WorldWideScience

Sample records for single dna molecules

  1. Nano-manipulation of single DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Shanghai Jiaotong Univ., Shanghai; Lv Junhong; Wang Guohua; Wang Ying; Li Minqian; Zhang Yi; Li Bin; Li Haikuo; An Hongjie

    2004-01-01

    Nano-manipulation of single atoms and molecules is a critical technique in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This review paper will focus on the recent development of the manipulation of single DNA molecules based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Precise manipulation has been realized including varied manipulating modes such as 'cutting', 'pushing', 'folding', 'kneading', 'picking up', 'dipping', etc. The cutting accuracy is dominated by the size of the AFM tip, which is usually 10 nm or less. Single DNA fragments can be cut and picked up and then amplified by single molecule PCR. Thus positioning isolation and sequencing can be performed. (authors)

  2. DNA-psoralen interaction: a single molecule experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, M S; Viana, N B; Mesquita, O N

    2004-11-15

    By attaching one end of a single lambda-DNA molecule to a microscope coverslip and the other end to a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers, we can study the entropic elasticity of the lambda-DNA by measuring force versus extension as we stretch the molecule. This powerful method permits single molecule studies. We are particularly interested in the effects of the photosensitive drug psoralen on the elasticity of the DNA molecule. We have illuminated the sample with different light sources, studying how the different wavelengths affect the psoralen-DNA linkage. To do this, we measure the persistence length of individual DNA-psoralen complexes.

  3. Single Molecule Scanning of DNA Radiation Oxidative Damage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal will develop an assay to map genomic DNA, at the single molecule level and in a nanodevice, for oxidative DNA damage arising from radiation exposure;...

  4. A single molecule DNA flow stretching microscope for undergraduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Kelly; Grafe, Brendan; Burke, Kathryn M.; Tanner, Nathan; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Loparo, Joseph; Price, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a simple, safe, and inexpensive single molecule flow stretching instrument is presented. The instrument uses a low cost upright microscope coupled to a webcam for imaging single DNA molecules that are tethered in an easy to construct microfluidic flow cell. The system requires no

  5. DNA analysis by single molecule stretching in nanofluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, E.; Juarros, A.; Retolaza, A.

    2011-01-01

    Imprint Lithography (NIL) technology combined with a conventional anodic bonding of the silicon base and Pyrex cover. Using this chip, we have performed single molecule imaging on a bench-top fluorescent microscope system. Lambda phage DNA was used as a model sample to characterize the chip. Single molecules of λ-DNA......Stretching single DNA molecules by confinement in nanofluidic channels has attracted a great interest during the last few years as a DNA analysis tool. We have designed and fabricated a sealed micro/nanofluidic device for DNA stretching applications, based on the use of the high throughput Nano...... stained with the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 were stretched in the nanochannel array and the experimental results were analysed to determine the extension factor of the DNA in the chip and the geometrical average of the nanochannel inner diameter. The determination of the extension ratio of the chip provides...

  6. Single-molecule chemical reactions on DNA origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    as templates for building materials with new functional properties. Relatively large nanocomponents such as nanoparticles and biomolecules can also be integrated into DNA nanostructures and imaged. Here, we show that chemical reactions with single molecules can be performed and imaged at a local position...... on a DNA origami scaffold by atomic force microscopy. The high yields and chemoselectivities of successive cleavage and bond-forming reactions observed in these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of post-assembly chemical modification of DNA nanostructures and their potential use as locally......DNA nanotechnology and particularly DNA origami, in which long, single-stranded DNA molecules are folded into predetermined shapes, can be used to form complex self-assembled nanostructures. Although DNA itself has limited chemical, optical or electronic functionality, DNA nanostructures can serve...

  7. Quantifying DNA melting transitions using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, Christopher P; Chen, W-H; Harris, Nolan C; Kiang, C-H; Lin, K-J

    2009-01-01

    We stretched a DNA molecule using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and quantified the mechanical properties associated with B and S forms of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), molten DNA, and single-stranded DNA. We also fit overdamped diffusion models to the AFM time series and used these models to extract additional kinetic information about the system. Our analysis provides additional evidence supporting the view that S-DNA is a stable intermediate encountered during dsDNA melting by mechanical force. In addition, we demonstrated that the estimated diffusion models can detect dynamical signatures of conformational degrees of freedom not directly observed in experiments.

  8. Quantifying DNA melting transitions using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, Christopher P [Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Chen, W-H; Harris, Nolan C; Kiang, C-H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Lin, K-J [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chkiang@rice.edu

    2009-01-21

    We stretched a DNA molecule using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and quantified the mechanical properties associated with B and S forms of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), molten DNA, and single-stranded DNA. We also fit overdamped diffusion models to the AFM time series and used these models to extract additional kinetic information about the system. Our analysis provides additional evidence supporting the view that S-DNA is a stable intermediate encountered during dsDNA melting by mechanical force. In addition, we demonstrated that the estimated diffusion models can detect dynamical signatures of conformational degrees of freedom not directly observed in experiments.

  9. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The

  10. Developing DNA nanotechnology using single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: An important effort in the DNA nanotechnology field is focused on the rational design and manufacture of molecular structures and dynamic devices made of DNA. As is the case for other technologies that deal with manipulation of matter, rational development requires high quality and informative feedback on the building blocks and final products. For DNA nanotechnology such feedback is typically provided by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analytical tools provide excellent structural information; however, usually they do not provide high-resolution dynamic information. For the development of DNA-made dynamic devices such as machines, motors, robots, and computers this constitutes a major problem. Bulk-fluorescence techniques are capable of providing dynamic information, but because only ensemble averaged information is obtained, the technique may not adequately describe the dynamics in the context of complex DNA devices. The single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) technique offers a unique combination of capabilities that make it an excellent tool for guiding the development of DNA-made devices. The technique has been increasingly used in DNA nanotechnology, especially for the analysis of structure, dynamics, integrity, and operation of DNA-made devices; however, its capabilities are not yet sufficiently familiar to the community. The purpose of this Account is to demonstrate how different SMF tools can be utilized for the development of DNA devices and for structural dynamic investigation of biomolecules in general and DNA molecules in particular. Single-molecule diffusion-based Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET/ALEX) and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques are briefly described and demonstrated. To illustrate the many applications of SMF to DNA nanotechnology, examples of SMF studies of DNA hairpins and

  11. Single-molecule mechanics of protein-labelled DNA handles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek S. Jadhav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA handles are often used as spacers and linkers in single-molecule experiments to isolate and tether RNAs, proteins, enzymes and ribozymes, amongst other biomolecules, between surface-modified beads for nanomechanical investigations. Custom DNA handles with varying lengths and chemical end-modifications are readily and reliably synthesized en masse, enabling force spectroscopic measurements with well-defined and long-lasting mechanical characteristics under physiological conditions over a large range of applied forces. Although these chemically tagged DNA handles are widely used, their further individual modification with protein receptors is less common and would allow for additional flexibility in grabbing biomolecules for mechanical measurements. In-depth information on reliable protocols for the synthesis of these DNA–protein hybrids and on their mechanical characteristics under varying physiological conditions are lacking in literature. Here, optical tweezers are used to investigate different protein-labelled DNA handles in a microfluidic environment under different physiological conditions. Digoxigenin (DIG-dsDNA-biotin handles of varying sizes (1000, 3034 and 4056 bp were conjugated with streptavidin or neutravidin proteins. The DIG-modified ends of these hybrids were bound to surface-modified polystyrene (anti-DIG beads. Using different physiological buffers, optical force measurements showed consistent mechanical characteristics with long dissociation times. These protein-modified DNA hybrids were also interconnected in situ with other tethered biotinylated DNA molecules. Electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD imaging control experiments revealed that quantum dot–streptavidin conjugates at the end of DNA handles remain freely accessible. The experiments presented here demonstrate that handles produced with our protein–DNA labelling procedure are excellent candidates for grasping single molecules exposing tags suitable for molecular

  12. Analysis of DNA interactions using single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzefeld, Markus; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Sewald, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in many biochemical pathways and determine the fate of the corresponding cell. Qualitative and quantitative investigations on these recognition and binding processes are of key importance for an improved understanding of biochemical processes and also for systems biology. This review article focusses on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy and its application to the quantification of forces and binding mechanisms that lead to the formation of protein-DNA complexes. AFM and dynamic force spectroscopy are exciting tools that allow for quantitative analysis of biomolecular interactions. Besides an overview on the method and the most important immobilization approaches, the physical basics of the data evaluation is described. Recent applications of AFM-based force spectroscopy to investigate DNA intercalation, complexes involving DNA aptamers and peptide- and protein-DNA interactions are given.

  13. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  14. Single-strand DNA molecule translocation through nanoelectrode gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiongce; Payne, Christina M; Cummings, Peter T; Lee, James W

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the translocation of single-strand DNA through nanoscale electrode gaps under the action of a constant driving force. The application behind this theoretical study is a proposal to use nanoelectrodes as a screening gap as part of a rapid genomic sequencing device. Preliminary results from a series of simulations using various gap widths and driving forces suggest that the narrowest electrode gap that a single-strand DNA can pass is ∼1.5 nm. The minimum force required to initiate the translocation within nanoseconds is ∼0.3 nN. Simulations using DNA segments of various lengths indicate that the minimum initiation force is insensitive to the length of DNA. However, the average threading velocity of DNA varies appreciably from short to long DNA segments. We attribute such variation to the different nature of drag force experienced by the short and long DNA segments in the environment. It is found that DNA molecules deform significantly to fit in the shape of the nanogap during the translocation

  15. Single-molecule denaturation mapping of DNA in nanofluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, Walter; Larsen, Niels Bent; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2010-01-01

    Here we explore the potential power of denaturation mapping as a single-molecule technique. By partially denaturing YOYO (R)-1-labeled DNA in nanofluidic channels with a combination of formamide and local heating, we obtain a sequence-dependent "barcode" corresponding to a series of local dips...... and peaks in the intensity trace along the extended molecule. We demonstrate that this structure arises from the physics of local denaturation: statistical mechanical calculations of sequence-dependent melting probability can predict the barcode to be observed experimentally for a given sequence...

  16. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  17. Single Molecule Study of DNA Organization and Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Botao

    We have studied five projects related to DNA organization and recombination using mainly single molecule force-spectroscopy and statistical tools. First, HU is one of the most abundant DNA-organizing proteins in bacterial chromosomes and participates in gene regulation. We report experiments that study the dependence of DNA condensation by HU on force, salt and HU concentration. A first important result is that at physiological salt levels, HU only bends DNA, resolving a previous paradox of why a chromosome-compacting protein should have a DNA-stiffening function. A second major result is quantitative demonstration of strong dependencies of HU-DNA dissociation on both salt concentration and force. Second, we have used a thermodynamic Maxwell relation to count proteins driven off large DNAs by tension, an effect important to understanding DNA organization. Our results compare well with estimates of numbers of proteins HU and Fis in previous studies. We have also shown that a semi-flexible polymer model describes our HU experimental data well. The force-dependent binding suggests mechano-chemical mechanisms for gene regulation. Third, the elusive role of protein H1 in chromatin has been clarified with purified H1 and Xenopus extracts. We find that H1 compacts DNA by both bending and looping. Addition of H1 enhances chromatin formation and maintains the plasticity of the chromatin. Fourth, the topology and mechanics of DNA twisting are critical to DNA organization and recombination. We have systematically measured DNA extension as a function of linking number density from 0.08 to -2 with holding forces from 0.2 to 2.4 pN. Unlike previous proposals, the DNA extension decreases with negative linking number. Finally, DNA recombination is a dynamic process starting from enzyme-DNA binding. We report that the Int-DBD domain of lambda integrase binds to DNA without compaction at low Int-DBD concentration. High concentration of Int-DBD loops DNA below a threshold force

  18. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  19. [Single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication based on DNA origami].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Fan, Youjie; Li, Bin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate single-molecule detection and characterization of DNA replication. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) as the template of DNA replication was attached to DNA origami by a hybridization reaction based on the complementary base-pairing principle. DNA replication catalyzed by E.coli DNA polymerase I Klenow Fragment (KF) was detected using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The height variations between the ssDNA and the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the distribution of KF during DNA replication and biotin-streptavidin (BA) complexes on the DNA strand after replication were detected. Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to analyze the changes in the DNA after replication. The designed ssDNA could be anchored on the target positions of over 50% of the DNA origami. The KF was capable of binding to the ssDNA fixed on DNA origami and performing its catalytic activities, and was finally dissociated from the DNA after replication. The height of DNA strand increased by about 0.7 nm after replication. The addition of streptavidin also resulted in an DNA height increase to about 4.9 nm due to the formation of BA complexes on the biotinylated dsDNA. The resulting dsDNA and BA complex were subsequently confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The combination of AFM and DNA origami allows detection and characterization of DNA replication at the single molecule level, and this approach provides better insights into the mechanism of DNA polymerase and the factors affecting DNA replication.

  20. Influence of DNA Lesions on Polymerase-Mediated DNA Replication at Single-Molecule Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlon, Hailey L; Romano, Louis J; Rueda, David

    2017-11-20

    Faithful replication of DNA is a critical aspect in maintaining genome integrity. DNA polymerases are responsible for replicating DNA, and high-fidelity polymerases do this rapidly and at low error rates. Upon exposure to exogenous or endogenous substances, DNA can become damaged and this can alter the speed and fidelity of a DNA polymerase. In this instance, DNA polymerases are confronted with an obstacle that can result in genomic instability during replication, for example, by nucleotide misinsertion or replication fork collapse. It is important to know how DNA polymerases respond to damaged DNA substrates to understand the mechanism of mutagenesis and chemical carcinogenesis. Single-molecule techniques have helped to improve our current understanding of DNA polymerase-mediated DNA replication, as they enable the dissection of mechanistic details that can otherwise be lost in ensemble-averaged experiments. These techniques have also been used to gain a deeper understanding of how single DNA polymerases behave at the site of the damage in a DNA substrate. In this review, we evaluate single-molecule studies that have examined the interaction between DNA polymerases and damaged sites on a DNA template.

  1. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging SM advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display6 or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide (PAA) thin film to construct a random SM array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies)7 and analyzed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimeter. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured based on the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and antibody binding profiling, were demonstrated. SMI-Seq enables “library vs. library” screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity. PMID:25252978

  2. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Tommerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free...

  3. Studying DNA looping by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung T; Kim, Harold D

    2014-06-28

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with many important biological processes such as DNA-protein recognition and DNA packaging into nucleosomes. Thermodynamics of dsDNA bending has been studied by a method called cyclization which relies on DNA ligase to covalently join short sticky ends of a dsDNA. However, ligation efficiency can be affected by many factors that are not related to dsDNA looping such as the DNA structure surrounding the joined sticky ends, and ligase can also affect the apparent looping rate through mechanisms such as nonspecific binding. Here, we show how to measure dsDNA looping kinetics without ligase by detecting transient DNA loop formation by FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer). dsDNA molecules are constructed using a simple PCR-based protocol with a FRET pair and a biotin linker. The looping probability density known as the J factor is extracted from the looping rate and the annealing rate between two disconnected sticky ends. By testing two dsDNAs with different intrinsic curvatures, we show that the J factor is sensitive to the intrinsic shape of the dsDNA.

  4. Aligned deposition and electrical measurements on single DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidelshtein, Gennady; Kotlyar, Alexander; Hashemi, Mohtadin; Gurevich, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    A reliable method of deposition of aligned individual dsDNA molecules on mica, silicon, and micro/nanofabricated circuits is presented. Complexes of biotinylated double stranded poly(dG)–poly(dC) DNA with avidin were prepared and deposited on mica and silicon surfaces in the absence of Mg 2+ ions. Due to its positive charge, the avidin attached to one end of the DNA anchors the complex to negatively charged substrates. Subsequent drying with a directional gas flow yields DNA molecules perfectly aligned on the surface. In the avidin–DNA complex only the avidin moiety is strongly and irreversibly bound to the surface, while the DNA counterpart interacts with the substrates much more weakly and can be lifted from the surface and realigned in any direction. Using this technique, avidin–DNA complexes were deposited across platinum electrodes on a silicon substrate. Electrical measurements on the deposited DNA molecules revealed linear IV-characteristics and exponential dependence on relative humidity. (paper)

  5. DNA replication at the single-molecule level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stratmann, S.A.; Oijen, A.M. van

    2014-01-01

    A cell can be thought of as a highly sophisticated micro factory: in a pool of billions of molecules – metabolites, structural proteins, enzymes, oligonucleotides – multi-subunit complexes assemble to perform a large number of basic cellular tasks, such as DNA replication, RNA/protein synthesis or

  6. Injection molded nanofluidic chips: Fabrication method and functional tests using single-molecule DNA experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utko, Pawel; Persson, Karl Fredrik; Kristensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels.......We demonstrate that fabrication of nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of polymers. We functionally test our devices by single-molecule DNA experiments in nanochannels....

  7. Physical manipulation of single-molecule DNA using microbead and its application to analysis of DNA-protein interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We carried out an individual DNA manipulation using an optical trapping for a microbead. This manipulation system is based on a fluorescent microscopy equipped with an IR laser. Both ends of linear DNA molecule were labeled with a biotin and a thiol group, respectively. Then the biotinylated end was attached to a microbead, and the other was immobilized on a thiol-linkable glass surface. We controlled the form of an individual DNA molecule by moving the focal point of IR laser, which trapped the microbead. In addition, we applied single-molecule approach to analyze DNA hydrolysis. We also used microchannel for single-molecule observation of DNA hydrolysis. The shortening of DNA in length caused by enzymatic hydrolysis was observed in real-time. The single-molecule DNA manipulation should contribute to elucidate detailed mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions

  8. DNA origami as biocompatible surface to match single-molecule and ensemble experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments on immobilized molecules allow unique insights into the dynamics of molecular machines and enzymes as well as their interactions. The immobilization, however, can invoke perturbation to the activity of biomolecules causing incongruities between single molecule and ensemble measurements. Here we introduce the recently developed DNA origami as a platform to transfer ensemble assays to the immobilized single molecule level without changing the nano-environment of the biomolecules. The idea is a stepwise transfer of common functional assays first to the surface of a DNA origami, which can be checked at the ensemble level, and then to the microscope glass slide for single-molecule inquiry using the DNA origami as a transfer platform. We studied the structural flexibility of a DNA Holliday junction and the TATA-binding protein (TBP)-induced bending of DNA both on freely diffusing molecules and attached to the origami structure by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This resulted in highly congruent data sets demonstrating that the DNA origami does not influence the functionality of the biomolecule. Single-molecule data collected from surface-immobilized biomolecule-loaded DNA origami are in very good agreement with data from solution measurements supporting the fact that the DNA origami can be used as biocompatible surface in many fluorescence-based measurements. PMID:22523083

  9. Using Synthetic Nanopores for Single-Molecule Analyses: Detecting SNPs, Trapping DNA Molecules, and the Prospects for Sequencing DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on studying properties of DNA molecules and DNA-protein interactions using synthetic nanopores, and it examines the prospects of sequencing DNA using synthetic nanopores. We have developed a method for discriminating between alleles that uses a synthetic nanopore to measure the binding of a restriction enzyme to DNA. There exists…

  10. Sub-ensemble monitoring of DNA strand displacement using multiparameter single-molecule FRET

    OpenAIRE

    Baltierra Jasso, Laura; Morten, Michael; Magennis, Steven William

    2018-01-01

    Non-enzymatic DNA strand displacement is an important mechanism in dynamic DNA nanotechnology. Here we show that the large parameter space that is accessible by single-molecule FRET is ideal for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple reactants and products of DNA strand exchange reactions. We monitored the strand displacement from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at 37 °C; the data were modelled as a second-order reaction approaching equilibrium, with a rate constan...

  11. Thermophoretic forces on DNA measured with a single-molecule spring balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Lüscher, Christopher James; Marie, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    We stretch a single DNA molecule with thermophoretic forces and measure these forces with a spring balance: the DNA molecule itself. It is an entropic spring which we calibrate, using as a benchmark its Brownian motion in the nanochannel that contains and prestretches it. This direct measurement ....... We find the Soret coefficient per unit length of DNA at various ionic strengths. It agrees, with novel precision, with results obtained in bulk for DNA too short to shield itself and with the thermodynamic model of thermophoresis.......We stretch a single DNA molecule with thermophoretic forces and measure these forces with a spring balance: the DNA molecule itself. It is an entropic spring which we calibrate, using as a benchmark its Brownian motion in the nanochannel that contains and prestretches it. This direct measurement...

  12. Studying DNA Looping by Single-Molecule FRET

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Tung T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with many important biological processes such as DNA-protein recognition and DNA packaging into nucleosomes. Thermodynamics of dsDNA bending has been studied by a method called cyclization which relies on DNA ligase to covalently join short sticky ends of a dsDNA. However, ligation efficiency can be affected by many factors that are not related to dsDNA looping such as the DNA structure surrounding the joined sticky ends, and ligase can als...

  13. Single-molecule analysis of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.; Mechali, Marcel

    The recent advent in single-molecule imaging and manipulation methods has made a significant impact on the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying many essential cellular processes. Single-molecule techniques such as electron microscopy and DNA fiber assays have been employed to study the

  14. Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Behavior on a DNA Origami Template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelboe; Rotaru, Alexandru; Arian, Dumitru

    2010-01-01

    DNA origami, the folding of a long single-stranded DNA sequence (scaffold strand) by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides (staple strands) into parallel aligned helices, is a highly efficient method to form advanced self-assembled DNA-architectures. Since molecules and various materials can...... be conjugated to each of the short staple strands, the origami method offers a unique possibility of arranging molecules and materials in well-defined positions on a structured surface. Here we combine the action of light with AFM and DNA nanostructures to study the production of singlet oxygen from a single...... photosensitizer molecule conjugated to a selected DNA origami staple strand on an origami structure. We demonstrate a distance-dependent oxidation of organic moieties incorporated in specific positions on DNA origami by singlet oxygen produced from a single photosensitizer located at the center of each origami....

  15. Nanomechanical DNA origami 'single-molecule beacons' directly imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Sakai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Xu, Yan; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    DNA origami involves the folding of long single-stranded DNA into designed structures with the aid of short staple strands; such structures may enable the development of useful nanomechanical DNA devices. Here we develop versatile sensing systems for a variety of chemical and biological targets at molecular resolution. We have designed functional nanomechanical DNA origami devices that can be used as 'single-molecule beacons', and function as pinching devices. Using 'DNA origami pliers' and 'DNA origami forceps', which consist of two levers ~170 nm long connected at a fulcrum, various single-molecule inorganic and organic targets ranging from metal ions to proteins can be visually detected using atomic force microscopy by a shape transition of the origami devices. Any detection mechanism suitable for the target of interest, pinching, zipping or unzipping, can be chosen and used orthogonally with differently shaped origami devices in the same mixture using a single platform. PMID:21863016

  16. A Single-Molecule Barcoding System using Nanoslits for DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kyubong; Schramm, Timothy M.; Schwartz, David C.

    Single DNA molecule approaches are playing an increasingly central role in the analytical genomic sciences because single molecule techniques intrinsically provide individualized measurements of selected molecules, free from the constraints of bulk techniques, which blindly average noise and mask the presence of minor analyte components. Accordingly, a principal challenge that must be addressed by all single molecule approaches aimed at genome analysis is how to immobilize and manipulate DNA molecules for measurements that foster construction of large, biologically relevant data sets. For meeting this challenge, this chapter discusses an integrated approach for microfabricated and nanofabricated devices for the manipulation of elongated DNA molecules within nanoscale geometries. Ideally, large DNA coils stretch via nanoconfinement when channel dimensions are within tens of nanometers. Importantly, stretched, often immobilized, DNA molecules spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs are required by all analytical platforms working with large genomic substrates because imaging techniques acquire sequence information from molecules that normally exist in free solution as unrevealing random coils resembling floppy balls of yarn. However, nanoscale devices fabricated with sufficiently small dimensions fostering molecular stretching make these devices impractical because of the requirement of exotic fabrication technologies, costly materials, and poor operational efficiencies. In this chapter, such problems are addressed by discussion of a new approach to DNA presentation and analysis that establishes scaleable nanoconfinement conditions through reduction of ionic strength; stiffening DNA molecules thus enabling their arraying for analysis using easily fabricated devices that can also be mass produced. This new approach to DNA nanoconfinement is complemented by the development of a novel labeling scheme for reliable marking of individual molecules with fluorochrome labels

  17. The elastic theory of a single DNA molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    methods and Monte Carlo simulations to understand the entropic elasticity, ... DNA; elastic theory; stacking interaction; supercoiling; hairpin-coil transition. .... the probability distribution of t and ϕ along the DNA chain [14,15], is governed by.

  18. Single DNA molecules as probes for interrogating silica surfaces after various chemical treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xia; Wu Zhan; Nie Huagui; Liu Ziling; He Yan; Yeung, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the adsorption of single YOYO-1-labeled λ-DNA molecules at glass surfaces after treatment with various chemical cleaning methods by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The characteristics of these surfaces were further assessed using contact angle (CA) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By recording the real-time dynamic motion of DNA molecules at the liquid/solid interface, subtle differences in adsorption affinities were revealed. The results indicate that the driving force for adsorption of DNA molecules on glass surfaces is mainly hydrophobic interaction. We also found that surface topography plays a role in the adsorption dynamics

  19. One-by-one single-molecule detection of mutated nucleobases by monitoring tunneling current using a DNA tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Phuc Tan; Nishino, Tomoaki; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-31

    A DNA molecule was utilized as a probe tip to achieve single-molecule genetic diagnoses. Hybridization of the probe and target DNAs resulted in electron tunneling along the emergent double-stranded DNA. Simple stationary monitoring of the tunneling current leads to single-molecule DNA detection and discovery of base mismatches and methylation.

  20. Real-time single-molecule observation of rolling-circle DNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Hamdan, Samir M.; Jergic, Slobodan; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple technique for visualizing replication of individual DNA molecules in real time. By attaching a rolling-circle substrate to a TIRF microscope-mounted flow chamber, we are able to monitor the progression of single-DNA synthesis events and accurately measure rates and processivities

  1. Probing the Conformational Landscape of DNA Polymerases Using Diffusion-Based Single-Molecule FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohlbein, J.; Kapanidis, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring conformational changes in DNA polymerases using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) has provided new tools for studying fidelity-related mechanisms that promote the rejection of incorrect nucleotides before DNA synthesis. In addition to the previously known open

  2. See me, feel me: methods to concurrently visualize and manipulate single DNA molecules and associated proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mameren, J.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Direct visualization of DNA and proteins allows researchers to investigate DNA-protein interactions with great detail. Much progress has been made in this area as a result of increasingly sensitive single-molecule fluorescence techniques. At the same time, methods that control the conformation of

  3. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun

    2018-01-17

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I-V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed.

  4. DNA-Based Single-Molecule Electronics: From Concept to Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Beyond being the repository of genetic information, DNA is playing an increasingly important role as a building block for molecular electronics. Its inherent structural and molecular recognition properties render it a leading candidate for molecular electronics applications. The structural stability, diversity and programmability of DNA provide overwhelming freedom for the design and fabrication of molecular-scale devices. In the past two decades DNA has therefore attracted inordinate amounts of attention in molecular electronics. This review gives a brief survey of recent experimental progress in DNA-based single-molecule electronics with special focus on single-molecule conductance and I–V characteristics of individual DNA molecules. Existing challenges and exciting future opportunities are also discussed. PMID:29342091

  5. Nanofabricated racks of aligned and anchored DNA substrates for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jason; Fazio, Teresa; Wang, Feng; Wind, Shalom; Greene, Eric C

    2010-01-19

    Single-molecule studies of biological macromolecules can benefit from new experimental platforms that facilitate experimental design and data acquisition. Here we develop new strategies to construct curtains of DNA in which the molecules are aligned with respect to one another and maintained in an extended configuration by anchoring both ends of the DNA to the surface of a microfluidic sample chamber that is otherwise coated with an inert lipid bilayer. This "double-tethered" DNA substrate configuration is established through the use of nanofabricated rack patterns comprised of two distinct functional elements: linear barriers to lipid diffusion that align DNA molecules anchored by one end to the bilayer and antibody-coated pentagons that provide immobile anchor points for the opposite ends of the DNA. These devices enable the alignment and anchoring of thousands of individual DNA molecules, which can then be visualized using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy under conditions that do not require continuous application of buffer flow to stretch the DNA. This unique strategy offers the potential for studying protein-DNA interactions on large DNA substrates without compromising measurements through application of hydrodynamic force. We provide a proof-of-principle demonstration that double-tethered DNA curtains made with nanofabricated rack patterns can be used in a one-dimensional diffusion assay that monitors the motion of quantum dot-tagged proteins along DNA.

  6. Electrochemical single-molecule conductivity of duplex and quadruplex DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Photoinduced and electrochemical charge transport in DNA (oligonucleotides, OGNs) and the notions “hopping”, superexchange, polaron, and vibrationally gated charge transport have been in focus over more than two decades. In recent years mapping of electrochemical charge transport of pure and redo...

  7. CdS nanowires formed by chemical synthesis using conjugated single-stranded DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, S. N.; Sahu, S. N.; Nozaki, S.

    2018-03-01

    CdS nanowires were successfully grown by chemical synthesis using two conjugated single-stranded (ss) DNA molecules, poly G (30) and poly C (30), as templates. During the early stage of the synthesis with the DNA molecules, the Cd 2+ interacts with Poly G and Poly C and produces the (Cd 2+)-Poly GC complex. As the growth proceeds, it results in nanowires. The structural analysis by grazing angle x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the zinc-blende CdS nanowires with the growth direction of . Although the nanowires are well surface-passivated with the DNA molecules, the photoluminescence quenching was caused by the electron transfer from the nanowires to the DNA molecules. The quenching can be used to detect and label the DNAs.

  8. Sub-Ensemble Monitoring of DNA Strand Displacement Using Multiparameter Single-Molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltierra-Jasso, Laura E; Morten, Michael J; Magennis, Steven W

    2018-03-05

    Non-enzymatic DNA strand displacement is an important mechanism in dynamic DNA nanotechnology. Here, we show that the large parameter space that is accessible by single-molecule FRET is ideal for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple reactants and products of DNA strand exchange reactions. We monitored the strand displacement from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at 37 °C; the data were modelled as a second-order reaction approaching equilibrium, with a rate constant of 10 m -1  s -1 . We also followed the displacement from a DNA three-way junction (3WJ) by ssDNA. The presence of three internal mismatched bases in the middle of the invading strand did not prevent displacement from the 3WJ, but reduced the second-order rate constant by about 50 %. We attribute strand exchange in the dsDNA and 3WJ to a zero-toehold pathway from the blunt-ended duplex arms. The single-molecule approach demonstrated here will be useful for studying complex DNA networks. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Discrimination among individual Watson–Crick base pairs at the termini of single DNA hairpin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah A.; Winters-Hilt, Stephen; DeGuzman, Veronica S.; Deamer, David; Ridino, Sam E.; Rodgers, Joseph T.; Olsen, Hugh E.; Marziali, Andre; Akeson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Nanoscale α-hemolysin pores can be used to analyze individual DNA or RNA molecules. Serial examination of hundreds to thousands of molecules per minute is possible using ionic current impedance as the measured property. In a recent report, we showed that a nanopore device coupled with machine learning algorithms could automatically discriminate among the four combinations of Watson–Crick base pairs and their orientations at the ends of individual DNA hairpin molecules. Here we use kinetic analysis to demonstrate that ionic current signatures caused by these hairpin molecules depend on the number of hydrogen bonds within the terminal base pair, stacking between the terminal base pair and its nearest neighbor, and 5′ versus 3′ orientation of the terminal bases independent of their nearest neighbors. This report constitutes evidence that single Watson–Crick base pairs can be identified within individual unmodified DNA hairpin molecules based on their dynamic behavior in a nanoscale pore. PMID:12582251

  10. Nanochannel Device with Embedded Nanopore: a New Approach for Single-Molecule DNA Analysis and Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuning; Reisner, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Nanopore and nanochannel based devices are robust methods for biomolecular sensing and single DNA manipulation. Nanopore-based DNA sensing has attractive features that make it a leading candidate as a single-molecule DNA sequencing technology. Nanochannel based extension of DNA, combined with enzymatic or denaturation-based barcoding schemes, is already a powerful approach for genome analysis. We believe that there is revolutionary potential in devices that combine nanochannels with embedded pore detectors. In particular, due to the fast translocation of a DNA molecule through a standard nanopore configuration, there is an unfavorable trade-off between signal and sequence resolution. With a combined nanochannel-nanopore device, based on embedding a pore inside a nanochannel, we can in principle gain independent control over both DNA translocation speed and sensing signal, solving the key draw-back of the standard nanopore configuration. We demonstrate that we can optically detect successful translocation of DNA from the nanochannel out through the nanopore, a possible method to 'select' a given barcode for further analysis. In particular, we show that in equilibrium DNA will not escape through an embedded sub-persistence length nanopore, suggesting that the pore could be used as a nanoscale window through which to interrogate a nanochannel extended DNA molecule. Furthermore, electrical measurements through the nanopore are performed, indicating that DNA sensing is feasible using the nanochannel-nanopore device.

  11. Biophysics of DNA-Protein Interactions From Single Molecules to Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a concise overview of current research on the biophysics of DNA-protein interactions. A wide range of new and classical methods are presented by authors investigating physical mechanisms by which proteins interact with DNA. For example, several chapters address the mechanisms by which proteins search for and recognize specific binding sites on DNA, a process critical for cellular function. Single molecule methods such as force spectroscopy as well as fluorescence imaging and tracking are described in these chapters as well as other parts of the book that address the dynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Other important topics include the mechanisms by which proteins engage DNA sequences and/or alter DNA structure. These simple but important model interactions are then placed in the broader biological context with discussion of larger protein-DNA complexes . Topics include replication forks, recombination complexes, DNA repair interactions, and ultimately, methods to understand the chromatin...

  12. Preparation, Single-Molecule Manipulation, and Energy Transfer Investigation of a Polyfluorene-graft-DNA polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Mikael; Christensen, Rasmus S; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart; Bakke, Mette R; Riber, Camilla F; Nielsen, Karina S; Zelikin, Alexander N; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2017-08-04

    Conjugated polymers have been intensively studied due to their unique optical and electronic properties combined with their physical flexibility and scalable bottom up synthesis. Although the bulk qualities of conjugated polymers have been extensively utilized in research and industry, the ability to handle and manipulate conjugated polymers at the nanoscale lacks significantly behind. Here, the toolbox for controlled manipulation of conjugated polymers was expanded through the synthesis of a polyfluorene-DNA graft-type polymer (poly(F-DNA)). The polymer possesses the characteristics associated with the conjugated polyfluorene backbone, but the protruding single-stranded DNA provides the material with an exceptional addressability. This study demonstrates controlled single-molecule patterning of poly(F-DNA), as well as energy transfer between two different polymer-DNA conjugates. Finally, highly efficient DNA-directed quenching of polyfluorene fluorescence was shown. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. DNA-cisplatin binding mechanism peculiarities studied with single molecule stretching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafuli, F. A. P.; Cesconetto, E. C.; Ramos, E. B.; Rocha, M. S.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the DNA-cisplatin binding mechanism peculiarities by monitoring the mechanical properties of these complexes. To accomplish this task, we have performed single molecule stretching experiments by using optical tweezers, from which the persistence and contour lengths of the complexes can be promptly measured. The persistence length of the complexes as a function of the drug total concentration in the sample was used to deduce the binding data, from which we show that cisplatin binds cooperatively to the DNA molecule, a point which so far has not been stressed in binding equilibrium studies of this ligand.

  14. DNA Origami Directed Au Nanostar Dimers for Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Swati; Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Sen, Tapasi

    2017-12-06

    We demonstrate the synthesis of Au nanostar dimers with tunable interparticle gap and controlled stoichiometry assembled on DNA origami. Au nanostars with uniform and sharp tips were immobilized on rectangular DNA origami dimerized structures to create nanoantennas containing monomeric and dimeric Au nanostars. Single Texas red (TR) dye was specifically attached in the junction of the dimerized origami to act as a Raman reporter molecule. The SERS enhancement factors of single TR dye molecules located in the conjunction region in dimer structures having interparticle gaps of 7 and 13 nm are 2 × 10 10 and 8 × 10 9 , respectively, which are strong enough for single analyte detection. The highly enhanced electromagnetic field generated by the plasmon coupling between sharp tips and cores of two Au nanostars in the wide conjunction region allows the accommodation and specific detection of large biomolecules. Such DNA-directed assembled nanoantennas with controlled interparticle separation distance and stoichiometry, and well-defined geometry, can be used as excellent substrates in single-molecule SERS spectroscopy and will have potential applications as a reproducible platform in single-molecule sensing.

  15. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayed, F.; Mashaghi, A.; Tans, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an

  16. Packaging of single DNA molecules by the yeast mitochondrial protein Abf2p: reinterpretation of recent single molecule experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, Dirk

    2004-07-01

    Brewer et al. (Biophys. J. 85 (2003) 2519-2524) have studied the compaction of dsDNA in a double flow cell by observing the extension of stained DNA tethered in buffer solutions with or without Abf2p. They use a Langmuir adsorption model in which one Abf2p molecule adsorbs on one site on the DNA, and the binding constant, K, is given as the ratio of the experimental rates of adsorption and desorption. This paper presents an improved interpretation. Instead of Langmuir adsorption we use the more appropriate McGhee-von Hippel (J. Mol. Biol. 86 (1974) 469-489) theory for the adsorption of large ligands to a one-dimensional lattice. We assume that each adsorbed molecule shortens the effective contour length of DNA by the foot print of Abf2p of 27 base pairs. When Abf2p adsorbs to DNA stretched in the flowing buffer solution, we account for a tension effect that decreases the adsorption rate and the binding constant by a factor of 2 to 4. The data suggest that the accessibility to Abf2p decreases significantly with increasing compaction of DNA, resulting in a lower adsorption rate and a lower binding constant. The kinetics reported by Brewer et al. (Biophys. J. 85 (2003) 2519-2524) lead to a binding constant K=3.6 x 10(6) M(-1) at the beginning, and to K=5 x 10(5) M(-1) near the end of a compaction run, more than an order of magnitude lower than the value K=2.57 x 10(7) M(-1) calculated by Brewer et al. (Biophys. J. 85 (2003) 2519-2524).

  17. Mapping Nanoscale Hotspots with Single-Molecule Emitters Assembled into Plasmonic Nanocavities Using DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Turek, V. A.; Kongsuwan, Nuttawut; Benz, Felix; Carnegie, Cloudy; van de Goor, Tim; de Nijs, Bart; Demetriadou, Angela; Hess, Ortwin; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2018-01-01

    Fabricating nanocavities in which optically-active single quantum emitters are precisely positioned, is crucial for building nanophotonic devices. Here we show that self-assembly based on robust DNA-origami constructs can precisely position single molecules laterally within sub-5nm gaps between plasmonic substrates that support intense optical confinement. By placing single-molecules at the center of a nanocavity, we show modification of the plasmon cavity resonance before and after bleaching the chromophore, and obtain enhancements of $\\geq4\\times10^3$ with high quantum yield ($\\geq50$%). By varying the lateral position of the molecule in the gap, we directly map the spatial profile of the local density of optical states with a resolution of $\\pm1.5$ nm. Our approach introduces a straightforward non-invasive way to measure and quantify confined optical modes on the nanoscale.

  18. Mapping Nanoscale Hotspots with Single-Molecule Emitters Assembled into Plasmonic Nanocavities Using DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Turek, V A; Kongsuwan, Nuttawut; Benz, Felix; Carnegie, Cloudy; van de Goor, Tim; de Nijs, Bart; Demetriadou, Angela; Hess, Ortwin; Keyser, Ulrich F; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2018-01-10

    Fabricating nanocavities in which optically active single quantum emitters are precisely positioned is crucial for building nanophotonic devices. Here we show that self-assembly based on robust DNA-origami constructs can precisely position single molecules laterally within sub-5 nm gaps between plasmonic substrates that support intense optical confinement. By placing single-molecules at the center of a nanocavity, we show modification of the plasmon cavity resonance before and after bleaching the chromophore and obtain enhancements of ≥4 × 10 3 with high quantum yield (≥50%). By varying the lateral position of the molecule in the gap, we directly map the spatial profile of the local density of optical states with a resolution of ±1.5 nm. Our approach introduces a straightforward noninvasive way to measure and quantify confined optical modes on the nanoscale.

  19. DNA origami-based shape IDs for single-molecule nanomechanical genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honglu; Chao, Jie; Pan, Dun; Liu, Huajie; Qiang, Yu; Liu, Ke; Cui, Chengjun; Chen, Jianhua; Huang, Qing; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yongyong; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-04-01

    Variations on DNA sequences profoundly affect how we develop diseases and respond to pathogens and drugs. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a nanomechanical imaging approach for genetic analysis with nanometre resolution. However, unlike fluorescence imaging that has wavelength-specific fluorophores, the lack of shape-specific labels largely hampers widespread applications of AFM imaging. Here we report the development of a set of differentially shaped, highly hybridizable self-assembled DNA origami nanostructures serving as shape IDs for magnified nanomechanical imaging of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Using these origami shape IDs, we directly genotype single molecules of human genomic DNA with an ultrahigh resolution of ~10 nm and the multiplexing ability. Further, we determine three types of disease-associated, long-range haplotypes in samples from the Han Chinese population. Single-molecule analysis allows robust haplotyping even for samples with low labelling efficiency. We expect this generic shape ID-based nanomechanical approach to hold great potential in genetic analysis at the single-molecule level.

  20. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA-barcoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M

    2014-11-27

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing, high-throughput protein analyses are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule protein detection using optical methods is limited by the number of spectrally non-overlapping chromophores. Here we introduce a single-molecular-interaction sequencing (SMI-seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging single-molecule advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide thin film to construct a random single-molecule array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies) and analysed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimetre. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured on the basis of the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor and antibody-binding profiling, are demonstrated. SMI-seq enables 'library versus library' screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity.

  1. Single-molecule studies of DNA transcription using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billingsley, Daniel J; Crampton, Neal; Thomson, Neil H; Bonass, William A; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can detect single biomacromolecules with a high signal-to-noise ratio on atomically flat biocompatible support surfaces, such as mica. Contrast arises from the innate forces and therefore AFM does not require imaging contrast agents, leading to sample preparation that is relatively straightforward. The ability of AFM to operate in hydrated environments, including humid air and aqueous buffers, allows structure and function of biological and biomolecular systems to be retained. These traits of the AFM are ensuring that it is being increasingly used to study deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) structure and DNA–protein interactions down to the secondary structure level. This report focuses in particular on reviewing the applications of AFM to the study of DNA transcription in reductionist single-molecule bottom-up approaches. The technique has allowed new insights into the interactions between ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase to be gained and enabled quantification of some aspects of the transcription process, such as promoter location, DNA wrapping and elongation. More recently, the trend is towards studying the interactions of more than one enzyme operating on a single DNA template. These methods begin to reveal the mechanics of gene expression at the single-molecule level and will enable us to gain greater understanding of how the genome is transcribed and translated into the proteome. (topical review)

  2. Highly Accurate Classification of Watson-Crick Basepairs on Termini of Single DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Vercoutere, Wenonah; DeGuzman, Veronica S.; Deamer, David; Akeson, Mark; Haussler, David

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a computational method for classification of individual DNA molecules measured by an α-hemolysin channel detector. We show classification with better than 99% accuracy for DNA hairpin molecules that differ only in their terminal Watson-Crick basepairs. Signal classification was done in silico to establish performance metrics (i.e., where train and test data were of known type, via single-species data files). It was then performed in solution to assay real mixtures of DNA hairpins. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) were used with Expectation/Maximization for denoising and for associating a feature vector with the ionic current blockade of the DNA molecule. Support Vector Machines (SVMs) were used as discriminators, and were the focus of off-line training. A multiclass SVM architecture was designed to place less discriminatory load on weaker discriminators, and novel SVM kernels were used to boost discrimination strength. The tuning on HMMs and SVMs enabled biophysical analysis of the captured molecule states and state transitions; structure revealed in the biophysical analysis was used for better feature selection. PMID:12547778

  3. Pulsed IR Heating Studies of Single-Molecule DNA Duplex Dissociation Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful technique that makes it possible to observe the conformational dynamics associated with biomolecular processes. The addition of precise temperature control to these experiments can yield valuable thermodynamic information about equilibrium and kinetic rate constants. To accomplish this, we have developed a microscopy technique based on infrared laser overtone/combination band absorption to heat small (≈10−11 liter) volumes of water. Detailed experimental characterization of this technique reveals three major advantages over conventional stage heating methods: 1), a larger range of steady-state temperatures (20–100°C); 2), substantially superior spatial (≤20 μm) control; and 3), substantially superior temporal (≈1 ms) control. The flexibility and breadth of this spatial and temporally resolved laser-heating approach is demonstrated in single-molecule fluorescence assays designed to probe the dissociation of a 21 bp DNA duplex. These studies are used to support a kinetic model based on nucleic acid end fraying that describes dissociation for both short (10 bp) DNA duplexes. These measurements have been extended to explore temperature-dependent kinetics for the 21 bp construct, which permit determination of single-molecule activation enthalpies and entropies for DNA duplex dissociation. PMID:24411254

  4. Digital quantification of rolling circle amplified single DNA molecules in a resistive pulse sensing nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnemund, M; Nilsson, M

    2015-05-15

    Novel portable, sensitive and selective DNA sensor methods for bio-sensing applications are required that can rival conventionally used non-portable and expensive fluorescence-based sensors. In this paper, rolling circle amplification (RCA) products are detected in solution and on magnetic particles using a resistive pulse sensing (RPS) nanopore. Low amounts of DNA molecules are detected by padlock probes which are circularized in a strictly target dependent ligation reaction. The DNA-padlock probe-complex is captured on magnetic particles by sequence specific capture oligonucleotides and amplified by a short RCA. Subsequent RPS analysis is used to identify individual particles with single attached RCA products from blank particles. This proof of concept opens up for a novel non-fluorescent digital DNA quantification method that can have many applications in bio-sensing and diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic Transport in Single-Stranded DNA Molecule Related to Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Silva, R. N. O.; Madeira, M. P.; Frazão, N. F.; Sousa, J. O.; Macedo-Filho, A.

    2018-04-01

    We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in single chain DNA molecule consisting of 182 nucleotides. The DNA chains studied were extracted from a segment of the human chromosome 4p16.3, which were modified by expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats to mimics Huntington's disease. The mutated DNA chains were connected between two platinum electrodes to analyze the relationship between charge propagation in the molecule and Huntington's disease. The computations were performed within a tight-binding model, together with a transfer matrix technique, to investigate the current-voltage (I-V) of 23 types of DNA sequence and compare them with the distributions of the related CAG repeat numbers with the disease. All DNA sequences studied have a characteristic behavior of a semiconductor. In addition, the results showed a direct correlation between the current-voltage curves and the distributions of the CAG repeat numbers, suggesting possible applications in the development of DNA-based biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  6. Droplet Microfluidics Approach for Single-DNA Molecule Amplification and Condensation into DNA-Magnesium-Pyrophosphate Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Zubaite

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein expression in vitro has broad applications in directed evolution, synthetic biology, proteomics and drug screening. However, most of the in vitro expression systems rely on relatively high DNA template concentrations to obtain sufficient amounts of proteins, making it harder to perform in vitro screens on gene libraries. Here, we report a technique for the generation of condensed DNA particles that can serve as efficient templates for in vitro gene expression. We apply droplet microfluidics to encapsulate single-DNA molecules in 3-picoliter (pL volume droplets and convert them into 1 μm-sized DNA particles by the multiple displacement amplification reaction driven by phi29 DNA polymerase. In the presence of magnesium ions and inorganic pyrophosphate, the amplified DNA condensed into the crystalline-like particles, making it possible to purify them from the reaction mix by simple centrifugation. Using purified DNA particles, we performed an in vitro transcription-translation reaction and successfully expressed complex enzyme β-galactosidase in droplets and in the 384-well format. The yield of protein obtained from DNA particles was significantly higher than from the corresponding amount of free DNA templates, thus opening new possibilities for high throughput screening applications.

  7. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels.

  8. The Conformational Dynamics of Cas9 Governing DNA Cleavage Are Revealed by Single-Molecule FRET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyi Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Off-target binding and cleavage by Cas9 pose major challenges in its application. How the conformational dynamics of Cas9 govern its nuclease activity under on- and off-target conditions remains largely unknown. Here, using intra-molecular single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements, we revealed that Cas9 in apo, sgRNA-bound, and dsDNA/sgRNA-bound forms spontaneously transits among three major conformational states, mainly reflecting significant conformational mobility of the catalytic HNH domain. We also uncovered surprising long-range allosteric communication between the HNH domain and the RNA/DNA heteroduplex at the PAM-distal end to ensure correct positioning of the catalytic site, which demonstrated that a unique proofreading mechanism served as the last checkpoint before DNA cleavage. Several Cas9 residues were likely to mediate the allosteric communication and proofreading step. Modulating interactions between Cas9 and heteroduplex at the PAM-distal end by introducing mutations on these sites provides an alternative route to improve and optimize the CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox. : Yang et al. revealed significant conformational dynamics of Cas9 at global and local scales using single-molecule FRET. They uncovered surprising long-range allosteric communication between the HNH nuclease domain and the RNA/DNA heteroduplex at the PAM-distal end that serves as a proofreading checkpoint to govern the nuclease activity and specificity of Cas9. Keywords: CRISPR, Cas9, single-molecule, FRET, conformational dynamics, proofreading, off-target, allosteric communication, genome editing

  9. Packaging of single DNA molecules by the yeast mitochondrial protein Abf2p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Laurence R; Friddle, Raymond; Noy, Aleksandr; Baldwin, Enoch; Martin, Shelley S; Corzett, Michele; Balhorn, Rod; Baskin, Ronald J

    2003-10-01

    Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are packaged by proteins in a very different manner. Although protein-DNA complexes called "nucleoids" have been identified as the genetic units of mitochondrial inheritance in yeast and man, little is known about their physical structure. The yeast mitochondrial protein Abf2p was shown to be sufficient to compact linear dsDNA, without the benefit of supercoiling, using optical and atomic force microscopy single molecule techniques. The packaging of DNA by Abf2p was observed to be very weak as evidenced by a fast Abf2p off-rate (k(off) = 0.014 +/- 0.001 s(-1)) and the extremely small forces (<0.6 pN) stabilizing the condensed protein-DNA complex. Atomic force microscopy images of individual complexes showed the 190-nm structures are loosely packaged relative to nuclear chromatin. This organization may leave mtDNA accessible for transcription and replication, while making it more vulnerable to damage.

  10. Single-Molecule Tethered Particle Motion: Stepwise Analyses of Site-Specific DNA Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Fang Fan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tethered particle motion/microscopy (TPM is a biophysical tool used to analyze changes in the effective length of a polymer, tethered at one end, under changing conditions. The tether length is measured indirectly by recording the Brownian motion amplitude of a bead attached to the other end. In the biological realm, DNA, whose interactions with proteins are often accompanied by apparent or real changes in length, has almost exclusively been the subject of TPM studies. TPM has been employed to study DNA bending, looping and wrapping, DNA compaction, high-order DNA–protein assembly, and protein translocation along DNA. Our TPM analyses have focused on tyrosine and serine site-specific recombinases. Their pre-chemical interactions with DNA cause reversible changes in DNA length, detectable by TPM. The chemical steps of recombination, depending on the substrate and the type of recombinase, may result in a permanent length change. Single molecule TPM time traces provide thermodynamic and kinetic information on each step of the recombination pathway. They reveal how mechanistically related recombinases may differ in their early commitment to recombination, reversibility of individual steps, and in the rate-limiting step of the reaction. They shed light on the pre-chemical roles of catalytic residues, and on the mechanisms by which accessory proteins regulate recombination directionality.

  11. Nanofluidic single-molecule sorting of DNA: a new concept in separation and analysis of biomolecules towards ultimate level performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Separation and separation-based analysis of biomolecules are fundamentally important techniques in the field of biotechnology. These techniques, however, depend on stochastic processes that intrinsically involve uncertainty, and thus it is not possible to achieve 100% separation accuracy. Theoretically, the ultimate resolution and sensitivity should be realized in a single-molecule system because of the deterministic nature of single-molecule manipulation. Here, we have proposed and experimentally demonstrated the concept of a 'single-molecule sorter' that detects and correctly identifies individual single molecules, realizing the ultimate level of resolution and sensitivity for any separation-based technology. The single-molecule sorter was created using a nanofluidic network consisting of a single inlet channel that branches off into multiple outlet channels. It includes two major functional elements, namely a single-molecule detection and identification element and a flow path switching element to accurately separate single molecules. With this system we have successfully demonstrated the world's first single-molecule sorting using DNA as a sample molecule. In the future, we hope to expand the application of such devices to comprehensive sorting of single-proteins from a single cell. We also believe that in addition to the single-molecule sorting method reported here, other types of single-molecule based processes will emerge and find use in a wide variety of applications.

  12. Single-cell multiple gene expression analysis based on single-molecule-detection microarray assay for multi-DNA determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Xianwei [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Xiaoli [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Jinxing [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin, Wenrui, E-mail: jwr@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-01-07

    Highlights: • A single-molecule-detection (SMD) microarray for 10 samples is fabricated. • The based-SMD microarray assay (SMA) can determine 8 DNAs for each sample. • The limit of detection of SMA is as low as 1.3 × 10{sup −16} mol L{sup −1}. • The SMA can be applied in single-cell multiple gene expression analysis. - Abstract: We report a novel ultra-sensitive and high-selective single-molecule-detection microarray assay (SMA) for multiple DNA determination. In the SMA, a capture DNA (DNAc) microarray consisting of 10 subarrays with 9 spots for each subarray is fabricated on a silanized glass coverslip as the substrate. On the subarrays, the spot-to-spot spacing is 500 μm and each spot has a diameter of ∼300 μm. The sequence of the DNAcs on the 9 spots of a subarray is different, to determine 8 types of target DNAs (DNAts). Thus, 8 types of DNAts are captured to their complementary DNAcs at 8 spots of a subarray, respectively, and then labeled with quantum dots (QDs) attached to 8 types of detection DNAs (DNAds) with different sequences. The ninth spot is used to detect the blank value. In order to determine the same 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples, the 10 DNAc-modified subarrays on the microarray are identical. Fluorescence single-molecule images of the QD-labeled DNAts on each spot of the subarray are acquired using a home-made single-molecule microarray reader. The amounts of the DNAts are quantified by counting the bright dots from the QDs. For a microarray, 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples can be quantified in parallel. The limit of detection of the SMA for DNA determination is as low as 1.3 × 10{sup −16} mol L{sup −1}. The SMA for multi-DNA determination can also be applied in single-cell multiple gene expression analysis through quantification of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) corresponding to multiple messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in single cells. To do so, total RNA in single cells is extracted and reversely transcribed into their cDNAs. Three

  13. Towards observing the encounter of the T7 DNA replication fork with a lesion site at the Single molecule level

    KAUST Repository

    Shirbini, Afnan

    2017-01-01

    and established the T7 leading strand synthesis at the single molecule level. I also optimized various control experiments to remove any interference from the nonspecific interactions of the DNA with the surface. My work established the foundation to image

  14. Enrichment of megabase-sized DNA molecules for single-molecule optical mapping and next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Łopacińska-Jørgensen, Joanna M; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Bak, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has caused a revolution, yet left a gap: long-range genetic information from native, non-amplified DNA fragments is unavailable. It might be obtained by optical mapping of megabase-sized DNA molecules. Frequently only a specific genomic region is of interest, so......-megabase- to megabase-sized DNA molecules were recovered from the gel and analysed by denaturation-renaturation optical mapping. Size-selected molecules from the same gel were sequenced by NGS. The optically mapped molecules and the NGS reads showed enrichment from regions defined by NotI restriction sites. We...... demonstrate that the unannotated genome can be characterized in a locus-specific manner via molecules partially overlapping with the annotated genome. The method is a promising tool for investigation of structural variants in enriched human genomic regions for both research and diagnostic purposes. Our...

  15. Enrichment of megabase-sized DNA molecules for single-molecule optical mapping and next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Łopacińska-Jørgensen, Joanna M; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Bak, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has caused a revolution, yet left a gap: long-range genetic information from native, non-amplified DNA fragments is unavailable. It might be obtained by optical mapping of megabase-sized DNA molecules. Frequently only a specific genomic region is of interest, so...

  16. Single-molecule analysis reveals the kinetics and physiological relevance of MutL-ssDNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghyun Park

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA binding by MutL homologs (MLH/PMS during mismatch repair (MMR has been considered based on biochemical and genetic studies. Bulk studies with MutL and its yeast homologs Mlh1-Pms1 have suggested an integral role for a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA binding activity during MMR. We have developed single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET and a single-molecule DNA flow-extension assays to examine MutL interaction with ssDNA in real time. The smFRET assay allowed us to observe MutL-ssDNA association and dissociation. We determined that MutL-ssDNA binding required ATP and was the greatest at ionic strength below 25 mM (K(D = 29 nM while it dramatically decreases above 100 mM (K(D>2 µM. Single-molecule DNA flow-extension analysis suggests that multiple MutL proteins may bind ssDNA at low ionic strength but this activity does not enhance stability at elevated ionic strengths. These studies are consistent with the conclusion that a stable MutL-ssDNA interaction is unlikely to occur at physiological salt eliminating a number of MMR models. However, the activity may infer some related dynamic DNA transaction process during MMR.

  17. The Conformational Dynamics of Cas9 Governing DNA Cleavage Are Revealed by Single-Molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengyi; Peng, Sijia; Sun, Ruirui; Lin, Jingdi; Wang, Nan; Chen, Chunlai

    2018-01-09

    Off-target binding and cleavage by Cas9 pose major challenges in its application. How the conformational dynamics of Cas9 govern its nuclease activity under on- and off-target conditions remains largely unknown. Here, using intra-molecular single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements, we revealed that Cas9 in apo, sgRNA-bound, and dsDNA/sgRNA-bound forms spontaneously transits among three major conformational states, mainly reflecting significant conformational mobility of the catalytic HNH domain. We also uncovered surprising long-range allosteric communication between the HNH domain and the RNA/DNA heteroduplex at the PAM-distal end to ensure correct positioning of the catalytic site, which demonstrated that a unique proofreading mechanism served as the last checkpoint before DNA cleavage. Several Cas9 residues were likely to mediate the allosteric communication and proofreading step. Modulating interactions between Cas9 and heteroduplex at the PAM-distal end by introducing mutations on these sites provides an alternative route to improve and optimize the CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livshits, Gideon I.; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir

    2014-01-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transport......DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set......-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4......-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA...

  19. In silico single-molecule manipulation of DNA with rigid body dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Carrivain

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new powerful method to reproduce in silico single-molecule manipulation experiments. We demonstrate that flexible polymers such as DNA can be simulated using rigid body dynamics thanks to an original implementation of Langevin dynamics in an open source library called Open Dynamics Engine. We moreover implement a global thermostat which accelerates the simulation sampling by two orders of magnitude. We reproduce force-extension as well as rotation-extension curves of reference experimental studies. Finally, we extend the model to simulations where the control parameter is no longer the torsional strain but instead the torque, and predict the expected behavior for this case which is particularly challenging theoretically and experimentally.

  20. Molecular Processes Studied at a Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Nanostructures and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilko Bald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA origami nanostructures allow for the arrangement of different functionalities such as proteins, specific DNA structures, nanoparticles, and various chemical modifications with unprecedented precision. The arranged functional entities can be visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM which enables the study of molecular processes at a single-molecular level. Examples comprise the investigation of chemical reactions, electron-induced bond breaking, enzymatic binding and cleavage events, and conformational transitions in DNA. In this paper, we provide an overview of the advances achieved in the field of single-molecule investigations by applying atomic force microscopy to functionalized DNA origami substrates.

  1. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA nucleoba...

  2. Towards observing the encounter of the T7 DNA replication fork with a lesion site at the Single molecule level

    KAUST Repository

    Shirbini, Afnan

    2017-05-01

    Single-molecule DNA flow-stretching assays have been a powerful approach to study various aspects on the mechanism of DNA replication for more than a decade. This technique depends on flow-induced force on a bead attached to a surface-tethered DNA. The difference in the elastic property between double-strand DNA (long) and single-strand DNA (short) at low regime force allows the observation of the beads motion when the dsDNA is converted to ssDNA by the replisome machinery during DNA replication. Here, I aim to develop an assay to track in real-time the encounter of the bacteriophage T7 replisome with abasic lesion site inserted on the leading strand template. I optimized methods to construct the DNA substrate that contains the abasic site and established the T7 leading strand synthesis at the single molecule level. I also optimized various control experiments to remove any interference from the nonspecific interactions of the DNA with the surface. My work established the foundation to image the encounter of the T7 replisome with abasic site and to characterize how the interactions between the helicase and the polymerase could influence the polymerase proofreading ability and its direct bypass of this highly common DNA damage type.

  3. Studies of G-quadruplex DNA structures at the single molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Sofie Louise

    2015-01-01

    Folding of G-quaduplex structures adopted by the human telomeric repeat is here studied by single molecule FRET microscopy. This method allows for the investigation of G-quadruplex structures and their conformational dynamic. Telomeres are located at the ends of our chromosomes and end in a single...... with human telomeric repeat adopt several different G-quadruplex conformations in the presence of K+ ions. G-quadruplexes inhibit telomerase activity and are therefore potential targets for anti-cancer drugs, which can be small molecule ligands capable of stabilizing G-quadruplex structures. Understanding...... range. FRET spectroscopy can be performed on an ensemble of molecules, or on the single molecule level. In single molecule FRET experiments it is possible to follow the behaviour in time for each molecule independently, allowing insight into both dynamically and statistically heterogeneous molecular...

  4. Single-molecule packaging initiation in real time by a viral DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafabakhsh, Reza; Kondabagil, Kiran; Earnest, Tyler; Lee, Kyung Suk; Zhang, Zhihong; Dai, Li; Dahmen, Karin A; Rao, Venigalla B; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-10-21

    Viral DNA packaging motors are among the most powerful molecular motors known. A variety of structural, biochemical, and single-molecule biophysical approaches have been used to understand their mechanochemistry. However, packaging initiation has been difficult to analyze because of its transient and highly dynamic nature. Here, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence assay that allowed visualization of packaging initiation and reinitiation in real time and quantification of motor assembly and initiation kinetics. We observed that a single bacteriophage T4 packaging machine can package multiple DNA molecules in bursts of activity separated by long pauses, suggesting that it switches between active and quiescent states. Multiple initiation pathways were discovered including, unexpectedly, direct DNA binding to the capsid portal followed by recruitment of motor subunits. Rapid succession of ATP hydrolysis was essential for efficient initiation. These observations have implications for the evolution of icosahedral viruses and regulation of virus assembly.

  5. A single thiazole orange molecule forms an exciplex in a DNA i-motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baochang; Wu, Xiangyang; Yeow, Edwin K L; Shao, Fangwei

    2014-06-18

    A fluorescent exciplex of thiazole orange (TO) is formed in a single-dye conjugated DNA i-motif. The exciplex fluorescence exhibits a large Stokes shift, high quantum yield, robust response to pH oscillation and little structural disturbance to the DNA quadruplex, which can be used to monitor the folding of high-order DNA structures.

  6. A polypeptide-DNA hybrid with selective linking capability applied to single molecule nano-mechanical measurements using optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Moayed

    Full Text Available Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN and the peptide StrepTag II (ST. We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST. In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications.

  7. Single molecule measurements of DNA helicase activity with magnetic tweezers and t-test based step-finding analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Strub, Marie-Paule; Neuman, Keir C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile and easy to implement single-molecule technique that has become increasingly prevalent in the study of nucleic acid based molecular motors. Here, we provide a description of the magnetic tweezers instrument and guidelines for measuring and analyzing DNA helicase activity. Along with experimental methods, we describe a robust method of single-molecule trajectory analysis based on the Student’s t-test that accommodates continuous transitions in addition to the discrete transitions assumed in most widely employed analysis routines. To illustrate the single-molecule unwinding assay and the analysis routine, we provide DNA unwinding measurements of Escherichia coli RecQ helicase under a variety of conditions (Na+, ATP, temperature, and DNA substrate geometry). These examples reveal that DNA unwinding measurements under various conditions can aid in elucidating the unwinding mechanism of DNA helicase but also emphasize that environmental effects on DNA helicase activity must be considered in relation to in vivo activity and mechanism. PMID:27131595

  8. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, G; Mansilla, S; Belluscio, L; Speroni, J; D' Alessio, C; Gottifredi, V [Fundacion Leloir, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Essers, J; Kanaar, R [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol {eta} ({eta}). The current model implies that Pol {eta} activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol {eta} behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol {eta} is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol {eta} to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  9. Sub-nuclear irradiation, in-vivo microscopy and single-molecule imaging to study a DNA Polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, G.; Mansilla, S.; Belluscio, L.; Speroni, J.; D'Alessio, C.; Gottifredi, V.; Essers, J.; Kanaar, R.

    2009-01-01

    When the DNA is damaged in cells progressing through S phase, replication blockage can be avoided by TLS (Translesion DNA synthesis). This is an auxiliary replication mechanism that relies on the function of specialized polymerases that accomplish DNA damage bypass. An example of a classical TLS polymerase is Pol η (eta). The current model implies that Pol η activity is circumscribed to S-phase. Here we perform a systematic characterization of Pol η behaviour after DNA-damage. We show that Pol η is recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions in cells outside S phase including cells permanently arrested in G1. This observation was confirmed by different sub-nuclear damage strategies including global UV irradiation, local UV irradiation and local multi-photon laser irradiation of single nuclei in living cells. By local UV irradiation and alpha particle irradiation we evaluated the potential connection between Pol h recruitment to DNA lesions outside S phase and Homologous recombination repair (HRR) or Nucleotide excision repair (NER). Finally, we employ a single-molecule imaging approach (known as DNA fiber-assay) to determine how Pol h influences the progression of the replication fork. Our data reveals that the re-localization of Pol η to DNA lesions might be temporally and mechanistically uncoupled from replicative DNA synthesis and from DNA damage processing. (authors)

  10. Identification of Putative Coffee Rust Mycoparasites via Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing of Infected Pustules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Timothy Y; Marino, John A; Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2016-01-15

    The interaction of crop pests with their natural enemies is a fundament to their control. Natural enemies of fungal pathogens of crops are poorly known relative to those of insect pests, despite the diversity of fungal pathogens and their economic importance. Currently, many regions across Latin America are experiencing unprecedented epidemics of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix). Identification of natural enemies of coffee rust could aid in developing management strategies or in pinpointing species that could be used for biocontrol. In the present study, we characterized fungal communities associated with coffee rust lesions by single-molecule DNA sequencing of fungal rRNA gene bar codes from leaf discs (≈28 mm(2)) containing rust lesions and control discs with no rust lesions. The leaf disc communities were hyperdiverse in terms of fungi, with up to 69 operational taxonomic units (putative species) per control disc, and the diversity was only slightly reduced in rust-infected discs, with up to 63 putative species. However, geography had a greater influence on the fungal community than whether the disc was infected by coffee rust. Through comparisons between control and rust-infected leaf discs, as well as taxonomic criteria, we identified 15 putative mycoparasitic fungi. These fungi are concentrated in the fungal family Cordycipitaceae and the order Tremellales. These data emphasize the complexity of diverse fungi of unknown ecological function within a leaf that might influence plant disease epidemics or lead to the development of species for biocontrol of fungal disease. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners and the mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA. The large numbers of interacting partners makes PCNA a necessary factor to consider when studying DNA replication, either in vitro or in vivo. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA, i.e. sliding along the duplex, reduces the six degrees of freedom of the molecule, three degrees of freedom of translation and three degrees of freedom of rotation, to only two, translation along the duplex and rotational tracking of the helix. Through this mechanism PCNA can recruit its partner proteins and localize them to the right spot on the DNA, maybe in the right spatial orientation, more effectively and in coordination with other proteins. Passive loading of the closed PCNA ring on the DNA without free ends is a topologically forbidden process. Replication factor C (RFC) uses energy of ATP hydrolysis to mechanically open the PCNA ring and load it on the dsDNA. The first half of the introduction gives overview of PCNA and RFC and the loading mechanism of PCNA on dsDNA. The second half is dedicated to a diffusion model and to an algorithm for analyzing PCNA sliding. PCNA and RFC were successfully purified, simulations and a mean squared displacement analysis algorithm were run and showed good stability and experimental PCNA sliding data was analyzed and led to parameters similar to the ones in literature.

  12. Single-molecule studies of DNA replication : Visualization of DNA replication by the T7 bacteriophage replisome at a single-molecule level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsema, Hylkje

    2014-01-01

    De replicatie van DNA speelt een centrale rol in het overbrengen van genetische informatie van cel naar cel. Ons DNA wordt gerepliceerd door een machine van verschillende eiwitten, die elk een verschillende taak hebben maar nauw samenwerken. Eén eiwit zorgt er bijvoorbeeld voor dat het dubbelstrengs

  13. Single Molecule Nano-Metronome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranachai, Chittanon; McKinney, Sean A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a DNA-based nano-mechanical device called the nano-metronome. Our device is made by introducing complementary single stranded overhangs at the two arms of the DNA four-way junction. The ticking rates of this stochastic metronome depend on ion concentrations and can be changed by a set of DNA-based switches to deactivate/reactivate the sticky end. Since the device displays clearly distinguishable responses even with a single basepair difference, it may lead to a single molecule sensor of minute sequence differences of a target DNA. PMID:16522050

  14. Sequence-selective single-molecule alkylation with a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide visualized in a DNA nanoscaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Tomofumi; Endo, Masayuki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hidaka, Kumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-03-14

    We demonstrate a novel strategy for visualizing sequence-selective alkylation of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using a synthetic pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide in a designed DNA origami scaffold. Doubly functionalized PI polyamide was designed by introduction of an alkylating agent 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI) and biotin for sequence-selective alkylation at the target sequence and subsequent streptavidin labeling, respectively. Selective alkylation of the target site in the substrate DNA was observed by analysis using sequencing gel electrophoresis. For the single-molecule observation of the alkylation by functionalized PI polyamide using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the target position in the dsDNA (∼200 base pairs) was alkylated and then visualized by labeling with streptavidin. Newly designed DNA origami scaffold named "five-well DNA frame" carrying five different dsDNA sequences in its cavities was used for the detailed analysis of the sequence-selectivity and alkylation. The 64-mer dsDNAs were introduced to five individual wells, in which target sequence AGTXCCA/TGGYACT (XY = AT, TA, GC, CG) was employed as fully matched (X = G) and one-base mismatched (X = A, T, C) sequences. The fully matched sequence was alkylated with 88% selectivity over other mismatched sequences. In addition, the PI polyamide failed to attach to the target sequence lacking the alkylation site after washing and streptavidin treatment. Therefore, the PI polyamide discriminated the one mismatched nucleotide at the single-molecule level, and alkylation anchored the PI polyamide to the target dsDNA.

  15. The effect of environmental factors on the electrical conductivity of a single oligo-DNA molecule measured using single-walled carbon nanotube nanoelectrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedala, Harindra; Roy, Somenath; Choi, Wonbong; Doud, Melissa; Mathee, Kalai; Hwang, Sookhyun; Jeon, Minhyon

    2008-01-01

    We present an electrical conductivity study on a double-stranded DNA molecule bridging a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) gap. The amine terminated DNA molecule was trapped between carboxyl functionalized SWNT electrodes by dielectrophoresis. The conductivity of DNA was measured while under the influence of various environmental factors, including salt concentration, counterion variation, pH and temperature. Typically, a current of tens of picoamperes at 1 V was observed at ambient conditions, with a decrease in conductance of about 33% in high vacuum conditions. The counterion variation was analyzed by changing the buffer from sodium acetate to tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane, which resulted in a two orders of magnitude increase in the conductivity of the DNA. A reversible shift in the current signal was observed for pH variation. An increase in conductivity of the DNA was also observed at high salt concentrations

  16. Single Molecule Nano-Metronome

    OpenAIRE

    Buranachai, Chittanon; McKinney, Sean A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2006-01-01

    We constructed a DNA-based nano-mechanical device called the nano-metronome. Our device is made by introducing complementary single stranded overhangs at the two arms of the DNA four-way junction. The ticking rates of this stochastic metronome depend on ion concentrations and can be changed by a set of DNA-based switches to deactivate/reactivate the sticky end. Since the device displays clearly distinguishable responses even with a single basepair difference, it may lead to a single molecule ...

  17. Optimized assembly and covalent coupling of single-molecule DNA origami nanoarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Ashwin; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2014-12-23

    Artificial DNA nanostructures, such as DNA origami, have great potential as templates for the bottom-up fabrication of both biological and nonbiological nanodevices at a resolution unachievable by conventional top-down approaches. However, because origami are synthesized in solution, origami-templated devices cannot easily be studied or integrated into larger on-chip architectures. Electrostatic self-assembly of origami onto lithographically defined binding sites on Si/SiO2 substrates has been achieved, but conditions for optimal assembly have not been characterized, and the method requires high Mg2+ concentrations at which most devices aggregate. We present a quantitative study of parameters affecting origami placement, reproducibly achieving single-origami binding at 94±4% of sites, with 90% of these origami having an orientation within ±10° of their target orientation. Further, we introduce two techniques for converting electrostatic DNA-surface bonds to covalent bonds, allowing origami arrays to be used under a wide variety of Mg2+-free solution conditions.

  18. DNA Physical Mapping via the Controlled Translocation of Single Molecules through a 5-10nm Silicon Nitride Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Derek; Reisner, Walter; Jiang, Zhijun; Hagerty, Nick; Wood, Charles; Chan, Jason

    2009-03-01

    The ability to map the binding position of sequence-specific markers, including transcription-factors, protein-nucleic acids (PNAs) or deactivated restriction enzymes, along a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device would be of key importance for the life-sciences. Such markers could give an indication of the active genes at particular stage in a cell's transcriptional cycle, pinpoint the location of mutations or even provide a DNA barcode that could aid in genomics applications. We have developed a setup consisting of a 5-10 nm nanopore in a 20nm thick silicon nitride film coupled to an optical tweezer setup. The translocation of DNA across the nanopore can be detected via blockades in the electrical current through the pore. By anchoring one end of the translocating DNA to an optically trapped microsphere, we hope to stretch out the molecule in the nanopore and control the translocation speed, enabling us to slowly scan across the genome and detect changes in the baseline current due to the presence of bound markers.

  19. Transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping probed by high-resolution, single-molecule imaging in live E. coli cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Hensel

    Full Text Available DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The "genetic switch" of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences O(R and O(L (separated by 2.3 kb, mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034, play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms.

  20. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  1. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Counting molecules in cell-free DNA and single cells RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    The field of Molecular Biology got started in earnest with the discovery of the molecular structure of DNA. This lead to a surge of interest into the relationships between DNA, RNA and proteins, and to the development of fundamental tools for manipulating those substances, such as cutting, ligating, amplifying, visualizing and size-selecting DNA. With these tools at hand it was possible to begin sequencing DNA, a process that took a leap forward in 2005 with the advent of Next Generation Sequ...

  3. Direct Atomic Force Microscopy Observation of DNA Tile Crystal Growth at the Single-Molecule Level

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Constantine G.; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Winfree, Erik

    2012-01-01

    While the theoretical implications of models of DNA tile self-assembly have been extensively researched and such models have been used to design DNA tile systems for use in experiments, there has been little research testing the fundamental assumptions of those models. In this paper, we use direct observation of individual tile attachments and detachments of two DNA tile systems on a mica surface imaged with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to compile statistics of tile attachments and detach...

  4. In-gel multiple displacement amplification of long DNA fragments diluted to the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikawa, Yuichi; Sugahara, Keisuke; Suga, Tomo; Ohtsuka, Yoshimi; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Shiomi, Naoko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi

    2008-12-15

    The isolation and multiple genotyping of long individual DNA fragments are needed to obtain haplotype information for diploid organisms. Limiting dilution of sample DNA followed by multiple displacement amplification is a useful technique but is restricted to short (reaction (PCR)-ready form. The haplotypes of seven SNPs spanning 240 kb of the DNA surrounding the human ATM gene region on chromosome 11 were determined for 10 individuals, demonstrating the feasibility of this new method.

  5. Direct atomic force microscopy observation of DNA tile crystal growth at the single-molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Hariadi, Rizal F; Winfree, Erik

    2012-06-27

    While the theoretical implications of models of DNA tile self-assembly have been extensively researched and such models have been used to design DNA tile systems for use in experiments, there has been little research testing the fundamental assumptions of those models. In this paper, we use direct observation of individual tile attachments and detachments of two DNA tile systems on a mica surface imaged with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to compile statistics of tile attachments and detachments. We show that these statistics fit the widely used kinetic Tile Assembly Model and demonstrate AFM movies as a viable technique for directly investigating DNA tile systems during growth rather than after assembly.

  6. Double-strand breaks in genome-sized DNA caused by mechanical stress under mixing: Quantitative evaluation through single-molecule observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hayato; Nose, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2018-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that changes in the higher-order structure of genome-sized DNA molecules of more than several tens kbp play important roles in the self-control of genome activity in living cells. Unfortunately, it has been rather difficult to prepare genome-sized DNA molecules without damage or fragmentation. Here, we evaluated the degree of double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by mechanical mixing by single-molecule observation with fluorescence microscopy. The results show that DNA breaks are most significant for the first second after the initiation of mechanical agitation. Based on such observation, we propose a novel mixing procedure to significantly decrease DSBs.

  7. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Molecular Modeling Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  8. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners

  9. Investigation of sliding DNA clamp dynamics by single-molecule fluorescence, mass spectrometry and structure-based modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Varun V; Harvey, Sophie R; Raper, Austin T; Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin; Wysocki, Vicki H; Suo, Zucai

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a trimeric ring-shaped clamp protein that encircles DNA and interacts with many proteins involved in DNA replication and repair. Despite extensive structural work to characterize the monomeric, dimeric, and trimeric forms of PCNA alone and in complex with interacting proteins, no structure of PCNA in a ring-open conformation has been published. Here, we use a multidisciplinary approach, including single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), native ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), and structure-based computational modeling, to explore the conformational dynamics of a model PCNA from Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso), an archaeon. We found that Sso PCNA samples ring-open and ring-closed conformations even in the absence of its clamp loader complex, replication factor C, and transition to the ring-open conformation is modulated by the ionic strength of the solution. The IM-MS results corroborate the smFRET findings suggesting that PCNA dynamics are maintained in the gas phase and further establishing IM-MS as a reliable strategy to investigate macromolecular motions. Our molecular dynamic simulations agree with the experimental data and reveal that ring-open PCNA often adopts an out-of-plane left-hand geometry. Collectively, these results implore future studies to define the roles of PCNA dynamics in DNA loading and other PCNA-mediated interactions. PMID:29529283

  10. Nanoconfinement-enhanced conformational response of single DNA molecules to changes in ionic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, Walter; Beech, J. P.; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2007-01-01

    100×100 nm in dimension. Surprisingly, we find that the variation of the persistence length alone with ionic strength is not enough to explain our results. The effect is due mainly to increasing self-avoidance created by the reduced screening of electrostatic interactions at low ionic strength......We show that the ionic environment plays a critical role in determining the configurational properties of DNA confined in silica nanochannels. The extension of DNA in the nanochannels increases as the ionic strength is reduced, almost tripling over two decades in ionic strength for channels around....... To quantify the increase in self-avoidance, we introduce a new parameter into the de Gennes theory: an effective DNA width that gives the increase in the excluded volume due to electrostatic repulsion....

  11. Integrated view of genome structure and sequence of a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Rodolphe; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; L. V. Bauer, David

    2013-01-01

    as well as unique structural variation. Following its mapping, a molecule of interest was rescued fromthe chip;amplified and localized to a chromosome by FISH; and interrogated down to 1-bp resolution with a commercial sequencer, thereby reconciling haplotype-phased chromosome substructure with sequence....

  12. True single-molecule DNA sequencing of a pleistocene horse bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Raghavan, Maanasa

    2011-01-01

    -preserved Pleistocene horse bone using the Helicos HeliScope and Illumina GAIIx platforms, respectively. We find that the percentage of endogenous DNA sequences derived from the horse is higher among the Helicos data than Illumina data. This result indicates that the molecular biology tools used to generate sequencing...

  13. Single-Molecule Kinetics Reveal Cation-Promoted DNA Duplex Formation Through Ordering of Single-Stranded Helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the kinetics of short, fully complementary oligonucleotides are investigated at the single-molecule level. Constructs 6–9 bp in length exhibit single exponential kinetics over 2 orders of magnitude time for both forward (kon, association) and reverse (koff, dissociation) processes. Bimolecular rate constants for association are weakly sensitive to the number of basepairs in the duplex, with a 2.5-fold increase between 9 bp (k′on = 2.1(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) and 6 bp (k′on = 5.0(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) sequences. In sharp contrast, however, dissociation rate constants prove to be exponentially sensitive to sequence length, varying by nearly 600-fold over the same 9 bp (koff = 0.024 s−1) to 6 bp (koff = 14 s−1) range. The 8 bp sequence is explored in more detail, and the NaCl dependence of kon and koff is measured. Interestingly, konincreases by >40-fold (kon = 0.10(1) s−1 to 4.0(4) s−1 between [NaCl] = 25 mM and 1 M), whereas in contrast, koffdecreases by fourfold (0.72(3) s−1 to 0.17(7) s−1) over the same range of conditions. Thus, the equilibrium constant (Keq) increases by ≈160, largely due to changes in the association rate, kon. Finally, temperature-dependent measurements reveal that increased [NaCl] reduces the overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) of duplex formation, albeit by an amount smaller than the reduction in entropic penalty (−TΔΔS° duplex formation. PMID:23931323

  14. Localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe: A new approach to study nuclear nanostructure at single molecule resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Szczurek, Aleksander T. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Prakash, Kirti [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mohana, Giriram K. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lee, Hyun-Keun [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Roignant, Jean-Yves [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Birk, Udo J. [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Dobrucki, Jurek W., E-mail: jerzy.dobrucki@uj.edu.pl [Laboratory of Cell Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Kraków (Poland); Cremer, Christoph, E-mail: c.cremer@imb-mainz.de [Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Ackermannweg 4, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Mainz (JGU), Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Higher order chromatin structure is not only required to compact and spatially arrange long chromatids within a nucleus, but have also important functional roles, including control of gene expression and DNA processing. However, studies of chromatin nanostructures cannot be performed using conventional widefield and confocal microscopy because of the limited optical resolution. Various methods of superresolution microscopy have been described to overcome this difficulty, like structured illumination and single molecule localization microscopy. We report here that the standard DNA dye Vybrant{sup ®} DyeCycle™ Violet can be used to provide single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) images of DNA in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells. This SMLM method enabled optical isolation and localization of large numbers of DNA-bound molecules, usually in excess of 10{sup 6} signals in one cell nucleus. The technique yielded high-quality images of nuclear DNA density, revealing subdiffraction chromatin structures of the size in the order of 100 nm; the interchromatin compartment was visualized at unprecedented optical resolution. The approach offers several advantages over previously described high resolution DNA imaging methods, including high specificity, an ability to record images using a single wavelength excitation, and a higher density of single molecule signals than reported in previous SMLM studies. The method is compatible with DNA/multicolor SMLM imaging which employs simple staining methods suited also for conventional optical microscopy. - Highlights: • Super-resolution imaging of nuclear DNA with Vybrant Violet and blue excitation. • 90nm resolution images of DNA structures in optically thick eukaryotic nuclei. • Enhanced resolution confirms the existence of DNA-free regions inside the nucleus. • Optimized imaging conditions enable multicolor super-resolution imaging.

  15. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  16. Single-Molecule Manipulation of Double-Stranded DNA Using Optical Tweezers: Interaction Studies of DNA with RecA and YOYO-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Scharer, Orlando D.; Kanaar, Ronald; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Schins, J.M.; Kanger, Johannes S.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    By using optical tweezers and a specially designed flow cell with an integrated glass micropipette, we constructed a setup similar to that of Smith et al. (Science 271:795-799, 1996) in which an individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule can be captured between two polystyrene beads. The first

  17. Effect of genomic long-range correlations on DNA persistence length: from theory to single molecule experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukhtar, Julien; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Milani, Pascale; Audit, Benjamin; Vaillant, Cedric; Fontaine, Emeline; Mongelard, Fabien; Lavorel, Guillaume; St-Jean, Philippe; Bouvet, Philippe; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2010-04-22

    Sequence dependency of DNA intrinsic bending properties has been emphasized as a possible key ingredient to in vivo chromatin organization. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air and liquid to image intrinsically straight (synthetic), uncorrelated (hepatitis C RNA virus) and persistent long-range correlated (human) DNA fragments in various ionic conditions such that the molecules freely equilibrate on the mica surface before being captured in a particular conformation. 2D thermodynamic equilibrium is experimentally verified by a detailed statistical analysis of the Gaussian nature of the DNA bend angle fluctuations. We show that the worm-like chain (WLC) model, commonly used to describe the average conformation of long semiflexible polymers, reproduces remarkably well the persistence length estimates for the first two molecules as consistently obtained from (i) mean square end-to-end distance measurement and (ii) mean projection of the end-to-end vector on the initial orientation. Whatever the operating conditions (air or liquid, concentration of metal cations Mg(2+) and/or Ni(2+)), the persistence length found for the uncorrelated viral DNA underestimates the value obtained for the straight DNA. We show that this systematic difference is the signature of the presence of an uncorrelated structural intrinsic disorder in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) DNA fragment that superimposes on local curvatures induced by thermal fluctuations and that only the entropic disorder depends upon experimental conditions. In contrast, the WLC model fails to describe the human DNA conformations. We use a mean-field extension of the WLC model to account for the presence of long-range correlations (LRC) in the intrinsic curvature disorder of human genomic DNA: the stronger the LRC, the smaller the persistence length. The comparison of AFM imaging of human DNA with LRC DNA simulations confirms that the rather small mean square end-to-end distance observed, particularly for G

  18. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  19. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  20. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Li Xincang; Li Lu; Wang Jinxing; Jin Wenrui

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10 -14 mol L -1 . Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  1. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xincang [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Lu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Jinxing [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin Wenrui, E-mail: jwr@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-01-24

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10{sup -14} mol L{sup -1}. Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  2. Probing DNA interactions with proteins using a single-molecule toolbox: inside the cell, in a test tube and in a computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J M; Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-interacting proteins have roles in multiple processes, many operating as molecular machines which undergo dynamic meta-stable transitions to bring about their biological function. To fully understand this molecular heterogeneity, DNA and the proteins that bind to it must ideally be interrogated at a single molecule level in their native in vivo environments, in a time-resolved manner, fast enough to sample the molecular transitions across the free-energy landscape. Progress has been made over the past decade in utilizing cutting-edge tools of the physical sciences to address challenging biological questions concerning the function and modes of action of several different proteins which bind to DNA. These physiologically relevant assays are technically challenging but can be complemented by powerful and often more tractable in vitro experiments which confer advantages of the chemical environment with enhanced detection signal-to-noise of molecular signatures and transition events. In the present paper, we discuss a range of techniques we have developed to monitor DNA-protein interactions in vivo, in vitro and in silico. These include bespoke single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques to elucidate the architecture and dynamics of the bacterial replisome and the structural maintenance of bacterial chromosomes, as well as new computational tools to extract single-molecule molecular signatures from live cells to monitor stoichiometry, spatial localization and mobility in living cells. We also discuss recent developments from our laboratory made in vitro, complementing these in vivo studies, which combine optical and magnetic tweezers to manipulate and image single molecules of DNA, with and without bound protein, in a new super-resolution fluorescence microscope.

  3. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  4. A novel technique using DNA denaturation to detect multiply induced single-strand breaks in a hydrated plasmid DNA molecule by X-ray and 4He2+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Noguchi, M.; Urushibara, A.

    2011-01-01

    To detect multiple single-strand breaks (SSBs) produced in plasmid DNA molecules by direct energy deposition from radiation tracks, we have developed a novel technique using DNA denaturation by which irradiated DNA is analysed as single-strand DNA (SS-DNA). The multiple SSBs that arise in both strands of DNA, but do not induce a double-strand break, are quantified as loss of SS-DNA using agarose gel electrophoresis. We have applied this method to X-ray and 4 He 2+ ion-irradiated samples of fully hydrated pUC18 plasmid DNA. The fractions of both SS-DNA and closed circular DNA (CC-DNA) exponentially decrease with the increasing dose of X rays and 4 He 2+ ions. The efficiency of the loss of SS-DNA was half that of CC-DNA for both types of irradiation, indicating that one of two strands in DNA is not broken when one SSB is produced in CC-DNA by irradiation. Contrary to our initial expectation, these results indicate that SSBs are not multiply induced even by high linear energy transfer radiation distributed in both strands. (authors)

  5. Periodically arranged benzene-linker molecules on boron-doped single-crystalline diamond films for DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shin, D.; Tokuda, N.; Rezek, Bohuslav; Nebel, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2006), s. 844-850 ISSN 1388-2481 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : electrochemical surface modification * single-crystalline CVD diamond * covalent DNA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.484, year: 2006

  6. Single-molecule dynamics in nanofabricated traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam

    2009-03-01

    The Anti-Brownian Electrokinetic trap (ABEL trap) provides a means to immobilize a single fluorescent molecule in solution, without surface attachment chemistry. The ABEL trap works by tracking the Brownian motion of a single molecule, and applying feedback electric fields to induce an electrokinetic motion that approximately cancels the Brownian motion. We present a new design for the ABEL trap that allows smaller molecules to be trapped and more information to be extracted from the dynamics of a single molecule than was previously possible. In particular, we present strategies for extracting dynamically fluctuating mobilities and diffusion coefficients, as a means to probe dynamic changes in molecular charge and shape. If one trapped molecule is good, many trapped molecules are better. An array of single molecules in solution, each immobilized without surface attachment chemistry, provides an ideal test-bed for single-molecule analyses of intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions. We present a technology for creating such an array, using a fused silica plate with nanofabricated dimples and a removable cover for sealing single molecules within the dimples. With this device one can watch the shape fluctuations of single molecules of DNA or study cooperative interactions in weakly associating protein complexes.

  7. Single molecule conductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis represents an excursion into the world of molecular electronics, i.e. the field of research trying to use individual (organic) molecules as electronic components; in this work various experimental methods have been explored to connect individual molecules to metallic contacts and

  8. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    overall absorption spectrum of a molecule is a superposition of many such sharp lines .... dilute solution of the enzyme and the substrate over few drops of silicone oil placed ..... Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM): Development.

  9. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  10. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  11. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  12. Single-Molecule Titration in a Protein Nanoreactor Reveals the Protonation/Deprotonation Mechanism of a C:C Mismatch in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hang; Cheyne, Cameron G; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2018-04-18

    Measurement of single-molecule reactions can elucidate microscopic mechanisms that are often hidden from ensemble analysis. Herein, we report the acid-base titration of a single DNA duplex confined within the wild-type α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore for up to 3 h, while monitoring the ionic current through the nanopore. Modulation between two states in the current-time trace for duplexes containing the C:C mismatch in proximity to the latch constriction of α-HL is attributed to the base flipping of the C:C mismatch. As the pH is lowered, the rate for the C:C mismatch to flip from the intra-helical state to the extra-helical state ( k intra-extra ) decreases, while the rate for base flipping from the extra-helical state to the intra-helical state ( k extra-intra ) remains unchanged. Both k intra-extra and k extra-intra are on the order of 1 × 10 -2 s -1 to 1 × 10 -1 s -1 and remain stable over the time scale of the measurement (several hours). Analysis of the pH-dependent kinetics of base flipping using a hidden Markov kinetic model demonstrates that protonation/deprotonation occurs while the base pair is in the intra-helical state. We also demonstrate that the rate of protonation is limited by transport of H + into the α-HL nanopore. Single-molecule kinetic isotope experiments exhibit a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for k intra-extra ( k H / k D ≈ 5) but a limited KIE for k extra-intra ( k H / k D ≈ 1.3), supporting our model. Our experiments correspond to the longest single-molecule measurements performed using a nanopore, and demonstrate its application in interrogating mechanisms of single-molecule reactions in confined geometries.

  13. Ultra-high-density 3D DNA arrays within nanoporous biocompatible membranes for single-molecule-level detection and purification of circulating nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Fox, K.; Karle, T. J.; Lohrmann, A.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated alumina membrane. The few nanometer-thick, yet perfect and continuous DLC-coating confers the chemical stability and biocompatibility of the sensor, allowing its direct application in biological conditions. The selective detection is based on complementary hybridization of a fluorescently-tagged circulating cancer oncomarker (a 21-mer nucleic acid) with covalently immobilized DNA on the surface of the membrane. The captured DNAs are detected in the nanoporous structure of the sensor using confocal scanning laser microscopy. The flow-through membrane sensor demonstrates broad-range sensitivity, spanning from 1015 molecules per cm2 down to single molecules, which is several orders of magnitude improvement compared to the flat DNA microarrays. Our study suggests that these flow-through type nanoporous sensors represent a new powerful platform for large volume sampling and ultrasensitive detection of different chemical biomarkers.Extracellular nucleic acids freely circulating in blood and other physiologic fluids are important biomarkers for non-invasive diagnostics and early detection of cancer and other diseases, yet difficult to detect because they exist in very low concentrations and large volumes. Here we demonstrate a new broad-range sensor platform for ultrasensitive and selective detection of circulating DNA down to the single-molecule level. The biosensor is based on a chemically functionalized nanoporous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated

  14. Extraction of ultrashort DNA molecules from herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutaker, Rafal M; Reiter, Ella; Furtwängler, Anja; Schuenemann, Verena J; Burbano, Hernán A

    2017-02-01

    DNA extracted from herbarium specimens is highly fragmented; therefore, it is crucial to use extraction protocols that retrieve short DNA molecules. Improvements in extraction and DNA library preparation protocols for animal remains have allowed efficient retrieval of molecules shorter than 50 bp. Here, we applied these improvements to DNA extraction protocols for herbarium specimens and evaluated extraction performance by shotgun sequencing, which allows an accurate estimation of the distribution of DNA fragment lengths. Extraction with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) buffer decreased median fragment length by 35% when compared with cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB); modifying the binding conditions of DNA to silica allowed for an additional decrease of 10%. We did not observe a further decrease in length for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) versus double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) library preparation methods. Our protocol enables the retrieval of ultrashort molecules from herbarium specimens, which will help to unlock the genetic information stored in herbaria.

  15. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  16. The role of the C-domain of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein in ssDNA binding and dsDNA helix-destabilization: Kinetic, single-molecule, and cross-linking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Kiran; Anderson, Brian; Perdana, Hendrik; Malinowski, Matthew A.; Win, Aye T.; Williams, Mark C.

    2018-01-01

    The model single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4, gene 32 protein (gp32) has well-established roles in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. gp32 is a single-chain polypeptide consisting of three domains. Based on thermodynamics and kinetics measurements, we have proposed that gp32 can undergo a conformational change where the acidic C-terminal domain binds internally to or near the single-stranded (ss) DNA binding surface in the core (central) domain, blocking ssDNA interaction. To test this model, we have employed a variety of experimental approaches and gp32 variants to characterize this conformational change. Utilizing stopped-flow methods, the association kinetics of wild type and truncated forms of gp32 with ssDNA were measured. When the C-domain is present, the log-log plot of k vs. [NaCl] shows a positive slope, whereas when it is absent (*I protein), there is little rate change with salt concentration, as expected for this model.A gp32 variant lacking residues 292–296 within the C-domain, ΔPR201, displays kinetic properties intermediate between gp32 and *I. The single molecule force-induced DNA helix-destabilizing activitiesas well as the single- and double-stranded DNA affinities of ΔPR201 and gp32 truncated at residue 295 also fall between full-length protein and *I. Finally, chemical cross-linking of recombinant C-domain and gp32 lacking both N- and C-terminal domains is inhibited by increasing concentrations of a short single-stranded oligonucleotide, and the salt dependence of cross-linking mirrors that expected for the model. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence in support of this model that have been obtained through structural probes. PMID:29634784

  17. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjoernsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas; Fogedby, Hans C

    2009-01-01

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation bubbles and selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins.

  18. Sensing single electrons with single molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakhotnik, Taras

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new methodology for probing transport of just one electron, a process of great importance both in nature and in artificial devices. Our idea for locating a single electron is analogues to the conventional GPS where signals from several satellites are used to locate a macro object. Using fluorescent molecules as tiny sensors, it is possible to determine 3D displacement vector of an electron

  19. Single-base resolution and long-coverage sequencing based on single-molecule nanomanipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Hongjie; Huang Jiehuan; Lue Ming; Li Xueling; Lue Junhong; Li Haikuo; Zhang Yi; Li Minqian; Hu Jun

    2007-01-01

    We show new approaches towards a novel single-molecule sequencing strategy which consists of high-resolution positioning isolation of overlapping DNA fragments with atomic force microscopy (AFM), subsequent single-molecule PCR amplification and conventional Sanger sequencing. In this study, a DNA labelling technique was used to guarantee the accuracy in positioning the target DNA. Single-molecule multiplex PCR was carried out to test the contamination. The results showed that the two overlapping DNA fragments isolated by AFM could be successfully sequenced with high quality and perfect contiguity, indicating that single-base resolution and long-coverage sequencing have been achieved simultaneously

  20. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  1. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration......, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments...... for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation...

  2. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S; Yuzyuk, Yury I; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Dovbeshko, Galina I; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm −1 ) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule

  3. How to read and write mechanical information in DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessel, Helmut

    In this talk I will show that DNA molecules contain another layer of information on top of the classical genetic information. This different type of information is of mechanical nature and guides the folding of DNA molecules inside cells. With the help of a new Monte Carlo technique, the Mutation Monte Carlo method, we demonstrate that the two layers of information can be multiplexed (as one can have two phone conversations on the same wire). For instance, we can guide on top of genes with single base-pair precision the packaging of DNA into nucleosomes. Finally, we study the mechanical properties of DNA molecules belonging to organisms all across the tree of life. From this we learn that in multicellular organisms the stiffness of DNA around transcription start sites differs dramatically from that of unicellular life. The reason for this difference is surprising.

  4. Deep learning for single-molecule science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Slabaugh, Gregory; Alonso, Eduardo; Al-Arif, SM Masudur R.

    2017-10-01

    Exploring and making predictions based on single-molecule data can be challenging, not only due to the sheer size of the datasets, but also because a priori knowledge about the signal characteristics is typically limited and poor signal-to-noise ratio. For example, hypothesis-driven data exploration, informed by an expectation of the signal characteristics, can lead to interpretation bias or loss of information. Equally, even when the different data categories are known, e.g., the four bases in DNA sequencing, it is often difficult to know how to make best use of the available information content. The latest developments in machine learning (ML), so-called deep learning (DL) offer interesting, new avenues to address such challenges. In some applications, such as speech and image recognition, DL has been able to outperform conventional ML strategies and even human performance. However, to date DL has not been applied much in single-molecule science, presumably in part because relatively little is known about the ‘internal workings’ of such DL tools within single-molecule science as a field. In this Tutorial, we make an attempt to illustrate in a step-by-step guide how one of those, a convolutional neural network (CNN), may be used for base calling in DNA sequencing applications. We compare it with a SVM as a more conventional ML method, and discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In particular, a ‘deep’ neural network has many features of a ‘black box’, which has important implications on how we look at and interpret data.

  5. Towards characterization of DNA structure under physiological conditions in vivo at the single-molecule level using single-pair FRET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fessl, Tomáš; Adamec, František; Polívka, Tomáš; Foldynová-Trantírková, Silvie; Vácha, František; Trantírek, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 16 (2012), s. 10 ISSN 0305-1048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : in-cell FRET * fluorescence * DNA * nucleic acid * ATTO * in vivo Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.278, year: 2012

  6. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P

    2016-03-17

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise.

  7. Single molecule detection, thermal fluctuation and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANAGIDA, Toshio; ISHII, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    Single molecule detection has contributed to our understanding of the unique mechanisms of life. Unlike artificial man-made machines, biological molecular machines integrate thermal noises rather than avoid them. For example, single molecule detection has demonstrated that myosin motors undergo biased Brownian motion for stepwise movement and that single protein molecules spontaneously change their conformation, for switching to interactions with other proteins, in response to thermal fluctuation. Thus, molecular machines have flexibility and efficiency not seen in artificial machines. PMID:28190869

  8. Spectrally resolved single-molecule electrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, F.; Krishnan, M.

    2018-03-01

    Escape-time electrometry is a recently developed experimental technique that offers the ability to measure the effective electrical charge of a single biomolecule in solution with sub-elementary charge precision. The approach relies on measuring the average escape-time of a single charged macromolecule or molecular species transiently confined in an electrostatic fluidic trap. Comparing the experiments with the predictions of a mean-field model of molecular electrostatics, we have found that the measured effective charge even reports on molecular conformation, e.g., folded or disordered state, and non-uniform charge distribution in disordered proteins or polyelectrolytes. Here we demonstrate the ability to use the spectral dimension to distinguish minute differences in electrical charge between individual molecules or molecular species in a single simultaneous measurement, under identical experimental conditions. Using one spectral channel for referenced measurement, this kind of photophysical distinguishability essentially eliminates the need for accurate knowledge of key experimental parameters, otherwise obtained through intensive characterization of the experimental setup. As examples, we demonstrate the ability to detect small differences (˜5%) in the length of double-stranded DNA fragments as well as single amino acid exchange in an intrinsically disordered protein, prothymosin α.

  9. Extracting Models in Single Molecule Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presse, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule experiments can now monitor the journey of a protein from its assembly near a ribosome to its proteolytic demise. Ideally all single molecule data should be self-explanatory. However data originating from single molecule experiments is particularly challenging to interpret on account of fluctuations and noise at such small scales. Realistically, basic understanding comes from models carefully extracted from the noisy data. Statistical mechanics, and maximum entropy in particular, provide a powerful framework for accomplishing this task in a principled fashion. Here I will discuss our work in extracting conformational memory from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments on large biomolecules. One clear advantage of this method is that we let the data tend towards the correct model, we do not fit the data. I will show that the dynamical model of the single molecule dynamics which emerges from this analysis is often more textured and complex than could otherwise come from fitting the data to a pre-conceived model.

  10. A single-molecule diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current–voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur–gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current–voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current–voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. PMID:15956208

  11. Electron microscope autoradiography of isolated DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delain, Etienne; Bouteille, Michel

    1980-01-01

    Autoradiographs of 3 H-thymidine-labelled DNA molecules were observed with an electron microscope. After ten months of exposure significant labelling was obtained with tritiated T7 DNA molecules which had a specific activity of 630,000 cpm/μg. Although isolated DNA molecules were not stretched out to such an extent that they could be rigorously compared to straight 'hot lines', the resolution was estimated and found to be similar to that obtained by autoradiography on thin plastic sections. The H.D. value was of the order of 1600A. From the known specific activity of the macromolecules, it was possible to compare the expected number of disintegrations from the samples to the number of grains obtained on the autoradiograms. This enabled us to calculate 1/ The absolute autoradiographic efficiency and 2/ The per cent ratio of thymidine residues labelled with tritium. These results throw some light on the resolution and sensitivity of electron microscope autoradiography of shadowed isolated macromolecules as compared to thin plastic sections

  12. A single-molecule diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-06-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current-voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur-gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current-voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current-voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. Author contributions: F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. designed research; M.E., R.O., M.K., M.F., F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. performed research; M.E., R.O., M.K., M.F., C.v.H., F.W., F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; M.E., R.O., M.K., C.v.H., F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. analyzed data; and F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: A, acceptor; D, donor; MCB, mechanically controlled break junction.Data deposition: The atomic coordinates have been deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database, Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, Cambridge CB2 1EZ, United Kingdom (CSD reference no. 241632).

  13. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  14. Direct identification of antibiotic resistance genes on single plasmid molecules using CRISPR/Cas9 in combination with optical DNA mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vilhelm; Rajer, Fredrika; Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Sandegren, Linus; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively involved in the rapid global spread of antibiotic resistance. We here present an assay, based on optical DNA mapping of single plasmids in nanofluidic channels, which provides detailed information about the plasmids present in a bacterial isolate. In a single experiment, we obtain the number of different plasmids in the sample, the size of each plasmid, an optical barcode that can be used to identify and trace the plasmid of interest and information about which plasmid that carries a specific resistance gene. Gene identification is done using CRISPR/Cas9 loaded with a guide-RNA (gRNA) complementary to the gene of interest that linearizes the circular plasmids at a specific location that is identified using the optical DNA maps. We demonstrate the principle on clinically relevant extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing isolates. We discuss how the gRNA sequence can be varied to obtain the desired information. The gRNA can either be very specific to identify a homogeneous group of genes or general to detect several groups of genes at the same time. Finally, we demonstrate an example where we use a combination of two gRNA sequences to identify carbapenemase-encoding genes in two previously not characterized clinical bacterial samples.

  15. Single Molecule Biophysics Experiments and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yang, Haw; Silbey, Robert J; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-01-01

    Discover the experimental and theoretical developments in optical single-molecule spectroscopy that are changing the ways we think about molecules and atoms The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This latest volume explores the advent of optical single-molecule spectroscopy, and how atomic force microscopy has empowered novel experiments on individual biomolecules, opening up new frontiers in molecular and cell biology and leading to new theoretical approaches

  16. On theory of single-molecule transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Tien Phuc

    2009-01-01

    The results of the study on single-molecule transistor are mainly investigated in this paper. The structure of constructed single-molecule transistor is similar to a conventional MOSFET. The conductive channel of the transistors is a single-molecule of halogenated benzene derivatives. The chemical simulation software CAChe was used to design and implement for the essential parameter of the molecules utilized as the conductive channel. The GUI of Matlab has been built to design its graphical interface, calculate and plot the output I-V characteristic curves for the transistor. The influence of temperature, length and width of the conductive channel, and gate voltage is considered. As a result, the simulated curves are similar to the traditional MOSFET's. The operating temperature range of the transistors is wider compared with silicon semiconductors. The supply voltage for transistors is only about 1 V. The size of transistors in this research is several nanometers.

  17. Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA®): a novel isothermal DNA amplification technology demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity for a single molecule of target analyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoser, Mark J; Mansukoski, Hannu K; Morrical, Scott W; Eboigbodin, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that they do not require thermal cycling or sophisticated laboratory equipment. However, non-target-dependent amplification has limited the sensitivity of isothermal technologies and complex probes are usually required to distinguish between non-specific and target-dependent amplification. Here, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA). SIBA technology is resistant to non-specific amplification, is able to detect a single molecule of target analyte, and does not require target-specific probes. The technology relies on the recombinase-dependent insertion of an invasion oligonucleotide (IO) into the double-stranded target nucleic acid. The duplex regions peripheral to the IO insertion site dissociate, thereby enabling target-specific primers to bind. A polymerase then extends the primers onto the target nucleic acid leading to exponential amplification of the target. The primers are not substrates for the recombinase and are, therefore unable to extend the target template in the absence of the IO. The inclusion of 2'-O-methyl RNA to the IO ensures that it is not extendible and that it does not take part in the extension of the target template. These characteristics ensure that the technology is resistant to non-specific amplification since primer dimers or mis-priming are unable to exponentially amplify. Consequently, SIBA is highly specific and able to distinguish closely-related species with single molecule sensitivity in the absence of complex probes or sophisticated laboratory equipment. Here, we describe this technology in detail and demonstrate its use for the detection of Salmonella.

  18. Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA®: a novel isothermal DNA amplification technology demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity for a single molecule of target analyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Hoser

    Full Text Available Isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR in that they do not require thermal cycling or sophisticated laboratory equipment. However, non-target-dependent amplification has limited the sensitivity of isothermal technologies and complex probes are usually required to distinguish between non-specific and target-dependent amplification. Here, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA. SIBA technology is resistant to non-specific amplification, is able to detect a single molecule of target analyte, and does not require target-specific probes. The technology relies on the recombinase-dependent insertion of an invasion oligonucleotide (IO into the double-stranded target nucleic acid. The duplex regions peripheral to the IO insertion site dissociate, thereby enabling target-specific primers to bind. A polymerase then extends the primers onto the target nucleic acid leading to exponential amplification of the target. The primers are not substrates for the recombinase and are, therefore unable to extend the target template in the absence of the IO. The inclusion of 2'-O-methyl RNA to the IO ensures that it is not extendible and that it does not take part in the extension of the target template. These characteristics ensure that the technology is resistant to non-specific amplification since primer dimers or mis-priming are unable to exponentially amplify. Consequently, SIBA is highly specific and able to distinguish closely-related species with single molecule sensitivity in the absence of complex probes or sophisticated laboratory equipment. Here, we describe this technology in detail and demonstrate its use for the detection of Salmonella.

  19. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  20. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  1. Single-photon sources based on single molecules in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerner, W E

    2004-01-01

    Single molecules in suitable host crystals have been demonstrated to be useful single-photon emitters both at liquid-helium temperatures and at room temperature. The low-temperature source achieved controllable emission of single photons from a single terrylene molecule in p-terphenyl by an adiabatic rapid passage technique. In contrast with almost all other single-molecule systems, terrylene single molecules show extremely high photostability under continuous, high-intensity irradiation. A room-temperature source utilizing this material has been demonstrated, in which fast pumping into vibrational sidebands of the electronically excited state achieved efficient inversion of the emissive level. This source yielded a single-photon emission probability p(1) of 0.86 at a detected count rate near 300 000 photons s -1 , with very small probability of emission of more than one photon. Thus, single molecules in solids can be considered as contenders for applications of single-photon sources such as quantum key distribution

  2. Torque Measurement at the Single Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Scott; Sheinin, Maxim Y.; Inman, James; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    Methods for exerting and measuring forces on single molecules have revolutionized the study of the physics of biology. However, it is often the case that biological processes involve rotation or torque generation, and these parameters have been more difficult to access experimentally. Recent advances in the single molecule field have led to the development of techniques which add the capability of torque measurement. By combining force, displacement, torque, and rotational data, a more comprehensive description of the mechanics of a biomolecule can be achieved. In this review, we highlight a number of biological processes for which torque plays a key mechanical role. We describe the various techniques that have been developed to directly probe the torque experienced by a single molecule, and detail a variety of measurements made to date using these new technologies. We conclude by discussing a number of open questions and propose systems of study which would be well suited for analysis with torsional measurement techniques. PMID:23541162

  3. Programmed Switching of Single Polymer Conformation on DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krissanaprasit, Abhichart; Madsen, Mikael; Knudsen, Jakob Bach

    2016-01-01

    -molecule conjugated polymer. The polymer is functionalized with short single-stranded (ss) DNA strands that extend from the backbone of the polymer and serve as handles. The DNA polymer conjugate can be aligned on DNA origami in three well-defined geometries (straight line, left-turned, and right-turned pattern......) by DNA hybridization directed by single-stranded guiding strands and ssDNA tracks extending from the origami surface and polymer handle. We demonstrate switching of a conjugated organic polymer conformation between left- and right-turned conformations of the polymer on DNA origami based on toehold...

  4. Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool (SMART: an integrated approach for analyzing single molecule data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Greenfeld

    Full Text Available Single molecule studies have expanded rapidly over the past decade and have the ability to provide an unprecedented level of understanding of biological systems. A common challenge upon introduction of novel, data-rich approaches is the management, processing, and analysis of the complex data sets that are generated. We provide a standardized approach for analyzing these data in the freely available software package SMART: Single Molecule Analysis Research Tool. SMART provides a format for organizing and easily accessing single molecule data, a general hidden Markov modeling algorithm for fitting an array of possible models specified by the user, a standardized data structure and graphical user interfaces to streamline the analysis and visualization of data. This approach guides experimental design, facilitating acquisition of the maximal information from single molecule experiments. SMART also provides a standardized format to allow dissemination of single molecule data and transparency in the analysis of reported data.

  5. Enhanced post wash retention of combed DNA molecules by varying multiple combing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Hemendra; Sharma, Pulkit

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in genomics have created a need for efficient techniques for deciphering information hidden in various genomes. Single molecule analysis is one such technique to understand molecular processes at single molecule level. Fiber- FISH performed with the help of DNA combing can help us in understanding genetic rearrangements and changes in genome at single DNA molecule level. For performing Fiber-FISH we need high retention of combed DNA molecules post wash as Fiber-FISH requires profuse washing. We optimized combing process involving combing solution, method of DNA mounting on glass slides and coating of glass slides to enhance post-wash retention of DNA molecules. It was found that average number of DNA molecules observed post-wash per field of view was maximum with our optimized combing solution. APTES coated glass slides showed lesser retention than PEI surface but fluorescent intensity was higher in case of APTES coated surface. Capillary method used to mount DNA on glass slides also showed lesser retention but straight DNA molecules were observed as compared to force flow method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Serogroup-level resolution of the “Super-7” Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli using nanopore single-molecule DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA sequencing and other DNA-based methods, such as PCR, are now broadly used for detection and identification of bacterial foodborne pathogens. For the identification of foodborne bacterial pathogens, it is important to make taxonomic assignments to the species, or even subspecies level. Long-read ...

  7. Single Molecule Nanoelectrochemistry in Electrical Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2016-11-15

    It is now possible to reliably measure single molecule conductance in a wide variety of environments including organic liquids, ultrahigh vacuum, water, ionic liquids, and electrolytes. The most commonly used methods deploy scanning probe microscopes, mechanically formed break junctions, or lithographically formed nanogap contacts. Molecules are generally captured between a pair of facing electrodes, and the junction current response is measured as a function of bias voltage. Gating electrodes can also be added so that the electrostatic potential at the molecular bridge can be independently controlled by this third noncontacting electrode. This can also be achieved in an electrolytic environment using a four-electrode bipotentiostatic configuration, which allows independent electrode potential control of the two contacting electrodes. This is commonly realized using an electrochemical STM and enables single molecule electrical characterization as a function of electrode potential and redox state of the molecular bridge. This has emerged as a powerful tool in modern interfacial electrochemistry and nanoelectrochemistry for studying charge transport across single molecules as a function of electrode potential and the electrolytic environments. Such measurements are possible in electrolytes ranging from aqueous buffers to nonaqueous ionic liquids. In this Account, we illustrate a number of examples of single molecule electrical measurements under electrode potential control use a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and demonstrate how these can help in the understanding of charge transport in single molecule junctions. Examples showing charge transport following phase coherent tunneling to incoherent charge hopping across redox active molecular bridges are shown. In the case of bipyridinium (or viologen) molecular wires, it is shown how electrochemical reduction leads to an increase of the single molecule conductance, which is controlled by the liquid electrochemical

  8. Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen the development of a number of novel biophysical methods that allow the manipulation and study of individual biomolecules. The ability to monitor biological processes at this fundamental level of sensitivity has given rise to an improved understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Through the removal of ensemble averaging, distributions and fluctuations of molecular properties can be characterized, transient intermediates identified, and catalytic mechanisms elucidated. By applying forces on biomolecules while monitoring their activity, important information can be obtained on how proteins couple function to structure. The Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics provides an introduction to these techniques and presents an extensive discussion of the new biological insights obtained from them. Coverage includes: Experimental techniques to monitor and manipulate individual biomolecules The use of single-molecule techniques in super-resolution and functional imaging Single-molec...

  9. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows: 1......) QD blinking and bleaching statistics, 2) the use of QDs in high speed single particle tracking with a special focus on how to design the biofunctional coatings of QDs which enable specific targeting to single proteins or lipids of interest, 3) a hybrid lipid-DNA analogue binding QDs which allows...... for tracking single lipids in lipid bilayers, 4) two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of QDs and 5) optical trapping and excitation of single QDs. In all of these applications, the focus is on the single particle sensitivity level of QDs. The high applicability of QDs in live cell imaging...

  10. Molecular spintronics using single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Lapo; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    A revolution in electronics is in view, with the contemporary evolution of the two novel disciplines of spintronics and molecular electronics. A fundamental link between these two fields can be established using molecular magnetic materials and, in particular, single-molecule magnets. Here, we review the first progress in the resulting field, molecular spintronics, which will enable the manipulation of spin and charges in electronic devices containing one or more molecules. We discuss the advantages over more conventional materials, and the potential applications in information storage and processing. We also outline current challenges in the field, and propose convenient schemes to overcome them.

  11. Single molecules and single nanoparticles as windows to the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldarola, Martín; Orrit, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Since the first optical detection of single molecules, they have been used as nanometersized optical sensors to explore the physical properties of materials and light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. Understanding nanoscale properties of materials is fundamental for the development of new technology that requires precise control of atoms and molecules when the quantum nature of matter cannot be ignored. In the following lines, we illustrate this journey into nanoscience with some experiments from our group.

  12. Preface: Special Topic on Single-Molecule Biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E; Schuler, Benjamin

    2018-03-28

    Single-molecule measurements are now almost routinely used to study biological systems and processes. The scope of this special topic emphasizes the physics side of single-molecule observations, with the goal of highlighting new developments in physical techniques as well as conceptual insights that single-molecule measurements bring to biophysics. This issue also comprises recent advances in theoretical physical models of single-molecule phenomena, interpretation of single-molecule signals, and fundamental areas of statistical mechanics that are related to single-molecule observations. A particular goal is to illustrate the increasing synergy between theory, simulation, and experiment in single-molecule biophysics.

  13. Single molecule SERS: Perspectives of analytical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčková, B.; Pavel, I.; Sládková, M.; Šišková, K.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    834-836, - (2007), s. 42-47 ISSN 0022-2860. [European Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy /28./. Istanbul, 03.09.2006-08.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0688 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) * surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) * single molecule SERS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.486, year: 2007

  14. Graphical models for inferring single molecule dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Ruben L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent explosion of experimental techniques in single molecule biophysics has generated a variety of novel time series data requiring equally novel computational tools for analysis and inference. This article describes in general terms how graphical modeling may be used to learn from biophysical time series data using the variational Bayesian expectation maximization algorithm (VBEM. The discussion is illustrated by the example of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET versus time data, where the smFRET time series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM with Gaussian observables. A detailed description of smFRET is provided as well. Results The VBEM algorithm returns the model’s evidence and an approximating posterior parameter distribution given the data. The former provides a metric for model selection via maximum evidence (ME, and the latter a description of the model’s parameters learned from the data. ME/VBEM provide several advantages over the more commonly used approach of maximum likelihood (ML optimized by the expectation maximization (EM algorithm, the most important being a natural form of model selection and a well-posed (non-divergent optimization problem. Conclusions The results demonstrate the utility of graphical modeling for inference of dynamic processes in single molecule biophysics.

  15. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction

  16. Directional rolling of positively charged nanoparticles along a flexibility gradient on long DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suehyun; Joo, Heesun; Kim, Jun Soo

    2018-01-31

    Directing the motion of molecules/colloids in any specific direction is of great interest in many applications of chemistry, physics, and biological sciences, where regulated positioning or transportation of materials is highly desired. Using Brownian dynamics simulations of coarse-grained models of a long, double-stranded DNA molecule and positively charged nanoparticles, we observed that the motion of a single nanoparticle bound to and wrapped by the DNA molecule can be directed along a gradient of DNA local flexibility. The flexibility gradient is constructed along a 0.8 kilobase-pair DNA molecule such that local persistence length decreases gradually from 50 nm to 40 nm, mimicking a gradual change in sequence-dependent flexibility. Nanoparticles roll over a long DNA molecule from less flexible regions towards more flexible ones as a result of the decreasing energetic cost of DNA bending and wrapping. In addition, the rolling becomes slightly accelerated as the positive charge of nanoparticles decreases due to a lower free energy barrier of DNA detachment from charged nanoparticle for processive rolling. This study suggests that the variation in DNA local flexibility can be utilized in constructing and manipulating supramolecular assemblies of DNA molecules and nanoparticles in structural DNA nanotechnology.

  17. Characterizing single-molecule FRET dynamics with probability distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Yusdi; Torella, Joseph P; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2010-07-12

    Probability distribution analysis (PDA) is a recently developed statistical tool for predicting the shapes of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) histograms, which allows the identification of single or multiple static molecular species within a single histogram. We used a generalized PDA method to predict the shapes of FRET histograms for molecules interconverting dynamically between multiple states. This method is tested on a series of model systems, including both static DNA fragments and dynamic DNA hairpins. By fitting the shape of this expected distribution to experimental data, the timescale of hairpin conformational fluctuations can be recovered, in good agreement with earlier published results obtained using different techniques. This method is also applied to studying the conformational fluctuations in the unliganded Klenow fragment (KF) of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which allows both confirmation of the consistency of a simple, two-state kinetic model with the observed smFRET distribution of unliganded KF and extraction of a millisecond fluctuation timescale, in good agreement with rates reported elsewhere. We expect this method to be useful in extracting rates from processes exhibiting dynamic FRET, and in hypothesis-testing models of conformational dynamics against experimental data.

  18. Biological Nanopores: Confined Spaces for Electrochemical Single-Molecule Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-02-20

    Nanopore sensing is developing into a powerful single-molecule approach to investigate the features of biomolecules that are not accessible by studying ensemble systems. When a target molecule is transported through a nanopore, the ions occupying the pore are excluded, resulting in an electrical signal from the intermittent ionic blockade event. By statistical analysis of the amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and shapes of the blockade events, many properties of the target molecule can be obtained in real time at the single-molecule level, including its size, conformation, structure, charge, geometry, and interactions with other molecules. With the development of the use of α-hemolysin to characterize individual polynucleotides, nanopore technology has attracted a wide range of research interest in the fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and nanoscience. As a powerful single-molecule analytical method, nanopore technology has been applied for the detection of various biomolecules, including oligonucleotides, peptides, oligosaccharides, organic molecules, and disease-related proteins. In this Account, we highlight recent developments of biological nanopores in DNA-based sensing and in studying the conformational structures of DNA and RNA. Furthermore, we introduce the application of biological nanopores to investigate the conformations of peptides affected by charge, length, and dipole moment and to study disease-related proteins' structures and aggregation transitions influenced by an inhibitor, a promoter, or an applied voltage. To improve the sensing ability of biological nanopores and further extend their application to a wider range of molecular sensing, we focus on exploring novel biological nanopores, such as aerolysin and Stable Protein 1. Aerolysin exhibits an especially high sensitivity for the detection of single oligonucleotides both in current separation and duration. Finally, to facilitate the use of nanopore measurements and statistical analysis

  19. Diversity of DNA β, a satellite molecule associated with some monopartite begomoviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briddon, Rob W.; Bull, Simon E.; Amin, Imran; Idris, Ali M.; Mansoor, Shahid; Bedford, Ian D.; Dhawan, Poonam; Rishi, Narayan; Siwatch, Surender S.; Abdel-Salam, Aly M.; Brown, Judith K.; Zafar, Yusuf; Markham, Peter G.

    2003-01-01

    DNA β molecules are symptom-modulating, single-stranded DNA satellites associated with monopartite begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae). Such molecules have thus far been shown to be associated with Ageratum yellow vein virus from Singapore and Cotton leaf curl Multan virus from Pakistan. Here, 26 additional DNA β molecules, associated with diverse plant species obtained from different geographical locations, were cloned and sequenced. These molecules were shown to be widespread in the Old World, where monopartite begomoviruses are known to occur. Analysis of the sequences revealed a highly conserved organization for DNA β molecules consisting of a single conserved open reading frame, an adenine-rich region, and a region of high sequence conservation [the satellite conserved region (SCR)]. The SCR contains a potential hairpin structure with the loop sequence TAA/GTATTAC; similar to the origins of replication of geminiviruses and nanoviruses. Two major groups of DNA β satellites were resolved by phylogenetic analyses. One group originated from hosts within the Malvaceae and the second from a more diverse group of plants within the Solanaceae and Compositae. Within the two clusters, DNA β molecules showed relatedness based both on host and geographic origin. These findings strongly support coadaptation of DNA β molecules with their respective helper begomoviruses

  20. Synthesis of single-molecule nanocars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Guillaume; Tour, James M

    2009-03-17

    The drive to miniaturize devices has led to a variety of molecular machines inspired by macroscopic counterparts such as molecular motors, switches, shuttles, turnstiles, barrows, elevators, and nanovehicles. Such nanomachines are designed for controlled mechanical motion and the transport of nanocargo. As researchers miniaturize devices, they can consider two complementary approaches: (1) the "top-down" approach, which reduces the size of macroscopic objects to reach an equivalent microscopic entity using photolithography and related techniques and (2) the "bottom-up" approach, which builds functional microscopic or nanoscopic entities from molecular building blocks. The top-down approach, extensively used by the semiconductor industry, is nearing its scaling limits. On the other hand, the bottom-up approach takes advantage of the self-assembly of smaller molecules into larger networks by exploiting typically weak molecular interactions. But self-assembly alone will not permit complex assembly. Using nanomachines, we hope to eventually consider complex, enzyme-like directed assembly. With that ultimate goal, we are currently exploring the control of nanomachines that would provide a basis for the future bottom-up construction of complex systems. This Account describes the synthesis of a class of molecular machines that resemble macroscopic vehicles. We designed these so-called nanocars for study at the single-molecule level by scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The vehicles have a chassis connected to wheel-terminated axles and convert energy inputs such as heat, electric fields, or light into controlled motion on a surface, ultimately leading to transport of nanocargo. At first, we used C(60) fullerenes as wheels, which allowed the demonstration of a directional rolling mechanism of a nanocar on a gold surface by STM. However, because of the low solubility of the fullerene nanocars and the incompatibility of fullerenes with photochemical processes, we developed new

  1. Future Directions for Transuranic Single Molecule Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Magnani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs based on transition metals and rare earths have been the object of considerable attention for the past 25 years. These systems exhibit slow relaxation of the magnetization, arising from a sizeable anisotropy barrier, and magnetic hysteresis of purely molecular origin below a given blocking temperature. Despite initial predictions that SMMs based on 5f-block elements could outperform most others, the results obtained so far have not met expectations. Exploiting the versatile chemistry of actinides and their favorable intrinsic magnetic properties proved, indeed, to be more difficult than assumed. However, the large majority of studies reported so far have been dedicated to uranium molecules, thus leaving the largest part of the 5f-block practically unexplored. Here, we present a short review of the progress achieved up to now and discuss some options for a possible way forward.

  2. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  3. Transport mirages in single-molecule devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenzi, R.; Misiorny, M.; Burzurí, E.; Wegewijs, M. R.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular systems can exhibit a complex, chemically tailorable inner structure which allows for targeting of specific mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. At the single-molecule level, two major complementary ways to explore these properties are molecular quantum-dot structures and scanning probes. This article outlines comprehensive principles of electron-transport spectroscopy relevant to both these approaches and presents a new, high-resolution experiment on a high-spin single-molecule junction exemplifying these principles. Such spectroscopy plays a key role in further advancing our understanding of molecular and atomic systems, in particular, the relaxation of their spin. In this joint experimental and theoretical analysis, particular focus is put on the crossover between the resonant regime [single-electron tunneling] and the off-resonant regime [inelastic electron (co)tunneling spectroscopy (IETS)]. We show that the interplay of these two processes leads to unexpected mirages of resonances not captured by either of the two pictures alone. Although this turns out to be important in a large fraction of the possible regimes of level positions and bias voltages, it has been given little attention in molecular transport studies. Combined with nonequilibrium IETS—four-electron pump-probe excitations—these mirages provide crucial information on the relaxation of spin excitations. Our encompassing physical picture is supported by a master-equation approach that goes beyond weak coupling. The present work encourages the development of a broader connection between the fields of molecular quantum-dot and scanning probe spectroscopy.

  4. On the identification techniques for ionizing radiation structure breaks in the DNA molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamluk, A.N.; Shirko, A.V.; Zhavarankau, I.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical method for evaluation of the number and locations of single-strand breaks in DNA using a change in the passage of a longitudinal wave along the double helix. A linear chain of n interacting particles connected by a pair of springs is taken as a model of the DNA molecule. (authors)

  5. Central dogma at the single-molecule level in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gene-Wei; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-07-20

    Gene expression originates from individual DNA molecules within living cells. Like many single-molecule processes, gene expression and regulation are stochastic, that is, sporadic in time. This leads to heterogeneity in the messenger-RNA and protein copy numbers in a population of cells with identical genomes. With advanced single-cell fluorescence microscopy, it is now possible to quantify transcriptomes and proteomes with single-molecule sensitivity. Dynamic processes such as transcription-factor binding, transcription and translation can be monitored in real time, providing quantitative descriptions of the central dogma of molecular biology and the demonstration that a stochastic single-molecule event can determine the phenotype of a cell.

  6. Memory effects in single-molecule spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Daniel T.; Schulz, Michael; Reineker, Peter

    2007-01-01

    From the time series of LH2 optical single-molecule fluorescence excitation spectra of Rhodospirillum molischianum the memory function of the Mori-Zwanzig equation for the optical intensity is derived numerically. We show that the time dependence of the excited states is determined by at least three different non-Markovian stochastic processes with decay constants for the Mori-Zwanzig kernel on the order of 1-5min -1 . We suggest that this decay stems from the conformational motion of the protein scaffold of LH2

  7. Repurposing a Benchtop Centrifuge for High-Throughput Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Darren; Wong, Wesley P

    2018-01-01

    We present high-throughput single-molecule manipulation using a benchtop centrifuge, overcoming limitations common in other single-molecule approaches such as high cost, low throughput, technical difficulty, and strict infrastructure requirements. An inexpensive and compact Centrifuge Force Microscope (CFM) adapted to a commercial centrifuge enables use by nonspecialists, and integration with DNA nanoswitches facilitates both reliable measurements and repeated molecular interrogation. Here, we provide detailed protocols for constructing the CFM, creating DNA nanoswitch samples, and carrying out single-molecule force measurements.

  8. Conducting single-molecule magnet materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosquer, Goulven; Shen, Yongbing; Almeida, Manuel; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2018-05-11

    Multifunctional molecular materials exhibiting electrical conductivity and single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour are particularly attractive for electronic devices and related applications owing to the interaction between electronic conduction and magnetization of unimolecular units. The preparation of such materials remains a challenge that has been pursued by a bi-component approach of combination of SMM cationic (or anionic) units with conducting networks made of partially oxidized (or reduced) donor (or acceptor) molecules. The present status of the research concerning the preparation of molecular materials exhibiting SMM behaviour and electrical conductivity is reviewed, describing the few molecular compounds where both SMM properties and electrical conductivity have been observed. The evolution of this research field through the years is discussed. The first reported compounds are semiconductors in spite being able to present relatively high electrical conductivity, and the SMM behaviour is observed at low temperatures where the electrical conductivity of the materials is similar to that of an insulator. During the recent years, a breakthrough has been achieved with the coexistence of high electrical conductivity and SMM behaviour in a molecular compound at the same temperature range, but so far without evidence of a synergy between these properties. The combination of high electrical conductivity with SMM behaviour requires not only SMM units but also the regular and as far as possible uniform packing of partially oxidized molecules, which are able to provide a conducting network.

  9. Entangled photons from single atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordén, Bengt

    2018-05-01

    The first two-photon entanglement experiment performed 50 years ago by Kocher and Commins (KC) provided isolated pairs of entangled photons from an atomic three-state fluorescence cascade. In view of questioning of Bell's theorem, data from these experiments are re-analyzed and shown sufficiently precise to confirm quantum mechanical and dismiss semi-classical theory without need for Bell's inequalities. Polarization photon correlation anisotropy (A) is useful: A is near unity as predicted quantum mechanically and well above the semi-classic range, 0 ⩽ A ⩽ 1 / 2 . Although yet to be found, one may envisage a three-state molecule emitting entangled photon pairs, in analogy with the KC atomic system. Antibunching in fluorescence from single molecules in matrix and entangled photons from quantum dots promise it be possible. Molecules can have advantages to parametric down-conversion as the latter photon distribution is Poissonian and unsuitable for producing isolated pairs of entangled photons. Analytical molecular applications of entangled light are also envisaged.

  10. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  11. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  12. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  13. Logical NAND and NOR Operations Using Algorithmic Self-assembly of DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Cui, Guangzhao; Zhang, Xuncai; Zheng, Yan

    DNA self-assembly is the most advanced and versatile system that has been experimentally demonstrated for programmable construction of patterned systems on the molecular scale. It has been demonstrated that the simple binary arithmetic and logical operations can be computed by the process of self assembly of DNA tiles. Here we report a one-dimensional algorithmic self-assembly of DNA triple-crossover molecules that can be used to execute five steps of a logical NAND and NOR operations on a string of binary bits. To achieve this, abstract tiles were translated into DNA tiles based on triple-crossover motifs. Serving as input for the computation, long single stranded DNA molecules were used to nucleate growth of tiles into algorithmic crystals. Our method shows that engineered DNA self-assembly can be treated as a bottom-up design techniques, and can be capable of designing DNA computer organization and architecture.

  14. DNA origami based Au–Ag-core–shell nanoparticle dimers with single-molecule SERS sensitivity† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about materials and methods, designs of DNA origami templates, height profiles, additional SERS spectra, assignment of DNA bands, SEM images, additional AFM images, FDTD simulations, additional reference spectra for Cy3 and detailed description of EF estimation, simulated absorption and scattering spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08674d Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, J.; Heck, C.; Ellerik, L.; Merk, V.

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled. PMID:26892770

  15. A brief introduction to single-molecule fluorescence methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, S.M.J.L.; Prevo, B.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Peterman, EJG; Wuite, GJL

    2011-01-01

    One of the more popular single-molecule approaches in biological science is single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which is the subject of the following section of this volume. Fluorescence methods provide the sensitivity required to study biology on the single-molecule level, but they also allow

  16. A brief introduction to single-molecule fluorescence methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wildenberg, Siet M.J.L.; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J.G.

    2018-01-01

    One of the more popular single-molecule approaches in biological science is single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which will be the subject of the following section of this volume. Fluorescence methods provide the sensitivity required to study biology on the single-molecule level, but they also

  17. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F

    2006-08-16

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  18. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritort, F

    2006-01-01

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives. (topical review)

  19. Separation and Characterization of DNA Molecules and Intermolecular Interactions in Pressure-Driven Micro Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Sarah; Wang, Tza-Huei

    Pressure-driven flow in micron-sized diameter capillaries can be used to separate DNA molecules by size in a technique called Free Solution Hydrodynamic Separation. By coupling this technique with Cylindrical Illumination Confocal Spectroscopy, we have developed a highly sensitive and quantitative platform capable of separating DNA molecules by length over a large dynamic range (25 bp to 48 kbp) in a single run using only picoliters or femtograms of a DNA sample. The optical detection volume completely spans the capillary cross section, enabling highly efficient single molecule detection for enhanced sensitivity and quantification accuracy via single molecule counting. Because each DNA molecule generates its own fluorescent burst, these burst profiles can be further analyzed to individually characterize each DNA molecule's shape as it passes through the detection region. We exploit these burst profiles to visualize fluctuations in conformation under shear flow in microcapillaries, and utilizing combined mobility shift analysis, explore the complex relationship between molecular properties including length and conformation, hydrodynamic mobility, solution conditions including ion species and concentrations, and separation conditions including flow rate and capillary diameter.

  20. Magnetization reversal in single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokacheva, Louisa

    2002-09-01

    I have studied the magnetization reversal in single molecule magnets (SMMs). SMMs are Van der Waals crystals, consisting of identical molecules containing transition metal ions, with high spin and large uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. They can be considered as ensembles of identical, iso-oriented nanomagnets. At high temperature, these materials behave as superparamagnets and their magnetization reversal occurs by thermal activation. At low temperature they become blocked, and their magnetic relaxation occurs via thermally assisted tunneling or pure quantum tunneling through the anisotropy barrier. We have conducted detailed experimental studies of the magnetization reversal in SMM material Mn12-acetate (Mn12) with S = 10. Low temperature measurements were conducted using micro-Hall effect magnetometry. We performed hysteresis and relaxation studies as a function of temperature, transverse field, and magnetization state of the sample. We identified magnetic sublevels that dominate the tunneling at a given field, temperature and magnetization. We observed a crossover between thermally assisted and pure quantum tunneling. The form of this crossover depends on the magnitude and direction of the applied field. This crossover is abrupt (first-order) and occurs in a narrow temperature interval (tunneling mechanisms in Mn12.

  1. Effect of caffeine on the parameters of the motive and gamma-irradiated DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, N.D.; Kondrat'eva, O.P.; Erisman, Eh.V.

    1979-01-01

    The binding of caffeine with DNA and its pole as a DNA molecule protector against radiational damage have been studied. It is shown that with the ratio of DNA and caffeine concentrations used no complex formation occurs. The irradiation of the DNA solution by 1 krad dose of γ-rays causes only a few single-strand breaks which leads to the decrease in the volume macromolecules without changing its thermodynamic ligidity. The presence of caffeine in the DNA solution before its irradiation decreases considerably the extent of radiational damage

  2. Protein dynamics during presynaptic complex assembly on individual ssDNA molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, Bryan; Ye, Ling F.; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a conserved pathway for repairing double?stranded breaks, which are processed to yield single?stranded DNA overhangs that serve as platforms for presynaptic complex assembly. Here we use single?molecule imaging to reveal the interplay between Saccharomyce cerevisiae RPA, Rad52, and Rad51 during presynaptic complex assembly. We show that Rad52 binds RPA?ssDNA and suppresses RPA turnover, highlighting an unanticipated regulatory influence on protein dynamics. Rad51 b...

  3. Repair of human DNA in molecules that replicate or remain unreplicated following ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.

    1980-01-01

    The extent of DNA replication, the incidence of uv induced pyrimidine dimers and the repair replication observed after their excision was monitored in human fibroblasts uv irradiated with single or split uv doses. The excision repair processes were measured in molecules that remained unreplicated or in those that replicated after the latter uv irradiation. Less DNA replication was observed after a split as opposed to single uv irradiation. Furthermore, a split dose did not modify the excision parameters measured after a single irradiation, regardless of whether the DNA had replicated or not

  4. DNA molecules and human therapeutics | Danquah | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors, display ...

  5. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  6. Optical probing of single fluorescent molecules and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Veerman, J.A.; Bouwhuis, R.; Bouwhuis, Rudo; van Hulst, N.F.; Vallée, R.A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Single-molecule detection and analysis of organic fluorescent molecules and proteins are presented, with emphasis o­n the underlying principles methodology and the application of single-molecule analysis at room temperature. This Minireview is mainly focused o­n the application of confocal and

  7. Highly parallel translation of DNA sequences into small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Weisinger

    Full Text Available A large body of in vitro evolution work establishes the utility of biopolymer libraries comprising 10(10 to 10(15 distinct molecules for the discovery of nanomolar-affinity ligands to proteins. Small-molecule libraries of comparable complexity will likely provide nanomolar-affinity small-molecule ligands. Unlike biopolymers, small molecules can offer the advantages of cell permeability, low immunogenicity, metabolic stability, rapid diffusion and inexpensive mass production. It is thought that such desirable in vivo behavior is correlated with the physical properties of small molecules, specifically a limited number of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, a defined range of hydrophobicity, and most importantly, molecular weights less than 500 Daltons. Creating a collection of 10(10 to 10(15 small molecules that meet these criteria requires the use of hundreds to thousands of diversity elements per step in a combinatorial synthesis of three to five steps. With this goal in mind, we have reported a set of mesofluidic devices that enable DNA-programmed combinatorial chemistry in a highly parallel 384-well plate format. Here, we demonstrate that these devices can translate DNA genes encoding 384 diversity elements per coding position into corresponding small-molecule gene products. This robust and efficient procedure yields small molecule-DNA conjugates suitable for in vitro evolution experiments.

  8. Single-molecule magnets ``without'' intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Vergnani, L.; Rodriguez-Douton, M. J.; Cornia, A.; Neugebauer, P.; Barra, A. L.; Sorace, L.; Sessoli, R.

    2012-02-01

    Intermolecular magnetic interactions (dipole-dipole and exchange) affect strongly the magnetic relaxation of crystals of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), especially at low temperature, where quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) dominates. This leads to complex many-body problems [l]. Measurements on magnetically diluted samples are desirable to clearly sort out the behaviour of magnetically-isolated SMMs and to reveal, by comparison, the effect of intermolecular interactions. Here, we diluted a Fe4 SMM into a diamagnetic crystal lattice, affording arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. We found that the resonant tunnel transitions are much sharper, the tunneling efficiency changes significantly, and two-body QTM transitions disappear. These changes have been rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and of transverse dipolar fields, whose effect has been analyzed using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on the SMM behaviour and disclose the magnetic response of truly-isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment.[4pt] [1] W. Wernsdorfer, at al, PRL 82, 3903 (1999); PRL 89, 197201 (2002); Nature 416, 406 (2002); IS Tupitsyn, PCE Stamp, NV Prokof'ev, PRB 69, 132406 (2004).

  9. Giant magnetoresistance through a single molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaus, Stefan; Bagrets, Alexei; Nahas, Yasmine; Yamada, Toyo K; Bork, Annika; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Evers, Ferdinand; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2011-03-01

    Magnetoresistance is a change in the resistance of a material system caused by an applied magnetic field. Giant magnetoresistance occurs in structures containing ferromagnetic contacts separated by a metallic non-magnetic spacer, and is now the basis of read heads for hard drives and for new forms of random access memory. Using an insulator (for example, a molecular thin film) rather than a metal as the spacer gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance, which typically produces a larger change in resistance for a given magnetic field strength, but also yields higher resistances, which are a disadvantage for real device operation. Here, we demonstrate giant magnetoresistance across a single, non-magnetic hydrogen phthalocyanine molecule contacted by the ferromagnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We measure the magnetoresistance to be 60% and the conductance to be 0.26G(0), where G(0) is the quantum of conductance. Theoretical analysis identifies spin-dependent hybridization of molecular and electrode orbitals as the cause of the large magnetoresistance.

  10. Single-Molecule Plasmon Sensing: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Adam B; Zijlstra, Peter

    2017-08-25

    Single-molecule detection has long relied on fluorescent labeling with high quantum-yield fluorophores. Plasmon-enhanced detection circumvents the need for labeling by allowing direct optical detection of weakly emitting and completely nonfluorescent species. This review focuses on recent advances in single molecule detection using plasmonic metal nanostructures as a sensing platform, particularly using a single particle-single molecule approach. In the past decade two mechanisms for plasmon-enhanced single-molecule detection have been demonstrated: (1) by plasmonically enhancing the emission of weakly fluorescent biomolecules, or (2) by monitoring shifts of the plasmon resonance induced by single-molecule interactions. We begin with a motivation regarding the importance of single molecule detection, and advantages plasmonic detection offers. We describe both detection mechanisms and discuss challenges and potential solutions. We finalize by highlighting the exciting possibilities in analytical chemistry and medical diagnostics.

  11. A single molecule switch based on two Pd nanocrystals linked

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conducting molecule; nanocrystals; scanning tunneling microscopy; negative differential resistance. Abstract. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on a single molecule device formed by two Pd ... Current Issue : Vol.

  12. Single molecule force spectroscopy: methods and applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yi; Hu Jun

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule measurements have transformed our view of biomolecules. Owing to the ability of monitoring the activity of individual molecules, we now see them as uniquely structured, fluctuating molecules that stochastically transition between frequently many substrates, as two molecules do not follow precisely the same trajectory. Indeed, it is this discovery of critical yet short-lived substrates that were often missed in ensemble measurements that has perhaps contributed most to the better understanding of biomolecular functioning resulting from single molecule experiments. In this paper, we give a review on the three major techniques of single molecule force spectroscopy, and their applications especially in biology. The single molecular study of biotin-streptavidin interactions is introduced as a successful example. The problems and prospects of the single molecule force spectroscopy are discussed, too. (authors)

  13. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To simulate single gene retrieval from ancient DNA, several related factors have been investigated. By monitoring a 889 bp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product and genomic DNA degradation, we find that heat and oxygen (especially heat) are both crucial factors influencing DNA degradation. The heat influence ...

  14. Single molecular biology: coming of age in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Lou, Hui-Qiang

    2017-09-20

    DNA replication is an essential process of the living organisms. To achieve precise and reliable replication, DNA polymerases play a central role in DNA synthesis. Previous investigations have shown that the average rates of DNA synthesis on the leading and lagging strands in a replisome must be similar to avoid the formation of significant gaps in the nascent strands. The underlying mechanism has been assumed to be coordination between leading- and lagging-strand polymerases. However, Kowalczykowski's lab members recently performed single molecule techniques in E. coli and showed the real-time behavior of a replisome. The leading- and lagging-strand polymerases function stochastically and independently. Furthermore, when a DNA polymerase is paused, the helicase slows down in a self-regulating fail-safe mechanism, akin to a ''dead-man's switch''. Based on the real-time single-molecular observation, the authors propose that leading- and lagging-strand polymerases synthesize DNA stochastically within a Gaussian distribution. Along with the development and application of single-molecule techniques, we will witness a new age of DNA replication and other biological researches.

  15. Charge transport in polyguanine-polycytosine DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J H; Chan, K S

    2007-01-01

    A double chain tight-binding model is proposed to interpret the experimental I-V curves for polyguanine-polycytosine DNA molecules reported in Porath et al (2000 Nature 493 635). The proposed model includes the salient features of existing transport models of DNA molecules. The proposed double chain model fits excellently with the experimental I-V curves and provides a theoretical interpretation of features found in the I-V curves, which so far do not have a satisfactory explanation. Steps in the I-V curves are explained as the result of transmission gaps caused by hybridization with reservoirs and inter-chain coupling. Variations in I-V curves are due to the variation of inter-chain and intra-chain hopping parameters caused by structural changes in the DNA molecules

  16. Transport through a Single Octanethiol Molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kockmann, D.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Octanethiol molecules adsorbed on Pt chains are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 77 K. The head of the octanethiol binds to a Pt atom and the tail is lying flat down on the chain. Open-loop current time traces reveal that the molecule wags its tail and attaches to the

  17. Single-molecule diffusion and conformational dynamics by spatial integration of temporal fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2014-10-06

    Single-molecule localization and tracking has been used to translate spatiotemporal information of individual molecules to map their diffusion behaviours. However, accurate analysis of diffusion behaviours and including other parameters, such as the conformation and size of molecules, remain as limitations to the method. Here, we report a method that addresses the limitations of existing single-molecular localization methods. The method is based on temporal tracking of the cumulative area occupied by molecules. These temporal fluctuations are tied to molecular size, rates of diffusion and conformational changes. By analysing fluorescent nanospheres and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths and topological forms, we demonstrate that our cumulative-area method surpasses the conventional single-molecule localization method in terms of the accuracy of determined diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the cumulative-area method provides conformational relaxation times of structurally flexible chains along with diffusion coefficients, which together are relevant to work in a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

  18. Single-molecule diffusion and conformational dynamics by spatial integration of temporal fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.; Abadi, Maram; Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule localization and tracking has been used to translate spatiotemporal information of individual molecules to map their diffusion behaviours. However, accurate analysis of diffusion behaviours and including other parameters, such as the conformation and size of molecules, remain as limitations to the method. Here, we report a method that addresses the limitations of existing single-molecular localization methods. The method is based on temporal tracking of the cumulative area occupied by molecules. These temporal fluctuations are tied to molecular size, rates of diffusion and conformational changes. By analysing fluorescent nanospheres and double-stranded DNA molecules of different lengths and topological forms, we demonstrate that our cumulative-area method surpasses the conventional single-molecule localization method in terms of the accuracy of determined diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the cumulative-area method provides conformational relaxation times of structurally flexible chains along with diffusion coefficients, which together are relevant to work in a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

  19. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-05

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence.

  20. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA

  1. Experimental techniques for single cell and single molecule biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.T.; Zhou, E.H.; Li, A.; Vedula, S.R.K.; Fu, H.X.

    2006-01-01

    Stresses and strains that act on the human body can arise either from external physical forces or internal physiological environmental conditions. These biophysical interactions can occur not only at the musculoskeletal but also cellular and molecular levels and can determine the health and function of the human body. Here, we seek to investigate the structure-property-function relationship of cells and biomolecules so as to understand their important physiological functions as well as establish possible connections to human diseases. With the recent advancements in cell and molecular biology, biophysics and nanotechnology, several innovative and state-of-the-art experimental techniques and equipment have been developed to probe the structural and mechanical properties of biostructures from the micro- down to picoscale. Some of these experimental techniques include the optical or laser trap method, micropipette aspiration, step-pressure technique, atomic force microscopy and molecular force spectroscopy. In this article, we will review the basic principles and usage of these techniques to conduct single cell and single molecule biomechanics research

  2. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  3. A plasmonic biosensor with single-molecule sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, P.; Paulo, P.M.R.; Yuan, H.; Khatua, S.; Yorulmaz, M.; Orrit, M.

    2013-01-01

    The plasmon resonance of a single metal nanoparticle induces an enhancement of the local electromagnetic field. We exploit this field enhancement to detect single molecules that are (1) poorly fluorescent or (2) completely non-fluorescent.

  4. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNAs with Sticky Ends at Water/Fused Silica Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Slavica [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to study intermolecular interactions of DNAs with unpaired (sticky) ends of different lengths at water/fused silica interface at the single-molecule level. Evanescent field residence time, linear velocity and adsorption/desorption frequency were measured in a microchannel for individual DNA molecules from T7, Lambda, and PSP3 phages at various pH values. The longest residence times and the highest adsorption/desorption frequencies at the constant flow at pH 5.5 were found for PSP3 DNA, followed by lower values for Lambda DNA, and the lowest values for T7 DNA. Since T7, Lambda, and PSP3 DNA molecules contain none, twelve and nineteen unpaired bases, respectively, it was concluded that the affinity of DNAs for the surface increases with the length of the sticky ends. This confirms that hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between sticky ends and fused-silica surface are driving forces for DNA adsorption at the fused-silica surface. Described single-molecule methodology and results therein can be valuable for investigation of interactions in liquid chromatography, as well as for design of DNA hybridization sensors and drug delivery systems.

  5. Novel approaches for single molecule activation and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Benfenati, Fabio; Torre, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    How can we obtain tools able to process and exchange information at the molecular scale In order to do this, it is necessary to activate and detect single molecules under controlled conditions. This book focuses on the generation of biologically-inspired molecular devices. These devices are based on the developments of new photonic tools able to activate and stimulate single molecule machines. Additionally, new light sensitive molecules can be selectively activated by photonic tools. These technological innovations will provide a way to control activation of single light-sensitive molecules, a

  6. Nanoscale methods for single-molecule electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathwig, Klaus; Aartsma, Thijs J; Canters, Gerard W; Lemay, Serge G

    2014-01-01

    The development of experiments capable of probing individual molecules has led to major breakthroughs in fields ranging from molecular electronics to biophysics, allowing direct tests of knowledge derived from macroscopic measurements and enabling new assays that probe population heterogeneities and internal molecular dynamics. Although still somewhat in their infancy, such methods are also being developed for probing molecular systems in solution using electrochemical transduction mechanisms. Here we outline the present status of this emerging field, concentrating in particular on optical methods, metal-molecule-metal junctions, and electrochemical nanofluidic devices.

  7. Rotation of a single molecule within a supramolecular bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimzewski, J.K.; Joachim, C.; Schlittler, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental visualization and verification of a single-molecule rotor operating within a supramolecular bearing is reported. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, single molecules were observed to exist in one of two spatially defined states Laterally separated by 0.26 nanometers. One...

  8. Single molecule image formation, reconstruction and processing: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Amit; Piestun, Rafael; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2016-07-01

    The ability to image at the single molecule scale has revolutionized research in molecular biology. This feature issue presents a collection of articles that provides new insights into the fundamental limits of single molecule imaging and reports novel techniques for image formation and analysis.

  9. Voltage dependency of transmission probability of aperiodic DNA molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliyanti, V.; Yudiarsah, E.

    2017-07-01

    Characteristics of electron transports in aperiodic DNA molecules have been studied. Double stranded DNA model with the sequences of bases, GCTAGTACGTGACGTAGCTAGGATATGCCTGA, in one chain and its complements on the other chains has been used. Tight binding Hamiltonian is used to model DNA molecules. In the model, we consider that on-site energy of the basis has a linearly dependency on the applied electric field. Slater-Koster scheme is used to model electron hopping constant between bases. The transmission probability of electron from one electrode to the next electrode is calculated using a transfer matrix technique and scattering matrix method simultaneously. The results show that, generally, higher voltage gives a slightly larger value of the transmission probability. The applied voltage seems to shift extended states to lower energy. Meanwhile, the value of the transmission increases with twisting motion frequency increment.

  10. Electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry towards the single-molecule level: Theoretical notions and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingdong; Chi Qijin; Albrecht, Tim; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Welinder, Anne C.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Surface structures controlled at the nanometer and single-molecule levels, with functions crucially determined by interfacial electron transfer (ET) are broadly reported in recent years, with different kinds of electrochemically controlled nanoscale/single molecule systems. One is the broad class of metallic and semiconductor-based nanoparticles, nano-arrays, nanotubes, and nanopits. Others are based on self-assembled molecular monolayers. The latter extend to bioelectrochemical systems with redox metalloproteins and DNA-based molecules as targets. We overview here some recent achievements in areas of interfacial electrochemical ET systems, mapped to the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Focus is on both experimental and theoretical studies in our group. Systems addressed are organized monolayers of redox active transition metal complexes, and metalloproteins and metalloenzymes on single-crystal Au(1 1 1)-electrode surfaces. These systems have been investigated by voltammetry, spectroscopy, microcantilever technology, and scanning probe microscopy. A class of Os-complexes has shown suitable as targets for electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), with close to single-molecule scanning tunnelling spectroscopic (STS) features. Mapping of redox metalloproteins from the three major classes, i.e. blue copper proteins, heme proteins, and iron-sulfur proteins, at the monolayer and single-molecule levels have also been achieved. In situ STM and spectroscopy of redox molecules and biomolecules have been supported by new theoretical frames, which extend established theory of interfacial electrochemical ET. The electrochemical nanoscale and single-molecule systems discussed are compared with other recent nanoscale and single-molecule systems with conspicuous device-like properties, particularly unimolecular rectifiers and single-molecule transistors. Both of these show analogies to electrochemical in situ STM features of redox molecules and

  11. Single-tube library preparation for degraded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carøe, Christian; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Vinner, Lasse

    2018-01-01

    these obstacles and enable higher throughput are therefore of interest to researchers working with degraded DNA. 2.In this study, we compare four Illumina library preparation protocols, including two “single-tube” methods developed for this study with the explicit aim of improving data quality and reducing...... of chemically damaged and highly fragmented DNA molecules. In particular, the enzymatic reactions and DNA purification steps during library preparation can result in DNA template loss and sequencing biases, affecting downstream analyses. The development of library preparation methods that circumvent...... preparation time and expenses. The methods are tested on grey wolf (Canis lupus) museum specimens. 3.We found single-tube protocols increase library complexity, yield more reads that map uniquely to the reference genome, reduce processing time, and may decrease laboratory costs by 90%. 4.Given the advantages...

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of Venus at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Charlotte C; Dedecker, Peter; De Cremer, Gert; Verstraeten, Natalie; Kint, Cyrielle; Michiels, Jan; Hofkens, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Venus is a recently developed, fast maturating, yellow fluorescent protein that has been used as a probe for in vivo applications. In the present work the photophysical characteristics of Venus were analyzed spectroscopically at the bulk and single molecule level. Through time-resolved single molecule measurements we found that single molecules of Venus display pronounced fluctuations in fluorescence emission, with clear fluorescence on- and off-times. These fluorescence intermittencies were found to occupy a broad range of time scales, ranging from milliseconds to several seconds. Such long off-times can complicate the analysis of single molecule counting experiments or single-molecule FRET experiments. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  13. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Severin, Jessica

    2016-07-19

    There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

  14. Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emory, S. R. (Steven R.); Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M. (Peter M); Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  15. Controlled transport through a single molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Avijit; Heimbuch, Rene; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate how an electrode–molecule–electrode junction can be controllably opened and closed by careful tuning of the contacts' interspace and voltage. The molecule, an octanethiol, flips to bridge a ~1 nm interspace between substrate and scanning tunnelling microscope tip when an electric

  16. Single-Molecule Detection in Nanogap-Embedded Plasmonic Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyan Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce nanogap-embedded silver plasmonic gratings for single-molecule (SM visualization using an epifluorescence microscope. This silver plasmonic platform was fabricated by a cost-effective nano-imprint lithography technique, using an HD DVD template. DNA/ RNA duplex molecules tagged with Cy3/Cy5 fluorophores were immobilized on SiO 2 -capped silver gratings. Light was coupled to the gratings at particular wavelengths and incident angles to form surface plasmons. The SM fluorescence intensity of the fluorophores at the nanogaps showed approximately a 100-fold mean enhancement with respect to the fluorophores observed on quartz slides using an epifluorescence microscope. This high level of enhancement was due to the concentration of surface plasmons at the nanogaps. When nanogaps imaged with epifluorescence mode were compared to quartz imaged using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy, more than a 30-fold mean enhancement was obtained. Due to the SM fluorescence enhancement of plasmonic gratings and the correspondingly high emission intensity, the required laser power can be reduced, resulting in a prolonged detection time prior to photobleaching. This simple platform was able to perform SM studies with a low-cost epifluorescence apparatus, instead of the more expensive TIRF or confocal microscopes, which would enable SM analysis to take place in most scientific laboratories.

  17. Zero-mode waveguide nanophotonic structures for single molecule characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Garrison M.; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W.

    2018-05-01

    Single-molecule characterization has become a crucial research tool in the chemical and life sciences, but limitations, such as limited concentration range, inability to control molecular distributions in space, and intrinsic phenomena, such as photobleaching, present significant challenges. Recent developments in non-classical optics and nanophotonics offer promising routes to mitigating these restrictions, such that even low affinity (K D ~ mM) biomolecular interactions can be studied. Here we introduce and review specific nanophotonic devices used to support single molecule studies. Optical nanostructures, such as zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs), are usually fabricated in thin gold or aluminum films and serve to confine the observation volume of optical microspectroscopy to attoliter to zeptoliter volumes. These simple nanostructures allow individual molecules to be isolated for optical and electrochemical analysis, even when the molecules of interest are present at high concentration (µM–mM) in bulk solution. Arrays of ZMWs may be combined with optical probes such as single molecule fluorescence, single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for distributed analysis of large numbers of single-molecule reactions or binding events in parallel. Furthermore, ZMWs may be used as multifunctional devices, for example by combining optical and electrochemical functions in a single discrete architecture to achieve electrochemical ZMWs. In this review, we will describe the optical properties, fabrication, and applications of ZMWs for single-molecule studies, as well as the integration of ZMWs into systems for chemical and biochemical analysis.

  18. Single Molecules as Optical Probes for Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrit, Michel

    Single molecules and single nanoparticles are convenient links between the nanoscale world and the laboratory. We discuss the limits for their optical detection by three different methods: fluorescence, direct absorption, and photothermal detection. We briefly review some recent illustrations of qualitatively new information gathered from single-molecule signals: intermittency of the fluorescence intensity, acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles (1-100 GHz) or of extended defects in molecular crystals (0.1-1 MHz), and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming molecular liquids. We conclude with an outlook of future uses of single-molecule methods in physical chemistry, soft matter, and material science.

  19. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  20. Conformational Smear Characterization and Binning of Single-Molecule Conductance Measurements for Enhanced Molecular Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshoj, Lee E; Afsari, Sepideh; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-11-01

    Electronic conduction or charge transport through single molecules depends primarily on molecular structure and anchoring groups and forms the basis for a wide range of studies from molecular electronics to DNA sequencing. Several high-throughput nanoelectronic methods such as mechanical break junctions, nanopores, conductive atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling break junctions, and static nanoscale electrodes are often used for measuring single-molecule conductance. In these measurements, "smearing" due to conformational changes and other entropic factors leads to large variances in the observed molecular conductance, especially in individual measurements. Here, we show a method for characterizing smear in single-molecule conductance measurements and demonstrate how binning measurements according to smear can significantly enhance the use of individual conductance measurements for molecular recognition. Using quantum point contact measurements on single nucleotides within DNA macromolecules, we demonstrate that the distance over which molecular junctions are maintained is a measure of smear, and the resulting variance in unbiased single measurements depends on this smear parameter. Our ability to identify individual DNA nucleotides at 20× coverage increases from 81.3% accuracy without smear analysis to 93.9% with smear characterization and binning (SCRIB). Furthermore, merely 7 conductance measurements (7× coverage) are needed to achieve 97.8% accuracy for DNA nucleotide recognition when only low molecular smear measurements are used, which represents a significant improvement over contemporary sequencing methods. These results have important implications in a broad range of molecular electronics applications from designing robust molecular switches to nanoelectronic DNA sequencing.

  1. Inhibition of DNA glycosylases via small molecule purine analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C Jacobs

    Full Text Available Following the formation of oxidatively-induced DNA damage, several DNA glycosylases are required to initiate repair of the base lesions that are formed. Recently, NEIL1 and other DNA glycosylases, including OGG1 and NTH1 were identified as potential targets in combination chemotherapeutic strategies. The potential therapeutic benefit for the inhibition of DNA glycosylases was validated by demonstrating synthetic lethality with drugs that are commonly used to limit DNA replication through dNTP pool depletion via inhibition of thymidylate synthetase and dihydrofolate reductase. Additionally, NEIL1-associated synthetic lethality has been achieved in combination with Fanconi anemia, group G. As a prelude to the development of strategies to exploit the potential benefits of DNA glycosylase inhibition, it was necessary to develop a reliable high-throughput screening protocol for this class of enzymes. Using NEIL1 as the proof-of-principle glycosylase, a fluorescence-based assay was developed that utilizes incision of site-specifically modified oligodeoxynucleotides to detect enzymatic activity. This assay was miniaturized to a 1536-well format and used to screen small molecule libraries for inhibitors of the combined glycosylase/AP lyase activities. Among the top hits of these screens were several purine analogs, whose postulated presence in the active site of NEIL1 was consistent with the paradigm of NEIL1 recognition and excision of damaged purines. Although a subset of these small molecules could inhibit other DNA glycosylases that excise oxidatively-induced DNA adducts, they could not inhibit a pyrimidine dimer-specific glycosylase.

  2. Quantum design rules for single molecule logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, N; Hliwa, M; Joachim, C

    2011-08-28

    Recent publications have demonstrated how to implement a NOR logic gate with a single molecule using its interaction with two surface atoms as logical inputs [W. Soe et al., ACS Nano, 2011, 5, 1436]. We demonstrate here how this NOR logic gate belongs to the general family of quantum logic gates where the Boolean truth table results from a full control of the quantum trajectory of the electron transfer process through the molecule by very local and classical inputs practiced on the molecule. A new molecule OR gate is proposed for the logical inputs to be also single metal atoms, one per logical input.

  3. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule, and on how the electron transport properties of the molecule depend on the strength of the electronic coupling between it and the electrodes. A variety of phenomena are observed depending on whether this coupling is weak, intermediate or strong.

  4. Direct Single-Molecule Observation of Mode and Geometry of RecA-Mediated Homology Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew J; Endo, Masayuki; Hobbs, Jamie K; Wälti, Christoph

    2018-01-23

    Genomic integrity, when compromised by accrued DNA lesions, is maintained through efficient repair via homologous recombination. For this process the ubiquitous recombinase A (RecA), and its homologues such as the human Rad51, are of central importance, able to align and exchange homologous sequences within single-stranded and double-stranded DNA in order to swap out defective regions. Here, we directly observe the widely debated mechanism of RecA homology searching at a single-molecule level using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) in combination with tailored DNA origami frames to present the reaction targets in a way suitable for AFM-imaging. We show that RecA nucleoprotein filaments move along DNA substrates via short-distance facilitated diffusions, or slides, interspersed with longer-distance random moves, or hops. Importantly, from the specific interaction geometry, we find that the double-stranded substrate DNA resides in the secondary DNA binding-site within the RecA nucleoprotein filament helical groove during the homology search. This work demonstrates that tailored DNA origami, in conjunction with HS-AFM, can be employed to reveal directly conformational and geometrical information on dynamic protein-DNA interactions which was previously inaccessible at an individual single-molecule level.

  5. A Brief Introduction to Single-Molecule Fluorescence Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wildenberg, Siet M J L; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2018-01-01

    One of the more popular single-molecule approaches in biological science is single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which will be the subject of the following section of this volume. Fluorescence methods provide the sensitivity required to study biology on the single-molecule level, but they also allow access to useful measurable parameters on time and length scales relevant for the biomolecular world. Before several detailed experimental approaches will be addressed, we will first give a general overview of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We start with discussing the phenomenon of fluorescence in general and the history of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Next, we will review fluorescent probes in more detail and the equipment required to visualize them on the single-molecule level. We will end with a description of parameters measurable with such approaches, ranging from protein counting and tracking, single-molecule localization super-resolution microscopy, to distance measurements with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer and orientation measurements with fluorescence polarization.

  6. Direct single-molecule dynamic detection of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianxin; Jia, Chuancheng; Li, Yanwei; Liu, Zitong; Wang, Jinying; Yang, Zhongyue; Gu, Chunhui; Su, Dingkai; Houk, Kendall N; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule detection can reveal time trajectories and reaction pathways of individual intermediates/transition states in chemical reactions and biological processes, which is of fundamental importance to elucidate their intrinsic mechanisms. We present a reliable, label-free single-molecule approach that allows us to directly explore the dynamic process of basic chemical reactions at the single-event level by using stable graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions. These junctions are constructed by covalently connecting a single molecule with a 9-fluorenone center to nanogapped graphene electrodes. For the first time, real-time single-molecule electrical measurements unambiguously show reproducible large-amplitude two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on solvent environments in a nucleophilic addition reaction of hydroxylamine to a carbonyl group. Both theoretical simulations and ensemble experiments prove that this observation originates from the reversible transition between the reactant and a new intermediate state within a time scale of a few microseconds. These investigations open up a new route that is able to be immediately applied to probe fast single-molecule physics or biophysics with high time resolution, making an important contribution to broad fields beyond reaction chemistry.

  7. Conserved linear dynamics of single-molecule Brownian motion

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2017-06-06

    Macromolecular diffusion in homogeneous fluid at length scales greater than the size of the molecule is regarded as a random process. The mean-squared displacement (MSD) of molecules in this regime increases linearly with time. Here we show that non-random motion of DNA molecules in this regime that is undetectable by the MSD analysis can be quantified by characterizing the molecular motion relative to a latticed frame of reference. Our lattice occupancy analysis reveals unexpected sub-modes of motion of DNA that deviate from expected random motion in the linear, diffusive regime. We demonstrate that a subtle interplay between these sub-modes causes the overall diffusive motion of DNA to appear to conform to the linear regime. Our results show that apparently random motion of macromolecules could be governed by non-random dynamics that are detectable only by their relative motion. Our analytical approach should advance broad understanding of diffusion processes of fundamental relevance.

  8. Conserved linear dynamics of single-molecule Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serag, Maged F.; Habuchi, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in homogeneous fluid at length scales greater than the size of the molecule is regarded as a random process. The mean-squared displacement (MSD) of molecules in this regime increases linearly with time. Here we show that non-random motion of DNA molecules in this regime that is undetectable by the MSD analysis can be quantified by characterizing the molecular motion relative to a latticed frame of reference. Our lattice occupancy analysis reveals unexpected sub-modes of motion of DNA that deviate from expected random motion in the linear, diffusive regime. We demonstrate that a subtle interplay between these sub-modes causes the overall diffusive motion of DNA to appear to conform to the linear regime. Our results show that apparently random motion of macromolecules could be governed by non-random dynamics that are detectable only by their relative motion. Our analytical approach should advance broad understanding of diffusion processes of fundamental relevance.

  9. Conserved linear dynamics of single-molecule Brownian motion

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.; Habuchi, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in homogeneous fluid at length scales greater than the size of the molecule is regarded as a random process. The mean-squared displacement (MSD) of molecules in this regime increases linearly with time. Here we show that non-random motion of DNA molecules in this regime that is undetectable by the MSD analysis can be quantified by characterizing the molecular motion relative to a latticed frame of reference. Our lattice occupancy analysis reveals unexpected sub-modes of motion of DNA that deviate from expected random motion in the linear, diffusive regime. We demonstrate that a subtle interplay between these sub-modes causes the overall diffusive motion of DNA to appear to conform to the linear regime. Our results show that apparently random motion of macromolecules could be governed by non-random dynamics that are detectable only by their relative motion. Our analytical approach should advance broad understanding of diffusion processes of fundamental relevance.

  10. The mechanism of 2-dimensional manipulation of DNA molecules by water and ethanol flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zigang; Huang Yibo; Li Bin; Zhang Yi

    2007-01-01

    Due to its unique physical and chemical properties, DNA has recently become a promising material for building blocks in nanofabrication. Many researches focus on how to use DNA molecules as a template for nanowires. Molecular Combing technique is one of important methods to manipulate DNA molecules by using a water meniscus and form specific DNA nano-structures on surfaces. In this paper, by employing a modified molecular combing technique, special patterns of DNA molecules was formed, and the interaction between liquid flows or meniscus and DNA molecules was analyzed, and the mechanism of manipulating DNA molecules by liquid was studied. (authors)

  11. Solid-state nanopores for scanning single molecules and mimicking biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalczyk, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores, nanometer-size holes in a thin synthetic membrane, are a versatile tool for the detection and manipulation of charged biomolecules. This thesis describes mostly experimental work on DNA translocation through solid-state nanopores, which we study at the single-molecule level.

  12. Single molecule magnets from magnetic building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, W.; Paretzki, A.; Cervetti, C.; Hohloch, S.; Rauschenbach, S.; Kern, K.; Dressel, M.; Bogani, L.; M&üLler, P.

    2013-03-01

    We provide a basic set of magnetic building blocks that can be rationally assembled, similar to magnetic LEGO bricks, in order to create a huge variety of magnetic behavior. Using rare-earth centers and multipyridine ligands, fine-tuning of intra and intermolecular exchange interaction is demonstrated. We have investigated a series of molecules with monomeric, dimeric and trimeric lanthanide centers using SQUID susceptometry and Hall bar magnetometry. A home-made micro-Hall-probe magnetometer was used to measure magnetic hysteresis loops at mK temperatures and fields up to 17 T. All compounds show hysteresis below blocking temperatures of 3 to 4 K. The correlation of the assembly of the building blocks with the magnetic properties will be discussed.

  13. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  14. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  15. Excitonic Behavior of Rhodamine Dimers: A Single-Molecule Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernando Campos, J.; van der Schaaf, Martijn; van Dijk, E.M.H.P.; Sauer, Markus; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2003-01-01

    The optical behavior of a dimer of tetramethylrhodamine-5-isothiocyanate has been investigated by means of single-molecule measurements. Bulk absorption and fluorescence spectra show the existence of two populations of the dimer molecule that exhibit distinct excitonic interactions (strong and weak

  16. Isolated single-molecule magnets on native gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobbi, Laura; Mannini, Matteo; Pacchioni, Mirko; Chastanet, Guillaume; Bonacchi, Daniele; Zanardi, Chiara; Biagi, Roberto; Del Pennino, Umberto; Gatteschi, Dante; Cornia, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2005-03-28

    The incorporation of thioether groups in the structure of a Mn12 single-molecule magnet, [Mn12(O12)(L)16(H2O)4] with L = 4-(methylthio)benzoate, is a successful route to the deposition of well-separated clusters on native gold surfaces and to the addressing of individual molecules by scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  17. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  18. Fast temporal fluctuations in single-molecule junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Roif; Secker, Daniel; Elbing, Mark; Mayor, Marcel; Weber, Heiko B

    2006-01-01

    The noise within the electrical current through single-molecule junctions is studied cryogenic temperature. The organic sample molecules were contacted with the mechanically controlled break-junction technique. The noise spectra refer to a where only few Lorentzian fluctuators occur in the conductance. The frequency dependence shows qualitative variations from sample to sample.

  19. Detection of kinetic change points in piece-wise linear single molecule motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Flynn R.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Duderstadt, Karl E.

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule approaches present a powerful way to obtain detailed kinetic information at the molecular level. However, the identification of small rate changes is often hindered by the considerable noise present in such single-molecule kinetic data. We present a general method to detect such kinetic change points in trajectories of motion of processive single molecules having Gaussian noise, with a minimum number of parameters and without the need of an assumed kinetic model beyond piece-wise linearity of motion. Kinetic change points are detected using a likelihood ratio test in which the probability of no change is compared to the probability of a change occurring, given the experimental noise. A predetermined confidence interval minimizes the occurrence of false detections. Applying the method recursively to all sub-regions of a single molecule trajectory ensures that all kinetic change points are located. The algorithm presented allows rigorous and quantitative determination of kinetic change points in noisy single molecule observations without the need for filtering or binning, which reduce temporal resolution and obscure dynamics. The statistical framework for the approach and implementation details are discussed. The detection power of the algorithm is assessed using simulations with both single kinetic changes and multiple kinetic changes that typically arise in observations of single-molecule DNA-replication reactions. Implementations of the algorithm are provided in ImageJ plugin format written in Java and in the Julia language for numeric computing, with accompanying Jupyter Notebooks to allow reproduction of the analysis presented here.

  20. Single Molecule Sensors to Study Hydrophobic Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Geisler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the hydrophobic interaction is crucial for many technical and biological processes. In the current study a molecular probe was developed which consists of a single polymer that is bound onto the tip of an AFM cantilever in order to study these effects on the molecular scale. In the following, equilibrium forces are measured and factors of influence such as temperature, cosolvents and chemical composition are varied. Thereby, the system under investigation is so sma...

  1. Single atom and-molecules chemisorption on solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anda, E.V.; Ure, J.E.; Majlis, N.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified model for the microscopic interpretation of single atom and- molecules chemisorption on metallic surfaces is presented. An appropriated hamiltonian for this problem is resolved, through the Green's function formalism. (L.C.) [pt

  2. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  3. Single Molecule Spectroscopy in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Nobel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Gräslund, Astrid; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Written by the leading experts in the field, this book describes the development and current state-of-the-art in single molecule spectroscopy. The application of this technique, which started 1989, in physics, chemistry and biosciences is displayed.

  4. Electrochemically-gated single-molecule electrical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shaoyin; Artés, Juan Manuel; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, single-molecule electrical contacts have emerged as a new experimental platform that allows exploring charge transport phenomena in individual molecular blocks. This novel tool has evolved into an essential element within the Molecular Electronics field to understand charge transport processes in hybrid (bio)molecule/electrode interfaces at the nanoscale, and prospect the implementation of active molecular components into functional nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Within this area, three-terminal single-molecule devices have been sought, provided that they are highly desired to achieve full functionality in logic electronic circuits. Despite the latest experimental developments offer consistent methods to bridge a molecule between two electrodes (source and drain in a transistor notation), placing a third electrode (gate) close to the single-molecule electrical contact is still technically challenging. In this vein, electrochemically-gated single-molecule devices have emerged as an experimentally affordable alternative to overcome these technical limitations. In this review, the operating principle of an electrochemically-gated single-molecule device is presented together with the latest experimental methodologies to built them and characterize their charge transport characteristics. Then, an up-to-date comprehensive overview of the most prominent examples will be given, emphasizing on the relationship between the molecular structure and the final device electrical behaviour

  5. Fluorescent Biosensors Based on Single-Molecule Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Li, Ying; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2016-09-20

    Biosensors for highly sensitive, selective, and rapid quantification of specific biomolecules make great contributions to biomedical research, especially molecular diagnostics. However, conventional methods for biomolecular assays often suffer from insufficient sensitivity and poor specificity. In some case (e.g., early disease diagnostics), the concentration of target biomolecules is too low to be detected by these routine approaches, and cumbersome procedures are needed to improve the detection sensitivity. Therefore, there is an urgent need for rapid and ultrasensitive analytical tools. In this respect, single-molecule fluorescence approaches may well satisfy the requirement and hold promising potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors. Encouragingly, owing to the advances in single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy over past decades, the detection of single fluorescent molecule comes true, greatly boosting the development of highly sensitive biosensors. By in vitro/in vivo labeling of target biomolecules with proper fluorescent tags, the quantification of certain biomolecule at the single-molecule level is achieved. In comparison with conventional ensemble measurements, single-molecule detection-based analytical methods possess the advantages of ultrahigh sensitivity, good selectivity, rapid analysis time, and low sample consumption. Consequently, single-molecule detection may be potentially employed as an ideal analytical approach to quantify low-abundant biomolecules with rapidity and simplicity. In this Account, we will summarize our efforts for developing a series of ultrasensitive biosensors based on single-molecule counting. Single-molecule counting is a member of single-molecule detection technologies and may be used as a very simple and ultrasensitive method to quantify target molecules by simply counting the individual fluorescent bursts. In the fluorescent sensors, the signals of target biomolecules may be translated to the

  6. Semisynthetic protein nanoreactor for single-molecule chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joongoo; Bayley, Hagan

    2015-01-01

    The modulation of ionic current flowing through an individual protein pore provides information at the single-molecule level about chemical reactions occurring within the pore. However, chemistry investigated in this way has been largely confined to the reactions of thiolates, presented by the side chains of cysteine residues. The introduction of unnatural amino acids would provide a large variety of reactive side chains with which additional single-molecule chemistry could be investigated. H...

  7. A study on interaction of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes for an effective ejection of the molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, N.; Wang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The ejection of DNA molecules from carbon nanotubes is reported from interaction energy perspectives by molecular dynamics simulations. The critical ejection energy, which is to be applied to a DNA molecule for a successful ejection from a carbon nanotube, is investigated based on a study on the friction and binding energy between the DNA molecule and the tube. An effective ejection is realized by subjecting a kinetic energy on the DNA molecule that is larger than the solved critical ejection energy. In addition, the relationship between ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes is investigated. -- Highlights: ► Report the ejection of DNA molecules from CNTs from interaction energy perspectives. ► Develop a methodology for the critical energy of an effective ejection of a DNA molecule from a CNT. ► Present the relationship between critical ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and CNTs. ► Provide a general guidance on the ejection of encapsulated molecules from CNTs.

  8. Real-time monitoring and manipulation of single bio-molecules in free solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hung-Wing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The observation and manipulation of single biomolecules allow their dynamic behaviors to be studied to provide insight into molecular genetics, biochip assembly, biosensor design, DNA biophysics. In a PDMS/glass microchannel, a nonuniform electroosmotic flow (EOF) was created. By using a scanning confocal fluorescence microscope and total internal-reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM), we demonstrated that negatively charged DNA molecules were focused by the nonuniform EOF into a thin layer at the glass surface. This phenomenon was applied to selectively detect target DNA molecules without requiring the separation of excessive probes and can be applied continuously to achieve high throughput. A variable-angle-TIRFM was constructed for imaging single DNA molecule dynamics at a solid/liquid interface. Implications we have are that the measured intensities cannot be used directly to determine the distances of molecules from the surface and the experimental counting results depict the distance-dependent dynamics of molecules near the surface; Molecules at low ionic strengths experience electrostatic repulsion at distances much further away from the surface than the calculated thickness of the electrical double layer. {delta}-DNA was employed as a nanoprobe for different functionalized surfaces to elucidate adsorption in chromatography. The 12-base unpaired ends of this DNA provide exposed purine and pyrimidine groups for adsorption. Patterns of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and patterns of metal oxides are generated. By recording the real-time dynamic motion of DNA molecules at the SAMs/aqueous interface, the various parameters governing the retention of an analyte during chromatographic separation can be studied. Even subtle differences among adsorptive forces can be revealed. Dynamic conformational changes of the prosthetic group, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), in flavoprotein NADH peroxidase, in thioredoxin reductase, and in free solution were monitored

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting DNA Repair and DNA Repair Deficiency in Research and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengel, Sarah R; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2017-09-21

    To maintain stable genomes and to avoid cancer and aging, cells need to repair a multitude of deleterious DNA lesions, which arise constantly in every cell. Processes that support genome integrity in normal cells, however, allow cancer cells to develop resistance to radiation and DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics. Chemical inhibition of the key DNA repair proteins and pharmacologically induced synthetic lethality have become instrumental in both dissecting the complex DNA repair networks and as promising anticancer agents. The difficulty in capitalizing on synthetically lethal interactions in cancer cells is that many potential targets do not possess well-defined small-molecule binding determinates. In this review, we discuss several successful campaigns to identify and leverage small-molecule inhibitors of the DNA repair proteins, from PARP1, a paradigm case for clinically successful small-molecule inhibitors, to coveted new targets, such as RAD51 recombinase, RAD52 DNA repair protein, MRE11 nuclease, and WRN DNA helicase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Gimzewski, James K; Mishra, Bud

    2008-01-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing

  11. Electrochemical proton relay at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Medvedev, I. G.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    A scheme for the experimental study of single-proton transfer events, based on proton-coupled two-electron transfer between a proton donor and a proton acceptor molecule confined in the tunneling gap between two metal leads in electrolyte solution is suggested. Expressions for the electric current...... are derived and compared with formalism for electron tunneling through redox molecules. The scheme allows studying the kinetics of proton and hydrogen atom transfer as well as kinetic isotope effects at the single-molecule level under electrochemical potential control....

  12. SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY, 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27-JULY 2, 2010, ITALY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor William Moerner

    2010-07-09

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology focuses on cutting-edge research in single-molecule science. Tremendous technical developments have made it possible to detect, identify, track, and manipulate single biomolecules in an ambient environment or even in a live cell. Single-molecule approaches have changed the way many biological problems are addressed, and new knowledge derived from these approaches continues to emerge. The ability of single-molecule approaches to avoid ensemble averaging and to capture transient intermediates and heterogeneous behavior renders them particularly powerful in elucidating mechanisms of biomolecular machines: what they do, how they work individually, how they work together, and finally, how they work inside live cells. The burgeoning use of single-molecule methods to elucidate biological problems is a highly multidisciplinary pursuit, involving both force- and fluorescence-based methods, the most up-to-date advances in microscopy, innovative biological and chemical approaches, and nanotechnology tools. This conference seeks to bring together top experts in molecular and cell biology with innovators in the measurement and manipulation of single molecules, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and to exchange ideas with leaders in the field. A number of excellent poster presenters will be selected for short oral talks. Topics as diverse as single-molecule sequencing, DNA/RNA/protein interactions, folding machines, cellular biophysics, synthetic biology and bioengineering, force spectroscopy, new method developments, superresolution imaging in cells, and novel probes for single-molecule imaging will be on the program. Additionally, the collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings in the beauty of the Il Ciocco site in

  13. A theoretical justification for single molecule peptide sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Swaminathan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The proteomes of cells, tissues, and organisms reflect active cellular processes and change continuously in response to intracellular and extracellular cues. Deep, quantitative profiling of the proteome, especially if combined with mRNA and metabolite measurements, should provide an unprecedented view of cell state, better revealing functions and interactions of cell components. Molecular diagnostics and biomarker discovery should benefit particularly from the accurate quantification of proteomes, since complex diseases like cancer change protein abundances and modifications. Currently, shotgun mass spectrometry is the primary technology for high-throughput protein identification and quantification; while powerful, it lacks high sensitivity and coverage. We draw parallels with next-generation DNA sequencing and propose a strategy, termed fluorosequencing, for sequencing peptides in a complex protein sample at the level of single molecules. In the proposed approach, millions of individual fluorescently labeled peptides are visualized in parallel, monitoring changing patterns of fluorescence intensity as N-terminal amino acids are sequentially removed, and using the resulting fluorescence signatures (fluorosequences to uniquely identify individual peptides. We introduce a theoretical foundation for fluorosequencing and, by using Monte Carlo computer simulations, we explore its feasibility, anticipate the most likely experimental errors, quantify their potential impact, and discuss the broad potential utility offered by a high-throughput peptide sequencing technology.

  14. Single-Molecule Analysis for RISC Assembly and Target Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi M; Tadakuma, Hisashi; Tomari, Yukihide

    2018-01-01

    RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is a small RNA-protein complex that mediates silencing of complementary target RNAs. Biochemistry has been successfully used to characterize the molecular mechanism of RISC assembly and function for nearly two decades. However, further dissection of intermediate states during the reactions has been warranted to fill in the gaps in our understanding of RNA silencing mechanisms. Single-molecule analysis with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful imaging-based approach to interrogate complex formation and dynamics at the individual molecule level with high sensitivity. Combining this technique with our recently established in vitro reconstitution system of fly Ago2-RISC, we have developed a single-molecule observation system for RISC assembly. In this chapter, we summarize the detailed protocol for single-molecule analysis of chaperone-assisted assembly of fly Ago2-RISC as well as its target cleavage reaction.

  15. Massively Parallel Single-Molecule Manipulation Using Centrifugal Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wesley; Halvorsen, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Precise manipulation of single molecules has led to remarkable insights in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, two issues that have impeded the widespread adoption of these techniques are equipment cost and the laborious nature of making measurements one molecule at a time. To meet these challenges, we have developed an approach that enables massively parallel single- molecule force measurements using centrifugal force. This approach is realized in the centrifuge force microscope, an instrument in which objects in an orbiting sample are subjected to a calibration-free, macroscopically uniform force- field while their micro-to-nanoscopic motions are observed. We demonstrate high- throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy with this technique by performing thousands of rupture experiments in parallel, characterizing force-dependent unbinding kinetics of an antibody-antigen pair in minutes rather than days. Currently, we are taking steps to integrate high-resolution detection, fluorescence, temperature control and a greater dynamic range in force. With significant benefits in efficiency, cost, simplicity, and versatility, single-molecule centrifugation has the potential to expand single-molecule experimentation to a wider range of researchers and experimental systems.

  16. Lattice diffusion of a single molecule in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Francesca; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2017-12-01

    The ability to trap a single molecule in an electrostatic potential well in solution has opened up new possibilities for the use of molecular electrical charge to study macromolecular conformation and dynamics at the level of the single entity. Here we study the diffusion of a single macromolecule in a two-dimensional lattice of electrostatic traps in solution. We report the ability to measure both the size and effective electrical charge of a macromolecule by observing single-molecule transport trajectories, typically a few seconds in length, using fluorescence microscopy. While, as shown previously, the time spent by the molecule in a trap is a strong function of its effective charge, we demonstrate here that the average travel time between traps in the landscape yields its hydrodynamic radius. Tailoring the pitch of the lattice thus yields two different experimentally measurable time scales that together uniquely determine both the size and charge of the molecule. Since no information is required on the location of the molecule between consecutive departure and arrival events at lattice sites, the technique is ideally suited to measurements on weakly emitting entities such as single molecules.

  17. Vesicle Encapsulation Studies Reveal that Single Molecule Ribozyme Heterogeneities Are Intrinsic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumus, Burak; Wilson, Timothy J.; Lilley, David M. J.; Ha, Taekjip

    2004-01-01

    Single-molecule measurements have revealed that what were assumed to be identical molecules can differ significantly in their static and dynamic properties. One of the most striking examples is the hairpin ribozyme, which was shown to exhibit two to three orders of magnitude variation in folding kinetics between molecules. Although averaged behavior of single molecules matched the bulk solution data, it was not possible to exclude rigorously the possibility that the variations around the mean values arose from different ways of interacting with the surface environment. To test this, we minimized the molecules' interaction with the surface by encapsulating DNA or RNA molecules inside 100- to 200-nm diameter unilamellar vesicles, following the procedures described by Haran and coworkers. Vesicles were immobilized on a supported lipid bilayer via biotin-streptavidin linkages. We observed no direct binding of DNA or RNA on the supported bilayer even at concentrations exceeding 100 nM, indicating that these molecules do not bind stably on the membrane. Since the vesicle diameter is smaller than the resolution of optical microscopy, the lateral mobility of the molecules is severely constrained, allowing long observation periods. We used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, nuclease digestion, and external buffer exchange to show that the molecules were indeed encapsulated within the vesicles. When contained within vesicles, the natural form of the hairpin ribozyme exhibited 50-fold variation in both folding and unfolding rates in 0.5 mM Mg2+, which is identical to what was observed from the molecules tethered directly on the surface. This strongly indicates that the observed heterogeneity in dynamic properties does not arise as an artifact of surface attachment, but is intrinsic to the nature of the molecules. PMID:15454471

  18. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  19. Challenges for single molecule electronic devices with nanographene and organic molecules. Do single molecules offer potential as elements of electronic devices in the next generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Interest in utilizing organic molecules to fabricate electronic materials has existed ever since organic (molecular) semiconductors were first discovered in the 1950s. Since then, scientists have devoted serious effort to the creation of various molecule-based electronic systems, such as molecular metals and molecular superconductors. Single-molecule electronics and the associated basic science have emerged over the past two decades and provided hope for the development of highly integrated molecule-based electronic devices in the future (after the Si-based technology era has ended). Here, nanographenes (nano-sized graphene) with atomically precise structures are among the most promising molecules that can be utilized for electronic/spintronic devices. To manipulate single small molecules for an electronic device, a single molecular junction has been developed. It is a powerful tool that allows even small molecules to be utilized. External electric, magnetic, chemical, and mechanical perturbations can change the physical and chemical properties of molecules in a way that is different from bulk materials. Therefore, the various functionalities of molecules, along with changes induced by external perturbations, allows us to create electronic devices that we cannot create using current top-down Si-based technology. Future challenges that involve the incorporation of condensed matter physics, quantum chemistry calculations, organic synthetic chemistry, and electronic device engineering are expected to open a new era in single-molecule device electronic technology.

  20. Fast recognition of single molecules based on single-event photon statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Shuangli; Huang Tao; Liu Yuan; Wang Jun; Zhang Guofeng; Xiao Liantuan; Jia Suotang

    2007-01-01

    Mandel's Q parameter, which is determined from single-event photon statistics, provides an alternative way to recognize single molecules with fluorescence detection, other than the second-order correlation function. It is shown that the Q parameter of an assumed ideal double-molecule fluorescence with the same average photon number as that of the sample fluorescence can act as the criterion for single-molecule recognition. The influence of signal-to-background ratio and the error estimates for photon statistics are also presented. We have applied this method to ascertain single Cy5 dye molecules within hundreds of milliseconds

  1. Single-molecule dataset (SMD): a generalized storage format for raw and processed single-molecule data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Max; van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Pavlichin, Dmitri S; Mabuchi, Hideo; Wiggins, Chris H; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-16

    Single-molecule techniques have emerged as incisive approaches for addressing a wide range of questions arising in contemporary biological research [Trends Biochem Sci 38:30-37, 2013; Nat Rev Genet 14:9-22, 2013; Curr Opin Struct Biol 2014, 28C:112-121; Annu Rev Biophys 43:19-39, 2014]. The analysis and interpretation of raw single-molecule data benefits greatly from the ongoing development of sophisticated statistical analysis tools that enable accurate inference at the low signal-to-noise ratios frequently associated with these measurements. While a number of groups have released analysis toolkits as open source software [J Phys Chem B 114:5386-5403, 2010; Biophys J 79:1915-1927, 2000; Biophys J 91:1941-1951, 2006; Biophys J 79:1928-1944, 2000; Biophys J 86:4015-4029, 2004; Biophys J 97:3196-3205, 2009; PLoS One 7:e30024, 2012; BMC Bioinformatics 288 11(8):S2, 2010; Biophys J 106:1327-1337, 2014; Proc Int Conf Mach Learn 28:361-369, 2013], it remains difficult to compare analysis for experiments performed in different labs due to a lack of standardization. Here we propose a standardized single-molecule dataset (SMD) file format. SMD is designed to accommodate a wide variety of computer programming languages, single-molecule techniques, and analysis strategies. To facilitate adoption of this format we have made two existing data analysis packages that are used for single-molecule analysis compatible with this format. Adoption of a common, standard data file format for sharing raw single-molecule data and analysis outcomes is a critical step for the emerging and powerful single-molecule field, which will benefit both sophisticated users and non-specialists by allowing standardized, transparent, and reproducible analysis practices.

  2. Rationale for single molecule detection by means of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, S.V.; Guzatov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    A consistent quantum electrodynamical description is proposed of Raman scattering of light by a molecule in a medium with a modified photon density of states. Enhanced local density of states near a metal nanobody is shown to increase a scattering rate by several orders of magnitude, thus providing a rationale for experimental detection of single molecules by means of Raman spectroscopy. For an ellipsoidal particle 10 14 -fold enhancement of the Raman scattering cross-section is obtained. (authors)

  3. Control of Single Molecule Fluorescence Dynamics by Stimulated Emission Depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, R. J.; Osborne, M. A.; Bain, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of manipulating the single molecule absorption-emission cycle using picosecond stimulated emission depletion (STED) is investigated using a stochastic computer simulation. In the simulation the molecule is subjected to repeated excitation and depletion events using time delayed pairs of excitation (PUMP) and depletion (DUMP) pulses derived from a high repetition rate pulsed laser system. The model is used to demonstrate that a significant and even substantial reduction in the ...

  4. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    . To describe the molecular basis of this behavior, two main mechanisms have been advanced: 'induced fit' and 'conformational selection'. Our understanding of these models relies primarily on NMR, computational studies and kinetic measurements. These techniques report the average behavior of a large ensemble...... of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance...

  5. A general approach to break the concentration barrier in single-molecule imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Loveland, Anna B.

    2012-09-09

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is often incompatible with physiological protein concentrations, as fluorescence background overwhelms an individual molecule\\'s signal. We solve this problem with a new imaging approach called PhADE (PhotoActivation, Diffusion and Excitation). A protein of interest is fused to a photoactivatable protein (mKikGR) and introduced to its surface-immobilized substrate. After photoactivation of mKikGR near the surface, rapid diffusion of the unbound mKikGR fusion out of the detection volume eliminates background fluorescence, whereupon the bound molecules are imaged. We labeled the eukaryotic DNA replication protein flap endonuclease 1 with mKikGR and added it to replication-competent Xenopus laevis egg extracts. PhADE imaging of high concentrations of the fusion construct revealed its dynamics and micrometer-scale movements on individual, replicating DNA molecules. Because PhADE imaging is in principle compatible with any photoactivatable fluorophore, it should have broad applicability in revealing single-molecule dynamics and stoichiometry of macromolecular protein complexes at previously inaccessible fluorophore concentrations. © 2012 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron transfer dynamics of bistable single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danilov, A.V; Kubatkin, S.; Kafanov, S. G.

    2006-01-01

    We present transport measurements of single-molecule junctions bridged by a molecule with three benzene rings connected by two double bonds and with thiol end-groups that allow chemical binding to gold electrodes. The I-V curves show switching behavior between two distinct states. By statistical ...... analysis of the switching events, we show that a 300 meV mode mediates the transition between the two states. We propose that breaking and reformation of a S-H bond in the contact zone between molecule and electrode explains the observed bistability....

  7. Real-time single-molecule imaging of quantum interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Milic, Adriana; Müllneritsch, Michael; Asenbaum, Peter; Tsukernik, Alexander; Tüxen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2012-03-25

    The observation of interference patterns in double-slit experiments with massive particles is generally regarded as the ultimate demonstration of the quantum nature of these objects. Such matter-wave interference has been observed for electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules and, in contrast to classical physics, quantum interference can be observed when single particles arrive at the detector one by one. The build-up of such patterns in experiments with electrons has been described as the "most beautiful experiment in physics". Here, we show how a combination of nanofabrication and nano-imaging allows us to record the full two-dimensional build-up of quantum interference patterns in real time for phthalocyanine molecules and for derivatives of phthalocyanine molecules, which have masses of 514 AMU and 1,298 AMU respectively. A laser-controlled micro-evaporation source was used to produce a beam of molecules with the required intensity and coherence, and the gratings were machined in 10-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes to reduce the effect of van der Waals forces. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy detected the position of each molecule with an accuracy of 10 nm and revealed the build-up of a deterministic ensemble interference pattern from single molecules that arrived stochastically at the detector. In addition to providing this particularly clear demonstration of wave-particle duality, our approach could also be used to study larger molecules and explore the boundary between quantum and classical physics.

  8. Probing Intranuclear Environments at the Single-Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünwald, David; Martin, Robert M.; Buschmann, Volker; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Genome activity and nuclear metabolism clearly depend on accessibility, but it is not known whether and to what extent nuclear structures limit the mobility and access of individual molecules. We used fluorescently labeled streptavidin with a nuclear localization signal as an average-sized, inert protein to probe the nuclear environment. The protein was injected into the cytoplasm of mouse cells, and single molecules were tracked in the nucleus with high-speed fluorescence microscopy. We analyzed and compared the mobility of single streptavidin molecules in structurally and functionally distinct nuclear compartments of living cells. Our results indicated that all nuclear subcompartments were easily and similarly accessible for such an average-sized protein, and even condensed heterochromatin neither excluded single molecules nor impeded their passage. The only significant difference was a higher frequency of transient trappings in heterochromatin, which lasted only tens of milliseconds. The streptavidin molecules, however, did not accumulate in heterochromatin, suggesting comparatively less free volume. Interestingly, the nucleolus seemed to exclude streptavidin, as it did many other nuclear proteins, when visualized by conventional fluorescence microscopy. The tracking of single molecules, nonetheless, showed no evidence for repulsion at the border but relatively unimpeded passage through the nucleolus. These results clearly show that single-molecule tracking can provide novel insights into mobility of proteins in the nucleus that cannot be obtained by conventional fluorescence microscopy. Our results suggest that nuclear processes may not be regulated at the level of physical accessibility but rather by local concentration of reactants and availability of binding sites. PMID:18065482

  9. Single Molecule Spectroscopy on Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Jelezko, F; Schuler, S; Thews, E; Tietz, C; Wechsler, A; Wrachtrup, J

    2001-01-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy was applied to unravel the energy transfer pathway in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes. Detailed analysis of excitation and fluorescence emission spectra has been made for peripheral plant antenna LHC II and Photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Optical transitions of individual pigments were resolved under nonselective excitation of antenna chlorophylls. High-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy of individual plant antenna LHC II indicates that at low temperatures, the excitation energy is localized on the red-most Chl a pool absorbing at 680 nm. More than one pigment molecule is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the LHC II trimer. The spectral lines of single Chl a molecules absorbing at 675 nm are broadened because of the Foerster energy transfer towards the red-most pigments. Low-temperature spectroscopy on single PS I trimers indicates that two subgroups of pigments, which are present in the red antenna pool, differ by the strength of t...

  10. Fabrication of Low Noise Borosilicate Glass Nanopores for Single Molecule Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh A Bafna

    Full Text Available We show low-cost fabrication and characterization of borosilicate glass nanopores for single molecule sensing. Nanopores with diameters of ~100 nm were fabricated in borosilicate glass capillaries using laser assisted glass puller. We further achieve controlled reduction and nanometer-size control in pore diameter by sculpting them under constant electron beam exposure. We successfully fabricate pore diameters down to 6 nm. We next show electrical characterization and low-noise behavior of these borosilicate nanopores and compare their taper geometries. We show, for the first time, a comprehensive characterization of glass nanopore conductance across six-orders of magnitude (1M-1μM of salt conditions, highlighting the role of buffer conditions. Finally, we demonstrate single molecule sensing capabilities of these devices with real-time translocation experiments of individual λ-DNA molecules. We observe distinct current blockage signatures of linear as well as folded DNA molecules as they undergo voltage-driven translocation through the glass nanopores. We find increased signal to noise for single molecule detection for higher trans-nanopore driving voltages. We propose these nanopores will expand the realm of applications for nanopore platform.

  11. Improved Dye Stability in Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    EcheverrÍa Aitken, Colin; Marshall, R. Andrew; Pugi, Joseph D.

    Complex biological systems challenge existing single-molecule methods. In particular, dye stability limits observation time in singlemolecule fluorescence applications. Current approaches to improving dye performance involve the addition of enzymatic oxygen scavenging systems and small molecule additives. We present an enzymatic oxygen scavenging system that improves dye stability in single-molecule experiments. Compared to the currently-employed glucose-oxidase/catalase system, the protocatechuate-3,4-dioxygenase system achieves lower dissolved oxygen concentration and stabilizes single Cy3, Cy5, and Alexa488 fluorophores. Moreover, this system possesses none of the limitations associated with the glucose oxidase/catalase system. We also tested the effects of small molecule additives in this system. Biological reducing agents significantly destabilize the Cy5 fluorophore as a function of reducing potential. In contrast, anti-oxidants stabilize the Cy3 and Alexa488 fluorophores. We recommend use of the protocatechuate-3,4,-dioxygenase system with antioxidant additives, and in the absence of biological reducing agents. This system should have wide application to single-molecule fluorescence experiments.

  12. Coherent interaction of single molecules and plasmonic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Grotz, Bernhard; Siyushev, Petr; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Quantum plasmonics opens the option to integrate complex quantum optical circuitry onto chip scale devices. In the past, often external light sources were used and nonclassical light was coupled in and out of plasmonic structures, such as hole arrays or waveguide structures. Another option to launch single plasmonic excitations is the coupling of single emitters in the direct proximity of, e.g., a silver or gold nanostructure. Here, we present our attempts to integrate the research of single emitters with wet-chemically grown silver nanowires. The emitters of choice are single organic dye molecules under cryogenic conditions, which are known to act as high-brightness and extremely narrow-band single photon sources. Another advantage is their high optical nonlinearity, such that they might mediate photon-photon interactions on the nanoscale. We report on the coupling of a single molecule fluorescence emission through the wire over the length of several wavelengths. The transmission of coherently emitted photons is proven by an extinction type experiment. As for influencing the spectral properties of a single emitter, we are able to show a remote change of the line-width of a single terrylene molecule, which is in close proximity to the nanowire.

  13. The interaction of linear and ring forms of DNA molecules with nanodiamonds synthesized by detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purtov, K V; Burakova, L P; Puzyr, A P; Bondar, V S

    2008-01-01

    Nanodiamonds synthesized by detonation have been found not to immobilize the ring form of pUC19 plasmid DNA. Linear pUC19 molecules with blunt ends, prepared by restriction of the initial ring form of pUC19 DNA, and linear 0.25-10 kb DNA fragments are adsorbed on nanodiamonds. The amount of adsorbed linear DNA molecules depends on the size of the molecules and the size of the nanodiamond clusters

  14. Electrochemical Single-Molecule Transistors with Optimized Gate Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Henrry M.; Catarelli, Samantha; Cea, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical gating at the single molecule level of viologen molecular bridges in ionic liquids is examined. Contrary to previous data recorded in aqueous electrolytes, a clear and sharp peak in the single molecule conductance versus electrochemical potential data is obtained in ionic liquids....... These data are rationalized in terms of a two-step electrochemical model for charge transport across the redox bridge. In this model the gate coupling in the ionic liquid is found to be fully effective with a modeled gate coupling parameter, ξ, of unity. This compares to a much lower gate coupling parameter...

  15. Thousand-fold enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence near a single gold nanorod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, H.; Khatua, S.; Zijlstra, P.; Yorulmaz, M.; Orrit, M.

    2013-01-01

    Single molecules: Large enhancements of single-molecule fluorescence up to 1100 times by using synthesized gold nanorods are reported (see picture). This high enhancement is achieved by selecting a dye with its adsorption and emission close to the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanorods

  16. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, Leila; Williams, Mark C; Rouzina, Ioulia

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork

  17. Quantification and Sequencing of Crossover Recombinant Molecules from Arabidopsis Pollen DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuha; Yelina, Nataliya E; Serra, Heïdi; Henderson, Ian R

    2017-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo recombination, which can result in formation of reciprocal crossover molecules. Crossover frequency is highly variable across the genome, typically occurring in narrow hotspots, which has a significant effect on patterns of genetic diversity. Here we describe methods to measure crossover frequency in plants at the hotspot scale (bp-kb), using allele-specific PCR amplification from genomic DNA extracted from the pollen of F 1 heterozygous plants. We describe (1) titration methods that allow amplification, quantification and sequencing of single crossover molecules, (2) quantitative PCR methods to more rapidly measure crossover frequency, and (3) application of high-throughput sequencing for study of crossover distributions within hotspots. We provide detailed descriptions of key steps including pollen DNA extraction, prior identification of hotspot locations, allele-specific oligonucleotide design, and sequence analysis approaches. Together, these methods allow the rate and recombination topology of plant hotspots to be robustly measured and compared between varied genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions.

  18. Going Vertical To Improve the Accuracy of Atomic Force Microscopy Based Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Robert; Van Patten, William J; Adhikari, Ayush; Perkins, Thomas T

    2018-01-23

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful technique to characterize the energy landscape of individual proteins, the mechanical properties of nucleic acids, and the strength of receptor-ligand interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based SMFS benefits from ongoing progress in improving the precision and stability of cantilevers and the AFM itself. Underappreciated is that the accuracy of such AFM studies remains hindered by inadvertently stretching molecules at an angle while measuring only the vertical component of the force and extension, degrading both measurements. This inaccuracy is particularly problematic in AFM studies using double-stranded DNA and RNA due to their large persistence length (p ≈ 50 nm), often limiting such studies to other SMFS platforms (e.g., custom-built optical and magnetic tweezers). Here, we developed an automated algorithm that aligns the AFM tip above the DNA's attachment point to a coverslip. Importantly, this algorithm was performed at low force (10-20 pN) and relatively fast (15-25 s), preserving the connection between the tip and the target molecule. Our data revealed large uncorrected lateral offsets for 100 and 650 nm DNA molecules [24 ± 18 nm (mean ± standard deviation) and 180 ± 110 nm, respectively]. Correcting this offset yielded a 3-fold improvement in accuracy and precision when characterizing DNA's overstretching transition. We also demonstrated high throughput by acquiring 88 geometrically corrected force-extension curves of a single individual 100 nm DNA molecule in ∼40 min and versatility by aligning polyprotein- and PEG-based protein-ligand assays. Importantly, our software-based algorithm was implemented on a commercial AFM, so it can be broadly adopted. More generally, this work illustrates how to enhance AFM-based SMFS by developing more sophisticated data-acquisition protocols.

  19. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  20. Towards single molecule biosensors using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xun; Nicovich, Philip R; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2017-07-15

    Conventional immunosensors require many binding events to give a single transducer output which represents the concentration of the analyte in the sample. Because of the requirements to selectively detect species in complex samples, immunosensing interfaces must allow immobilisation of antibodies while repelling nonspecific adsorption of other species. These requirements lead to quite sophisticated interfacial design, often with molecular level control, but we have no tools to characterise how well these interfaces work at the molecular level. The work reported herein is an initial feasibility study to show that antibody-antigen binding events can be monitored at the single molecule level using single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM). The steps to achieve this first requires showing that indium tin oxide surfaces can be used for SMLM, then that these surfaces can be modified with self-assembled monolayers using organophosphonic acid derivatives, that the amount of antigens and antibodies on the surface can be controlled and monitored at the single molecule level and finally antibody binding to antigen modified surfaces can be monitored. The results show the amount of antibody that binds to an antigen modified surface is dependent on both the concentration of antigen on the surface and the concentration of antibody in solution. This study demonstrates the potential of SMLM for characterising biosensing interfaces and as the transducer in a massively parallel, wide field, single molecule detection scheme for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Single-step rapid assembly of DNA origami nanostructures for addressable nanoscale bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Yanming; Zeng, Dongdong; Chao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    nm resolution and at the single-molecule level. We attach a pair of enzymes (horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase) at the inner side of DNA nanotubes and observe high coupling efficiency of enzyme cascade within this confined nanospace. Hence, DNA nanostructures with such unprecedented...

  2. A new microcavity design for single molecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Schleifenbaum, F.; Stupperich, C.; Failla, A.V.; Hartschuh, A.; Meixner, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new microcavity design which allows for efficient detection of single molecules by measuring the molecular fluorescence emission coupled into a resonant cavity mode. The Fabry-Perot-type microresonator consists of two silver mirrors separated by a thin polymer film doped with dye molecules in ultralow concenctration. By slightly tilting one of the mirrors different cavity lengths can be selected within the same sample. Locally, on a μm scale, the microcavity still acts as a planar Fabry-Perot resonator. Using scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy, single emitters on resonance with a single mode of the microresonator can be spatially addressed. Our microcavity is demonstrated to be well-suited for investigating the coupling mechanism between single quantum emitters and single modes of the electromagnetic field. The microcavity layout could be integrated in a lab-on-a-microchip design for ultrasensitive microfluidic analytics and can be considered as an important improvement for single photon sources based on single molecules operating at room temperature

  3. Single-Molecule Analysis of Pre-mRNA Splicing with Colocalization Single-Molecule Spectroscopy (CoSMoS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Joerg E; Serebrov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of single-molecule techniques to study pre-mRNA splicing has provided insights into the dynamic nature of the spliceosome. Colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS) allows following spliceosome assembly in real time at single-molecule resolution in the full complexity of cellular extracts. A detailed protocol of CoSMoS has been published previously (Anderson and Hoskins, Methods Mol Biol 1126:217-241, 2014). Here, we provide an update on the technical advances since the first CoSMoS studies including slide surface treatment, data processing, and representation. We describe various labeling strategies to generate RNA reporters with multiple dyes (or other moieties) at specific locations.

  4. Cell biochemistry studied by single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanov, G I; Nenasheva, T A; Peckham, M; Molloy, J E

    2006-11-01

    Over the last decade, there have been remarkable developments in live-cell imaging. We can now readily observe individual protein molecules within living cells and this should contribute to a systems level understanding of biological pathways. Direct observation of single fluorophores enables several types of molecular information to be gathered. Temporal and spatial trajectories enable diffusion constants and binding kinetics to be deduced, while analyses of fluorescence lifetime, intensity, polarization or spectra give chemical and conformational information about molecules in their cellular context. By recording the spatial trajectories of pairs of interacting molecules, formation of larger molecular complexes can be studied. In the future, multicolour and multiparameter imaging of single molecules in live cells will be a powerful analytical tool for systems biology. Here, we discuss measurements of single-molecule mobility and residency at the plasma membrane of live cells. Analysis of diffusional paths at the plasma membrane gives information about its physical properties and measurement of temporal trajectories enables rates of binding and dissociation to be derived. Meanwhile, close scrutiny of individual fluorophore trajectories enables ideas about molecular dimerization and oligomerization related to function to be tested directly.

  5. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Banerjee

    Full Text Available DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM and spectroscopy (AFS. The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  6. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Banerjee, S; Sett, S; Ghosh, S; Rakshit, T; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  7. Plasmonic tunnel junctions for single-molecule redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nijs, Bart; Benz, Felix; Barrow, Steven J; Sigle, Daniel O; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Palma, Aniello; Carnegie, Cloudy; Kamp, Marlous; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Scherman, Oren A; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2017-10-20

    Nanoparticles attached just above a flat metallic surface can trap optical fields in the nanoscale gap. This enables local spectroscopy of a few molecules within each coupled plasmonic hotspot, with near thousand-fold enhancement of the incident fields. As a result of non-radiative relaxation pathways, the plasmons in such sub-nanometre cavities generate hot charge carriers, which can catalyse chemical reactions or induce redox processes in molecules located within the plasmonic hotspots. Here, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows us to track these hot-electron-induced chemical reduction processes in a series of different aromatic molecules. We demonstrate that by increasing the tunnelling barrier height and the dephasing strength, a transition from coherent to hopping electron transport occurs, enabling observation of redox processes in real time at the single-molecule level.

  8. Single-Molecule Methods for Nucleotide Excision Repair: Building a System to Watch Repair in Real Time

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Muwen; Beckwitt, Emily C.; Springall, Luke; Kad, Neil M.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule approaches to solving biophysical problems are powerful tools that allow static and dynamic real-time observations of specific molecular interactions of interest in the absence of ensemble-averaging effects. Here, we provide detailed protocols for building an experimental system that employs atomic force microscopy and a single-molecule DNA tightrope assay based on oblique angle illumination fluorescence microscopy. Together with approaches for engineering site-specific lesion...

  9. A Single Molecule Investigation of the Photostability of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Kulatunga, Pasad; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are very attractive probes for multi-color fluorescence applications. We report here however that single QDs that are subject to continuous blue excitation from a 100W mercury arc lamp will undergo a continuous blue-switching of the emission wavelength eventually reaching a per...... is especially detrimental for multi-color single molecule applications, as we regularly observe spectral blue-shifts of 50 nm, or more even after only ten seconds of illumination....

  10. Droplet Microfluidics for Compartmentalized Cell Lysis and Extension of DNA from Single-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, Philip; Juncker, David; Reisner, Walter

    Current single cell DNA analysis methods suffer from (i) bias introduced by the need for molecular amplification and (ii) limited ability to sequence repetitive elements, resulting in (iii) an inability to obtain information regarding long range genomic features. Recent efforts to circumvent these limitations rely on techniques for sensing single molecules of DNA extracted from single-cells. Here we demonstrate a droplet microfluidic approach for encapsulation and biochemical processing of single-cells inside alginate microparticles. In our approach, single-cells are first packaged inside the alginate microparticles followed by cell lysis, DNA purification, and labeling steps performed off-chip inside this microparticle system. The alginate microparticles are then introduced inside a micro/nanofluidic system where the alginate is broken down via a chelating buffer, releasing long DNA molecules which are then extended inside nanofluidic channels for analysis via standard mapping protocols.

  11. Continuous throughput and long-term observation of single-molecule FRET without immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Swati; VanDelinder, Virginia; Banterle, Niccolò; Fuertes, Gustavo; Milles, Sigrid; Agez, Morgane; Lemke, Edward A

    2014-03-01

    We present an automated microfluidic platform that performs multisecond observation of single molecules with millisecond time resolution while bypassing the need for immobilization procedures. With this system, we confine biomolecules to a thin excitation field by reversibly collapsing microchannels to nanochannels. We demonstrate the power of our method by studying a variety of complex nucleic acid and protein systems, including DNA Holliday junctions, nucleosomes and human transglutaminase 2.

  12. Promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. A single-molecule view of the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gary M; Baumann, Christoph G; Quinn, Diana M; Molloy, Justin E; Hoggett, James G

    2004-01-30

    A single-molecule transcription assay has been developed that allows, for the first time, the direct observation of promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by a single RNA polymerase (RNAP) molecule in real-time. To promote DNA binding and transcription initiation, a DNA molecule tethered between two optically trapped beads was held near a third immobile surface bead sparsely coated with RNAP. By driving the optical trap holding the upstream bead with a triangular oscillation while measuring the position of both trapped beads, we observed the onset of promoter binding, promoter escape (productive initiation), and processive elongation by individual RNAP molecules. After DNA template release, transcription re-initiation on the same DNA template is possible; thus, multiple enzymatic turnovers by an individual RNAP molecule can be observed. Using bacteriophage T7 RNAP, a commonly used RNAP paradigm, we observed the association and dissociation (k(off)= 2.9 s(-1)) of T7 RNAP and promoter DNA, the transition to the elongation mode (k(for) = 0.36 s(-1)), and the processive synthesis (k(pol) = 43 nt s(-1)) and release of a gene-length RNA transcript ( approximately 1200 nt). The transition from initiation to elongation is much longer than the mean lifetime of the binary T7 RNAP-promoter DNA complex (k(off) > k(for)), identifying a rate-limiting step between promoter DNA binding and promoter escape.

  13. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Single molecule magnet behaviour in robust dysprosium-biradical complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, Kevin; Pointillart, Fabrice; Rosa, Patrick; Etienne, Mael; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2010-09-21

    A Dy-biradical complex was synthesized and characterized down to very low temperature. ac magnetic measurements reveal single molecule magnet behaviour visible without any application of dc field. The transition to the quantum tunneling regime is evidenced. Photophysical and EPR measurements provide evidence of the excellent stability of these complexes in solution.

  15. Computing magnetic anisotropy constants of single molecule magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present here a theoretical approach to compute the molecular magnetic anisotropy parameters, and for single molecule magnets in any given spin eigenstate of exchange spin Hamiltonian. We first describe a hybrid constant -valence bond (VB) technique of solving spin Hamiltonians employing full spatial ...

  16. Fabrication of birefringent nanocylinders for single-molecule force and torque measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping-Chun; Chang, Jen-Chien; La Porta, Arthur; Yu, Edward T.

    2014-06-01

    Optically anisotropic subwavelength scale dielectric particles have been shown to enable studies of the mechanical properties of bio-molecules via optical trapping and manipulation. However, techniques emphasized to date for fabrication of such particles generally suffer from limited uniformity and control over particle dimensions, or low throughput and high cost. Here, an approach for rapid, low-cost, fabrication of large quantities of birefringent quartz nanocylinders with dimensions optimized for optical torque wrench experiments is described. For a typical process, 108 or more quartz cylinders with diameters of 500 nm and heights of 800 nm, with uniformity of ±5% in each dimension, can be fabricated over ˜10 cm2 areas, for binding to a single bio-molecule, and harvested for use in optical trapping experiments. Use of these structures to measure extensional and torsional dynamics of single DNA molecules is demonstrated with measured forces and torques shown to be in very good agreement with previously reported results.

  17. Fabrication of birefringent nanocylinders for single-molecule force and torque measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ping-Chun; T Yu, Edward; Chang, Jen-Chien; La Porta, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Optically anisotropic subwavelength scale dielectric particles have been shown to enable studies of the mechanical properties of bio-molecules via optical trapping and manipulation. However, techniques emphasized to date for fabrication of such particles generally suffer from limited uniformity and control over particle dimensions, or low throughput and high cost. Here, an approach for rapid, low-cost, fabrication of large quantities of birefringent quartz nanocylinders with dimensions optimized for optical torque wrench experiments is described. For a typical process, 10 8 or more quartz cylinders with diameters of 500 nm and heights of 800 nm, with uniformity of ±5% in each dimension, can be fabricated over ∼10 cm 2 areas, for binding to a single bio-molecule, and harvested for use in optical trapping experiments. Use of these structures to measure extensional and torsional dynamics of single DNA molecules is demonstrated with measured forces and torques shown to be in very good agreement with previously reported results. (papers)

  18. DNA-templated synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lifeng

    2009-11-18

    A series of electron microscopy characterizations demonstrate that single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) can bind to nanotube surfaces and disperse bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into individual tubes. The ssDNA molecules on the nanotube surfaces demonstrate various morphologies, such as aggregated clusters and spiral wrapping around a nanotube with different pitches and spaces, indicating that the morphology of the SWCNT/DNA hybrids is not related solely to the base sequence of the ssDNA or the chirality or the diameter of the nanotubes. In addition to serving as a non-covalent dispersion agent, the ssDNA molecules bonded to the nanotube surface can provide addresses for localizing Pt(II) complexes along the nanotubes. The Pt nanoparticles obtained by a reduction of the Pt2+-DNA adducts are crystals with a size of direct ethanol/methanol fuel cells and nanoscale electronics.

  19. Modulation of intermolecular interactions in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Katie Jeanne

    Polynuclear manganese clusters exhibiting interesting magnetic and quantum properties have been an area of intense research since the discovery of the first single-molecule magnet (SMM) in 1993. These molecules, below their blocking temperature, function as single-domain magnetic particles which exhibit classical macroscale magnetic properties as well as quantum mechanical phenomena such as quantum tunnelling of magnetization (QTM) and quantum phase interference. The union of classical and quantum behavior in these nanomaterials makes SMMs ideal candidates for high-density information storage and quantum computing. However, environmental coupling factors (nuclear spins, phonons, neighboring molecules) must be minimized if such applications are ever to be fully realized. The focus of this work is making small structural changes in well-known manganese SMMs in order to drastically enhance the overall magnetic and quantum properties of the system. Well-isolated molecules of high crystalline quality should lead to well-defined energetic and spectral properties as well. An advantage of SMMs over bulk magnetic materials is that they can be chemically altered from a "bottom-up" approach providing a synthetic tool for tuning magnetic properties. This systematic approach is utilized in the work presented herein by incorporating bulky ligands and/or counterions to "isolate" the magnetic core of [Mn4] dicubane SMMs. Reducing intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice (neighboring molecules, solvate molecules, dipolar interactions) is an important step toward developing viable quantum computing devices. Detailed bulk magnetic studies as well as single crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency EPR studies on these sterically-isolated complexes show enhanced, and sometimes even unexpected, quantum dynamics. The importance of intra- and intermolecular interactions remains a common theme throughout this work, extending to other SMMs of various topology including

  20. Experimental demonstration of a single-molecule electric motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Heather L; Murphy, Colin J; Jewell, April D; Baber, Ashleigh E; Iski, Erin V; Khodaverdian, Harout Y; McGuire, Allister F; Klebanov, Nikolai; Sykes, E Charles H

    2011-09-04

    For molecules to be used as components in molecular machines, methods that couple individual molecules to external energy sources and that selectively excite motion in a given direction are required. Significant progress has been made in the construction of molecular motors powered by light and by chemical reactions, but electrically driven motors have not yet been built, despite several theoretical proposals for such motors. Here we report that a butyl methyl sulphide molecule adsorbed on a copper surface can be operated as a single-molecule electric motor. Electrons from a scanning tunnelling microscope are used to drive the directional motion of the molecule in a two-terminal setup. Moreover, the temperature and electron flux can be adjusted to allow each rotational event to be monitored at the molecular scale in real time. The direction and rate of the rotation are related to the chiralities of both the molecule and the tip of the microscope (which serves as the electrode), illustrating the importance of the symmetry of the metal contacts in atomic-scale electrical devices.

  1. Investigation of polyelectrolyte desorption by single molecule force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedsam, C; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E

    2004-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the investigation of intra- and intermolecular interactions at the level of individual molecules. Many examples, including the investigation of the dynamic properties of complex biological systems as well as the properties of covalent bonds or intermolecular transitions within individual polymers, are reported in the literature. The technique has recently been extended to the systematic investigation of desorption processes of individual polyelectrolyte molecules adsorbed on generic surfaces. The stable covalent attachment of polyelectrolyte molecules to the AFM-tip provides the possibility of performing long-term measurements with the same set of molecules and therefore allows the in situ observation of the impact of environmental changes on the adsorption behaviour of individual molecules. Different types of interactions, e.g. electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions, that determine the adsorption process could be identified and characterized. The experiments provided valuable details that help to understand the nature and the properties of non-covalent interactions, which is helpful with regard to biological systems as well as for technical applications. Apart from this, desorption experiments can be utilized to characterize the properties of surfaces or polymer coatings. Therefore they represent a versatile tool that can be further developed in terms of various aspects

  2. Transition paths in single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2018-03-28

    In a typical single-molecule force spectroscopy experiment, the ends of the molecule of interest are connected by long polymer linkers to a pair of mesoscopic beads trapped in the focus of two laser beams. At constant force load, the total extension, i.e., the end-to-end distance of the molecule plus linkers, is measured as a function of time. In the simplest systems, the measured extension fluctuates about two values characteristic of folded and unfolded states, with occasional transitions between them. We have recently shown that molecular (un)folding rates can be recovered from such trajectories, with a small linker correction, as long as the characteristic time of the bead fluctuations is shorter than the residence time in the unfolded (folded) state. Here, we show that accurate measurements of the molecular transition path times require an even faster apparatus response. Transition paths, the trajectory segments in which the molecule (un)folds, are properly resolved only if the beads fluctuate more rapidly than the end-to-end distance of the molecule. Therefore, over a wide regime, the measured rates may be meaningful but not the transition path times. Analytic expressions for the measured mean transition path times are obtained for systems diffusing anisotropically on a two-dimensional free energy surface. The transition path times depend on the properties both of the molecule and of the pulling device.

  3. Single-Molecule Methods for Nucleotide Excision Repair: Building a System to Watch Repair in Real Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Muwen; Beckwitt, Emily C; Springall, Luke; Kad, Neil M; Van Houten, Bennett

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule approaches to solving biophysical problems are powerful tools that allow static and dynamic real-time observations of specific molecular interactions of interest in the absence of ensemble-averaging effects. Here, we provide detailed protocols for building an experimental system that employs atomic force microscopy and a single-molecule DNA tightrope assay based on oblique angle illumination fluorescence microscopy. Together with approaches for engineering site-specific lesions into DNA substrates, these complementary biophysical techniques are well suited for investigating protein-DNA interactions that involve target-specific DNA-binding proteins, such as those engaged in a variety of DNA repair pathways. In this chapter, we demonstrate the utility of the platform by applying these techniques in the studies of proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spin-Spin Cross Relaxation in Single-Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Bhaduri, S.; Tiron, R.; Hendrickson, D. N.; Christou, G.

    2002-10-01

    The one-body tunnel picture of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) is not always sufficient to explain the measured tunnel transitions. An improvement to the picture is proposed by including also two-body tunnel transitions such as spin-spin cross relaxation (SSCR) which are mediated by dipolar and weak superexchange interactions between molecules. A Mn4 SMM is used as a model system. At certain external fields, SSCRs lead to additional quantum resonances which show up in hysteresis loop measurements as well-defined steps. A simple model is used to explain quantitatively all observed transitions.

  5. Enzymatic production of single-molecule FISH and RNA capture probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Imre; Wippich, Frank; Ephrussi, Anne

    2017-10-01

    Arrays of singly labeled short oligonucleotides that hybridize to a specific target revolutionized RNA biology, enabling quantitative, single-molecule microscopy analysis and high-efficiency RNA/RNP capture. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method that allows flexible functionalization of inexpensive DNA oligonucleotides by different fluorescent dyes or biotin using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and custom-made functional group conjugated dideoxy-UTP. We show that (i) all steps of the oligonucleotide labeling-including conjugation, enzymatic synthesis, and product purification-can be performed in a standard biology laboratory, (ii) the process yields >90%, often >95% labeled product with minimal carryover of impurities, and (iii) the oligonucleotides can be labeled with different dyes or biotin, allowing single-molecule FISH, RNA affinity purification, and Northern blot analysis to be performed. © 2017 Gaspar et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  7. Like-charge attraction and opposite-charge decomplexation between polymers and DNA molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2016-01-01

    We scrutinize the effect of polyvalent ions on polymer-DNA interactions. We extend a recently developed test charge theory to the case of a stiff polymer interacting with a DNA molecule in an electrolyte mixture. The theory accounts for one-loop level electrostatic correlation effects such as the ionic cloud deformation around the strongly charged DNA molecule as well as image-charge forces induced by the low DNA permittivity. Our model can reproduce and explain various characteristics of the...

  8. Genetic exchanges caused by ultraviolet photoproducts in phage lamda DNA molecules: the role of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.F.; Howard-Flanders, P.; Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.

    1976-01-01

    Genetic recombination induced by structural damage in DNA molecules was investigated in E. coli K12(lamda) lysogens infected with genetically marked phage lamda. Photoproducts were induced in the phage DNA before infection by exposing them either to 313 nm light in the presence of acetophenone or to 254 nm light. To test the role of the replication of the damage phage DNA on the frequency of the induced recombination , both heteroimmune and homoimmune crosses were performed, and scored for P + recombinants. In heteroimmune crosses, recombination was less frequent in infected cells exposed to visible light and in wild type cells able to perform excision repair than in excision-defective lysogens. Therefore, much of the induced recombination can be attributed to the pyrimidine dimers in the phage DNA. In homoimmune crosses, replication of the phage DNA containing ultraviolet photoproducts was represented by lamda immunity, and was further blocked by the lack of the P gene product needed for replication. The 254 nm photoproducts increased the frequency of recombination in these homoimmune crosses, even though phage DNA replication was blocked. Irradiation with 313 nm light and acetophenone M, which produces dimers and unknown photoproducts, was not as effective per dimer as the 254 nm light. It is concluded from these results that certain unidentified 254 nm photoproducts can cause recombination even in the absence of DNA replication. They are not pyrimidine dimers, as they are not susceptible to excision repair or photoreactivation. In contrast, pyrimidine dimers appear to cause recombination only when the DNA containing them undergoes replication. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Simple test system for single molecule recognition force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Stroh, Cordula M.; Ebner, Andreas; Klampfl, Christian; Gall, Alex A.; Romanin, Christoph; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    We have established an easy-to-use test system for detecting receptor-ligand interactions on the single molecule level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). For this, avidin-biotin, probably the best characterized receptor-ligand pair, was chosen. AFM sensors were prepared containing tethered biotin molecules at sufficiently low surface concentrations appropriate for single molecule studies. A biotin tether, consisting of a 6 nm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain and a functional succinimide group at the other end, was newly synthesized and covalently coupled to amine-functionalized AFM tips. In particular, PEG 800 diamine was glutarylated, the mono-adduct NH 2 -PEG-COOH was isolated by ion exchange chromatography and reacted with biotin succinimidylester to give biotin-PEG-COOH which was then activated as N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to give the biotin-PEG-NHS conjugate which was coupled to the aminofunctionalized AFM tip. The motional freedom provided by PEG allows for free rotation of the biotin molecule on the AFM sensor and for specific binding to avidin which had been adsorbed to mica surfaces via electrostatic interactions. Specific avidin-biotin recognition events were discriminated from nonspecific tip-mica adhesion by their typical unbinding force (∼40 pN at 1.4 nN/s loading rate), unbinding length (<13 nm), the characteristic nonlinear force-distance relation of the PEG linker, and by specific block with excess of free d-biotin. The convenience of the test system allowed to evaluate, and compare, different methods and conditions of tip aminofunctionalization with respect to specific binding and nonspecific adhesion. It is concluded that this system is well suited as calibration or start-up kit for single molecule recognition force microscopy

  10. Surface Passivation for Single-molecule Protein Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandradoss, Stanley D.; Haagsma, Anna C.; Lee, Young Kwang; Hwang, Jae-Ho; Nam, Jwa-Min; Joo, Chirlmin

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be instrumental in understanding a wide range of biological phenomena at the nanoscale. Important examples of what this technique can yield to biological sciences are the mechanistic insights on protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. When interactions of proteins are probed at the single-molecule level, the proteins or their substrates are often immobilized on a glass surface, which allows for a long-term observation. This immobilization scheme may introduce unwanted surface artifacts. Therefore, it is essential to passivate the glass surface to make it inert. Surface coating using polyethylene glycol (PEG) stands out for its high performance in preventing proteins from non-specifically interacting with a glass surface. However, the polymer coating procedure is difficult, due to the complication arising from a series of surface treatments and the stringent requirement that a surface needs to be free of any fluorescent molecules at the end of the procedure. Here, we provide a robust protocol with step-by-step instructions. It covers surface cleaning including piranha etching, surface functionalization with amine groups, and finally PEG coating. To obtain a high density of a PEG layer, we introduce a new strategy of treating the surface with PEG molecules over two rounds, which remarkably improves the quality of passivation. We provide representative results as well as practical advice for each critical step so that anyone can achieve the high quality surface passivation. PMID:24797261

  11. Molecular electronics--resonant transport through single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörtscher, Emanuel; Riel, Heike

    2010-01-01

    The mechanically controllable break-junction technique (MCBJ) enables us to investigate charge transport through an individually contacted and addressed molecule in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment at variable temperature ranging from room temperature down to 4 K. Using a statistical measurement and analysis approach, we acquire current-voltage (I-V) characteristics during the repeated formation, manipulation, and breaking of a molecular junction. At low temperatures, voltages accessing the first molecular orbitals in resonance can be applied, providing spectroscopic information about the junction's energy landscape, in particular about the molecular level alignment in respect to the Fermi energy of the electrodes. Thereby, we can investigate the non-linear transport properties of various types of functional molecules and explore their potential use as functional building blocks for future nano-electronics. An example will be given by the reversible and controllable switching between two distinct conductive states of a single molecule. As a proof-of-principle for functional molecular devices, a single-molecule memory element will be demonstrated.

  12. Machine learning approach for single molecule localisation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colabrese, Silvia; Castello, Marco; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Del Bue, Alessio

    2018-04-01

    Single molecule localisation (SML) microscopy is a fundamental tool for biological discoveries; it provides sub-diffraction spatial resolution images by detecting and localizing "all" the fluorescent molecules labeling the structure of interest. For this reason, the effective resolution of SML microscopy strictly depends on the algorithm used to detect and localize the single molecules from the series of microscopy frames. To adapt to the different imaging conditions that can occur in a SML experiment, all current localisation algorithms request, from the microscopy users, the choice of different parameters. This choice is not always easy and their wrong selection can lead to poor performance. Here we overcome this weakness with the use of machine learning. We propose a parameter-free pipeline for SML learning based on support vector machine (SVM). This strategy requires a short supervised training that consists in selecting by the user few fluorescent molecules (∼ 10-20) from the frames under analysis. The algorithm has been extensively tested on both synthetic and real acquisitions. Results are qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with the state of the art in SML microscopy and demonstrate that the introduction of machine learning can lead to a new class of algorithms competitive and conceived from the user point of view.

  13. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  14. New antifouling platform characterized by single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji Young; Song, In Taek; Lau, K H Aaron; Messersmith, Phillip B; Yoon, Tae-Young; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-03-12

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm(2) which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm(2) adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm(2)). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others.

  15. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten; Luka-Guth, Katharina; Wieser, Matthias; Lokamani; Wolf, Jannic Sebastian; Helm, Manfred; Gemming, Sibylle; Kerbusch, Jochen; Scheer, Elke; Huhn, Thomas; Erbe, Artur

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  16. New Antifouling Platform Characterized by Single-Molecule Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm2 which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm2 adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm2). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  17. Strong plasmonic enhancement of single molecule photostability in silver dimer optical antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminska Izabela

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photobleaching is an effect terminating the photon output of fluorophores, limiting the duration of fluorescence-based experiments. Plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs can increase the overall fluorophore photostability through an enhancement of the radiative rate. In this work, we use the DNA origami technique to arrange a single fluorophore in the 12-nm gap of a silver NP dimer and study the number of emitted photons at the single molecule level. Our findings yielded a 30× enhancement in the average number of photons emitted before photobleaching. Numerical simulations are employed to rationalize our results. They reveal the effect of silver oxidation on decreasing the radiative rate enhancement.

  18. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Zhang, Miao; Sychugov, Ilya; Roxhed, Niclas; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Solid state nanopores enable translocation and detection of single bio-molecules such as DNA in buffer solutions. Here, sub-10 nm nanopore arrays in silicon membranes were fabricated by using electron-beam lithography to define etch pits and by using a subsequent electrochemical etching step. This approach effectively decouples positioning of the pores and the control of their size, where the pore size essentially results from the anodizing current and time in the etching cell. Nanopores with diameters as small as 7 nm, fully penetrating 300 nm thick membranes, were obtained. The presented fabrication scheme to form large arrays of nanopores is attractive for parallel bio-molecule sensing and DNA sequencing using optical techniques. In particular the signal-to-noise ratio is improved compared to other alternatives such as nitride membranes suffering from a high-luminescence background.

  19. Flexible single molecule simulation of reaction-diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Loetstedt, Per

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for simulation of the motion and reactions of single molecules at a microscopic level. The molecules diffuse in a solvent and react with each other or a polymer and molecules can dissociate. Such simulations are of interest e.g. in molecular biology. The algorithm is similar to the Green's function reaction dynamics (GFRD) algorithm by van Zon and ten Wolde where longer time steps can be taken by computing the probability density functions (PDFs) and then sample from the distribution functions. Our computation of the PDFs is much less complicated than GFRD and more flexible. The solution of the partial differential equation for the PDF is split into two steps to simplify the calculations. The sampling is without splitting error in two of the coordinate directions for a pair of molecules and a molecule-polymer interaction and is approximate in the third direction. The PDF is obtained either from an analytical solution or a numerical discretization. The errors due to the operator splitting, the partitioning of the system, and the numerical approximations are analyzed. The method is applied to three different systems involving up to four reactions. Comparisons with other mesoscopic and macroscopic models show excellent agreement.

  20. Statistical inference in single molecule measurements of protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Megan J.; Tsitkov, Stanislav; Hess, Henry

    2018-02-01

    Significant effort has been invested into understanding the dynamics of protein adsorption on surfaces, in particular to predict protein behavior at the specialized surfaces of biomedical technologies like hydrogels, nanoparticles, and biosensors. Recently, the application of fluorescent single molecule imaging to this field has permitted the tracking of individual proteins and their stochastic contribution to the aggregate dynamics of adsorption. However, the interpretation of these results is complicated by (1) the finite time available to observe effectively infinite adsorption timescales and (2) the contribution of photobleaching kinetics to adsorption kinetics. Here, we perform a protein adsorption simulation to introduce specific survival analysis methods that overcome the first complication. Additionally, we collect single molecule residence time data from the adsorption of fibrinogen to glass and use survival analysis to distinguish photobleaching kinetics from protein adsorption kinetics.

  1. Automatic Bayesian single molecule identification for localization microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yunqing; Hendriks, Johnny; Gensch, Thomas; Dai, Luru; Li, Junbai

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) is on its way to become a mainstream imaging technique in the life sciences. However, analysis of SMLM data is biased by user provided subjective parameters required by the analysis software. To remove this human bias we introduce here the Auto-Bayes method that executes the analysis of SMLM data automatically. We demonstrate the success of the method using the photoelectron count of an emitter as selection characteristic. Moreover, the principle...

  2. Optimized Free Energies from Bidirectional Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, David D. L.; Adib, Artur B.

    2008-05-01

    An optimized method for estimating path-ensemble averages using data from processes driven in opposite directions is presented. Based on this estimator, bidirectional expressions for reconstructing free energies and potentials of mean force from single-molecule force spectroscopy—valid for biasing potentials of arbitrary stiffness—are developed. Numerical simulations on a model potential indicate that these methods perform better than unidirectional strategies.

  3. Berry-phase blockade in single-molecule magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    We formulate the problem of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM) in the Coulomb blockade regime taking into account topological interference effects for the tunneling of the large spin of a SMM. The interference originates from spin Berry phases associated with different tunneling paths. We show that in the case of incoherent spin states it is essential to place the SMM between oppositely spin-polarized source and drain leads in order to detect the spin tunneling in the s...

  4. Single Molecule Fluorescence: from Physical Fascination to Biological Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy is particularly well-known from the beautiful images that have been obtained with this technique from cells. Several cellular components could be nicely visualized simultaneously by staining them with different fluorophores. Not only for ensemble applications but also in single molecule research confocal fluorescence microscopy became a popular technique. In this thesis the possibilities are shown to study a complicated biological process, which is Nucleotide ...

  5. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  6. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  7. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin

    2012-10-25

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Single-Molecule Photocurrent at a Metal-Molecule-Semiconductor Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Brooke, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J

    2017-11-08

    We demonstrate here a new concept for a metal-molecule-semiconductor nanodevice employing Au and GaAs contacts that acts as a photodiode. Current-voltage traces for such junctions are recorded using a STM, and the "blinking" or "I(t)" method is used to record electrical behavior at the single-molecule level in the dark and under illumination, with both low and highly doped GaAs samples and with two different types of molecular bridge: nonconjugated pentanedithiol and the more conjugated 1,4-phenylene(dimethanethiol). Junctions with highly doped GaAs show poor rectification in the dark and a low photocurrent, while junctions with low doped GaAs show particularly high rectification ratios in the dark (>10 3 for a 1.5 V bias potential) and a high photocurrent in reverse bias. In low doped GaAs, the greater thickness of the depletion layer not only reduces the reverse bias leakage current, but also increases the volume that contributes to the photocurrent, an effect amplified by the point contact geometry of the junction. Furthermore, since photogenerated holes tunnel to the metal electrode assisted by the HOMO of the molecular bridge, the choice of the latter has a strong influence on both the steady state and transient metal-molecule-semiconductor photodiode response. The control of junction current via photogenerated charge carriers adds new functionality to single-molecule nanodevices.

  9. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin; Furumaki, Shu; Yang, Jaesung; Lee, Ji-Eun; Chung, Heejae; Oba, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Rybtchinski, Boris; Wilson, Thea M.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Vacha, Martin; Kim, Dongho

    2012-01-01

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Viruses and Tetraspanins: Lessons from Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Selma; Rubinstein, Eric; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Tetraspanins are four-span membrane proteins that are widely distributed in multi-cellular organisms and involved in several infectious diseases. They have the unique property to form a network of protein-protein interaction within the plasma membrane, due to the lateral associations with one another and with other membrane proteins. Tracking tetraspanins at the single molecule level using fluorescence microscopy has revealed the membrane behavior of the tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cell lines, providing a first dynamic view of this network. Single molecule tracking highlighted that these 2 proteins can freely diffuse within the plasma membrane but can also be trapped, permanently or transiently, in tetraspanin-enriched areas. More recently, a similar strategy has been used to investigate tetraspanin membrane behavior in the context of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this review we summarize the main results emphasizing the relationship in terms of membrane partitioning between tetraspanins, some of their partners such as Claudin-1 and EWI-2, and viral proteins during infection. These results will be analyzed in the context of other membrane microdomains, stressing the difference between raft and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, but also in comparison with virus diffusion at the cell surface. New advanced single molecule techniques that could help to further explore tetraspanin assemblies will be also discussed. PMID:24800676

  11. Nanogap Electrodes towards Solid State Single-Molecule Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ajuan; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2015-12-01

    With the establishment of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-based integrated circuit technology, it has become more difficult to follow Moore's law to further downscale the size of electronic components. Devices based on various nanostructures were constructed to continue the trend in the minimization of electronics, and molecular devices are among the most promising candidates. Compared with other candidates, molecular devices show unique superiorities, and intensive studies on molecular devices have been carried out both experimentally and theoretically at the present time. Compared to two-terminal molecular devices, three-terminal devices, namely single-molecule transistors, show unique advantages both in fundamental research and application and are considered to be an essential part of integrated circuits based on molecular devices. However, it is very difficult to construct them using the traditional microfabrication techniques directly, thus new fabrication strategies are developed. This review aims to provide an exclusive way of manufacturing solid state gated nanogap electrodes, the foundation of constructing transistors of single or a few molecules. Such single-molecule transistors have the potential to be used to build integrated circuits. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  13. New tools to study biophysical properties of single molecules and single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio S. Rocha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a review on two new tools to study biophysical properties of single molecules and single cells. A laser incident through a high numerical aperture microscope objective can trap small dielectric particles near the focus. This arrangement is named optical tweezers. This technique has the advantage to permit manipulation of a single individual object. We use optical tweezers to measure the entropic elasticity of a single DNA molecule and its interaction with the drug Psoralen. Optical tweezers are also used to hold a kidney cell MDCK away from the substrate to allow precise volume measurements of this single cell during an osmotic shock. This procedure allows us to obtain information about membrane water permeability and regulatory volume increase. Defocusing microscopy is a recent technique invented in our laboratory, which allows the observation of transparent objects, by simply defocusing the microscope in a controlled way. Our physical model of a defocused microscope shows that the image contrast observed in this case is proportional to the defocus distance and to the curvature of the transparent object. Defocusing microscopy is very useful to study motility and mechanical properties of cells. We show here the application of defocusing microscopy to measurements of macrophage surface fluctuations and their influence on phagocytosis.Apresentamos uma revisão de duas novas técnicas para estudar propriedades biofísicas de moléculas únicas e células únicas. Um laser incidindo em uma objetiva de microscópio de grande abertura numérica é capaz de aprisionar pequenas partículas dielétricas na região próxima ao foco. Este aparato é chamado de pinça óptica. Esta técnica tem a grande vantagem de permitir a manipulação de um objeto individual. Usamos a pinça óptica para medir a elasticidade entrópica de uma molécula única de DNA em sua interação com o fármaco Psoralen. A pinça óptica também é usada para segurar

  14. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Fahad

    2017-02-23

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5\\'nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5\\'nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually \\'locks\\' protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability.

  15. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH 2 -PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH 2 -PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His 6 -tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni 2+ -His 6 bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His 6 -tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin β1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His 6 -tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557

  16. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) study of DNA hybridization at single nanoparticle transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Jahr, N.; Jatschka, J.; Csaki, A.; Stranik, O.; Fritzsche, W.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of DNA–DNA interaction on the localized surface plasmon resonance of single 80 nm gold nanoparticles is studied. Therefore, both the attachment of the capture DNA strands at the particle surface and the sequence-specific DNA binding (hybridization) of analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA is subject of investigations. The influence of substrate attachment chemistry, the packing density of DNA as controlled by an assisting layer of smaller molecules, and the distance as increased by a linker on the LSPR efficiency is investigated. The resulting changes in signal can be related to a higher hybridization efficiency of the analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA. The subsequent attachment of additional DNA strands to this system is studied, which allows for a multiple step detection of binding and an elucidation of the resulting resonance shifts. The detection limit was determined for the utilized DNA system by incubation with various concentration of analyte DNA. Although the method allows for a marker-free detection, we show that additional markers such as 20 nm gold particle labels increase the signal and thereby the sensitivity significantly. The study of resonance shift for various DNA lengths revealed that the resonance shift per base is stronger for shorter DNA molecules (20 bases) as compared to longer ones (46 bases).

  17. Single Fluorescent Molecules as Nano-Illuminators for Biological Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E.

    2011-03-01

    Since the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in a solid (Phys. Rev. Lett. {62}, 2535 (1989)), much has been learned about the ability of single molecules to probe local nanoenvironments and individual behavior in biological and nonbiological materials in the absence of ensemble averaging that can obscure heterogeneity. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic imaging of individual fluorophores leads naturally to superlocalization, or determination of the position of the molecule with precision beyond the optical diffraction limit, simply by digitization of the point-spread function from the single emitter. For example, the shape of single filaments in a living cell can be extracted simply by allowing a single molecule to move through the filament (PNAS {103}, 10929 (2006)). The addition of photoinduced control of single-molecule emission allows imaging beyond the diffraction limit (super-resolution) and a new array of acronyms (PALM, STORM, F-PALM etc.) and advances have appeared. We have used the native blinking and switching of a common yellow-emitting variant of green fluorescent protein (EYFP) reported more than a decade ago (Nature {388}, 355 (1997)) to achieve sub-40 nm super-resolution imaging of several protein structures in the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus: the quasi-helix of the actin-like protein MreB (Nat. Meth. {5}, 947 (2008)), the cellular distribution of the DNA binding protein HU (submitted), and the recently discovered division spindle composed of ParA filaments (Nat. Cell Biol. {12}, 791 (2010)). Even with these advances, better emitters would provide more photons and improved resolution, and a new photoactivatable small-molecule emitter has recently been synthesized and targeted to specific structures in living cells to provide super-resolution images (JACS {132}, 15099 (2010)). Finally, a new optical method for extracting three-dimensional position information based on

  18. Coupling single-molecule magnets to quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Mark; Martínez-Pérez, María José; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Hümmer, Thomas; García-Ripoll, Juanjo

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study theoretically the coupling of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) to a variety of quantum circuits, including microwave resonators with and without constrictions and flux qubits. The main result of this study is that it is possible to achieve strong and ultrastrong coupling regimes between SMM crystals and the superconducting circuit, with strong hints that such a coupling could also be reached for individual molecules close to constrictions. Building on the resulting coupling strengths and the typical coherence times of these molecules (∼ μs), we conclude that SMMs can be used for coherent storage and manipulation of quantum information, either in the context of quantum computing or in quantum simulations. Throughout the work we also discuss in detail the family of molecules that are most suitable for such operations, based not only on the coupling strength, but also on the typical energy gaps and the simplicity with which they can be tuned and oriented. Finally, we also discuss practical advantages of SMMs, such as the possibility to fabricate the SMMs ensembles on the chip through the deposition of small droplets. (paper)

  19. Single molecule transcription factor dynamics in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzacq, Xavier

    During early development in the Drosophila embryo, cell fates are determined over the course of just 2 hours with exquisite spatio-temoral precision. One of the key regulators of this process is the transcription factor Bicoid which forms a concentration gradient across the long axis of the embryo. Although Bicoids' primary role is activation at the anterior, where concentrations are highest, it is also known to play a role in the posterior where there are only 100s of molecules per nucleus. Understanding how Bicoid can find its target at such low concentrations has remained intractable, largely due to the inability to perform single molecule imaging in the context of the developing embryo. Here we use lattice light sheet microscopy to overcome the technical barriers of sample thickness and auto-fluorescence to characterize the single molecule dynamics of Bicoid. We find that off-rates do not vary across the embryo and that instead the on-rates are modulated through the formation of clusters that enrich local concentration. This data is contrary to the current concentration dependent model of Bicoid function since local concentration within the nucleus is now a regulated parameter and suggests a previously unknown mechanism for regulation at extremely low concentrations.

  20. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  1. Platinum plasmonic nanostructure arrays for massively parallel single-molecule detection based on enhanced fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Toshiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Obara, Takayuki; Itabashi, Naoshi; Imai, Kazumichi

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated platinum bowtie nanostructure arrays producing fluorescence enhancement and evaluated their performance using two-photon photoluminescence and single-molecule fluorescence measurements. A comprehensive selection of suitable materials was explored by electromagnetic simulation and Pt was chosen as the plasmonic material for visible light excitation near 500 nm, which is preferable for multicolor dye-labeling applications like DNA sequencing. The observation of bright photoluminescence (λ = 500-600 nm) from each Pt nanostructure, induced by irradiation at 800 nm with a femtosecond laser pulse, clearly indicates that a highly enhanced local field is created near the Pt nanostructure. The attachment of a single dye molecule was attempted between the Pt triangles of each nanostructure by using selective immobilization chemistry. The fluorescence intensities of the single dye molecule localized on the nanostructures were measured. A highly enhanced fluorescence, which was increased by a factor of 30, was observed. The two-photon photoluminescence intensity and fluorescence intensity showed qualitatively consistent gap size dependence. However, the average fluorescence enhancement factor was rather repressed even in the nanostructure with the smallest gap size compared to the large growth of photoluminescence. The variation of the position of the dye molecule attached to the nanostructure may influence the wide distribution of the fluorescence enhancement factor and cause the rather small average value of the fluorescence enhancement factor.

  2. Low-temperature phonoemissive tunneling rates in single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Garg, Anupam

    2016-03-01

    Tunneling between the two lowest energy levels of single molecule magnets with Ising type anisotropy, accompanied by the emission or absorption of phonons, is considered. Quantitatively accurate calculations of the rates for such tunneling are performed for a model Hamiltonian especially relevant to the best studied example, Fe8. Two different methods are used: high-order perturbation theory in the spin-phonon interaction and the non-Ising-symmetric parts of the spin Hamiltonian, and a novel semiclassical approach based on spin-coherent-state-path-integral instantons. The methods are found to be in good quantitative agreement with other, and consistent with previous approaches to the problem. The implications of these results for magnetization of molecular solids of these molecules are discussed briefly.

  3. Kondo effect in single-molecule magnet transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael; Mucciolo, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We present a careful and thorough microscopic derivation of the anisotropic Kondo Hamiltonian for single-molecule magnet (SMM) transistors. When the molecule is strongly coupled to metallic leads, we show that by applying a transverse magnetic field it is possible to topologically induce or quench the Kondo effect in the conductance of a SMM with either an integer or a half-integer spin S>1/2. This topological Kondo effect is due to the Berry-phase interference between multiple quantum tunneling paths of the spin. We calculate the renormalized Berry-phase oscillations of the two Kondo peaks as a function of a transverse magnetic field by means of the poor man's scaling approach. We illustrate our findings with the SMM Ni4, which we propose as a possible candidate for the experimental observation of the conductance oscillations.

  4. Robust Magnetic Properties of a Sublimable Single-Molecule Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefl, Evan; Mannini, Matteo; Bernot, Kevin; Yi, Xiaohui; Amato, Alex; Leviant, Tom; Magnani, Agnese; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas; Sessoli, Roberta; Salman, Zaher

    2016-06-28

    The organization of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) on surfaces via thermal sublimation is a prerequisite for the development of future devices for spintronics exploiting the richness of properties offered by these magnetic molecules. However, a change in the SMM properties due to the interaction with specific surfaces is usually observed. Here we present a rare example of an SMM system that can be thermally sublimated on gold surfaces while maintaining its intact chemical structure and magnetic properties. Muon spin relaxation and ac susceptibility measurements are used to demonstrate that, unlike other SMMs, the magnetic properties of this system in thin films are very similar to those in the bulk, throughout the full volume of the film, including regions near the metal and vacuum interfaces. These results exhibit the robustness of chemical and magnetic properties of this complex and provide important clues for the development of nanostructures based on SMMs.

  5. Single gene retrieval from thermally degraded DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    DNA thermal degradation was shown to occur via a singlet oxygen pathway. A comparative study of the ther- mal degradation of cellular DNA and isolated DNA showed that cellular ..... definite level of energy (e.g. depurination active energy,.

  6. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Su

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments, microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  7. Quantum Point Contact Single-Nucleotide Conductance for DNA and RNA Sequence Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Sepideh; Korshoj, Lee E; Abel, Gary R; Khan, Sajida; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-11-28

    Several nanoscale electronic methods have been proposed for high-throughput single-molecule nucleic acid sequence identification. While many studies display a large ensemble of measurements as "electronic fingerprints" with some promise for distinguishing the DNA and RNA nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil), important metrics such as accuracy and confidence of base calling fall well below the current genomic methods. Issues such as unreliable metal-molecule junction formation, variation of nucleotide conformations, insufficient differences between the molecular orbitals responsible for single-nucleotide conduction, and lack of rigorous base calling algorithms lead to overlapping nanoelectronic measurements and poor nucleotide discrimination, especially at low coverage on single molecules. Here, we demonstrate a technique for reproducible conductance measurements on conformation-constrained single nucleotides and an advanced algorithmic approach for distinguishing the nucleobases. Our quantum point contact single-nucleotide conductance sequencing (QPICS) method uses combed and electrostatically bound single DNA and RNA nucleotides on a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine molecules. We demonstrate that by varying the applied bias and pH conditions, molecular conductance can be switched ON and OFF, leading to reversible nucleotide perturbation for electronic recognition (NPER). We utilize NPER as a method to achieve >99.7% accuracy for DNA and RNA base calling at low molecular coverage (∼12×) using unbiased single measurements on DNA/RNA nucleotides, which represents a significant advance compared to existing sequencing methods. These results demonstrate the potential for utilizing simple surface modifications and existing biochemical moieties in individual nucleobases for a reliable, direct, single-molecule, nanoelectronic DNA and RNA nucleotide identification method for sequencing.

  8. Single DNA imaging and length quantification through a mobile phone microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshan; Luo, Wei; Chiang, Samuel; Kappel, Tara; Mejia, Crystal; Tseng, Derek; Chan, Raymond Yan L.; Yan, Eddie; Qi, Hangfei; Shabbir, Faizan; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    The development of sensitive optical microscopy methods for the detection of single DNA molecules has become an active research area which cultivates various promising applications including point-of-care (POC) genetic testing and diagnostics. Direct visualization of individual DNA molecules usually relies on sophisticated optical microscopes that are mostly available in well-equipped laboratories. For POC DNA testing/detection, there is an increasing need for the development of new single DNA imaging and sensing methods that are field-portable, cost-effective, and accessible for diagnostic applications in resource-limited or field-settings. For this aim, we developed a mobile-phone integrated fluorescence microscopy platform that allows imaging and sizing of single DNA molecules that are stretched on a chip. This handheld device contains an opto-mechanical attachment integrated onto a smartphone camera module, which creates a high signal-to-noise ratio dark-field imaging condition by using an oblique illumination/excitation configuration. Using this device, we demonstrated imaging of individual linearly stretched λ DNA molecules (48 kilobase-pair, kbp) over 2 mm2 field-of-view. We further developed a robust computational algorithm and a smartphone app that allowed the users to quickly quantify the length of each DNA fragment imaged using this mobile interface. The cellphone based device was tested by five different DNA samples (5, 10, 20, 40, and 48 kbp), and a sizing accuracy of <1 kbp was demonstrated for DNA strands longer than 10 kbp. This mobile DNA imaging and sizing platform can be very useful for various diagnostic applications including the detection of disease-specific genes and quantification of copy-number-variations at POC settings.

  9. Single helically folded aromatic oligoamides that mimic the charge surface of double-stranded B-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziach, Krzysztof; Chollet, Céline; Parissi, Vincent; Prabhakaran, Panchami; Marchivie, Mathieu; Corvaglia, Valentina; Bose, Partha Pratim; Laxmi-Reddy, Katta; Godde, Frédéric; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Pourquier, Philippe; Huc, Ivan

    2018-05-01

    Numerous essential biomolecular processes require the recognition of DNA surface features by proteins. Molecules mimicking these features could potentially act as decoys and interfere with pharmacologically or therapeutically relevant protein-DNA interactions. Although naturally occurring DNA-mimicking proteins have been described, synthetic tunable molecules that mimic the charge surface of double-stranded DNA are not known. Here, we report the design, synthesis and structural characterization of aromatic oligoamides that fold into single helical conformations and display a double helical array of negatively charged residues in positions that match the phosphate moieties in B-DNA. These molecules were able to inhibit several enzymes possessing non-sequence-selective DNA-binding properties, including topoisomerase 1 and HIV-1 integrase, presumably through specific foldamer-protein interactions, whereas sequence-selective enzymes were not inhibited. Such modular and synthetically accessible DNA mimics provide a versatile platform to design novel inhibitors of protein-DNA interactions.

  10. Click strategies for single-molecule protein fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milles, Sigrid; Tyagi, Swati; Banterle, Niccolò; Koehler, Christine; VanDelinder, Virginia; Plass, Tilman; Neal, Adrian P; Lemke, Edward A

    2012-03-21

    Single-molecule methods have matured into central tools for studies in biology. Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, in particular, have been widely applied to study biomolecular structure and dynamics. The major bottleneck for a facile and general application of these studies arises from the need to label biological samples site-specifically with suitable fluorescent dyes. In this work, we present an optimized strategy combining click chemistry and the genetic encoding of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) to overcome this limitation for proteins. We performed a systematic study with a variety of clickable UAAs and explored their potential for high-resolution single-molecule FRET (smFRET). We determined all parameters that are essential for successful single-molecule studies, such as accessibility of the probes, expression yield of proteins, and quantitative labeling. Our multiparameter fluorescence analysis allowed us to gain new insights into the effects and photophysical properties of fluorescent dyes linked to various UAAs for smFRET measurements. This led us to determine that, from the extended tool set that we now present, genetically encoding propargyllysine has major advantages for state-of-the-art measurements compared to other UAAs. Using this optimized system, we present a biocompatible one-step dual-labeling strategy of the regulatory protein RanBP3 with full labeling position freedom. Our technique allowed us then to determine that the region encompassing two FxFG repeat sequences adopts a disordered but collapsed state. RanBP3 serves here as a prototypical protein that, due to its multiple cysteines, size, and partially disordered structure, is not readily accessible to any of the typical structure determination techniques such as smFRET, NMR, and X-ray crystallography.

  11. Simulation Assisted Analysis of the Intrinsic Stiffness for Short DNA Molecules Imaged with Scanning Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowei Wang

    Full Text Available Studying the mechanical properties of short segments of dsDNA can provide insight into various biophysical phenomena, from DNA looping to the organization of nucleosomes. Scanning atomic force microscopy (AFM is able to acquire images of single DNA molecules with near-basepair resolution. From many images, one may use equilibrium statistical mechanics to quantify the intrinsic stiffness (or persistence length of the DNA. However, this approach is highly dependent upon both the correct microscopic polymer model and a correct image analysis of DNA contours. These complications have led to significant debate over the flexibility of dsDNA at short length scales. We first show how to extract accurate measures of DNA contour lengths by calibrating to DNA traces of simulated AFM data. After this calibration, we show that DNA adsorbed on an aminopropyl-mica surface behaves as a worm-like chain (WLC for contour lengths as small as ~20 nm. We also show that a DNA binding protein can modify the mechanics of the DNA from that of a WLC.

  12. 48-spot single-molecule FRET setup with periodic acceptor excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Segal, Maya; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Labanca, Ivan; Maccagnani, Piera; Ghioni, Massimo; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) allows measuring distances between donor and acceptor fluorophores on the 3-10 nm range. Solution-based smFRET allows measurement of binding-unbinding events or conformational changes of dye-labeled biomolecules without ensemble averaging and free from surface perturbations. When employing dual (or multi) laser excitation, smFRET allows resolving the number of fluorescent labels on each molecule, greatly enhancing the ability to study heterogeneous samples. A major drawback to solution-based smFRET is the low throughput, which renders repetitive measurements expensive and hinders the ability to study kinetic phenomena in real-time. Here we demonstrate a high-throughput smFRET system that multiplexes acquisition by using 48 excitation spots and two 48-pixel single-photon avalanche diode array detectors. The system employs two excitation lasers allowing separation of species with one or two active fluorophores. The performance of the system is demonstrated on a set of doubly labeled double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides with different distances between donor and acceptor dyes along the DNA duplex. We show that the acquisition time for accurate subpopulation identification is reduced from several minutes to seconds, opening the way to high-throughput screening applications and real-time kinetics studies of enzymatic reactions such as DNA transcription by bacterial RNA polymerase.

  13. Bright photoactivatable fluorophores for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jonathan B; English, Brian P; Choi, Heejun; Muthusamy, Anand K; Mehl, Brian P; Dong, Peng; Brown, Timothy A; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Liu, Zhe; Lionnet, Timothée; Lavis, Luke D

    2016-12-01

    Small-molecule fluorophores are important tools for advanced imaging experiments. We previously reported a general method to improve small, cell-permeable fluorophores which resulted in the azetidine-containing 'Janelia Fluor' (JF) dyes. Here, we refine and extend the utility of these dyes by synthesizing photoactivatable derivatives that are compatible with live-cell labeling strategies. Once activated, these derived compounds retain the superior brightness and photostability of the JF dyes, enabling improved single-particle tracking and facile localization microscopy experiments.

  14. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in single-molecule magnet junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiqing; Wang, Qiang; Jiao, Hujun; Liang, J.-Q.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum transport through single-molecule magnet (SMM) junctions with ferromagnetic and normal-metal leads in the sequential regime. The current obtained by means of the rate-equation gives rise to the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR), which varies with the angle between the magnetization direction of ferromagnetic lead and the easy axis of SMM. The angular dependence of TAMR can serve as a probe to determine experimentally the easy axis of SMM. Moreover, it is demonstrated that both the magnitude and the sign of TAMR are tunable by the bias voltage, suggesting a new spin-valve device with only one magnetic electrode in molecular spintronics.

  15. Berry-Phase Blockade in Single-Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2007-06-01

    We formulate the problem of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM) in the Coulomb blockade regime taking into account topological interference effects for the tunneling of the large spin of a SMM. The interference originates from spin Berry phases associated with different tunneling paths. We show that, in the case of incoherent spin states, it is essential to place the SMM between oppositely spin-polarized source and drain leads in order to detect the spin tunneling in the stationary current, which exhibits topological zeros as a function of the transverse magnetic field.

  16. [Interactions of DNA bases with individual water molecules. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics computation results vs. experimental data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, E; Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Herrera, J N F; Poltev, V I

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate details of the DNA-water interactions we performed the calculations and systemaitic search for minima of interaction energy of the systems consisting of one of DNA bases and one or two water molecules. The results of calculations using two force fields of molecular mechanics (MM) and correlated ab initio method MP2/6-31G(d, p) of quantum mechanics (QM) have been compared with one another and with experimental data. The calculations demonstrated a qualitative agreement between geometry characteristics of the most of local energy minima obtained via different methods. The deepest minima revealed by MM and QM methods correspond to water molecule position between two neighbor hydrophilic centers of the base and to the formation by water molecule of hydrogen bonds with them. Nevertheless, the relative depth of some minima and peculiarities of mutual water-base positions in' these minima depend on the method used. The analysis revealed insignificance of some differences in the results of calculations performed via different methods and the importance of other ones for the description of DNA hydration. The calculations via MM methods enable us to reproduce quantitatively all the experimental data on the enthalpies of complex formation of single water molecule with the set of mono-, di-, and trimethylated bases, as well as on water molecule locations near base hydrophilic atoms in the crystals of DNA duplex fragments, while some of these data cannot be rationalized by QM calculations.

  17. DNA-encoded chemical libraries: advancing beyond conventional small-molecule libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Raphael M; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2014-04-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) represent a promising tool in drug discovery. DECL technology allows the synthesis and screening of chemical libraries of unprecedented size at moderate costs. In analogy to phage-display technology, where large antibody libraries are displayed on the surface of filamentous phage and are genetically encoded in the phage genome, DECLs feature the display of individual small organic chemical moieties on DNA fragments serving as amplifiable identification barcodes. The DNA-tag facilitates the synthesis and allows the simultaneous screening of very large sets of compounds (up to billions of molecules), because the hit compounds can easily be identified and quantified by PCR-amplification of the DNA-barcode followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing. Several approaches have been used to generate DECLs, differing both in the methods used for library encoding and for the combinatorial assembly of chemical moieties. For example, DECLs can be used for fragment-based drug discovery, displaying a single molecule on DNA or two chemical moieties at the extremities of complementary DNA strands. DECLs can vary substantially in the chemical structures and the library size. While ultralarge libraries containing billions of compounds have been reported containing four or more sets of building blocks, also smaller libraries have been shown to be efficient for ligand discovery. In general, it has been found that the overall library size is a poor predictor for library performance and that the number and diversity of the building blocks are rather important indicators. Smaller libraries consisting of two to three sets of building blocks better fulfill the criteria of drug-likeness and often have higher quality. In this Account, we present advances in the DECL field from proof-of-principle studies to practical applications for drug discovery, both in industry and in academia. DECL technology can yield specific binders to a variety of target

  18. DNA Translator and Aligner: HyperCard utilities to aid phylogenetic analysis of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eernisse, D J

    1992-04-01

    DNA Translator and Aligner are molecular phylogenetics HyperCard stacks for Macintosh computers. They manipulate sequence data to provide graphical gene mapping, conversions, translations and manual multiple-sequence alignment editing. DNA Translator is able to convert documented GenBank or EMBL documented sequences into linearized, rescalable gene maps whose gene sequences are extractable by clicking on the corresponding map button or by selection from a scrolling list. Provided gene maps, complete with extractable sequences, consist of nine metazoan, one yeast, and one ciliate mitochondrial DNAs and three green plant chloroplast DNAs. Single or multiple sequences can be manipulated to aid in phylogenetic analysis. Sequences can be translated between nucleic acids and proteins in either direction with flexible support of alternate genetic codes and ambiguous nucleotide symbols. Multiple aligned sequence output from diverse sources can be converted to Nexus, Hennig86 or PHYLIP format for subsequent phylogenetic analysis. Input or output alignments can be examined with Aligner, a convenient accessory stack included in the DNA Translator package. Aligner is an editor for the manual alignment of up to 100 sequences that toggles between display of matched characters and normal unmatched sequences. DNA Translator also generates graphic displays of amino acid coding and codon usage frequency relative to all other, or only synonymous, codons for approximately 70 select organism-organelle combinations. Codon usage data is compatible with spreadsheet or UWGCG formats for incorporation of additional molecules of interest. The complete package is available via anonymous ftp and is free for non-commercial uses.

  19. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, S. J., E-mail: ray.sjr@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-28

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  20. Magnetic Quantum Tunneling and Symmetry in Single Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Andrew D.

    2003-03-01

    We have studied the symmetry of magnetic quantum tunneling (MQT) in single molecule magnets (SMMs) using a micro-Hall effect magnetometer and high field vector superconducting magnet system. In the most widely studied SMM, Mn12-acetate, an average crystal 4-fold symmetry in the magnetic response is shown to be due to local molecular environments of 2-fold symmetry that are rotated by 90 degrees with respect to one another. We attribute this to ligand disorder that leads to local rhombic distortions, a model first proposed by Cornia et al. based on x-ray diffraction data [1]. We have magnetically distilled a Mn12-acetate crystal to study a subset of these lower (2-fold) site symmetry molecules and present evidence for a spin-parity effect consistent with a local 2-fold symmetry [2]. These results highlight the importance of subtle changes in molecule environment in modulating magnetic anisotropy and MQT. [1] Cornia et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 257201 (2002) [2] E. del Barco, A. D. Kent, E. Rumberger, D. H. Hendrickson, G. Christou, submitted for publication (2002) and Europhys. Lett. 60, 768 (2002)

  1. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  2. Single Molecule Detection in Living Biological Cells using Carbon Nanotube Optical Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nanoscale sensing elements offer promise for single molecule analyte detection in physically or biologically constrained environments. Molecular adsorption can be amplified via modulation of sharp singularities in the electronic density of states that arise from 1D quantum confinement [1]. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), as single molecule optical sensors [2-3], offer unique advantages such as photostable near-infrared (n-IR) emission for prolonged detection through biological media, single-molecule sensitivity and, nearly orthogonal optical modes for signal transduction that can be used to identify distinct classes of analytes. Selective binding to the SWNT surface is difficult to engineer [4]. In this lecture, we will briefly review the immerging field of fluorescent diagnostics using band gap emission from SWNT. In recent work, we demonstrate that even a single pair of SWNT provides at least four optical modes that can be modulated to uniquely fingerprint chemical agents by the degree to which they alter either the emission band intensity or wavelength. We validate this identification method in vitro by demonstrating detection and identification of six genotoxic analytes, including chemotherapeutic drugs and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are spectroscopically differentiated into four distinct classes. We also demonstrate single-molecule sensitivity in detecting hydrogen peroxide, one of the most common genotoxins and an important cellular signal. Finally, we employ our sensing and fingerprinting method of these analytes in real time within live 3T3 cells, demonstrating the first multiplexed optical detection from a nanoscale biosensor and the first label-free tool to optically discriminate between genotoxins. We will also discuss our recent efforts to fabricate biomedical sensors for real time detection of glucose and other important physiologically relevant analytes in-vivo. The response of embedded SWNT in a swellable hydrogel construct to

  3. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E. Vasdekis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  4. Single-Molecule Electrochemical Gating in Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, Nicola J.; Higgins, Simon J.; Jeppesen, Jan O.

    2012-01-01

    The single-molecular conductance of a redox active molecular bridge has been studied in an electrochemical single-molecule transistor configuration in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). The redox active pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene (pTTF) moiety was attached to gold contacts at both ends through...... −(CH2)6S– groups, and gating of the redox state was achieved with the electrochemical potential. The water-free, room-temperature, ionic liquid environment enabled both the monocationic and the previously inaccessible dicationic redox states of the pTTF moiety to be studied in the in situ scanning...... and decreases again as the second redox process is passed. This is described as an “off–on–off–on–off” conductance switching behavior. This molecular conductance vs electrochemical potential relation could be modeled well as a sequential two-step charge transfer process with full or partial vibrational...

  5. Compact quantum dots for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Nie, Shuming

    2012-10-09

    Single-molecule imaging is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms of biomolecular function and for visualizing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of molecular behaviors that underlie cellular biology (1-4). To image an individual molecule of interest, it is typically conjugated to a fluorescent tag (dye, protein, bead, or quantum dot) and observed with epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. While dyes and fluorescent proteins have been the mainstay of fluorescence imaging for decades, their fluorescence is unstable under high photon fluxes necessary to observe individual molecules, yielding only a few seconds of observation before complete loss of signal. Latex beads and dye-labeled beads provide improved signal stability but at the expense of drastically larger hydrodynamic size, which can deleteriously alter the diffusion and behavior of the molecule under study. Quantum dots (QDs) offer a balance between these two problematic regimes. These nanoparticles are composed of semiconductor materials and can be engineered with a hydrodynamically compact size with exceptional resistance to photodegradation (5). Thus in recent years QDs have been instrumental in enabling long-term observation of complex macromolecular behavior on the single molecule level. However these particles have still been found to exhibit impaired diffusion in crowded molecular environments such as the cellular cytoplasm and the neuronal synaptic cleft, where their sizes are still too large (4,6,7). Recently we have engineered the cores and surface coatings of QDs for minimized hydrodynamic size, while balancing offsets to colloidal stability, photostability, brightness, and nonspecific binding that have hindered the utility of compact QDs in the past (8,9). The goal of this article is to demonstrate the synthesis, modification, and characterization of these optimized nanocrystals, composed of an alloyed HgxCd1-xSe core coated with an

  6. Photoinduced nuclear spin conversion of methyl groups of single molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigl, A.

    2007-01-01

    A methyl group is an outstanding quantum system due to its special symmetry properties. The threefold rotation around one of its bond is isomorphic to the group of even permutations of the remaining protons, a property which imposes severe quantum restrictions on the system, for instance a strict correlation of rotational states with nuclear spin states. The resulting long lifetimes of the rotational tunneling states of the methyl group can be exploited for applying certain high resolution optical techniques, like hole burning or single molecule spectroscopy to optically switch the methyl group from one tunneling state to another therebye changing the nuclear spin of the protons. One goal of the thesis was to perform this switching in single methyl groups. To this end the methyl group was attached to a chromophoric system, in the present case terrylene, which is well suited for single molecule spectroscopy as well as for hole burning. Experiments were performed with the bare terrylene molecule in a hexadecane lattice which served as a reference system, with alphamethyl terrylene and betamethyl terrylene, both embedded in hexadecane, too. A single molecular probe is a highly sensitive detector for dynamic lattice instabilities. Already the bare terrylene probe showed a wealth of interesting local dynamic effects of the hexadecane lattice which could be well acounted for by the assumption of two nearly degenerate sites with rather different optical and thermal properties, all of which could be determined in a quantitative fashion. As to the methylated terrylene systems, the experiments verified that for betamethyl terrylene it is indeed possible to measure rotational tunneling events in single methyl groups. However, the spectral patterns obtained was much more complicated than expected pointing to the presence of three spectroscopically different methyl groups. In order to achieve a definite assignement, molecular mechanics simulations of the terrylene probes in the

  7. The Single-Molecule Centroid Localization Algorithm Improves the Accuracy of Fluorescence Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Boyang; Wang, Yanbo; Park, Seongjin; Han, Kyu Young; Singh, Digvijay; Kim, Jin H; Cheng, Wei; Ha, Taekjip

    2018-03-13

    Here, we demonstrate that the use of the single-molecule centroid localization algorithm can improve the accuracy of fluorescence binding assays. Two major artifacts in this type of assay, i.e., nonspecific binding events and optically overlapping receptors, can be detected and corrected during analysis. The effectiveness of our method was confirmed by measuring two weak biomolecular interactions, the interaction between the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G and immunoglobulin G and the interaction between double-stranded DNA and the Cas9-RNA complex with limited sequence matches. This analysis routine requires little modification to common experimental protocols, making it readily applicable to existing data and future experiments.

  8. Effect of base-pair inhomogeneities on charge transport along the DNA molecule, mediated by twist and radial polarons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmero, F; Archilla, J F R; Hennig, D; Romero, F R

    2004-01-01

    Some recent results for a three-dimensional, semi-classical, tight-binding model for DNA show that there are two types of polarons, namely radial and twist polarons, which can transport charge along the DNA molecule. However, the existence of two types of base pairs in real DNA makes it crucial to find out if charge transport also exists in DNA chains with different base pairs. In this paper, we address this problem in its simple case, a homogeneous chain except for a single different base pair, which we call a base-pair inhomogeneity, and its effect on charge transport. Radial polarons experience either reflection or trapping. However, twist polarons are good candidates for charge transport along real DNA. This transport is also very robust with respect to weak parametric and diagonal disorder

  9. Characterization of photoactivated singlet oxygen damage in single-molecule optical trap experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Markita P; McCall, Patrick M; Qi, Zhi; Chemla, Yann R

    2009-10-21

    Optical traps or "tweezers" use high-power, near-infrared laser beams to manipulate and apply forces to biological systems, ranging from individual molecules to cells. Although previous studies have established that optical tweezers induce photodamage in live cells, the effects of trap irradiation have yet to be examined in vitro, at the single-molecule level. In this study, we investigate trap-induced damage in a simple system consisting of DNA molecules tethered between optically trapped polystyrene microspheres. We show that exposure to the trapping light affects the lifetime of the tethers, the efficiency with which they can be formed, and their structure. Moreover, we establish that these irreversible effects are caused by oxidative damage from singlet oxygen. This reactive state of molecular oxygen is generated locally by the optical traps in the presence of a sensitizer, which we identify as the trapped polystyrene microspheres. Trap-induced oxidative damage can be reduced greatly by working under anaerobic conditions, using additives that quench singlet oxygen, or trapping microspheres lacking the sensitizers necessary for singlet state photoexcitation. Our findings are relevant to a broad range of trap-based single-molecule experiments-the most common biological application of optical tweezers-and may guide the development of more robust experimental protocols.

  10. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  11. Multispot single-molecule FRET: High-throughput analysis of freely diffusing molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Ingargiola

    Full Text Available We describe an 8-spot confocal setup for high-throughput smFRET assays and illustrate its performance with two characteristic experiments. First, measurements on a series of freely diffusing doubly-labeled dsDNA samples allow us to demonstrate that data acquired in multiple spots in parallel can be properly corrected and result in measured sample characteristics consistent with those obtained with a standard single-spot setup. We then take advantage of the higher throughput provided by parallel acquisition to address an outstanding question about the kinetics of the initial steps of bacterial RNA transcription. Our real-time kinetic analysis of promoter escape by bacterial RNA polymerase confirms results obtained by a more indirect route, shedding additional light on the initial steps of transcription. Finally, we discuss the advantages of our multispot setup, while pointing potential limitations of the current single laser excitation design, as well as analysis challenges and their solutions.

  12. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.; Elshenawy, M. M.; Takahashi, Masateru; Whitman, B. H.; Walter, N. G.; Hamdan, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation

  13. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  14. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  15. Different responses to muon implantation in single- and double-stranded DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Penny L.; Tani, Akiko; Oganesyan, Vasily S.; Butt, Julea N.; Cottrell, Stephen P.; Jayasooriya, Upali A.

    2006-01-01

    A model-free analysis of the longitudinal muon spin relaxation of muons implanted into single- and double-stranded DNA samples is reported. These samples show distinctly different responses to implanted muons with discontinuities of the integrated asymmetries at temperatures where these molecules are likely to have onset of molecular and electron dynamics

  16. Single-strand breaks in supercoiled DNA induced by vacuum-UV radiation in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakura, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mitsuo; Hieda, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Ito, Atsushi; Ito, Takashi

    1986-09-01

    The induction of single-strand breaks in the DNA of plasmid pBR 322 by vacuum-UV radiation above 145 nm in aqueous solutions was studied in relation to the production of OH-radicals in water. The similarity and dissimilarity were examined on the wavelength dependence between the two effects. The maximum of single strand breaks at 150 nm could be explained by the action of OH-radicals derived from direct water photolysis: the maximum at 180 nm remains unexplained. There was no indication that the direct absorption of photon by the DNA molecule plays an important role in the production of single-strand breaks.

  17. Single-strand breaks in supercoiled DNA induced by vacuum-UV radiation in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mitsuo; Hieda, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Ito, Atsushi; Ito, Takashi

    1986-01-01

    The induction of single-strand breaks in the DNA of plasmid pBR 322 by vacuum-UV radiation above 145 nm in aqueous solutions was studied in relation to the production of OH-radicals in water. The similarity and dissimilarity were examined on the wavelength dependence between the two effects. The maximum of single strand breaks at 150 nm could be explained by the action of OH-radicals derived from direct water photolysis: the maximum at 180 nm remains unexplained. There was no indication that the direct absorption of photon by the DNA molecule plays an important role in the production of single-strand breaks. (author)

  18. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in amega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead......, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA......-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies....

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F.

    2006-08-01

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  20. An all-electric single-molecule motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldenthuis, Johannes S; Prins, Ferry; Thijssen, Joseph M; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2010-11-23

    Many types of molecular motors have been proposed and synthesized in recent years, displaying different kinds of motion, and fueled by different driving forces such as light, heat, or chemical reactions. We propose a new type of molecular motor based on electric field actuation and electric current detection of the rotational motion of a molecular dipole embedded in a three-terminal single-molecule device. The key aspect of this all-electronic design is the conjugated backbone of the molecule, which simultaneously provides the potential landscape of the rotor orientation and a real-time measure of that orientation through the modulation of the conductivity. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we show that this approach provides full control over the speed and continuity of motion, thereby combining electrical and mechanical control at the molecular level over a wide range of temperatures. Moreover, chemistry can be used to change all key parameters of the device, enabling a variety of new experiments on molecular motors.

  1. Single-molecule protein sequencing through fingerprinting: computational assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Docter, Margreet; van Ginkel, Jetty; de Ridder, Dick; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-10-01

    Proteins are vital in all biological systems as they constitute the main structural and functional components of cells. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have brought the promise of complete proteomics by helping draft the human proteome. Yet, this commonly used protein sequencing technique has fundamental limitations in sensitivity. Here we propose a method for single-molecule (SM) protein sequencing. A major challenge lies in the fact that proteins are composed of 20 different amino acids, which demands 20 molecular reporters. We computationally demonstrate that it suffices to measure only two types of amino acids to identify proteins and suggest an experimental scheme using SM fluorescence. When achieved, this highly sensitive approach will result in a paradigm shift in proteomics, with major impact in the biological and medical sciences.

  2. Single-molecule protein sequencing through fingerprinting: computational assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yao; Docter, Margreet; Van Ginkel, Jetty; Joo, Chirlmin; De Ridder, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are vital in all biological systems as they constitute the main structural and functional components of cells. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have brought the promise of complete proteomics by helping draft the human proteome. Yet, this commonly used protein sequencing technique has fundamental limitations in sensitivity. Here we propose a method for single-molecule (SM) protein sequencing. A major challenge lies in the fact that proteins are composed of 20 different amino acids, which demands 20 molecular reporters. We computationally demonstrate that it suffices to measure only two types of amino acids to identify proteins and suggest an experimental scheme using SM fluorescence. When achieved, this highly sensitive approach will result in a paradigm shift in proteomics, with major impact in the biological and medical sciences. (paper)

  3. Nanofabrication of SERS Substrates for Single/Few Molecules Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Melino, Gianluca

    2015-05-04

    Raman spectroscopy is among the most widely employed methods to investigate the properties of materials in several fields of study. Evolution in materials science allowed us to fabricate suitable substrates, at the nanoscale, capable to enhance the electromagnetic field of the signals coming from the samples which at this range turn out to be in most cases singles or a few molecules. This particular variation of the classical technique is called SERS (Surface Enanched Raman Spectroscopy). In this work, the enhancement of the electromagnetic field is obtained by manipulation of the optical properties of metals with respect to their size. By using electroless deposition (bottom up technique), gold and silver nanoparticles were deposited in nanostructured patterns obtained on silicon wafers by means of electron beam lithography (top down technique). Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at extremely low concentration (10-8 M) was absorbed on the resultant dimers and the collection of the Raman spectra demonstrated the high efficiency of the substrates.

  4. Quantum turnstile operation of single-molecule magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldoveanu, V; Dinu, I V; Tanatar, B; Moca, C P

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent transport through single-molecule magnets coupled to magnetic or non-magnetic electrodes is studied in the framework of the generalized master equation method. We investigate the transient regime induced by the periodic switching of the source and drain contacts. If the electrodes have opposite magnetizations the quantum turnstile operation allows the stepwise writing of intermediate excited states. In turn, the transient currents provide a way to read these states. Within our approach we take into account both the uniaxial and transverse anisotropy. The latter may induce additional quantum tunneling processes which affect the efficiency of the proposed read-and-write scheme. An equally weighted mixture of molecular spin states can be prepared if one of the electrodes is ferromagnetic. (paper)

  5. Mechanisms of Cellular Proteostasis: Insights from Single-Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Carlos J.; Kaiser, Christian M.; Maillard, Rodrigo A.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Wilson, Christian A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells employ a variety of strategies to maintain proteome homeostasis. Beginning during protein biogenesis, the translation machinery and a number of molecular chaperones promote correct de novo folding of nascent proteins even before synthesis is complete. Another set of molecular chaperones helps to maintain proteins in their functional, native state. Polypeptides that are no longer needed or pose a threat to the cell, such as misfolded proteins and aggregates, are removed in an efficient and timely fashion by ATP-dependent proteases. In this review, we describe how applications of single-molecule manipulation methods, in particular optical tweezers, are shedding new light on the molecular mechanisms of quality control during the life cycles of proteins. PMID:24895851

  6. Spin interactions in Graphene-Single Molecule Magnets Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Aña; Luis, Fernando; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Dressel, Martin; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is a potential component of novel spintronics devices owing to its long spin diffusion length. Besides its use as spin-transport channel, graphene can be employed for the detection and manipulation of molecular spins. This requires an appropriate coupling between the sheets and the single molecular magnets (SMM). Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of graphene-Fe4 SMM hybrids. The Fe4 clusters are anchored non-covalently to the graphene following a diffusion-limited assembly and can reorganize into random networks when subjected to slightly elevated temperature. Molecules anchored on graphene sheets show unaltered static magnetic properties, whilst the quantum dynamics is profoundly modulated. Interaction with Dirac fermions becomes the dominant spin-relaxation channel, with observable effects produced by graphene phonons and reduced dipolar interactions. Coupling to graphene drives the spins over Villain's threshold, allowing the first observation of strongly-perturbative tunneling processes. Preliminary spin-transport experiments at low-temperature are further presented.

  7. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Trigonal Single-Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Del Barco, Enrique; Hill, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    We perform a numerical analysis of the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) that occurs in a spin S = 6 single-molecule magnet (SMM) with idealized C3 symmetry. The deconstructive points in the QTM are located by following the Berry-phase interference (BPI) oscillations. We find that the O4^3 (=12[Sz,S+^3 +S-^3 ]) operator unfreezes odd-k QTM resonances and generates three-fold patterns of BPI minima in all resonances, including k = 0! This behavior cannot be reproduced with operators that possess even rotational symmetry about the quantization axis. We find also that the k = 0 BPI minima shift away from zero longitudinal field. The wider implications of these results will be discussed in terms of the QTM behavior observed in other SMMs.

  8. A Low Spin Manganese(IV) Nitride Single Molecule Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mei; Cutsail, George E; Aravena, Daniel; Amoza, Martín; Rouzières, Mathieu; Dechambenoit, Pierre; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Pink, Maren; Ruiz, Eliseo; Clérac, Rodolphe; Smith, Jeremy M

    2016-09-01

    Structural, spectroscopic and magnetic methods have been used to characterize the tris(carbene)borate compound PhB(MesIm) 3 Mn≡N as a four-coordinate manganese(IV) complex with a low spin ( S = 1/2) configuration. The slow relaxation of the magnetization in this complex, i.e. its single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties, is revealed under an applied dc field. Multireference quantum mechanical calculations indicate that this SMM behavior originates from an anisotropic ground doublet stabilized by spin-orbit coupling. Consistent theoretical and experiment data show that the resulting magnetization dynamics in this system is dominated by ground state quantum tunneling, while its temperature dependence is influenced by Raman relaxation.

  9. Spin thermoelectric effects in organic single-molecule devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Wang, M.X.; Qian, C.; Hong, X.K.; Zhang, D.B.; Liu, Y.S.; Yang, X.F., E-mail: xfyang@cslg.edu.cn

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • A stronger spin thermoelectric performance in a polyacetylene device is observed. • For the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, a transport gap is opened. Thus the thermoelectric effects are largely enhanced. - Abstract: The spin thermoelectric performance of a polyacetylene chain bridging two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) is investigated based on first principles method. Two different edge spin arrangements in ZGNRs are considered. For ferromagnetic (FM) ordering, transmission eigenstates with different spin indices distributed below and above Fermi level are observed, leading directly to a strong spin thermoelectric effect in a wide temperature range. With the edge spins arranged in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, an obvious transport gap appears in the system, which greatly enhances the thermoelectric effects. The presence of a small spin splitting also induces a spin thermoelectric effect greater than the charge thermoelectric effect in certain temperature range. In general, the single-molecule junction exhibits the potential to be used for the design of perfect thermospin devices.

  10. Single Molecule Study of Photoconversion and Spectral Heterogeneities of Fluorophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Zhiyu

    of conformational changes and dynamics. The photophysical properties of organic dyes directly determine the quality of the experiments. So the better understanding of the photophysical properties of organic dyes, the better we are able to design the experiments and interpret the data, especially in single molecule...... important criteria for a good fluorophore. Improving the photostability of organic dyes by designing the structure is always a difficult task for organic chemists. It requires a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of the photobleaching behavior of fluorophores. It is the aim of this work...... to understand the mechanisms of photobleaching behaviors of organic dyes, terrylene diimide (TDI) and amino-trioxatriangulenium dye (A3-TOTA+). Photobleaching is usually seen as permanent loss of fluorescence. In this work, we show that organic fluorophores can be converted into another chemical compound after...

  11. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted Alfred [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  12. Photon-counting single-molecule spectroscopy for studying conformational dynamics and macromolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, Ted Alfred

    2002-01-01

    Single-molecule methods have the potential to provide information about conformational dynamics and molecular interactions that cannot be obtained by other methods. Removal of ensemble averaging provides several benefits, including the ability to detect heterogeneous populations and the ability to observe asynchronous reactions. Single-molecule diffusion methodologies using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are developed to monitor conformational dynamics while minimizing perturbations introduced by interactions between molecules and surfaces. These methods are used to perform studies of the folding of Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2, a small, single-domain protein, and of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers. Confocal microscopy is used in combination with sensitive detectors to detect bursts of photons from fluorescently labeled biomolecules as they diffuse through the focal volume. These bursts are analyzed to extract fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency. Advances in data acquisition and analysis techniques that are providing a more complete picture of the accessible molecular information are discussed. Photon Arrival-time Interval Distribution (PAID) analysis is a new method for monitoring macromolecular interactions by fluorescence detection with simultaneous determination of coincidence, brightness, diffusion time, and occupancy (proportional to concentration) of fluorescently-labeled molecules undergoing diffusion in a confocal detection volume. This method is based on recording the time of arrival of all detected photons, and then plotting the two-dimensional histogram of photon pairs, where one axis is the time interval between each pair of photons 1 and 2, and the second axis is the number of other photons detected in the time interval between photons 1 and 2. PAID is related to Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by a collapse of this histogram onto the time interval axis. PAID extends auto- and cross-correlation FCS

  13. Generation of Gene-Engineered Chimeric DNA Molecules for Specific Therapy of Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, Vera; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Dimitrova, Iliyana; Nikolova, Maria; Erdei, Anna; Prechl, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of self-reactive B and T cells and autoantibody production. In particular, double-stranded DNA-specific B cells play an important role in lupus progression, and their selective elimination is a reasonable approach for effective therapy of SLE. DNA-based vaccines aim at the induction of immune response against the vector-encoded antigen. Here, we are exploring, as a new DNA-based therapy of SLE, a chimeric DNA molecule encoding a DNA-mimotope peptide, and the Fv but not the immunogenic Fc fragment of an FcγRIIb-specific monoclonal antibody. This DNA construct was inserted in the expression vector pNut and used as a naked DNA vaccine in a mouse model of lupus. The chimeric DNA molecule can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and cross-links cell surface receptors on DNA-specific B cells, delivering an inhibitory intracellular signal. Intramuscular administration of the recombinant DNA molecule to lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice prevented increase in IgG anti-DNA antibodies and was associated with a low degree of proteinuria, modulation of cytokine profile, and suppression of lupus nephritis. PMID:23075110

  14. Adsorption Characteristics of DNA Nucleobases, Aromatic Amino Acids and Heterocyclic Molecules on Silicene and Germanene Monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Tanveer; Vovusha, Hakkim; Kaewmaraya, Thanayut; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    Binding of DNA/RNA nucleobases, aromatic amino acids and heterocyclic molecules on two-dimensional silicene and germanene sheets have been investigated for the application of sensing of biomolecules using first principle density functional theory

  15. A Synthetic Biology Project - Developing a single-molecule device for screening drug-target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Keith; Evans, Luke; Youell, James

    2012-07-16

    This review describes a European-funded project in the area of Synthetic Biology. The project seeks to demonstrate the application of engineering techniques and methodologies to the design and construction of a biosensor for detecting drug-target interactions at the single-molecule level. Production of the proteins required for the system followed the principle of previously described "bioparts" concepts (a system where a database of biological parts - promoters, genes, terminators, linking tags and cleavage sequences - is used to construct novel gene assemblies) and cassette-type assembly of gene expression systems (the concept of linking different "bioparts" to produce functional "cassettes"), but problems were quickly identified with these approaches. DNA substrates for the device were also constructed using a cassette-system. Finally, micro-engineering was used to build a magnetoresistive Magnetic Tweezer device for detection of single molecule DNA modifying enzymes (motors), while the possibility of constructing a Hall Effect version of this device was explored. The device is currently being used to study helicases from Plasmodium as potential targets for anti-malarial drugs, but we also suggest other potential uses for the device. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantum Tunneling Symmetry of Single Molecule Magnet Mn_12-acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barco, E.; Kent, A. D.; Rumberger, E.; Hendrikson, D. N.; Christou, G.

    2003-03-01

    We have studied the symmetry of magnetic quantum tunneling (MQT) in single crystals of single molecular magnet (SMM) Mn_12-acetate. A superconducting high field vector magnet was used to apply magnetic fields in arbitrary directions respect to the axes of the crystal. The MQT probability is extracted from the change in magnetization measured on sweeping the field through a MQT resonance. This is related to the quantum splitting of the molecules relaxing in the time window of the experiment [1]. The dependence of the MQT probability on the angle between the applied transverse field and the crystallographic axes shows a four-fold rotation pattern, with maxima at angles separated by 90 degrees. By selecting a part of the splitting distribution of the sample by applying an initial transverse field in the direction of one of the observed maxima the situation changes completely. The resulting behavior of the MQT probability shows a two-fold rotation pattern with maxima separated by 180 degrees. Moreover, if the selection is made by applying the initial transverse field in the direction of a complementary four-fold maximum the behavior shows again two-fold symmetry. However, the maxima are found to be shifted by 90 degrees respect to the first selection. The fact that we observe two-fold symmetry for different selections is a clear evidence of the existence of different molecules with lower anisotropy than the imposed by the tetragonal crystallographic site symmetry. The general four-fold symmetry observed is thus due in large part to equal populations of molecules with opposite signs of the second order anisotropy, as suggested by Cornia et al. and appears to be a consequence of to the existence of a discrete set of lower symmetry isomers in a Mn_12-acetate crystal [2]. [1] E. del Barco, A. D. Kent, E. Rumberger, D. N. Hendrikson and G. Christou, Europhys. Lett. 60, 768 (2002) [2] A. Cornia, R. Sessoli, L. Sorace, D. Gatteschi, A. L. Barra and C. Daiguebonne, Phys. Rev

  17. Probe Microscopic Studies of DNA Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Umemura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids of DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs are promising nanobioconjugates for nanobiosensors, carriers for drug delivery, and other biological applications. In this review, nanoscopic characterization of DNA-CNT hybrids, in particular, characterization by scanning probe microscopy (SPM, is summarized. In many studies, topographical imaging by atomic force microscopy has been performed. However, some researchers have demonstrated advanced SPM operations in order to maximize its unique and valuable functions. Such sophisticated approaches are attractive and will have a significant impact on future studies of DNA-CNT hybrids.

  18. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  19. Effects of Environmental Factors and Metallic Electrodes on AC Electrical Conduction Through DNA Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, S; Obaid, A; Al-Marzouki, F M

    2017-12-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is one of the best candidate materials for various device applications such as in electrodes for rechargeable batteries, biosensors, molecular electronics, medical- and biomedical-applications etc. Hence, it is worthwhile to examine the mechanism of charge transport in the DNA molecule, however, still a question without a clear answer is DNA a molecular conducting material (wire), semiconductor, or insulator? The answer, after the published data, is still ambiguous without any confirmed and clear scientific answer. DNA is found to be always surrounded with different electric charges, ions, and dipoles. These surrounding charges and electric barrier(s) due to metallic electrodes (as environmental factors (EFs)) play a substantial role when measuring the electrical conductivity through λ-double helix (DNA) molecule suspended between metallic electrodes. We found that strong frequency dependence of AC-complex conductivity comes from the electrical conduction of EFs. This leads to superimposing serious incorrect experimental data to measured ones. At 1 MHz, we carried out a first control experiment on electrical conductivity with and without the presence of DNA molecule. If there are possible electrical conduction due to stray ions and contribution of substrate, we will detected them. This control experiment revealed that there is an important role played by the environmental-charges around DNA molecule and any experiment should consider this role. We have succeeded to measure both electrical conductivity due to EFs (σ ENV ) and electrical conductivity due to DNA moleculeDNA ) independently by carrying the measurements at different DNA-lengths and subtracting the data. We carried out measurements as a function of frequency (f) and temperature (T) in the ranges 0.1 Hz molecule from all EFs effects that surround the molecule, but also to present accurate values of σ DNA and the dielectric constant of the molecule ε' DNA as a

  20. Evaluation of the Kinetic Property of Single-Molecule Junctions by Tunneling Current Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, Takanori; Hasegawa, Yusuke; Kiguchi, Manabu; Nishino, Tomoaki

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the formation and breaking of single-molecule junctions of two kinds of dithiol molecules by time-resolved tunneling current measurements in a metal nanogap. The resulting current trajectory was statistically analyzed to determine the single-molecule conductance and, more importantly, to reveal the kinetic property of the single-molecular junction. These results suggested that combining a measurement of the single-molecule conductance and statistical analysis is a promising method to uncover the kinetic properties of the single-molecule junction.

  1. Mapping and characterizing N6-methyladenine in eukaryotic genomes using single molecule real-time sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shijia; Beaulaurier, John; Deikus, Gintaras; Wu, Tao; Strahl, Maya; Hao, Ziyang; Luo, Guanzheng; Gregory, James A; Chess, Andrew; He, Chuan; Xiao, Andrew; Sebra, Robert; Schadt, Eric E; Fang, Gang

    2018-05-15

    N6-methyladenine (m6dA) has been discovered as a novel form of DNA methylation prevalent in eukaryotes, however, methods for high resolution mapping of m6dA events are still lacking. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing has enabled the detection of m6dA events at single-nucleotide resolution in prokaryotic genomes, but its application to detecting m6dA in eukaryotic genomes has not been rigorously examined. Herein, we identified unique characteristics of eukaryotic m6dA methylomes that fundamentally differ from those of prokaryotes. Based on these differences, we describe the first approach for mapping m6dA events using SMRT sequencing specifically designed for the study of eukaryotic genomes, and provide appropriate strategies for designing experiments and carrying out sequencing in future studies. We apply the novel approach to study two eukaryotic genomes. For green algae, we construct the first complete genome-wide map of m6dA at single nucleotide and single molecule resolution. For human lymphoblastoid cells (hLCLs), joint analyses of SMRT sequencing and independent sequencing data suggest that putative m6dA events are enriched in the promoters of young, full length LINE-1 elements (L1s). These analyses demonstrate a general method for rigorous mapping and characterization of m6dA events in eukaryotic genomes. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Quantification of DNA damage by single-cell electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1990-01-01

    A simple technique of micro-agarose gel electrophoresis has been developed to quantify DNA damage in individual cells. Cells are embedded in agarose gel on microscope slides, lysed by detergents and then electrophoresed for a short time under neutral or alkaline condition. In irradiated cells, DNA migrates from the nucleus toward the anode, displaying commet-like pattern by staining with DNA-specific fluorescence dye. DNA damage is evaluated by measuring the distance of DNA migration. The technique was applied for measuring DNA damage in single cells exposed to 60 Co γ-rays, or to KUR radiation in the presence or absence of 10 B-enriched boric acid. The enhanced production of double-stranded DNA breaks by 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction was demonstrated here. The significant increase in the length of DNA migration was observed in single cells exposed to such a low dose as 20 cGy after alkaline micro electrophoresis. (author)

  3. Novel Single-Stranded DNA Virus Genomes Recovered from Chimpanzee Feces Sampled from the Mambilla Plateau in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Matthew; Bawuro, Musa; Christopher, Alfred; Knight, Alexander; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Chapman, Hazel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metagenomic approaches are rapidly expanding our knowledge of the diversity of viruses. In the fecal matter of Nigerian chimpanzees we recovered three gokushovirus genomes, one circular replication-associated protein encoding single-stranded DNA virus (CRESS), and a CRESS DNA molecule. PMID:28254982

  4. Multicopy Single-Stranded DNA Directs Intestinal Colonization of Enteric Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brewer, Heather M.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Adams, L. Garry; McClelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Fang, Ferric C.

    2015-09-14

    Multicopy single-stranded DNAs (msDNAs) are hybrid RNA-DNA molecules encoded on retroelements called retrons and produced by the action of retron reverse transcriptases. Retrons are widespread in bacteria but the natural function of msDNA has remained elusive despite 30 years of study. The major roadblock to elucidation of the function of these unique molecules has been the lack of any identifiable phenotypes for mutants unable to make msDNA. We report that msDNA of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is necessary for colonization of the intestine. Similarly, we observed a defect in intestinal persistence in an enteropathogenic E. coli mutant lacking its retron reverse transcriptase. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of msDNA, proteins of central anaerobic metabolism needed for Salmonella colonization of the intestine are dysregulated. We show that the msDNA-deficient mutant can utilize nitrate but not other alternate electron acceptors in anaerobic conditions. Consistent with the availability of nitrate in the inflamed gut, a neutrophilic inflammatory response partially rescued the ability of a mutant lacking msDNA to colonize the intestine. These findings together indicate that the mechanistic basis of msDNA function during Salmonella colonization of the intestine is proper production of proteins needed for anaerobic metabolism. We further conclude that a natural function of msDNA is to regulate protein abundance, the first attributable function for any msDNA. Our data provide novel insight into the function of this mysterious molecule that likely represents a new class of regulatory molecules.

  5. Photon-Induced Magnetization Reversal in Single Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Mustafa

    2005-03-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMM) have been the subject of intensive research for more than a decade now because of their unique properties such as macroscopic quantum tunneling. Recent work in this area is focused on whether SMM are potential qubits, as proposed theoretically [1]. We use continuous millimeter wave radiation to manipulate the populations of the energy levels of a single crystal molecular magnet Fe8 [2]. When radiation is in resonance with the transitions between energy levels, the steady state magnetization exhibits dips. As expected, the magnetic field locations of these dips vary linearly with the radiation frequency. We will describe our experimental results, which provide a lower bound of 0.17 ns for transverse relaxation time. Transitions between excited states are found even though these states have negligible population at the experimental temperature. We find evidence that the sample heating is significant when the resonance condition is satisfied. Recent experiments are concentrated on the spin dynamics of Fe8 induced by pulsed radiation and results of these studies will also be presented. [1] Leuenberger, M. N. and Loss, D., Nature 410, 789 (2001). [2] M. Bal et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 100408(R) (2004).

  6. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozovsky, Sharon [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Forstner, Martin B. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sondermann, Holger [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  7. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of gold nanoparticle on stability of the DNA molecule: A study of molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izanloo, Cobra

    2017-09-02

    An understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions with gold nanoparticles is useful in today medicine applications. We have performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a B-DNA duplex (CCTCAGGCCTCC) in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle with a truncated octahedron structure composed of 201 gold atoms (diameter ∼1.8 nm) to investigate gold nanoparticle (GNP) effects on the stability of DNA. During simulation, the nanoparticle is closed to DNA and phosphate groups direct the particles into the major grooves of the DNA molecule. Because of peeling and untwisting states that are occur at end of DNA, the nucleotide base lies flat on the surface of GNP. The configuration entropy is estimated using the covariance matrix of atom-positional fluctuations for different bases. The results show that when a gold nanoparticle has interaction with DNA, entropy increases. The results of conformational energy and the hydrogen bond numbers for DNA indicated that DNA becomes unstable in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle. The radial distribution function was calculated for water hydrogen-phosphate oxygen pairs. Almost for all nucleotide, the presence of a nanoparticle around DNA caused water molecules to be released from the DNA duplex and cations were close to the DNA.

  9. Tertiary Structures of the Escherichia coli and Human Chromosome 21 Molecules of DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzálek, Petr; Kypr, Jaroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 1 (2001), s. 219-223 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5004802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA crystal structures * phosphorus atom representation * genomic DNA molecules Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2001

  10. Computational and Experimental Insight Into Single-Molecule Piezoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Christopher Wayne

    Piezoelectric materials allow for the harvesting of ambient waste energy from the environment. Producing lightweight, highly responsive materials is a challenge for this type of material, requiring polymer, foam, or bio-inspired materials. In this dissertation, I explore the origin of the piezoelectric effect in single molecules through density functional theory (DFT), analyze the piezoresponse of bio-inspired peptidic materials through the use of atomic and piezoresponse force microscopy (AFM and PFM), and develop a novel class of materials combining flexible polyurethane foams and non-piezoelectric, polar dopants. For the DFT calculations, functional group, regiochemical, and heteroatom derivatives of [6]helicene were examined for their influence on the piezoelectric response. An aza[6]helicene derivative was found to have a piezoelectric response (108 pm/V) comparable to ceramics such as lead zirconium titanate (200+ pm/V). These computed materials have the possibility to compete with current field-leading piezomaterials such as lead zirconium titanate (PZT), zinc oxide (ZnO), and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and its derivatives. The use of AFM/PFM allows for the demonstration of the piezoelectric effect of the selfassembled monolayer (SAM) peptidic systems. Through PFM, the influence that the helicity and sequence of the peptide has on the overall response of the molecule can be analyzed. Finally, development of a novel class of piezoelectrics, the foam-based materials, expands the current understanding of the qualities required for a piezoelectric material from ceramic and rigid materials to more flexible, organic materials. Through the exploration of these novel types of piezoelectric materials, new design rules and figures of merit have been developed.

  11. Mammalian DNA single-strand break repair: an X-ra(y)ted affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldecott, K W

    2001-05-01

    The genetic stability of living cells is continuously threatened by the presence of endogenous reactive oxygen species and other genotoxic molecules. Of particular threat are the thousands of DNA single-strand breaks that arise in each cell, each day, both directly from disintegration of damaged sugars and indirectly from the excision repair of damaged bases. If un-repaired, single-strand breaks can be converted into double-strand breaks during DNA replication, potentially resulting in chromosomal rearrangement and genetic deletion. Consequently, cells have adopted multiple pathways to ensure the rapid and efficient removal of single-strand breaks. A general feature of these pathways appears to be the extensive employment of protein-protein interactions to stimulate both the individual component steps and the overall repair reaction. Our current understanding of DNA single-strand break repair is discussed, and testable models for the architectural coordination of this important process are presented. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. A 3D-DNA Molecule Made of PlayMais

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Massimo; Horié, Ninon; Zuchuat, Sandrine; Weber, Aurélia; Ducret, Verena; Linder, Patrick; Perron, Karl

    2015-01-01

    More than 60 years have passed since the work of Rosalind Franklin, James Watson, and Francis Crick led to the discovery of the 3D-DNA double-helix structure. Nowadays, due to the simple and elegant architecture of its double helix, the structure of DNA is widely known. The biological role of the DNA molecule (e.g., genetic information), however,…

  13. Calix[4]arene Based Single-Molecule Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karotsis, Georgios; Teat, Simon J.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Piligkos, Stergios; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Brechin, Euan K.

    2009-06-04

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have been the subject of much interest in recent years because their molecular nature and inherent physical properties allow the crossover between classical and quantum physics to be observed. The macroscopic observation of quantum phenomena - tunneling between different spin states, quantum interference between tunnel paths - not only allows scientists to study quantum mechanical laws in great detail, but also provides model systems with which to investigate the possible implementation of spin-based solid state qubits and molecular spintronics. The isolation of small, simple SMMs is therefore an exciting prospect. To date almost all SMMs have been made via the self-assembly of 3d metal ions in the presence of bridging/chelating organic ligands. However, very recently an exciting new class of SMMs, based on 3d metal clusters (or single lanthanide ions) housed within polyoxometalates, has appeared. These types of molecule, in which the SMM is completely encapsulated within (or shrouded by) a 'protective' organic or inorganic sheath have much potential for design and manipulation: for example, for the removal of unwanted dipolar interactions, the introduction of redox activity, or to simply aid functionalization for surface grafting. Calix[4]arenes are cyclic (typically bowl-shaped) polyphenols that have been used extensively in the formation of versatile self-assembled supramolecular structures. Although many have been reported, p-{sup t}But-calix[4]arene and calix[4]arene (TBC4 and C4 respectively, Figure 1A) are frequently encountered due to (a) synthetic accessibility, and (b) vast potential for alteration at either the upper or lower rim of the macrocyclic framework. Within the field of supramolecular chemistry, TBC4 is well known for interesting polymorphic behavior and phase transformations within anti-parallel bi-layer arrays, while C4 often forms self-included trimers. The polyphenolic nature of calix[n]arenes (where

  14. Single molecule microscopy on Store-Operated Calcium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madl, J.

    2011-01-01

    Store-Operated Calcium Entry is essential for many signaling processes in non-excitable cells. The best studied Store-Operated Calcium current is the Calcium-Release-Activated-Calcium (CRAC) current in T-cells and mast cells, with Orai1 representing the essential pore forming subunit. Functional CRAC channels in store-depleted cells are composed of four Orai1 subunits. However, the stoichiometric composition in resting cells is still discussed controversially: both a tetrameric and a dimeric stoichiometry of resting-state Orai1 have been reported for immobilized or immobile Orai1 proteins. The aim of this thesis was to design a more versatile approach that allows reliable determination of the subunit stoichiometry of mobile Orai1 channels. The motive for this approach is that mobile sub-fractions of the entire Orai1 population provide the cleanest pool of data, devoid of contributions e.g. from immobile Orai1 clusters or Orai1-loaded vesicles attached to the plasma membrane. Moreover, resting-state Orai1 is predominantly mobile, and mobility appears critical for the lateral redistribution which occurs upon store depletion. The method per se is based on single molecule fluorescence microscopy and brightness analysis. Orai1 proteins were fused to a monomeric variant of Green Fluorescent Protein (mGFP) and over-expressed in a human cell line (T24). The 1:1 labeling stoichiometry allows using the brightness of individual Orai1-mGFP channels as a direct measure of the pore stoichiometry. Due to over-expression a potential mixing with endogenous Orai1 can be neglected. However, over-expression of Orai1-mGFP results in channel densities that are too high to allow for resolving single channels using diffraction limited optical microscopy. In order to overcome this challenge, I developed an experimental strategy that allows reduction of the density of actively fluorescent Orai1-mGFP channels without altering the labeling stoichiometry. In order to reduce the surface density

  15. DNA minor groove binding of small molecules: Experimental and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Eight indole derivatives were studied for their DNA binding ability using fluorescence quenching and molecular docking methods. These indole compounds have structural moieties similar as in few indole alkaloids. Experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that indole derivatives bind in the minor ...

  16. Radioprotection of DNA molecule by oxido-reduction's coenzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araos, M.S.; Fernandez, M.; Tomicic, I.; Toha, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The radio protective action of respiratory coenzymes on DNA-water solutions is studied after irradiation with a 60 Co source. Coenzymes were used separately or in mixtures of their oxidized and reduced forms. The dose relative factor (DRF) values evaluated by uv absorbancy measurements of DNA damage were high: 18.03 for the (NAD-FAD-quinone) mixture (a respiratory chain model); 14.91 for (quinone-hydroquinone) mixtures; 14.46 for quinone; 14.27 for hydroquinone; 12.49 for FAD; 7.21 for the (NAD-NADH) mixture; 6.48 for NADH and 3.79 for NAD. No parallelism was found between the DNA coenzymes strong interactions and their protective action, performed by overcoming the indirect radiation damage. Besides, uv irradiation studies give no support to protection through direct energy transfer processes from excited DNA to coenzymes. The high efficiency of the mixtures of oxidized-reduced respiratory coenzymes is discussed in terms of simultaneous and equivalent trapping of recombinable radicals. The high tolerance of these protectors in living cells is emphasized. (author)

  17. Morse potential in DNA molecule – An experiment proposal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-07-27

    Jul 27, 2012 ... We rely on the helicoidal Peyrard-Bishop model for DNA dynamics. Interaction between nucleotides at a same site belonging to different strands is modelled by a Morse potential energy. This potential depends on two parameters that are different for AT and CG pairs, which is a possible source for ...

  18. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-01

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  19. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-28

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  20. Solubilization of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes with Single- stranded DNA Generated from Asymmetric PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be effectively dispersed and functionalized bywrapping with long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA synthesized by asymmetric PCR. ThessDNA-CNTs attached on surface of glass carbon electrode made it possible forelectrochemical analysis and sensing, which was demonstrated by reduction of H2O2 onhemoglobin/ssDNA-CNTs modified electrodes. This research showed the potentialapplication of DNA-functionalised CNTs in construction of future electrochemicalbiosensors.

  1. Chemo-mechanical pushing of proteins along single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloski, Joshua E; Kozlov, Alexander G; Galletto, Roberto; Lohman, Timothy M

    2016-05-31

    Single-stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) proteins bind with high affinity to ssDNA generated during DNA replication, recombination, and repair; however, these SSBs must eventually be displaced from or reorganized along the ssDNA. One potential mechanism for reorganization is for an ssDNA translocase (ATP-dependent motor) to push the SSB along ssDNA. Here we use single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to detect such pushing events. When Cy5-labeled Escherichia coli (Ec) SSB is bound to surface-immobilized 3'-Cy3-labeled ssDNA, a fluctuating FRET signal is observed, consistent with random diffusion of SSB along the ssDNA. Addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1, a 5' to 3' ssDNA translocase, results in the appearance of isolated, irregularly spaced saw-tooth FRET spikes only in the presence of ATP. These FRET spikes result from translocase-induced directional (5' to 3') pushing of the SSB toward the 3' ssDNA end, followed by displacement of the SSB from the DNA end. Similar ATP-dependent pushing events, but in the opposite (3' to 5') direction, are observed with EcRep and EcUvrD (both 3' to 5' ssDNA translocases). Simulations indicate that these events reflect active pushing by the translocase. The ability of translocases to chemo-mechanically push heterologous SSB proteins along ssDNA provides a potential mechanism for reorganization and clearance of tightly bound SSBs from ssDNA.

  2. Investigation on Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current–Voltage Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Isshiki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the current through an electronic device and the voltage across its terminals is a current–voltage characteristic (I–V that determine basic device performance. Currently, I–V measurement on a single-molecule scale can be performed using break junction technique, where a single molecule junction can be prepared by trapping a single molecule into a nanogap between metal electrodes. The single-molecule I–Vs provide not only the device performance, but also reflect information on energy dispersion of the electronic state and the electron-molecular vibration coupling in the junction. This mini review focuses on recent representative studies on I–Vs of the single molecule junctions that cover investigation on the single-molecule diode property, the molecular vibration, and the electronic structure as a form of transmission probability, and electronic density of states, including the spin state of the single-molecule junctions. In addition, thermoelectronic measurements based on I–Vs and identification of the charged carriers (i.e., electrons or holes are presented. The analysis in the single-molecule I–Vs provides fundamental and essential information for a better understanding of the single-molecule science, and puts the single molecule junction to more practical use in molecular devices.

  3. A general approach to break the concentration barrier in single-molecule imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; Walter, Johannes C.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is often incompatible with physiological protein concentrations, as fluorescence background overwhelms an individual molecule's signal. We solve this problem with a new imaging approach called PhADE (Photo

  4. Conjugation of Organic Molecules to DNA and Their Application in DNA Nanotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Eva Maria

    2012-01-01

    Denne PhD afhandling præsenterer fire kapitler, som omhandler det videnskabelige område DNA nanoteknologi. Kapitel 1 er en general introduktion til DNA nanoteknologi, som først beskriver opbygningen af DNA og efter flere underkapitler slutter med en gennemgang af nogle fantastiske dynamiske DNA s...

  5. Direct squencing from the minimal number of DNA molecules needed to fill a 454 picotiterplate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Džunková

    Full Text Available The large amount of DNA needed to prepare a library in next generation sequencing protocols hinders direct sequencing of small DNA samples. This limitation is usually overcome by the enrichment of such samples with whole genome amplification (WGA, mostly by multiple displacement amplification (MDA based on φ29 polymerase. However, this technique can be biased by the GC content of the sample and is prone to the development of chimeras as well as contamination during enrichment, which contributes to undesired noise during sequence data analysis, and also hampers the proper functional and/or taxonomic assignments. An alternative to MDA is direct DNA sequencing (DS, which represents the theoretical gold standard in genome sequencing. In this work, we explore the possibility of sequencing the genome of Escherichia coli fs 24 from the minimum number of DNA molecules required for pyrosequencing, according to the notion of one-bead-one-molecule. Using an optimized protocol for DS, we constructed a shotgun library containing the minimum number of DNA molecules needed to fill a selected region of a picotiterplate. We gathered most of the reference genome extension with uniform coverage. We compared the DS method with MDA applied to the same amount of starting DNA. As expected, MDA yielded a sparse and biased read distribution, with a very high amount of unassigned and unspecific DNA amplifications. The optimized DS protocol allows unbiased sequencing to be performed from samples with a very small amount of DNA.

  6. Highly multiplexed targeted DNA sequencing from single nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Marco L; Wang, Yong; Kim, Charissa; Gao, Ruli; Jiang, Jerry; Sei, Emi; Navin, Nicholas E

    2016-02-01

    Single-cell DNA sequencing methods are challenged by poor physical coverage, high technical error rates and low throughput. To address these issues, we developed a single-cell DNA sequencing protocol that combines flow-sorting of single nuclei, time-limited multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), low-input library preparation, DNA barcoding, targeted capture and next-generation sequencing (NGS). This approach represents a major improvement over our previous single nucleus sequencing (SNS) Nature Protocols paper in terms of generating higher-coverage data (>90%), thereby enabling the detection of genome-wide variants in single mammalian cells at base-pair resolution. Furthermore, by pooling 48-96 single-cell libraries together for targeted capture, this approach can be used to sequence many single-cell libraries in parallel in a single reaction. This protocol greatly reduces the cost of single-cell DNA sequencing, and it can be completed in 5-6 d by advanced users. This single-cell DNA sequencing protocol has broad applications for studying rare cells and complex populations in diverse fields of biological research and medicine.

  7. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-01-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex has long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent m...

  8. Elasticity of short DNA molecules: theory and experiment for contour lengths of 0.6-7 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Li, Jinyu; Nelson, Philip C; Perkins, Thomas T; Betterton, M D

    2007-12-15

    The wormlike chain (WLC) model currently provides the best description of double-stranded DNA elasticity for micron-sized molecules. This theory requires two intrinsic material parameters-the contour length L and the persistence length p. We measured and then analyzed the elasticity of double-stranded DNA as a function of L (632 nm-7.03 microm) using the classic solution to the WLC model. When the elasticity data were analyzed using this solution, the resulting fitted value for the persistence length p(wlc) depended on L; even for moderately long DNA molecules (L = 1300 nm), this apparent persistence length was 10% smaller than its limiting value for long DNA. Because p is a material parameter, and cannot depend on length, we sought a new solution to the WLC model, which we call the "finite wormlike chain (FWLC)," to account for effects not considered in the classic solution. Specifically we accounted for the finite chain length, the chain-end boundary conditions, and the bead rotational fluctuations inherent in optical trapping assays where beads are used to apply the force. After incorporating these corrections, we used our FWLC solution to generate force-extension curves, and then fit those curves with the classic WLC solution, as done in the standard experimental analysis. These results qualitatively reproduced the apparent dependence of p(wlc) on L seen in experimental data when analyzed with the classic WLC solution. Directly fitting experimental data to the FWLC solution reduces the apparent dependence of p(fwlc) on L by a factor of 3. Thus, the FWLC solution provides a significantly improved theoretical framework in which to analyze single-molecule experiments over a broad range of experimentally accessible DNA lengths, including both short (a few hundred nanometers in contour length) and very long (microns in contour length) molecules.

  9. Charge transport through image charged stabilized states in a single molecule single electron transistor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedegard, Per; Bjornholm, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present paper gives an elaborate theoretical description of a new molecular charge transport mechanism applying to a single molecule trapped between two macroscopic electrodes in a solid state device. It is shown by a Hubbard type model of the electronic and electrostatic interactions, that the close proximity of metal electrodes may allow electrons to tunnel from the electrode directly into very localized image charge stabilized states on the molecule. Due to this mechanism, an exceptionally large number of redox states may be visited within an energy scale which would normally not allow the molecular HOMO-LUMO gap to be transversed. With a reasonable set of parameters, a good fit to recent experimental values may be obtained. The theoretical model is furthermore used to search for the physical boundaries of this effect, and it is found that a rather narrow geometrical space is available for the new mechanism to work: in the specific case of oligophenylenevinylene molecules recently explored in such devices several atoms in the terminal benzene rings need to be at van der Waal's distance to the electrode in order for the mechanism to work. The model predicts, that chemisorption of the terminal benzene rings too gold electrodes will impede the image charge effect very significantly because the molecule is pushed away from the electrode by the covalent thiol-gold bond

  10. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  11. Enzymatic production of 'monoclonal stoichiometric' single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M; Högberg, Björn

    2013-07-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools, as diagnostic probes, in gene therapy and in DNA nanotechnology. Oligonucleotides are typically produced via solid-phase synthesis, using polymer chemistries that are limited relative to what biological systems produce. The number of errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and the resulting diversity of sequences can be a problem. Here we present the 'monoclonal stoichiometric' (MOSIC) method for enzyme-mediated production of DNA oligonucleotides. We amplified oligonucleotides from clonal templates derived from single bacterial colonies and then digested cutter hairpins in the products, which released pools of oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We prepared 14-378-nucleotide MOSIC oligonucleotides either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification or by amplification of phagemid DNA in Escherichia coli. Analyses of the formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides.

  12. Single-Molecule Flow Platform for the Quantification of Biomolecules Attached to Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Han, Rui; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Yifei; Fujimoto, Bryant S; Yu, Jiangbo; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Rong, Yu; Zhou, Xing-Hua; Chiu, Daniel T

    2018-05-15

    We describe here a flow platform for quantifying the number of biomolecules on individual fluorescent nanoparticles. The platform combines line-confocal fluorescence detection with near nanoscale channels (1-2 μm in width and height) to achieve high single-molecule detection sensitivity and throughput. The number of biomolecules present on each nanoparticle was determined by deconvolving the fluorescence intensity distribution of single-nanoparticle-biomolecule complexes with the intensity distribution of single biomolecules. We demonstrate this approach by quantifying the number of streptavidins on individual semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots); streptavidin was rendered fluorescent using biotin-Alexa647. This flow platform has high-throughput (hundreds to thousands of nanoparticles detected per second) and requires minute amounts of sample (∼5 μL at a dilute concentration of 10 pM). This measurement method is an additional tool for characterizing synthetic or biological nanoparticles.

  13. Nonlinear and Nonsymmetric Single-Molecule Electronic Properties Towards Molecular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-09-05

    This review highlights molecular design for nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronic properties such as rectification, negative differential resistance, and switching, which are important components of future single-molecule information processing devices. Perspectives on integrated "molecular circuits" are also provided. Nonlinear and nonsymmetric single-molecule electronics can be designed by utilizing (1) asymmetric molecular cores, (2) asymmetric anchoring groups, (3) an asymmetric junction environment, and (4) asymmetric electrode materials. This review mainly focuses on the design of molecular cores.

  14. Ordered array of CoPc-vacancies filled with single-molecule rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng-Bo; Wang, Ya-Li; Tao, Min-Long; Sun, Kai; Tu, Yu-Bing; Yuan, Hong-Kuan; Wang, Jun-Zhong

    2018-05-01

    We report the highly ordered array of CoPc-vacancies and the single-molecule rotors inside the vacancies. When CoPc molecules are deposited on Cd(0001) at low-temperature, three types of molecular vacancies appeared randomly in the CoPc monolayer. Annealing the sample to higher temperature leads to the spontaneous phase separation and self-organized arrangement of the vacancies. Highly ordered arrays of two-molecule vacancies and single-molecule vacancies have been obtained. In particular, there is a rotating CoPc molecule inside each single-molecule vacancy, which constitutes the array of single-molecule rotors. These results provide a new routine to fabricate the nano-machines on a large scale.

  15. Stereoelectronic Effect-Induced Conductance Switching in Aromatic Chain Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Na; Wang, Jinying; Jia, Chuancheng; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Xisha; Yu, Chenmin; Li, Mingliang; Wang, Shuopei; Gong, Yao; Sun, Hantao; Zhang, Guanxin; Liu, Zhirong; Zhang, Guangyu; Liao, Jianhui; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2017-02-08

    Biphenyl, as the elementary unit of organic functional materials, has been widely used in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, over decades little has been fundamentally understood regarding how the intramolecular conformation of biphenyl dynamically affects its transport properties at the single-molecule level. Here, we establish the stereoelectronic effect of biphenyl on its electrical conductance based on the platform of graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions, where a specifically designed hexaphenyl aromatic chain molecule is covalently sandwiched between nanogapped graphene point contacts to create stable single-molecule junctions. Both theoretical and temperature-dependent experimental results consistently demonstrate that phenyl twisting in the aromatic chain molecule produces different microstates with different degrees of conjugation, thus leading to stochastic switching between high- and low-conductance states. These investigations offer new molecular design insights into building functional single-molecule electrical devices.

  16. Single-Molecule View of Small RNA-Guided Target Search and Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globyte, Viktorija; Kim, Sung Hyun; Joo, Chirlmin

    2018-05-20

    Most everyday processes in life involve a necessity for an entity to locate its target. On a cellular level, many proteins have to find their target to perform their function. From gene-expression regulation to DNA repair to host defense, numerous nucleic acid-interacting proteins use distinct target search mechanisms. Several proteins achieve that with the help of short RNA strands known as guides. This review focuses on single-molecule advances studying the target search and recognition mechanism of Argonaute and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) systems. We discuss different steps involved in search and recognition, from the initial complex prearrangement into the target-search competent state to the final proofreading steps. We focus on target search mechanisms that range from weak interactions, to one- and three-dimensional diffusion, to conformational proofreading. We compare the mechanisms of Argonaute and CRISPR with a well-studied target search system, RecA.

  17. A New Theoretical Approach to Single-Molecule Fluorescence Optical Studies of RNA Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xinghai; Shan Guangcun; Bao Shuying

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in condensed phases has many important chemical and biological applications. The single-molecule fluorescence measurements contain information about conformational dynamics on a vast range of time scales. Based on the data analysis protocols methodology proposed by X. Sunney Xie, the theoretical study here mainly focuses on the single-molecule studies of single RNA with interconversions among different conformational states, to with a single FRET pair attached. We obtain analytical expressions for fluorescence lifetime correlation functions that relate changes in fluorescence lifetime to the distance-dependent FRET mechanism within the context of the Smoluchowski diffusion model. The present work establishes useful guideline for the single-molecule studies of biomolecules to reveal the complicated folding dynamics of single RNA molecules at nanometer scale.

  18. Observation of Single-Protein and DNA Macromolecule Collisions on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Jeffrey E; Renault, Christophe; Bard, Allen J

    2015-07-08

    Single-molecule detection is the ultimate sensitivity in analytical chemistry and has been largely unavailable in electrochemical analysis. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of detecting electrochemically inactive single biomacromolecules, such as enzymes, antibodies, and DNA, by blocking a solution redox reaction when molecules adsorb and block electrode sites. By oxidizing a large concentration of potassium ferrocyanide on an ultramicroelectrode (UME, radius ≤150 nm), time-resolved, discrete adsorption events of antibodies, enzymes, DNA, and polystyrene nanospheres can be differentiated from the background by their "footprint". Further, by assuming that the mass transport of proteins to the electrode surface is controlled mainly by diffusion, a size estimate using the Stokes-Einstein relationship shows good agreement of electrochemical data with known protein sizes.

  19. Single-molecule stochastic times in a reversible bimolecular reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter; Valleriani, Angelo

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we consider the reversible reaction between reactants of species A and B to form the product C. We consider this reaction as a prototype of many pseudobiomolecular reactions in biology, such as for instance molecular motors. We derive the exact probability density for the stochastic waiting time that a molecule of species A needs until the reaction with a molecule of species B takes place. We perform this computation taking fully into account the stochastic fluctuations in the number of molecules of species B. We show that at low numbers of participating molecules, the exact probability density differs from the exponential density derived by assuming the law of mass action. Finally, we discuss the condition of detailed balance in the exact stochastic and in the approximate treatment.

  20. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisenda, R.; Perrin, M.L.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from

  1. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  2. Rational design of single-molecule magnets: a supramolecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Thorsten

    2011-01-07

    Since the discovery that Mn(12)OAc acts as a single-molecule magnet (SMM), an increasing number of transition metal complexes have been demonstrated to behave as SMMs. The signature of a SMM is a slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperatures accompanied by a magnetic hysteresis. The origin of SMM behaviour is the existence of an appreciable thermal barrier U for spin-reversal called magnetic anisotropy barrier which is related to the combination of a large total spin ground state (S(t)) and an easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. The extensive research on Mn(12)OAc and other SMMs has established more prerequisites for a rational development of new SMMs besides the high-spin ground state and the magnetic anisotropy: the symmetry should be at least C(3) to minimize the quantum tunneling of the magnetization through the anisotropy barrier but lower than cubic to avoid the cancellation of the local anisotropies upon projection onto the spin ground state. Based on these prerequisites, we have designed the ligand triplesalen which combines the phloroglucinol bridging unit for high spin ground states by the spin-polarization mechanism with a salen-like ligand environment for single-site magnetic anisotropies by a strong tetragonal ligand field. The C(3) symmetric, trinuclear complexes of the triplesalen ligand (talen(t-Bu(2)))(6-) exhibit a strong ligand folding resulting in an overall bowl-shaped molecular structure. This ligand folding preorganizes the axial coordination sites of the metal salen subunits for the complementary binding of three facial nitrogen atoms of a hexacyanometallate unit. This leads to a high driving force for the formation of heptanuclear complexes [M(t)(6)M(c)](n+) by the assembly of three molecular building blocks. Attractive van der Waals interactions of the tert-butyl phenyl units of two triplesalen trinuclear building blocks increase the driving force. In this respect, we have been able to synthesize the isostructural series [Mn(III)(6

  3. DNA-encoded libraries - an efficient small molecule discovery technology for the biomedical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunig, Verena; Potowski, Marco; Gohla, Anne; Brunschweiger, Andreas

    2018-06-27

    DNA-encoded compound libraries are a highly attractive technology for the discovery of small molecule protein ligands. These compound collections consist of small molecules covalently connected to individual DNA sequences carrying readable information about the compound structure. DNA-tagging allows for efficient synthesis, handling and interrogation of vast numbers of chemically synthesized, drug-like compounds. They are screened on proteins by an efficient, generic assay based on Darwinian principles of selection. To date, selection of DNA-encoded libraries allowed for the identification of numerous bioactive compounds. Some of these compounds uncovered hitherto unknown allosteric binding sites on target proteins; several compounds proved their value as chemical biology probes unraveling complex biology; and the first examples of clinical candidates that trace their ancestry to a DNA-encoded library were reported. Thus, DNA-encoded libraries proved their value for the biomedical sciences as a generic technology for the identification of bioactive drug-like molecules numerous times. However, large scale experiments showed that even the selection of billions of compounds failed to deliver bioactive compounds for the majority of proteins in an unbiased panel of target proteins. This raises the question of compound library design.

  4. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of DNA Aptamers to a Small Molecule Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; McConnell, Erin M; Koudrina, Anna; Velu, Ranganathan; Mattice, Christopher; Hunt, Vernon; McKeague, Maureen; DeRosa, Maria C

    2017-12-14

    Aptamers, synthetic oligonucleotide-based molecular recognition probes, have found use in a wide array of biosensing technologies based on their tight and highly selective binding to a variety of molecular targets. However, the inherent challenges associated with the selection and characterization of aptamers for small molecule targets have resulted in their underrepresentation, despite the need for small molecule detection in fields such as medicine, the environment, and agriculture. This protocol describes the steps in the selection, sequencing, affinity characterization, and truncation of DNA aptamers that are specific for small molecule targets. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Voltage-Driven Conformational Switching with Distinct Raman Signature in a Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hai; Palma, Carlos-Andres; Gong, Yuxiang; Hasch, Peter; Elbing, Mark; Mayor, Marcel; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V

    2018-04-11

    Precisely controlling well-defined, stable single-molecule junctions represents a pillar of single-molecule electronics. Early attempts to establish computing with molecular switching arrays were partly challenged by limitations in the direct chemical characterization of metal-molecule-metal junctions. While cryogenic scanning probe studies have advanced the mechanistic understanding of current- and voltage-induced conformational switching, metal-molecule-metal conformations are still largely inferred from indirect evidence. Hence, the development of robust, chemically sensitive techniques is instrumental for advancement in the field. Here we probe the conformation of a two-state molecular switch with vibrational spectroscopy, while simultaneously operating it by means of the applied voltage. Our study emphasizes measurements of single-molecule Raman spectra in a room-temperature stable single-molecule switch presenting a signal modulation of nearly 2 orders of magnitude.

  6. Electrical detection and quantification of single and mixed DNA nucleotides in suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Panicker, Neena G.; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Mustafa, Farah

    2016-09-01

    High speed sequential identification of the building blocks of DNA, (deoxyribonucleotides or nucleotides for short) without labeling or processing in long reads of DNA is the need of the hour. This can be accomplished through exploiting their unique electrical properties. In this study, the four different types of nucleotides that constitute a DNA molecule were suspended in a buffer followed by performing several types of electrical measurements. These electrical parameters were then used to quantify the suspended DNA nucleotides. Thus, we present a purely electrical counting scheme based on the semiconductor theory that allows one to determine the number of nucleotides in a solution by measuring their capacitance-voltage dependency. The nucleotide count was observed to be similar to the multiplication of the corresponding dopant concentration and debye volume after de-embedding the buffer contribution. The presented approach allows for a fast and label-free quantification of single and mixed nucleotides in a solution.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of single molecules and organic layers on surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Single molecules and organic layers on well-defined solid surfaces have attracted tremendous attention owing to their interesting physical and chemical properties. The ultimate utility of single molecules or self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for potential applications is critically dependent on the

  8. Electric-Field Control of Interfering Transport Pathways in a Single-Molecule Anthraquinone Transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Max; Thijssen, Jos M.; Valkenier, Hennie; Hummelen, Jan C.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    It is understood that molecular conjugation plays an important role in charge transport through single-molecule junctions. Here, we investigate electron transport through an anthraquinone based single-molecule three-terminal device. With the use of an electric-field induced by a gate electrode, the

  9. Evidence for a single hydrogen molecule connected by an atomic chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiguchi, M.; Stadler, Robert; Bækgaard, Iben Sig Buur

    2007-01-01

    Stable, single-molecule conducting-bridge configurations are typically identified from peak structures in a conductance histogram. In previous work on Pt with H-2 at cryogenic temperatures it has been shown that a peak near 1G(0) identifies a single-molecule Pt-H-2-Pt bridge. The histogram shows...

  10. Electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry towards the single-molecule level: Theoretical notions and systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Albrecht, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Surface structures controlled at the nanometer and single-molecule levels, with functions crucially determined by interfacial electron transfer (ET) are broadly reported in recent years, with different kinds of electrochemically controlled nanoscale/single molecule systems. One is the broad class...

  11. Purification of Single-Stranded cDNA Based on RNA Degradation Treatment and Adsorption Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Franco, Bernardo; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2016-08-02

    Analysis of gene expression is a common research tool to study networks controlling gene expression, the role of genes with unknown function, and environmentally induced responses of organisms. Most of the analytical tools used to analyze gene expression rely on accurate cDNA synthesis and quantification to obtain reproducible and quantifiable results. Thus far, most commercial kits for isolation and purification of cDNA target double-stranded molecules, which do not accurately represent the abundance of transcripts. In the present report, we provide a simple and fast method to purify single-stranded cDNA, exhibiting high purity and yield. This method is based on the treatment with RNase H and RNase A after cDNA synthesis, followed by separation in silica spin-columns and ethanol precipitation. In addition, our method avoids the use of DNase I to eliminate genomic DNA from RNA preparations, which improves cDNA yield. As a case report, our method proved to be useful in the purification of single-stranded cDNA from the pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  12. Single-molecule force-conductance spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonded complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; De Vico, Luca; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2017-01-01

    to inform about molecular recognition events at the single-molecule limit. For this, we consider the force-conductance characteristics of a prototypical class of hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes sandwiched between gold electrodes. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton...... is mechanically manipulated. The implication is that force and conductance provide complementary information about the evolution of molecules in junctions that can be used to interrogate basic structure-transport relations at the single-molecule limit....

  13. The mitochondrial and plastid genomes of Volvox carteri: bloated molecules rich in repetitive DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Robert W

    2009-03-01

    compartment. We conclude that the palindromic repeats in V. carteri represent a single class of selfish DNA and speculate that the derivation of this element involved the lateral gene transfer of an organelle intron that first appeared in the mitochondrial genome, spreading to the ptDNA through mitochondrion-to-plastid DNA migrations, and eventually arrived in the nucDNA through organelle-to-nucleus DNA transfer events. The overall implications of palindromic repeats on the evolution of chlorophyte organelle genomes are discussed.

  14. Hardware solution for continuous time-resolved burst detection of single molecules in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael; Erdmann, Rainer; Lauritsen, Kristian; Rahn, Hans-Juergen

    1998-04-01

    Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is a valuable tool for Single Molecule Detection (SMD). However, existing TCSPC systems did not support continuous data collection and processing as is desirable for applications such as SMD for e.g. DNA-sequencing in a liquid flow. First attempts at using existing instrumentation in this kind of operation mode required additional routing hardware to switch between several memory banks and were not truly continuous. We have designed a hard- and software system to perform continuous real-time TCSPC based upon a modern solid state Time to Digital Converter (TDC). Short dead times of the fully digital TDC design combined with fast Field Programmable Gay Array logic permit a continuous data throughput as high as 3 Mcounts/sec. The histogramming time may be set as short as 100 microsecond(s) . Every histogram or every single fluorescence photon can be real-time tagged at 200 ns resolution in addition to recording its arrival time relative to the excitation pulse. Continuous switching between memory banks permits concurrent histogramming and data read-out. The instrument provides a time resolution of 60 ps and up to 4096 histogram channels. The overall instrument response function in combination with a low cost picosecond diode laser and an inexpensive photomultiplier tube was found to be 180 ps and well sufficient to measure sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes.

  15. Single Molecule Science for Personalized Nanomedicine: Atomic Force Microscopy of Biopolymer-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Carlin

    Nanotechnology has a unique and relatively untapped utility in the fields of medicine and dentistry at the level of single-biopolymer and -molecule diagnostics. In recent years atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest due to its ability to obtain atomic-resolution of molecular structures and probe biophysical behaviors of biopolymers and proteins in a variety of biologically significant environments. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the nanoscale manipulation and observation of biopolymers to develop an innovative technology for personalized medicine while understanding complex biological systems. These studies described here primarily use AFM to observe biopolymer interactions with proteins and its surroundings with unprecedented resolution, providing a better understanding of these systems and interactions at the nanoscale. Transcriptional profiling, the measure of messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance in a single cell, is a powerful technique that detects "behavior" or "symptoms" at the tissue and cellular level. We have sought to develop an alternative approach, using our expertise in AFM and single molecule nanotechnology, to achieve a cost-effective high throughput method for sensitive detection and profiling of subtle changes in transcript abundance. The technique does not require amplification of the mRNA sample because the AFM provides three-dimensional views of molecules with unprecedented resolution, requires minimal sample preparation, and utilizes a simple tagging chemistry on cDNA molecules. AFM images showed collagen polymers in teeth and of Drebrin-A remodeling of filamentous actin structure and mechanics. AFM was used to image collagen on exposed dentine tubules and confirmed tubule occlusion with a desensitizing prophylaxis paste by Colgate-Palmolive. The AFM also superseded other microscopy tools in resolving F-actin helix remodeling and possible cooperative binding by a neuronal actin binding protein---Drebrin-A, an

  16. Alternative types of molecule-decorated atomic chains in Au–CO–Au single-molecule junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Balogh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the formation and evolution of Au–CO single-molecule break junctions. The conductance histogram exhibits two distinct molecular configurations, which are further investigated by a combined statistical analysis. According to conditional histogram and correlation analysis these molecular configurations show strong anticorrelations with each other and with pure Au monoatomic junctions and atomic chains. We identify molecular precursor configurations with somewhat higher conductance, which are formed prior to single-molecule junctions. According to detailed length analysis two distinct types of molecule-affected chain-formation processes are observed, and we compare these results to former theoretical calculations considering bridge- and atop-type molecular configurations where the latter has reduced conductance due to destructive Fano interference.

  17. Dynamic simulations of single-molecule enzyme networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armbruster, H.D.; Nagy, J.D.; Rijt, van de E.A.F.; Rooda, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of technologies allowing accurate visualization of biochemical reactions to the scale of individual molecules has arisen an appreciation of the role of statistical fluctuations in intracellular biochemistry. The stochastic nature of metabolism can no longer be ignored. It can

  18. Physics of Polymers under Nanoscopic Confinement: a Single Molecule Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keshavarz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Physicist Masoumeh Keshavarz studied the thermal motion of a fluorescently labelled, individual “reporter” polymer molecule, surrounded and entangled by a gel of similar but unlabelled polymers. Owing to their extreme length and stiffness, it is possible to follow the shape and the motion of the

  19. Single-Photon Source for Quantum Information Based on Single Dye Molecule Fluorescence in Liquid Crystal Host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukishova, S.G.; Knox, R.P.; Freivald, P.; McNamara, A.; Boyd, R.W.; Stroud, Jr. C.R.; Schmid, A.W.; Marshall, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a new application for liquid crystals: quantum information technology. A deterministically polarized single-photon source that efficiently produces photons exhibiting antibunching is a pivotal hardware element in absolutely secure quantum communication. Planar-aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts deterministically align the single dye molecules which produce deterministically polarized single (antibunched) photons. In addition, 1-D photonic bandgap cholesteric liquid crystals will increase single-photon source efficiency. The experiments and challenges in the observation of deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules in planar-aligned glassy nematic-liquid-crystal oligomer as well as photon antibunching in glassy cholesteric oligomer are described for the first time

  20. Bianthrone in a Single-Molecule Junction: Conductance Switching with a Bistable Molecule Facilitated by Image Charge Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Bianthrone is a sterically hindered compound that exists in the form of two nonplanar isomers. Our experimental study of single-molecule junctions with bianthrone reveals persistent switching of electric conductance at low temperatures, which can be reasonably associated with molecular isomerizat...

  1. Utilizing Biotinylated Proteins Expressed in Yeast to Visualize DNA–Protein Interactions at the Single-Molecule Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijun Xue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Much of our knowledge in conventional biochemistry has derived from bulk assays. However, many stochastic processes and transient intermediates are hidden when averaged over the ensemble. The powerful technique of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy has made great contributions to the understanding of life processes that are inaccessible when using traditional approaches. In single-molecule studies, quantum dots (Qdots have several unique advantages over other fluorescent probes, such as high brightness, extremely high photostability, and large Stokes shift, thus allowing long-time observation and improved signal-to-noise ratios. So far, however, there is no convenient way to label proteins purified from budding yeast with Qdots. Based on BirA–Avi and biotin–streptavidin systems, we have established a simple method to acquire a Qdot-labeled protein and visualize its interaction with DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. For proof-of-concept, we chose replication protein A (RPA and origin recognition complex (ORC as the proteins of interest. Proteins were purified from budding yeast with high biotinylation efficiency and rapidly labeled with streptavidin-coated Qdots. Interactions between proteins and DNA were observed successfully at the single-molecule level.

  2. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M.n.; Marrink, S.j.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MAR- TINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell

  3. Zero-phonon-line emission of single molecules for applications in quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraz, Alper; Ehrl, M.; Mustecaplioglu, O. E.; Hellerer, T.; Brauchle, C.; Zumbusch, A.

    2005-07-01

    A single photon source which generates transform limited single photons is highly desirable for applications in quantum optics. Transform limited emission guarantees the indistinguishability of the emitted single photons. This, in turn brings groundbreaking applications in linear optics quantum information processing within an experimental reach. Recently, self-assembled InAs quantum dots and trapped atoms have successfully been demonstrated as such sources for highly indistinguishable single photons. Here, we demonstrate that nearly transform limited zero-phonon-line (ZPL) emission from single molecules can be obtained by using vibronic excitation. Furthermore we report the results of coincidence detection experiments at the output of a Michelson-type interferometer. These experiments reveal Hong-Ou-Mandel correlations as a proof of the indistinguishability of the single photons emitted consecutively from a single molecule. Therefore, single molecules constitute an attractive alternative to single InAs quantum dots and trapped atoms for applications in linear optics quantum information processing. Experiments were performed with a home-built confocal microscope keeping the sample in a superfluid liquid Helium bath at 1.4K. We investigated terrylenediimide (TDI) molecules highly diluted in hexadecane (Shpol'skii matrix). A continuous wave single mode dye laser was used for excitation of vibronic transitions of individual molecules. From the integral fluorescence, the ZPL of single molecules was selected with a spectrally narrow interference filter. The ZPL emission was then sent to a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for linewidth measurements or a Michelson-type interferometer for coincidence detection.

  4. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Using a Chimeric Single-Guide RNA Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Butt, Haroon

    2017-08-24

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in diverse eukaryotic organisms for targeted mutagenesis. However, targeted gene editing is inefficient and requires the simultaneous delivery of a DNA template for homology-directed repair (HDR). Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate targeted double-strand breaks and to deliver an RNA repair template for HDR in rice (Oryza sativa). We used chimeric single-guide RNA (cgRNA) molecules carrying both sequences for target site specificity (to generate the double-strand breaks) and repair template sequences (to direct HDR), flanked by regions of homology to the target. Gene editing was more efficient in rice protoplasts using repair templates complementary to the non-target DNA strand, rather than the target strand. We applied this cgRNA repair method to generate herbicide resistance in rice, which showed that this cgRNA repair method can be used for targeted gene editing in plants. Our findings will facilitate applications in functional genomics and targeted improvement of crop traits.

  5. Pathological mechanisms underlying single large‐scale mitochondrial DNA deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Mariana C.; Rosa, Hannah S.; Grady, John P.; Blakely, Emma L.; He, Langping; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Newman, Jane; McFarland, Robert; Ng, Yi Shiau; Gorman, Grainne S.; Schaefer, Andrew M.; Tuppen, Helen A.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Single, large‐scale deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are a common cause of mitochondrial disease. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the genetic defect and molecular phenotype to improve understanding of pathogenic mechanisms associated with single, large‐scale mtDNA deletions in skeletal muscle. Methods We investigated 23 muscle biopsies taken from adult patients (6 males/17 females with a mean age of 43 years) with characterized single, large‐scale mtDNA deletions. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in skeletal muscle biopsies was quantified by immunoreactivity levels for complex I and complex IV proteins. Single muscle fibers with varying degrees of deficiency were selected from 6 patient biopsies for determination of mtDNA deletion level and copy number by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results We have defined 3 “classes” of single, large‐scale deletion with distinct patterns of mitochondrial deficiency, determined by the size and location of the deletion. Single fiber analyses showed that fibers with greater respiratory chain deficiency harbored higher levels of mtDNA deletion with an increase in total mtDNA copy number. For the first time, we have demonstrated that threshold levels for complex I and complex IV deficiency differ based on deletion class. Interpretation Combining genetic and immunofluorescent assays, we conclude that thresholds for complex I and complex IV deficiency are modulated by the deletion of complex‐specific protein‐encoding genes. Furthermore, removal of mt‐tRNA genes impacts specific complexes only at high deletion levels, when complex‐specific protein‐encoding genes remain. These novel findings provide valuable insight into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with these mutations. Ann Neurol 2018;83:115–130 PMID:29283441

  6. A Starting Point for Fluorescence-Based Single-Molecule Measurements in Biomolecular Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gust

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  7. Non-uniform binding of single-stranded DNA binding proteins to hybrids of single-stranded DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes observed by atomic force microscopy in air and in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemura, Kazuo, E-mail: meicun2006@163.com; Ishizaka, Kei; Nii, Daisuke; Izumi, Katsuki

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Conjugates of protein, DNA, and SWNTs were observed by AFM in liquid. • Non-uniform binding of proteins was visualized in liquid. • Thickness of DNA molecules on SWNT surfaces was well characterized in liquid. - Abstract: Using atomic force spectroscopy (AFM), we observed hybrids of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with or without protein molecules in air and in an aqueous solution. This is the first report of ssDNA–SWNT hybrids with proteins in solution analyzed by AFM. In the absence of protein, the height of the ssDNA–SWNT hybrids was 1.1 ± 0.3 nm and 2.4 ± 0.6 nm in air and liquid, respectively, suggesting that the ssDNA molecules adopted a flexible structure on the SWNT surface. In the presence of single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins, the heights of the hybrids in air and liquid increased to 6.4 ± 3.1 nm and 10.0 ± 4.5 nm, respectively. The AFM images clearly showed binding of the SSB proteins to the ssDNA–SWNT hybrids. The morphology of the SSB–ssDNA–SWNT hybrids was non-uniform, particularly in aqueous solution. The variance of hybrid height was quantitatively estimated by cross-section analysis along the long-axis of each hybrid. The SSB–ssDNA–SWNT hybrids showed much larger variance than the ssDNA–SWNT hybrids.

  8. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Perrin, Mickael L; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule-electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions.

  9. Single ionization of diatomic molecules by bare ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purkait, M; Mandal, C R

    2014-01-01

    The molecular three-Coulomb wave model (M3CW) has been extensively used to study the double-differential ionization cross sections (DDCS) of diatomic molecules by the impact of bare ions at intermediate and high energies. In this model, the distortion of the initial channel by the incoming projectile is also included. The present DDCS results are found to be in good accord both with the experiment of Baran et al 2008 as well as with other theory

  10. Single-Molecule Transport at a Rectifying GaAs Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Brooke, Richard J; Ferri, Nicolò; Higgins, Simon J; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J

    2017-02-08

    In most single- or few-molecule devices, the contact electrodes are simple ohmic resistors. Here we describe a new type of single-molecule device in which metal and semiconductor contact electrodes impart a function, namely, current rectification, which is then modified by a molecule bridging the gap. We study junctions with the structure Au STM tip/X/n-GaAs substrate, where "X" is either a simple alkanedithiol or a conjugated unit bearing thiol/methylthiol contacts, and we detect current jumps corresponding to the attachment and detachment of single molecules. From the magnitudes of the current jumps we can deduce values for the conductance decay constant with molecule length that agree well with values determined from Au/molecule/Au junctions. The ability to impart functionality to a single-molecule device through the properties of the contacts as well as through the properties of the molecule represents a significant extension of the single-molecule electronics "tool-box".

  11. Enzymatic Production of Monoclonal Stoichiometric Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M.; Högberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools as probes for diagnostics and gene therapy. Today, production of oligonucleotides is done via solid-phase synthesis. However, the capabilities of current polymer chemistry are limited in comparison to what can be produced in biological systems. The errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and sequence diversity can often be a problem. Here, we present the Monoclonal Stoichiometric (MOSIC) method for enzymatic DNA oligonucleotide production. Using this method, we amplify oligonucleotides from clonal templates followed by digestion of a cutter-hairpin, resulting in pools of monoclonal oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We present data where MOSIC oligonucleotides, 14–378 nt long, were prepared either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification, or by amplification in Escherichia coli in the form of phagemid DNA. The formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides. PMID:23727986

  12. Adsorption Characteristics of DNA Nucleobases, Aromatic Amino Acids and Heterocyclic Molecules on Silicene and Germanene Monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Tanveer

    2017-09-14

    Binding of DNA/RNA nucleobases, aromatic amino acids and heterocyclic molecules on two-dimensional silicene and germanene sheets have been investigated for the application of sensing of biomolecules using first principle density functional theory calculations. Binding energy range for nucleobases, amino acids and heterocyclic molecules with both the sheets have been found to be (0.43-1.16eV), (0.70-1.58eV) and (0.22-0.96eV) respectively, which along with the binding distances show that these molecules bind to both sheets by physisorption and chemisorption process. The exchange of electric charges between the monolayers and the incident molecules has been examined by means of Bader charge analysis. It has been observed that the introduction of DNA/RNA nucleobases, aromatic amino acids and heterocyclic molecules alters the electronic properties of both silicene and germanene nano sheets as studied by plotting the total (TDOS) and partial (PDOS) density of states. The DOS plots reveal the variation in the band gaps of both silicene and germanene caused by the introduction of studied molecules. Based on the obtained results we suggest that both silicene and germanene monolayers in their pristine form could be useful for sensing of biomolecules.

  13. Single Molecule Experiments Challenge the Strict Wave-Particle Dualism of Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Otto Greulich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the “single photon limit” of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. “Single photon detectors” do not meet their promise―only “photon number resolving single photon detectors” do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  14. Single molecule experiments challenge the strict wave-particle dualism of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2010-01-21

    Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the "single photon limit" of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. "Single photon detectors" do not meet their promise-only "photon number resolving single photon detectors" do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  15. Sequence Dependent Interactions Between DNA and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxbury, Daniel

    It is known that single-stranded DNA adopts a helical wrap around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), forming a water-dispersible hybrid molecule. The ability to sort mixtures of SWCNTs based on chirality (electronic species) has recently been demonstrated using special short DNA sequences that recognize certain matching SWCNTs of specific chirality. This thesis investigates the intricacies of DNA-SWCNT sequence-specific interactions through both experimental and molecular simulation studies. The DNA-SWCNT binding strengths were experimentally quantified by studying the kinetics of DNA replacement by a surfactant on the surface of particular SWCNTs. Recognition ability was found to correlate strongly with measured binding strength, e.g. DNA sequence (TAT)4 was found to bind 20 times stronger to the (6,5)-SWCNT than sequence (TAT)4T. Next, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, equilibrium structures formed by (a) single-strands and (b) multiple-strands of 12-mer oligonucleotides adsorbed on various SWCNTs were explored. A number of structural motifs were discovered in which the DNA strand wraps around the SWCNT and 'stitches' to itself via hydrogen bonding. Great variability among equilibrium structures was observed and shown to be directly influenced by DNA sequence and SWCNT type. For example, the (6,5)-SWCNT DNA recognition sequence, (TAT)4, was found to wrap in a tight single-stranded right-handed helical conformation. In contrast, DNA sequence T12 forms a beta-barrel left-handed structure on the same SWCNT. These are the first theoretical indications that DNA-based SWCNT selectivity can arise on a molecular level. In a biomedical collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, pathways for DNA-SWCNT internalization into healthy human endothelial cells were explored. Through absorbance spectroscopy, TEM imaging, and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we showed that intracellular concentrations of SWCNTs far exceeded those of the incubation

  16. Investigation of photobleaching and saturation of single molecules by fluorophore recrossing events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Sean M.; Reif, Randall D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States); Pappas, Dimitri [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States)], E-mail: d.pappas@ttu.edu

    2007-08-15

    A method for investigation of photobleaching and saturation of single molecules by fluorophore recrossing events in a laser beam is described. The diffraction-limited probe volumes encountered in single-molecule detection (SMD) produce high excitation irradiance, which can decrease available signal. The single molecules of several dyes were detected and the data was used to extract interpeak times above a defined threshold value. The interpeak times revealed the number of fluorophore recrossing events. The number of molecules detected that were within 2 ms of each other represented a molecular recrossing for this work. Calcein, fluorescein and R-phycoerythrin were analyzed and the saturation irradiance and photobleaching effects were determined as a function of irradiance. This approach is simple and it serves as a method of optimizing experimental conditions for single-molecule detection.

  17. Antibacterial small molecules targeting the conserved TOPRIM domain of DNA gyrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott S Walker

    Full Text Available To combat the threat of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, novel agents that circumvent established resistance mechanisms are urgently needed. Our approach was to focus first on identifying bioactive small molecules followed by chemical lead prioritization and target identification. Within this annotated library of bioactives, we identified a small molecule with activity against efflux-deficient Escherichia coli and other sensitized Gram-negatives. Further studies suggested that this compound inhibited DNA replication and selection for resistance identified mutations in a subunit of E. coli DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase. Our initial compound demonstrated weak inhibition of DNA gyrase activity while optimized compounds demonstrated significantly improved inhibition of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase and caused cleaved complex stabilization, a hallmark of certain bactericidal DNA gyrase inhibitors. Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to this new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors reside exclusively in the TOPRIM domain of GyrB and are not associated with resistance to the fluoroquinolones, suggesting a novel binding site for a gyrase inhibitor.

  18. Modulation and Control of Charge Transport Through Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2017-02-01

    The ability to modulate and control charge transport though single-molecule junction devices is crucial to achieving the ultimate goal of molecular electronics: constructing real-world-applicable electronic components from single molecules. This review aims to highlight the progress made in single-molecule electronics, emphasizing the development of molecular junction electronics in recent years. Among many techniques that attempt to wire a molecule to metallic electrodes, the single-molecule break junction (SMBJ) technique is one of the most reliable and tunable experimental platforms for achieving metal-molecule-metal configurations. It also provides great freedom to tune charge transport through the junction. Soon after the SMBJ technique was introduced, it was extensively used to measure the conductances of individual molecules; however, different conductances were obtained for the same molecule, and it proved difficult to interpret this wide distribution of experimental data. This phenomenon was later found to be mainly due to a lack of precise experimental control and advanced data analysis methods. In recent years, researchers have directed considerable effort into advancing the SMBJ technique by gaining a deeper physical understanding of charge transport through single molecules and thus enhancing its potential applicability in functional molecular-scale electronic devices, such as molecular diodes and molecular transistors. In parallel with that research, novel data analysis methods and approaches that enable the discovery of hidden yet important features in the data are being developed. This review discusses various aspects of molecular junction electronics, from the initial goal of molecular electronics, the development of experimental techniques for creating single-molecule junctions and determining single-molecule conductance, to the characterization of functional current-voltage features and the investigation of physical properties other than charge

  19. Single-molecule conductivity of non-redox and redox molecules at pure and gold-mined Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Ulstrup, Jens

    The structure, two-dimensional organization, and function of molecules immobilized on solid surfaces can be addressed in a degree of detail that has reached the level of the single-molecule. In this context redox molecules are “smart” molecules adding sophisticated electronic function. Redox meta...

  20. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arroyo, Carlos R.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3......)-phenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives, in which the central benzene ring is coupled to either para- or meta-positions. Using the break-junction technique, we find that the conductance for a single meta-OPV3 molecule wired between gold electrodes is one order of magnitude smaller than that of a para-OPV3 molecule...