletes from Santa Catharina. A total of 593 athletes of both sexes and mean age of 21.18 (± 5.58 years, 371 men, randomly selected, practitioners of individual and collective sport modalities, federated in clubs in the western region of Santa Catarina participated in the study. Social status perception was assessed using the MacArthur scale version for young people adapted to the sports context. For the association between perceived status and sociodemographic indicators, the Chi-square and Multinomial Logistic Regression tests were used, stratified by gender and adjusted for age variables, educational level, marital status and socioeconomic status. Dissatisfaction with status was found in 85% of the sample. Moreover, 46.9% of participants perceived themselves with low family status and 46% perceived themselves with intermediate status in their clubs. The association between groups showed statistically significant differences according to sex, age, educational level and marital status. The association between sociodemographic variables and status according to sex indicated that younger men, with less education, and single were more likely to be dissatisfied with their status. There is need for greater attention by health professionals regarding younger male athletes, with lower education and single regarding their status perception.

  15. Birth-Order Complementarity and Marital Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Cornelia J. Vanderkooy; Hayden, Delbert J.

    1985-01-01

    Tested the influence of birth-order complementarity on marital adjustment among 327 married women using the Spanier Dyadic Adjustment Scale (1976). Birth-order complementarity was found to be unassociated with marital adjustment. (Author/BL)

  16. Fathering After Marital Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Harry Finkelstein; Rosenthal, Kristine M.

    1978-01-01

    Deals with experiences of a group of separated or divorced fathers who chose to remain fully involved in the upbringing of their children. As they underwent transition from married parenthood to single fatherhood, these men learned that meeting demands of child care contributed to personal stability and growth. (Author)

  17. Leisure Activity Patterns and Marital Conflict in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Saadat, Hassan; Noushad, Siena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the past few decades, the association between leisure activity patterns and marital conflict or satisfaction has been studied extensively. However, most studies to date have been limited to middle-class families of developed societies, and an investigation of the issue, from a developing country perspective like Iran, is non-existent. Objectives: In an observational, analytical, cross-sectional study we aimed to investigate the relationship between leisure activity patterns and marital conflict in a nationally representative sample of Iranian married males. Patients and Methods: Using the cluster sampling method, a representative sample of 400 Iranian married individuals from seven provinces of Iran was surveyed. Self-administered surveys included a checklist collecting demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the enrolled participants, leisure time questionnaire, and marital conflict questionnaire. The main patterns of leisure activity were derived from principal component analysis. For each pattern, factor scores were calculated. The relationship between factor scores and marital conflict were assessed using multivariate linear regression models accounting for the potential confounding effects of age, education, socioeconomic status, job status, number of children, duration of marriage, and time spent for leisure. Results: Two hundred and ninety-nine respondents completed the leisure time and marital conflict questionnaires. Five major leisure patterns were identified accounting for 60.3% of the variance in data. The most dominant pattern was family-oriented activities (e.g. spending time with family outdoors and spending time with family indoors) and was negatively linked to marital conflict (standardized beta= −0.154, P = 0.013). Of the four remaining patterns, three only included individual activities and one was a family-individual composite. Individual patterns exhibited discrepant behavior; while the pattern involving activities

  18. Does Single Motherhood Hurt Infant Health among Young Mothers?

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Albert Young-Il; Lee, Jungmin

    2017-01-01

    Does single motherhood adversely affect infant health? This question is not easy to answer because of the endogeneity of coresidence during pregnancy. In this paper, we exploit quasi-natural variation in single motherhood from the moment of conception to that of birth arising from marriageable age restrictions and the reform of the laws in Korea. The Korean birth certificate dataset is unique in that it allows us to distinguish coresidence and legal marital status and further to identify the ...

  19. "When Are You Getting Married?" The Intergenerational Transmission of Attitudes regarding Marital Timing and Marital Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian J.; Carroll, Jason S.; Vitas, Jennifer M.; Hill, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    Using a sample of 335 young adults and their parents, this study investigated the intergenerational transmission of marital attitudes from parents to their children and how parental marital quality moderates that relationship. Results suggested that the marital attitudes of both mothers and fathers are related to the marital attitudes of their…

  20. Does Premarital Cohabitation Predict Subsequent Marital Stability and Marital Quality? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Anita; O'Leary, K. Daniel; Moyer, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Cohabitation with a romantic partner has become common in recent decades. This meta-analysis examined the link between premarital cohabitation and marital stability (k = 16) and marital quality (k = 12). Cohabitation had a significant negative association with both marital stability and marital quality. The negative predictive effect on marital…

  1. ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVE ON MARITAL RAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Endriyo Susila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marital rape has become a controversial issue in many countries including Indonesia. For the majority of the Indonesian people, it is impossible for rape to take place inside the marriage institution, however some other peoples believe that it possibly occurs. Since it is considered as a kind of rape anyway, those who agree with that concept, insist on the government of Indonesia to qualify marital rape as an offence. This is sounded usually by the human rights activists, especially the feminists. This research is aimed to elaborate the legal position of what so-call marital rape in Islam. As a country whose population is majority Muslim, it can be understood that the development of the Indonesian law is influenced by the Islamic values. This research provide an important reference to deal with the issue of the criminalization of marital rape in Indonesia.Since the research focuses more on the study of legal materials from various sources, it is qualified as a normative legal research. To support the collection of data, interview upon the competent legal experts has also been exercised. The standard of qualification of the legal experts involving in the interview are those who are interested in Islamic Law, especially Islamic Family law as well as Islamic Criminal Law.    Based on the research finding, it is found that the type of the relationship between husband and wife as suggested in Islamic teaching naturaly prevents the what so-call marital rape to occur. It is difficult to imagine the existence of marital rape inside the Muslim familes, since the husband is bound with the obligation to treat her wife well (mu’asyarah bil ma’ruf. In sexual matter, the doctrine of mu’asyarah bil ma’ruf can be applied by respecting the need and the willingness of the wife in sexual matter. Meaning to say, the husband is obliged to fulfill his wife sexual desire in one side, and in the other side he is not allowed to force her wife for sex when she

  2. Marital and Family Counseling in Prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, David; Jones, Charlotte Williams

    1980-01-01

    Describes series of successful marital workshops conducted at Kansas State Penitentiary, involving problems of inmates, their wives and children. Marital and family counseling seen as effective in implementing changes in inmates' attitudes and behaviors. Recommends marital counseling in all penitentiaries; suggests social workers work to make…

  3. Stress, Communication, and Marital Quality in Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Thomas; Bodenmann, Guy; Rudaz, Myriam; Bradbury, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    The association between daily stress outside and inside of the relationship and marital functioning in the form of communication in conflict situations and marital quality was examined. We hypothesized that relationship stress mediates the association between external stress and marital functioning at the individual level, and that the association…

  4. Transactional Relations Between Marital Functioning and Depressive Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Cummings, E. Mark

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated dynamic, longitudinal associations between depressive symptoms and marital processes. Two hundred ninety-six couples reported on marital satisfaction, marital conflict, and depressive symptoms yearly for three years. Observational measures of marital conflict were also collected. Results suggested that different domains of marital functioning related to husbands’ versus wives’ symptoms. For husbands, transactional relations between marital satisfaction and depre...

  5. Marital satisfaction and life circumstances of grown children with autism across 7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L; Barker, Erin T; Baker, Jason K; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Greenberg, Jan S

    2012-10-01

    We examined the extent to which marital satisfaction across 7 years in 199 mothers was associated with the characteristics (gender, age, and intellectual disability status) of their adolescent or adult child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and whether fluctuations in marital satisfaction covaried with the child's autism symptoms, health, behavior problems, and closeness in the parent-child relationship. We also examined the impact of the departure of the adult child out of the family home on mothers' marital satisfaction. The effect of family context variables including the presence of an additional child with a disability, maternal education, and household income on marital satisfaction were also examined. We found that closeness in the mother-child relationship and household income had a significant effect on level of marital satisfaction, and that variability in the slope of mothers' marital satisfaction was significantly predicted by fluctuations in the behavior problems of the adolescent or adult child with an ASD. The grown child's departure out of the family home was not related to change in marital satisfaction. Interventions aimed at managing the behavior problems of adolescents and adults with ASDs may help strengthen parents' marital relationship. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Marital Satisfaction and Life Circumstances of Grown Children With Autism Across 7 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Barker, Erin T.; Baker, Jason K.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the extent to which marital satisfaction across 7 years in 199 mothers was associated with the characteristics (gender, age, and intellectual disability status) of their adolescent or adult child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and whether fluctuations in marital satisfaction covaried with the child’s autism symptoms, health, behavior problems, and closeness in the parent–child relationship. We also examined the impact of the departure of the adult child out of the family home on mothers’ marital satisfaction. The effect of family context variables including the presence of an additional child with a disability, maternal education, and household income on marital satisfaction were also examined. We found that closeness in the mother–child relationship and household income had a significant effect on level of marital satisfaction, and that variability in the slope of mothers’ marital satisfaction was significantly predicted by fluctuations in the behavior problems of the adolescent or adult child with an ASD. The grown child’s departure out of the family home was not related to change in marital satisfaction. Interventions aimed at managing the behavior problems of adolescents and adults with ASDs may help strengthen parents’ marital relationship. PMID:22866933

  7. Marital rape: history, research, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennice, Jennifer A; Resick, Patricia A

    2003-07-01

    Despite the increased recognition that the topic of marital rape has generated in the past 2 decades, the literature in this area remains sparse. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state of the marital rape literature. First, the lengthy history of legal, cultural, and professional invalidation of marital rape victims, and the resulting negative treatment implications, is discussed. Second, marital rape research is reviewed, including prevalence, descriptive, and comparison studies. This review highlights the seriousness of marital rape, in terms of prevalence and posttrauma distress, as well as the limitations of extant research. Finally, barriers to treatment and recommendations for professionals are discussed.

  8. Single parent status and children's objectively measured level of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhammer, John; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Møller, Niels Christian; Lund-Kristensen, Peter; Froberg, Karsten; Andersen, Lars Bo

    Single-parent family status has been investigated as a possible psychosocial determinant of children's level of physical activity (PA)-although with mixed and inconclusive results. Prevailing evidence of the importance of two-parent family status as a resource for children's PA is based on a mix of subjective and objective measurements of PA. Objectives: To investigate if the level of PA among children living with a single parent was lower compared to children living with two parents by means of a meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies. We restricted our analysis to studies with objective measurements of PA. Data sources: The databases, Social Science Citation Index, PsycINFO, PubMed, and EBSCO were searched (1987-2013). Study eligibility criteria: Observational studies comparing objectively measured PA between single-parent children and children from two-parent families. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: We used guidelines from the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions and a modified version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale overall to assess the quality of the included studies. We refrained from calculation of summary scores. Twelve studies met the following inclusion criteria of which six were unpublished: (a) child age (6-18 years) and (b) objectively measured level of PA. Meta-analysis revealed pooled estimates of -0.01 for boys (95 % CI -0.04-0.03, p  = 0.77, I 2  = 6.5 %, p  = 0.38) and 0.01 for girls (95 % CI -0.03-0.04, p  = 0.62, I 2  = 21.0 %, p  = 0.24), respectively. Estimates show no differences in objectively measured physical activity between children living in single-parent families compared to children living with two parents. Analyses investigating seven potential moderators did not yield any statistical significant effect size estimates. No evidence of heterogeneity between studies was observed. Limitations: Retrieved articles were assessed by several of the authors. Blinding of the

  9. Associação entre mortalidade e estado marital: uma análise para idosos residentes no Município de São Paulo, Brasil, Estudo SABE, 2000 e 2006 Asociación entre el estado civil y la mortalidad: un análisis de los ancianos residentes en São Paulo, Brasil, el Estudio SABE, 2000 y 2006 Association between marital status and mortality among elderly residents in São Paulo City, Brazil, SABE Study, 2000 and 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeda A. O. Duarte

    2013-03-01

    una mejor comprensión de los factores asociados con la supervivencia de los ancianos, además de apoyar las políticas de salud dirigidas a este contingente de población.This study aimed to analyze the association between mortality and marital status in the elderly population (60 years and older in São Paulo, Brazil. The authors used data from the SABE Study (Health, Well-Being, and Aging from 2000 and 2006. Statistical analysis used Poisson regression, considering variation in time of mortality risk. The mortality rate among single elderly males was 61% higher than among married men. Separation or divorce and widowhood increased the odds of death in elderly women (separated/divorced women and widows showed mortality rates 82% and 35% higher, respectively, than married women. It is hoped that the current study will improve our understanding of factors associated with survival in the elderly, in addition to supporting health policies for this population group.

  10. The longitudinal association of marital confidence, time spent together, and marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew D; Anderson, Jared R

    2013-06-01

    Using three waves of dyadic data collected at 18-month intervals from a community-based sample of 610 newly married heterosexual couples (1 220 individuals), we examined the relationship between marital confidence, time spent together, and marital satisfaction using a modified actor-partner interdependence model. Results indicate that after controlling for marital satisfaction and time spent together at Time 1, marital confidence around the time of marriage was associated with marital satisfaction approximately 3 years later. In addition, marital confidence was associated with how much time husbands and wives spent together at Time 2, which was related to marital satisfaction at Time 3. Tests of the mediating paths from marital confidence to marital satisfaction trended toward significance. The results suggest the importance of assessing for relationship confidence when working with couples in the early stages of their relationship. © FPI, Inc.

  11. Marital history and survival after a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Matthew E; Nelson, Alicia

    2016-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and nearly one million Americans will have a heart attack this year. Although the risks associated with a heart attack are well established, we know surprisingly little about how marital factors contribute to survival in adults afflicted with heart disease. This study uses a life course perspective and longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study to examine how various dimensions of marital life influence survival in U.S. older adults who suffered a heart attack (n = 2197). We found that adults who were never married (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73), currently divorced (OR = 1.70), or widowed (OR = 1.34) were at significantly greater risk of dying after a heart attack than adults who were continuously married; and the risks were not uniform over time. We also found that the risk of dying increased by 12% for every additional marital loss and decreased by 7% for every one-tenth increase in the proportion of years married. After accounting for more than a dozen socioeconomic, psychosocial, behavioral, and physiological factors, we found that current marital status remained the most robust indicator of survival following a heart attack. The implications of the findings are discussed in the context of life course inequalities in chronic disease and directions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Case Study: Physical Capacity and Nutritional Status Before and After a Single-Handed Yacht Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Giovanna; Magnani, Sara; Doneddu, Azzurra; Sainas, Gianmarco; Pinna, Virginia; Caboi, Marco; Palazzolo, Girolamo; Tocco, Filippo; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2017-12-18

    During solitary sailing the sailor is exposed to sleep deprivation and difficulties in consuming regular meals. Sailor weight loss is often reported. In the present case study we describe changes in the physical capacity and the nutritional status of an athlete attempting a single-handed yacht race around the globe. An Italian male ocean racer (GM) asked for our help to reach an optimum level of physical and nutritional preparation. We planned his diet after assessing his anthropometric parameters and body composition as well as his usual energy intake and nutritional expenditure. The diet consisted in 120 meals stored in sealed plastic bags. Before his departure, GM performed two incremental exercise tests (cycle- and arm crank- ergometry) to assess his physical capacity. Cardiac functions were also estimated by Doppler echocardiography. All measures and exercise tests were repeated 10 days after GM finished the race, which lasted 64 days. Anthropometric measures did not change significantly, with the exception of Arm Fat Area and Thigh Muscle area, which decreased. There were evident increments in maximum oxygen intake and maximum workload during arm cranking after the race. On the contrary, maximum oxygen uptake and maximum workload decreased during cycling. Finally, End Diastolic and Stroke Volume decreased after the race. It was concluded that nutritional counseling was useful to avoid excessive changes in the nutritional status and body composition due to 64 days of solitary navigation. However, a reduction in physical leg capacity and cardiovascular functions secondary to legs disuse were present.

  13. The inevitability of infidelity: sexual reputation, social geographies, and marital HIV risk in rural Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jennifer S; Meneses, Sergio; Thompson, Brenda; Negroni, Mirka; Pelcastre, Blanca; del Rio, Carlos

    2007-06-01

    Marriage presents the single greatest risk for HIV infection among women in rural Mexico. We drew on 6 months of participant observation, 20 marital case studies, 37 key informant interviews, and archival research to explore the factors that shape HIV risk among married women in one of the country's rural communities. We found that culturally constructed notions of reputation in this community lead to sexual behavior designed to minimize men's social risk (threats to one's social status or relationships), rather than viral risk and that men's desire for companionate intimacy may actually increase women's risk for HIV infection. We also describe the intertwining of reputation-based sexual identities with structurally patterned sexual geographies (i.e. the social spaces that shape sexual behavior). We propose that, because of the structural nature of men's extramarital sexual behavior, intervention development should concentrate on sexual geographies and risky spaces rather than risky behaviors or identities.

  14. Marital commitment, communication and marital satisfaction: An analysis based on actor-partner interdependence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yubo; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Xinrui

    2018-01-10

    Marital commitment and satisfaction are known to be closely related, but only limited research has examined the asymmetric interaction patterns between spouses. In this paper, the authors study 400 Chinese couples and find that communication mediates the relationship between marital commitment and marital satisfaction. Using the actor-partner interdependence model, they find that wives and husbands show asymmetric associations for marital commitment, communication and satisfaction. Specifically, compared with husbands, wives are more attuned to the path from marital commitment to marital satisfaction via communication. Implications and limitations are discussed. © 2018 International Union of Psychological Science.

  15. Relationship between mental health and marital satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolsattar Shahi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marital satisfaction is an important component of the marriage. Mental health as a component of the personal characteristic also related with marital satisfaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between mental health and marital satisfaction of couples.Methods: Three hundred couples from high-risk area of Gorgan – North of Iran were selected. Association between men's and women’s mental health level was measured using General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28. Marital satisfaction measured by Enrich Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire among married couples. Data was analyzed using multiple regression and analysis of variance modelling.Results: Results indicated that marital satisfaction was predicted by the person’s mental health level. Findings also showed that depression and anxiety were significantly associated with marital satisfaction. 52.5% of studied individuals had mental disorders at the clinical level (p≤0/05. Marital satisfaction in this population was 51.7%. Conclusions: The study confirmed that mental health is an important predictor of marital satisfaction. Improving mental health may lead to improve marital satisfaction.

  16. Family socioeconomic status and child executive functions: the roles of language, home environment, and single parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsour, Khaled; Sheridan, Margaret; Jutte, Douglas; Nuru-Jeter, Amani; Hinshaw, Stephen; Boyce, W Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The association between family socioeconomic status (SES) and child executive functions is well-documented. However, few studies have examined the role of potential mediators and moderators. We studied the independent and interactive associations between family SES and single parenthood to predict child executive functions of inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, and working memory and examined child expressive language abilities and family home environment as potential mediators of these associations. Sixty families from diverse SES backgrounds with a school-age target child (mean [SD] age = 9.9 [0.96] years) were evaluated. Child executive functioning was measured using a brief battery. The quality of the home environment was evaluated using the Home Observation for the Measurement of the Environment inventory. Family SES predicted the three child executive functions under study. Single parent and family SES were interactively associated with children's inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility; such that children from low SES families who were living with one parent performed less well on executive function tests than children from similarly low SES who were living with two parents. Parental responsivity, enrichment activities and family companionship mediated the association between family SES and child inhibitory control and working memory. This study demonstrates that family SES inequalities are associated with inequalities in home environments and with inequalities in child executive functions. The impact of these disparities as they unfold in the lives of typically developing children merits further investigation and understanding.

  17. The influence of parents' marital quality on adult children's attitudes toward marriage and its alternatives: main and moderating effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Mick; Thornton, Arland

    2006-11-01

    Drawing on a panel study of parents and children, we investigate linkages between parents' marital quality and adult children's attitudes toward a range of family issues, including premarital sex, cohabitation, lifelong singlehood, and divorce. We hypothesize that parents' marital quality will be negatively related to children's support for these behaviors in adulthood and that parents' marital quality will condition the intergenerational transmission of attitudes toward these issues. We find some evidence that parents' marital quality influences children's support for divorce and premarital sex. More important, our analyses show that parents' marital quality facilitates the intergenerational transmission of attitudes. Parents' attitudes toward premarital sex, cohabitation, and being single are more strongly linked to those same attitudes among their young adult children when parents' marital quality is high than when it is low.

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF PARENTS' MARITAL QUALITY ON ADULT CHILDREN'S ATTITUDES TOWARD MARRIAGE AND ITS ALTERNATIVES: MAIN AND MODERATING EFFECTS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUNNINGHAM, MICK; THORNTON, ARLAND

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on a panel study of parents and children, we investigate linkages between parents' marital quality and adult children's attitudes toward a range of family issues, including premarital sex, cohabitation, lifelong singlehood, and divorce. We hypothesize that parents' marital quality will be negatively related to children's support for these behaviors in adulthood and that parents' marital quality will condition the intergenerational transmission of attitudes toward these issues. We find some evidence that parents' marital quality influences children's support for divorce and premarital sex. More important, our analyses show that parents' marital quality facilitates the intergenerational transmission of attitudes. Parents' attitudes toward premarital sex, cohabitation, and being single are more strongly linked to those same attitudes among their young adult children when parents' marital quality is high than when it is low. PMID:17236540

  19. Structural cerebral abnormalities and neurodevelopmental status in single ventricle congenital heart disease before Fontan procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, Walter; Mayer, Kristina Nadine; Scheer, Ianina; Tuura, Ruth; Schranz, Dietmar; Hahn, Andreas; Wetterling, Kristina; Beck, Ingrid; Latal, Beatrice; Reich, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Neonates with single ventricle congenital heart disease are at risk for structural cerebral abnormalities. Little is known about the further evolution of cerebral abnormalities until Fontan procedure. Between August 2012 and July 2015, we conducted a prospective cross-sectional two centre study using cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuro-developmental outcome assessed by the Bayley-III. Forty-seven children (31 male) were evaluated at a mean age of 25.9 ± 3.4 months with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (25) or other single ventricle (22). Cerebral MRI was abnormal in 17 patients (36.2%) including liquor space enlargements (10), small grey (9) and minimal white (5) matter injuries. Eight of 17 individuals had combined lesions. Median (range) cognitive composite score (CCS) (100, 65-120) and motor composite score (MCS) (97, 55-124) were comparable to the reference data, while language composite score (LCS) (97, 68-124) was significantly lower ( P  = 0.040). Liquor space enlargement was associated with poorer performance on all Bayley-III subscores (CCS: P  = 0.02; LCS: P  = 0.002; MCS: P  = 0.013). The number of re-operations [odds ratio (OR) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.3] ( P  = 0.03) and re-interventions (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-3.8) ( P  = 0.03) was associated with a higher rate of overall MRI abnormalities. Cerebral MRI abnormalities occur in more than one third of children with single ventricle, while the neuro-developmental status is less severely affected before Fontan procedure. Liquor space enlargement is the predominant MRI finding associated with poorer neuro-developmental status, warranting further studies to determine aetiology and further evolution until school-age. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. The nutritional status and dietary adequacy of single homeless women and their children in shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M A

    1992-01-01

    Data were collected on the nutrient intake and nutritional status of 96 single mothers and their 192 dependent children who had been displaced from their homes. The objective of the study was to provide information on the dietary adequacy of a newly identified subgroup of homeless persons, single women and their dependent children. Once situated in temporary housing, those participating in the study indicated that they believed that they were receiving sufficient food. However, a nutrient analysis found that the study subjects in all age groups were consuming less than 50 percent of the 1989 Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, magnesium, zinc, and folic acid. Adults were consuming less than 50 percent of the RDA for calcium. The type and amounts of fats consumed were in higher than desirable quantities for a significant number of subjects of all ages. The health risk factors of iron deficiency anemia, obesity, and hypercholesterolemia were prevalent. The findings indicate a need to examine and remedy nutrient intake deficiencies among single women who are heads of household and their dependent children in temporary housing situations. Diet-related conditions found included low nutrient intakes that may affect child growth and development, risk factors associated with chronic disease, and lack of appropriate foods and knowledge of food preparation methods in shelter situations. Applicable, understandable nutrition education should be offered mothers in shelter situations to help them make food choices at the shelter and when they become self-sufficient. Assistance programs such as the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children, and food stamps, should be available to this group.

  1. Marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard B; Mason, Tiffany M; Canlas, Jerevie M; Wang, Dahua; Nelson, David A; Hart, Craig H

    2013-08-01

    Although there is substantial evidence that low marital satisfaction is a significant risk factor for depression, little research has examined this relationship in cultures outside of the U.S. and Europe. The validity of the marital discord model of depression in Chinese culture was tested by studying 391 couples living in Beijing and Hangzhou, China. Results of structural equation modeling using an actor-partner interdependence model strategy indicated that husbands' and wives' marital satisfaction was significantly predictive of their own depressive symptoms. In addition, wives' marital satisfaction significantly predicted husbands' depressive symptoms. These results provide evidence that the marital discord model of depression is useful in understanding the role of marital dissatisfaction as a risk factor for depressive symptoms in collectivistic societies, such as China. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  2. [Impact of psychological factors on marital satisfaction and divorce proneness in clinical couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Seong Sook

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the psychological factors that affect marital satisfaction or divorce likelihood in clinical couples. Clinical couples (n=57) who visited "M" couple clinic participated in the study. Data was collected from September 2005 to June 2006 using a Marital Satisfaction Scale, a Marital Status Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Maudsley Obsessional-Compulsive Inventory, and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. The couples showed high scores on depression, obsessive-compulsion, personality factors and divorce probability and a low score on marital satisfaction. The wife's obsessive-compulsion was a predictor of her marital satisfaction, and the wife's social introversion and depression, and husband's obsessive-compulsion were predictors of the wife's prospect of divorce. The husband's hypomania and depression were predictors of his marital satisfaction, and there were no predictors of the husband's prospect of divorce. Obsessive-compulsion is a significant factor in a couple's relationship, although previous studies have not been interested in obsessive-compulsion. Divorce likelihood should be evaluated for clinical couples as well as marital satisfaction, because it is more important for divorce prevention. Each spouse who has a psychological problem such as depression, obsessive-compulsion, and deviated personality needs individual therapy as well as couple therapy.

  3. Marital satisfaction before and after deployments associated with the Global War on Terror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeland, Kelly C; Sutton, Geoffrey W; Schumm, Walter R

    2008-12-01

    Previously, McLeland and Sutton (2005) assessed marital satisfaction among 46 male civilians and Reserve Component personnel, some of the latter having been alerted for a future deployment. Subsequently, marital satisfaction was also assessed for 74 male Active Component Army personnel who had recently returned from duty in a combat zone. Marital satisfaction scores were compared across personnel status. Mixed results were obtained from an analysis of variance comparing the five subgroups of personnel; however, when the three types of deployment groups were contrasted with the civilian and never-deployed military groups, substantial (ES = 0.55) and significant (p marital satisfaction were observed. Although exploratory, these data indicate that predeployment and postdeployment situations are stressful for military members and may be associated with lower marital satisfaction for months before and months after a deployment, as well as during the deployment. Furthermore, changes in marital or relationship satisfaction may be more sensitive and timely as indicators of any stressful effects of deployments and separation on military families than changes in marital or relationship stability.

  4. Relationship between mental health and marital satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolsattar Shahi; Ibrahim Ghaffari; Khalil Ghasemi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Marital satisfaction is an important component of the marriage. Mental health as a component of the personal characteristic also related with marital satisfaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between mental health and marital satisfaction of couples.Methods: Three hundred couples from high-risk area of Gorgan – North of Iran were selected. Association between men's and women’s mental health level was measured using General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-...

  5. The Influence of Religiosity on Marital Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Khodabakhsh Ahmadi; Esfandiar Azad-Marzabadi; Seyed M. Nabipoor

    2008-01-01

    The following research sought to examine the relationship between a married individuals religiosity level and its impact upon his or her level of marital satisfaction. Findings in this connection can help strengthen families 660 heterosexually hetero-sexually couples from Tehran were studied multistage using cluster sampling. Information regarding religiosity and marital satisfaction was collected using the researchers prepared questionnaire and ENRICH marital satisfaction scale. The results ...

  6. Interaction of iron status with single nucleotide polymorphisms on incidence of type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihye Kim

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with a risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2D in Korean adults and to investigate the longitudinal association between these SNPs and T2D and the interaction effects of iron intake and average hemoglobin level. Data from the KoGES_Ansan and Ansung Study were used. Gene-iron interaction analysis was conducted using a two-step approach. To select candidate SNPs associated with T2D, a total of 7,935 adults at baseline were included in genome-wide association analysis (step one. After excluding T2D prevalent cases, prospective analyses were conducted with 7,024 adults aged 40-69 (step two. The association of selected SNPs and iron status with T2D and their interaction were determined using a Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 3 SNPs [rs9465871 (CDKAL1, rs10761745 (JMJD1C, and rs163177 (KCNQ1] were selected as candidate SNPs related to T2D. Among them, rs10761745 (JMJD1C and rs163177 (KCNQ1 were prospectively associated with T2D. High iron intake was also prospectively associated with the risk of T2D after adjusting for covariates. Average hemoglobin level was positively associated with T2D after adjusting for covariates in women. We also found significant interaction effects between rs10761745 (JMJD1C and average hemoglobin levels on the risk of T2D among women with normal inflammation and without anemia at baseline. In conclusion, KCNQ1 and JMJD1C may prospectively contribute to the risk of T2D incidence among adults over the age of 40 and JMJD1C, but CDKAL1 may not, and iron status may interactively contribute to T2D incidence in women.

  7. Marital Sex Role Incongruence and Marital Adjustment: A Reply to Bowen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Robert A.; Li, Jason T.

    1989-01-01

    Defends authors' methodological approach to examining incongruity of marital sex role attitudes and satisfaction in their "Journal of Family Issues" (JFI) article, "Magnitude and Directional Effects of Marital Sex Role Incongruence and Marital Adjustment," from Gary Bowen's critique (JFI l0:416-419). Asserts that methodological approach used,…

  8. The Marital Happiness/Disruption Relationship by Level of Marital Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, J. Richard

    1983-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that the inverse relationship between marital happiness and disruption will be strong under conditions of high marital alternatives and weak under conditions of low marital alternatives. Used micro data from a sample of 400 White, urban, American couples. Found no support for the hypothesis. (Author/RC)

  9. Marital adjustment of patients with substance dependence, schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shital S Muke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marital adjustment is considered as a part of social well-being. Disturbed marital relationship can directly affect the disease adjustment and the way they face disease outcomes and complications. It may adversely affect physical health, mental health, the quality-of-life and even economic status of individuals. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the marital adjustment among patients with substance dependence, schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of each 30 patients with substance dependence, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, diagnosed as per international classification of diseases-10 diagnostic criteria for research with a minimum duration of illness of 1 year were evaluated using marital adjustment questionnaire. The data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistics. Results: Prevalence of poor marital adjustment in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder and substance dependence was 60%, 70% and 50% respectively. There was a significant difference on overall marital adjustment among substance dependence and bipolar affective disorder patients. There was no significant difference on overall marital adjustment among patients with substance dependence and schizophrenia as well as among patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. On marital adjustment domains, schizophrenia patients had significantly poor sexual adjustment than substance dependence patients while bipolar affective disorder patients had significantly poor sexual and social adjustment compared with substance dependence patients. Conclusion: Patients with substance dependence have significant better overall marital adjustment compared with bipolar affective disorder patients. Patients with substance dependence have significantly better social and sexual adjustment than patients with bipolar affective disorder as well as significantly better sexual

  10. Marital Counseling: An Integrated Brief Therapy Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Sandy; Norem, Ken

    1998-01-01

    Addresses advantages of, and potential pitfalls in, integrated approaches to marital counseling. Presents a sequential approach in which various approaches to marital counseling are integrated without jeopardizing internal consistency and uniformity in treatment. Offers precounseling considerations and procedures for a five-session series.…

  11. relationship between parenting styles and marital adjustment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    The relationship between permissive parenting style and marital adjustment was also very low, positive and insignificant. There was a low, positive and significant joint relationship between the parenting styles and marital adjustment of married teachers in secondary schools in Obio/Akpor Local Government Area of Rivers ...

  12. Everyday Marital Conflict and Child Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, E. Mark; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Papp, Lauren M.

    2004-01-01

    Children's immediate aggressive responding to exposure to marital conflict was examined. Participants were 108 families with 8- to 16-year-old children (53 boys, 55 girls), with diary records of children's reactions to marital conflict in the home completed by 103 mothers (n = 578 records) and 95 fathers (n = 377 records) during a 15-day period.…

  13. Marital Lifestyles and Adjustment to Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriboga, David A.; Thurnher, Majda

    1980-01-01

    Results suggest that characteristics of the marital lifestyle may impede or facilitate adjustment to marital separation, although salient characteristics may vary for men and women, and change with age. The existence of separate avenues for self-expression constitutes a major resource in coping with the transition to singlehood. (Author)

  14. The Marital Happiness of Remarried Divorced Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Norval D.; Weaver, Charles N.

    1977-01-01

    A comparison of the reported marital happiness of ever-divorced and never-divorced white respondents to three recent U. S. national surveys reveals significantly greater marital happiness for never-divorced females but not for never-divorced males. Even among females, the difference in the percentage of "very happy" responses was less…

  15. [Family caregivers' burden and marital satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyoshi, Kazuko; Becker, Carl; Siwaku, Kuninori; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between home-based elder care and marital satisfaction. Care managers distributed a questionnaire to home caregivers in order to assess the items such as annual income, marital satisfaction, Zarit caregiver burden, sleeping hours and how often they have to get up in the night to take care of the elder. A total of 149 caregivers completed the questionnaire. Their marital satisfaction was inversely correlated to caregiver burden, but positively correlated with annual income. Subjective psychological perception of caregiver burden was the most important factor influencing a marital satisfaction. It appears that a marital satisfaction depend far more on subjective perception of caregiver burden than on more objective measurements of caregiver burden.

  16. Relationship Between Life Style and Marital Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سمیه پورمیدانی

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between life style and marital satisfaction in married students of all universities in Isfahan. The method of research was descriptive correlation. Statistical population consisted of married students of Isfahan universities in the year 2013-2014 that 383 students (276 female and 107 male were selected viamultistage cluster sampling from five universities. The participants were asked to complete health promoting life Style questionnaire (walker, 1990, and enrich marital satisfaction inventory (enrich, 1986. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation and inferential statistics (pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression. The results showed that there was a significant positive correlation between life style and marital satisfaction (P<0.01. The multiple regression analyses indicated that life style could predict 20 percent variance of marital satisfaction. These results suggest that life style education can help couples to enrich their marital life through life style modification.

  17. Premarital precursors of marital infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth S; Rhoades, Galena Kline; Stanley, Scott M; Markman, Howard J; Williams, Tamara; Melton, Jessica; Clements, Mari L

    2008-06-01

    Premarital precursors of infidelity were evaluated in a sample of 72 couples (N = 144) who were taking part in a longitudinal study of marriage. Premarital self-report and observational data were compared for couples who experienced infidelity and those who did not experience infidelity in the first years of marriage. Couples in which the male engaged in marital infidelity were characterized, premaritally, by significantly lower male sexual satisfaction, lower male positive communication, and higher female invalidation, whereas couples in which the female went on to engage in infidelity were characterized, premaritally, by significantly lower levels of female positive communication, higher levels of male and female negative communication, and higher levels of male and female invalidation. Implications of the findings for future research on the prediction and prevention of infidelity are discussed.

  18. Effect of Marital Relationship Enrichment Program on Marital Satisfaction, Marital Intimacy, and Sexual Satisfaction of Infertile Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Khani, Somayeh; Kazemi, Farideh; Kalhori, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Reyhaneh; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2017-10-01

    Infertile couples only think of having children during their sexual intercourse, and their constant concern about this issue increases their stress level. Psychosocial and social stress leads to decreased life satisfaction, increased marital problems, and reduced sexual confidence. This study aims to determine the effect of enrichment program on marital and sexual satisfaction as well as marital intimacy among infertile couples. This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 50 infertile couples in 2013 in Hamedan. The marital relationship enrichment program was taught to the experimental group during seven 90 minutes sessions. Enrich marital satisfaction, Linda Berg sexual satisfaction, and marital intimacy questionnaires were completed by both groups in 3 pretest steps immediately after the end of training sessions, and 8 weeks later. The results were analyzed in STATA11 software using t test, Chi-square, ANCOVA, RM-ANOVA, and Bonferroni post-hoc test. To check the data normality, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used. Pintimacy immediately after the test (P=0.04) and 8 weeks after the test (Pintimacy and also marital and sexual satisfaction in infertile couples (Registration Number: IRCT201604299014N97). Copyright© by Royan Institute. All rights reserved.

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow in status epileptics measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiseki, Hajime; Terashi, Akiro; Hamamoto, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tokuzo.

    1995-01-01

    We have performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99m Tc-hexamethylpropylene amineoxime (HM-PAO) to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in status epileptics (SE) caused by a cerebral vascular accident. In addition, we have discussed the neurophysiology of SE based on the SPECT findings. A total of sixteen patients (5 males and 11 females, average age; 78.2 years old) with SE who were suffering from prolonged consciousness disturbance were investigated. When SPECT was performed in the ictal state, there was a remarkable increase in radio isotope (RI) uptake at the focus which correlated well with EEG findings. However, in other cortical regions, basal ganglia and thalamus, there was a relatively demonstrated decrease in RI uptake compared with that of the focus. Additionally in the interictal state, we found a decrease in RI uptake in the epileptic foci and normal recovery of the RI uptake level in other cerebral regions. We speculate that these characteristic patterns of cerebral blood flow distribution shown by SPECT scans in the ictal state reflect the state of consciousness disturbance due to SE. In general, in the elderly, it is difficult to make a differential diagnosis between prolonged consciousness disturbance due to nonconvulsive SE and other diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, dehydration, metabolic disorder, etc. Nevertheless, nonconvulsive SE causes diffuse cell loss and irreversible brain damage. Therefore the elderly who have suffered from prolonged consciousness disturbance due to SE need an exact diagnosis and immediate medical treatment. When we diagnose a nonconvulsive SE, the characteristic findings of SPECT scans in the ictal state are very clear and useful. In conclusion, SPECT is a very simple and non-invasive method that demonstrates abnormalities of brain function exactly. Therefore, we should perform not only EEC but also SPECT scans when making a diagnosis of SE. (author)

  20. Is an Empty Nest Best?: Coresidence With Adult Children and Parental Marital Quality Before and After the Great Recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eden M; Kim, Kyungmin; Fingerman, Karen L

    2018-03-02

    Since the Great Recession, the proportion of young adults living with their parents has risen steadily in the United States. Research on coresidence with adult children and parental marital quality is mixed, but marital quality may suffer if children coreside under certain circumstances. When coresidence signifies a deviation from normative expectations, it may be a source of stress in parents' marriages. Further, living with adult children who are suffering problems may be especially detrimental to parental marital quality. Middle-aged parents (N = 287; mean age = 50.65) completed measures of marital quality, child problems, and coresidence at 2 time points, at the onset of the Great Recession in 2008 and again in 2013. Regression analyses estimating marital quality from coresidence status revealed that coresidence with a child was associated with lower parental marital quality in 2008, but not in 2013 (when it may be considered more normative to have adult children living in the home). Additional analyses showed living with a child who was suffering problems was associated with lower marital quality in 2013. These findings suggest that coresidence may be detrimental to marital quality, but perhaps only when coresidence is nonnormative or when coresidence co-occurs with child problems.

  1. The Effects of Life Skills Training on Marital Satisfaction of Married Women: A Case Study in Dogonbadan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abbasi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Successful family relationships and marital satisfaction largely depends on couples’ awareness of their marital or parental roles. Marital relations training could provide adaptation with expected roles for both husband and wife. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of life skills training on marital satisfaction in married women. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study which was carried out in 2010 examined fifty married women in Dogonbadan, Iran. The Enrich Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire and related demographic data which was collected prior and one year after training, were used for the study. T-test was used for data analysis. Results: The mean age, average number of children, and the average length of marriage were 35, 1.8, and 10.36 years respectively. The average of all scores was significantly different in pretest and post test (p<0.002. Also, the scores of personality objects (p<0.05, marital relationships (p<0.001, conflict resolution (p<0.001, and financial and economic monitoring (p<0.001 were significantly different. The differences in mean scores of subscales in relationship with relatives and friends, leisure activities, and marriage and children were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results showed that marital skills' training is effective in improving the marital status and satisfaction, and also improved the quality of life among married couples.

  2. Marriage of matching doors: Marital sorting on parental background in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Who marries whom has important implications for the (re-production of social inequalities. Whereas previous studies on marital sorting have mainly focused on the husband's and the wife's traits, in this research I assess the importance of parental background in marital sorting in contemporary China in light of the tradition of marriage of matching doors. Methods: Drawing on data from the 2006 China General Social Survey, I use log-linear models to explore the extent to which couples sort based on their parents' occupational status and hukou (household registration, and the interaction between the two. Results: The results show a significant association between the occupational status of an individual's father and of his or her spouse, net of the intergenerational mobility between parents and children and the assortative mating between the husband and the wife. Furthermore, there is a significant net association between the occupational status of an individual's father and father-in-law. Parents' hukou status also plays a pivotal role in marital sorting, in that an individual's father and father-in-law tend to have the same rural or urban hukou. Nevertheless, the interaction between the father's occupational status and hukou is not found to play a significant role in shaping the pattern of marital sorting. Conclusions: Given the persistence of the tradition of marriage of matching doors, it is important to conceptualize marriage in contemporary China as a family affair, rather than a de-institutionalized, privatized, or individualized practice.

  3. Personality Change Among Newlyweds: Patterns, Predictors, and Associations With Marital Satisfaction Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavner, Justin A; Weiss, Brandon; Miller, Joshua D; Karney, Benjamin R

    2017-12-18

    The early years of marriage are a time of significant personal and relational changes as partners adjust to their new roles, but the specific ways that spouses' personalities may change in early marriage and how these changes are associated with spouses' marital satisfaction trajectories have been overlooked. Using 3 waves of data collected over the first 18 months of marriage (N = 338 spouses, or 169 heterosexual newlywed marriages), we examined changes in spouses' self-reported Big 5 personality traits over time and the association between initial levels and changes in personality and spouses' concurrent marital satisfaction trajectories. Results indicated significant changes in personality over time, including declines in agreeableness for husbands and for wives, declines in extraversion for husbands, declines in openness and neuroticism for wives, and increases in conscientiousness for husbands. These results did not differ by spouses' age, demographics, relationship length prior to marriage, cohabitation prior to marriage, initial marital satisfaction, or parenthood status. Initial levels of personality as well as changes in personality over time were associated with spouses' marital satisfaction trajectories. Taken together, these findings indicate that newlywed spouses' personalities undergo meaningful changes during the newlywed years and these changes are associated with changes in spouses' marital satisfaction. Further research is needed to understand the processes underlying changes in personality early in marriage and to examine the mechanisms linking changes in personality and changes in marital satisfaction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. SPOUSAL INTRUSION AS A PREDICTOR OF WIVES' MARITAL SATISFACTION IN THEIR SPOUSES' RETIREMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoglan, Bahadir

    2015-06-01

    Retirement of men changes their roles and participation and affects their spouses' daily routines, roles, and participation. This study assessed the effects of spousal intrusion on marital satisfaction in retirement. Questionnaires assessing demographics, spousal intrusion, shared couple activities, feelings, and marital satisfaction were administered to a group of 151 volunteer women whose husbands were retired in two cities in Turkey. The women were recruited among those who were willing to share their feelings and thoughts about their husbands' retirement process as a result of one-on-one interviews. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the perception of spousal intrusion, education status, frequency of shared activities, and dyadic adjustment predicted women's marital satisfaction in retirement. However, spousal intrusion did not significantly predict women's marital satisfaction when dyadic adjustment was entered in the second model. In the third model, final variables together predicted 19% of women's marital satisfaction in their spouse's retirement. These findings are important as they underline the factors affecting women's marital satisfaction in their spouses' retirement period.

  5. Older women's experiences of psychological violence in their marital relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, Lyse

    2005-01-01

    Violence within older couples is a reality, not a myth. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 women ages 60 to 81 who had suffered marital psychological violence. Husbands' psychologically violent behaviors were grouped into 14 categories: control, denigration, deprivation, intimidation, threats, abdication of responsibility, manipulation, blame, harassment, negation of reality, indifference, making the wife feel guilty, sulking, and infantilization. Control behaviors were found to be the central category. Control dynamics increased at retirement, when children left home and when husbands experienced a decrease in health status. Implications for practice are also discussed.

  6. Profiles Using Indicators of Marital Communication, Communication Styles, and Marital Satisfaction in Mexican Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Bravo, Claudia; Watty Martínez, Alejandra

    2017-05-19

    Marital problems have multiple causes. One factor leading to marital dissatisfaction is communication, both the inability to communicate in certain areas and the way in which communication is made. One hundred four Mexican couples who attend a reproductive health care institution in Mexico City took part in this study. The relationship between the amount and style of communication was studied in order to develop profiles with explanatory indicators. A study was carried out with two samples (men and women) that were classified in terms of marital satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Indicators related to marital satisfaction are talking about the marital relationship, discussing work (women and men), communicating about sexuality (women). Indicators of marital dissatisfaction are talking about children, having and perceiving a reserved and negative style of communication (men), having and perceiving a negative and violent style of communication (women).

  7. Personality traits and sexual satisfaction as determinants of marital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yet what still remains uncertain is which factors account for the differing degrees of marital satisfaction and the fluctuations in the marital quality (e.g. marital conflict) that spouses experience over time. This study therefore sets out to investigate personality traits and sexual satisfaction as determinants of marital satisfaction ...

  8. Approaches to Marital Therapy | Esere | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In so doing efforts are geared towards highlighting the theory of transactional analysis and marital therapy, the concepts of life positions and marital therapy, the concepts of Rational - Emotive Therapy (RET) and marital conflict. Techniques of cognitive therapies in enhancing marital happiness are also highlighted.

  9. Sources of Marital Conflict in Five Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Dillon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis of previously collected data examined four fitness-relevant issues for their possible role in marital conflict. These were sex, finances, division of labor, and raising children, selected in light of their pertinence to sex differences in reproductive strategies. Over 2,000 couples in five diverse cultures were studied. Marital conflict was assessed by the Problems with Partner scale, which was previously shown to demonstrate measurement invariance across cultures and genders. All four issues were significantly related to perceived marital problems in almost all cases. Thus, conflict tended to arise around issues relevant to reproductive strategies. A few cultural idiosyncrasies emerged and are discussed. In all cultures, wives reported more problems than husbands. Another important issue was kindness. The results suggest that a key factor in marital success or failure may be kindness necessary to sustain this prolonged and intimate relationship of cooperation for raising one's offspring.

  10. 76 FR 33027 - Agency Information Collection (Statement of Marital Relationship) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... collection. Abstract: VA Form 21-4170 is completed by individuals claiming to be common law widows/widowers of deceased veterans and by veterans and their claimed common law spouses to establish marital status. VA uses the information collected to determine whether a common law marriage was valid under the law...

  11. 76 FR 16858 - Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Marital Relationship); Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... validity of a common law marriage. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection... collection. Abstract: VA Form 21-4170 is completed by individuals claiming to be common law widows/widowers of deceased veterans and by veterans and their claimed common law spouses to establish marital status...

  12. Parenting Practices of Resident Fathers: The Role of Marital and Biological Ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lawrence M.; Carlson, Marcia J.; Bzostek, Sharon H.; Osborne, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,098) to examine differences in the parenting practices of four types of resident fathers, defined by their biological relationship to a focal child and their marital status with regard to the focal child's mother. Regression results suggest that biological fathers and…

  13. MARITAL RAPE: ASSAULT ON WOMEN'S DIGNITY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Madhu Shastri

    2018-01-01

    A marriage, generally, is a bond of trust and affection.Dependency of women on men, the relationship entails coercive potential. Marital rape is undesirable intercourse by a husband with his wife by force, physical violence or without her consent. Marital rape is a non-consensual act of violence unconventional by a husband against the wife where she is physically, emotionally and sexually abused. It questions the very essence of human relationship, wife is continuously raped by whom she beli...

  14. The Relationship between Self-efficacy and Marital Satisfaction among Married Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Mashal pour fard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The present study was designed and conducted to determine the relationship between self-efficacy and marital satisfaction among married and single students. Materials and Methods The sample of this study consisted of 50 married students of Payame Noor University in IZEH city, South West of Iran; then simple random sampling method was used to select samples. To measure self-efficacy questionnaire Scherer and Enrich marital satisfaction questionnaire was used. Data were analyses using SPSS-20. Results The mean age of students were 23 + 0.739 years. In terms of demographic characteristics, 50% of the study population were women and 50% were men. Results showed thatthere was a significant negative correlation between self-efficacy and marital satisfaction of male students (r= - 0.55 and P=0.001, respectively. Also, there was a significant negative correlation between self-efficacy and marital satisfaction in married women students (r= -0.47 and P=0.001, respectively. Conclusion The root of many marital problems, including divorce, the factors they are directly or indirectly marital satisfaction. Therefore, considering these variables can be important to prevent disputes in married life and many negative consequences for physical and mental health will bring the couple and their children that can affect the beneficial aspects of married life.

  15. Socioeconomic Status and Overweight Prevalence in Polish Adolescents: The Impact of Single Factors and a Complex Index of Socioeconomic Status in Respect to Age and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOWALKOWSKA, Joanna; WADOLOWSKA, Lidia; WERONIKA WUENSTEL, Justyna; SŁOWIŃSKA, Małgorzata Anna; NIEDŹWIEDZKA, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to analyze the association between overweight prevalence and socioeconomic status (SES) measured by complex SES index and single SES factors in Polish adolescents in respect to age and sex. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010-2011. A total of 1,176 adolescents aged 13.0-18.9 years were included. The respondents were students of junior-high and high schools from northern, eastern and central Poland. Quota sampling by sex and age was used. The SES was determined by: place of residence, self-declared economic situation, and parental education level. Respondents with low, average or high SES index (SESI) were identified. The level of overweight was assessed using Polish and international standards. Results The odds ratio (OR) for overweight prevalence in the oldest girls (aged 17.0-18.9 years) with high SESI was 0.34 (95%CI:0.13-0.92; P socioeconomic status and prevalence of overweight was related to sex and age. The high socioeconomic status strongly lowered the risk of overweight prevalence in the oldest girls, but not in boys, irrespective of age. Maternal education level lowered risk of overweight prevalence in girls. PMID:25909059

  16. The Mental Health Status of Single-Parent Community College Students in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Divya P; Lee, Christine; Trieu, Sang Leng

    2016-01-01

    Single-parenting students face unique challenges that may adversely affect their mental health, which have not been explored in community college settings. The authors conducted secondary analysis of Spring 2013 data from the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment to examine difficulties facing single-parent community college students and the association between single parenting and negative mental health (depression, self-injury, suicide attempt). Participants were 6,832 California community college students, of whom 309 were single parents. Demographic and mental health data were characterized using univariate descriptive analyses. Bivariate analyses determined whether single parents differed from other students regarding negative mental health or traumatic/difficult events. Finances, family, and relationship difficulties disproportionally affected single parents, who reported nearly twice as many suicide attempts as their counterparts (5.3% vs. 2.7%; p students face a higher prevalence of mental health stressors than other community college students.

  17. Genital Herpes in Marital Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jacob

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available During 1983-86, 225 patients were clinically diagnosed to have genital herpes (GH at our clinic. Of these, 90 men and 55 women were currently married. All the spouses were screened clinically and through standardized techniques for isolation and typing of herpes simplex virus, serological testing and Papanicolaou smear. There were 90 couples in whom at least one spouse had GH and in 38 (42% couples both partners had GH. Clinically, 49% of wives and 75% of husbands of GH patients were diagnosed to have the disease. The spouses of recurrent GH patients had a higher frequency of the disease than spouses of primary GH patients. Among spouses who were clinically asymptomatic, 40% had high serological titres suggestive of GH. Wives generally experienced more severe symptoms, especially pain in the lesions. Majority of lesions in both the partners were vesicles and ulcers. Prodromata were more among recurrent GH patients in both the partners. The frequency of recurrences wasalso similar in spouses. Seventy percent of wives and 40% of husbands could not identify any precipitating factor. Intercourse, physical stress and rich food were cited as possible factors in the remaining. All the wives had acquired the diseases through their husbands who were promiscuous. Fifty percent of husbands had been infected before marriage. Given the fact that asymptomatic carriers exist, it is better to consider all marital partners of GH as infected. Repeated and long-term follow, - up examination, particularly of wives of GH patients is therefore essential as an important socio-preventive aspect of this disease.

  18. “Don’t Marry, Be Happy!” – How Single Women in Malaysia View Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmawati Azman Azwan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore how single women in Malaysia who have never been married view marriage and related issues. Two-hundred single women between the ages of 24 to 66 were interviewed in this study. Participants reported their view on gender and marriage (42-items, social expectations related to their marital status (12-item and their marital plan. Participants reported moderately traditional view about gender and marriage experienced some level of expectations to get married and although they generally felt positive with their current status of being single, they were still open to the idea of marriage. Ideal characteristics of a partner include kindness, sincerity, responsibility and maturity. Findings indicated realistic but open expectations related to marriage.

  19. Marital Interaction in Middle and Old Age: A Predictor of Marital Satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Marina; Kliegel, Matthias; Shapiro, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Many studies point out the importance of marital satisfaction for well-being. However, although being married is still the norm in middle and old age, research on the determinants of marital satisfaction has neglected long-term marriages. While research on short-term marriages mainly focuses on partner fit (e.g., in personality traits and…

  20. Dysphoria and Marital Discord: Are Dysphoric Individuals at Risk for Marital Maladjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Steven R. H.; O'Leary, K. Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Examined effects of dysphoria on husbands' and wives' later marital adjustment among 264 couples about to marry. Assessed relationship satisfaction and level of dysphoria in both spouses prior to marriage, 6 months after marriage, and 18 months after marriage. Premarital dysphoria was associated with later marital dissatisfaction. Gender…

  1. Effect of Marital Counselling on Women‟s Attitude Towards Marital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of marital counselling on women's attitude towards marital stability. The study adopted a pre-test post-test quasi experimental design. The sample consisted of 52 married women (academic and non-academic) staff of the Faculty of Education, University of Port-Harcourt, Rivers State of ...

  2. The Relationship between Marital Satisfaction, Marital Stability, Nuclear Family Triangulation, and Childhood Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linna; Crane, D. Russell

    2001-01-01

    Study examined the effect of triangulation on depression in children. Clinical samples and nonclinical samples were taken from Utah and Illinois. Results showed children's depressive symptoms to be most strongly linked to the father's level of marital satisfaction, marital stability, and perceived family triangulation. Mothers' variables did not…

  3. Trajectories of Marital Conflict across the Life Course: Predictors and Interactions with Marital Happiness Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp Dush, Claire M.; Taylor, Miles G.

    2012-01-01

    Using typologies outlined by Gottman and Fitzpatrick as well as institutional and companionate models of marriage, the authors conducted a latent class analysis of marital conflict trajectories using 20 years of data from the Marital Instability Over the Life Course study. Respondents were in one of three groups: high, medium (around the mean), or…

  4. A cross-cultural examination of the relation of marital communication behavior to marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Uzma S; Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy

    2007-12-01

    Numerous studies have examined the communication behaviors of Western, primarily North American, couples and have demonstrated a robust and reliable association between marital satisfaction and couple communication. However, there has been relatively less attention given to the generalizability of these findings to non-Western couples. To address this issue, the authors conducted an observational study of marital communication among couples from 3 different cultural groups: 50 White American couples, 52 Pakistani couples in Pakistan, and 48 immigrant Pakistani couples in America. The results show that positive and negative communication behaviors were associated with marital satisfaction within each of the 3 cultural groups. However, the American group's marital satisfaction was more strongly related to marital communication behaviors than was that of the Pakistani group and, to a lesser extent, the immigrant group.

  5. Socioeconomic Status, Parenting, and Externalizing Problems in African American Single-Mother Homes: A Person-Oriented Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Margaret T.; Jones, Deborah J.; Youngstrom, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    African American youth, particularly those from single-mother homes, are overrepresented in statistics on externalizing problems. The family is a central context in which to understand externalizing problems; however, reliance on variable-oriented approaches to the study of parenting, which originate from work with intact, middle-income, European American families, may obscure important information regarding variability in parenting styles among African American single mothers, and in turn, variability in youth outcomes as well. The current study demonstrated that within African American single-mother families: (a) a person-, rather than variable-, oriented approach to measuring parenting style may further elucidate variability; (b) socioeconomic status may provide 1 context within which to understanding variability in parenting style; and (c) 1 marker of socioeconomic status, income, and parenting style may each explain variability in youth externalizing problems; however, the interaction between income and parenting style was not significant. Findings have potential implications for better understanding the specific contexts in which externalizing problems may be most likely to occur within this at-risk and underserved group. PMID:26053349

  6. Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kieran T; Pasch, Lauri A; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels whereas positive support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and divorce status. These findings emphasize the need to look beyond conflict when explaining how aggression affects relationships and when working with couples with a history of physical aggression who are seeking to improve their relationships. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Alcohol and Marital Violence: Bond Style According its Co-Occurrence in Couples at Bogota City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Jimena Perdomo Escobar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to analyze the bond style according to the co-occurrence of alcohol consumption and violence in marital dyads of women who belong to middle and low socioeconomic status. A factorial 2x2 non-experimental cross sectional design was applied to a sample of 101 women who participated voluntarily. The questionnaire of Alcohol and Couple Violence Co-occurrence and the Adults’ Bond Scale were used. Moreover, the c2, the OR and the c2 tests by Mantel & Haenszel were applied. It was found that 79% of women and 89,9% of their husbands were regular consumers. Marital violence towards women occurred in 31,6% of the cases, meanwhile this type of violence was suffered by men in 25% of the cases. Co-occurrence of consumption and maltreatment was found in 22 cases. So, consumption would be a risk factor for marital violence. However, there was not a significant correlation between these aspects and women’s bond style. Mantel y Haenszel’s c2 showed significantly (p=0,036 that this kind of bond was only affected by OH consumptionif it co-occurs with marital violence. But, if the last factor does not occur, bond style behaves orthogonally to the OH consumption. It was concluded that there is an interdependence relationship between bond style according to differential occurrence of alcohol consumption and marital violence.

  8. Integrative self-knowledge and marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Nima; Watson, P J; Fayyaz, Fatemeh; Chen, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Married Iranian couples (N = 210) responded to the Integrative Self-Knowledge Scale along with a measure of marital satisfaction, the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) Big Five, and an index of interpersonal problems. Integrative self-knowledge correlated positively with marital satisfaction, positively with all but the extraversion Big Five traits, and negatively with three indices of interpersonal problems. Integrative self-knowledge also mediated a number of personality relationships with marital satisfaction. Spouse-ratings of personality confirmed the adaptive implications of integrative self-knowledge for marriage. Linkages with questionnaire response styles supported the description of integrative self-knowledge as a measure of both self-insight and self-development. Results confirmed the potential of integrative self-knowledge for studying self-regulatory processes and suggested that the enhancement of self-knowledge may be a useful goal in efforts to strengthen marriages.

  9. Age and marital status linked to quality of life of long term survivors of head and neck or prostate cancer: report from a survey of radiation therapy oncology group patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.; Stern, J.; Asbell, S.; Osborne, D.; Peer, J.; Wasserman, T.; Hinrich, S.; Paulus, R.; Scarantino, C.; Bruner, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This research project was designed to evaluate the QOL of prostate cancer survivors (PCS) or head and neck cancer survivors (HNCS) enrolled on RTOG clinical trials. Materials and Methods: Patients alive >4 years from registration on RTOG clinical trials were eligible to participate. Potential PCS or HNCS were identified in the RTOG database and institutions (INST) that agreed to participate were sent surveys and a list of eligible survivors. All eligible PCS or HNCS at that INST were given an informed consent and a survey. The survey consists of questionnaires on QOL, insurance issues, mood, sexual function, alcohol and tobacco use, and mental status. Results: To date, 460 survivors were approached from 40 INST and 276 (60%) have signed the informed consent. Twenty-one percent are HNCS. Sixteen percent of PCS are African American, as are 12% in HNCS. The current average age of PCS is 75 (range of 55-91 years); 65 (41-84) for HNCS. PCS were less likely to be current smokers (8%) compared to HNCS (15%, p=0.057). In HNCS age was associated with speech impairment: 61% under 65 had normal speech vs. 88%>65, p=0.023. Elderly HNCS reported less disfigurement (p=0.037) and greater spiritual well-being than younger survivors (p=0.0005). HNCS reported greater distress from illness (p=0.002) and anger (p=0.03) than PCS. HNCS reported more sexual dysfunction than PCS (p=0.017). In PCS married survivors had greater sexual dysfunction than non-married survivors (p=0.04). Conclusion: Survivors over age 65 that had head and neck cancer had less chronic effects of disease and treatment than their younger counterparts. They also had greater spiritual well-being. Survivors of head and neck cancer had greater sexual dysfunction than prostate cancer survivors, likely linked to their younger age. In addition, sexual function was of greater interest to married patients; therefore, of greater consequence with dysfunction. Younger patients report more long term effects of disease

  10. The transition to parenthood and marital quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L K; Booth, A

    1985-12-01

    An extensive literature demonstrates a negative correlation between the presence of children and marital quality. Few of these studies are designed to test the reasons for this relationship. This study examines 2 possible paths: that people who choose to have children differ from those who do not in ways that affect marital quality, and that having a child changes marital structure and process. This research is based on a nationwide sample interviewed 1st in 1980 and again in 1983. In 1980, telephone interviews were conducted with 2,033 married individuals. The analysis of the effects of transition to parenthood is restricted to the 220 individuals who met the following conditions: childless in 1980, wife under 35 in 1980, successfully reintterviewed in 1983, and marriage intact between 1980-3. The results of the analysis support neither hypotheses. Prior to the birth of the child, parents and nonparents do not differ in marital interaction, happiness, disagreements, problems, or traditionalism in the division of labor, though future parents are already somewhat more likely to believe that the division of household labor is unfair. In regard to the argument that a new baby causes negative changes in marital structure and process, these data give only weak support. The sharpest difference found in this analysis is in the propensity to divorce or permanently separate, a propensity substantially greater among the nonparents. The greater willingness of childless couples to divorce means that a continuing sample of childless couples is more highly selected for marital happiness than a continuing sample of parents. This selectivity in divorce rather than the direct effect of children seems to be the major reason that cross-sectional comparisons show parents to be somewhat less happy than nonparents.

  11. The Role of Marital Burnout and Early Maladaptive Schemas in Marital Satisfaction between Young Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Kebritchi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the fundamental role of the family structure and the importance of proper marriages in modern society as well as the important role of childhood and its effect on marital relations in adulthood, this study aimed to investigate the role of burnout, early maladaptive schemas and style in marital satisfaction among young couples. This study is a correlation (multiple regressions and descriptive research. The sample consisted of 100 couples (100 females and 100 males, couples aged 20 to 35 years with a high school diploma or higher education who were randomly chosen from student couples of Tehran and Karaj Kharazmi university or other couples out of university which filled out four questionnaires. Following questionnaires were used as research tools: Pines’ Couple Burnout Measure (CBM, Enrich’s Marital Satisfaction (Enrich, Yang’s early maladaptive schemas (EMSQ-R.[6][8]. Results showed that there were three interactive relationships among these variables, so that all three variables were investigated and separately explained concerning marital satisfaction. There was a significant negative correlation between marital burnout and all other subscales and marital satisfaction, and a significant positive correlation between marital burnout and all maladaptive schemas except emotional deprivation schema.

  12. Emotion recognition and marital satisfaction in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Lee X; Pettigrew, L Creed; Kryscio, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in the comprehension of facial and prosodic expressions are commonly associated with right hemisphere stroke. However, little is known regarding the impact of these disorders on social relations. We examined facial and prosodic processing, mood, and marital satisfaction in 12 right hemisphere damaged (RHD) stroke patients and nine controls. Results revealed significant impairments in the comprehension of facial expressions and prosody among RHD stroke patients. Nonparametric correlations in the RHD group showed significant associations between marital satisfaction and facial affect discrimination and matching, and nonaffective prosody discrimination. We conclude that deficits in the recognition of nonverbal expressions are associated with reduced relationship satisfaction.

  13. Current Status of Comprehensive Chromosome Screening for Elective Single-Embryo Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ming-Yih; Chao, Kuang-Han; Chen, Chin-Der; Chang, Li-Jung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Yu-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Most in vitro fertilization (IVF) experts and infertility patients agree that the most ideal assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcome is to have a healthy, full-term singleton born. To this end, the most reliable policy is the single-embryo transfer (SET). However, unsatisfactory results in IVF may result from plenty of factors, in which aneuploidy associated with advanced maternal age is a major hurdle. Throughout the past few years, we have got a big leap in advancement of the genetic...

  14. Current Status of Single-Agent Phase I Trials in Japan: Toward Globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizugaki, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Noboru; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhide; Tamura, Tomohide

    2015-06-20

    In Japan, phase I trials, except first-in-human trials, are usually initiated from approximately 50% of the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD) determined during the initial phase I trials in North America and Europe (the West). However, the key findings of phase I trials in Japan and the West, such as dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) profiles and MTD or MAD levels, have not been compared. We retrospectively analyzed data for patients enrolled onto single-agent phase I trials at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1995 and 2012. DLT profiles, MTDs, and MADs of single-agent phase I trials in Japan were compared with those from trials in the West that were obtained from the literature. A total of 777 patients were enrolled onto 54 single-agent phase I trials, including five first-in-human trials. DLTs were observed in 11.1% of the patients. Importantly, 66.4% of the DLTs were observed within a dose range (80% to 120%) similar to those reported for the trials in the West. The majority of MTDs or MADs could be considered similar between patients, and 80.3% of the drugs had similar MTDs or MADs in the West. The toxicity profiles of single-agent phase I agents determined from trials conducted in Japan were comparable to those obtained from trials in the West. We believe that phase I trials in Japan could be conducted over timelines similar to those in the West, allowing for global or parallel phase I clinical trials. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. [Single and reduced port laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer: current status and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G X; Li, J M; Wang, Y N; Deng, H J; Mou, T Y

    2017-07-01

    For further maximizing the minimally invasive benefits for colorectal cancer patients, laparoscopic surgeons have been dedicating to improve the surgery through single-port (SILES) or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), which is supported by amount of single-port devices and flexible laparoscopic instruments.Many small sample studies of single institution have suggested that SILES for colorectal cancer has similar oncological outcomes with conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS), could improve the cosmetic results, and is more minimally invasive than CLS. However, evidences of advantages for SILES are limited, because of there has been only 4 published studies of prospective randomized clinical trial so far. Due to the technical difficulties and long learning curves, SILES and NOTES are relatively hard to be widely promoted. Thus, a balance between minimally invasive pursuit and laparoscopic technical challenge should be sought. In this way, modified SILES and reduced-port laparoscopic surgery have emerged in recent years, which might be minimally invasive solutions with lower technical demanding for laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgeries. Adding a port as the surgeon's dominant operation channel improved the collisions or overlapping of instruments with movement to reduce the technical difficulties. SILS+ 1 is safe and feasible, would be supported by more and more evidences.

  16. Marital Dissolution and Child Educational Outcomes in San Borja, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snopkowski, Kristin

    2016-12-01

    Serial monogamy is likely an adaptive mating strategy for women when the expected future fitness gains with a different partner are greater than expected future fitness with one's current partner. Using interview data from more than 400 women in San Borja, Bolivia, discrete-time event history analyses and random effects regression analyses were conducted to examine predictors of marital dissolution, separated by remarriage status, and child educational outcomes. Male income was found to be inversely associated with women's risk of "divorce and remarriage," whereas female income is positively associated with women's risk of "divorce, but not remarriage." Children of women who divorce and remarry tend to have significantly lower educational outcomes than children of married parents, but women with higher incomes are able to buffer their children from the negative educational outcomes of divorce and remarriage. Counter to predictions, there is no evidence that women with kin in the community have a significant difference in likelihood of divorce or a buffering effect of child outcomes. In conclusion, predictors of divorce differ depending on whether the woman goes on to remarry, suggesting that male income may be a better predictor of a serial monogamy strategy whereas female income predicts marital dissolution only. Thus, women who are relatively autonomous because of greater income may not benefit from remarriage.

  17. MARRIAGE, SEXUALITY, AND HOLINESS: ASPECTS OF MARITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    it also influenced it at decisive points and developed its own marital ethics. Through a consideration of philosophical ... offers an unusual look at the perception and ethical evaluation of sexuality in the texts of the Apostle Paul and his school. 2. ...... proximity to Plutarch is also revealed in Mor. 142e (= Conjug. prae. 33), in.

  18. Marital Satisfaction and Cherokee Language Fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Rockey; Stoltenberg, Cal; Robbins, Sharla; Ross, J. Mike

    2002-01-01

    The Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised (MSI-R; D.K. Snyder, 1997) norms were compared with scores for 162 volunteer Cherokee participants. Differences were found on the Inconsistency, Conventionalization, Global Distress, and Aggression subscales. Participants classified as fluent or nonfluent in the Cherokee language differed on the…

  19. Natural and Professional Help during Marital Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Paul A.; Zax, Melvin

    Although few people bring their psychological problems to mental health professionals, research in the area of 'natural' help is rudimentary. To investigate the process and effectiveness of natural professional groups in helping individuals experiencing marital disruption, 42 helpers (14 mental health professionals, 14 divorce lawyers, and 14…

  20. Development and Marital Power in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Life histories of 794 Mexican women, ages 25-31 and 40-49, revealed that wives faced diverse circumstances with respect to marital power and husband dominance. Results support the modernization perspective on the consequences of economic development, in that educational attainment affected wives' exposure to domestic violence and participation in…

  1. influence of spousal communication on marital stability

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Engr E. Egbochukwu

    become a slave to it. The assumption for its social necessity is rested on the premise that through it, families are established and the family is the fundamental unit .... problems. This research deems it necessary to investigate the Influence of spousal communication on marital stability. This is because divorce is becoming a ...

  2. Buffering children from marital conflict and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, L F; Gottman, J M

    1997-06-01

    Examined several protective mechanisms that may reduce deleterious correlates of marital conflict and marital dissolution in young children. One set of potential buffers focused on parent-child interaction: parental warmth, parental scaffolding/praise, and inhibition of parental rejection. As a second set of potential buffers, each parent was interviewed about their "meta-emotion philosophy"--that is, their feelings about their own emotions, and their attitudes and responses to their children's anger and sadness. The third set of potential buffers concerned intraindividual characteristics of the child, including the child's intelligence and regulatory physiology (basal vagal tone and vagal suppression). Fifty-six families with a preschool child were studied at two time points: when the children were 5 years old (Time 1) and again when the children were 8 years old (Time 2). At Time 1, naturalistic observations of marital and parent-child interaction were conducted and assessment of child regulatory physiology was obtained through measures of basal vagal tone and suppression of vagal tone. Parents were also interviewed individually about their feelings about their own and their children's emotions, and children's intelligence was assessed. At Time 2, assessment of child outcomes were obtained, including observations of peer interaction, mother ratings of behavior problems and mother and teacher ratings of peer aggression, mother ratings of child physical illness, and measures of achievement. Results indicated that all Time 1 buffering factors protected children in face of marital conflict and dissolution.

  3. A Multivariate, Multisurvey Study of Marital Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Norval D.; Weaver, Charles N.

    1978-01-01

    Multiple regression analysis with data from each of three recent U.S. national surveys is used to estimate the direct effects of each of 10 independent variables on the reported marital happiness of white males and females ages 18 through 59. All of the estimated direct effects are weak or nil. (Author)

  4. Emotional intelligence, happiness, hope and marital satisfaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emotional Intelligence Scale, Subjective-happiness Scale, Adult Trait-hope Scale and the Marital Satisfaction Scale were used to collect data from the participants. Statistical analysis involved the use of Simple Linear and Standard Multiple regression. Findings indicated that, emotional intelligence did not have a significant ...

  5. Communication: A Vital Strategy For Managing Marital Problems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marital problem is an age long issue that eats into the fabrics of marriages resulting in separation, divorce. It causes lots of harm to the couples, their family and the society at large. This paper investigated the sources of marital problems, and common methods of managing marital problems. It offers to use communication as ...

  6. Labor supply and the welfare costs of marital conflict.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen van den Brink, H.; Groot, W.J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Marital conflicts can have negative welfare consequences. In this paper we use an equivalence scale approach to analyze the household labor supply and welfare effects of marital conflict. It might be assumed that there is a simultaneous relation between labor supply and marital conflict: increased

  7. Parenthood and Marital Satisfaction: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenge, Jean M.; Campbell, W. Keith; Foster, Craig A.

    2003-01-01

    This meta-analysis finds that parents report lower marital satisfaction compared with nonparents. There is also a significant negative correlation between marital satisfaction and number of children. The data suggest that marital satisfaction decreases after the birth of a child due to role conflicts and restriction of freedom. (Contains 30…

  8. The Impact of Doctoral Study on Marital Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannock, Rebecca Groves; Litten, Mary Jo; Smith, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Explores whether marital relationships of doctoral students are affected while they are in graduate school. Results show no significant differences among the marital satisfaction of graduate students at different stages in their program. Differences were found with couples involved in marital therapy. Spouses of graduate students reported less…

  9. How Does Premarital Cohabitation Affect Trajectories of Marital Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tach, Laura; Halpern-Meekin, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the link between premarital cohabitation and trajectories of subsequent marital quality using random effects growth curve models and repeated measures of marital quality from married women in the NLSY-79 (N = 3,598). We find that premarital cohabitors experience lower quality marital relationships on average, but this is driven by…

  10. A Multidimensional Comparison of Maritally and Sexually Dysfunctioned Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Phyllis; Snyder, Douglas K.

    The Marital Satisfaction Inventory (MSI) is a potential instrument for differentiating couples with specific sexual distress from those with more general marital complaints. Couples (N=45) expressing primary complaints of dissatisfaction with their sexual relationship and couples (N=45) expressing primary complaints of generalized marital distress…

  11. The Psychobiology of Children Exposed to Marital Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Kasey M.; Holden, George W.; Holahan, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the psychological and physiological functioning of a community sample of children exposed to marital violence, comparing them to a clinical comparison group without marital violence exposure. Results replicated past findings of elevated levels of trauma symptomatology in this population. Further, children exposed to marital violence…

  12. The relationship between family-of-origin and marital satisfaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to explore the relationship between marital satisfaction and family-oforigin factors amongst couples with children. Locke and Wallace's Marital Adjustment Test and the McMaster Family Assessment Device were used to measure marital satisfaction and familyof- origin factors respectively.

  13. Dyadic Processes in Early Marriage: Attributions, Behavior, and Marital Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durtschi, Jared A.; Fincham, Frank D.; Cui, Ming; Lorenz, Frederick O.; Conger, Rand D.

    2011-01-01

    Marital processes in early marriage are important for understanding couples' future marital quality. Spouses' attributions about a partner's behavior have been linked to marital quality, yet the mechanisms underlying this association remain largely unknown. When we used couple data from the Family Transitions Project (N = 280 couples) across the…

  14. Oxidant-antioxidant status in Egyptian children with sickle cell anemia: a single center based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghamrawy, Mona Kamal; Hanna, Wagdi Maurice; Abdel-Salam, Amina; El-Sonbaty, Marwa M; Youness, Eman R; Adel, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    the present study was conducted to investigate the oxidant-antioxidant status in Egyptian children with sickle cell anemia. the serum levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAO), paraoxonase (PON), vitamin E, nitrite, and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in 40 steady state children with homozygous sickle cell anemia (24 males and 16 females) and 20 apparently healthy age- and gender-matched controls. mean serum TAO, PON, vitamin E, and nitrite levels were significantly lower in the group with sickle cell anemia, whereas mean serum MDA was significantly higher in these children compared to controls. No significant differences in mean levels of TAO, PON, nitrite, vitamin E, and MDA were found in sickle cell anemia patients receiving hydroxyurea when compared with those not receiving hydroxyurea. A significant negative correlation between serum nitrite and the occurrence of vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) was observed (r=-0.3, p=0.04). PON level was found to be positively correlated with patients' weight and BMI (r=-0.4, p=0.01; r=-0.7, psickle cell anemia have chronic oxidative stress that may result in increased VOC, and decreased serum nitrite may be associated with increases in VOC frequency. A novel finding in this study is the decrease in PON level in these patients, which is an interesting subject for further research. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of “Marital Skills training for mastectomy women” in improving marital satisfaction of husbands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Bahmani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the health issues related to patients suffering from cancer is paying attention to mental health of the patients and their families. This research was carried out to determine the effect of teaching marital life skills for mastectomy women in the increase of marital satisfaction of this group of patients as well as its direct effect on their spouses’ satisfaction. This was a quasi-experimental research designed as pretest/posttest with random assignment and control group. 22 women suffering from breast cancer, undergoing mastectomy, treated by radiotherapy and having marital satisfaction lower than the moderate level based on the short form (40-question of the ENRICH (evaluation and nurturing relationship issues, communication and happiness questionnaire were selected via purposive sampling and divided into experimental and control groups using random assignment. The pretest was carried out on experimental and control groups and the husbands. The intervention was performed during 12 didactic sessions, two a week, for women of the experimental group in the absence of their husbands. Results indicated that the mean score of marital satisfaction in mastectomy women and their husbands in the experimental group was higher than that of the control group, and the difference was statistically significant. In conclusion, the combined intervention method used in this research was effective in increasing marital satisfaction of mastectomy women, and had also a positive effect on their husbands’ marital satisfaction.

  16. Evaluation of single whole inclusion serum test for IgG antibody to Chlamydia trachomatis in asymptomatic women.

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, M P; Amortegui, A J

    1987-01-01

    IgG antibody titres against Chlamydia trachomatis were measured using a whole inclusion assay (Electro-Nucleonics Laboratories, Bethesda, Maryland, USA) in single serum samples of patients who presented for termination of pregnancy with evidence of infection with this organism (case group) and of 30 women with no evidence of infection (control group). Case and control patients were matched for age, race, marital status, history of sexually transmitted diseases, number of lifetime sexual partn...

  17. Sexual and marital relationships after radiotherapy for seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schover, L.R.; Gonzales, M.; von Eschenbach, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Questionnaires on sexual function, marital status, and fertility were returned by 84 men who received radiotherapy for seminoma (Stage I, II, or III). The mean length of follow-up was ten years. Although 93 per cent were married, 19 per cent had low rates of sexual activity, 12 per cent reported low sexual desire, 15 per cent had erectile dysfunction, 10 per cent had difficulty reaching orgasm, and 14 per cent had premature ejaculation. The most common problems were reduced intensity of orgasm (33%) and reduced semen volume (49%). Twenty-one men remained childless, and 30 per cent of men worried at least occasionally about infertility. Thirteen children were conceived after cancer therapy. The data suggest that sexual dysfunction and infertility are important concerns for a subgroup of men treated for seminoma

  18. Oxidant-antioxidant status in Egyptian children with sickle cell anemia: a single center based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Kamal El-Ghamrawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the present study was conducted to investigate the oxidant-antioxidant status in Egyptian children with sickle cell anemia. METHODS: the serum levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAO, paraoxonase (PON, vitamin E, nitrite, and malondialdehyde (MDA were measured in 40 steady state children with homozygous sickle cell anemia (24 males and 16 females and 20 apparently healthy age- and gender-matched controls. RESULTS: mean serum TAO, PON, vitamin E, and nitrite levels were significantly lower in the group with sickle cell anemia, whereas mean serum MDA was significantly higher in these children compared to controls. No significant differences in mean levels of TAO, PON, nitrite, vitamin E, and MDA were found in sickle cell anemia patients receiving hydroxyurea when compared with those not receiving hydroxyurea. A significant negative correlation between serum nitrite and the occurrence of vaso-occlusive crises (VOC was observed (r = -0.3, p = 0.04. PON level was found to be positively correlated with patients' weight and BMI (r = -0.4, p = 0.01; r = -0.7, p < 0.001, respectively, but not with frequency of VOC. The area under the curve of serum nitrite in predicting occurrence of VOC was 0.782, versus 0.701 for PON, and 0.650 for TAO (p = 0.006. Serum MDA was not correlated with nitrite, PON, TAO, or vitamin E levels. No significant correlations were detected between serum nitrite and hemoglobin or antioxidant enzymes. CONCLUSION: children with sickle cell anemia have chronic oxidative stress that may result in increased VOC, and decreased serum nitrite may be associated with increases in VOC frequency. A novel finding in this study is the decrease in PON level in these patients, which is an interesting subject for further research.

  19. Diabetes Risk and Disease Management in Later Life: A National Longitudinal Study of the Role of Marital Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Waite, Linda; Shen, Shannon

    2016-11-01

    We assess the association between marital quality and both the risk of developing diabetes and the management of diabetes after its onset in later life. We use data from the first two waves of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project to estimate regression models with lagged dependent variables. The sample includes 1,228 married respondents, among whom 389 were diabetic. Those with either a reported diagnosis or with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% are identified diabetic. We categorize diabetic respondents into three groups: controlled, undiagnosed, and uncontrolled diabetes. We conduct factor analysis to construct positive and negative marital quality scales. For women, an increase in positive marital quality between Waves 1 and 2 is related to a lower risk of being diabetic at Wave 2, net of diabetes status at Wave 1; surprisingly, for men, an increase in negative marital quality between Waves 1 and 2 is related to both a lower risk of being diabetic at Wave 2 and a higher chance of controlling diabetes at Wave 2 after its onset. Our results challenge the traditional assumption that negative marital quality is always detrimental to health and encourage family scholars to distinguish different sources and types of negative marital quality. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. "His" and "her" marriage? The role of positive and negative marital characteristics in global marital satisfaction among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Kathrin; Jopp, Daniela S; Carr, Deborah; Sosinsky, Laura; Kim, Se-Kang

    2014-07-01

    We explore gender differences in older adults' appraisals of positive and negative aspects of their marriages, examine how these appraisals relate to global marital satisfaction, and identify distinctive marital profiles associated with global satisfaction in men and women. Data are from the Changing Lives of Older Couples Study (n = 1,110). We used a variant of principal components analysis to generate marital quality profiles, based on one's endorsement of positive and negative marital characteristics. OLS regression was used to detect associations between marital profiles and global marital satisfaction. Men offered more positive marital assessments than women, particularly on items reflecting positive treatment by one's wife. Three marital quality profiles emerged: Positive, Positive-Negative, and Negative. Although marital satisfaction was best explained by positive appraisals in both genders, they were less important for men than for women. The negative profile showed a tendency for a stronger prediction in men. Prior studies show small differences in men's and women's global marital satisfaction. Our work provides evidence that the presence and magnitude of such gender differences may vary based on the specific marital component considered. We discuss ways that gender shapes marital interactions, expectations, and perceptions, and the implications of our results for the well-being of married older adults. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  2. Current status and future perspectives in laparoendoscopic single-site and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic urological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autorino, Riccardo; Stein, Robert J; Lima, Estevão; Damiano, Rocco; Khanna, Rakesh; Haber, Georges-Pascal; White, Michael A; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2010-05-01

    Objective of this study is to provide an evidence-based analysis of the current status and future perspectives of scarless urological surgery. A PubMed search has been performed for all relevant urological literature regarding natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS). In addition, experience with LESS and NOTES at our own institution has been considered. All clinical and investigative reports for LESS and NOTES procedures in the urological literature have been considered. A wide variety of clinical procedures in urology have been successfully completed by using LESS techniques. Thus far, experience with NOTES has largely been investigational, although early clinical reports are emerging. Further development of instrumentation and platforms is necessary for both techniques to become more widely adopted throughout the urological community.

  3. General Health Status and Marital Satisfaction among Female Drug Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toktam Kazemeini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies show that drug abusers’ spouses are more likely to develop mental disorders, psychosis and behavioral disturbance than normal couples; they may experience more anxiety, insomnia and depression. Additionally, they are sensitive to their interpersonal relationships and face multiple problems in their social function .

  4. marital status and occupation versus serum total cholesterol and hdl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    Keywords: Occupation, Cholesterol, Kano, Serum Lipid. INTRODUCTION. Differences in serum HDL – CH and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL – CH) levels between communities have been employed in explaining the postulated relationship that exist between serum lipoprotein levels and the incidence of coronary ...

  5. 29 CFR 36.445 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or... students differently on the basis of sex. (b) Pregnancy and related conditions. (1) A recipient shall not...

  6. 7 CFR 15a.40 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs and... students differently on the basis of sex. (b) Pregnancy and related conditions. (1) A recipient shall not...

  7. 10 CFR 5.445 - Marital or parental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or... students differently on the basis of sex. (b) Pregnancy and related conditions. (1) A recipient shall not...

  8. Marital Status & Risk Behaviors Among U.S. Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    lyndon.riviere@amedd.army.mil The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors, and are not be construed as...STD; e.g. had sex with multiple partners, or did not use a condom ?”. Respondents were asked to answer either yes or no to all six questions...psychology of risk taking: Toward the integration of psychometric and neuropsychological paradigms. [ Article ]. American Journal of Psychology, 121(3

  9. Marital Status and Personal Happiness: An Analysis of Trend Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gary R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Analyzed General Social Survey data from 1972 through 1989 on personal happiness of married and never-married individuals. Showed that never-married males and younger never-married females were happier in late 1980s than in 1970s and that younger married women were somewhat less happy in late 1980s than in 1970s. Trends were weaker than earlier…

  10. Current Status of Comprehensive Chromosome Screening for Elective Single-Embryo Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yih Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most in vitro fertilization (IVF experts and infertility patients agree that the most ideal assisted reproductive technology (ART outcome is to have a healthy, full-term singleton born. To this end, the most reliable policy is the single-embryo transfer (SET. However, unsatisfactory results in IVF may result from plenty of factors, in which aneuploidy associated with advanced maternal age is a major hurdle. Throughout the past few years, we have got a big leap in advancement of the genetic screening of embryos on aneuploidy, translocation, or mutations. This facilitates a higher success rate in IVF accompanied by the policy of elective SET (eSET. As the cost is lowering while the scale of genome characterization continues to be up over the recent years, the contemporary technologies on trophectoderm biopsy and freezing-thaw, comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS with eSET appear to be getting more and more popular for modern IVF centers. Furthermore, evidence has showen that, by these avant-garde techniques (trophectoderm biopsy, vitrification, and CCS, older infertile women with the help of eSET may have an opportunity to increase the success of their live birth rates approaching those reported in younger infertility patients.

  11. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in iron-related genes and iron status in multiethnic populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E McLaren

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. We previously performed a genome-wide association study of iron-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using DNA from white men aged ≥ 25 y and women ≥ 50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study with serum ferritin (SF ≤ 12 µg/L (cases and controls (SF >100 µg/L in men, SF >50 µg/L in women. We report a follow-up study of white, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian HEIRS participants, analyzed for association between SNPs and eight iron-related outcomes. Three chromosomal regions showed association across multiple populations, including SNPs in the TF and TMPRSS6 genes, and on chromosome 18q21. A novel SNP rs1421312 in TMPRSS6 was associated with serum iron in whites (p = 3.7 × 10(-6 and replicated in African Americans (p = 0.0012.Twenty SNPs in the TF gene region were associated with total iron-binding capacity in whites (p<4.4 × 10(-5; six SNPs replicated in other ethnicities (p<0.01. SNP rs10904850 in the CUBN gene on 10p13 was associated with serum iron in African Americans (P = 1.0 × 10(-5. These results confirm known associations with iron measures and give unique evidence of their role in different ethnicities, suggesting origins in a common founder.

  12. Single Sodium Pyruvate Ingestion Modifies Blood Acid-Base Status and Post-Exercise Lactate Concentration in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Olek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of a single sodium pyruvate ingestion on a blood acid-base status and exercise metabolism markers. Nine active, but non-specifically trained, male subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. One hour prior to the exercise, subjects ingested either 0.1 g·kg−1 of body mass of a sodium pyruvate or placebo. The capillary blood samples were obtained at rest, 60 min after ingestion, and then three and 15 min after completing the workout protocol to analyze acid-base status and lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glucose concentrations. The pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation and the heart rate were measured during the exercise at a constant power output, corresponding to ~90% O2max. The blood pH, bicarbonate and the base excess were significantly higher after sodium pyruvate ingestion than in the placebo trial. The blood lactate concentration was not different after the ingestion, but the post-exercise was significantly higher in the pyruvate trial (12.9 ± 0.9 mM than in the placebo trial (10.6 ± 0.3 mM, p < 0.05 and remained elevated (nonsignificant after 15 min of recovery. The blood pyruvate, alanine and glucose concentrations, as well as the overall pulmonary gas exchange during the exercise were not affected by the pyruvate ingestion. In conclusion, the sodium pyruvate ingestion one hour before workout modified the blood acid-base status and the lactate production during the exercise.

  13. Single and combined metal contamination in coastal environments in China: current status and potential ecological risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Romana; Zhang, Tingwan; Zhang, Xuejiao; Wang, Min; Pan, Jin-Fen; Wang, Zhumei; Zhang, Bo

    2018-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, metal and metalloid pollution is one of the most serious environmental problems in China. Current contamination status of metals and metalloid and their potential ecological risks along China's coasts were reviewed in the present paper by a comprehensive study on metal contents in marine waters and sediments in the past few decades. The priority metals/metalloid cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As), which were the target elements of the designated project "Comprehensive Prevention and Control of Heavy Metal Pollution" issued by the Chinese government in 2011, were selected considering their high toxicity, persistence, and prevalent existence in coastal environment. Commonly used environmental quality evaluation methods for single and combined metals were compared, and we accordingly suggest the comprehensive approach of joint utilization of the Enrichment Factor and Effect Range Median combined with Pollution Load Index and Mean Effect Range Median Quotient (EEPME); this battery of guidelines may provide consistent, internationally comparable, and accurate understanding of the environment pollution status of combined metals/metalloid and their potential ecological risk.

  14. Marital moratorium and fertility control in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, H Y

    1970-11-01

    Abstract Since 1949, the issue of marital postponement has been extensively discussed in China. Unlike some other means of fertility control (e.g. abortion and oral contraception), marital postponement has been welcomed with the fewest misgivings. Lately, marital postponement has also been given renewed emphasis by those outside China who see a weak link between various current national family planning programmes based on improved technology and the goal of fertility reduction. One aim of this paper is to render a comprehensive account of the marital postponement programme in China in the course of the birth control campaign during the last two decades. The second objective is to discuss the lessons that may be learned from it, and its implications for the current fertility controversy in the United States. Four general conclusions emerge from a careful analysis of the available documents: (1) in China, proponents of delayed marriage were divided on the question of how to secure its general acceptance. One issue dividing them was whether or not China's Marriage Law of 1950 should be amended in order to achieve it. Those who favoured raising the minimum legal age disagreed on the details of the presumably needed change. There is enough evidence to suggest that medical personnel were the chief advocates of compulsory postponement of marriage. The government rejected this legalistic approach and, in so doing, agreed with Chen Ta (a noted demographer) and others who sought to achieve postponement of marriage through appropriate social and economic measures. (2) Decisions to delay matrimony in different socio-cultural settings are not necessarily identical sociological phenomena. In some societies, (e.g. the United States), they may amount to no more than a course of action that enables individuals involved to realize or develop alternate goals in life. In others (e.g. China), they are literally acts of rebellion. (3) The fertility policy dispute has been carried on in

  15. Infidelity in couples seeking marital therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, David C; Yi, Jean; Baucom, Donald H; Christensen, Andrew

    2005-09-01

    The revelation of an affair is often an emotionally explosive event for a couple, yet little is known about specific individual and relationship factors that accompany infidelity. The present study examined the qualities of individuals and couples that differentiate couples with (n = 19) and without (n = 115) infidelity using couples from a randomized clinical trial of marital therapy. Findings indicated that couples with infidelity showed greater marital instability, dishonesty, arguments about trust, narcissism, and time spent apart. Gender also proved to be a significant moderator of several effects. Men who had participated in affairs showed increased substance use, were older, and were more sexually dissatisfied. Results offer initial clues to concomitants of affairs for couple therapists. (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Effect of socioeconomic conditions on health care utilization in marital violence: a cross-sectional investigation from the Japanese Study on Stratification, Health, Income, and Neighborhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Maki; Kawakami, Norito; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-02-28

    The health-care-seeking process while experiencing marital violence can be significantly influenced by one's socioeconomic status, which limits the availability of resources and opportunities for accessing those resources. This study exploratorily examined the effects of socioeconomic factors on the association between marital violence and health care utilization in Japan. Cross-sectional data on 2,984 male and female community residents aged 25 to 50 years was obtained from the first wave of Japanese Study of Stratification, Health, Income, and Neighborhood (J-SHINE) conducted between 2010 and 2011. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between marital violence and health care utilization. Interaction terms were used to examine the moderating effect of educational attainment, household income, and employment status on the association. Mediation analysis was conducted to estimate the magnitude of mediating effects of mastery, social support, and health literacy in relation to the moderating effect of socioeconomic factors. Health care utilization in Japan was more prevalent among those who experienced marital violence (69.4 vs. 65.1%). The association between marital violence and health care utilization differed by employment status at a 0.10 level, while educational attainment and household income did not have substantial influence on health care utilization in the presence of marital violence. None of the psychosocial resources (mastery, health literacy, instrumental support, and informational support) explained the differential association by employment status. This study highlights the increased health care needs of those experiencing marital violence in Japan. The health care needs of the unemployed are potentially unmet in the presence of marital violence. Removing barriers to health care experienced by the unemployed may be an effective strategy for connecting survivors to needed supports and care.

  17. Profiles of higher earning wives in Hong Kong and the implications for marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Law, Frances Yik Wa; Hu, Debao; Fan, Susan; Yip, Paul Siu Fai

    2015-01-01

    Higher earning wives are emerging as a global phenomenon; however, the profiles of higher earning wives and the implications for marital satisfaction remain unknown in Hong Kong. On the basis of a representative household survey of 689 Hong Kong Chinese couples in 2012, this study aimed to explore the profiles of higher earning wives in Hong Kong and examine the effect of wives' income advantage on the couples' marital satisfaction. Results indicated that higher earning wives were clustered into 2 groups. One group of higher earning wives was older, was better educated, held managerial and professional jobs, and lived in high-income families compared with lower earning wives. The other group of higher earning wives was not well educated, held nonprofessional jobs, and lived in low-income families. Higher earning wives reported similar marital satisfaction with lower earning wives as well as their husbands. However, higher earning wives with nonprofessional jobs and from low-income families reported lower life and marital satisfaction than did those with better socioeconomic status. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. The Association between Marital Transitions, Body Mass Index, and Weight: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Dinour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the association between different marital transitions and changes in body mass index (BMI and body weight. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published between January 1990 and December 2011. Longitudinal studies were included if they compared dependent variables, such as BMI or weight, before and after a change in marital status. Results. Twenty articles were included: 4 articles described only transitions into marriage and/or cohabitation, 2 articles described only transitions out of marriage and/or cohabitation, and 14 articles described both. Overall, transitions into marriage were associated with weight gain, whereas transitions out of marriage were associated with weight loss. No major differences were observed between genders or across specific marital transition states. Conclusions. Additional research is warranted to better understand this phenomenon and the impact of marital transitions on obesity and obesity-related behaviors. This paper highlights potential opportunities to incorporate programs, practices, and policies that aim to promote and support healthy weights and lifestyles upon entering or leaving a marriage or cohabiting relationship.

  19. Emotional and physical satisfaction in noncohabiting, cohabiting, and marital relationships: the importance of jealous conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzeva, Mariana; Paik, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This article examines whether associations between marital status and emotional and physical satisfaction depend on jealous conflict associated with expectations about sexual exclusivity. Using data from a representative sample of 681 women and men drawn from the city of Chicago and its inner suburbs, this study estimated logistic regression models of jealous conflict and ordered logistic regression models of adults' reported emotional and physical satisfaction of their relationships. The results show that marriages are less exposed to jealous conflict than cohabiting and noncohabiting relationships. Regarding emotional and physical satisfaction, their associations with marital status were contingent upon whether individuals reported jealous conflict in their relationships. Specifically, in relationships without jealous conflict, married couples were more emotionally satisfied than noncohabiting couples. Married couples, but not cohabiting and noncohabiting couples, had significantly lower emotional and physical satisfaction when jealous conflict occurred. Cohabitors were not less emotionally or physically satisfied than married respondents. Overall, this research supports the argument that sexual exclusivity expectations are important for understanding the link between marital status and relationship quality.

  20. Illicit Drug Use and Marital Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Kenneth E.; Cornelius, Jack R.

    2008-01-01

    With the acquisition of adult social roles such as marriage, more deviant or socially disapproved behaviors such as drug use often decrease. The objective of this work was to examine patterns of illicit drug use in a community sample of adults during the transition and early years of marriage. Additionally, this work examined if couples who were discrepant in their drug use (i.e., one individual reported past year drug use and the partner reported no use) experience sharper declines in marital satisfaction compared to other couples. Multilevel regression models explored these issues over the first four years of marriage (N= 634 couples). Although rates of illicit drug use decline over the first four years of marriage, a significant number of husbands and wives continued to use illicit drugs (21% and 16%, respectively). At the transition to marriage, both husbands and wives who had discrepant drug use behaviors experienced lower levels of marital satisfaction compared to other couples. Over the first four years of marriage, couples in each group experienced significant declines in marital satisfaction. PMID:17945436

  1. The Effect of Rehabilitation Method Based on Existential Approach and Olson\\'s Model on Marital Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maedeh Naghiyaee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mastectomy as a treatment for breast cancer can disturb marital satisfaction of many couples. In this way, existential anxieties stemming from this potentially deleterious event, and inefficient responses to them, could be mediating. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a rehabilitation method based on existential approach and Olson's marital enrichment model on marital satisfaction of women who had undergone mastectomy and their husbands . Methods: In this study, a single subject research design is used. The study population comprised couples who had referred to Radiotherapy department of Imam Hussein hospital in Tehran, that among them three couples whose average age was 20 to 50 years old, wife's had undergone mastectomy, tumor has not spread to other parts of the body, and had no prior history of psychiatric disorders before cancer, were selected through purposeful sampling and Intervention in 12 sessions of 90 minutes once a week, has been designed to suit their specific needs. The level of couple's marital satisfaction was evaluated using Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Results: Comparing couple's scores on the diagram during 9 time measurement (3 times baseline, 4 times during intervention, and 2 times follow up assessment and calculating recovery percentage, represent increasing in score of marital adjustment scale. Discussion: So it seems that, this kind of an eclectic couple therapy, by considering couples existential anxiety, has been promoted their marital satisfaction. Explanations are given in discussion part .

  2. The Rate of Marital Fidelity and Quality of Love in Divorce Applicants with and Without Marital Infidelity Precedent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Modarresi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: The issue of marital infidelity is considered as an increasing concern in our society, which is associated with instability in relationships and high rate of divorce.The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of marital adjustment and the quality of love in the applicants with a history of divorce and marital infidelity. Methods: In this qualification-analytical, cross-sectional study performed in 2012 in the Fars welfare organization, 90 people were selected by available sampling and classified into three groups with a history of marital infidelity and divorce, divorce without a history of marital infidelity and controls. Three individual groups completed the Inventory Adjustment Scale and Sternberg's love triangle. Subjects with a history of marital infidelity completed questionnaires of regarding love triangle scale again regarding upon their marital relationship. Data were analyzed by dependent t-test and ANOVA. Results: Significant differences were observed among divorce group and various aspects of marital love triangle (P<0/001.Results also revealed that there was a significant difference between the groups with and without marital infidelity, from the view point of intimacy, passion and anxiousness, commitment, and decision in relationship (P<0/001. Investigating the quality of love in individuals with marital infidelity showed differences in all aspects of Sternberg`s love triangle in relationship with wife and ultra-marital relationships (P<0/001. Conclusion: Marital incompatibility alone is not a strong reason for marital infidelity in hard conditions of life and according to the research’s results. The most significant factor in attracting for ultra- marital relationship and the quality of the relationship and love between couples were the quality of the relationship and love between couples.

  3. Influence of marital history over two and three generations on early death. A longitudinal study of Danish men born in 1953

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2006-01-01

    associated with mortality risk in a dose-response pattern. All analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic position variables and mental health. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the proximity hypothesis as son's marital status was the strongest predictor of mortality, and suggest an accumulative effect......BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of marital status over two and three generations on last generation's mortality, and tested the hypothesis of an effect of the latest status (proximity effect) as well as the hypothesis of an accumulative effect. METHODS: The study population covers...... a random sample of all boys born in the the metropolitan area of Copenhagen with complete data from interviews and registers on two and three generation's marital status, socioeconomic position variables, and last generation's admission to psychiatric hospital, n = 2614. Among these 105 deaths occurred...

  4. Reviewing Sexual Function After Delivery and Its Association with Some of the Demographic Marital Satisfaction Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Broumandfar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Desirable sexual function has an important role in strengthening the marital life of the couples. Sexual disorders can cause mental pressure and affect quality of life and marital relationship. Methods: This was a descriptive correlation study in one group and one phase covering multivariables. The study sample included 384 women after delivery period that had the following inclusion criteria: the age of at least 18 years, delivery in 38-42 pregnancy weeks, primiparous and multiparous women, living in the city, single pregnancy, and twelve months elapsed from the delivery. The required data such demographic, marital satisfaction and sexual function index were collected through reporting questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical methods using software SPSS. Results: The findings of the study indicated that the most prevalent disorder of the sexual relationship in postpartum was dyspareunia and the least prevalent was the sexual desire. There was no significant association between sexual function and, age, education degree , body mass index ,body size and job, but there was a significant association for other factors such as the economic, residence and marital satisfaction (p<0.01. Conclusion: It is recommended that sexual problems after delivery be placed on the list of health teaching issues to pass easily this period of time. Women should be assured that these problems gradually would be improved and they should learn using proper techniques to decrease dyspareunia which is a sexual disorder in postpartum period.

  5. Gender Differences in the Structure of Marital Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Christopher R; Marcus, Katherine; Turkheimer, Eric; Emery, Robert E

    2018-03-22

    Marriages consist of shared experiences and interactions between husbands and wives that may lead to different impressions of the quality of the relationship. Few studies, unfortunately, have tested gender differences in the structure of marital quality, and even fewer studies have evaluated whether genetic and environmental influences on marital quality differ across gender. In this study, we evaluated gender differences in the structure of marital quality using independent samples of married male (n = 2406) and married female (n = 2215) participants from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States who provided ratings on twenty-eight marital quality items encompassing six marital quality constructs. We further explored gender differences in genetic and environmental influences on marital quality constructs in a subsample of 491 pairs of twins. Results suggest partial metric invariance across gender but structural variability in marital quality constructs. Notably, correlations between constructs were stronger in women than men. Results also support gender differences in the genetic and environmental influences on different aspects of marital quality. We discuss that men and women may approach and react to marriage differently as the primary reason why we observed differences in the structure of marital quality.

  6. Waiting-List Controlled Trial of Cognitive Marital Therapy in Severe Marital Discord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Edward M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of marital therapy designed to enhance intimacy through self-disclosure of personal constructs. Couples in therapy (n=22) and controls (n=19) showed significant reduction in symptoms of nonpsychotic emotional illness. Couples in therapy subjectively reported improvement. Found significant pattern of improvement for wives in…

  7. A single-item self-rated health measure correlates with objective health status in the elderly: a survey in suburban Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinqin eMeng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe measurement of health status of the elderly remains one important topic. Self-rated health status (SRH is considered to be a simple indicator to measure the health status of the old population. But some researchers still take a skeptical view about its reliability. This study aims to investigate the association between self-rated health indicator and health status of the elderly and discuss its subsequent public health implications.MethodsIn a total 1096 people who were 60 years of age or older from 1784 households from a suburban area of Beijing were interviewed using multistage stratified cluster sampling. SRH was measured by a single question please choose one point in this 0-100 scale which can best represent your health today?. The disease status and physical functional status were also obtained. A multiple linear regression was conducted to test the associate between SRH and individual’s disease/functional status.ResultsThe average of SRH scores of the elderly was 72.49±15.64 (on a 1 to 100 scale. The SRH scores declined not only with the severity of self-reported mental/disease status, but also with the decrease of physical functional status. Multiple linear regression showed that after adjustment for other variables, two-week sickness, chronic diseases, hospitalization, and ability of self-care (washing and dressing were able to explain 35% of the variation in SRH among the elderly. Among them, disease status and self-care ability were the most powerful predictor of SRH. After adjusting other variables, physical functional status could explain only 5% of the variation in SRH.ConclusionSRH reflects the disease/functional health status of the elderly. It is an easy-to-implement variable and it can reduce both recall bias and investigator bias, thus being widely used in health surveys. It is a cost-effective means of measuring the health status. However, the comparability of SRH in different populations should be studied

  8. Relationship between Parenting Styles and Marital Adjustment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between authoritarian parenting style and marital adjustment was very low, positive and insignificant. The relationship between permissive parenting style and marital adjustment was also very low, positive and insignificant. There was a low, positive and significant joint relationship between the parenting ...

  9. Experiencing the Marital Bed | Thompson | Indo-Pacific Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the marital bed through existential themes of spatial, temporal, corporeal and relational experience. It is a collaborative effort in that it relates anecdotes contributed by twelve people who each described – in writing, in interviews and in conversation – very personal moments of life in the “marital bed”.

  10. Debt Change and Marital Satisfaction Change in Recently Married Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Although recently married couples report debt as one of their top concerns, research has not measured how debt changes relate to changes in their marital satisfaction. Further, the mechanisms that link debt and marital satisfaction are unknown. Findings using the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 1,078 couples) demonstrated that…

  11. The Development of the Marital Satisfaction Scale (MSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canel, Azize Nilgun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the process of developing the Marital Satisfaction Scale (MSS) aiming to support studies in the field of marital satisfaction and to obtain information about couples in a short time through psychological counseling is discussed. The scale including 101 yes-no items aiming to reveal couples' opinions about their marriages was…

  12. Relationship of Attachment Styles and Emotional Intelligence With Marital Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Abbasi, Amir Reza; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud; Aghamohammadiyan Sharbaf, Hamidreza; Karshki, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    The early relationships between infant and care takers are significant and the emotional interactions of these relationships play an important role in forming personality and adulthood relationships. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship of attachment styles (AS) and emotional intelligence (EI) with marital satisfaction (MS). In this cross-sectional research, 450 married people (226 male, 224 female) were selected using multistage sampling method in Mashhad, Iran, in 2011. Subjects completed the attachment styles questionnaire (ASQ), Bar-On emotional quotient inventory (EQ-i) and Enrich marital satisfaction questionnaire. The results indicated that secure attachment style has positive significant relationship with marital satisfaction (r = 0.609, P intelligence and its components have positive significant relationship with marital satisfaction; thus, emotional intelligence and intrapersonal, adaptability and general mood components can significantly predict marital satisfaction (P interpersonal and stress management components cannot significantly predict marital satisfaction (P > 0.05). According to the obtained results, attachment styles and emotional intelligence are the key factors in marital satisfaction that decrease marital disagreement and increase the positive interactions of the couples.

  13. Marital History and the Burden of Cardiovascular Disease in Midlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenmei

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the effects of marital history on the burden of cardiovascular disease in midlife. With use of data from the 1992 Health and Retirement Study, a series of nested logistic regression models was used to estimate the association between marital history and the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. Results suggest that, in midlife,…

  14. Narcissism and newlywed marriage: Partner characteristics and marital trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavner, Justin A; Lamkin, Joanna; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith; Karney, Benjamin R

    2016-04-01

    Despite narcissism's relation with interpersonal dysfunction, surprisingly little empirical research has been devoted to understanding narcissism's effect on intimate relationships in general or marital relationships in particular. The current study addressed this gap using longitudinal data from a community sample of 146 newlywed couples assessed 6 times over the first 4 years of marriage. First, we examined partner characteristics associated with higher levels of narcissism to determine the degree to which couples were matched on narcissism and related traits. Second, we examined how narcissism predicted the trajectory of marital quality over time, testing narcissism's association with initial levels of relationship functioning (the intercept) and changes in relationship functioning (the slope). Results indicated a small degree of homophily but otherwise no clear pattern of partner characteristics for individuals higher in narcissism. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that wives' total narcissism and entitlement/exploitativeness scores predicted the slope of marital quality over time, including steeper declines in marital satisfaction and steeper increases in marital problems. Husbands' narcissism scores generally had few effects on their own marital quality or that of their wives. These findings are notable in indicating that the effects of personality characteristics on marital functioning may take some time to manifest themselves, even if they were present from early in the marriage. Future research into the mediating psychological and interpersonal processes that link wives' narcissism with poorer marital functioning over time would be valuable. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Parental Marital Quality, Parental Divorce, and Relations with Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Alan; Amato, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined data from 419 parents and their adult children to assess impact of parental marital quality and divorce while child is residing with parents on parent-child relations 12 years later. Low marital quality and divorce appeared to have independent effects on adult child-parent relations. Fathers' relationships suffered more than mothers';…

  16. Parental Marital Discord and Treatment Response in Depressed Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Meredith M.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that parental marital discord contributes to the development of internalizing and externalizing symptoms in children and adolescents. Few studies, however, have examined the association between parental marital discord and youth's response to treatment. The present study examined the impact of interparental discord on treatment…

  17. Non-marital cohabitation in the Republic of Serbia

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    Ranđelović Dragana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-marital cohabitation, as a community of life of two people connected only by the feeling of love and desire for living together, without form and registration, is an institution as old as marriage. Throughout history, attitude of the legislator has been changing from forbidding to ignoring it. In our society there is a negative attitude towards non-marital cohabitations, which is the result of patriarchal ideas and customs. However, the Constitution of the Republic of Serbia and the Family Law equate marriage and non-marital cohabitation. In this paper, the author will try to determine to what extent in terms of effects the marital and non-marital cohabitation are equal, or to what extent the rights of non-marital partners are recognized. The subject of analysis are primarily the Constitution and Family law, but also many other regulations governing the issues relating to the rights and obligations of non-marital cohabitation partners. In fact, although Family law equalizes marriage and non-marital cohabitation, they are not equal either de facto or de jure. The author will try to point out the deficiencies in the legal regulations, the practical problems and suggest possible and better solutions.

  18. Marital quality in wives of persons with alcohol dependence syndrome

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    Debasree Bora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marriage is a strong bond between couples with the promise of lifelong dedication and emotional wellbeing. The effects of alcoholism in husbands may lead to disturbances in marital life. Lack of understanding, unpredictable behaviour of the husbands, and their irresponsibility in family matters can often lead to poor quality of a couple’s relationship. Aim of the study: The study is aimed to understand the marital quality of the wives of persons with alcohol dependence syndrome. Material and methods: Thirty wives of persons with alcohol dependence syndrome according to ICD-10 were taken as the sample, using purposive sample collection. Socio-demographic profile was assessed through semi-structured questionnaire while Marital Quality Scale (MQS-1995 was applied to assess the marital quality after taking their informed consent. Higher scores indicate poorer quality of marital life. Data analysis was done using SPSS for descriptive statistics. Results: The domain mean scores of rejection, understanding, and decision-making, and the total score of marital quality were high. Thus, indicating poorer quality of marital life among the wives of persons with alcohol dependence. Conclusion: Alcohol dependence is highly associated with poor marital quality as the person with alcohol dependence tends to adapt faulty communication patterns and behaviour which in turn leads to poor adjustment, unhappiness, and a high degree of dissatisfaction with relationships. Treatment plan for this group should be planned keeping these factors in consideration, as a priority.

  19. Effects Of Emotional Intelligence On Marital Adjustment Of Couples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects Of Emotional Intelligence On Marital Adjustment Of Couples In Nigeria. PT Ortese, S A Tor-Anyiin. Abstract. Emotional Intelligence (EQI) has been identified as a factor in success, in work, business and life adjustment. This paper examined the effects of Emotional Intelligence on marital adjustment of couples in ...

  20. Self-actualization and empathy as predictors of marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, D G; Compton, W C; Rust, J O

    1995-12-01

    The relationships between marital satisfaction, self-actualization, and empathy scores were tested for 30 intact couples. Analyses indicated that both satisfaction and empathy scores were independent predictors of marital satisfaction scores for men, but not for women. Implications were discussed.

  1. Gender-Wise Comparison on Emotional Intelligence and Marital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research aims at exploring and comparing the marital satisfaction and emotional intelligence of people between age 25-65. Tools used were namely Marital Satisfaction Scale (MSS) and Exploring Emotional Abilities (EEA). A fairly representative data of 316 respondents was collected from Maharashtra, India.

  2. Marital Distress and Mental Health Care Service Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonbrun, Yael Chatav; Whisman, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the association between marital distress and mental health service utilization in a population-based sample of men and women (N = 1,601). Method: The association between marital distress and mental health care service utilization was evaluated for overall mental health service utilization and for…

  3. Marriage, sexuality, and holiness: Aspects of marital ethics in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qumran, Jubilees) texts, this article outlines the marital concepts existing in the NT environment. In this context, the reciprocal community and the duration of the marital relationship are emphasized while sexuality remains wholly limited to reproduction. The core of the article offers a concrete analysis of texts from the Corpus ...

  4. Age at Marriage, Religion and Marital Satisfaction Among Igbo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the contributions of age at marriage and religion couples to marital satisfaction among Igbo people in Imo State. Five hundred and eight subjects were selected from five local government areas in Imo State using a multi-stage random sampling technique. A questionnaire titled \\"Marital Satisfaction ...

  5. A New Proposal for Measuring Marital Fertility in Historical Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús J. Sánchez-Barricarte

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a critical analysis is made of some of the indices used in numerous historical studies on the decline of fertility. More concretely, it is demonstrated how the Total Marital Fertility Rate (TMFR and the Ig and I’g indices of marital fertility designed by Coale (1986 not only are not good indicators of a population’s level of marital fertility, but also in some cases (for example, when there is an important delay in female mean age at marriage can even indicate an increase in marital fertility when in reality it is decreasing. Likewise, a new index for measuring marital fertility (known as the Navarre Index is presented which takes into account women’s average age at marriage as well as their mortality rate during their reproductive period.

  6. Reassessing the link between premarital cohabitation and marital instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Steffen

    2010-08-01

    Premarital cohabitation has been found to be positively correlated with the likelihood of marital dissolution in the United States. To reassess this link, I estimate proportional hazard models of marital dissolution for first marriages by using pooled data from the 1988, 1995, and 2002 surveys of the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). These results suggest that the positive relationship between premarital cohabitation and marital instability has weakened for more recent birth and marriage cohorts. Using multiple marital outcomes for a person to account for one source of unobserved heterogeneity, panel models suggest that cohabitation is not selective of individuals with higher risk of marital dissolution and may be a stabilizing factor for higher-order marriages. Further research with more recent data is needed to assess whether these results are statistical artifacts caused by data weaknesses in the NSFG.

  7. Marital Disruption and Allostatic Load in Late Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rote, Sunshine

    2017-06-01

    This study examines the link between marital disruption and biological risk, and asks whether the association of this precarious life event with health is contingent on marital loss duration and history. Data are drawn from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project ( N = 1,414), and Poisson regressions are presented for allostatic load and logistic regressions for individual biomarkers. The currently unmarried with more distant marital disruptions exhibit higher levels of allostatic load than the currently married, which is primarily driven by dysregulation of cardiovascular and metabolic indicators. Results also reveal the differing ways marital disruption "gets under the skin" with widowhood associated with compromised inflammatory, metabolic, and cardiovascular functioning, and divorce with cardiovascular and neuroendocrine markers. Findings lend support for both the crisis and chronic strain models, and likely reflect normative expectations of the timing of life events, decrements in marital resources, and selection processes.

  8. Marital Conflict in Older Couples: Positivity, Personality, and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveniuk, James; Waite, Linda J.; McClintock, Martha K.; Teidt, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the implications of health and personality characteristics for late-life marital conflict, using data from the 2010–11 wave of the National Social Life Health and Aging Project (NSHAP), a nationally representative study with data on both partners in 955 marital and cohabitational dyads. Using these data, we relate characteristics of husbands to characteristics of their wives, and vice versa. Wives with husbands in fair or poor physical health are more likely to report high levels of marital conflict, but the reverse is not true. Similarly, wives report more conflict when their husbands are high on Neuroticism, high on Extraversion, and low on a new measure we call Positivity. Our findings point to noteworthy gender differences between men and women in the associations between individual characteristics and levels of marital conflict. We point to differences between husbands’ and wives’ marital roles as a contributor to these differences. PMID:27274569

  9. Why do marital partners of people living with HIV not test for HIV? A qualitative study in Lusaka, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Musheke

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of HIV status is crucial for HIV prevention and management in marital relationships. Yet some marital partners of people living with HIV decline HIV testing despite knowing the HIV-positive status of their partners. To date, little research has explored the reasons for this. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken in Lusaka, Zambia, between March 2010 and September 2011, nested within a larger ethnographic study. In-depth interviews were held with individuals who knew the HIV-positive status of their marital partners but never sought HIV testing (n = 30 and HIV service providers of a public sector clinic (n = 10. A focus group discussion was also conducted with eight (8 lay HIV counsellors. Data was transcribed, coded and managed using ATLAS.ti and analysed using latent content analysis. Results The overarching barrier to uptake of HIV testing was study participants’ perception of their physical health, reinforced by uptake of herbal remedies and conventional non-HIV medication to mitigate perceived HIV-related symptoms. They indicated willingness to test for HIV if they noticed a decline in physical health and other alternative forms of care became ineffective. Also, some study participants viewed themselves as already infected with HIV on account of the HIV-positive status of their marital partners, with some opting for faith healing to get ‘cured’. Other barriers were the perceived psychological burden of living with HIV, modulated by lay belief that knowledge of HIV-positive status led to rapid physical deterioration of health. Perceived inability to sustain uptake of life-long treatment – influenced by a negative attitude towards treatment – further undermined uptake of HIV testing. Self-stigma, which manifested itself through fear of blame and a need to maintain moral credibility in marital relationships, also undermined uptake of HIV testing. Conclusions Improving uptake of HIV

  10. Why do marital partners of people living with HIV not test for HIV? A qualitative study in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musheke, Maurice; Merten, Sonja; Bond, Virginia

    2016-08-25

    Knowledge of HIV status is crucial for HIV prevention and management in marital relationships. Yet some marital partners of people living with HIV decline HIV testing despite knowing the HIV-positive status of their partners. To date, little research has explored the reasons for this. An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken in Lusaka, Zambia, between March 2010 and September 2011, nested within a larger ethnographic study. In-depth interviews were held with individuals who knew the HIV-positive status of their marital partners but never sought HIV testing (n = 30) and HIV service providers of a public sector clinic (n = 10). A focus group discussion was also conducted with eight (8) lay HIV counsellors. Data was transcribed, coded and managed using ATLAS.ti and analysed using latent content analysis. The overarching barrier to uptake of HIV testing was study participants' perception of their physical health, reinforced by uptake of herbal remedies and conventional non-HIV medication to mitigate perceived HIV-related symptoms. They indicated willingness to test for HIV if they noticed a decline in physical health and other alternative forms of care became ineffective. Also, some study participants viewed themselves as already infected with HIV on account of the HIV-positive status of their marital partners, with some opting for faith healing to get 'cured'. Other barriers were the perceived psychological burden of living with HIV, modulated by lay belief that knowledge of HIV-positive status led to rapid physical deterioration of health. Perceived inability to sustain uptake of life-long treatment - influenced by a negative attitude towards treatment - further undermined uptake of HIV testing. Self-stigma, which manifested itself through fear of blame and a need to maintain moral credibility in marital relationships, also undermined uptake of HIV testing. Improving uptake of HIV testing requires a multi-pronged approach that addresses self-stigma, lay risk

  11. Psychological distress of marital and cohabitation breakups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Lara Patrício; Aassve, Arnstein

    2013-11-01

    Using data from a large survey, the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), this paper explores the extent to which marital and cohabiting unions differ with respect to the short-term effects of union dissolution on mental health. We compare married individuals who divorced or separated with cohabitors whose first union ended and test the hypothesis that married individuals experience larger negative effects. Results show that initial differences are not statistically significant once the presence of children is controlled for, suggesting that the presence of children is a particularly significant source of increased psychological distress in union dissolutions. However, parenthood does not explain serious psychological distress, which appears to be associated with enduring traits (the personality trait neuroticism). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Divorce Costs and Marital Dissolution in a One-to-One Matching Framework With Nontransferable Utilities

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    Ismail Saglam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use a two-period one-to-one matching model with incomplete information to examine the effect of changes in divorce costs on marital dissolution. Each individual who has a nontransferable expected utility about the quality of each potential marriage decides whether to marry or to remain single at the beginning of the first period. Individuals married in the first period learn the qualities of their marriages at the beginning of the second period and then decide whether to stay married or to unilaterally divorce. We show that, for any society, there exist matching environments where the probability of the marital dissolution does not reduce divorce costs under gender-optimal matching rules. In such environments, an allocation effect of divorce costs with an ambiguous sign outweighs an incentive effect that is always negative. We also show that these results may also arise under stable matching rules that are not gender optimal.

  13. Marital context and post-infarction quality of life: is it social support or something more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, M

    1986-01-01

    The development of a theory of quality of life following serious illness is currently an important field of endeavour in rehabilitation research. The interpersonal relationships of people and elements of the self-concept appear to be salient factors in causal models of subjective well-being. One such model developed to explain characteristic levels of well-being was used in a longitudinal study of adaptation to a first myocardial infarction. Data were collected from a national sample of male cardiac patients and their spouses on the illness and marital situation as predictors of long-term well-being or ill-being. Analyses of data from the first three waves of the study, which is to extend over 5 years after the onset of illness, are to be discussed in the paper. Marital status, the emotional quality of the spouse relationship and long-standing marital stressors were found to have direct and indirect effects on the two dimensions of the Bradburn Affect Balance Scale. The same is true of continuing problems associated with the heart attack relative to perceptions of having coped effectively with the after effects of illness. Differences in self-esteem and personal competence were suggested as mediators of socio-environmental and illness-related influences. The two-factor conception of well-being developed was found to be a useful framework for investigating positive and negative aspects of psychosocial rehabilitation. The same factors that explain differences between happy and unhappy people in social indicators research also appeared to be determinants of different trajectories of adaptation in the wake of a life-threatening illness. Previous research using theoretical models from stress research has overemphasized psychosocial morbidity and stress management and neglected positive processes of adaptation. The identification of love resources related to positive feeling states and life satisfaction has, therefore, not received the attention it deserves. This is

  14. COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL MARITAL THERAPY: A COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL APPROACH FOR MARITAL DISTRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Ampuni, Sutarimah

    2015-01-01

    Marriage therapy was initially developed in the United States in the 1930s. It was originally born by psychoanalysis, with the first report on psychoanalysis of married couples was presented in 1931 (Nichols & Schwartz, 1998). In recent years, there have been many other approaches being applied for marital problems, including classicapproaches such as experiential, insight-oriented, and behavioral approaches, and more contemporary approaches such as solution-building and cognitive-behavioral ...

  15. Socioeconomic status and fertility decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dribe, Martin; Breschi, Marco; Gagnon, Alain

    2017-01-01

    America to analyse the relationship between socio-economic status and fertility during the fertility transition. Using comparable analytical models and class schemes for each population, we examined the changing socio-economic differences in marital fertility and related these to common theories...

  16. Marital stability and repartnering: infertility-related stress trajectories of unsuccessful fertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Mariana V; Costa, Patrício; Peterson, Brennan D; Costa, Maria E; Schmidt, Lone

    2014-12-01

    To compare the trajectories of infertility-related stress between patients who remain in the same relationship and patients who repartner. Longitudinal cohort study using latent growth modeling. Fertility centers. Childless men and women evaluated before starting a new cycle of fertility treatment and observed for a 5-year period of unsuccessful treatments. None. Marital stability and infertility-related stress. The majority of patients (86%) remained with their initial partner, but 14% of participants separated and repartnered while pursuing fertility treatments. Marital stability significantly predicted the initial status of infertility stress and infertility stress growth levels. Specifically, patients who repartnered had higher infertility stress levels at all time points compared with those who remained in the same relationship, regardless of the partner they were with at assessment. Furthermore, results showed an increasing stress trajectory over time for those who repartnered, compared with those who remained in a stable relationship. Men and women in fertility treatment who form a second union have higher initial levels of stress in their original relationship and higher changes in stress levels over the course of treatments. These findings suggest that high infertility-related stress levels before entering fertility treatment can negatively affect the stability of marital relationships and lead to repartnering. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aygül Akyüz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level.

  18. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Aygül; Şahiner, Gönül; Seven, Memnun; Bakır, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS) for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW) for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level. PMID:24696770

  19. [Relationships between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) psychological type and marital satisfaction, divorce proneness, positive affect, and conflict regulation in clinic couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Seong Sook

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationships between the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) psychological type and marital satisfaction, divorce proneness, positive affect, and conflict regulation in couple visiting a clinic. Couples (n=62) who visited "M" couple clinic participated in the study. Data were collected from March to June 2009 using the Marital Satisfaction Scale, Marital Status Inventory, Positive Affect Inventory, and Conflict Regulation Inventory. The couples showed no significant differences in marital satisfaction, positive affect, and conflict regulation according to similarities between spouses in MBTI types. However, they showed significant differences in divorce proneness of husband according to a similarity in the Sensing/Intuition indicator. They also showed significant differences in divorce proneness, positive affect, and conflict regulation between the couples for ISTJ (Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging) or ESTJ (Extraversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging) types compared to other couples. When nurses counsel couples, they should understand that differences in psychological type between spouses affects their marital relationship. In addition, nurses should educate couples on the characteristics of each type according to the couple's types and help them to understand each other, especially for couples where one spouse is the ISTJ/ESTJ type. These interventions will improve marital satisfaction and prevent the divorce in these couples.

  20. Marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms among Chinese older couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianrong; Wang, Dahua; Li, Chunhua; Miller, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental disorders among older people. Consistent with the Marital Discord Model of Depression (MDMD), research in Western cultures has found that marital distress is one of the risk factors for depression among older adults. However, the effect of marital distress on depression among older adults has not been examined in a collectivistic society, such as China. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms in a sample of Chinese older adults. Considering the dyadic nature of the data, the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model was used to test for the actor and partner effects. The study investigated 139 older couples who were recruited from communities in Beijing, the capital of China. The Lock-Wallace Marital Adjustment and the CES-D scales were administered to the participants. The results indicated that neither of the actor effects was significant. One of the partner effects was significant, with the husbands' marital satisfaction predicting their wives' depressive symptoms. The MDMD was only partially supported among older couples in China. An asymmetrical pattern of cross-spouse effects was found, suggesting that the husbands' perception of marital dissatisfaction could significantly predict their wives' depressive symptoms.

  1. Birds do it. Bees do it. So why not single women and lesbians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bambi E S

    1997-01-01

    Infertile couples have come to take assisted reproductive technologies (ART) for granted. An increasing number of single women and lesbian couples also desire to have children and turn to ART, especially donor insemination, to fulfill this desire. While most married couples find that access to ART is limited primarily by the ability to pay, for single women and lesbian couples, the story may be much different. In the United States, they may find that doctors and infertility clinics view their desires as immoral and refuse to accept them as patients, although other doctors and clinics readily accept them. In most other countries, however, it is against the law for single women and lesbian couples to make use of ART, including donor insemination. In this paper, I will argue that marital status and sexual orientation should not serve as a barrier to accessing the world of reproductive medicine. I will base this conclusion on two arguments. First, that justice requires that we treat like cases alike. Just as we would not accept or reject patients for cardiac rehabilition programs based on factors such as a history of poor eating habits, so too we should not look at nonmedical factors such as marital status when deciding whether to treat infertility. For the second justification for the conclusion of equal access to ART, I will examine the concept of the family. I will argue that it is morally acceptable for single women and lesbian couples to have children and to head families.

  2. The Effectiveness of Promoting Iranians’ Marital Quality Training Program in Marital Quality Among Couples Referring to Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadoll Khorramabadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increase of dissatisfaction in marriage and its adverse effects on physical and mental health of couples and children make it necessary to improve marital interaction and implement enrichment programs. This research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of PIMQ (Promoting Iranians’ Marital Quality training program in marital quality. A researcher-made program called PIMQ designed based on cultural beliefs, value system, religious orientation, literacy level, and social character of couples was used in this research. This program was implemented on 30 couples who were randomly placed in two experimental and control groups. The marital quality scale was administered to each group before educational sessions. The PIMQ program was implemented for the experimental group in eight sessions of one hour while the second group received no intervention. The sessions were held once a week. Immediately after the completion of educational sessions, the marital quality scale was applied on both groups. A month after the completion of sessions, the follow-up was performed. The results of covariance analysis showed that PIMQ training program could increase marital quality in the experimental group and the increase remained significant at one month follow-up. Based on the research hypotheses, PIMQ training program increased marital quality in the posttest and follow-up.

  3. [Characteristics of non-marital and non-commercial heterosexual transmission of HIV infection in Miao-Dong Autonomous prefecture of Qiandongnan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q Y; Wang, F L; Xu, P; Wen, H J; Xiong, Y X; Yang, J; Long, Y; He, H J; Shi, J; Lyu, P

    2017-11-06

    sexual partners (11.1%(8)) (χ(2)=61.10, Pcommercial transmission who lived mobile was 72.9% (94), which was higher than who lived fixedly (52.2%(412)) (χ(2)=19.34, Pcommercial heterosexual transmission in Qian dongnan was higher than general national levels. The characteristics of sex, marriage status, migration, vocation, the members of non-marital sex partners were significant differed between commercial heterosexual transmission and non-marital and non-commercial heterosexual transmission.

  4. Single motherhood and neonatal and infant mortality in Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso and Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izugbara, C

    2016-06-01

    Childhood mortality is a stubborn problem and remains highest in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Existing research on childhood mortality in SSA indicate that most of the childhood deaths are from preventable causes such as diarrhoea, pneumonia, measles, malaria, HIV and underlying malnutrition, acute respiratory infections, whooping cough, tuberculosis, bronchopneumonia, dirty feeding bottles and utensils, inadequate disposal of household refuse and poor storage of drinking water. However, insufficient attention has been given to maternal marital status and childhood mortality relationships. Understanding the implications of maternal marital status for childhood mortality can add to our knowledge of the correlates of neonatal and infant mortality and furnish insights to support the design and delivery of interventions to address the problem. To document and examine the extent to which the association between neonatal and infant mortality varies between single and ever-married mothers in Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso, and Burundi. A single mother is defined in this study as a woman who has either lived with a partner, married before, widowed, separated during the survey periods and has given at least one life birth. Ever-married woman is woman who has been married at least once in their lives although their current marital status may not be married. Data for this study were drawn from the latest Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone and Burundi. The selected datasets came from 2010 Burkina Faso DHS (BFDHS), 2008 Sierra Leone DHS (SLDHS) and 2010 Burundi DHS (EDSB II). The relevant data for this study (women age 15-49 years who had at least one live birth within the five years preceding the survey) were extracted from the whole dataset of each country (Burkinabe (n = 17,087), Sierra Leonean (n = 7374) and Burundian (n = 9389). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to assess the association between neonatal and infant

  5. Marital Quality, Gender, and Markers of Inflammation in the MIDUS Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Carrie J.; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2013-01-01

    Marital quality is an important factor for understanding the relationship between marriage and health. Low-quality relationships may not have the same health benefits as high-quality relationships. To understand the association between marital quality and health, we examined associations between two indicators of marital quality (marital support…

  6. Economic pressure, cultural adaptation stress, and marital quality among Mexican-origin couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Heather M; Supple, Andrew J; Su, Jinni; Rodriguez, Yuliana; Cavanaugh, Alyson M; Hengstebeck, Natalie D

    2014-02-01

    Based on data from a sample of 120 first-generation Mexican immigrant couples collected at the start of the Great Recession in the United States, this study tested an actor-partner interdependence mediation model (APIMeM) in which spouses' perceptions of stress related to economic pressure and cultural adaptation were linked to their own and their partners' reports of marital satisfaction through spouses' depressive symptoms and marital negativity. As hypothesized, results supported indirect links between economic and cultural adaptation stressors and spouses' marital negativity and satisfaction: (1) contextual stress was associated with depressive symptoms, (2) depressive symptoms were positively associated with marital negativity for both husbands and wives and negatively associated with marital satisfaction for wives only, and (3) marital negativity was inversely associated with marital satisfaction for both spouses. Two partner effects emerged: (a) husbands' depressive symptoms were positively associated with wives' reports of marital negativity and (b) husbands' marital negativity was inversely related to wives' marital satisfaction. From these findings, we can infer that the psychological distress that arises for Mexican-origin spouses as they respond to the challenges of making ends meet during difficult economic times while they simultaneously navigate adapting to life in a new country is evidenced in their marital quality. Specifically, this study found that contextual stress external to the marital relationship was transmitted via spouses' psychological distress and negative marital exchanges to spouses' marital satisfaction. Wives' marital satisfaction was shown to be uniquely vulnerable to their own and their husbands' depressive symptoms and marital negativity.

  7. Marital satisfaction and physical health: evidence for an orchid effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Susan C; Krueger, Robert F

    2013-03-01

    Marital distress and conflict are linked to poor physical health. Here, we used behavior genetic modeling to determine the etiology of this association. Biometric moderation models were used to estimate gene-by-environment interaction in the presence of gene-environment correlation between marital satisfaction and self-reported health. Using a sample of 347 married twin pairs from the Midlife in the United States study, we found that genetic influences on the variation in self-reported health were greatest at both high (h (2) = .30) and low (h (2) = .38) levels of marital satisfaction, with the lowest levels of heritability estimated for participants at the average level of marital satisfaction (h (2) = .10). These findings are evidence of the orchid effect: the idea that genetic influences on a phenotype such as physical health are enhanced in nonnormative-both unusually positive and unusually negative-environmental contexts.

  8. Exploring Marital Satisfaction among Graduate Students: Implications for Service Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Joshua M.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a synopsis of the theoretical and empirical literature describing the effects of graduate study on marital satisfaction. These findings offer implications for psychoeducational and responsive interventions for family counselors working with this population.

  9. Human Fertility Increases with the Marital-radius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labouriau, Rodrigo; Amorim, António

    2008-01-01

    We report a positive association between marital radius (distance between mates' birthplaces) and fertility detected in a large population. Spurious association due to socioeconomic factors is discarded by a conditional analysis involving income, education, and urbanicity. Strong evidence...

  10. Involuntary childlessness and marital adjustment: his and hers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, P M; Coyle, A T; Llabre, M M

    1990-01-01

    This study of 103 couples in treatment for infertility suggests that spouses are generally similar in the way they perceive their marital adjustment, but that they arrive at their views by different routes. Acceptance of a childless lifestyle is consistently associated with greater marital adjustment for men, but greater stress associated with infertility undermines marital adjustment for both husbands and wives. Men adjust better to an involuntarily childless marriage if their wives are employed or have high earnings. Wife's marital adjustment diminishes with the length of the marriage and the course of treatment for infertility. The stress women experience as a result of infertility influences their perception of their marriage and may undermine their ability to get the support they need during the transition to nonparenthood.

  11. Marital Relationship and Its Associated Factors in Veterans Exposed to High Dose Chemical Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the associates of marital relationship in mustard exposed veterans.Materials and Methods: Two hundred ninety two married Iranian mustard exposed veterans, who had been exposed to single high dose mustard gas in Iraq-Iran war, were assessed for marital adjustment with Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS. Census sampling was done. The patients' quality of life (SF-36, spirometric measures and war related data were also extracted.Results: A total of 189 subjects (65% completed our study. The mean (±SD of the RDAS Total score, RDAS Dyadic Consensus , RDAS Affectional Expression, RDAS Dyadic Satisfaction , and RDAS Dyadic Cohesion were 50.61 (8.16, 16.67 (2.77, 7.62 (1.84, 14.76 (3.39, and 11.54 (3.79, respectively. RDAS Dyadic satisfaction was correlated with SF-36 and all its sub-scores (p<0.05. RDAS total score showed significant correlation with SF-36 total score and most of its sub-scores (p<0.05. RDAS affective expression was significantly correlated with role limitation, social function, general mental health, vitality, General health perceptions, physical composite score (PCS and mental composite score (MCS (p<0.05. RDAS dyadic consensus was not correlated with any SF-36 sub-scores.Conclusion: Veterans health team including physicians, psychologists and/or psychiatrists should know that poorer marital satisfaction is linked with lower quality of life scores, late after mustard exposure, although marital relationship is independent of spirometric findings, age, duration from exposure and comorbidity score.

  12. Influence of hyperprotection (overexactness on marital problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Kapustin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As it was mentioned in one of the previous papers, basic styles of parenting in families with parent-child problems were hyperprotection and overexactness. Another paper described a new so-called existential criterion of normal and abnormal personality based on the works of Erich Fromm. Applying this criterion to personality evaluation of overprotecting and overexacting parents in families with parent-child problems showed that their personality could be identified as abnormal. Research on the influence of hyperprotection and overexactness at children personality development in these families, where existential criterion was also applied, showed that these parenting styles contribute to promoting child specific abnormal personality types: oriented on external assistance, oriented on compliance with other people’s requirements and oriented on protest against such compliance. In the present study, the direct or indirect hyperprotection or overexactness in 80 per cent of cases was observed. Direct hyperprotection or overexactness means that theyare clearly determined in relationship of the married couple. Indirect hyperprotection or overexactness indicates that the couple has abnormal personality types that date have roots in the childhood under the influence of the hyperprotection and overexactness. Classification of these cases was developed, based on various types of direct or indirect input of hyperprotection and overexactness in emerging marital problems. A variety of problems in couples are shown to be closely connected with abnormality of their own personality or the personality of their immediate environment, primarily wives, husbands and parents.

  13. Status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensiek, AE; Absalom, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Status epilepticus is defined as epileptic activity that continues for more than 30 minutes as a single seizure or as recurrent seizures without inter-ictal return of consciousness. The seizure activity is usually classified as partial or generalized. Although status epilepticus is an uncommon

  14. A study on relationship between emotional maturity and marital satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmael Mosavi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is one of the most important events of people's lives and when it happens, it could have both positive and negative consequences. In this paper, we present an empirical study to investigate the relationship between emotional maturity and marital satisfaction using a classical questionnaire. The study chooses all people aged 25-35 who live in region 10 of the city of Esfahan, Iran. The proposed study splits the main hypothesis into five detailed questions, which considers the relationship between marital satisfaction with five other components including emotional instability, return emotional, social maladjustment, close character and lack of independence. The results indicate a negative correlation between marital satisfaction and these items and t-student confirmed that there are meaningful relationship between marital satisfaction and emotional instability, return emotional, close character and lack of independence but there is no meaningful relationship between marital satisfaction and social maladjustment. In summary, the survey concluded that there is meaningful relationship between marital satisfaction and emotional maturity.

  15. Labour division, marital quality and the ideology of gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Milica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is defined as a social, religious and legal community of a husband and wife, and the quality of this relationship is very important for spouses, children and the society in the widest sense. According to the definition of marriage itself it is clear that a suitable gender ideology and the attitudes towards native roles have the significant role in many aspects of the marital and family dynamics. What is more, it is considered that native roles have the leading role in the determination of the quality of marital relations by determining what people expect from their partners and marriage. The role of women and the attitudes towards their role have undergone many changes in the last few decades under the influence of particular social changes, primarily thanks to the higher employment rate of women, and consequently different gender division of labor between men and women, both at work and in families. This paper analyses how the employment of women and the change in the traditional division of labor influence the quality of marital relationships. First of all, we have indicated the significant positive, as well as negative implications which the change in the marital division of labor has to the quality of marital relations. In the end, we have tried to point out that the adopted gender ideology, traditional or egalitarian/feminist acts as an important and essential mediator in the relation between the division of labor and perceived quality of marital relationship.

  16. The Dutch Marital Satisfaction and Communication Questionnaire: A Validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Van den Troost

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to validate the Dutch Marital Satisfaction and Communication Questionnaire (DMSCQ, a 16-item measure that disentangles marital satisfaction, negative communication and open communication. In three subsequent studies empirical evidence for the construct and criterion validity is presented using (confirmatory factor analyses, and correlational analyses with criterion variables. Results indicate that the 16 items represent a solid three-factor structure, which was replicated across time and in independent samples. High agreement in factor structure between men and women was demonstrated by high levels of Tucker's coefficient of congruence. The internal consistencies of the marital satisfaction and negative communication scales are good; for the open communication scale it is somewhat lower but still acceptable. Consistent evidence was obtained for a negative relationship between the three marital outcomes and parental depression and conflictual family climate whereas the three former are positively related to life satisfaction and well-being. Spouses who feel restricted by their parental role or experience parenting stress tend to be less satisfied with their partnership and perceive the marital communication as more negative. Our results demonstrate that the DMSCQ provides a brief, valid and reliable measure of marital satisfaction, negative and open communication.

  17. Marital conflict and fifth-graders' risk for injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Roth, David L; Elliott, Marc N; Chien, Alyna T; Mrug, Sylvie; Shipp, Eva; Dittus, Patricia; Zlomke, Kimberly; Schuster, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    Injuries are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for American children. Marital conflict has been associated with a range of negative health outcomes, but little is known about how marital conflict may influence risk of injury among children. We hypothesized marital conflict would be related to increased youth injury risk after controlling for relevant demographic and parenting covariates. A community sample of 3218 fifth-graders recruited from three US locales was utilized. Ordinal logistic regression models were used to predict the frequency of unintentional injuries from marital conflict while adjusting for demographics, parenting factors (nurturance, communication, involvement with youth), and family cohesion. Higher levels of marital conflict were associated with higher rates of injury that required professional medical attention (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.06, 1.35 per standard deviation). The same association held after inclusion of all covariates in a multivariate ordinal logistic regression model. Parental marital conflict is associated with higher rates of injuries requiring professional medical attention in preadolescent children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Marital Processes, Arranged Marriage, and Contraception to Limit Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Dirgha J.; Axinn, William G.

    2013-01-01

    An international transition away from familially-arranged marriages toward participation in spouse choice has endured for decades and continues to spread through rural Asia today. Though we know this transformation has important consequences for childbearing early in marriage, we know much less about longer-term consequences of this marital revolution. This study draws upon theories of family and fertility change and a rural Asian panel study designed to investigate changes in both marital and childbearing behaviors to investigate these long-term consequences. Controlling for social changes that shape both marital practices and childbearing behaviors, and explicitly considering multiple dimensions of marital processes, we find evidence consistent with an independent, long-standing association of participation in spouse choice with higher rates of contraception to terminate childbearing. These results add a new dimension to the evidence linking revolutions in marital behavior to long-term declines in fertility, but also motivate new research to consider a broader range of long-term consequences of changing marital processes. PMID:23709184

  19. The Effectiveness of Marital Therapy based on Acceptance and Commitment on Couples’ Marital Satisfaction and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Omidi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study assessed the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT for couples on couples’ quality of life (QOL, emotional regulation, marital satisfaction, general health, and mindfulness.

  20. Marital Satisfaction and Its Influencing Factors in Fertile and Infertile Women

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Amiri; Zakieh Sadeqi; Mohammad Hassan Hoseinpoor; Ahmad Khosravi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine marital satisfaction and its influencing factors among fertile and infertile women in Shahroud.Materials and methods: In this comparative study, 1528 participants (511 infertile and1017 fertile women) were evaluated using Enrich Marital Satisfaction Scale. Data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test.Results: A total of 1402 participants (78.7%) had high marital satisfaction. The results show that no significant differences exist between marital satisfaction, marital...

  1. “His” and “Her” Marriage? The Role of Positive and Negative Marital Characteristics in Global Marital Satisfaction Among Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Boerner, Kathrin; Jopp, Daniela S.; Carr, Deborah; Sosinsky, Laura; Kim, Se-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We explore gender differences in older adults’ appraisals of positive and negative aspects of their marriages, examine how these appraisals relate to global marital satisfaction, and identify distinctive marital profiles associated with global satisfaction in men and women.

  2. Effect of Infant Health Problem, Mother's Depression and Marital Relationship on Infant Abuse in Korea: Mediating Pathway of Marital Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Eun Kim, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: The findings from this study demonstrate the fundamental importance of infant health as linked to the mother's mental health, and marital relationship and increasing the quality of marital relationship may be the key to infant abuse prevention.

  3. “His” and “Her” Marriage? The Role of Positive and Negative Marital Characteristics in Global Marital Satisfaction Among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopp, Daniela S.; Carr, Deborah; Sosinsky, Laura; Kim, Se-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We explore gender differences in older adults’ appraisals of positive and negative aspects of their marriages, examine how these appraisals relate to global marital satisfaction, and identify distinctive marital profiles associated with global satisfaction in men and women. Method. Data are from the Changing Lives of Older Couples Study (n = 1,110). We used a variant of principal components analysis to generate marital quality profiles, based on one’s endorsement of positive and negative marital characteristics. OLS regression was used to detect associations between marital profiles and global marital satisfaction. Results. Men offered more positive marital assessments than women, particularly on items reflecting positive treatment by one’s wife. Three marital quality profiles emerged: Positive, Positive–Negative, and Negative. Although marital satisfaction was best explained by positive appraisals in both genders, they were less important for men than for women. The negative profile showed a tendency for a stronger prediction in men. Discussion. Prior studies show small differences in men’s and women’s global marital satisfaction. Our work provides evidence that the presence and magnitude of such gender differences may vary based on the specific marital component considered. We discuss ways that gender shapes marital interactions, expectations, and perceptions, and the implications of our results for the well-being of married older adults. PMID:24742399

  4. System approaches to study root hairs as a single cell plant model: current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shakhawat eHossain

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of plant functional genomics derives primarily from measurements of gene, protein and/or metabolite levels averaged over the whole plant or multicellular tissues. These approaches risk diluting the response of specific cells that might respond strongly to the treatment but whose signal is diluted by the larger proportion of non-responding cells. For example, if a gene is expressed at a low level, does this mean that it is indeed lowly expressed or is it highly expressed, but only in a few cells? In order to avoid these issues, we adopted the soybean root hair cell, derived from a single, differentiated root epidermal cell, as a single-cell model for functional genomics. Root hair cells are intrinsically interesting since they are major conduits for root water and nutrient uptake and are also the preferred site of infection by nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria. Although a variety of other approaches have been used to study single plant cells or single cell types, the root hair system is perhaps unique in allowing application of the full repertoire of functional genomic and biochemical approaches. In this mini review, we summarize our published work and place this within the broader context of root biology, with a significant focus on understanding the initial events in the soybean-rhizobium interaction.

  5. Authoritative knowledge and single women's unintentional pregnancies, abortions, adoption, and single motherhood: social stigma and structural violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Marcia A

    2003-09-01

    This article explores the sources of authoritative knowledge that shaped single, white, middle-class women's unintentional pregnancies and child-bearing decisions throughout five reproductive eras. Women who terminated a pregnancy were most influenced by their own personal needs and circumstances. birth mothers' decisions were based on external sources of knowledge, such as their mothers, social workers, and social pressures. In contrast, single mothers based their decision on instincts and their religious or moral beliefs. Reproductive policies further constrained and significantly shaped women's experiences. The social stigma associated with these forms of stratified maternity suggests that categorizing pregnant women by their marital status, or births as out-of-wedlock, reproduces the structural violence implicit to normative models of female sexuality and maternity. This mixed-method study included focus groups to determine the kinds of knowledge women considered authoritative, a mailed survey to quantify these identified sources, and one-on-one interviews to explore outcomes in depth.

  6. A seven-year investigation of marital expectations and marriage among urban, low-income, African American adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlander, Sarah E; Agostini, Wendy R Miller; Houston, Avril Melissa; Black, Maureen M

    2010-02-01

    Welfare reform has targeted marriage promotion among low-income women. This study explores patterns of marital expectations and marriage among 181 urban, low-income, African American adolescent mothers and their mothers. Using PROC TRAJ to analyze developmental trajectories of adolescent mother-grandmother relationship quality over 24 months, we categorized relationships as either high or low support. We examined the effects of intergenerational marriage models and adolescent mother-grandmother relationship quality on marital expectations and marriage over the first 7 years postpartum. At 24 months, half (52%) of adolescent mothers expected to marry, but marital expectations did not predict marriage. Marital expectations were associated with concurrent involvement in a romantic relationship, not intergenerational marriage models or a supportive adolescent mother-grandmother relationship. After 7 years, 14% of adolescent mothers were married. Married mothers lived in families characterized by the joint effects of intergenerational marriage models and supportive adolescent mother-grandmother relationships. They were older and had more children than did single mothers, suggesting that they were in a family formation phase of life. Policies that promote the education and employment opportunities necessary to support a family are needed.

  7. Marital age homogamy in China: A reversal of trend in the reform era?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zheng; Xie, Yu

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of trends in marital age homogamy in China from 1960 to 2005 that uses data from the China 2005 1% Population Inter-census Survey. Instead of a consistent increase in age homogamy, as expected, results show an inverted U-shaped trend. One plausible explanation is that intensified economic pressure, rising consumerism, and a shrinking gender gap in education during the post-1990s reform era have acted to increase women's desire to marry men who are more economically established, and thus usually older, than less financially secure men. We argue that age hypergamy maintains status hypergamy, a deeply rooted norm for couples in China. An auxiliary analysis based on the human capital model for earnings supports this interpretation. A continued trend in age hypergamy implies a future “marriage squeeze” for men of low socioeconomic status. PMID:24468440

  8. Emotion regulation predicts marital satisfaction: more than a wives' tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Lian; Haase, Claudia M; Levenson, Robert W

    2014-02-01

    Emotion regulation is generally thought to be a critical ingredient for successful interpersonal relationships. Ironically, few studies have investigated the link between how well spouses regulate emotion and how satisfied they are with their marriages. We utilized data from a 13-year, 3-wave longitudinal study of middle-aged (40-50 years old) and older (60-70 years old) long-term married couples, focusing on the associations between downregulation of negative emotion (measured during discussions of an area of marital conflict at Wave 1) and marital satisfaction (measured at all 3 waves). Downregulation of negative emotion was assessed by determining how quickly spouses reduced signs of negative emotion (in emotional experience, emotional behavior, and physiological arousal) after negative emotion events. Data were analyzed using actor-partner interdependence modeling. Findings showed that (a) greater downregulation of wives' negative experience and behavior predicted greater marital satisfaction for wives and husbands concurrently and (b) greater downregulation of wives' negative behavior predicted increases in wives' marital satisfaction longitudinally. Wives' use of constructive communication (measured between Waves 1 and 2) mediated the longitudinal associations. These results show the benefits of wives' downregulation of negative emotion during conflict for marital satisfaction and point to wives' constructive communication as a mediating pathway. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Emotion regulation predicts marital satisfaction: More than a wives’ tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Lian; Haase, Claudia M.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Emotion regulation is generally thought to be a critical ingredient for successful interpersonal relationships. Ironically, few studies have investigated the link between how well spouses regulate emotion and how satisfied they are with their marriages. We utilized data from a 13-year, 3-wave longitudinal study of middle-aged (40–50 years old) and older (60–70 years old) long-term married couples, focusing on the associations between downregulation of negative emotion (measured during discussions of an area of marital conflict at Wave 1) and marital satisfaction (measured at all three waves). Downregulation of negative emotion was assessed by determining how quickly spouses reduced signs of negative emotion (in emotional experience, emotional behavior, and physiological arousal) after negative emotion events. Data were analyzed using actor-partner interdependence modeling. Findings showed that (a) greater downregulation of wives’ negative experience and behavior predicted greater marital satisfaction for wives and husbands concurrently and (b) greater downregulation of wives’ negative behavior predicted increases in wives’ marital satisfaction longitudinally. Wives’ use of constructive communication (measured between Waves 1 and 2) mediated the longitudinal associations. These results show the benefits of wives’ downregulation of negative emotion during conflict for marital satisfaction and point to wives’ constructive communication as a mediating pathway. PMID:24188061

  10. Marital Satisfaction Trends in Hong Kong Between 2002 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Fan, Susan; Yip, Paul

    2016-07-03

    Macrosocial changes may generate influences on marital quality. This study used data from the 2002-2012 Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice surveys conducted by the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong to track the trends of marital satisfaction of both husbands and wives over a 10-year period in Hong Kong, with associated factors. Results indicated that 85% of the husbands and around 80% of the wives reported that they were satisfied with their marital relationships, and no significant changes in general were observed for them between 2002 and 2012 except for some subgroups. Husbands aged 45-49 years, in employment and whose monthly household income between 25,000 HKD and 39,999 HKD, reported marital satisfaction decreased over the past 10 years and wives with primary education or below also reported a decreasing trend during this period. Education and family income had positive influences on the husbands' and wives' marital satisfaction, and husbands were more likely to be sensitive to the unemployment. Less than one-third of couples needed professional counseling on family-related issues, and couple conflicts and work-family conflicts were the urgent needs that should be given priority in delivering services. The implications of this study are discussed in the Chinese context of Hong Kong.

  11. The Comparison of Marital Satisfaction between Fertile and Iinfertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abdolmajid Bahrainian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This research studied and compared marital satisfaction level of the women who have infertility problem with those who does not have this problem. Methods: Totally 180 persons participated (90 infertile women and 90 fertile women were participated in this study. Participants were comprised of those referring to 3 Tehran city infertility centers. For data gathering in this research, the constructed questionnaire and Enrich Marital Satisfactions questionnaire have been used. Data analysis has been done with use of two independent t-tests and one way variance analysis has been done. Results: Results showed significant difference in satisfaction level of the fertile and infertile women, while, our research hypotheses were not confirmed in this regard by studying factors effective on marital satisfaction of the infertile women. The number of unsuccessful pregnancies whether in fertile women or infertile women didn’t have considerable effect on the marital satisfaction, while, effect of this factor on marital satisfaction level of the infertile women was higher than that on the fertile women. Discussion: Generally, by inclusion of limitations in this plan, it is impossible to generalize the present research results with difficulty, though it is inevitable to emphasize on negative consequences of the spouses' life and it is important to pay attention to its different dimensions.

  12. Marital Satisfaction and Sexual Satisfaction in Married Men in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Hadi Sayed Alitabar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Premarital sex in big cities like Tehran, has increased significantly and could also have an impact on future relations people after marriage. The main objective of this study was to compare marital satisfaction and sexual satisfaction in married men with and without a history of premarital sex.Materials and Methods: This research was causal-comparative. The population of this study consists of all married men less than 45 years in Tehran. 144 married men in Tehran were selected by convenience sampling method. To collect the data, Kansas marital satisfaction and Enrich sexual satisfaction subscale were used. Independent sample t test were used for data analysis.  Results: The results showed that marital satisfaction in married men with a history of premarital sex other than with current wife with a mean (SD 15.6 (4.1 is less than men with no history of 17.6 (3.5 (P<0.01. Sexual satisfaction in married men with a history of premarital sex other than with current wife with a mean (SD 31.4 (6.9 is less than men with no history of 33.7 (5.4 (P<0.01. Marital and sexual satisfactions among married men with and without a history of sex with current partner were similar.Conclusion: This research suggests that married men with a premarital sexual history with other partners, have lower marital satisfaction and sexual satisfaction

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Suvarna Bhasma Parada Marit

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    Kapil Thakur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The goal of this study was to characterize Suvarna Bhasma Parada Marit by using the Ayurvedic test parameters, physico-chemical tests, and various instrumentation techniques. Methods: Suvarna Bhasma, an Ayurvedic formulation manufactured as per Bharat Bhaishajya Ratnakar 5/8357 (BBR, has been studied using various instrumentation techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX, laser particle size distribution (PSD analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS, and physico-chemical parameters, such as the loss on drying (LOD, loss on ignition (LOI, and acid insoluble Ash (AIA were determined. In addition, Ayurvedic tests, such as Rekhapurnatva (enterable in the furrows of the fingers, Varitaratwa (floatable over water, Nirdhoomta (smokeless, Dantagre Kach-Kach (gritty particle feeling between the teeth, were performed. Results: The XRD study showed Suvarna Bhasma to be crystalline in nature and to contain more than 98% gold. The mean size of the gold crystallites was less than 10 microns, and the morphology was globular and irregular. Suvarna Bhasma contains gold as its single and major element, with EDAX and FT-IR spectra showing that it is more than 98% pure gold. The moisture content (LOD is less than 0.5%, the LOI is less than 2%, and the AIA is not less than 95%. The Ayurvedic tests, as specified above, helped to confirm the quality of Suvarna bhasma prepared as per the text reference (BBR. Conclusion: This chemical characterization of Suvarna Bhasma performed in this study by using modern instrumentation techniques will be helpful in understanding its pharmacological actions and will help in establishing quality protocols and specifications to substantiate the safety, efficacy & quality of Suvarna Bhasma.

  14. Posterior implant single-tooth replacement and status of adjacent teeth during a 10-year period: a retrospective report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Carl E; Misch-Dietsh, Francine; Silc, Jennifer; Barboza, Eliane; Cianciola, Louis J; Kazor, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this case series study was to evaluate posterior single-tooth implant survival and the long-term conditions of the adjacent teeth. A retrospective evaluation of 1,162 consecutive patients with a single missing posterior tooth treated with 1,377 external hex implants supporting 1,365 restorations surrounded by natural teeth over a 1- to 10-year period was reviewed from four private offices. Implant survival data were collected relative to stage I to stage II healing, stage II to prosthesis delivery, and prosthesis delivery to up to 10 years of follow-up. Long-term adjacent tooth conditions were assessed, including decay, endodontic therapy (root canal therapy [RCT]), and/or extraction during the follow-up period. Of the 1,377 implants inserted, there were 11 surgical failures from stage I to stage II healing. There was one failure from stage II healing to prosthesis delivery. There were two prosthetic-phase failures. The surgical success rate was 99.2%, whereas the overall survival rate was 98.9% at an average of 61 months of follow-up (range, 12 to 125 months). A total of 2,589 adjacent teeth were followed during the study. No natural adjacent tooth was lost during this period. Interproximal decay developed in 129 adjacent teeth (5%), and nine adjacent teeth required RCT (0.4%) as a result of decay or restoration. The use of single-tooth implants as replacements for posterior missing teeth is a viable long-term treatment. Adjacent natural teeth complications are minimal for as long as 10 years after implant insertion.

  15. Early father-daughter relationship and demographic determinants of spousal marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsheikh Ali, Ahmad; Daoud, Fawzi Shaker

    2016-01-01

    This study examined several dimensions of early father-daughter relationship as predictors of marital satisfaction among 494 respondents. Descriptive comparative approach was used in result analysis. The Father Presence Questionnaire and Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire were used, in addition to a number of demographic variables. Results showed that only physical relationship with the father, and perceptions of father's influence, had a positive significant impact on wives' marital satisfaction. Of all domains, only positive feelings about the father had a negative impact on the husband's marital satisfaction. Most demographic variables had statistically significant effect on marital satisfaction. Sociocultural implications for marital satisfaction for wives and husbands are discussed.

  16. Single parent households and increased child asthma morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrief, Terri; Beck, Andrew F; Simmons, Jeffrey M; Huang, Bin; Kahn, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    To characterize whether single parent households are associated with pediatric asthma-related repeat healthcare utilization and to examine family-level psychosocial variables that may explain this relationship. We analyzed a prospective cohort of 526 children aged 1-16 years hospitalized for asthma or bronchodilator-responsive wheezing whose caregivers self-reported their marital status. Those reporting being "single" were considered the at-risk category. The outcome was repeat asthma-related utilization (emergency room (ER) revisit or hospital readmission) within 12 months. We assessed, a priori, four psychosocial variables (household income, caregiver risk of psychological distress, ratio of in-home children to adults, and regular attendance at childcare or a secondary home). Among all children enrolled in the cohort, 40% returned to the ER or hospital for asthma within 12 months. Of all caregivers, 59% self-identified as single. Single status was significantly associated with each psychosocial variable. Children in households with lower incomes and higher ratios of children to adults were both more likely to return to the ER or hospital than children with higher incomes and lower ratios, respectively (each p asthma from single parent households were more likely to have asthma-related reutilization within 12 months than children from homes with married parents. This was driven, in large part, by underlying differences in household income.

  17. Health problems and marital satisfaction among older couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korporaal, Marga; Broese van Groenou, Marjolein I; van Tilburg, Theo G

    2013-12-01

    Older couples are likely to be confronted with health problems of both spouses and these health problems may negatively influence their marital satisfaction. The present study examined these possible negative effects using a dyadic perspective. Data from 78 independently living older couples were analyzed using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM). Health problems were modeled as a latent factor of functional disability, the number of chronic diseases, and self-rated health. The couple's health context, that is, similarity or dissimilarity, was examined with an actor-partner interaction variable. For wives, spousal health problems were negatively associated with their marital satisfaction, but only under the condition that their own health was relatively good. For husbands, neither own nor spousal health problems were associated with their marital satisfaction. Future research focusing on older couples needs to consider the couple's health context next to health at the individual level.

  18. Naturalization, reciprocity and marks of marital violence: male defendants' perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento Paixão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze male criminals' perception about marital violence. Method: An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study undertaken with 23 men who were criminally prosecuted for marital violence. A multimethod data collection was conducted, with individual interview and focal group techniques combined, between May and December 2015. The data collected were initially categorized using the NVIVO® 11 software program, and then organized using the Collective Subject Discourse method. Results: the collective discourses reveal that, in the male's perception, conjugal violence is inherent in a marital relationships: it is a private, reciprocal problem that leaves body marks. Conclusion: gender dissymmetry as a social construct is evidenced, signaling the need to create spaces for reflection and re-signification of men and women, from a gender perspective.

  19. Marital Dialogue – between Conflict, Agreement and Relationship Breakdown

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    Kornaszewska-Polak Monika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Marital dialogue plays an essential role in shaping the relationship between spouses and supports experiencing personal I in the context of the community – We. In these couples, where dialogue is going well, it fulfils the function of a secure base forming a community based on the foundation of unity. However, contemporary culture denies an interpersonal dialogue the authenticity and engagement, emphasizing individualistic attitudes, preoccupation with oneself, leading to relationship and community disintegration and breakdown. This paper is to present the authors twenty year research into bonds, communication styles, marital conflicts and ways of coping with them. The research shows various issues related to developing the interpersonal dialogue and thus creating bonds and unity in the marriage and family. At first, the research devoted to the transmission of generation patterns in the family is presented and it is followed by presentation of selected psychological factors influencing marriage quality and marital satisfaction.

  20. Marital Quality and Families of Children with Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Barker, Erin T; Greenberg, Jan S

    2011-01-01

    In the current review, we highlight recent research on marital quality in parents of children with developmental disabilities (DD) and discuss the child and family factors that account for why some marriages fare better than others. We will also discuss the need for the field of DD to broaden its perspective on marital quality and to examine the impact of marriages on child well-being and the well-being of parents. The clinical implications of recent research findings on marital quality for improving supports and interventions for families of children with DD are discussed. A theoretical framework and model of marriage and parent and child psychosocial well-being in the context of child disability is proposed and a roadmap for future research is provided.

  1. Sexual violence, marital guidance, and Victorian bodies: an aesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    This essay examines some of the emotional rules, encoded in grammars of representation and framed within law and prescriptive marital advice literature, regarding the expression of male sexual aggressivity within the bedroom. Despite the general Victorian idealization of marriage, many wives suffered physical and sexual abuse at the hands of their husbands, marital rape drawing particular attention from early feminists, psychologists, physicians, and evolutionary physiologists. In the 1870s, a belief that unrestrained sexual license was a symptom of degeneration led these commentators to consider marital rape particularly harmful to husbands. By the turn of the century, however, the focus of this harm had nominally shifted to women, who might become frigid if forced to submit to sex--a problem for wives but for husbands as well. As sexology and psychology gained greater influence, couples came to rely on the emotion-talk of commentators to negotiate mutually agreeable bedroom activity.

  2. Cultural differences in family, marital, and gender-role values among immigrants and majority members in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends-Tóth, Judit; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the size of differences in self-reported family, marital, and gender-role values in five cultural groups in the Netherlands (6338 Dutch mainstreamers and 422 Turkish, 369 Moroccan, 429 Surinamese, and 394 Antillean first- and second-generation immigrants). It was found that the three value scales were neither completely independent, nor could they be merged into a single value scale. The factor structures of all scales were identical for the five cultural groups, implying that the concepts can be compared. Age, sex, and notably education accounted for a substantial part of the cultural differences in all values. Cultural differences were larger for marital and family values than for gender-role values. Family and marital values yielded the same rank order of mean scores in the five cultural groups: Turks and Moroccans scored the lowest (having the most traditional values), followed by Surinamers, Antilleans, and Dutch mainstreamers. This rank order corresponds with the ethnic hierarchy of cultural groups that is based on the evaluation of ethnic groups by mainstreamers according to their liking of and likeness to ethnic groups. Generational differences were not found for family and gender-role values but first-generation immigrants in all groups had more traditional marital values than had second-generation immigrants. It was concluded that the theoretical framework based on a combination of three Hofstede dimensions (individualism-collectivism, power-distance, and femininity-masculinity), a model of the hierarchy of the ethnic groups in the Dutch society, and acculturation theory provided an adequate way to address family, marital, and gender-role value differences in the five cultural groups.

  3. The Influence on Premarital Heterosexual Relationships on Marital Timing and Marital Desire among College Students in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    فريده خلج‌آبادي‌فراهاني

    2015-04-01

    In the first phase of the survey, 2031 university students aged 18-40 from among 7 universities (both public and private in Tehran were selected using two stage stratified cluster sampling method. Data collection was completed between January 2010 and May 2011 using an anonymous self-administer valid and reliable questionnaire. The mean age of respondents was 22.5, 12% were married with a mean age at marriage of 27(SD=6.32. The influence of premarital heterosexual relationships on marriage age was assessed among married and on desire to marry among single students. The results show that after control of gender, economic and cultural situation of the family, the experience of progressive (sexual relationship between opposite sex is one of the determinant factors of marriage age among university students. Reporting experience of progressive premarital heterosexual relationships and intimacy are associated with about two years delay in marriage (b-coefficient=1.7, P<0/05 Moreover, There is a gender difference in the relations between premarital heterosexual relationships and desire for marriage. So as, both heterosexual friendships and intimacy was significantly linked with greater desire for marriage among females, while among men, only progressive intimacy was inversely linked with desire for marriage. Men with greater experiences showed lower desire for marriage, while premarital heterosexual friendship was not associated with marital desire and propensity.  The changes in trends of premarital heterosexual relationships among young people and recent types of partnerships needs to be considered more than before in evolution of marriage and the family in Iran and also differing implications of such relationships between men and women needs greater consideration.

  4. Sanctification of sexuality: implications for newlyweds' marital and sexual quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Krystal M; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2011-10-01

    Research on the intersection of sexuality, religion, and spirituality has primarily examined whether global levels of religiousness (e.g., service attendance) deter premarital and extramarital sexual activity. Virtually no empirical work has addressed whether specific spiritual beliefs about sexuality enhance marital sexuality. Using a community sample of 83 individuals married between 4 and 18 months, we found that greater perceptions of sexuality as sanctified predicted greater marital satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, sexual intimacy, and spiritual intimacy beyond global religiousness and demographics. The findings open a new line of research on religion and family life, and extend theories on the possible benefits of the sanctification of intimate relationships.

  5. Marite Kallasma - diktorist eetrinägude direktoriks / Tuuli Koch

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Koch, Tuuli

    2008-01-01

    Legendaarne telediktor Marite Kallasma pälvis president Toomas Hendrik Ilveselt Valgetähe V klassi teenetemärgi. Praegu on Marite Kallasma eetrinõustaja ja diktorite õpetaja. Vt. samas: teenetemärgi pälvinud kaitseliitlane Janek Tšeljadinov, USA ajaloolane ja ajakirjanik Anne Applebaum, briti ajaloolane Antony Beevor, Portugali president Anibal Cavaco Silva, briti ajaloolane Norman Davies, Narva sümfooniaorkestri looja Anatoli Štšura, Kallaste vanausuliste koguduse esimees Pavel Varunin, Eesti Entsüklopeediakirjastuse kunstiline toimetaja Maie-Hele Segerkrantz

  6. Status report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation FY1997 -- Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, N.G.

    1997-08-01

    The wash factors will be used to partition the single-shell tank (SST) inventory into soluble and insoluble portions. The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of bulk analytes, such as chromium, aluminum, and phosphate, as well as minor components. Wash and leach factors are given here for 18 analytes, elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW). These factors are determined by a weighting methodology developed earlier by this task. Tank-specific analyte inventory values depicted in Tank Waste Data Summary Worksheets, are calculated from concentrations obtained from characterization reports; the waste density; and the tank waste volume. The experimentally determined percentage of analytes removed by washing and leaching in a particular tank waste are translated into a mass (metric tons) in Experimental Washing and Leaching Data Summary Worksheets.

  7. Status Report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation-Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, N.G.

    1996-09-01

    This report discusses a methodology developed to depict overall wash and leach factors for the Hanford single-shell tank (SST) inventory. The factors derived from this methodology, which is based on available partitioning data, are applicable to a composite SST inventory rather than only an assumed insoluble portion. The purpose of considering the entire inventory is to provide a more representative picture of the partitioning behavior of the analytes during envisioned waste retrieval and processing activities. The work described in this report was conducted by the Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of analytes, such as sodium, aluminum, phosphate, and other minor components. Wash and leach factors are given for elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW).

  8. Effects of communication styles on marital satisfaction and distress of parents of pediatric cancer patients : a prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg - Williams, Barbara; Van de Wiel, Harry B. M.; Kamps, Willem; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.

    ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of communication styles on marital satisfaction and distress of parents of children treated for cancer. MethodsMarital dissatisfaction (Maudsley Marital Questionnaire), intimacy, avoidance, destructive and incongruent

  9. Effect of marital distance on birth weight and length of offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozieł Sławomir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Marital distance (MD, the geographical distance between birthplaces of spouses, is considered an agent favouring occurrence of heterosis and can be used as a measure of its level. Heterosis itself is a phenomenon of hybrid vigour and seems to be an important factor regulating human growth and development. The main aim of the study is to examine potential effects of MD on birth weight and length of offspring, controlling for socioeconomic status (SES, mother’s age and birth order. Birth weight (2562 boys and 2572 girls and length (2526 boys, 2542 girls of children born in Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski (Poland in 1980, 1983, 1985 and 1988 were recorded during cross-sectional surveys carried out between 1994-1999. Data regarding the socio-demographic variables of families were provided by the parents. Analysis of covariance showed that MD significantly affected both birth weight and length, allowing for sex, birth order, mother’s age and SES of family. For both sexes, a greater marital distance was associated with a higher birth weight and a longer birth length. Our results support the hypothesis that a greater geographical distance between the birth places of parents may contribute to the heterosis effects in offspring. Better birth outcomes may be one of the manifestations of these effects.

  10. Spouses with identical residential addresses before marriage: an indicator of pre-marital cohabitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, J

    1997-01-01

    This article analyses new data on identical address marriages in England and Wales during 1994. It outlines previous background research which has provided good evidence that identical address marriages are likely to be ones in which the couple premaritally cohabited. Recent evidence, based on results from the General Household Survey, is also presented. The article analyses the number and characteristics of identical address marriages, both to provide new (proxy) information on pre-marital cohabitation, and also to announce the publication of a new set of tables on identical address marriages which will be included in the Marriage and Divorce Statistics annual reference volume in future years. Overall, six in every 10 couples marrying in 1994 gave identical addresses. The pattern of variation of this proportion among different subgroups of couples who married in 1994 is analysed--according to: age at marriage; the previous marital status of the partners before marriage; the manner of solemnisation of the marriage, and, for religious weddings, by denomination; by day of the week; month of the year, and by the county in which the wedding took place.

  11. The capacity for romantic intimacy: exploring the contribution of best friend and marital and parental relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, M; Mayseless, O

    2001-06-01

    This study examined, in a longitudinal design, the contributions of three different relationships, namely marital, parent-child and best friend, to the capacity for intimacy in romantic relationships of Israeli male adolescents, as well as the mediating role of socio-emotional capacities. Eighty-four 17-year-old adolescents and their parents filled out questionnaires concerning the quality of these relational contexts. Four years later the Intimacy Status Interview was administered to the adolescents at the conclusion of their mandatory military service to examine closeness, separateness, and commitment within their romantic relationships. Results showed that all relational contexts were related to capacity for intimacy (directly or indirectly), with higher relational qualities associated with better capability for intimacy. The marital relationship was associated with intimacy through its effect on the parent-child relationships. The effects of the parent-child relationships on the capacity for intimacy were mediated through the adolescents' socio-emotional capabilities. The contribution of the parent-adolescent relationships to the capacity for closeness and commitment was further mediated through relationships with the best friend, whereas the contribution to the capacity for separateness was not. A substantial number of our participants showed high capability for intimacy although in the military service context the circumstances for the development of intimacy were quite limited and non-optimal. Exploration of the separateness and closeness facets of intimacy in romantic relationships in the two sexes and in other contexts is recommended. Copyright 2001 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.

  12. Better late than early: Marital timing and subjective well-being in midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew D; Krahn, Harvey J; Galambos, Nancy L

    2017-08-01

    Drawing on data from 405 Canadian adults surveyed as high school seniors (Age 18) and again in midlife (Age 43), the present study examined whether marital timing, a variable rooted in the age norm hypothesis (whether marriage was early, on time, or late in relation to peers), might contribute additional insight into the well-documented association between marital status and subjective well-being (SWB; happiness, symptoms of depression, and self-esteem). The analysis also considered 3 alternative explanations of the marriage-SWB link: the social selection hypothesis, social role theory, and the adaptation perspective. Path analysis results demonstrated marrying on time or late compared with marrying early predicted fewer symptoms of depression in midlife, offering some support for the age norm hypothesis. Little support was found for the social selection hypothesis, but getting married and divorcing were consistently linked with future SWB, in accordance with social role theory. Marrying at an older age predicted higher self-esteem in midlife for men, implying potential adaptation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Continuing evidence for poorer treatment outcomes for single male patients: Retreatment data from RTOG 97-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; DeSilvio, Michelle; Hartsell, William; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Coyne, James; Scarantino, Charles; JanJan, Nora

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The specific aim of this study was to evaluate outcome differences by gender and partner status for patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 97-14. Methods and Materials: RTOG 97-14 randomized patients with metastatic breast or prostate cancer to bone to receive 8 Gy in 1 fraction or 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Retreatment rates and overall survival were made based upon gender, marital status, and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS). The cumulative incidence method was used to estimate retreatment time at 36 months from enrollment, and Gray's test was used to test for treatment differences within the same groupings. Marital status, gender, KPS, and treatment were variables tested in a univariate Cox model evaluating the time to retreatment. Results: Married men and women and single women receiving 30 Gy had significantly longer time to retreatment, p = 0.0067, p = 0.0052, and p = 0.0009 respectively. We failed to show a difference in retreatment rates over time in single men receiving either 30 Gy or 8 Gy. Univariate analysis of the entire group determined patients receiving 30 Gy in 10 fractions significantly less likely to receive retreatment, p < 0.0001, with a trend toward single patients less likely to be re-treated, p = 0.07. Conclusion: Non-disease-related variables, such as social support, might influence the results of clinical trials with subjective endpoints such as retreatment rates. The statistically nonsignificant difference in the 36-month retreatment rates observed in single male patients receiving 8 Gy may be a result of inadequate social support systems in place to facilitate additional care. Patients receiving 8 Gy in a single fraction had significantly higher retreatment rates compared with patients receiving 30 Gy in 10 fractions

  14. Influence of fullerenol C60(OH24 on enzime status in serum of rats after single dose administration of doxorubicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govedarica Biljana Č.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The antracycline antibiotics have one of the widest areas of use in oncology. The most investigated mechanisms of their antineoplastic activity include: interactions of these antibiotics with DNA, inhibition of topoisomerase II and production of free radicals. However, the side effects of doxorubicin, especially cardiotoxicity, are the limiting factor of its use in cancer therapy. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of fullerenol С60(ОH24 as a cytoprotector in single doze administration of doxorubicin on the activity of enzymes in serum (CK, AST, ALT, LDH and a-HBDH in rats in in vivo system. Activity of enzymes (CK, LDH, HBDH, AST, and ALT in serume was measured with standard commercial methods. The results of analysis of the samples treated with the combination of fullerenol and doxorubicin show no difference in enzyme activity in comparison with the control group. The results indicate the possibility of using fullerenol as a protector in the therapy with doxorubicin in malign neoplasm.

  15. Prediction of Marital Satisfaction Based on Emotional Intelligence in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Shahbazi, Sara; Ghafourifard, Mansour; Ali Sheikhi, Rahim

    2017-12-01

    This study was coperinducted with the aim of prediction of marital satisfaction based on emotional intelligence for postmenopausal women. This cross-sectional study was the descriptive-correlation and with a sample size of 134 people to predict marital satisfaction based on emotional intelligence for postmenopausal women was conducted in the Borujen city. The subjects were selected by convenience sampling. Data collection tools included an emotional intelligence questionnaire (Bar-on) and Enrich marital satisfaction questionnaire. The results of this study showed a significant positive relationship between marital satisfaction and emotional intelligence ( P marital satisfaction. Due to the positive relationship between emotional intelligence and marital satisfaction, adequacy of emotional intelligence is improved as important structural in marital satisfaction. So it seems that can with measuring emotional intelligence in reinforced marital satisfaction during menopause, done appropriate action.

  16. Contextualizing change in marital satisfaction during middle age: an 18-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorchoff, Sara M; John, Oliver P; Helson, Ravenna

    2008-11-01

    To address the need for longitudinal marital research that takes contextual factors into account, we investigated change in women's marital satisfaction over 18 years of middle age. We examined not only whether marital satisfaction changed, but also why and how it changed. Marital satisfaction increased in middle age, and increased marital, but not life, satisfaction was linked to the transition to an empty nest. More specifically, the transition to an empty nest increased marital satisfaction via an increase in women's enjoyment of time with their partners, but not via an increase in the quantity of that time with partners. Also, increasing marital satisfaction was not attributable to changing partners. Taken together, these findings support the utility of applying a contextualized approach focused on major life transitions to the study of long-term change in marital satisfaction.

  17. Happy Marriage, Happy Life? Marital Quality and Subjective Well-Being in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah; Freedman, Vicki A; Cornman, Jennifer C; Schwarz, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    The authors examined associations between marital quality and both general life satisfaction and experienced (momentary) well-being among older husbands and wives, the relative importance of own versus spouse's marital appraisals for well-being, and the extent to which the association between own marital appraisals and well-being is moderated by spouse's appraisals. Data are from the 2009 Disability and Use of Time daily diary supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics ( N = 722). One's own marital satisfaction is a sizable and significant correlate of life satisfaction and momentary happiness; associations do not differ significantly by gender. The authors did not find a significant association between spouse's marital appraisals and own well-being. However, the association between husband's marital quality and life satisfaction is buoyed when his wife also reports a happy marriage, yet flattened when his wife reports low marital quality. Implications for understanding marital dynamics and well-being in later life are discussed.

  18. Do Marital Prospects Dissuade Unmarried Fertility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; Knowles, John

    is that weaker marriage-market prospects may be strong enough to explain higher unmarried birth rates. Relative to the existing literature, the essential contributions of the model are to allow for accumulation of children over the lifecycle and for the marriage of single mothers. We use the model...

  19. The effectiveness of group therapy based on quality of life on marital adjustment, marital satisfaction and mood regulation of Bushehr Male abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yoseph Dehghani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this research was to study the The effectiveness of group therapy based on quality of life on marital adjustment, marital satisfaction and mood regulation of Bushehr Male abusers. Materials and Methods: In this study which was a quasi-experimental pre-test, post-test with control group, the sample group was selected by clustering sampling method from the men who referred to Bushehr addiction treatment clinics that among them a total of 30 patients randomly divided into two experimental and control groups of 15 individuals. The instrument included short version of the Marital Adjustment Questionnaire, Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire and Garnefski Emotional Regulation Scale that was completed by the participants in the pre-test and post-test stages.The experimental group was treated based on group life quality in eight sessions but the control group did not receive any treatment. Multi-variate covariance analysis is used for statistical analysis of data. Results: The results revealed that after intervention there was a significant difference between two groups in terms of marital adjustment, marital satisfaction and emotional regulation variables (P<0/001.The rate of marital adjustment, marital satisfaction and emotional regulation in experimental group compare with control group and it was significantly higher in post-test.  Conclusion: treatment based on quality of life which have formed from combination of positive psychology and cognitive-behavioral approach can increase marital adjustment, marital satisfaction and mood regulation of abusers.

  20. Association between Sexual Function and Marital Relationship in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Patients  with  ischemic  heart  disease  (IHD  may  report  difficulties with  sexual  function  and  marital relationship. However, there is a dearth of studies focusing on the association between these aspects in IHD patients. The present study sought to assess the association between sexual function and marital relationship among IHD patients and also test the effect modification of gender, education level, and marital distress on the above association.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 551 patients with IHD were enrolled and their sexual function and marital relationship quality were assessed with the Relation and Sexuality Scale (RSS and Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS, respectively. Association between marital relationship quality and sexual function was assessed with respect to gender, education level, and marital distress.Results: Most participants (72% were men at a mean age of 57 ± 11 (range = 36-80 years. Total sexual function was significantly correlated with total marital quality (r = -0.28, marital consensus (r = -0.17, marital coherence (r = -0.19, marital affection expression (r = -0.22, and marital satisfaction (r = -0.25. Total marital quality also showed a significant association with sexual fear (r = -0.11. These associations were moderated by gender, education level, and marital distress level.Conclusion: Among the IHD patients, sexual function and marital relationship quality showed a mild to moderate association. Association between sexual function and marital relationship quality, however, may depend on gender, education level, and marital distress level.

  1. AFRICAN AMERICAN STEPFATHER?STEPCHILD RELATIONSHIPS, MARITAL QUALITY, AND MENTAL HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Chalandra M.; Futris, Ted G.; Hicks, Megan R.; Lee, Tae-Kyoung; Oshri, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    This study examined associations between stepfather-stepchild relationship quality, stepfathers? depressive symptoms, and two aspects of marriage: marital quality and positive marital interactions. Marital quality was assessed in terms of commitment, trust, passionate and friendship-based love, and happiness. Marital interactions were assessed in terms of intimacy, shared activities, and verbal communication. Using data collected from 149 recently married African American stepfathers, structu...

  2. Gender Bias in Marital Therapy: A Multidimensional Scaling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmond, Mary Jo; Denton, Wallace

    1988-01-01

    Examined whether patient gender influenced prognostic judgments and if male and female therapists used different client characteristics when formulating judgments. Based prognostic judgments on clinical profiles of couples seeking marital therapy for inhibited sexual desire. Found that identified patient's gender did not influence prognostic…

  3. Partner Killing by Men in Cohabiting and Marital Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Todd K.; Mouzos, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    Using a national-level U.S. database, T. K. Shackelford (2001) calculated rates of uxoricide (the murder of a woman by her romantic partner) by relationship type (cohabiting or marital), by ages of the partners, and by the age difference between partners. Women in cohabiting relationships were 9 times more likely to be killed by their partner than…

  4. Marital Property Reforms: Implications for Older Farm Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Kathleen K.

    Throughout American history, marital property reform has been a concern of farm women. With most of the farm family's business assets in real estate, women without the right of ownership can find that they have limited wealth and no influence in the distribution of the farm's assets. The National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws…

  5. Comparing different thinking styles and marital satisfaction among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present study was to compare different thinking styles and marital satisfaction among engineers of urban and nonurban areas. The design of this study was casual-comparative. The sample population of this study consisted of the engineers who were members of engineers' society of Sari city among ...

  6. Patterns of Change in Marital Satisfaction over the Newlywed Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavner, Justin A.; Bradbury, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    Although marital satisfaction starts high and declines for the average newlywed, some spouses may follow qualitatively distinct trajectories. Using 8 self-reports of satisfaction collected over 4 years from 464 newlywed spouses, we identified 5 trajectory groups, including patterns defined by high intercepts and no declines in satisfaction,…

  7. Trait Expressiveness and Marital Satisfaction: The Role of Idealization Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul J. E.; Caughlin, John P.; Huston, Ted L.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the processes that underlie the association between trait expressiveness and marital satisfaction. Analyses suggested that expressiveness promotes satisfaction by leading spouses to engage in affectionate behavior and by leading them to idealize their partner. Extends previous research by providing a plausible explanation of the…

  8. Psychopathology and Marital Satisfaction: The Importance of Evaluating Both Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisman, Mark A.; Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Weinstock, Lauren M.

    2004-01-01

    Using path analysis and hierarchical linear modeling, the authors evaluated the associations between both partners' level of depression and anxiety, as measured by Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) content scales, and both partners' level of marital satisfaction among married couples (N = 774) that participated in the MMPI…

  9. Sources of marital stress experienced by married people as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated sources of marital stress experienced by married people as perceived by lecturers of College of Education. Respondents were stratified into different strata of gender, age group, educational qualification and number of children, after which simple random sampling technique was used for selecting 20 ...

  10. Saving Sinking Ships: Implications from a Theory of Marital Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laner, Mary Riege

    1978-01-01

    A recently developed theory of marital dissolution that utilizes a systems perspective is briefly presented. The theory was derived from almost 1,300 propositions in extant literature, and is readily understandable to layman, practitioner, and academician. Implications contained within the theory for those concerned with saving floundering marital…

  11. Areas of Marital Dissatisfaction among Long-Term Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duba, Jill D.; Hughey, Aaron W.; Lara, Tracy; Burke, Monica G.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand relational dissatisfaction and duration of long-term married couples, this study surveyed 30 couples married at least 40 years with the Marital Satisfaction Inventory. Findings suggest various areas of dissatisfaction (e.g., affective communication, conflict over child rearing) and relationship among and link to other areas of…

  12. How Does Marital Dynamics Influence Psychological well-being in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the influence of marital dynamics on the psychological wellbeing of farm-families in Ogun-state Nigeria. Research participants included spouses in twenty-six families drawn from five farming communities in the state. The uniqueness of the study is its feminist methodological approach, which ...

  13. Influence of Spousal Communication on Marital Stability: Implication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is often said that the home is the basic unit of the larger society. Thus when the home is settled, the society is at peace. The main focus of this study was to find out the influence of spousal communication on marital stability: Implications for Conducive Home Environment. A researcher-designed questionnaire titled ...

  14. the impact of decreased speech intelligibility on marital communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The onset of motor neuron disease (MND), a neurodegenerative disease, results in physical and communication disabilities that impinge on an individual's ability to remain functionally independent. Multiple aspects of the marital relationship are affected by the continuously changing roles and responsibilities.

  15. Congruence of Parental Perception, Marital Satisfaction, and Child Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lucy Rau; Allen, Deborah R.

    1978-01-01

    Parents completed the Locke-Wallace Scale, the Interpersonal Checklist, and the Children's Behavior Checklist to assess marital satisfaction, congruence of perceptions, and agreement in perceptions of their child and child adjustment. Variables were positively intercorrelated. Similarity in partners' self-concepts and psychological empathy were…

  16. The Impact of Marital Separation/Divorce on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Doris S.

    1978-01-01

    Reports on a study of the impact of marital separation/divorce on children aged 3-17 during the 12-month period following the parental separation. Results suggests that a child's adjustment is directly related to the amount of interparent hostility to which the child has been exposed. (Author)

  17. An Analysis of Communication Patterns in Differentially Satisfied Marital Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting-Toomey, Stella

    A study analyzed the verbal interactions of married couples in high, moderate, and low marital satisfaction groups to determine whether (1) the interaction processes within the three satisfaction groups differed and (2) there were different communication patterns that characterized the interaction processes of the groups. Subjects were 34 young…

  18. Marriage, sexuality, and holiness: Aspects of marital ethics in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... an equal and holistic relationship of the marital partners. Simultaneously – and here the Pauline texts extend beyond the borders of their environment – sexual intercourse is valued as an important component of the relationship between husband and wife. Here, the relationship of marriage, including the physical union of ...

  19. Marital Relationships in Late Adulthood: Synchronous versus Asynchronous Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Liat

    2001-01-01

    Studies marital relations of 469 Israeli couples, in late adulthood, categorized as synchronous (either both pre-retired or both retired) and asynchronous (one spouse working and one retired). Examines differences between the groups for division of household tasks, power relations, and quality of marriage. Martial power relations were generally…

  20. The influence of marital factors on genital human papilloma virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To study the association between marital factors and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of the cervix. Method: The subjects were 450 randomly selected sexually active women attending the antenatal, postnatal, gynaecology and family planning clinics in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the ...

  1. Obstetric and marital consequences of female genital mutilation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the relationships between FGM practice and obstetric complications/marital harmony among ever-married women in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey was carried out, and a quantitative analytical technique was used in analysing the data. Findings of the study reveal that women who ...

  2. Incidence and causes of marital infidelity as perceived by secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the incidence and causes of marital infidelity in Orlu Educational Zone of Imo State. The researcher used both purposive and the simple random sampling techniques in selecting the schools and participants in the study. Thus, 40 public secondary schools were purposively selected out of the 83 ...

  3. Post-partum depression, anxiety and marital satisfaction: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-22

    Mar 22, 2018 ... depressive illness, stress, psychological factors and obstetric factors.6,7. Some psychosocial stressors in ... mother, her marital relationship and her infant make them essential conditions for early diagnosis, prevention and ... anxiety disorders in non-pregnant mothers.35. Given the high prevalence of PPD ...

  4. Use of tests and measures in marital and family research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, C

    1999-06-01

    Measures from the marital and family literature were rank ordered by frequency of appearance in the PsycINFO database from 1974-1997. The Family Environment Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales were the instruments found to be most used in research.

  5. Transient Structured Distance as a Maneuver in Marital Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Bernard L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Experience with 73 cases has shown the value of Transient Structured Distance as a maneuver in marriage therapy. While the TSD is a radical form of intervention with risks of anxiety reactions, homosexual panic, or divorce, it has proved effective with difficult forms of acute or chronic marital disharmony. (Author)

  6. Treating the Marital Crisis with the Two-Marriage Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, John P.; Briggs, Muriel A.

    1979-01-01

    The technique called "two-marriage therapy" (conjoint cotherapy by married cotherapy teams) has been developed to help couples in marital crises to confront the elusive nature of marriage. This paper attempts to show how the presence of a married cotherapy team adds a significant salutary perspective on the marriage in conflict. (Author)

  7. Marital Breakdown, Shame, and Suicidality in Men: A Direct Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolves, Kairi; Ide, Naoko; De Leo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The influence of feelings of shame originating from marital breakdown on suicidality is examined. The role of mental health problems as probable mediating factors is also considered. Internalized shame, state (related to separation) shame, and mental health problems were significantly correlated with the score for suicidality during separation in…

  8. Marital Naming Plans among Students at Four Evangelical Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Dougherty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasingly egalitarian gender roles in the United States, when the wedding bells ring for heterosexual couples, husband and wife still commonly emerge sharing the man’s last name. Largely missing from previous studies of marital name change is the influence of religion. We examine the marital naming plans of 199 students from four Evangelical colleges. Nearly all these students planned to marry and more than 80% planned to follow the traditional naming pattern for their gender. Bivariate correlations and logistic regression models reveal that private prayer and more literal views of the Bible correspond to plans for a traditional marital surname. Yet, only a small minority of students evoked religious language to justify their surname choice. Gender roles, identity, and tradition were dominant themes in their explanations. Whether recognized or not, personal religiosity and the model of marriage cultivated in religious families guide the marital naming intentions of Evangelical students. Thus, religion operates as an invisible influence shaping ideals of marriage and family within Evangelical subculture.

  9. Communication in marital homes and work performance among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of communication in marital homes on secondary school teachers work performance in Akwa Ibom State. One research question and one hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. The ex-post facto research design was used in the study. Using stratified random sampling technique, ...

  10. Ambition-Limited, Problem-Focused Brief Marital Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Presents atheoretical short-term marital therapy model in which treatment is limited to six to eight sessions and focuses on special problems raised by couple and on couple's capacity to react positively to clinical suggestions. Describes highlights of therapy model: homework assignments, negotiation of conflict issues, communication training, and…

  11. Marital Cohesiveness and Family Life Transitions: A Social Exchange Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatelli, Ronald M.; And Others

    This paper examines the impact of individual and family life transitions on marital relationships from a social exchange perspective. The first section of the paper reviews and integrates several social exchange perspectives, derived from both sociological and social psychological traditions, in particular the works of Thibaut and Kelly (1959),…

  12. Marital Conflict Behaviors and Implications for Divorce over 16 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birditt, Kira S.; Brown, Edna; Orbuch, Terri L.; McIlvane, Jessica M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined self-reported marital conflict behaviors and their implications for divorce. Husbands and wives (N = 373 couples; 47% White American, 53% Black American) reported conflict behaviors in Years 1, 3, 7, and 16 of their marriages. Individual behaviors (e.g., destructive behaviors) and patterns of behaviors between partners (e.g.,…

  13. The marital dynamics of conflict over the division of labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluwer, E.S.; Heesink, J.A.M.; Van de Vliert, E.

    The division of labor as a source of conflict is a concern for many couples. This study goes beyond the mere prediction of the amount of marital conflict by scrutinizing the relationship between spouses' discontent with the division of labor, their conflict interaction patterns, and subsequent

  14. Post-partum depression, anxiety and marital satisfaction: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many studies have noted the high prevalence of post-partum depression (PPD) and anxiety associated with poor marital satisfaction, albeit amidst a dearth of literature on comorbid PPD and anxiety among women in Nigeria. Objective: The study was aimed to assess the prevalence of PPD and anxiety, and to ...

  15. Predicting marital satisfaction from the attachment styles and gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the influence of attachment styles and gender on marital satisfaction. One hundred and fifty participants (73 males and 77 females) were randomly selected from members of a Christian organization, Ewet Offot and indigenous residents of Nwaniba Road, Uyo. Two instruments used were the Love ...

  16. Unresolved Issues in Adult Children's Marital Relationships Involving Intergenerational Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, John M.; Norris, Joan E.; Pratt, Michael W.

    2003-01-01

    When their first child was 5, 30 couples discussed an unresolved issue in their marital relationship that involved one of their parents, and how they would resolve this issue. Five intergenerational themes were identified in these disagreements: balancing nuclear vs. extended family time, changing rules and roles, pleasing parents vs. spouse,…

  17. Marital Adjustment, Stress and Depression among Working and Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study is aimed at exploring the relationship between marital adjustment, stress and depression. Sample of the study consisted of 150 working and non-working married women (working married women = 75, non-working married women = 75). Their age ranged between 18 to 50 years. Their education was at ...

  18. Marital Instability And Depression Among Public Servants In Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to establish the relationship between marital instability as a determinant of depression among public servant in cross river state, Nigeria. The study adopted the ex-post fact design. The sample consisted of 500 (429 males 71 female) public servants who were randomly selected from state ...

  19. Coping strategies for marital stress as reported by lecturers of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated coping strategies for marital stress as reported by lecturers of a college of education. Lecturers were stratified into different strata of schools in the college i.e School of Education, Science, Arts and Social Sciences, Vocational Technology and Languages, after which a simple random sampling ...

  20. Reassessing the Link between Women's Premarital Cohabitation and Marital Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Spencer L.; Beattie, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    Using data from 2,898 women from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979, we employ a novel method to examine two perspectives, social selection and the experience of cohabitation, commonly used to explain the negative relationship outcomes cohabiting women report. Results reveal cohabitation is negatively related to marital happiness and…

  1. Work Identity and Marital Adjustment in Blue-Collar Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaesser, David L.; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss

    The expansion theory, which maintains that an individual has unlimited energy to expend in work or marital involvement, and the drain theory, which maintains that an individual's energy for work can be depleted by overcommitment to family, compete with each other in explaining the effect of worklife on the adult male's family relationships. To…

  2. Developmental Patterns in Marital Satisfaction: Another Look at Covenant Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaris, Alfred; Sanchez, Laura A.; Krivickas, Kristi

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the trajectory of marital satisfaction in the first 7 years between couples in covenant versus standard marriages. The authors analyzed data on 707 Louisiana marriages from the Marriage Matters Panel Survey of Newlywed Couples, 1998-2004, using multivariate longitudinal growth modeling. When the sample was…

  3. Premarital Cohabitation and Marital Dissolution: An Examination of Recent Marriages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Wendy D.; Cohen, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    An ongoing question remains for family researchers: Why does a positive association between cohabitation and marital dissolution exist when one of the primary reasons to cohabit is to test relationship compatibility? Drawing on recently collected data from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth, the authors examined whether premarital…

  4. Factors associated with teenage marital pregnancy among Bangladeshi women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nury Abu Taher MS

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teenage pregnancy is a public health concern both in developed and developing world. In Bangladesh, most of the first pregnancies occur immediately after marriage, especially among teenagers. Although women aged 15-29 years are the most fertility contributing women in Bangladesh, studies are not yet conducted on teenage pregnancy within this group of women. In the current study, an attempt had been made to identify the factors affecting teenage marital pregnancy in women aged 15-29 years. Methods A cross sectional survey was carried out in 389 women, selected with a convenience sampling technique. Participants were selected on the basis of two criteria, such as married women and age within 15-29 years. We excluded women aged more than 29 years as we attempted to conduct study within high fertility contributing women and with the assumption that they may provide data subjected to relatively high level of recall bias as marital pregnancy may be a longer past event to them. In the analysis, we applied bi-variate and multi-variate logistic regression technique to find out odds ratio of teenage marital pregnancy. Results Result revealed that 72.5% of the participants experienced first marital pregnancy during their teenage, with a mean age of 17.88 years (SD = 2.813. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that participants aged 20-24 years had higher likelihood (OR 1.971, 95% CI 1.132 to 3.434, whereas participants aged 25-29 years had lower likelihood (OR 0.054, 95% CI 0.016 to 0.190 of experiencing teenage marital pregnancy compared to participants aged 15-19 years. In addition, participants desired for >2 children had significant higher odds (OR 3.573, 95% CI 1.910 to 6.684 and participants born in urban area had significant lower odds (OR 0.458, 95% CI 0.228 to 0.919 for teenage marital pregnancy. Conclusions Based on the findings, we conclude that in order to reduce teenage marital pregnancy, consideration should

  5. Factors associated with teenage marital pregnancy among Bangladeshi women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayem, Amir M; Nury, Abu Taher Ms

    2011-05-20

    Teenage pregnancy is a public health concern both in developed and developing world. In Bangladesh, most of the first pregnancies occur immediately after marriage, especially among teenagers. Although women aged 15-29 years are the most fertility contributing women in Bangladesh, studies are not yet conducted on teenage pregnancy within this group of women. In the current study, an attempt had been made to identify the factors affecting teenage marital pregnancy in women aged 15-29 years. A cross sectional survey was carried out in 389 women, selected with a convenience sampling technique. Participants were selected on the basis of two criteria, such as married women and age within 15-29 years. We excluded women aged more than 29 years as we attempted to conduct study within high fertility contributing women and with the assumption that they may provide data subjected to relatively high level of recall bias as marital pregnancy may be a longer past event to them. In the analysis, we applied bi-variate and multi-variate logistic regression technique to find out odds ratio of teenage marital pregnancy. Result revealed that 72.5% of the participants experienced first marital pregnancy during their teenage, with a mean age of 17.88 years (SD = 2.813). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that participants aged 20-24 years had higher likelihood (OR 1.971, 95% CI 1.132 to 3.434), whereas participants aged 25-29 years had lower likelihood (OR 0.054, 95% CI 0.016 to 0.190) of experiencing teenage marital pregnancy compared to participants aged 15-19 years. In addition, participants desired for >2 children had significant higher odds (OR 3.573, 95% CI 1.910 to 6.684) and participants born in urban area had significant lower odds (OR 0.458, 95% CI 0.228 to 0.919) for teenage marital pregnancy. Based on the findings, we conclude that in order to reduce teenage marital pregnancy, consideration should be given on women's desired number of children and birth place

  6. Predicting 2-Year Marital Satisfaction from Partners' Discussion of Their Marriage Checkup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Christina B.; Scott, Rogina L.; Castellani, Angela M.; Cordova, James V.

    2002-01-01

    This study tested whether the observed marital interactions of partners following a marriage checkup predicted marital satisfaction 2 years later. In addition, this study examined whether recommendations to pursue therapy predicted subsequent treatment seeking and whether changes in marital distress following the checkup remained stable over 2…

  7. Spillover between Marital Quality and Job Satisfaction: Long-Term Patterns and Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stacy J.; May Dee C.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated process of spillover between marital quality and job satisfaction among married individuals. Results indicated increases in marital satisfaction were significantly related to increases in job satisfaction, and increases in marital discord were significantly related to declines in job satisfaction. These processes operate similarly for…

  8. Marital Happiness and Psychological Well-Being across the Life Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp Dush, Claire M.; Taylor, Miles G.; Kroeger, Rhiannon A.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from six waves of the Study of Marital Instability over the Life Course (N = 1,998), we conducted a latent class analysis to test for distinct marital happiness trajectories. We found three distinct marital happiness trajectories: low, middle, and high happiness. Initial levels of life happiness were strongly associated with membership…

  9. Remarriage, Stepchildren, and Marital Conflict: Challenges to the Incomplete Institutionalization Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William L.; DeMaris, Alfred

    1995-01-01

    Examines hypothesis that stepfamilies experience more marital conflict than do biological families. Measured remarriage's and stepchildren's impact on marital conflict frequency. Findings suggest that remarriage and stepchildren are not necessarily associated with more frequent marital conflict and that stepchildren's effect varied depending on…

  10. Statistical investigation of the impact of timing of marriage on marital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicate that girl-child marriage and later-marriage increase the risk of marital dissolution. Various recommendations for policy interventions aimed at improving the marital stability of Nigerian women are stated. KEYWORDS: Marital disruption, Gross nuptiality table, Multiple decrement table, Girl-child marriage, ...

  11. Reading Others’ Emotions: The Role of Intuitive Judgments in Predicting Marital Satisfaction, Quality, and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Waldinger, Robert J.; Hauser, Stuart T.; Schulz, Marc S.; Allen, Joseph P.; Crowell, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined links between emotion expression in couple interactions and marital quality and stability. Core aspects of emotion expression in marital interactions were identified with the use of naïve observational coding by multiple raters. Judges rated 47 marital discussions with 15 emotion descriptors. Coders’ pooled ratings yielded good reliability on 4 types of emotio...

  12. Factors That Influence the Association Between Adult Attachment and Marital Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hatch, Daniel LeRoy

    2008-01-01

    Adult attachment theory offers a promising conceptual framework for understanding the psychological and contextual factors that contribute to marital satisfaction. A consistent association has been found between adult attachment dimensions and marital satisfaction. The current study examined several mediating mechanisms that may explain the relationship between adult attachment dimensions and marital satisfaction. Specifically, relationship expectations, four types of responses to accommodati...

  13. Marital Relationship in Greek Families: Raising a Child with a Severe Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibidaki, Assimina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The target of the study is to examine important aspects of the marital relationship: marital satisfaction, spouse's representation of the marital relationship, roles and boundaries in families raising a child with a severe disability. Also, this study compares families with a child with a severe disability to those with children…

  14. Brief Report: Fathers' and Mothers' Marital Relationship Predicts Daughters' Pubertal Development Two Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxbe, Darby E.; Repetti, Rena L.

    2009-01-01

    Parents of 50 4th grade girls reported on their marital relationships and then, two years later, rated their daughters' pubertal development. Fathers' ratings of marital dissatisfaction, mothers' ratings of less emotional support from husbands, and both parents' ratings of aversive marital conflict were correlated with more advanced pubertal…

  15. Marital dissatisfaction, psychological distress, and the coping of parents of pediatric cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; Jaspers, JPC; Kamps, WA; Klip, EC

    1998-01-01

    This study examines the marital satisfaction of 124 parents of pediatric cancer patients in relation to their psychological distress and coping preferences over a year. Results show that there was a significant increase in marital dissatisfaction for the group as a whole. Marital dissatisfaction was

  16. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pandolfo Feoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

  17. The Long-Term Health Implications of Marital Disruption: Divorce, Work Limits, and Social Security Disability Benefits Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Kenneth A; Tamborini, Christopher R; Reznik, Gayle L

    2015-10-01

    We provide new evidence on the long-term impact of divorce on work disability among U.S. men. Using data from the 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation linked to U.S. Social Security Administration records, we assess the relationship between divorce and subsequent self-reports of work limitations and the receipt of federal disability benefits. The examination of self-reports and administrative records of medically qualified benefits provides dual confirmation of key relationships. We compare men who experienced a marital dissolution between 1975 and 1984 with continuously married men for 20 years following divorce using fixed-effects and propensity score matching models, and choose a sample to help control for selection into divorce. On average, we find that divorce is not associated with an increased probability of self-reported work limitations or receipt of disability benefits over the long run. However, among those who do not remarry, we do find that divorce increases men's long-term probability of both self-reported work limitations and federal disability benefit receipt. Lack of marital resources may drive this relationship. Alternative estimates that do not control for selection into divorce demonstrate that selection bias can substantially alter findings regarding the relationship between marital status changes and subsequent health.

  18. Family and Marital Conflict Among Chinese Older Adults in the United States: The Influence of Personal Coping Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Man; Dong, Xinqi; Tiwari, Agnes

    2017-07-01

    Conflict in the family is a major risk factor for the well-being of older immigrants, whose lives are centered around their families. This study examined the potential linkage between personal coping resources and family and marital conflict among U.S. Chinese older adults. Data were derived from the PINE study, a population-based study of Chinese elders in Chicago (N = 3,157). Logistic regressions were carried out to predict the likelihood of having conflict with family members and with the spouse, respectively, using indicators of personal coping resources (ie, socioeconomic status, physical health, acculturation level, perceived children's filial piety, number of friends, and sense of mastery). The results showed that older adults with higher education (odds ratio [OR] = 1.03, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.06; OR = 1.09, CI = 1.06-1.11, respectively), lower perception of children being filial (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.93-0.97; OR = 0.96, CI = 0.94-0.98], respectively), and lower sense of mastery (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.94-0.96; OR = 0.98, CI = 0.97-0.99, respectively) were more likely to report both family and marital conflict. Older adults who had more friends were less likely to report marital conflict (OR = 0.61, CI = 0.43-0.86). Overall, older immigrants with greater coping resources seemed to have less family and marital conflict. Particularly important are their own sense of control and available support from children and friends in the new society. Higher education could be a risk factor for these conflicts. Future studies are needed to distinguish everyday life conflict from acculturation-related conflict in this population. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Examining marital violence in India: review and recommendations for future research and practice.

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    Bhat, Meghna; Ullman, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Marital violence has been recognized globally as a grave public health concern with devastating consequences affecting the physical, reproductive, sexual and psychological health of women. This article is a narrative review about marital violence in India, an understudied subtype of domestic violence. We include both theoretical and empirical studies of legal definitions, incidence and prevalence, correlates of marital violence and the consequences of such violence on survivors (N = 18). In addition to examining the sociocultural context and correlates of marital violence in India, we discuss the implications of current knowledge and recommendations for reducing and responding to marital violence.

  20. The Role of the Emotional Intelligence and Emotional Schema in Womenn’s Marital Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    جعفر حسني

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the role of emotional intelligence and emotional schema in marital satisfaction among women. A sample of 200 married women (100 employed and 100 household women was selected randomly and completed measures of emotional schemas, emotional intelligence, and marital satisfaction. The results of stepwise regression analysis showed that attention and clarity components of emotional intelligence are significant predictors of most marital satisfaction dimensions. Also, blame, agreement, simplistic view of emotions and higher values towards emotional schemas predicted different dimensions of marital satisfaction. Based on the findings it can be concluded that the emotional intelligence and effective emotional schema play a key role in marital satisfaction.

  1. Components of treatment delay in rheumatoid arthritis differ according to autoantibody status: validation of a single-centre observation using national audit data.

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    Pratt, Arthur G; Lendrem, Dennis; Hargreaves, Ben; Aslam, Osman; Galloway, James B; Isaacs, John D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether time to treatment following symptom onset differs between RA patients according to autoantibody status. A single-centre retrospective analysis of a UK early RA inception cohort was first undertaken to identify those components of the patient journey that differed by serological subtype. Data from a UK national audit of early inflammatory arthritis patients was accessed to replicate the key finding. A total of 173 RA patients were diagnosed over a 31-month period, of whom 80 (46%) were ACPA/RF double-seropositive (ACPA(+)/RF(+)), 53 (31%) ACPA(-)/RF(-), 17 (10%) ACPA(+)/RF(-) and 23 (13%) RF(+)/ACPA(-) Overall, ACPA(+)/RF(+) patients experienced significantly longer symptom duration before DMARD initiation. This was accounted for by delays in their presentation to primary care following symptom onset-a finding that was robustly confirmed in an independent dataset of 2192 UK early RA patients. In contrast, ACPA(-)/RF(-) patients were significantly more likely to experience delays in DMARD initiation after presenting to secondary care. Causes of treatment delays in early RA differ according to patients' autoantibody status. More insidious symptom onset and/or distinct health-seeking behaviours among ACPA(+)/RF(+) patients may contribute to late presentations in primary care, whereas ACPA(-)/RF(-) patients experience delayed diagnosis and treatment in secondary care. These observations inform the research agenda, potentially influencing the design of service delivery for early arthritis patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  2. Marital and Parental Satisfaction of Married Physicians with Children

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    Warde, Carole M; Moonesinghe, Kushan; Allen, Walter; Gelberg, Lillian

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate personal and professional factors associated with marital and parental satisfaction of physicians. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS A survey was sent to equal numbers of licensed male and female physicians in a Southern California county. Of 964 delivered questionnaires, 656 (68%) were returned completed. Our sample includes 415 currently married physicians with children, 64% male and 36% female. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Ratings of marital and parental satisfaction were measured on a 5-point Likert scale, 5 being extremely satisfied. Prevalence of work and home life factors was also evaluated. The mean score for marital satisfaction was 3.92 (range 1.75–5.0). Approximately half of the physicians reported high levels of marital satisfaction (63% of male physicians and 45% of female physicians). The gender difference disappeared after adjusting for age differences. Two factors were associated with high marital satisfaction: a supportive spouse (odds ratio [OR] 10.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.66, 40.08) and role conflict (OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.42, 0.88). The mean score for parental satisfaction was 3.43 (range 1.0–5.0), and approximately two thirds of both male and female physicians reported at least moderate levels of parental satisfaction. The major factors associated with parental satisfaction were a supportive spouse (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.32, 3.80), role conflict (OR 0.35; 95% CI 0.23, 0.53), salaried practice setting (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.21, 3.81), marriage to a spouse working in a profession (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.21, 3.81), and marriage to a spouse working as a homemaker (OR 2.33; 95% CI 1.20, 4.56). Number of hours worked was not found to be related to either satisfaction score, but rather to an intervening variable, role conflict. CONCLUSIONS For physicians with children, our study indicates that minimizing the level of role conflict and having a supportive spouse are associated with higher levels of marital and

  3. Reading others emotions: The role of intuitive judgments in predicting marital satisfaction, quality, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldinger, Robert J; Hauser, Stuart T; Schulz, Marc S; Allen, Joseph P; Crowell, Judith A

    2004-03-01

    This study examined links between emotion expression in couple interactions and marital quality and stability. Core aspects of emotion expression in marital interactions were identified with the use of naive observational coding by multiple raters. Judges rated 47 marital discussions with 15 emotion descriptors. Coders' pooled ratings yielded good reliability on 4 types of emotion expression: hostility, distress, empathy, and affection. These 4 types were linked with concurrent marital satisfaction and interviewer ratings of marital adjustment as well as with marital stability at a 5-year follow-up. The study also examined the extent to which naive judges' ratings of emotion expression correspond to "expert" ratings using the Specific Affect Coding System (SPAFF). The unique advantages of naive coding of emotion expression in marital interaction are discussed.

  4. Reading Others’ Emotions: The Role of Intuitive Judgments in Predicting Marital Satisfaction, Quality, and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldinger, Robert J.; Hauser, Stuart T.; Schulz, Marc S.; Allen, Joseph P.; Crowell, Judith A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined links between emotion expression in couple interactions and marital quality and stability. Core aspects of emotion expression in marital interactions were identified with the use of naïve observational coding by multiple raters. Judges rated 47 marital discussions with 15 emotion descriptors. Coders’ pooled ratings yielded good reliability on 4 types of emotion expression: hostility, distress, empathy, and affection. These 4 types were linked with concurrent marital satisfaction and interviewer ratings of marital adjustment as well as with marital stability at a 5-year follow-up. The study also examined the extent to which naïve judges’ ratings of emotion expression correspond to “expert” ratings using the Specific Affect Coding System (SPAFF). The unique advantages of naïve coding of emotion expression in marital interaction are discussed. PMID:14992610

  5. [Reliability and validity of marital love scale in middle- aged and elderly couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuko; Sagara, Junko

    2012-08-01

    A marital love scale was created to study the marital quality of middle-aged and elderly couples, and the scale's reliability and validity were examined. In this study, 888 middle-aged and elderly married participants completed the marital love scale questionnaire as well as answering questions regarding marriage satisfaction and husband-wife communication. In all age groups, men scored higher than women on the marital love scale. The marital love score gradually increased from the middle-aged to the senior period, and like the marriage satisfaction score, the marital love score showed a U-shaped curve in the whole married life. The results also showed that the scale was highly correlated with marriage satisfaction and spousal self-disclosure. Thus, the validity and internal consistency of the marital love scale were confirmed.

  6. Early father–daughter relationship and demographic determinants of spousal marital satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsheikh Ali A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad Alsheikh Ali,1 Fawzi Shaker Daoud2 1Counseling Psychology Program, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Hashemite University, 2Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Al-Ahliyya Amman University, Amman, Jordan Abstract: This study examined several dimensions of early father–daughter relationship as predictors of marital satisfaction among 494 respondents. Descriptive comparative approach was used in result analysis. The Father Presence Questionnaire and Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire were used, in addition to a number of demographic variables. Results showed that only physical relationship with the father, and perceptions of father’s influence, had a positive significant impact on wives’ marital satisfaction. Of all domains, only positive feelings about the father had a negative impact on the husband's marital satisfaction. Most demographic variables had statistically significant effect on marital satisfaction. Sociocultural implications for marital satisfaction for wives and husbands are discussed. Keywords: early father–daughter relationship, demographic, spousal marital satisfaction

  7. Understanding the Relationships between Gender Inequitable Behaviours, Childhood Trauma and Socio-Economic Status in Single and Multiple Perpetrator Rape in Rural South Africa: Structural Equation Modelling.

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    Rachel Jewkes

    Full Text Available Interventions to prevent rape perpetration must be designed to address its drivers. This paper seeks to extend understanding of drivers of single and multiple perpetrator rape (referred to here as SPR and MPR respectively and the relationships between socio-economic status, childhood trauma, peer pressure, other masculine behaviours and rape.1370 young men aged 15 to 26 were interviewed as part of the randomised controlled trial evaluation of Stepping Stones in the rural Eastern Cape. We used multinomial to compare the characteristics of men who reported rape perpetration at baseline. We used structural equation modelling (SEM to examine pathways to rape perpetration.76.1% of young men had never raped, 10.0% had perpetrated SPR and 13.9% MPR. The factors associated with both MPR and SPR (compared to never having raped were indicators of socio-economic status (SES, childhood trauma, sexual coercion by a woman, drug and alcohol use, peer pressure susceptibility, having had transactional sex, multiple sexual partners and being physically violent towards a partner. The SEM showed the relationship between SES and rape perpetration to be mediated by gender inequitable masculinity. It was complex as there was a direct path indicating that SES correlated with the masculinity variable directly such that men of higher SES had more gender inequitable masculinities, and indirect path mediated by peer pressure resistance indicated that the former pertained so long as men lacked peer pressure resistance. Having a higher SES conveyed greater resistance for some men. There was also a path mediated through childhood trauma, such that men of lower SES were more likely to have a higher childhood trauma exposure and this correlated with a higher likelihood of having the gender inequitable masculinity (with or without the mediating effect of peer pressure resistance.Both higher and lower socio-economic status were associated with raping. Prevention of rape

  8. Understanding the Relationships between Gender Inequitable Behaviours, Childhood Trauma and Socio-Economic Status in Single and Multiple Perpetrator Rape in Rural South Africa: Structural Equation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewkes, Rachel; Nduna, Mzikazi; Jama-Shai, Nwabisa; Chirwa, Esnat; Dunkle, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions to prevent rape perpetration must be designed to address its drivers. This paper seeks to extend understanding of drivers of single and multiple perpetrator rape (referred to here as SPR and MPR respectively) and the relationships between socio-economic status, childhood trauma, peer pressure, other masculine behaviours and rape. Method 1370 young men aged 15 to 26 were interviewed as part of the randomised controlled trial evaluation of Stepping Stones in the rural Eastern Cape. We used multinomial to compare the characteristics of men who reported rape perpetration at baseline. We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine pathways to rape perpetration. Results 76.1% of young men had never raped, 10.0% had perpetrated SPR and 13.9% MPR. The factors associated with both MPR and SPR (compared to never having raped) were indicators of socio-economic status (SES), childhood trauma, sexual coercion by a woman, drug and alcohol use, peer pressure susceptibility, having had transactional sex, multiple sexual partners and being physically violent towards a partner. The SEM showed the relationship between SES and rape perpetration to be mediated by gender inequitable masculinity. It was complex as there was a direct path indicating that SES correlated with the masculinity variable directly such that men of higher SES had more gender inequitable masculinities, and indirect path mediated by peer pressure resistance indicated that the former pertained so long as men lacked peer pressure resistance. Having a higher SES conveyed greater resistance for some men. There was also a path mediated through childhood trauma, such that men of lower SES were more likely to have a higher childhood trauma exposure and this correlated with a higher likelihood of having the gender inequitable masculinity (with or without the mediating effect of peer pressure resistance). Discussion Both higher and lower socio-economic status were associated with raping

  9. Understanding the Relationships between Gender Inequitable Behaviours, Childhood Trauma and Socio-Economic Status in Single and Multiple Perpetrator Rape in Rural South Africa: Structural Equation Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewkes, Rachel; Nduna, Mzikazi; Jama-Shai, Nwabisa; Chirwa, Esnat; Dunkle, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Interventions to prevent rape perpetration must be designed to address its drivers. This paper seeks to extend understanding of drivers of single and multiple perpetrator rape (referred to here as SPR and MPR respectively) and the relationships between socio-economic status, childhood trauma, peer pressure, other masculine behaviours and rape. 1370 young men aged 15 to 26 were interviewed as part of the randomised controlled trial evaluation of Stepping Stones in the rural Eastern Cape. We used multinomial to compare the characteristics of men who reported rape perpetration at baseline. We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine pathways to rape perpetration. 76.1% of young men had never raped, 10.0% had perpetrated SPR and 13.9% MPR. The factors associated with both MPR and SPR (compared to never having raped) were indicators of socio-economic status (SES), childhood trauma, sexual coercion by a woman, drug and alcohol use, peer pressure susceptibility, having had transactional sex, multiple sexual partners and being physically violent towards a partner. The SEM showed the relationship between SES and rape perpetration to be mediated by gender inequitable masculinity. It was complex as there was a direct path indicating that SES correlated with the masculinity variable directly such that men of higher SES had more gender inequitable masculinities, and indirect path mediated by peer pressure resistance indicated that the former pertained so long as men lacked peer pressure resistance. Having a higher SES conveyed greater resistance for some men. There was also a path mediated through childhood trauma, such that men of lower SES were more likely to have a higher childhood trauma exposure and this correlated with a higher likelihood of having the gender inequitable masculinity (with or without the mediating effect of peer pressure resistance). Both higher and lower socio-economic status were associated with raping. Prevention of rape perpetration must

  10. Non-marital pregnancy and the second demographic transition in Australia in historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Carmichael

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Australia has remarkably detailed data on non-marital pregnancy dating from 1908. They both offer insight into long-term trends in childbearing resulting from non-marital sexual activity and reveal in historical context key features of the second demographic transition and its genesis. Objective: Trends are traced in rates of non-marital conception of children ultimately born both outside and within marriage. A range of related indices is also presented in examining how demographic behaviour surrounding non-marital pregnancy (i helped generate the second demographic transition and (ii unfolded as a component of it. Methods: Core indices are rates of non-marital conception partitioned into additive components associated with marital and non-marital confinement. Data on non-marital and early marital births (at marriage durations 0-7 months are lagged back 38 weeks to a date of and age at conception basis to facilitate a common, unmarried, population at risk. Results: Post-war weakening of parental oversight of courtship was a fundamental trigger to the broader rejection of normative and institutional values that underpinned the second demographic transition. In tandem with denying the unmarried access to oral contraception it generated rampant youthful non-marital pregnancy, which undermined Judeo-Christian values, especially once abortion law reform occurred. Conclusions: Childbearing following non-marital conception transitioned rapidly after the 1960s from primarily the unintended product of youthful intercourse in non-coresidential relationships to mainly intended behaviour at normative reproductive ages in consensual unions. Family formation increasingly mixed non-marital births and premaritally and/or maritally conceived marital births.

  11. Marital infidelity and its effect on pathogen diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Marital infidelity is usually examined solely in terms of strategies of men and women, with an emphasis on the enhanced payoff for male infidelity (provided he can get away with it). What are not clear are the strategies used, in terms of how often to engage in extra-marital affairs. It has been proposed that female strategies are governed by a "decision" to maximize the genetic diversity of her offspring, in order to better guarantee that at least some will survive against a common pathogen. This strategy would then impact on the strategies and diversity of pathogens. I make a number of predictions about both strategies and the genetic diversity of humans and pathogens, couched in game-theoretic terms. These predictions are then compared with the existing evidence on the strategies used by women and also in terms of the genetic diversity of human populations.

  12. Relationships between attachment and marital satisfaction in married couples

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    Patrícia Gallerová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Theory of attachment strongly influences exploring of close relationships in childhood and in adulthood as well. According Bowlby attachment is "lasting relationship bond characterized by need of seeking and maintaining proximity with a person in stressful situations especially (Bowbly, 2010. Hazan a Shaver (1987 applied theory of early attachment in romantic relationships of adults. Behavior of adult human in relationships is more or less predictable by style of attachment in childhood (Feeney, 1999. Brennan, Clark a Shaver (1998 created four-dimensional model of attachment which was based on Ainsworth´s theory as well. The model was formed of two dimensions - anxiety and avoidance. The authors identified four types of attachment: secure, fearful, dismissive and preoccupied style of attachment (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998. Satisfaction in romantic relationship can be explained as a degree in which is relationship for a human enojyable. Attachment influences satisfaction in relationship in terms of meeting need of proximity and safety (Mikulincer, Florian, Cowan, & Cowan, 2002. Several researches show that safe attachment is associated with higher satisfaction in marriage and on the other hand people with insecure style of attachment show lower degree of satisfaction in relationship (Alexandrov, Cowan, & Cowan, 2005; Treboux, Crowell, & Waters, 2004. At the same time style of attachment of the partner also influences individual a lot, satisfaction does not depend only on his own style of attachment but also on attachment of his partner (Farinelli, & McEwan, 2009. The study examined relations between the relationship attachment and marital satisfaction. The goal was to explain the relationship between the adult attachment and marital satisfaction of the individual and her/his husband/wife. The research examined relationship between adult attachment and marital satisfaction as well. Quantitative questionnaire survey: The battery consisted of

  13. The benefits of child-parent psychotherapy to marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltz, Jack S; Rogge, Ronald D; Rogosch, Fred A; Cicchetti, Dante; Toth, Sheree L

    2015-12-01

    Given the interdependent nature of relationships within the family system, the purpose of this study was to examine the potential role of child-parent psychotherapy (CPP) to extend its positive influence beyond the mother-child relationship within families challenged by maternal depression. Accordingly, we analyzed longitudinal associations between depressive symptoms and marital satisfaction over 3 years in order to evaluate if the benefits of CPP to mother-child attachment security might generalize within the family and indirectly benefit marital relationships. We tested our hypotheses in a randomized control trial of CPP (N = 159 families) to examine the intervention's efficacy in families with mothers with histories of depression since the target child's birth (Mage = 20.4 months, SD = 2.5; 56% boys). Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) with an actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) framework, the results supported our hypothesis as well as revealed significant associations between depressive symptoms and marital functioning. Specifically, shifts in mothers' depressive symptoms within specific waves of follow-up were associated with corresponding shifts in both their husbands' and their own relationship satisfaction in those same waves. After controlling for those effects, only mothers with a history of depression who received CPP demonstrated slight improvements in relationship satisfaction over the 3 years of the study, suggesting secondary benefits of CPP within the family system. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of examining therapeutic processes within the larger family system. Concerning future research, we also suggest examining potential mechanisms through which CPP might influence marital satisfaction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. A study on relationship between emotional maturity and marital satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Esmael Mosavi; Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2012-01-01

    Marriage is one of the most important events of people's lives and when it happens, it could have both positive and negative consequences. In this paper, we present an empirical study to investigate the relationship between emotional maturity and marital satisfaction using a classical questionnaire. The study chooses all people aged 25-35 who live in region 10 of the city of Esfahan, Iran. The proposed study splits the main hypothesis into five detailed questions, which considers the relation...

  15. Study of marital communication in marriages with infidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Martín-Lanas, R. (Raquel); Beunza-Nuin, M.I. (Mª Isabel); Cano-Prous, A. (Adrián); Tricas-Sauras, S. (Sandra); Manrique-Astiz, E. (Eduardo); Aubá-Guedea, E. (Enrique)

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Infidelity has a significant psychological impact on marriages and families. Marriages with an infidelity experience show a great number of premarital communication problems such as low rates of positive interaction and high rates of invalidation and negative interaction (1). OBJECTIVES To analyse communicative resources of spouses belonging to marriages with at least one unfaithfulness episode. To compare marital communication depending on the sex of the unfaithfu...

  16. MARITAL RELATIONSHIP AND EXPECTATIONS ABOUT PARENTHOOD IN GAY COUPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Meletti, Alexandre Trevisani; Scorsolini-Comin, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the processes of construction of the marital relationship and expectations about parenthood in same-sex couples. It has been interviewed four gay couples (four men and four women) who have been living together for four years, on average. Semi-structured interviews have been used and the technique of the life history has been also performed in an individual appliance. They have also been audio taped, fully and literally transcribed. The content analysis ...

  17. Meaningfulness of service and marital satisfaction in Army couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jeffrey S; Renshaw, Keith D; Allen, Elizabeth S; Markman, Howard J; Stanley, Scott M

    2014-10-01

    The vast numbers of military service members who have been deployed since 2001 highlights the need to better understand relationships of military couples. A unique consideration in military couples is the concept of meaningfulness of service, or the value service members and their partners place on military service in spite of the sacrifices it requires. In a sample of 606 Army couples, the authors used path analysis to examine how male service members' and female spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service added to the prediction of marital satisfaction in both members of the couple, when accounting for service members' PTSD symptoms. Spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service was linked with higher marital satisfaction in spouses, regardless of service member's perceived meaningfulness of service. Service members' perceived meaningfulness of service was also associated with increased marital satisfaction in service members, but only when their spouses also perceived higher meaningfulness. There were no significant interactions between service members' PTSD and either partner's perceived meaningfulness. Implications for enhanced attention to spousal perceptions of meaningfulness of service are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Marital, reproductive, and educational behaviors covary with life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, Daniel Brian

    2012-12-01

    Theories of "life history evolution" suggest that individuals might adjust the timing of marriage and reproduction, as well as their propensity to terminate a marriage or pregnancy and invest in skill development, in response to indicators of the locally prevailing level of life expectancy. In particular, such theories generate the hypothesis that foreshortened time horizons lead to hastened reproduction and marriage whereas lengthier time horizons increase the likelihood of reproductive and marital termination and lead to greater investment in education. Here, I show that the scheduling and occurrence of marital and reproductive behavior (including both initiation and termination), as well as levels of educational attainment and investment, covary with life expectancy, even after controlling for the effects of affluence. In analyses of variation in marital, reproductive, and educational behaviors at two jurisdictional levels in Canada, life expectancy was positively correlated with patterns of age-specific fertility, age at first marriage, divorce, abortion, conferral of high school and higher education degrees (with the exception of the trades) and mean number of years of schooling. The large and highly consistent relationships observed between life expectancy and the behaviors under investigation suggest that these associations may be mediated by individual "perceptions" of life expectancy, though more research is needed before conclusions can be firmly reached.

  19. Marital exogamy in the Aland Islands, Finland, 1750-1949.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relethford, J H; Mielke, J H

    1994-01-01

    Marriage records from 1750 through 1949 were used to examine effects of population size, geographic distance, and temporal change on rates of marital exogamy in the Aland Islands, Finland. Exogamy rates for individuals (not couples) were computed for 15 Aland parishes in each of four 50-year time periods, giving a total of 60 observations. These rates were analysed with respect to population size using a quadratic regression model. Regression analyses were also used to examine the relationship of marital exogamy with two measures of geographic distance--average distance to all other parishes and nearest-neighbour distance. Analysis of variance was used to examine temporal trends. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine all of these factors simultaneously. Marital exogamy is highest in smaller and larger populations, and less in medium-sized populations. Higher exogamy rates in small populations are related to the lack of available mates in small groups. Higher exogamy rates in larger populations may reflect economic attraction of larger groups. Exogamy rates are lower in the more geographically isolated parishes. From 1750 through 1899 there is little change in exogamy rates, whereas exogamy rates double after 1900. This temporal change reflects changes in transportation technology and other cultural factors promoting increased migration. The multiple regression model shows population size, geographic distance, and temporal change are all significant correlates of exogamy, collectively explaining a large percentage of variation in rates (R2 = 0.79).

  20. [Functioning of the marriages applying for marital therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małus, Aleksandra; Konarzewska, Beata; Szulc, Agata; Galińska-Skok, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of functioning of the marriages applying for marital therapy. The research included 44 marriages: 22 of them were qualified for the marital therapy and 22 constituted a control group - were not taking part in therapy. Participants evaluated themselves and their relation using: SCORE-15 (Systematic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation), UMACL (UWIST Mood Adjective Check List), KKM (Marriage Communication Questionnaire). Marriages applying for the therapy, when compared with control group, showed worse general functioning, lower adaptability, more disrupted communication and were overwhelmed by difficulties in higher degree. The lower level of engagement and support, as well as the higher level of depreciating behavior were present in their communication. In this group the lower mood expressed in lower degree of Hedonic Tone and higher degree of Tense Arousal was also recorded. The specific functioning of marriages in crisis applying for the marital therapy is an important indication for the family therapists, in respect to their interventions during therapy process. When working with couples, it is important to consider their difficulties in communication, the tendency to depreciating each other, the lower mood and estimating the therapy as helpful and needful with simultaneous devaluating of their own styles of coping.