WorldWideScience

Sample records for silicon direct bonding

  1. Effect of nanoscale surface roughness on the bonding energy of direct-bonded silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, N.; Spearing, S. M.

    2003-11-01

    Direct wafer bonding of silicon wafers is a promising technology for manufacturing three-dimensional complex microelectromechanical systems as well as silicon-on-insulator substrates. Previous work has reported that the bond quality declines with increasing surface roughness, however, this relationship has not been quantified. This article explicitly correlates the bond quality, which is quantified by the apparent bonding energy, and the surface morphology via the bearing ratio, which describes the area of surface lying above a given depth. The apparent bonding energy is considered to be proportional to the real area of contact. The effective area of contact is defined as the area sufficiently close to contribute to the attractive force between the two bonding wafers. Experiments were conducted with silicon wafers whose surfaces were roughened by a buffered oxide etch solution (BOE, HF:NH4F=1:7) and/or a potassium hydroxide solution. The surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. The wafers were direct bonded to polished "monitor" wafers following a standard RCA cleaning and the resulting bonding energy was measured by the crack-opening method. The experimental results revealed a clear correlation between the bonding energy and the bearing ratio. A bearing depth of ˜1.4 nm was found to be appropriate for the characterization of direct-bonded silicon at room temperature, which is consistent with the thickness of the water layer at the interface responsible for the hydrogen bonds that link the mating wafers.

  2. Cohesive zone model for direct silicon wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubair, D. V.; Spearing, S. M.

    2007-05-01

    Direct silicon wafer bonding and decohesion are simulated using a spectral scheme in conjunction with a rate-dependent cohesive model. The cohesive model is derived assuming the presence of a thin continuum liquid layer at the interface. Cohesive tractions due to the presence of a liquid meniscus always tend to reduce the separation distance between the wafers, thereby opposing debonding, while assisting the bonding process. In the absence of the rate-dependence effects the energy needed to bond a pair of wafers is equal to that needed to separate them. When rate-dependence is considered in the cohesive law, the experimentally observed asymmetry in the energetics can be explained. The derived cohesive model has the potential to form a bridge between experiments and a multiscale-modelling approach to understand the mechanics of wafer bonding.

  3. Characterization of bulk-micromachined direct-bonded silicon nanofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jay K.; Huen, Tony; Szema, Robert; Ferrari, Mauro

    1998-03-01

    The ability to separate 30-100 nm particles - nanofiltration - is critical for many biomedical applications. Where this filtration needs to be absolute, such as for viral elimination in the blood fractionation process, the large variations in pore size found with conventional polymeric filters can lead to the unwanted presence of viruses in the filtrate. To overcome this problem, we have developed a filter with micromachined channels sandwiched between two bonded silicon wafers. These channels are formed through the selective deposition and then removal of a thermally-grown oxide, the thickness of which can be controlled to +/- 4 percent for 30 nm pores. In this paper, we will present both the gas and liquid characterization, and the filtration studies done on 44 and 100 nm beads.

  4. Improvement of silicon direct bonding using surfaces activated by hydrogen plasma treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, W B; Lee Jae Sik; Sung, M Y

    2000-01-01

    The plasma surface treatment, using hydrogen gas, of silicon wafers was studied as a pretreatment for silicon direct bonding. Chemical reactions of the hydrogen plasma with the surfaces were used for both surface activation and removal of surface contaminants. Exposure of the silicon wafers to the plasma formed an active oxide layer on the surface. This layer was hydrophilic. The surface roughness and morphology were examined as functions of the plasma exposure time and power. The surface became smoother with shorter plasma exposure time and lower power. In addition, the plasma surface treatment was very efficient in removing the carbon contaminants on the silicon surface. The value of the initial surface energy, as estimated by using the crack propagation method, was 506 mJ/M sup 2 , which was up to about three times higher than the value for the conventional direct bonding method using wet chemical treatments.

  5. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Takuto, E-mail: tkojima@toyota-ti.ac.jp; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya, 468-8511 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi{sub 2}.

  6. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuto; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi 2

  7. A quality quantitative method of silicon direct bonding based on wavelet image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao; Tao, Zhi; Li, Haiwang; Xu, Tiantong; Yu, Mingxing

    2018-04-01

    The rapid development of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) has received significant attention from researchers in various fields and subjects. In particular, the MEMS fabrication process is elaborate and, as such, has been the focus of extensive research inquiries. However, in MEMS fabrication, component bonding is difficult to achieve and requires a complex approach. Thus, improvements in bonding quality are relatively important objectives. A higher quality bond can only be achieved with improved measurement and testing capabilities. In particular, the traditional testing methods mainly include infrared testing, tensile testing, and strength testing, despite the fact that using these methods to measure bond quality often results in low efficiency or destructive analysis. Therefore, this paper focuses on the development of a precise, nondestructive visual testing method based on wavelet image analysis that is shown to be highly effective in practice. The process of wavelet image analysis includes wavelet image denoising, wavelet image enhancement, and contrast enhancement, and as an end result, can display an image with low background noise. In addition, because the wavelet analysis software was developed with MATLAB, it can reveal the bonding boundaries and bonding rates to precisely indicate the bond quality at all locations on the wafer. This work also presents a set of orthogonal experiments that consist of three prebonding factors, the prebonding temperature, the positive pressure value and the prebonding time, which are used to analyze the prebonding quality. This method was used to quantify the quality of silicon-to-silicon wafer bonding, yielding standard treatment quantities that could be practical for large-scale use.

  8. Micro-architecture embedding ultra-thin interlayer to bond diamond and silicon via direct fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Cheol; Kim, Jongsik; Xin, Yan; Lee, Jinhyung; Kim, Young-Gyun; Subhash, Ghatu; Singh, Rajiv K.; Arjunan, Arul C.; Lee, Haigun

    2018-05-01

    The continuous demand on miniaturized electronic circuits bearing high power density illuminates the need to modify the silicon-on-insulator-based chip architecture. This is because of the low thermal conductivity of the few hundred nanometer-thick insulator present between the silicon substrate and active layers. The thick insulator is notorious for releasing the heat generated from the active layers during the operation of devices, leading to degradation in their performance and thus reducing their lifetime. To avoid the heat accumulation, we propose a method to fabricate the silicon-on-diamond (SOD) microstructure featured by an exceptionally thin silicon oxycarbide interlayer (˜3 nm). While exploiting the diamond as an insulator, we employ spark plasma sintering to render the silicon directly fused to the diamond. Notably, this process can manufacture the SOD microarchitecture via a simple/rapid way and incorporates the ultra-thin interlayer for minute thermal resistance. The method invented herein expects to minimize the thermal interfacial resistance of the devices and is thus deemed as a breakthrough appealing to the current chip industry.

  9. Low-temperature wafer direct bonding of silicon and quartz glass by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxi; Xu, Jikai; Zeng, Xiaorun; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Chunqing; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile bonding process for combining silicon and quartz glass wafers by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning. After a post-annealing at 200 °C, strong bonding interfaces with no defects or microcracks were obtained. On the basis of the detailed surface and bonding interface characterizations, the bonding mechanism was explored and discussed. The amino groups terminated on the cleaned surfaces might contribute to the bonding strength enhancement during the annealing. This cost-effective bonding process has great potentials for silicon- and glass-based heterogeneous integrations without requiring a vacuum system.

  10. Direct bonding of ALD Al2O3 to silicon nitride thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laganà, Simone; Mikkelsen, E. K.; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (TEM) by improving low temperature annealing bonding strength when using atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide. We have investigated and characterized bonding of Al2O3-SixNy (low stress silicon rich nitride) and Al2O3-Si3N4 (stoichiometric nitride) thin films annealed from room temperature up......O3 can be bonded to. Preliminary tests demonstrating a well-defined nanochannel system with-100 nm high channels successfully bonded and tests against leaks using optical fluorescence technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of liquid samples are also reported. Moreover...

  11. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porz, F.

    1982-10-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 1500 0 C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE) [de

  12. Hexacoordinate bonding and aromaticity in silicon phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2010-12-23

    Si-E bondings in hexacoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were analyzed using bond order (BO), energy partition, atoms in molecules (AIM), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL). Bond models were proposed to explain differences between hexacoordinate and tetracoordinate Si-E bondings. Aromaticity of silicon phthalocyanine was investigated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA), conceptual density functional theory (DFT), ring critical point (RCP) descriptors, and delocalization index (DI). Structure, energy, bonding, and aromaticity of tetracoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were studied and compared with hexacoordinate one.

  13. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  14. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bu...

  15. Gelcasting of SiC/Si for preparation of silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.P.; Tsinghua University, Beijing,; Cheng, Y.B.; Lu, J.W.; Huang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper, gelcasting of aqueous slurry with coarse silicon carbide(1mm) and fine silicon particles was investigated to fabricate silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide materials. Through the examination of influence of different polyelectrolytes on the Zeta potential and viscosity of silicon and silicon carbide suspensions, a stable SiC/Si suspension with 60 vol% solid loading could be prepared by using polyelectrolyte of D3005 and sodium alginate. Gelation of this suspension can complete in 10-30 min at 60-80 deg C after cast into mold. After demolded, the wet green body can be dried directly in furnace and the green strength will develop during drying. Complex shape parts with near net size were prepared by the process. Effects of the debindering process on nitridation and density of silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide were also examined. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  16. Sol-gel bonding of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, C.J.; Cassidy, D.J.; Triani, G.; Latella, B.A.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Finnie, K.S.; Short, K.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.; Collins, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Sol-gel bonds have been produced between smooth, clean silicon substrates by spin-coating solutions containing partially hydrolysed silicon alkoxides. The two coated substrates were assembled and the resulting sandwich fired at temperatures ranging from 60 to 600 deg. C. The sol-gel coatings were characterised using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy, while the corresponding bonded specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were characterised using both microindentation and tensile testing. Bonding of silicon wafers has been successfully achieved at temperatures as low as 60 deg. C. At 300 deg. C, the interfacial fracture energy was 1.55 J/m 2 . At 600 deg. C, sol-gel bonding provided superior interfacial fracture energy over classical hydrophilic bonding (3.4 J/m 2 vs. 1.5 J/m 2 ). The increase in the interfacial fracture energy is related to the increase in film density due to the sintering of the sol-gel interface with increasing temperature. The superior interfacial fracture energy obtained by sol-gel bonding at low temperature is due to the formation of an interfacial layer, which chemically bonds the two sol-gel coatings on each wafer. Application of a tensile stress on the resulting bond leads to fracture of the samples at the silicon/sol-gel interface

  17. Silicon-to-silicon wafer bonding using evaporated glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Lindahl, M.

    1998-01-01

    Anodic bending of silicon to silicon 4-in. wafers using an electron-beam evaporated glass (Schott 8329) was performed successfully in air at temperatures ranging from 200 degrees C to 450 degrees C. The composition of the deposited glass is enriched in sodium as compared to the target material....... The roughness of the as-deposited films was below 5 nm and was found to be unchanged by annealing at 500 degrees C for 1 h in air. No change in the macroscopic edge profiles of the glass film was found as a function of annealing; however, small extrusions appear when annealing above 450 degrees C. Annealing...... of silicon/glass structures in air around 340 degrees C for 15 min leads to stress-free structures. Bonded wafer pairs, however, show no reduction in stress and always exhibit compressive stress. The bond yield is larger than 95% for bonding temperatures around 350 degrees C and is above 80% for bonding...

  18. Research on the Effects of Process Parameters on Surface Roughness in Wet-Activated Silicon Direct Bonding Base on Orthogonal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei NIE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness is a very important index in silicon direct bonding and it is affected by processing parameters in the wet-activated process. These parameters include the concentration of activation solution, holding time and treatment temperature. The effects of these parameters were investigated by means of orthogonal experiments. In order to analyze the wafer roughness more accurately, the bear ratio of the surface was used as the evaluation index. From the results of the experiments, it could be concluded that the concentration of the activation solution affected the roughness directly and the higher the concentration, the lower the roughness. Holding time did not affect the roughness as acutely as that of the concentration, but a reduced activation time decreased the roughness perceptibly. It was also discovered that the treatment temperature had a weak correlation with the surface roughness. Based on these conclusions, the parameters of concentration, temperature and holding time were optimized respectively as NH4OH:H2O2=1:1 (without water, 70 °C and 5 min. The results of bonding experiments proved the validity of the conclusions of orthogonal experiments.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9711

  19. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  20. Silicon waveguides produced by wafer bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mette; Jensen, Flemming; Bunk, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    X-ray waveguides are successfully produced employing standard silicon technology of UV photolithography and wafer bonding. Contrary to theoretical expectations for similar systems even 100 mu m broad guides of less than 80 nm height do not collapse and can be used as one dimensional waveguides...

  1. Sol-gel bonding of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, C.J.; Cassidy, D.J.; Triani, G.; Latella, B.A.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Finnie, K.S.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.; Collins, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature bonding of silicon wafers was achieved using sol-gel technology. The initial sol-gel chemistry of the coating solution was found to influence the mechanical properties of the resulting bonds. More precisely, the influence of parameters such as the alkoxide concentration, water-to-alkoxide molar ratio, pH, and solution aging on the final bond morphologies and interfacial fracture energy was studied. The thickness and density of the sol-gel coating were characterised using ellipsometry. The corresponding bonded specimens were investigated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy to monitor their chemical composition, infrared imaging to control bond integrity, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy to study their microstructure. Their interfacial fracture energy was measured using microindentation. An optimum water-to-alkoxide molar ratio of 10 and hydrolysis water at pH = 2 were found. Such conditions led to relatively dense films (> 90%), resulting in bonds with a fracture energy of 3.5 J/m 2 , significantly higher than those obtained using classical hydrophilic bonding (typically 1.5-2.5 J/m 2 ). Ageing of the coating solution was found to decrease the bond strength

  2. Bond strength tests between silicon wafers and duran tubes (fusion bonded fluidic interconnects)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazal, I.; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, J.H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2005-01-01

    The fusion bond strength of glass tubes with standard silicon wafers is presented. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and those coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are presented. Results obtained are discussed in terms of homogeneity and strength of fusion bond. High pressure testing

  3. Direct Bonded Pontic (Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhandi Sidjaja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced science and technology in dentistry enable dental practitioners to modified she bonding techniques in tooth replacement. A pontic made of composite resin bonded to etched enamel of the adjacent teeth can be used in the replacement of one missing anterior tooth with a virgin or sowed adpicent tooth. The advantages of this technique include a one visit treatment, cow cost, good esthetics, less side effects and easy repair or rebounding. Clinical evaluation showed a high success rate therefore with a proper diagnosis and a perfect skill of the direct bonded technique this treatment can be used as an alternative restoration.

  4. Comparative TEM study of bonded silicon/silicon interfaces fabricated by hydrophilic, hydrophobic and UHV wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznicek, A.; Scholz, R.; Senz, S.; Goesele, U.

    2003-01-01

    Wafers of Czochralski-grown silicon were bonded hydrophilically, hydrophobically and in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) at room temperature. Wafers bonded hydrophilically adhere together by hydrogen bonds, those bonded hydrophobically by van der Waals forces and UHV-bonded ones by covalent bonds. Annealing the pre-bonded hydrophilic and hydrophobic wafer pairs in argon for 2 h at different temperatures increases the initially low bonding energy. UHV-bonded wafer pairs were also annealed to compare the results. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations show nano-voids at the interface. The void density depends on the initial bonding strength. During annealing the shape, coverage and density of the voids change significantly

  5. Role of the bond defect for structural transformations between crystalline and amorphous silicon: A molecular-dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, D. M.; Weber, B.; Gaertner, K.

    2000-01-01

    The relation between the bond defect, which is a topological defect, and structural transformations between crystalline and amorphous silicon, is studied by molecular-dynamics simulations. The investigation of 1-keV boron implantation into crystalline silicon proves that the bond defect can also be generated directly by collisional-induced bond switching in addition to its formation by incomplete recombination of primary defects. This supports the assumption that the bond defect may play an important role in the amorphization process of silicon by light ions. The analysis of the interface between (001) silicon and amorphous silicon shows that there are two typical defect configurations at the interface which result from two different orientations of the bond defect with respect to the interface. Thus the bond defect appears to be a characteristic structural feature of the interface. Moreover, annealing results indicate that the bond defect acts as a growth site for interface-mediated crystallization

  6. Magnetic Induction Machines Embedded in Fusion-Bonded Silicon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnold, David P; Cros, Florent; Zana, Iulica; Allen, Mark G; Das, Sauparna; Lang, Jeffrey H

    2004-01-01

    ...) within etched and fusion-bonded silicon to form the machine structure. The induction machines were characterized in motoring mode using tethered rotors, and exhibited a maximum measured torque...

  7. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    century and most chemists appear to think of 'chemi- cal bond' as ..... These complexes, in their global min- ima, have ... taneously act as hydrogen bond donor and acceptor displaying ... also has a local minimum, which is linear and similar to.

  8. Room temperature Cu-Cu direct bonding using surface activated bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Howlader, M.M.R.; Itoh, T.; Suga, T.

    2003-01-01

    Thin copper (Cu) films of 80 nm thickness deposited on a diffusion barrier layered 8 in. silicon wafers were directly bonded at room temperature using the surface activated bonding method. A low energy Ar ion beam of 40-100 eV was used to activate the Cu surface prior to bonding. Contacting two surface-activated wafers enables successful Cu-Cu direct bonding. The bonding process was carried out under an ultrahigh vacuum condition. No thermal annealing was required to increase the bonding strength since the bonded interface was strong enough at room temperature. The chemical constitution of the Cu surface was examined by Auger electron spectroscope. It was observed that carbon-based contaminations and native oxides on copper surface were effectively removed by Ar ion beam irradiation for 60 s without any wet cleaning processes. An atomic force microscope study shows that the Ar ion beam process causes no surface roughness degradation. Tensile test results show that high bonding strength equivalent to bulk material is achieved at room temperature. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscope observations reveal the presence of void-free bonding interface without intermediate layer at the bonded Cu surfaces

  9. Science and technology of plasma activated direct wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberds, Brian Edward

    This dissertation studied the kinetics of silicon direct wafer bonding with emphasis on low temperature bonding mechanisms. The project goals were to understand the topological requirements for initial bonding, develop a tensile test to measure the bond strength as a function of time and temperature and, using the kinetic information obtained, develop lower temperature methods of bonding. A reproducible surface metrology metric for bonding was best described by power spectral density derived from atomic force microscopy measurements. From the tensile strength kinetics study it was found that low annealing temperatures could be used to obtain strong bonds, but at the expense of longer annealing times. Three models were developed to describe the kinetics. A diffusion controlled model and a reaction rate controlled model were developed for the higher temperature regimes (T > 600sp°C), and an electric field assisted oxidation model was proposed for the low temperature range. An in situ oxygen plasma treatment was used to further enhance the field-controlled mechanism which resulted in dramatic increases in the low temperature bonding kinetics. Multiple internal transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (MIT-FTIR) was used to monitor species evolution at the bonded interface and a capacitance-voltage (CV) study was undertaken to investigate charge distribution and surface states resulting from plasma activation. A short, less than a minute, plasma exposure prior to contacting the wafers was found to obtain very strong bonds for hydrophobic silicon wafers at very low temperatures (100sp°C). This novel bonding method may enable new technologies involving heterogeneous material systems or bonding partially fabricated devices to become realities.

  10. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  11. Silicon nanostructures produced by laser direct etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Dirac, Paul Andreas Holger; Petersen, Jon Wulff

    1995-01-01

    A laser direct-write process has been applied to structure silicon on a nanometer scale. In this process, a silicon substrate, placed in a chlorine ambience, is locally heated above its melting point by a continuous-wave laser and translated by high-resolution direct-current motor stages. Only...

  12. The relationship of microstructure and temperature to fracture mechanics parameters in reaction bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, H.M.; Dalgleish, B.J.; Pratt, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The development of physical properties in reaction bonded silicon nitride has been investigated over a range of temperatures and correlated with microstructure. Fracture mechanics parameters, elastic moduli, strength and critical defect size have been determined. The nitrided microstructure is shown to be directly related to these observed properties and these basic relationships can be used to produce material with improved properties. (orig.) [de

  13. Reaction sintering of a clay-containing silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide refractory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenser, S.P.; Cheng, Y.B.

    1998-01-01

    Aspects of the reaction sequence for the reaction bonding of a cast refractory, which in the green state was composed of 79 wt-% SiC grit, 16 wt-% Si powder and 5 wt-% clay were established. As it was fired up to 1600 deg C in flowing N 2 (g), weight gains were noted and phase evolution was monitored by X-ray diffraction. However, details of the reaction sequence were not determined directly from this material because several reaction-bonding processes occurred simultaneously. Reaction features were ascertained by contrasting the weight changes and phase evolution in the refractory with those observed during reaction-bonding of (a) Si and clay without the SiC and (b) SiC and clay without the Si. In addition to silicon nitridation and the development of sialon phases by silicothermal and carbothermal reduction-nitridation processes, indirect evidence suggested that α-Si 3 N 4 formed by the carbothermal reduction-nitridation (CRN) of SiO(g). Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  14. Direct Wafer Bonding and Its Application to Waveguide Optical Isolators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Shoji, Yuya; Takei, Ryohei

    2012-05-24

    This paper reviews the direct bonding technique focusing on the waveguide optical isolator application. A surface activated direct bonding technique is a powerful tool to realize a tight contact between dissimilar materials. This technique has the potential advantage that dissimilar materials are bonded at low temperature, which enables one to avoid the issue associated with the difference in thermal expansion. Using this technique, a magneto-optic garnet is successfully bonded on silicon, III-V compound semiconductors and LiNbO₃. As an application of this technique, waveguide optical isolators are investigated including an interferometric waveguide optical isolator and a semileaky waveguide optical isolator. The interferometric waveguide optical isolator that uses nonreciprocal phase shift is applicable to a variety of waveguide platforms. The low refractive index of buried oxide layer in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide enhances the magneto-optic phase shift, which contributes to the size reduction of the isolator. A semileaky waveguide optical isolator has the advantage of large fabrication-tolerance as well as a wide operation wavelength range.

  15. Direct Wafer Bonding and Its Application to Waveguide Optical Isolators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Takei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the direct bonding technique focusing on the waveguide optical isolator application. A surface activated direct bonding technique is a powerful tool to realize a tight contact between dissimilar materials. This technique has the potential advantage that dissimilar materials are bonded at low temperature, which enables one to avoid the issue associated with the difference in thermal expansion. Using this technique, a magneto-optic garnet is successfully bonded on silicon, III-V compound semiconductors and LiNbO3. As an application of this technique, waveguide optical isolators are investigated including an interferometric waveguide optical isolator and a semileaky waveguide optical isolator. The interferometric waveguide optical isolator that uses nonreciprocal phase shift is applicable to a variety of waveguide platforms. The low refractive index of buried oxide layer in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI waveguide enhances the magneto-optic phase shift, which contributes to the size reduction of the isolator. A semileaky waveguide optical isolator has the advantage of large fabrication-tolerance as well as a wide operation wavelength range.

  16. Electronic properties of interfaces produced by silicon wafer hydrophilic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trushin, Maxim

    2011-07-15

    The thesis presents the results of the investigations of electronic properties and defect states of dislocation networks (DNs) in silicon produced by wafers direct bonding technique. A new insight into the understanding of their very attractive properties was succeeded due to the usage of a new, recently developed silicon wafer direct bonding technique, allowing to create regular dislocation networks with predefined dislocation types and densities. Samples for the investigations were prepared by hydrophilic bonding of p-type Si (100) wafers with same small misorientation tilt angle ({proportional_to}0.5 ), but with four different twist misorientation angles Atw (being of < , 3 , 6 and 30 , respectively), thus giving rise to the different DN microstructure on every particular sample. The main experimental approach of this work was the measurements of current and capacitance of Schottky diodes prepared on the samples which contained the dislocation network at a depth that allowed one to realize all capabilities of different methods of space charge region spectroscopy (such as CV/IV, DLTS, ITS, etc.). The key tasks for the investigations were specified as the exploration of the DN-related gap states, their variations with gradually increasing twist angle Atw, investigation of the electrical field impact on the carrier emission from the dislocation-related states, as well as the establishing of the correlation between the electrical (DLTS), optical (photoluminescence PL) and structural (TEM) properties of DNs. The most important conclusions drawn from the experimental investigations and theoretical calculations can be formulated as follows: - DLTS measurements have revealed a great difference in the electronic structure of small-angle (SA) and large-angle (LA) bonded interfaces: dominating shallow level and a set of 6-7 deep levels were found in SA-samples with Atw of 1 and 3 , whereas the prevalent deep levels - in LA-samples with Atw of 6 and 30 . The critical twist

  17. Pressure bonding molybdenum alloy (TZM) to reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffsmith, S.A.; Landingham, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Topping cycles could boost the energy efficiencies of a variety of systems by using what is now waste heat. One such topping cycle uses a ceramic helical expander and would require that a reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) rotor be bonded to a shaft of TZM (Mo-0.5 wt % Ti-0.08 wt % Zr). Coupon studies show that TZM can be bonded to RBSN at 1300 0 C and 69 MPa if there is an interlayer of MoSi 2 . A layer of finely ground (10 μm) MoSi 2 facilitates bond formation and provides a thicker bond interface. The hardness and grain structure of the TZM and RBSN were not affected by the temperature and pressure required to bond the coupons

  18. Interaction between dangling bonds in vacancy-defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, M.J.; Fazzio, A.

    1983-01-01

    The 'defect-molecule' model in the simplest scheme (without configuration interaction) is reviewed and the concept of 'delocalized dangling-bonds' is explorated in the study of the interaction between the unsaturated hybrids of the mono and divacancy in silicon. The 'defect-molecule' hamiltonian is written in parametric form, and the parameters are extracted from full self-consistent calculations for both systems carried out through the MS-Xα molecular cluster model. (Author) [pt

  19. Hydrogen concentration profiles and chemical bonding in silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.; Stein, H.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Picraux, S.T.

    1978-01-01

    The complementary technique of nuclear reaction analysis and infrared absorption were used to study the concentration profile and chemical bonding of hydrogen in silicon nitride for different preparation and annealing conditions. Silicon nitride prepared by chemical vapor deposition from ammonia-silane mixtures is shown to have hydrogen concentrations of 8.1 and 6.5 at.% for deposition temperatures of 750 and 900 0 C, respectively. Plasma deposition at 300 0 C from these gases results in hydrogen concentrations of approximately 22 at.%. Comparison of nuclear reaction analysis and infrared absorption measurements after isothermal annealing shows that all of the hydrogen retained in the films remains bonded to either silicon or nitrogen and that hydrogen release from the material on annealing is governed by various trap energies involving at least two N-H and one Si-H trap. Reasonable estimates of the hydrogen release rates can be made from the effective diffusion coefficient obtained from measurements of hydrogen migration in hydrogen implanted and annealed films

  20. Direct bandgap silicon: tensile-strained silicon nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Hapala, Prokop; Valenta, J.; Jelínek, Pavel; Cibulka, Ondřej; Ondič, Lukáš; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2014), "1300042-1"-"1300042-9" ISSN 2196-7350 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235; GA ČR GAP204/10/0952 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * badstructure * light emission * direct bandgap * surface capping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  2. Evaluation of bonding between oxygen plasma treated polydimethyl siloxane and passivated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K C [Bioelectronics/BioMEMS Laboratory, Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Liao, E [Semiconductor Process Technologies Laboratory, Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Ong, W L [Bioelectronics/BioMEMS Laboratory, Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Wong, J D S [Semiconductor Process Technologies Laboratory, Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Agarwal, A [Bioelectronics/BioMEMS Laboratory, Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Nagarajan, R [Semiconductor Process Technologies Laboratory, Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Yobas, L [Bioelectronics/BioMEMS Laboratory, Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    Oxygen plasma treatment has been used extensively to bond polydimethyl siloxane to polydimethyl siloxane or glass in the rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. This study aimed to improve the bonding quality of polydimethyl siloxane to passivated silicon using oxygen plasma treatment, and also to evaluate the bonding quality. Four types of passivated silicon were used: phosphosilicate glass, undoped silicate glass, silicon nitride and thermally grown silicon dioxide. Bonding strength was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using manual peel and mechanical shear tests respectively. Through peel tests we found that the lowering of plasma pressure from 500 to 30 mTorr and using a plasma power between 20 to 60 W helped to improve the bond quality for the first three types of passivation. Detailed analysis and discussion were conducted to explain the discrepancy between the bonding strength results and peeling results. Our results suggested that polydimethyl siloxane can be effectively bonded to passivated silicon, just as to polydimethyl siloxane or glass.

  3. Density functional study of the bonding in small silicon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, R.; Sinnott, S.B.; DePristo, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the ground electronic state, equilibrium geometry, vibrational frequencies, and binding energy for various isomers of Si n (n = 2--8) obtained with the linear combination of atomic orbitals-density functional method. We used both a local density approximation approach and one with gradient corrections. Our local density approximation results concerning the relative stability of electronic states and isomers are in agreement with Hartree--Fock and Moller--Plesset (MP2) calculations [K. Raghavachari and C. M. Rohlfing, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 2219 (1988)]. The binding energies calculated with the gradient corrected functional are in good agreement with experiment (Si 2 and Si 3 ) and with the best theoretical estimates. Our analysis of the bonding reveals two limiting modes of bonding and classes of silicon clusters. One class of clusters is characterized by relatively large s atomic populations and a large number of weak bonds, while the other class of clusters is characterized by relatively small s atomic populations and a small number of strong bonds

  4. Modeling of direct wafer bonding: Effect of wafer bow and etch patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. T.; Spearing, S. M.

    2002-12-01

    Direct wafer bonding is an important technology for the manufacture of silicon-on-insulator substrates and microelectromechanical systems. As devices become more complex and require the bonding of multiple patterned wafers, there is a need to understand the mechanics of the bonding process. A general bonding criterion based on the competition between the strain energy accumulated in the wafers and the surface energy that is dissipated as the bond front advances is developed. The bonding criterion is used to examine the case of bonding bowed wafers. An analytical expression for the strain energy accumulation rate, which is the quantity that controls bonding, and the final curvature of a bonded stack is developed. It is demonstrated that the thickness of the wafers plays a large role and bonding success is independent of wafer diameter. The analytical results are verified through a finite element model and a general method for implementing the bonding criterion numerically is presented. The bonding criterion developed permits the effect of etched features to be assessed. Shallow etched patterns are shown to make bonding more difficult, while it is demonstrated that deep etched features can facilitate bonding. Model results and their process design implications are discussed in detail.

  5. Removal of dangling bonds and surface states on silicon (001) with a monolayer of selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Meng; Udeshi, Darshak; Basit, Nasir; Maldonado, Eduardo; Kirk, Wiley P.

    2003-01-01

    Dangling bonds and surface states are inherent to semiconductor surfaces. By passivating dangling bonds on the silicon (001) surface with a monolayer of selenium, surface states are removed from the band gap. Magnesium contacts on selenium-passivated silicon (001) behave ohmically, as expected from the work function of magnesium and the electron affinity of silicon. After rapid thermal annealing and hot-plate annealing, magnesium contacts on selenium-passivated silicon (001) show better thermal stability than on hydrogen-passivated silicon (001), which is attributed to the suppression of silicide formation by selenium passivation

  6. Si-H bond dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, R. Jason; McGrane, Shawn D.

    2007-08-01

    The ultrafast structural dynamics of the Si-H bond in the rigid solvent environment of an amorphous silicon thin film is investigated using two-dimensional infrared four-wave mixing techniques. The two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) vibrational correlation spectrum resolves the homogeneous line shapes ( 4ps waiting times. The Si-H stretching mode anharmonic shift is determined to be 84cm-1 and decreases slightly with vibrational frequency. The 1→2 linewidth increases with vibrational frequency. Frequency dependent vibrational population times measured by transient grating spectroscopy are also reported. The narrow homogeneous line shape, large inhomogeneous broadening, and lack of spectral diffusion reported here present the ideal backdrop for using a 2DIR probe following electronic pumping to measure the transient structural dynamics implicated in the Staebler-Wronski degradation [Appl. Phys. Lett. 31, 292 (1977)] in a-Si:H based solar cells.

  7. Ductile mode grinding of reaction-bonded silicon carbide mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo

    2017-09-10

    The demand for reaction-bonded silicon carbide (RB-SiC) mirrors has escalated recently with the rapid development of space optical remote sensors used in astronomy or Earth observation. However, RB-SiC is difficult to machine due to its high hardness. This study intends to perform ductile mode grinding to RB-SiC, which produces superior surface integrity and fewer subsurface damages, thus minimizing the workload of subsequent lapping and polishing. For this purpose, a modified theoretical model for grain depth of cut of grinding wheels is presented, which correlates various processing parameters and the material characteristics (i.e., elastic module) of a wheel's bonding matrix and workpiece. Ductile mode grinding can be achieved as the grain depth of cut of wheels decreases to be less than the critical cut depth of workpieces. The theoretical model gives a roadmap to optimize the grinding parameters for ductile mode grinding of RB-SiC and other ultra-hard brittle materials. Its feasibility was validated by experiments. With the optimized grinding parameters for RB-SiC, the ductile mode grinding produced highly specular surfaces (with roughness of ∼2.2-2.8  nm Ra), which means the material removal mechanism of RB-SiC is dominated by plastic deformation rather than brittle fracture. Contrast experiments were also conducted on fused silica, using the same grinding parameters; this produced only very rough surfaces, which further validated the feasibility of the proposed model.

  8. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  9. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, C. A., E-mail: cstephe3@nd.edu; Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); O' Brien, W. A. [Rigetti Quantum Computing, 775 Heinz Avenue, Berkeley, California 94710 (United States); Penninger, M. W. [Honeywell UOP, Des Plaines, Illinois 60016 (United States); Schneider, W. F. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Gillett-Kunnath, M. [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Zajicek, J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Yu, K. M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Kudrawiec, R. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-08-07

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge{sub 1−x}C{sub x} (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III–V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  10. Sequential plasma activation methods for hydrophilic direct bonding at sub-200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ran; Yamauchi, Akira; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We present our newly developed sequential plasma activation methods for hydrophilic direct bonding of silica glasses and thermally grown SiO2 films. N2 plasma was employed to introduce a metastable oxynitride layer on wafer surfaces for the improvement of bond energy. By using either O2-plasma/N2-plasma/N-radical or N2-plasma/N-radical sequential activation, the quartz-quartz bond energy was increased from 2.7 J/m2 to close to the quartz bulk fracture energy that was estimated to be around 9.0 J/m2 after post-bonding annealing at 200 °C. The silicon bulklike bond energy between thermal SiO2 films was also obtained. We suggest that the improvement is attributable to surface modification such as N-related defect formation and asperity softening by the N2 plasma surface treatment.

  11. Eutectic and solid-state wafer bonding of silicon with gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abouie, Maryam; Liu, Qi; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Eutectic and solid-state Au-Si bonding are compared for both a-Si and c-Si samples. ► Exchange of a-Si and Au layer was observed in both types of bonded samples. ► Use of c-Si for bonding resulted in formation of craters at the Au/c-Si interface. ► Solid-state Au-Si bonding produces better bonds in terms of microstructure. - Abstract: The simple Au-Si eutectic, which melts at 363 °C, can be used to bond Si wafers. However, faceted craters can form at the Au/Si interface as a result of anisotropic and non-uniform reaction between Au and crystalline silicon (c-Si). These craters may adversely affect active devices on the wafers. Two possible solutions to this problem were investigated in this study. One solution was to use an amorphous silicon layer (a-Si) that was deposited on the c-Si substrate to bond with the Au. The other solution was to use solid-state bonding instead of eutectic bonding, and the wafers were bonded at a temperature (350 °C) below the Au-Si eutectic temperature. The results showed that the a-Si layer prevented the formation of craters and solid-state bonding not only required a lower bonding temperature than eutectic bonding, but also prevented spill out of the solder resulting in strong bonds with high shear strength in comparison with eutectic bonding. Using amorphous silicon, the maximum shear strength for the solid-state Au-Si bond reached 15.2 MPa, whereas for the eutectic Au-Si bond it was 13.2 MPa.

  12. Silicon Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate and fabricate small scale Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for Zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries...... such as lithium-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density. Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density and ease of refueling compared to charging batteries, making μDMFC a suitable replacement energy source. In this Ph.D. dissertation, silicon micro fabrication...... techniques where utilized to build μDMFCs with the purpose of engineering the structures, both on the micro and nano scales in order to realize a high level of control over the membrane and catalyst components. The work presents four different monolithic fuel cell designs. The primary design is based...

  13. Suppression of interfacial voids formation during silane (SiH4)-based silicon oxide bonding with a thin silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Yue; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The material properties and bonding behavior of silane-based silicon oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to determine the chemical composition of the silicon oxide films. The incorporation of hydroxyl (-OH) groups and moisture absorption demonstrates a strong correlation with the storage duration for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. It is observed that moisture absorption is prevalent in the silane-based silicon oxide film due to its porous nature. The incorporation of -OH groups and moisture absorption in the silicon oxide films increase with the storage time (even in clean-room environments) for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. Due to silanol condensation and silicon oxidation reactions that take place at the bonding interface and in the bulk silicon, hydrogen (a byproduct of these reactions) is released and diffused towards the bonding interface. The trapped hydrogen forms voids over time. Additionally, the absorbed moisture could evaporate during the post-bond annealing of the bonded wafer pair. As a consequence, defects, such as voids, form at the bonding interface. To address the problem, a thin silicon nitride capping film was deposited on the silicon oxide layer before bonding to serve as a diffusion barrier to prevent moisture absorption and incorporation of -OH groups from the ambient. This process results in defect-free bonded wafers.

  14. Influence of silicon dangling bonds on germanium thermal diffusion within SiO{sub 2} glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba, D.; Martin, F.; Ross, G. G. [INRS Centre for Energy, Materials and Telecommunications, 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Cai, R. S.; Wang, Y. Q. [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Demarche, J.; Terwagne, G. [LARN, Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matière et du Rayonnement (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Rosei, F. [INRS Centre for Energy, Materials and Telecommunications, 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada)

    2014-03-17

    We study the influence of silicon dangling bonds on germanium thermal diffusion within silicon oxide and fused silica substrates heated to high temperatures. By using scanning electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, we determine that the lower mobility of Ge found within SiO{sub 2}/Si films can be associated with the presence of unsaturated SiO{sub x} chemical bonds. Comparative measurements obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that 10% of silicon dangling bonds can reduce Ge desorption by 80%. Thus, the decrease of the silicon oxidation state yields a greater thermal stability of Ge inside SiO{sub 2} glass, which could enable to considerably extend the performance of Ge-based devices above 1300 K.

  15. Morphology and stress at silicon-glass interface in anodic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jiali [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cai, Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Ming, Xiaoxiang [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Yu, Xinhai, E-mail: yxhh@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Shuangliang, E-mail: szhao@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Tu, Shan-Tung [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Honglai [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous SiO{sub 2} is the most probable silica morphology generated in anodic bonding. • Amorphous SiO{sub 2} thickness at the interface is at least 2 nm for 90 min anodic bonding. • Silicon oxidation rate at the interface is 0.022 nm min{sup −1} from 30 to 90 min. - Abstract: The morphologies and structural details of formed silica at the interface of silicon-glass anodic bonding determine the stress at the interface but they have been rarely clarified. In this study, a miniaturized anodic bonding device was developed and coupled with a Raman spectrometer. The silicon-glass anodic bonding was carried out and the evolution of the stress at the bonding interface was measured in situ by a Raman spectrometer. In addition, large-scale atomistic simulations were conducted by considering the formed silica with different morphologies. The most conceivable silica morphology was identified as the corresponding silicon-glass interfacial stress presents qualitatively agreement with the experimental observation. It was found that amorphous SiO{sub 2} is the silica morphology generated in anodic bonding. The amorphous SiO{sub 2} thickness is at least 2 nm in the case of 90 min anodic bonding at 400 °C with the DC voltage of −1000 V. The combination of experimental and simulation results can ascertain the silicon oxidation reaction rate in anodic bonding process, and under the above-mentioned condition, the reaction rate was estimated as 0.022 nm min{sup −1} from 30 to 90 min.

  16. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  17. Porous silicon-based direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhafarov, T D; Yuksel, S Aydin

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the use of Au/porous silicon/Silicon Schottky type structure, as a direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell is demonstrated. The porous silicon filled with hydrochlorid acid was developed as a proton conduction membrane. The Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon cells were fabricated by first creating the porous silicon layer in single-crystalline Si using the anodic etching under illumination and then deposition Au catalyst layer onto the porous silicon. Using 80 mM H2S solution as fuel the open circuit voltage of 0.4 V was obtained and maximum power density of 30 W/m2 at room temperature was achieved. These results demonstrate that the Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell which uses H2S:dH2O solution as fuel and operates at room temperature can be considered as the most promising type of low cost fuel cell for small power-supply units.

  18. Study of gluing and wire bonding for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.H.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Hyun, H.J.; Jeon, H.B.; Joo, C.W.; Kah, D.H.; Kim, H.J.; Mibe, T.; Onuki, Y.; Park, H.; Rao, K.K.; Sato, N.; Shimizu, N.; Tanida, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into gluing and wire bonding for assembling the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) for the Belle II experiment at KEK in Japan. Optimizing the gluing of the silicon microstrip sensors, the support frame, and the readout flex cables is important for achieving the required mechanical precision. The wire bonding between the sensors and the readout electronic chips also needs special care to maximize the physics capability of the SVD. The silicon sensors and signal fan out flex circuits (pitch adapters) are glued and connected using wire bonding. We determine that gluing quality is important for achieving good bonding efficiency. The standard deviation in the glue thickness for the best result is measured to be 3.11 μm. Optimal machine parameters for wire bonding are determined to be 70 mW power, 20 gf force, and 20 ms for the pitch adapter and 60 mW power, 20 gf force, and 20 ms for the silicon strip sensors; these parameters provide a pull force of (10.92±0.72) gf. With these settings, 75% of the pitch adapters and 25% of the strip sensors experience the neck-broken type of break

  19. Preservation of atomically clean silicon surfaces in air by contact bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Francois; Ljungberg, Karin

    1997-01-01

    When two hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces are placed in contact under cleanroom conditions, a weak bond is formed. Cleaving this bond under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, and observing the surfaces with low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we find that the or...... reconstruction from oxidation in air, Contact bonding opens the way to novel applications of reconstructed semiconductor surfaces, by preserving their atomic structure intact outside of a UHV chamber. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics.......When two hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces are placed in contact under cleanroom conditions, a weak bond is formed. Cleaving this bond under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, and observing the surfaces with low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we find...... that the ordered atomic structure of the surfaces is protected from oxidation, even after the bonded samples have been in air for weeks. Further, we show that silicon surfaces that have been cleaned and hydrogen-passivated in UHV can be contacted in UHV in a similarly hermetic fashion, protecting the surface...

  20. Effect of light aging on silicone-resin bond strength in maxillofacial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Gregory; Pantopoulos, Antonis; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos; Hatamleh, Muhanad

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of accelerated light aging on bond strength of a silicone elastomer to three types of denture resin. A total of 60 single lap joint specimens were fabricated with auto-, heat-, and photopolymerized (n = 20) resins. An addition-type silicone elastomer (Episil-E) was bonded to resins treated with the same primer (A330-G). Thirty specimens served as controls and were tested after 24 hours, and the remaining were aged under accelerated exposure to daylight for 546 hours (irradiance 765 W/m(2) ). Lap shear joint tests were performed to evaluate bond strength at 50 mm/min crosshead speed. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were carried out to detect statistical significance (p Accelerated light aging for 546 hours affects the bond strength of an addition-type silicone elastomer to three different denture resins. The bond strength significantly increased after aging for photo- and autopolymerized resins. All the bonds failed adhesively. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Non-silicon substrate bonding mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hainan [Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nae Yoon, E-mail: nylee@gachon.ac.kr [Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Inchon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: Low-molecular-weight PDMS coating on the surfaces of non-silicon substrates such as thermoplastics ensures permanent sealing with a silicone elastomer, PDMS, simply by surface oxidization followed by ambient condition bonding, mediated by a robust siloxane bond formation at the interface. - Highlights: • Non-silicon thermoplastic was bonded with poly(dimethylsiloxane) silicone elastomer. • Low-molecular-weight PDMS interfacial layer was chemically coated on thermoplastic. • Bonding was realized by corona treatment and physical contact under ambient condition. • Bonding is universally applicable regardless of thermoplastic type and property. • Homogeneous PDMS-like microchannel was obtained inside the thermoplastic-PDMS microdevice. - Abstract: In this paper, we introduce a simple and robust strategy for bonding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with various thermoplastic substrates to fabricate a thermoplastic-based closed microfluidic device and examine the feasibility of using the proposed method for realizing plastic–plastic bonding. The proposed bonding strategy was realized by first coating amine functionality on an oxidized thermoplastic surface. Next, the amine-functionalized surface was reacted with a monolayer of low-molecular-weight PDMS, terminated with epoxy functionality, by forming a robust amine-epoxy bond. Both the PDMS-coated thermoplastic and PDMS were then oxidized and permanently assembled at 25 °C under a pressure of 0.1 MPa for 15 min, resulting in PDMS-like surfaces on all four inner walls of the microchannel. Surface characterizations were conducted, including water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and fluorescence measurement, to confirm the successful coating of the thin PDMS layer on the plastic surface, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting a peel test, burst test, and leakage test. Using the proposed method, we could successfully bond various thermoplastics such

  2. A Microsystem Based on Porous Silicon-Glass Anodic Bonding for Gas and Liquid Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Rendina

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We have recently presented an integrated silicon-glass opto-chemical sensor forlab-on-chip applications, based on porous silicon and anodic bonding technologies. In thiswork, we have optically characterized the sensor response on exposure to vapors of severalorganic compounds by means of reflectivity measurements. The interaction between theporous silicon, which acts as transducer layer, and the organic vapors fluxed into the glasssealed microchamber, is preserved by the fabrication process, resulting in optical pathincrease, due to the capillary condensation of the vapors into the pores. Using theBruggemann theory, we have calculated the filled pores volume for each substance. Thesensor dynamic has been described by time-resolved measurements: due to the analysischamber miniaturization, the response time is only of 2 s. All these results have beencompared with data acquired on the same PSi structure before the anodic bonding process.

  3. Effects of bond primers on bending strength and bonding of glass fibers in fiber-embedded maxillofacial silicone prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of three commonly used bond primers on the bending strength of glass fibers and their bond strength to maxillofacial silicone elastomer after 360 hours of accelerated daylight aging. Eighty specimens were fabricated by embedding resin-impregnated fiber bundles (1.5-mm diameter, 20-mm long) into maxillofacial silicone elastomer M511 (Cosmesil). Twenty fiber bundles served as control and did not receive surface treatment with primers, whereas the remaining 60 fibers were treated with three primers (n = 20): G611 (Principality Medical), A-304 (Factor II), and A-330-Gold (Factor II). Forty specimens were dry stored at room temperature (23 ± 1°C) for 24 hours, and the remaining specimens were aged using an environmental chamber under accelerated exposure to artificial daylight for 360 hours. The aging cycle included continuous exposure to quartz-filtered visible daylight (irradiance 760 W/m(2) ) under an alternating weathering cycle (wet for 18 minutes, dry for 102 minutes). Pull-out tests were performed to evaluate bond strength between fiber bundles and silicone using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. A 3-point bending test was performed to evaluate the bending strength of the fiber bundles. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Bonferroni post hoc test, and an independent t-test were carried out to detect statistical significances (p accelerated daylight aging. Treatment with primer and accelerated daylight aging increased bending strength of glass fibers. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers with Low-Temperature Wafer Direct Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fabrication method of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs by wafer direct bonding, which utilizes both the wet chemical and O2plasma activation processes to decrease the bonding temperature to 400 °C. Two key surface properties, the contact angle and surface roughness, are studied in relation to the activation processes, respectively. By optimizing the surface activation parameters, a surface roughness of 0.274 nm and a contact angle of 0° are achieved. The infrared images and static deflection of devices are assessed to prove the good bonding effect. CMUTs having silicon membranes with a radius of 60 μm and a thickness of 2 μm are fabricated. Device properties have been characterized by electrical and acoustic measurements to verify their functionality and thus to validate this low-temperature process. A resonant frequency of 2.06 MHz is obtained by the frequency response measurements. The electrical insertion loss and acoustic signal have been evaluated. This study demonstrates that the CMUT devices can be fabricated by low-temperature wafer direct bonding, which makes it possible to integrate them directly on top of integrated circuit (IC substrates.

  5. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced.

  6. Direct atomic absorption determination of silicon in metallic niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinova, Eh.S.; Guzeev, I.D.; Nedler, V.V.; Khokhrin, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration is being given to realization of the basic advantage of non-flame atomizer-analysis of directly solid samples-for silicon determination in niobium for the content of the first one of less than 1x10 -3 mass %. Analysis technique is described. Diagrams of the dependences of atomic silicon absorption in graphite cells of usual type as well as lined by tungsten carbide and atomic silicon absorption on the value of niobium weighed amount are presented. It is shown that Si determination in metallic niobium according to aqueous reference solutions results in understatement of results 2.4 times. The optimal conditions for Si determination in niobium are the following: 2400 deg C temperature, absence of carbon and oxygen. Different niobium specimens with the known silicon content were used as reference samples

  7. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500.degree. C. in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850.degree. to 950.degree. C. in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  8. Simultaneous On-State Voltage and Bond-Wire Resistance Monitoring of Silicon Carbide MOSFETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Luo, Haoze; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    the voltage between the kelvin-source and power-source can be used to specifically monitor bond-wire degradation. Meanwhile, the drain to kelvin-source voltage can be monitored to track defects in the semiconductor die or gate driver. Through an accelerated aging test on 20 A Silicon Carbide Metal......-Oxide-Semiconductor-Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), it is shown that there are opposing trends in the evolution of the on-state resistances of both the bond-wires and the MOSFET die. In summary, after 50,000 temperature cycles, the resistance of the bond-wires increased by up to 2 mΩ, while the on-state resistance of the MOSFET dies...... decreased by approximately 1 mΩ. The conventional failure precursor (monitoring a single forward voltage) cannot distinguish between semiconductor die or bond-wire degradation. Therefore, the ability to monitor both these parameters due to the presence of an auxiliary-source terminal can provide more...

  9. 31 CFR 353.3 - Converting definitive savings bonds to book-entry bonds in New Treasury Direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... New Treasury Direct, an online system for holding Treasury securities. The Web address for New... bonds should follow online instructions for conversion. Regulations governing converted bonds are found at 31 CFR part 363. [70 FR 14941, Mar. 23, 2005] ...

  10. Effect of hot isostatic pressing on reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. K.; Moore, T. J.; Millard, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specimens of nearly theoretical density have been obtained through the isostatic hot pressing of reaction-bonded silicon nitride under 138 MPa of pressure for two hours at 1850, 1950, and 2050 C. An amorphous phase that is introduced by the hot isostatic pressing partly accounts for the fact that while room temperature flexural strength more than doubles, the 1200 C flexural strength increases significantly only after pressing at 2050 C.

  11. Unanticipated C=C bonds in covalent monolayers on silicon revealed by NEXAFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael V; Lee, Jonathan R I; Brehmer, Daniel E; Linford, Matthew R; Willey, Trevor M

    2010-02-02

    Interfaces are crucial to material properties. In the case of covalent organic monolayers on silicon, molecular structure at the interface controls the self-assembly of the monolayers, which in turn influences the optical properties and electrical transport. These properties intrinsically affect their application in biology, tribology, optics, and electronics. We use near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to show that the most basic covalent monolayers formed from 1-alkenes on silicon retain a double bond in one-fifth to two-fifths of the resultant molecules. Unsaturation in the predominantly saturated monolayers will perturb the regular order and affect the dependent properties. The presence of unsaturation in monolayers produced by two different methods also prompts the re-evaluation of other radical-based mechanisms for forming covalent monolayers on silicon.

  12. In situ metalation of free base phthalocyanine covalently bonded to silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lupo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Free 4-undecenoxyphthalocyanine molecules were covalently bonded to Si(100 and porous silicon through thermic hydrosilylation of the terminal double bonds of the undecenyl chains. The success of the anchoring strategy on both surfaces was demonstrated by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with control experiments performed adopting the commercially available 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine, which is not suited for silicon anchoring. Moreover, the study of the shape of the XPS N 1s band gave relevant information on the interactions occurring between the anchored molecules and the substrates. The spectra suggest that the phthalocyanine ring interacts significantly with the flat Si surface, whilst ring–surface interactions are less relevant on porous Si. The surface-bonded molecules were then metalated in situ with Co by using wet chemistry. The efficiency of the metalation process was evaluated by XPS measurements and, in particular, on porous silicon, the complexation of cobalt was confirmed by the disappearance in the FTIR spectra of the band at 3290 cm−1 due to –NH stretches. Finally, XPS results revealed that the different surface–phthalocyanine interactions observed for flat and porous substrates affect the efficiency of the in situ metalation process.

  13. Directional Etching of Silicon by Silver Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2011-02-01

    We report directional etching of nanostructures (nanochannels and nanotrenches) into the Si(100) substrates in aqueous HF and H2O2 solution by lithographically defined Ag patterns (nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanorings). The Effect of Ag/Si interface oxide on the directional etching has been studied by etching Ag/SiOx/Si samples of known interface oxide thickness. Based on high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging and TEM-energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra of the Ag/Si interfaces, we propose that maintenance of the sub-nanometer oxide at the Ag/Si interfaces and Ag-Si interaction are the key factors which regulate the directional etching of Si.

  14. Direct Electroplating on Highly Doped Patterned Silicon Wafers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas Llona, Laura Dolores; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    Nickel thin films have been electrodeposited directly on highly doped silicon wafers after removal of the native oxide layer. These substrates conduct sufficiently well to allow deposition using a periferical electrical contact on the wafer. Films 2 μm thick were deposited using a nickel sulfamate

  15. Development of new assembly techniques for a silicon micro-vertex detector unit using the flip-chip bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Mandai, M.; Kanazawa, H.; Yamanaka, J.; Miyahara, S.; Kamiya, M.; Fujita, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Ikeda, M.; Koike, S.; Matsuda, T.; Ozaki, H.; Tanaka, M.; Tsuboyama, T.; Avrillon, S.; Okuno, S.; Haba, J.; Hanai, H.; Mori, S.; Yusa, K.; Fukunaga, C.

    1994-01-01

    Full-size models of a detector unit for a silicon micro-vertex detector were built for the KEK B factory. The Flip-Chip Bonding (FCB) method using a new type anisotropic conductive film was examined. The structure using the FCB method successfully provides a new architecture for the silicon micro-vertex detector unit. (orig.)

  16. Flip-chip bonded optoelectronic integration based on ultrathin silicon (UTSi) CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sunkwang; Ho, Tawei; Zhang, Liping; Sawchuk, Alexander A.

    2003-06-01

    We describe the design and test of flip-chip bonded optoelectronic CMOS devices based on Peregrine Semiconductor's 0.5 micron Ultra-Thin Silicon on sapphire (UTSi) technology. The UTSi process eliminates the substrate leakage that typically results in crosstalk and reduces parasitic capacitance to the substrate, providing many benefits compared to bulk silicon CMOS. The low-loss synthetic sapphire substrate is optically transparent and has a coefficient of thermal expansion suitable for flip-chip bonding of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and detectors. We have designed two different UTSi CMOS chips. One contains a flip-chip bonded 1 x 4 photodiode array, a receiver array, a double edge triggered D-flip flop-based 2047-pattern pseudo random bit stream (PRBS) generator and a quadrature-phase LC-voltage controlled oscillator (VCO). The other chip contains a flip-chip bonded 1 x 4 VCSEL array, a driver array based on high-speed low-voltage differential signals (LVDS) and a full-balanced differential LC-VCO. Each VCSEL driver and receiver has individual input and bias voltage adjustments. Each UTSi chip is mounted on different printed circuit boards (PCBs) which have holes with about 1 mm radius for optical output and input paths through the sapphire substrate. We discuss preliminary testing of these chips.

  17. 31 CFR 315.3 - Converting definitive savings bonds to book-entry bonds in New Treasury Direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... book-entry bonds through New Treasury Direct, an online system for holding Treasury securities. The Web... definitive savings bonds should follow online instructions for conversion. Regulations governing converted bonds are found at 31 CFR part 363. [70 FR 14941, Mar. 23, 2005] ...

  18. GaN-on-Silicon - Present capabilities and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Timothy

    2018-02-01

    Gallium Nitride, in the form of epitaxial HEMT transistors on various substrate materials, is the newest and most promising semiconductor technology for high performance devices in the RF, microwave, and mmW arenas. This is particularly true for GaN-on-Silicon based devices and MMIC's which enable both state-of-the-art high frequency functionality and the ability to scale production into large wafer diameter CMOS foundries. The design and development of GaN-on-Silicon structures and devices will be presented beginning with the basic material parameters, growth of the required epitaxial construction, and leading to the fundamental operational theory of high frequency, high power HEMTs. In this discussion comparisons will be made with alternative substrate materials with emphasis on contrasting the inherent advantages of a silicon based system. Theory of operation of microwave and mmW high power HEMT devices will be presented with special emphasis on fundamental limitations of device performance including inherent frequency limiting transit time analysis, required impedance transformations, internal and external parasitic reactance, thermal impedance optimization, and challenges improved by full integration into monolithic MMICs. Lastly, future directions for implementing GaN-on-Silicon into mainstream CMOS silicon semiconductor technologies will be discussed.

  19. Investigations of the electrical neutralization and bonding mechanisms of shallow impurities in silicon grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazmerski, L.L.; Nelson, A.J.; Dhere, R.G.; Abou-Elfotouh, F.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions between shallow acceptors (B, Al, Ga and In) and hydrogen in polycrystalline Si are investigated. The bonding mechanisms involved in the acceptor neutralization process at grain boundaries are examined using microanalytical techniques. Differences in the incorporation of molecular and atomic hydrogen, and corresponding variations in electrical passivation at grain boundaries, are observed. Low-temperature Auger difference spectroscopy confirms Si-H bonding to dominate B, Ga and In-doped cases, with no direct acceptor-hydrogen bonding. Al-rich grain boundaries show H-complex and hydroxyl bonding. The data confirm chemical bond strength trends with B< Ga< In. Volume-indexed AES is utilized to compare bonding and H-distributions in B- and Al-rich grain boundary regions

  20. Ultraclean Si/Si interface formation by surface preparation and direct bonding in ultrahigh vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansson, Karin; Grey, Francois; Bengtsson, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    Silicon surfaces have been cleaned and bonded in ultrahigh vacuum, at a pressure in the 10(-10) Torr range. The bonded interfaces show extremely low contamination levels as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Nevertheless, a potential barrier could be detected at the interface by spreading...

  1. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.H.; Jeon, H.B.; Park, H.; Uozumi, S.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A.K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P.K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.

    2016-01-01

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor “Origami” method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force. - Highlights: • Gluing and wire binding for Belle-II SVD are studied. • Gluing robot and Origami module are used. • QA are satisfied in terms of the achieved bonding throughput and the pull force. • Result will be applied for L6 ladder assembly.

  2. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K.H.; Jeon, H.B. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H., E-mail: sunshine@knu.ac.kr [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uozumi, S. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); and others

    2016-09-21

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor “Origami” method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force. - Highlights: • Gluing and wire binding for Belle-II SVD are studied. • Gluing robot and Origami module are used. • QA are satisfied in terms of the achieved bonding throughput and the pull force. • Result will be applied for L6 ladder assembly.

  3. Surface/subsurface observation and removal mechanisms of ground reaction bonded silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang; Zhang, Yu-Min; Han, Jie-cai; Zhang, Yun-long; Zhang, Jian-han; Zhou, Yu-feng; Han, Yuan-yuan

    2006-01-01

    Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide (RBSiC) has long been recognized as a promising material for optical applications because of its unique combination of favorable properties and low-cost fabrication. Grinding of silicon carbide is difficult because of its high hardness and brittleness. Grinding often induces surface and subsurface damage, residual stress and other types of damage, which have great influence on the ceramic components for optical application. In this paper, surface integrity, subsurface damage and material removal mechanisms of RBSiC ground using diamond grinding wheel on creep-feed surface grinding machine are investigated. The surface and subsurface are studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The effects of grinding conditions on surface and subsurface damage are discussed. This research links the surface roughness, surface and subsurface cracks to grinding parameters and provides valuable insights into the material removal mechanism and the dependence of grind induced damage on grinding conditions.

  4. Direct deposition of gold on silicon with focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Irradiation with ions at very low energies (below 500 eV) no longer induces a removal of substrate material, but the ions are directly deposited on the surface. In this way, gold has been deposited on silicon with focused ion beam exposure and the properties of the film have been investigated with atomic force microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  5. 31 CFR 360.3 - Converting definitive savings bonds to book-entry bonds in New Treasury Direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Treasury Direct, an online system for holding Treasury securities. The Web address for New Treasury Direct... follow online instructions for conversion. Regulations governing converted bonds are found at 31 CFR part 363. [70 FR 14942, Mar. 23, 2005] ...

  6. Interface bonding in silicon oxide nanocontacts: interaction potentials and force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierez-Kien, M.; Craciun, A. D.; Pinon, A. V.; Le Roux, S.; Gallani, J. L.; Rastei, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    The interface bonding between two silicon-oxide nanoscale surfaces has been studied as a function of atomic nature and size of contacting asperities. The binding forces obtained using various interaction potentials are compared with experimental force curves measured in vacuum with an atomic force microscope. In the limit of small nanocontacts (typically contact area which is altered by stretching speeds. The mean unbinding force is found to decrease as the contact spends time in the attractive regime. This contact weakening is featured by a negative aging coefficient which broadens and shifts the thermal-induced force distribution at low stretching speeds.

  7. Processing development for ceramic structural components: the influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    The influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride has been studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, 4 pt. bend test, and mecury intrusion porosimetry. It has been shown that presintering at 1050/sup 0/C will not affect the final nitrided properties. At 1200/sup 0/C, the oxide layer is removed, promoting the formation of B-phase silicon nitride. Presintering at 1200/sup 0/C also results in compact weight loss due to the volatilization of silicon, and the formation of large pores which severely reduce nitrided strength. The development of the structure of sintered silicon compacts appears to involve a temperature gradient, with greater sintering observed near the surface.

  8. Simultaneous On-State Voltage and Bond-Wire Resistance Monitoring of Silicon Carbide MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Baker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In fast switching power semiconductors, the use of a fourth terminal to provide the reference potential for the gate signal—known as a kelvin-source terminal—is becoming common. The introduction of this terminal presents opportunities for condition monitoring systems. This article demonstrates how the voltage between the kelvin-source and power-source can be used to specifically monitor bond-wire degradation. Meanwhile, the drain to kelvin-source voltage can be monitored to track defects in the semiconductor die or gate driver. Through an accelerated aging test on 20 A Silicon Carbide Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor-Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs, it is shown that there are opposing trends in the evolution of the on-state resistances of both the bond-wires and the MOSFET die. In summary, after 50,000 temperature cycles, the resistance of the bond-wires increased by up to 2 mΩ, while the on-state resistance of the MOSFET dies decreased by approximately 1 mΩ. The conventional failure precursor (monitoring a single forward voltage cannot distinguish between semiconductor die or bond-wire degradation. Therefore, the ability to monitor both these parameters due to the presence of an auxiliary-source terminal can provide more detailed information regarding the aging process of a device.

  9. Temperature-feedback direct laser reshaping of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouassa, M.; Mitsai, E.; Syubaev, S.; Pavlov, D.; Zhizhchenko, A.; Jadli, I.; Hassayoun, L.; Zograf, G.; Makarov, S.; Kuchmizhak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Direct laser reshaping of nanostructures is a cost-effective and fast approach to create or tune various designs for nanophotonics. However, the narrow range of required laser parameters along with the lack of in-situ temperature control during the nanostructure reshaping process limits its reproducibility and performance. Here, we present an approach for direct laser nanostructure reshaping with simultaneous temperature control. We employ thermally sensitive Raman spectroscopy during local laser melting of silicon pillar arrays prepared by self-assembly microsphere lithography. Our approach allows establishing the reshaping threshold of an individual nanostructure, resulting in clean laser processing without overheating of the surrounding area.

  10. Direct modification of silicon surface by nanosecond laser interference lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dapeng [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Wang, Zuobin, E-mail: wangz@cust.edu.cn [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Zhang, Ziang [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); Yue, Yong [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Li, Dayou [JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Maple, Carsten [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic structures on silicon surface have numerous significant applications in photoelectronics and surface engineering. A number of technologies have been developed to fabricate the structures in various research fields. In this work, we take the strategy of direct nanosecond laser interference lithography technology, and focus on the silicon material to create different well-defined surface structures based on theoretical analysis of the formation of laser interference patterns. Two, three and four-beam laser interference systems were set up to fabricate the grating, regular triangle and square structures on silicon surfaces, respectively. From the AFM micrographs, the critical features of structures have a dependence on laser fluences. For a relative low laser fluence, grating and dot structures formed with bumps due to the Marangoni Effect. With the increase of laser fluences, melt and evaporation behaviors can be responsible for the laser modification. By properly selecting the process parameters, well-defined grating and dot structures can been achieved. It can be demonstrated that direct laser interference lithography is a facile and efficient technology with the advantage of a single process procedure over macroscale areas for the fabrication of micro and nano structures.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of reaction bonded silicon carbide/carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thostenson, Erik T; Karandikar, Prashant G; Chou, T.-W.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated considerable excitement in the scientific and engineering communities because of their exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes possess exceptionally high stiffness and strength combined with high electrical and thermal conductivities. These novel material properties have stimulated considerable research in the development of nanotube-reinforced composites (Thostenson et al 2001 Compos. Sci. Technol. 61 1899, Thostenson et al 2005 Compos. Sci. Technol. 65 491). In this research, novel reaction bonded silicon carbide nanocomposites were fabricated using melt infiltration of silicon. A series of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (NT-CMCs) were fabricated and the structure and properties were characterized. Here we show that carbon nanotubes are present in the as-fabricated NT-CMCs after reaction bonding at temperatures above 1400 deg. C. Characterization results reveal that a very small volume content of carbon nanotubes, as low as 0.3 volume %, results in a 75% reduction in electrical resistivity of the ceramic composites. A 96% decrease in electrical resistivity was observed for the ceramics with the highest nanotube volume fraction of 2.1%

  12. Effect of Curing Direction on Microtensile Bond Strength of Fifth and Sixth Generation Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nadaf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Composite restorative materials and dental adhesives are usually cured with light sources. The light direction may influence the bond strength of dental adhesives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light direction on the microtensile bond strength of fifth and sixth generation dental adhesives.Materials and Methods: Prime & Bond NT and Clearfil SE bond were used with different light directions.Sixty human incisor teeth were divided into 4 groups (n=15. In groups A and C, Clearfil SE bond with light curing direction from buccal was used for bonding a composite resin to dentin. In groups B and D, Prime & Bond NT with light curing direction from composite was used. After thermocycling the specimens were subjected to tensile force until debonding occurred and values for microtensile bond strength were recorded. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test.Results: The findings showed that the bond strength of Clearfil SE bond was significantly higher than that of Prime&Bond NT (P<0.001. There was no significant difference between light curing directions (P=0.132.Conclusion: Light curing direction did not have significant effect on the bond strength. Sixth generation adhesives was more successful than fifth generation in terms of bond strength to dentin.

  13. Phase transitions in liquids with directed intermolecular bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Son, L.; Ryltcev, R.

    2005-01-01

    Liquids with quasi - chemical bonding between molecules are described in terms of vertex model. It is shown that this bonding results in liquid - liquid phase transition, which occurs between phases with different mean density of intermolecular bonds. The transition may be suggested to be a universal phenomena for those liquids.

  14. Spatial control of direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on silicon dioxide by directional copper dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beld, Wesley Theodorus Eduardus; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the spatial control of direct graphene synthesis onto silicon dioxide by controlled dewetting. The dewetting process is controlled through a combination of using a grooved substrate and conducting copper deposition at an angle. The substrate is then treated

  15. Assembly and evaluation of a pyroelectric detector bonded to vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes over thin silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharous, E; Theocharous, S P; Lehman, J H

    2013-11-20

    A novel pyroelectric detector consisting of a vertically aligned nanotube array on thin silicon (VANTA/Si) bonded to a 60 μm thick crystal of LiTaO₃ has been fabricated. The performance of the VANTA/Si-coated pyroelectric detector was evaluated using National Physical Laboratory's (NPL's) detector-characterization facilities. The relative spectral responsivity of the detector was found to be spectrally flat in the 0.8-24 μm wavelength range, in agreement with directional-hemispherical reflectance measurements of witness samples of the VANTA. The spatial uniformity of response of the test detector exhibited good uniformity, although the nonuniformity increased with increasing modulation frequency. The nonuniformity may be assigned either to the dimensions of the VANTA or the continuity of the bond between the VANTA/Si coating and the pyroelectric crystal substrate. The test detector exhibited a small superlinear response, which is similar to that of pyroelectric detectors coated with good quality gold-black coatings.

  16. Electrical transport in transverse direction through silicon carbon alloy multilayers containing regular size silicon quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Aparajita [Energy Research Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kole, Arindam, E-mail: erak@iacs.res.in [Energy Research Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Dasgupta, Arup [Microscopy and Thermophysical Property Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Chaudhuri, Partha [Energy Research Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Low temperature columnar growth of regular sized Si-quantum dots (Si-QDs) within a-SiC:H/μc-SiC:H multilayer structure by tuning the a-SiC:H layer thickness. • Thickness optimization of the a-SiC:H layers resulted in a sharp increase of the transverse current and a decrease of the trap concentrations. • The arrangements of the Si-QDs favor percolation paths for the transverse current. - Abstract: Electrical transport in the transverse direction has been studied through a series of hydrogenated silicon carbon alloy multilayers (SiC-MLs) deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. Each SiC-ML consists of 30 cycles of the alternating layers of a nearly amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) and a microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) that contains high density of silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs). A detailed investigation by cross sectional TEM reveals preferential growth of densely packed Si-QDs of regular sizes ∼4.8 nm in diameter in a vertically aligned columnar structure within the SiC-ML. More than six orders of magnitude increase in transverse current through the SiC-ML structure were observed for decrease in the a-SiC:H layer thickness from 13 nm to 2 nm. The electrical transport mechanism was established to be a combination of grain boundary or band tail hopping and Frenkel–Poole (F-P) type conduction depending on the temperature and externally applied voltage ranges. Evaluation of trap concentration within the multilayer structures from the fitted room temperature current voltage characteristics by F-P function shows reduction up-to two orders of magnitude indicating an improvement in the short range order in the a-SiC:H matrix for decrease in the thickness of a-SiC:H layer.

  17. GeSn-on-insulator substrate formed by direct wafer bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Dian; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiao, E-mail: elegong@nus.edu.sg, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: elegong@nus.edu.sg, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Lee, Kwang Hong; Wang, Bing [Low Energy Electronic Systems (LEES), Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), 1 CREATE Way, #10-01 CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); Bao, Shuyu [Low Energy Electronic Systems (LEES), Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), 1 CREATE Way, #10-01 CREATE Tower, Singapore 138602 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tan, Chuan Seng [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-07-11

    GeSn-on-insulator (GeSnOI) on Silicon (Si) substrate was realized using direct wafer bonding technique. This process involves the growth of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} layer on a first Si (001) substrate (donor wafer) followed by the deposition of SiO{sub 2} on Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}, the bonding of the donor wafer to a second Si (001) substrate (handle wafer), and removal of the Si donor wafer. The GeSnOI material quality is investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), atomic-force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} layer on GeSnOI substrate has a surface roughness of 1.90 nm, which is higher than that of the original Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} epilayer before transfer (surface roughness is 0.528 nm). The compressive strain of the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} film in the GeSnOI is as low as 0.10% as confirmed using HRXRD and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Pseudo-direct bandgap transitions in silicon nanocrystals: effects on optoelectronics and thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek; Yu, Yixuan; Sun, Qi-C.; Korgel, Brian; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-11-01

    While silicon nanostructures are extensively used in electronics, the indirect bandgap of silicon poses challenges for optoelectronic applications like photovoltaics and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here, we show that size-dependent pseudo-direct bandgap transitions in silicon nanocrystals dominate the interactions between (photoexcited) charge carriers and phonons, and hence the optoelectronic properties of silicon nanocrystals. Direct measurements of the electronic density of states (DOS) for different sized silicon nanocrystals reveal that these pseudo-direct transitions, likely arising from the nanocrystal surface, can couple with the quantum-confined silicon states. Moreover, we demonstrate that since these transitions determine the interactions of charge carriers with phonons, they change the light emission, absorption, charge carrier diffusion and phonon drag (Seebeck coefficient) in nanoscaled silicon semiconductors. Therefore, these results can have important implications for the design of optoelectronics and thermoelectric devices based on nanostructured silicon.While silicon nanostructures are extensively used in electronics, the indirect bandgap of silicon poses challenges for optoelectronic applications like photovoltaics and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here, we show that size-dependent pseudo-direct bandgap transitions in silicon nanocrystals dominate the interactions between (photoexcited) charge carriers and phonons, and hence the optoelectronic properties of silicon nanocrystals. Direct measurements of the electronic density of states (DOS) for different sized silicon nanocrystals reveal that these pseudo-direct transitions, likely arising from the nanocrystal surface, can couple with the quantum-confined silicon states. Moreover, we demonstrate that since these transitions determine the interactions of charge carriers with phonons, they change the light emission, absorption, charge carrier diffusion and phonon drag (Seebeck coefficient) in

  19. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, Pay Jun [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba 6-6-01, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Manufacturing Process Department, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100, Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Yan, Jiwang, E-mail: yan@mech.keio.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, 223-8522 (Japan); Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba 6-6-01, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  20. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, Pay Jun; Yan, Jiwang; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2013-01-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  1. Effect of loading rate on dynamic fracture of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Wedge-loaded, modified tapered double cantilever beam (WL-MTDCB) specimens under impact loading were used to determine the room temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). The crack extension history, with the exception of the terminal phase, was similar to that obtained under static loading. Like its static counterpart, a distinct crack acceleration phase, which was not observed in dynamic fracture of steel and brittle polymers, was noted. Unlike its static counterpart, the crack continued to propagate at nearly its terminal velocity under a low dynamic stress intensity factor during the terminal phase of crack propagation. These and previously obtained results for glass and RBSN show that dynamic crack arrest under a positive dynamic stress intensity factor is unlikely in static and impact loaded structural ceramics.

  2. Thermal shock behaviour of mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide ceramics with yttria addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shuqiang; Zeng Yuping; Jiang Dongliang

    2007-01-01

    Thermal shock resistance of mullite (3Al 2 O 3 · 2SiO 2 )-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics with 3.0 wt% yttria (Y 2 O 3 ) addition was evaluated by a water-quenching technique. The thermal shock damage was investigated as a function of the quenching temperature, quenching cycles and specimen thickness. The residual flexural strength of the quenched specimens decreases with increasing quenching temperature and specimen thickness due to the larger thermal stress caused by thermal shock. However, quenching cycles at the temperature difference of 1200 deg. C have no effect on the residual strength since the same thermal stress was produced in repeated thermal shock processes. The good thermal shock damage resistance of the specimens is contributed mainly by the low strength and moderate elastic modulus. Moreover, the pores prevent the continuous propagation of cracks and alleviate further damage

  3. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural examination of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has shown that there is often a region adjacent to the as-nitrided surfaces that is even more porous than the interior of this already quite porous material. Because this layer of large porosity is considered detrimental to both the strength and oxidation resistance of RBSN, a study was undertaken to determine if its formation could be prevented during processing. All test bars studied were made from a single batch of Si powder which was milled for 4 hours in heptane in a vibratory mill using high density alumina cylinders as the grinding media. After air drying the powder, bars were compacted in a single acting die and hydropressed.

  4. Structural, dynamical, electronic, and bonding properties of laser-heated silicon: An ab initio molecular-dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1997-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystalline silicon. We found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bonding. As a result the system undergoes a melting

  5. Reliable four-point flexion test and model for die-to-wafer direct bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, T., E-mail: toshiyuki.tabata@cea.fr; Sanchez, L.; Fournel, F.; Moriceau, H. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-07

    For many years, wafer-to-wafer (W2W) direct bonding has been very developed particularly in terms of bonding energy measurement and bonding mechanism comprehension. Nowadays, die-to-wafer (D2W) direct bonding has gained significant attention, for instance, in photonics and microelectro-mechanics, which supposes controlled and reliable fabrication processes. So, whatever the stuck materials may be, it is not obvious whether bonded D2W structures have the same bonding strength as bonded W2W ones, because of possible edge effects of dies. For that reason, it has been strongly required to develop a bonding energy measurement technique which is suitable for D2W structures. In this paper, both D2W- and W2W-type standard SiO{sub 2}-to-SiO{sub 2} direct bonding samples are fabricated from the same full-wafer bonding. Modifications of the four-point flexion test (4PT) technique and applications for measuring D2W direct bonding energies are reported. Thus, the comparison between the modified 4PT and the double-cantilever beam techniques is drawn, also considering possible impacts of the conditions of measures such as the water stress corrosion at the debonding interface and the friction error at the loading contact points. Finally, reliability of a modified technique and a new model established for measuring D2W direct bonding energies is demonstrated.

  6. A contribution to the study of metal-ceramic bonding by direct vacuum brazing with reactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Wettability and bonding tests were utilized to evaluate the behaviour of various specials alloys, for work at high temperature under vacuum, for the inter-bonding of silicon carbide, alumina ceramic, graphite (for electrical applications) and petroleum coke and their joining with themselves as the metals titanium, molybdenum, nickel and copper. The joints exhibiting effective bonding were investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-rays diffraction. Elemental mapping of the constituents and quantitative chemical microanalysis were also undertaken, via the energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDS). On the basis of the results the possible mechanisms of bond-formation have been discussed. It was verified that: a) of the filler metals studied, those which exhibited effective wettability on all the above materials were: 49Cu-49Ti-2Be, Zircaloy4-5Be and a commercial alloy Ticusil, which consisted of a Cu-Ag eutectic with a small addition of pure Ti, of nominal composition 26.7Cu-68.8Ag-4.5Ti; b) the alloys with high levels of reactive metals such as Ti and Zr tended to form low ductility bonds due to the formation of hard, brittle phases; c) the copper suffered pronounced erosion when in direct contact with alloys of high Ti and Zr contents, due to the formation of phases whose melting points were below the brazing temperature of those materials; e) the compounds detected as reaction products were identified as, TiC in the samples rich in carbon, such as the SiC ceramic and graphite joints, or the oxides Cu2Ti2O5 and Cu3TiO4 in the bonding of alumina to alloys including Ti in their composition or in that of the filler metal, proving that the effectiveness of the bond is dependent upon an initial and indispensable chemical bonding. (author)

  7. Directional radiative properties of anisotropic rough silicon and gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.J.; Chen, Y.B.; Zhang, Z.M. [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Recent studies have shown that the topography of some chemically etched microrough silicon surfaces is non-Gaussian and may be strongly anisotropic. However, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of anisotropic surfaces has not been fully understood. The present study uses the Monte Carlo method to investigate the out-of-plane BRDF, multiple scattering, and the change of the polarization state upon reflection. Two ray-tracing algorithms are developed that incorporate the surface topography or slope distribution of the samples obtained by the use of an atomic force microscope. The predicted BRDFs for silicon surfaces with or without a gold coating are in reasonable agreement with the results measured using a laser scatterometer at a wavelength of 635nm. The employment of surface topographic data is indispensable to the BRDF modeling of anisotropic surfaces. While first-order scattering makes the dominant contribution to reflections from the studied surfaces, it is critical to consider the polarization state change in order to correctly predict the out-of-plane BRDF. The versatile Monte Carlo modeling tools developed through the present study help gain a better understanding of the directional radiative properties of microrough surfaces and, furthermore, will have an impact on thermal metrology in the semiconductor industry. (author)

  8. Examining the free radical bonding mechanism of benzoquinone– and hydroquinone–methanol passivation of silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotulak, Nicole A.; Chen, Meixi; Schreiber, Nikolas; Jones, Kevin; Opila, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Photons are required for high levels of c-Si passivation by both BQ/ME and HQ/ME solutions. • Protons are required for high levels of c-Si passivation by both BQ/ME and HQ/ME solutions. • The free radical QH· is the likely passivating species for c-Si surfaces from BQ/ME and HQ/ME solutions. - Abstract: The surface passivation of p-benzoquinone (BQ) and hydroquinone (HQ) when dissolved in methanol (ME) has been examined through effective lifetime testing of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers treated with the aforementioned solutions. Changes in the availability of both photons and protons in the solutions were demonstrated to affect the level of passivation achieved. The requirement of both excess protons and ambient light exposure to maintain high effective lifetimes supports the presence of a free radical species that drives the surface passivation. Surface analysis suggests a 1:1 ratio of HQ-like bonds to methoxy bonds on the c-Si surface after treatment with a BQ/ME solution.

  9. Glass frit bonding with controlled width and height using a two-step wet silicon etching procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifang, Liu; Daner, Chen; Liwei, Lin; Gaofeng, Zheng; Jianyi, Zheng; Lingyun, Wang; Daoheng, Sun

    2016-03-01

    A simple and versatile two-step silicon wet etching technique for the control of the width and height of the glass frit bonding layer has been developed to improve bonding strength and reliability in wafer-level microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) packaging processes. The height of the glass frit bonding layer is set by the design of a vertical reference wall which regulates the distance between the silicon wafer and the encapsulation capping substrate. On the other hand, the width of the bonding layer is constrained between two micro grooves which are used to accommodate the spillages of extra glass frit during the bonding process. An optimized thermal bonding process, including the formation of glass liquid, removal of gas bubbles under vacuum and the filling of voids under normal atmospheric condition has been developed to suppress the formation of the bubbles/voids. The stencil printing and pre-sintering processes for the glass frit have been characterized before the thermal bonding process under different magnitudes of bonding pressure. The bonding gap thickness is found to be equal to the height of the reference wall of 10 μm in the prototype design. The bubbles/voids are found to be suppressed effectively and the bonding strength increases from 10.2 to 19.1 MPa as compared with a conventional thermal annealing process in air. Experimentally, prototype samples are measured to have passed the high hermetic sealing leakage tests of 5  ×  10-8 atm cc s-1.

  10. The interaction of reaction-bonded silicon carbide and inconel 600 with a nickel-based brazing alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, J. R.; Pugh, M. D.; Drew, R. A. L.

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the present research was to join reaction-bonded silicon carbide (RBSC) to INCONEL 600 (a nickel-based superalloy) for use in advanced heat engine applications using either direct brazing or composite interlayer joining. Direct brazing experiments employed American Welding Society (AWS) BNi-5, a commercial nickel-based brazing alloy, as a filler material; composite interlayers consisted of intimate mixtures of α-SiC and BNi-5 powders. Both methods resulted in the liquid filler metal forming a Ni-Si liquid with the free Si in the RBSC, which, in turn, reacted vigorously with the SiC component of the RBSC to form low melting point constituents in both starting materials and Cr carbides at the metal-ceramic interface. Using solution thermodynamics, it was shown that a Ni-Si liquid of greater than 60 at. pct Ni will decompose a-SiC at the experimental brazing temperature of 1200 ‡C; these calculations are consistent with the experimentally observed composition profiles and reaction morphology within the ceramic. It was concluded that the joining of RBSC to INCONEL 600 using a nickel-based brazing alloy is not feasible due to the inevitability of the filler metal reacting with the ceramic, degrading the high-temperature properties of the base materials.

  11. Wafer-level integration of NiTi shape memory alloy on silicon using Au–Si eutectic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradin, Henrik; Bushra, Sobia; Braun, Stefan; Stemme, Göran; Van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the wafer level integration of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) sheets with silicon substrates through Au–Si eutectic bonding. Different bond parameters, such as Au layer thicknesses and substrate surface treatments were evaluated. The amount of gold in the bond interface is the most important parameter to achieve a high bond yield; the amount can be determined by the barrier layers between the Au and Si or by the amount of Au deposition. Deposition of a gold layer of more than 1 μm thickness before bonding gives the most promising results. Through patterning of the SMA sheet and by limiting bonding to small areas, stresses created by the thermal mismatch between Si and NiTi are reduced. With a gold layer of 1 μm thickness and bond areas between 200 × 200 and 800 × 800 μm 2 a high bond strength and a yield above 90% is demonstrated. (paper)

  12. Interfacial bonding and friction in silicon carbide (filament)-reinforced ceramic- and glass-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, J.D.; Shetty, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports interfacial shear strength and interfacial sliding friction stress assessed in unidirectional SiC-filament-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and borosilicate glass composites and 0/90 cross-ply reinforced borosilicate glass composite using a fiber pushout test technique. The interface debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load were measured for varying lengths of the embedded fibers by continuously monitoring the load during debonding and pushout of single fibers in finite-thickness specimens. The dependences of the debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load on the initial embedded lengths of the fibers were in agreement with nonlinear shear-lag models. An iterative regression procedure was used to evaluate the interfacial properties, shear debond strength (τ d ), and sliding friction stress (τ f ), from the embedded fiber length dependences of the debonding load and the maximum frictional sliding load, respectively. The shear-lag model and the analysis of sliding friction permit explicit evaluation of a coefficient of sliding friction (μ) and a residual compressive stress on the interface (σ 0 ). The cross-ply composite showed a significantly higher coefficient of interfacial friction as compared to the unidirectional composites

  13. A Direct Proof of the Resonance-Impaired Hydrogen Bond (RIHB) Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuhui; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2018-01-24

    The concept of resonance-enhanced hydrogen bond (RAHB) has been widely accepted and applied as it highlights the positive impact of π-conjugation on intramolecular H-bonds. However, electron delocalization is directional and there is a possibility that π-resonance goes from the H-bond acceptor to the H-bond donor, leading to a negative impact on H-bonds. Here we used the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method which is a variant of ab initio valence bond (VB) theory and able to derive strictly electron-localized structures self-consistently, to quantify the interplay between H-bond and π-resonance in the terms of geometry, energetics and spectral properties. The comparison of geometrical optimizations with and without π-resonance shows that conjugation can indeed either enhance or weaken intramolecular H-bonds. We further experimented with various substituents attached to either the H-bond acceptor and/or H-bond donor side(s) to tune the H-bonding strength in both directions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of silicone-based denture liners after thermocycling and surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harsimran; Datta, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    To examine, evaluate, and compare the tensile bond strength of two silicone-based liners; one autopolymerizing and one heat cured, when treated with different chemical etchants to improve their adhesion with denture base resin. Hundred and sixty test specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were fabricated; out of which 80 specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after bonding it to autopolymerizing resilient liner (Ufigel P) and rest 80 to heat-cured resilient liner (Molloplast B). Each main group was further divided into four subgroups of 20 specimens each, one to act as a control and three were subjected to surface treatment with different chemical etchants namely dichloromethane, MMA monomer, and chloroform. The two silicone-based denture liners were processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 40 mm) in the space provided by a spacer of 3 mm, thermocycled (5-55°C) for 500 cycles, and then their tensile strength measurements were done in the universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA technique showed a highly significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values for all the groups. The Student's t-test computed values of statistics for the compared groups were greater than the critical values both at 5% and at 1% levels. Surface treatment of denture base resin with chemical etchants prior to the application of silicone-based liner (Ufigel P and Molloplast-B) increased the tensile bond strength. The increase was the highest with specimens subjected to 180 s of MMA surface treatment and the lowest with control group specimens.

  15. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of silicone-based denture liners after thermocycling and surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimran Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To examine, evaluate, and compare the tensile bond strength of two silicone-based liners; one autopolymerizing and one heat cured, when treated with different chemical etchants to improve their adhesion with denture base resin. Materials and Methods: Hundred and sixty test specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA were fabricated; out of which 80 specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after bonding it to autopolymerizing resilient liner (Ufigel P and rest 80 to heat-cured resilient liner (Molloplast B. Each main group was further divided into four subgroups of 20 specimens each, one to act as a control and three were subjected to surface treatment with different chemical etchants namely dichloromethane, MMA monomer, and chloroform. The two silicone-based denture liners were processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 40 mm in the space provided by a spacer of 3 mm, thermocycled (5-55°C for 500 cycles, and then their tensile strength measurements were done in the universal testing machine. Results: One-way ANOVA technique showed a highly significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values for all the groups. The Student′s t-test computed values of statistics for the compared groups were greater than the critical values both at 5% and at 1% levels. Conclusion: Surface treatment of denture base resin with chemical etchants prior to the application of silicone-based liner (Ufigel P and Molloplast-B increased the tensile bond strength. The increase was the highest with specimens subjected to 180 s of MMA surface treatment and the lowest with control group specimens.

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach

  17. Bio-inspired co-catalysts bonded to a silicon photocathode for solar hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yidong; Abrams, Billie; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2011-01-01

    The production of fuels directly or indirectly from sunlight represents one of the major challenges to the development of a sustainable energy system. Hydrogen is the simplest fuel to produce and while platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen...... at the reversible potential match the requirement of a photoelectrochemical hydrogen production system with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in excess of 10%. The experimental observations are supported by DFT calculations of the Mo3S4 cluster adsorbed on the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface providing insights...... deposited on various supports. It will be demonstrated how this overpotential can be eliminated by depositing the same type of hydrogen evolution catalyst on p-type Si which can harvest the red part of the solar spectrum. Such a system could constitute the cathode part of a tandem dream device where the red...

  18. Ultrathin silicon oxynitride layer on GaN for dangling-bond-free GaN/insulator interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Kengo; Yayama, Tomoe; Miyazaki, Takehide; Taoka, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Mitsuaki

    2018-01-23

    Despite the scientific and technological importance of removing interface dangling bonds, even an ideal model of a dangling-bond-free interface between GaN and an insulator has not been known. The formation of an atomically thin ordered buffer layer between crystalline GaN and amorphous SiO 2 would be a key to synthesize a dangling-bond-free GaN/SiO 2 interface. Here, we predict that a silicon oxynitride (Si 4 O 5 N 3 ) layer can epitaxially grow on a GaN(0001) surface without creating dangling bonds at the interface. Our ab initio calculations show that the GaN/Si 4 O 5 N 3 structure is more stable than silicon-oxide-terminated GaN(0001) surfaces. The electronic properties of the GaN/Si 4 O 5 N 3 structure can be tuned by modifying the chemical components near the interface. We also propose a possible approach to experimentally synthesize the GaN/Si 4 O 5 N 3 structure.

  19. Enzyme Kinetics By Directly Imaging A Porous Silicon Microfluidic Reactor Using Desorption/Ionization on Silicon Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, K.P.F.; Azoz, Seyla; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics were obtained in a porous silicon microfluidic channel by combining an enzyme and substrate droplet, allowing them to react and deposit a small amount of residue on the channel walls, and then analyzing this residue by directly ionizing the channel walls using a matrix assisted laser

  20. Void-Free Direct Bonding of CMUT Arrays with Single Crystalline Plates and Pull- In Insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Dahl Johnsen, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    The implications on direct bonding quality, when using a double oxidation step to fabricate capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs), is analyzed. The protrusions along the CMUT cavity edges created during the second oxidation are investigated using simulations, AFM measurements, a...

  1. Developments of integrated laser crystals by a direct bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Akira; Fukuyama, Hiroyasu; Katsumata, Masaki; Tanaka, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Yukikatu

    2003-01-01

    Laser crystal integration using a neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate (or orthovanadate) laser crystal, and non-doped yttrium vanadate crystals that function as cold fingers has been demonstrated. A newly developed dry etching process was adopted in the preparation for contact of mechanically polished surfaces. In the heat treatment process, temperature optimization was essential to get rid of precipitation of vanadic acid caused by the thermo-chemical reaction in a vacuum furnace. The bonded crystal was studied via optical characteristics, magnified inspections, laser output performances pumped by a CW laser diode. From these experiments, it was clear that the integrated Nd:YVO 4 laser crystal, securing the well-improved thermal conductivity, can increase laser output power nearly twice that of the conventional single crystal which was cracked in high power laser pumping of 10 W due to its intrinsic poor thermal conductivity. (author)

  2. Investigation of the heating behavior of carbide-bonded graphene coated silicon wafer used for hot embossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gao; Li, Lihua; Lee, Wing Bun; Ng, Man Cheung; Chan, Chang Yuen

    2018-03-01

    A recently developed carbide-bonded graphene (CBG) coated silicon wafer was found to be an effective micro-patterned mold material for implementing rapid heating in hot embossing processes owing to its superior electrical and thermal conductivity, in addition to excellent mechanical properties. To facilitate the achievement of precision temperature control in the hot embossing, the heating behavior of a CBG coated silicon wafer sample was experimentally investigated. First, two groups of controlled experiments were conducted for quantitatively evaluating the influence of the main factors such as the vacuum pressure and gaseous environment (vacuum versus nitrogen) on its heating performance. The electrical and thermal responses of this sample under a voltage of 60 V were then intensively analyzed, and revealed that it had somewhat semi-conducting properties. Further, we compared its thermal profiles under different settings of the input voltage and current limiting threshold. Moreover, the strong temperature dependence of electrical resistance for this material was observed and determined. Ultimately, the surface temperature of CBG coated silicon wafer could be as high as 1300 ℃, but surprisingly the graphene coating did not detach from the substrate under such an elevated temperature due to its strong thermal coupling with the silicon wafer.

  3. Bi-directional ultrasonic wave coupling to FBGs in continuously bonded optical fiber sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2017-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are typically spot-bonded onto the surface of a structure to detect ultrasonic waves in laboratory demonstrations. However, to protect the rest of the optical fiber from any environmental damage during real applications, bonding the entire length of fiber, called continuous bonding, is commonly done. In this paper, we investigate the impact of continuously bonding FBGs on the measured Lamb wave signal. In theory, the ultrasonic wave signal can bi-directionally transfer between the optical fiber and the plate at any adhered location, which could potentially produce output signal distortion for the continuous bonding case. Therefore, an experiment is performed to investigate the plate-to-fiber and fiber-to-plate signal transfer, from which the signal coupling coefficient of each case is theoretically estimated based on the experimental data. We demonstrate that the two coupling coefficients are comparable, with the plate-to-fiber case approximately 19% larger than the fiber-to-plate case. Finally, the signal waveform and arrival time of the output FBG responses are compared between the continuous and spot bonding cases. The results indicate that the resulting Lamb wave signal output is only that directly detected at the FBG location; however, a slight difference in signal waveform is observed between the two bonding configurations. This paper demonstrates the practicality of using continuously bonded FBGs for ultrasonic wave detection in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications.

  4. Effect of Processing Parameters on Thickness of Columnar Structured Silicon Wafers Directly Grown from Silicon Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Seok Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain optimum growth conditions for desired thickness and more effective silicon feedstock usage, effects of processing parameters such as preheated substrate temperatures, time intervals, moving velocity of substrates, and Ar gas blowing rates on silicon ribbon thickness were investigated in the horizontal growth process. Most of the parameters strongly affected in the control of ribbon thickness with columnar grain structure depended on the solidification rate. The thickness of the silicon ribbon decreased with an increasing substrate temperature, decreasing time interval, and increasing moving velocity of the substrate. However, the blowing of Ar gas onto a liquid layer existing on the surface of solidified ribbon contributed to achieving smooth surface roughness but did not closely affect the change of ribbon thickness in the case of a blowing rate of ≥0.65 Nm3/h because the thickness of the solidified layer was already determined by the exit height of the reservoir.

  5. Distribution of species and Ga–N bonds in silicon co-implanted with gallium and nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surodin, S. I.; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Kryukov, R. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration profiles of species in silicon subjected to gallium and nitrogen co-implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with the layer-by-layer ion etching of the implanted layer. It is shown that practically entire implanted gallium undergoes out-diffusion, but the preliminary implantation of nitrogen for the synthesis of a barrier SiN_x layer makes it possible to avoid the essential loss of gallium. In this case, about 14 % of implanted gallium bond to nitrogen. The obtained data are discussed from the viewpoint of the possibility of ion synthesis of GaN inclusions in silicon matrix.

  6. Distribution of species and Ga–N bonds in silicon co-implanted with gallium and nitrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surodin, S. I., E-mail: surodin.bsn@mail.ru; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Kryukov, R. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I., E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Lobachevsky University, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The concentration profiles of species in silicon subjected to gallium and nitrogen co-implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with the layer-by-layer ion etching of the implanted layer. It is shown that practically entire implanted gallium undergoes out-diffusion, but the preliminary implantation of nitrogen for the synthesis of a barrier SiN{sub x} layer makes it possible to avoid the essential loss of gallium. In this case, about 14 % of implanted gallium bond to nitrogen. The obtained data are discussed from the viewpoint of the possibility of ion synthesis of GaN inclusions in silicon matrix.

  7. Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Seong Jip; Nahm, Sahn

    2013-01-01

    Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process

  8. Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Jip [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 Korea and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Sahn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16

    Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process.

  9. Periodic patterning of silicon by direct nanosecond laser interference ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera, T.; Pérez, N.; Rodríguez, A.; Yurrita, P.; Olaizola, S.M.; Castaño, E.

    2011-01-01

    The production of periodic structures in silicon wafers by four-beam is presented. Because laser interference ablation is a single-step and cost-effective process, there is a great technological interest in the fabrication of these structures for their use as antireflection surfaces. Three different laser fluences are used to modify the silicon surface (0.8 J cm -2 , 1.3 J cm -2 , 2.0 J cm -2 ) creating bumps in the rim of the irradiated area. Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), in particular micro and nano-ripples, are also observed. Measurements of the reflectivity show a decrease in the reflectance for the samples processed with a laser fluence of 2.0 J cm -2 , probably caused by the appearance of the nano-ripples in the structured area, while bumps start to deteriorate.

  10. Directed Atom-by-Atom Assembly of Dopants in Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Bethany M; Song, Jiaming; Sims, Hunter; Troparevsky, M Claudia; Humble, Travis S; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Snijders, Paul C; Lupini, Andrew R

    2018-05-17

    The ability to controllably position single atoms inside materials is key for the ultimate fabrication of devices with functionalities governed by atomic-scale properties. Single bismuth dopant atoms in silicon provide an ideal case study in view of proposals for single-dopant quantum bits. However, bismuth is the least soluble pnictogen in silicon, meaning that the dopant atoms tend to migrate out of position during sample growth. Here, we demonstrate epitaxial growth of thin silicon films doped with bismuth. We use atomic-resolution aberration-corrected imaging to view the as-grown dopant distribution and then to controllably position single dopants inside the film. Atomic-scale quantum-mechanical calculations corroborate the experimental findings. These results indicate that the scanning transmission electron microscope is of particular interest for assembling functional materials atom-by-atom because it offers both real-time monitoring and atom manipulation. We envision electron-beam manipulation of atoms inside materials as an achievable route to controllable assembly of structures of individual dopants.

  11. Methods for characterization of wafer-level encapsulation applied on silicon to LTCC anodic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M F; Ghavanini, F A; Enoksson, P; Haasl, S; Löfgren, L; Persson, K; Rusu, C; Schjølberg-Henriksen, K

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents initial results on generic characterization methods for wafer-level encapsulation. The methods, developed specifically to evaluate anodic bonding of low-temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) to Si, are generally applicable to wafer-level encapsulation. Different microelectromechanical system (MEMS) structures positioned over the whole wafer provide local information about the bond quality. The structures include (i) resonating cantilevers as pressure sensors for bond hermeticity, (ii) resonating bridges as stress sensors for measuring the stress induced by the bonding and (iii) frames/mesas for pull tests. These MEMS structures have been designed, fabricated and characterized indicating that local information can easily be obtained. Buried electrodes to enable localized bonding have been implemented and their effectiveness is indicated from first results of the novel Si to LTCC anodic bonding.

  12. Low-temperature poly(oxymethylene) direct bonding via self-assembled monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weixin; Ma, Bo; Kuwae, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2018-02-01

    A direct bonding of poly(oxymethylene) (POM) was feasible at 100 °C by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a surface modification method. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GOPTS) were used in our work. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that both APTES and GOPTS modified the POM surface successfully. Bonding strength evaluation revealed that surface modification was affected by pretreatment (VUV/O3) process time. In addition, the bonding condition with highest strength had an average strength of 372 kPa. This technology is expected to be used in packaging for micro-/nano-electromechanical systems, such as biomedical devices.

  13. Directed C-H Bond Oxidation of (+)-Pleuromutilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoshen; Kucera, Roman; Goethe, Olivia F; Murphy, Stephen K; Herzon, Seth B

    2018-05-01

    Antibiotics derived from the diterpene fungal metabolite (+)-pleuromutilin (1) are useful agents for the treatment Gram-positive infections in humans and farm animals. Pleuromutilins elicit slow rates of resistance development and minimal cross-resistance with existing antibiotics. Despite efforts aimed at producing new derivatives by semisynthesis, modification of the tricyclic core is underexplored, in part due to a limited number of functional group handles. Herein, we report methods to selectively functionalize the methyl groups of (+)-pleuromutilin (1) by hydroxyl-directed iridium-catalyzed C-H silylation, followed by Tamao-Fleming oxidation. These reactions provided access to C16, C17, and C18 monooxidized products, as well as C15/C16 and C17/C18 dioxidized products. Four new functionalized derivatives were prepared from the protected C17 oxidation product. C6 carboxylic acid, aldehyde, and normethyl derivatives were prepared from the C16 oxidation product. Many of these sequences were executed on gram scales. The efficiency and practicality of these routes provides an easy method to rapidly interrogate structure-activity relationships that were previously beyond reach. This study will inform the design of fully synthetic approaches to novel pleuromutilins and underscores the power of the hydroxyl-directed iridium-catalyzed C-H silylation reaction.

  14. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications

  15. Composite bonded magnets with controlled anisotropy directions prepared by viscous deformation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Fumitoshi; Kawamura, Kiyomi; Okada, Yukihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogushi, Masaki; Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2007-01-01

    When a radially anisotropic rare earth bonded magnet for a rotor with a high (BH) max value is magnetized multi-polarly, its flux distributes rectangularly and increases a cogging torque. In order to overcome this difficulty, we newly developed highly dense Sm 2 Fe 17 N 3 and Nd 2 Fe 14 B-based composite bonded magnets with continuously controlled anisotropy directions by using a viscous deformation technique

  16. Direct 13C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fürtig, Boris; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina; Kovacs, Helena; Schwalbe, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond 1 H detection. Here, we develop 13 C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for 13 C direct detection allows correlations of donor–acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed 13 C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  17. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Daix

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In0.53Ga0.47As (InGaAs active layer is equal to 3.5 × 109 cm−2, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm2/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000–3000 cm2/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  18. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daix, N., E-mail: dai@zurich.ibm.com; Uccelli, E.; Czornomaz, L.; Caimi, D.; Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Siegwart, H.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J. [IBM Research - Zürich, Säumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Hartmann, J. M. [CEA, LETI 17, rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Shiu, K.-T.; Cheng, C.-W.; Krishnan, M.; Lofaro, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sadana, D. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Rd., Route 134 Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I) fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (InGaAs) active layer is equal to 3.5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000–3000 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  19. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daix, N.; Uccelli, E.; Czornomaz, L.; Caimi, D.; Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Siegwart, H.; Marchiori, C.; Hartmann, J. M.; Shiu, K.-T.; Cheng, C.-W.; Krishnan, M.; Lofaro, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sadana, D.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2014-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I) fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In0.53Ga0.47As (InGaAs) active layer is equal to 3.5 × 109 cm-2, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm2/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000-3000 cm2/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  20. Non-silicon substrate bonding mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hainan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a simple and robust strategy for bonding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with various thermoplastic substrates to fabricate a thermoplastic-based closed microfluidic device and examine the feasibility of using the proposed method for realizing plastic-plastic bonding. The proposed bonding strategy was realized by first coating amine functionality on an oxidized thermoplastic surface. Next, the amine-functionalized surface was reacted with a monolayer of low-molecular-weight PDMS, terminated with epoxy functionality, by forming a robust amine-epoxy bond. Both the PDMS-coated thermoplastic and PDMS were then oxidized and permanently assembled at 25 °C under a pressure of 0.1 MPa for 15 min, resulting in PDMS-like surfaces on all four inner walls of the microchannel. Surface characterizations were conducted, including water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and fluorescence measurement, to confirm the successful coating of the thin PDMS layer on the plastic surface, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting a peel test, burst test, and leakage test. Using the proposed method, we could successfully bond various thermoplastics such as poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) with PDMS without the collapse or deformation of the microchannel, and the proposed method was successfully extended to the bonding of two thermoplastics, PMMA, and PC.

  1. Direct writing of sub-wavelength ripples on silicon using femtosecond laser at high repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Changxin; Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Kaijun; Zhu, Min; Qiu, Rong; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The NSRs and DSRs are obtained on silicon surface. • With increasing direct writing speed, the NSRs suddenly changes and becomes the DSRs. • We develop a Sipe–Drude interference theory by considering the thermal excitation. - Abstract: The near sub-wavelength and deep sub-wavelength ripples on monocrystalline silicon were formed in air by using linearly polarized and high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses (f = 76 MHz, λ = 800 nm, τ = 50 fs). The effects of laser pulse energy, direct writing speed and laser polarization on silicon surface morphology are studied. When the laser pulse energy is 2 nJ/pulse and the direct writing speed varies from 10 to 25 mm/s, the near sub-wavelength ripples (NSRs) with orientation perpendicular to the laser polarization are generated. While the direct writing speed reaches 30 mm/s, the direction of the obtained deep sub-wavelength ripples (DSRs) suddenly changes and becomes parallel to the laser polarization, rarely reported so far for femtosecond laser irradiation of silicon. Meanwhile, we extend the Sipe–Drude interference theory by considering the thermal excitation, and numerically calculate the efficacy factor for silicon irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The revised Sipe–Drude interference theoretical results show good agreement with the periods and orientations of sub-wavelength ripples.

  2. Oxide-Free Bonding of III-V-Based Material on Silicon and Nano-Structuration of the Hybrid Waveguide for Advanced Optical Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Pantzas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxide-free bonding of III-V-based materials for integrated optics is demonstrated on both planar Silicon (Si surfaces and nanostructured ones, using Silicon on Isolator (SOI or Si substrates. The hybrid interface is characterized electrically and mechanically. A hybrid InP-on-SOI waveguide, including a bi-periodic nano structuration of the silicon guiding layer is demonstrated to provide wavelength selective transmission. Such an oxide-free interface associated with the nanostructured design of the guiding geometry has great potential for both electrical and optical operation of improved hybrid devices.

  3. Direct Growth of Graphene on Silicon by Metal-Free Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Lixuan; Zhu, Daming; Liu, Xing; Yang, Tieying; Wang, Lei; Wang, Rui; Jiang, Sheng; Chen, Zhenhua; Xu, Zhongmin; Li, Xiaolong

    2018-06-01

    The metal-free synthesis of graphene on single-crystal silicon substrates, the most common commercial semiconductor, is of paramount significance for many technological applications. In this work, we report the growth of graphene directly on an upside-down placed, single-crystal silicon substrate using metal-free, ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition. By controlling the growth temperature, in-plane propagation, edge-propagation, and core-propagation, the process of graphene growth on silicon can be identified. This process produces atomically flat monolayer or bilayer graphene domains, concave bilayer graphene domains, and bulging few-layer graphene domains. This work would be a significant step toward the synthesis of large-area and layer-controlled, high-quality graphene on single-crystal silicon substrates. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Metal-free oxidative olefination of primary amines with benzylic C-H bonds through direct deamination and C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Xing, Li-Juan; Xu, Tong; Zhu, Xue-Ping; Zhou, Wen; Kang, Ning; Wang, Bin

    2014-09-14

    An oxidative olefination reaction between aliphatic primary amines and benzylic sp(3) C-H bonds has been achieved using N-bromosuccinimide as catalyst and tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant. The olefination proceeds under mild metal-free conditions through direct deamination and benzylic C-H bond activation, and provides easy access to biologically active 2-styrylquinolines with (E)-configuration.

  5. Modification of Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleosides by Direct C-H Bond Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal-catalyzed modifications of the activated heterocyclic bases of nucleosides as well as DNA or RNA fragments employing traditional cross-coupling methods have been well-established in nucleic acid chemistry. This review covers advances in the area of cross-coupling reactions in which nucleosides are functionalized via direct activation of the C8-H bond in purine and the C5-H or C6-H bond in uracil bases. The review focuses on Pd/Cu-catalyzed couplings between unactivated nucleoside bases with aryl halides. It also discusses cross-dehydrogenative arylations and alkenylations as well as other reactions used for modification of nucleoside bases that avoid the use of organometallic precursors and involve direct C-H bond activation in at least one substrate. The scope and efficiency of these coupling reactions along with some mechanistic considerations are discussed.

  6. Technology for bonding silicon nitride ceramics. Heat treatment technology to improve diffusion bonding strength; Chikka keiso ceramics no setsugo gijutsu. Kakusan setsugo kyodo kaizen no tame no metsushori gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M.; Shigematsu, K. [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya,Nagoya (Japan)

    1999-01-25

    Silicon nitride ceramics is a structural ceramics with excellent high temperature strength and tenacity, being expected of expansion of application as a high temperature material. However, its processibility is poor, and special sintering technique is required to manufacture members of complex shapes. Therefore, development has been made on a technology to manufacture bonded materials with high mechanical strength, by which diffusion bonding in high temperature nitrogen gas and heat treatment are combined, and crystalline structure in the vicinity of bonding interface is controlled. (translated by NEDO)

  7. Rh(III-catalyzed directed C–H bond amidation of ferrocenes with isocyanates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takebayashi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [RhCp*(OAc2(H2O] [Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl] catalyzed the C–H bond amidation of ferrocenes possessing directing groups with isocyanates in the presence of 2 equiv/Rh of HBF4·OEt2. A variety of disubstituted ferrocenes were prepared in high yields, or excellent diastereoselectivities.

  8. Directed dewetting of amorphous silicon film by a donut-shaped laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Zheng, Cheng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; In, Jung Bin; Sakellari, Ioanna; Raman, Rajesh N; Matthews, Manyalibo J; Elhadj, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation of a thin film with a beam-shaped laser is proposed to achieve site-selectively controlled dewetting of the film into nanoscale structures. As a proof of concept, the laser-directed dewetting of an amorphous silicon thin film on a glass substrate is demonstrated using a donut-shaped laser beam. Upon irradiation of a single laser pulse, the silicon film melts and dewets on the substrate surface. The irradiation with the donut beam induces an unconventional lateral temperature profile in the film, leading to thermocapillary-induced transport of the molten silicon to the center of the beam spot. Upon solidification, the ultrathin amorphous silicon film is transformed to a crystalline silicon nanodome of increased height. This morphological change enables further dimensional reduction of the nanodome as well as removal of the surrounding film material by isotropic silicon etching. These results suggest that laser-based dewetting of thin films can be an effective way for scalable manufacturing of patterned nanostructures. (paper)

  9. Directed dewetting of amorphous silicon film by a donut-shaped laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; In, Jung Bin; Zheng, Cheng; Sakellari, Ioanna; Raman, Rajesh N; Matthews, Manyalibo J; Elhadj, Selim; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2015-04-24

    Irradiation of a thin film with a beam-shaped laser is proposed to achieve site-selectively controlled dewetting of the film into nanoscale structures. As a proof of concept, the laser-directed dewetting of an amorphous silicon thin film on a glass substrate is demonstrated using a donut-shaped laser beam. Upon irradiation of a single laser pulse, the silicon film melts and dewets on the substrate surface. The irradiation with the donut beam induces an unconventional lateral temperature profile in the film, leading to thermocapillary-induced transport of the molten silicon to the center of the beam spot. Upon solidification, the ultrathin amorphous silicon film is transformed to a crystalline silicon nanodome of increased height. This morphological change enables further dimensional reduction of the nanodome as well as removal of the surrounding film material by isotropic silicon etching. These results suggest that laser-based dewetting of thin films can be an effective way for scalable manufacturing of patterned nanostructures.

  10. Nature of bonding forces between two hydrogen-passivated silicon wafers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Nielsen, E.; Hult, E.

    1998-01-01

    The nature and strength of the bonding forces between two II-passivated Si surfaces are studied with the density-functional theory, using an approach based on recent theoretical advances in understanding of van der Waals forces between two surfaces. Contrary to previous suggestions of van der Waals...

  11. Direct reciprocity in animals: The roles of bonding and affective processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidin, Esteban; Carballo, Fabricio; Bentosela, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    The presence of direct reciprocity in animals is a debated topic, because, despite its evolutionary plausibility, it is believed to be uncommon. Some authors claim that stable reciprocal exchanges require sophisticated cognition which has acted as a constraint on its evolution across species. In contrast, a more recent trend of research has focused on the possibility that direct reciprocity occurs within long-term bonds and relies on simple as well as more complex affective mechanisms such as emotional book-keeping, rudimentary and higher forms of empathy, and inequity aversion, among others. First, we present evidence supporting the occurrence of long-term reciprocity in the context of existing bonds in social birds and mammals. Second, we discuss the evidence for affective responses which, modulated by bonding, may underlie altruistic behaviours in different species. We conclude that the mechanisms that may underlie reciprocal exchanges are diverse, and that some act in interaction with bonding processes. From simple associative learning in social contexts, through emotional contagion and behavioural mimicry, to empathy and a sense of fairness, widespread and diverse social affective mechanisms may explain why direct reciprocity may not be a rare phenomenon among social vertebrates. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  12. Direct observation of the lattice sites of implanted manganese in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Amorim, Lígia; Decoster, Stefan; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped Si has attracted significant interest in the context of dilute magnetic semiconductors. We investigated the lattice location of implanted Mn in silicon of different doping types (n, n+ and p+) in the highly dilute regime. Three different lattice sites were identified by means of emission channeling experiments: ideal substitutional sites; sites displaced from bond-centered towards substitutional sites and sites displaced from anti-bonding towards tetrahedral interstitial sites. For all doping types investigated, the substitutional fraction remained below ∼ 30%. We discuss the origin of the observed lattice sites as well as the implications of such structures on the understanding of Mn-doped Si systems.

  13. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  14. Internal-strain effect on the valence band of strained silicon and its correlation with the bond angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaoka, Takeshi, E-mail: inaoka@phys.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Kadekawa, Yukihiro [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2014-02-14

    By means of the first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the effect of relative atom displacement in the crystal unit cell, namely, internal strain on the valence-band dispersion of strained silicon, and find close correlation of this effect with variation in the specific bond angles due to internal strain. We consider the [111] ([110]) band dispersion for (111) ((110)) biaxial tensility and [111] ([110]) uniaxial compression, because remarkably small values of hole effective mass m* can be obtained in this dispersion. Under the practical condition of no normal stress, biaxial tensility (uniaxial compression) involves additional normal compression (tensility) and internal strain. With an increase in the internal-strain parameter, the energy separation between the highest and second-highest valence bands becomes strikingly larger, and the highest band with conspicuously small m* extends remarkably down to a lower energy region, until it intersects or becomes admixed with the second band. This is closely correlated with the change in the specific bond angles, and this change can reasonably explain the above enlargement of the band separation.

  15. Wafer bonding applications and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Gösele, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade direct wafer bonding has developed into a mature materials integration technology. This book presents state-of-the-art reviews of the most important applications of wafer bonding written by experts from industry and academia. The topics include bonding-based fabrication methods of silicon-on-insulator, photonic crystals, VCSELs, SiGe-based FETs, MEMS together with hybrid integration and laser lift-off. The non-specialist will learn about the basics of wafer bonding and its various application areas, while the researcher in the field will find up-to-date information about this fast-moving area, including relevant patent information.

  16. Transverse wave propagation in [ab0] direction of silicon single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Sang Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Se Ho; Kim, Young H. [Applied Acoustics Lab, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The speed and oscillation directions of elastic waves propagating in the [ab0] direction of a silicon single crystal were obtained by solving Christoffel's equation. It was found that the quasi waves propagate in the off-principal axis, and hence, the directions of the phase and group velocities are not the same. The maximum deviation of the two directions was 7.2 degree angle. Two modes of the pure transverse waves propagate in the [110] direction with different speeds, and hence, two peaks were observed in the pulse echo signal. The amplitude ratio of the two peaks was dependent on the initial oscillating direction of the incident wave. The pure and quasi-transverse waves propagate in the [210] direction, and the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. The skewing angle of the quasi wave was calculated as 7.14 degree angle, and it was measured as 9.76 degree angle. The amplitude decomposition in the [210] direction was similar to that in the [110] direction, since the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. These results offer useful information in measuring the crystal orientation of the silicon single crystal.

  17. Direct current microhollow cathode discharges on silicon devices operating in argon and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, R.; Felix, V.; Stolz, A.; Aubry, O.; Lefaucheux, P.; Dzikowski, S.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Overzet, L. J.; Dussart, R.

    2018-02-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges have been produced on silicon platforms using processes usually used for MEMS fabrication. Microreactors consist of 100 or 150 μm-diameter cavities made from Ni and SiO2 film layers deposited on a silicon substrate. They were studied in the direct current operating mode in two different geometries: planar and cavity configuration. Currents in the order of 1 mA could be injected in microdischarges operating in different gases such as argon and helium at a working pressure between 130 and 1000 mbar. When silicon was used as a cathode, the microdischarge operation was very unstable in both geometry configurations. Strong current spikes were produced and the microreactor lifetime was quite short. We evidenced the fast formation of blisters at the silicon surface which are responsible for the production of these high current pulses. EDX analysis showed that these blisters are filled with argon and indicate that an implantation mechanism is at the origin of this surface modification. Reversing the polarity of the microdischarge makes the discharge operate stably without current spikes, but the discharge appearance is quite different from the one obtained in direct polarity with the silicon cathode. By coating the silicon cathode with a 500 nm-thick nickel layer, the microdischarge becomes very stable with a much longer lifetime. No current spikes are observed and the cathode surface remains quite smooth compared to the one obtained without coating. Finally, arrays of 76 and 576 microdischarges were successfully ignited and studied in argon. At a working pressure of 130 mbar, all microdischarges are simultaneously ignited whereas they ignite one by one at higher pressure.

  18. Effects of accelerated artificial daylight aging on bending strength and bonding of glass fibers in fiber-embedded maxillofacial silicone prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effect of different periods of accelerated artificial daylight aging on bond strength of glass fiber bundles embedded into maxillofacial silicone elastomer and on bending strength of the glass fiber bundles. Forty specimens were fabricated by embedding resin-impregnated fiber bundles (1.5-mm diameter, 20-mm long) into maxillofacial silicone elastomer. Specimens were randomly allocated into four groups, and each group was subjected to different periods of accelerated daylight aging as follows (in hours); 0, 200, 400, and 600. The aging cycle included continuous exposure to quartz-filtered visible daylight (irradiance 760 W/m(2)) under an alternating weathering cycle (wet for 18 minutes, dry for 102 minutes). Pull-out tests were performed to evaluate bond strength between fiber bundles and silicone using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Also a three-point bending test was performed to evaluate bending strength of the fiber bundles. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests were carried out to detect statistical significance (p aging only. After 200 hours of exposure to artificial daylight and moisture conditions, bond strength between glass fibers and heat-cured silicones is optimal, and the bending strength of the glass fiber bundles is enhanced.

  19. Fabrication of an integrated ΔE-E-silicon detector by wafer bonding using cobalt disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thungstroem, G.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Westerberg, L.; Norlin, L.-O.; Petersson, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    The problem concerning mechanical stability of thin self-supporting ΔE detector in a ΔE-E semiconductor detector telescope, has been solved by integrating both detectors into one unit. We show here a low-cost method to integrate the detectors by wafer bonding using cobalt disilicide. The ΔE-detector has a thickness of 6.5 μm and the E detector 290 μm with an area of 24.8 mm 2 . The system was characterized with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrical measurement, particle measurement and two-dimensional electrical simulation. (orig.)

  20. Fabrication of an integrated {Delta}E-E-silicon detector by wafer bonding using cobalt disilicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thungstroem, G. [Mid-Sweden Univ., Sundsvall (Sweden). Dept. of Inf. Technol.]|[Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Electronics, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden); Veldhuizen, E.J. van [Uppsala University, Department of Radiation Science, Box 535, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Westerberg, L. [Uppsala University, The Svedberg Laboratory, Box 533, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Norlin, L.-O. [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Frescativaegen 24, S-104 05 Stockholm (Sweden); Petersson, C.S. [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Electronics, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The problem concerning mechanical stability of thin self-supporting {Delta}E detector in a {Delta}E-E semiconductor detector telescope, has been solved by integrating both detectors into one unit. We show here a low-cost method to integrate the detectors by wafer bonding using cobalt disilicide. The {Delta}E-detector has a thickness of 6.5 {mu}m and the E detector 290 {mu}m with an area of 24.8 mm{sup 2}. The system was characterized with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrical measurement, particle measurement and two-dimensional electrical simulation. (orig.).

  1. Bonding temperature dependence of GaInAsP/InP laser diode grown on hydrophilically directly bonded InP/Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Masaki; Onuki, Yuya; Hayasaka, Natsuki; Nishiyama, Tetsuo; Kamada, Naoki; Han, Xu; Kallarasan Periyanayagam, Gandhi; Uchida, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hirokazu; Shimomura, Kazuhiko

    2018-02-01

    The bonding-temperature-dependent lasing characteristics of 1.5 a µm GaInAsP laser diode (LD) grown on a directly bonded InP/Si substrate were successfully obtained. We have fabricated the InP/Si substrate using a direct hydrophilic wafer bonding technique at bonding temperatures of 350, 400, and 450 °C, and deposited GaInAsP/InP double heterostructure layers on this InP/Si substrate. The surface conditions, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and electrical characteristics after the growth were compared at these bonding temperatures. No significant differences were confirmed in X-ray diffraction analysis and PL spectra at these bonding temperatures. We realized the room-temperature lasing of the GaInAsP LD on the InP/Si substrate bonded at 350 and 400 °C. The threshold current densities were 4.65 kA/cm2 at 350 °C and 4.38 kA/cm2 at 400 °C. The electrical resistance was found to increase with annealing temperature.

  2. Cobalt-Catalyzed, Aminoquinoline-Directed sp2 C-H Bond Alkenylation by Alkynes**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorjeva, Liene; Daugulis, Olafs

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method for cobalt-catalyzed, aminoquinoline- and picolinamide-directed sp2 C-H bond alkenylation by alkynes. Method shows excellent functional group tolerance and both internal and terminal alkynes are competent substrates for the coupling. The reaction employs Co(OAc)2*4H2O catalyst, Mn(OAc)2 cocatalyst, and oxygen from air as a terminal oxidant. PMID:25060365

  3. Droplet-Assisted Laser Direct Nanoscale Writing on Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Jen Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano-structuring using laser direct writing technology has shown great potential for industrial applications. A novel application of water droplets to this technology is proposed in this paper. With a hydrophobic layer and a controlled substrate temperature, a layer of randomly distributed water droplets with a high contact angle is formed on the substrate. These liquid droplets can be used as lenses to enhance the laser intensity at the bottom of the droplets. As a result, nanoscale holes can be fabricated on the substrate by controlling the laser energy density. We successfully fabricated holes with a diameter of 600 nm at a substrate temperature of 12 ∘C and a power density of 1.2 × 108 W/cm2 in our experiments. We also found that the hole diameter was around a ninth of the water droplet diameter. Meanwhile, the machined holes are not affected much by the focal length of the lens, but a hole with less than 100 nm in diameter at the center was observed.

  4. Development of an Indium Bump Bond Process for Silicon Pixel Detectors at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Brönnimann, C; Gobrecht, J; Heising, S; Horisberger, M; Horisberger, R P; Kästli, H C; Lehmann, J; Rohe, T; Streuli, S; Broennimann, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The hybrid pixel detectors used in the high energy physics experiments currently under construction use a three dimensional connection technique, the so-called bump bonding. As the pitch below 100um, required in these applications, cannot be fullfilled with standard industrial processes (e.g. the IBM C4 process), an in-house bump bond process using reflown indium bumps was developed at PSI as part of the R&D for the CMS-pixel detector. The bump deposition on the sensor is performed in two subsequent lift-off steps. As the first photolithographic step a thin under bump metalization (UBM) is sputtered onto bump pads. It is wettable by indium and defines the diameter of the bump. The indium is evaporated via a second photolithographic step with larger openings and is reflown afterwards. The height of the balls is defined by the volume of the indium. On the readout chip only one photolithographic step is carried out to deposit the UBM and a thin indium layer for better adhesion. After mating both parts a seco...

  5. Bonding mechanism of a yttrium iron garnet film on Si without the use of an intermediate layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantzas, Konstantinos; Patriarche, Gilles; Talneau, Anne; Youssef, Jamal Ben

    2014-01-01

    Direct bonding of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) on silicon without the use of an intermediate bonding layer is demonstrated and characterized using scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. During the bonding experiment, the garnet is reduced in the presence of oxide-free silicon. As a result, a 5 nm thick SiO 2 /amorphous-YIG bilayer is formed and welds the garnet to silicon.

  6. /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling in structural investigations. VII. Substitution effects and direct carbon-carbon constants of the triple bond in acetyline derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivdin, L.B.; Proidakov, A.G.; Bazhenov, B.N.; Zinchenko, S.V.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1989-01-10

    The effects of substitution on the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants of the triple bond were studied in 100 derivatives of acetylene. It was established that these parameters exhibit increased sensitivity to the effect of substituents compared with other types of compounds. The main factor which determines their variation is the electronegativity of the substituting groups, and in individual cases the /pi/-electronic effects are appreciable. The effect of the substituents with an element of the silicon subgroup at the /alpha/ position simultaneously at the triple bond or substituent of the above-mentioned type and a halogen atom.

  7. Effect of deposition temperature on the bonding configurations and properties of fluorine doped silicon oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Ting-Wei; Huang, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen; Wang, Ming-Wei; Hung, Chen-I.; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2011-01-01

    In our study, fluorine-doped silicon oxide (SiOF) films were prepared using a mixture of SiH 4 , N 2 O, and CF 4 in a conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system at various deposition temperatures. Deposition behaviors are determined by the deposition temperature. Our results show that for temperatures below 300 deg. C the process is surface-reaction-limited controlled, but becomes diffusion-limited when the deposition temperature exceeds 300 deg. C. The surface topography images obtained using an atomic force microscope show that a large amount of free volume space was created in the film with a low temperature deposition. The optical microscope and secondary ion mass spectrometer analyses show that precipitates were produced at the near-surface at the deposition temperature of 150 deg. C with a higher fluorine concentration of 2.97 at.%. Our results show that the properties of the SiOF film are controlled not only by the free volume space but also by the fluorine concentration. An optimal SiOF film prepared at a temperature of 200 deg. C shows a low dielectric constant of 3.55, a leakage current of 1.21 x 10 -8 A/cm 2 at 1 MV/cm, and a fluorine concentration of 2.5 at.%.

  8. Organoactinides-new type of catalysts for carbon-silicon bond formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, Aswini K.; Wang, Ji.Q.; Wang, Jiaxi; Gourevich, Ilya; Eisen, Moris S.

    2002-01-01

    Organoactinide complexes of the type Cp 2 * AnMe 2 (An=Th, U) have been found to be efficient catalysts for the hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes. The chemoselectivity and regiospecificity of the reactions depend strongly on the nature of the catalyst, the nature of the alkyne, the silane substituents, the ratio between the silane and alkyne, the solvent and the reaction temperature. The hydrosilylation reaction of the terminal alkynes with PhSiH 3 at room temperature produces the trans-vinylsilane as the major product along with the silylalkyne and the corresponding alkene. At higher temperatures the cis-vinylsilane and the double hydrosilylated alkene, in which the two silicon moieties are connected at the same carbon atom, are also obtained. Replacing the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl ligand by the bridge ligation [Me 2 SiCp'' 2 ] 2- 2[Li] + (Cp''=C 5 Me 4 ) affords the synthesis of ansa-Me 2 SiCp'' 2 ThBu 2 , which was found to react extremely fast for the hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes or alkenes with PhSiH 3 . Besides the rapidity of the processes using the bridge organoactinide, as compared to Cp * 2 ThMe 2 , the chemo- and regio-selectivity of the products were increased allowing the production of only the trans-vinylsilane and the 1-silylated alkane for the hydrosilylation of alkyne and alkene, respectively. (author)

  9. Low-temperature direct heterogeneous bonding of polyether ether ketone and platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weixin; Shigetou, Akitsu; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Direct heterogeneous bonding between polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and Pt was realized at the temperatures lower than 150°C. In order to create sufficient bondability to diverse materials, the surface was modified by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation, which formed hydrate bridges. For comparison, direct bonding between surfaces atomically cleaned via Ar fast atom bombardment (FAB) was conducted in a vacuum. The VUV irradiation was found to be effective for creating an ultrathin hydrate bridge layer from the residual water molecules in the chamber. Tight bonds were formed through dehydration of the hydrate bridges by heating at 150°C, which also contributed to enhancing interdiffusion across the interface. The VUV-modified surfaces showed bondability as good as that of the FAB-treated surfaces, and the VUV-modified samples had shear strengths at the same level as those of FAB-treated surfaces. This technology will be of practical use in the packaging of lightweight, flexible biomedical devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Copper-catalyzed transformation of ketones to amides via C(CO)-C(alkyl) bond cleavage directed by picolinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haojie; Zhou, Xiaoqiang; Zhan, Zhenzhen; Wei, Daidong; Shi, Chong; Liu, Xingxing; Huang, Guosheng

    2017-09-13

    Copper catalyzed chemoselective cleavage of the C(CO)-C(alkyl) bond leading to C-N bond formation with chelation assistance of N-containing directing groups is described. Inexpensive Cu(ii)-acetate serves as a convenient catalyst for this transformation. This method highlights the emerging strategy to transform unactivated alkyl ketones into amides in organic synthesis and provides a new strategy for C-C bond cleavage.

  11. Optimization of Magnetically Driven Directional Solidification of Silicon Using Artificial Neural Networks and Gaussian Process Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dropka, N.; Holeňa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 471, 1 August (2017), s. 53-61 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01251S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : computer simulation * fluid flows * magnetic fields * directional solidification * semiconducting silicon Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016

  12. Impedimetric immunosensor for human serum albumin detection on a direct aldehyde-functionalized silicon nitride surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, David, E-mail: caballero@unistra.fr [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); University of Barcelona, Department of Electronics, C/ Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Martinez, Elena [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bausells, Joan [Centre Nacional de Microelectronica (CNM-IMB), CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Errachid, Abdelhamid, E-mail: abdelhamid.errachid-el-salhi@univ-lyon1.fr [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Universite Claude Bernard - Lyon 1, LSA - UMR 5180, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Samitier, Josep [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); University of Barcelona, Department of Electronics, C/ Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An impedimetric label-free immunosensor was developed for the specific detection of human serum albumin proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-HSA antibodies were covalently immobilized on silicon nitride surfaces using a direct functionalization methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silicon nitride offers multiple advantages compared to other common materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed sensor has high sensitivity and good selectivity for the detection of HSA proteins. - Abstract: In this work we report the fabrication and characterization of a label-free impedimetric immunosensor based on a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) surface for the specific detection of human serum albumin (HSA) proteins. Silicon nitride provides several advantages compared with other materials commonly used, such as gold, and in particular in solid-state physics for electronic-based biosensors. However, few Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-based biosensors have been developed; the lack of an efficient and direct protocol for the integration of biological elements with silicon-based substrates is still one of its the main drawbacks. Here, we use a direct functionalization method for the direct covalent binding of monoclonal anti-HSA antibodies on an aldehyde-functionalized Si-p/SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} structure. This methodology, in contrast with most of the protocols reported in literature, requires less chemical reagents, it is less time-consuming and it does not need any chemical activation. The detection capability of the immunosensor was tested by performing non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements for the specific detection of HSA proteins. Protein concentrations within the linear range of 10{sup -13}-10{sup -7} M were detected, showing a sensitivity of 0.128 {Omega} {mu}M{sup -1} and a limit of detection of 10{sup -14} M. The specificity of the sensor was also addressed by studying the

  13. Impedimetric immunosensor for human serum albumin detection on a direct aldehyde-functionalized silicon nitride surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, David; Martinez, Elena; Bausells, Joan; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Samitier, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An impedimetric label-free immunosensor was developed for the specific detection of human serum albumin proteins. ► Anti-HSA antibodies were covalently immobilized on silicon nitride surfaces using a direct functionalization methodology. ► Silicon nitride offers multiple advantages compared to other common materials. ► The proposed sensor has high sensitivity and good selectivity for the detection of HSA proteins. - Abstract: In this work we report the fabrication and characterization of a label-free impedimetric immunosensor based on a silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) surface for the specific detection of human serum albumin (HSA) proteins. Silicon nitride provides several advantages compared with other materials commonly used, such as gold, and in particular in solid-state physics for electronic-based biosensors. However, few Si 3 N 4 -based biosensors have been developed; the lack of an efficient and direct protocol for the integration of biological elements with silicon-based substrates is still one of its the main drawbacks. Here, we use a direct functionalization method for the direct covalent binding of monoclonal anti-HSA antibodies on an aldehyde-functionalized Si-p/SiO 2 /Si 3 N 4 structure. This methodology, in contrast with most of the protocols reported in literature, requires less chemical reagents, it is less time-consuming and it does not need any chemical activation. The detection capability of the immunosensor was tested by performing non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements for the specific detection of HSA proteins. Protein concentrations within the linear range of 10 −13 –10 −7 M were detected, showing a sensitivity of 0.128 Ω μM −1 and a limit of detection of 10 −14 M. The specificity of the sensor was also addressed by studying the interferences with a similar protein, bovine serum albumin. The results obtained show that the antibodies were efficiently immobilized and the proteins

  14. CO2 laser-induced directional recrystallization to produce single crystal silicon-core optical fibers with low loss

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, Noel; Fokine, Michael; Franz, Yohann; Hawkins, Thomas; Jones, Maxwell; Ballato, John; Peacock, Anna C.; Gibson, Ursula J.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced losses in silicon-core fibers are obtained using CO2 laser directional recrystallization of the core. Single crystals with aspect ratios up to 1500:1 are reported, limited by the scan range of the equipment. This processing technique holds promise for bringing crystalline silicon-core fibers to a central role in nonlinear optics and signal processing applications.

  15. Comparative study on direct and indirect bracket bonding techniques regarding time length and bracket detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Vinicius Bozelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the time spent for direct (DBB - direct bracket bonding and indirect (IBB - indirect bracket bonding bracket bonding techniques. The time length of laboratorial (IBB and clinical steps (DBB and IBB as well as the prevalence of loose bracket after a 24-week follow-up were evaluated. METHODS: Seventeen patients (7 men and 10 women with a mean age of 21 years, requiring orthodontic treatment were selected for this study. A total of 304 brackets were used (151 DBB and 153 IBB. The same bracket type and bonding material were used in both groups. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Wilcoxon non-parametric test at 5% level of significance. RESULTS: Considering the total time length, the IBB technique was more time-consuming than the DBB (p < 0.001. However, considering only the clinical phase, the IBB took less time than the DBB (p < 0.001. There was no significant difference (p = 0.910 for the time spent during laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical session for IBB in comparison to the clinical procedure for DBB. Additionally, no difference was found as for the prevalence of loose bracket between both groups. CONCLUSION: the IBB can be suggested as a valid clinical procedure since the clinical session was faster and the total time spent for laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical procedure was similar to that of DBB. In addition, both approaches resulted in similar frequency of loose bracket.

  16. Etching of enamel for direct bonding with a thulium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabaş Sarp, Ayşe S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2011-03-01

    Background: Laser etching of enamel for direct bonding can decrease the risk of surface enamel loss and demineralization which are the adverse effects of acid etching technique. However, in excess of +5.5°C can cause irreversible pulpal responses. In this study, a 1940- nm Thulium Fiber Laser in CW mode was used for laser etching. Aim: Determination of the suitable Laser parameters of enamel surface etching for direct bonding of ceramic brackets and keeping that intrapulpal temperature changes below the threshold value. Material and Method: Polycrystalline ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded on bovine teeth by using 2 different kinds of etching techniques: Acid and Laser Etching. In addition to these 3 etched groups, there was also a group which was bonded without etching. Brackets were debonded with a material testing machine. Breaking time and the load at the breaking point were measured. Intrapulpal temperature changes were recorded by a K-type Thermocouple. For all laser groups, intrapulpal temperature rise was below the threshold value of 5.5°C. Results and Conclusion: Acid-etched group ( 11.73 MPa) significantly required more debonding force than 3- second- irradiated ( 5.03 MPa) and non-etched groups ( 3.4 MPa) but the results of acid etched group and 4- second- irradiated group (7.5 MPa) showed no significant difference. Moreover, 4- second irradiated group was over the minimum acceptable value for clinical use. Also, 3- second lasing caused a significant reduction in time according to acid-etch group. As a result, 1940- nm laser irradiation is a promising method for laser etching.

  17. Tailoring the optical characteristics of microsized InP nanoneedles directly grown on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Sun, Hao; Ren, Fan; Ng, Kar Wei; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Chen, Roger; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-01-08

    Nanoscale self-assembly offers a pathway to realize heterogeneous integration of III-V materials on silicon. However, for III-V nanowires directly grown on silicon, dislocation-free single-crystal quality could only be attained below certain critical dimensions. We recently reported a new approach that overcomes this size constraint, demonstrating the growth of single-crystal InGaAs/GaAs and InP nanoneedles with the base diameters exceeding 1 μm. Here, we report distinct optical characteristics of InP nanoneedles which are varied from mostly zincblende, zincblende/wurtzite-mixed, to pure wurtzite crystalline phase. We achieved, for the first time, pure single-crystal wurtzite-phase InP nanoneedles grown on silicon with bandgaps of 80 meV larger than that of zincblende-phase InP. Being able to attain excellent material quality while scaling up in size promises outstanding device performance of these nanoneedles. At room temperature, a high internal quantum efficiency of 25% and optically pumped lasing are demonstrated for single nanoneedle as-grown on silicon substrate. Recombination dynamics proves the excellent surface quality of the InP nanoneedles, which paves the way toward achieving multijunction photovoltaic cells, long-wavelength heterostructure lasers, and advanced photonic integrated circuits.

  18. Characteristics of thin-film transistors based on silicon nitride passivation by excimer laser direct patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chao-Nan; Huang, Jung-Jie

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the removal of silicon nitride using KrF laser ablation technology with a high threshold fluence of 990 mJ/cm 2 . This technology was used for contact hole patterning to fabricate SiN x -passivation-based amorphous-silicon thin films in a transistor device. Compared to the photolithography process, laser direct patterning using KrF laser ablation technology can reduce the number of process steps by at least three. Experimental results showed that the mobility and threshold voltages of thin film transistors patterned using the laser process were 0.16 cm 2 /V-sec and 0.2 V, respectively. The device performance and the test results of gate voltage stress reliability demonstrated that laser direct patterning is a promising alternative to photolithography in the panel manufacturing of thin-film transistors for liquid crystal displays. - Highlights: ► KrF laser ablation technology is used to remove silicon nitride. ► A simple method for direct patterning contact-hole in thin-film-transistor device. ► Laser technology reduced processing by at least three steps

  19. Observation of internucleotide NH...N hydrogen bonds in the absence of directly detectable protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Ananya; Kettani, Abdelali; Skripkin, Eugene; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    1999-01-01

    Several structural motifs found in nucleic acids involve N-H ... N hydrogen bonds in which the donor hydrogens are broadened to extinction due to chemical or conformational exchange. In such situations, it is impossible to use the well-established HNN-COSY or soft HNN-COSY experiments, which report the presence of the hydrogen bond directly on the donor proton(s). We present a pulse sequence, H(CN)N(H), for alleviating this problem in hydrogen bonds of the type N d H ... N a -CH, in which the donor N d nitrogen is correlated with the corresponding non-exchangeable C-H proton associated with the acceptor N a nitrogen. In this way, missing N d H ... N a correlations in an HNN-COSY spectrum may be recovered from CH-N d correlations in the H(CN)N(H) spectrum. By correlating a different set of nuclei relative to the HNN-COSY class of experiments, the H(CN)N(H) experiment also serves to remove ambiguities associated with degeneracies in HNN-COSY spectra. The technique is demonstrated on d(GGAGGAG) 4 ,a quadruplex containing a novel A . (G . G . G . G) . A hexad and on d(GGGCAGGT) 4 , containing a G . C . G . C tetrad, in which missing NH 2 ... N7 correlations are retrieved via H8-(N2,N6) correlations in the H(CN)N(H) spectrum

  20. Cobalt-catalyzed, aminoquinoline-directed C(sp²)-H bond alkenylation by alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorjeva, Liene; Daugulis, Olafs

    2014-09-15

    A method for cobalt-catalyzed, aminoquinoline- and picolinamide-directed C(sp(2))-H bond alkenylation by alkynes was developed. The method shows excellent functional-group tolerance and both internal and terminal alkynes are competent substrates for the coupling. The reaction employs a Co(OAc)2⋅4 H2O catalyst, Mn(OAc)2 co-catalyst, and oxygen (from air) as a terminal oxidant. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Direct calculation of self-consistent π bond orders in conjugated systems and pairing relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Pairing relations in excited states of conjugated systems which satisfy to a given symmetry with a Pariser-Parr-Pople-like (PPP) calculation are studied. Six π - electron systems are considered having a symmetry axis which does not cross π centers following a treatment which permits the direct obtainment of the bond order matrix based on Hall's method. Pairing relations are looked for, too, using particular solutions when U(3) groups is applied. Pyridazine molecules are used in order to test the results. (L.C.) [pt

  2. Formation of III–V-on-insulator structures on Si by direct wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Masafumi; Iida, Ryo; Ikku, Yuki; Kim, Sanghyeon; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Takagi, Hideki; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Yamada, Hisashi; Ichikawa, Osamu; Fukuhara, Noboru; Hata, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the formation of III–V-compound-semiconductors-on-insulator (III–V-OI) structures with thin buried oxide (BOX) layers on Si wafers by using developed direct wafer bonding (DWB). In order to realize III–V-OI MOSFETs with ultrathin body and extremely thin body (ETB) InGaAs-OI channel layers and ultrathin BOX layers, we have developed an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) O 2 plasma-assisted DWB process with ECR sputtered SiO 2 BOX layers and a DWB process based on atomic-layer-deposition Al 2 O 3 (ALD-Al 2 O 3 ) BOX layers. It is essential to suppress micro-void generation during wafer bonding process to achieve excellent wafer bonding. We have found that major causes of micro-void generation in DWB processes with ECR-SiO 2 and ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers are desorption of Ar and H 2 O gas, respectively. In order to suppress micro-void generation in the ECR-SiO 2 BOX layers, it is effective to introduce the outgas process before bonding wafers. On the other hand, it is a possible solution for suppressing micro-void generation in the ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers to increase the deposition temperature of the ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers. It is also another possible solution to deposit ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers on thermally oxidized SiO 2 layers, which can absorb the desorption gas from ALD-Al 2 O 3 BOX layers. (invited paper)

  3. Performance limits of direct cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators - experimental results at the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-K.; Fernandez, P.; Mills, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The successful use of cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators at third-generation synchrotron facilities is well documented. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) it has been shown that, at 100 mA operation with the standard APS undulator A, the cryogenically cooled silicon monochromator performs very well with minimal (<2 arcsec) or no observable thermal distortions. However, to date there has not been any systematic experimental study on the performance limits of this approach. This paper presents experimental results on the performance limits of these directly cooled crystals. The results show that if the beam is limited to the size of the radiation central cone then, at the APS, the crystal will still perform well at twice the present 100 mA single 2.4 m-long 3.3 cm-period undulator heat load. However, the performance would degrade rapidly if a much larger incident white-beam size is utilized

  4. Silicon Mie resonators for highly directional light emission from monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, Ahmet Fatih; Curto, Alberto G.; Raza, Søren; Kik, Pieter G.; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2018-05-01

    Controlling light emission from quantum emitters has important applications, ranging from solid-state lighting and displays to nanoscale single-photon sources. Optical antennas have emerged as promising tools to achieve such control right at the location of the emitter, without the need for bulky, external optics. Semiconductor nanoantennas are particularly practical for this purpose because simple geometries such as wires and spheres support multiple, degenerate optical resonances. Here, we start by modifying Mie scattering theory developed for plane wave illumination to describe scattering of dipole emission. We then use this theory and experiments to demonstrate several pathways to achieve control over the directionality, polarization state and spectral emission that rely on a coherent coupling of an emitting dipole to optical resonances of a silicon nanowire. A forward-to-backward ratio of 20 was demonstrated for the electric dipole emission at 680 nm from a monolayer MoS2 by optically coupling it to a silicon nanowire.

  5. Fabrication of multi-functional silicon surface by direct laser writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashwani Kumar; Soni, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    We present a simple, quick and one-step methodology based on nano-second laser direct writing for the fabrication of micro-nanostructures on silicon surface. The fabricated surfaces suppress the optical reflection by multiple reflection due to light trapping effect to a much lower value than polished silicon surface. These textured surfaces offer high enhancement ability after gold nanoparticle deposition and then explored for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for specific molecular detection. The effect of laser scanning line interval on optical reflection and SERS signal enhancement ability was also investigated. Our results indicate that low optical reflection substrates exhibit uniform SERS enhancement with enhancement factor of the order of 106. Furthermore, this methodology provide an alternative approach for cost-effective large area fabrication with good control over feature size.

  6. Micro direct methanol fuel cell with perforated silicon-plate integrated ionomer membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and characterization of a silicon based micro direct methanol fuel cell using a Nafion ionomer membrane integrated into a perforated silicon plate. The focus of this work is to provide a platform for micro- and nanostructuring of a combined current collector...... at a perforation ratio of 40.3%. The presented fuel cells also show a high volumetric peak power density of 2 mW cm−3 in light of the small system volume of 480 μL, while being fully self contained and passively feed....... and catalytic electrode. AC impedance spectroscopy is utilized alongside IV characterization to determine the influence of the plate perforation geometries on the cell performance. It is found that higher ratios of perforation increases peak power density, with the highest achieved being 2.5 mW cm−2...

  7. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazal, I.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are

  8. Investigation on cold-drawn gold bonding wire with serial and reverse-direction drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae-Hyung; Rollett, A.D.; Cho, J.-S.; Park, Y.-J.; Park, S.-H.; Oh, K.H.

    2006-01-01

    Gold bonding wires have been manufactured through multiple drawing steps with serial and reverse-direction drawing. The texture and microstructure of the gold bonding wires were characterized with X-ray diffraction and EBSD and compared with the predictions of finite element (FE) simulation. Initial fiber decreases during drawing and is replaced by fiber. The oriented grains are concentrated in the center and surface regions, whereas the oriented grains are located throughout the cross-section of the wire. Regions near the surface often exhibit the complex textures. A simplified forward and backward drawing process was modeled by FE analysis with ABAQUS/Standard TM . The simple two-step drawing process results in severe variation in shear strain under the surface and displays the opposite behavior in the shear components of the deformation gradient. The texture evolution was predicted using the deformation gradient calculated in the FE simulations together with a model of polycrystal plasticity. The and fibers are predicted to develop in the center part of the wire where homogeneous deformation occurs. The regions near the surface that experience repeated shear strain exhibit complex textures that deviate from the standard and fibers. The {1 1 2} and {1 1 1} components are prevalent in the higher shear strain regions. The variations of the anisotropic elastic directional moduli with position were also calculated

  9. Batch fabrication of polymer microfluidic cartridges for QCM sensor packaging by direct bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, Niklas; Zandi Shafagh, Reza; Gylfason, Kristinn B.; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2017-12-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensing is an established technique commonly used in laboratory based life-science applications. However, the relatively complex, multi-part design and multi-step fabrication and assembly of state-of-the-art QCM cartridges make them unsuited for disposable applications such as point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics. In this work, we present the uncomplicated manufacturing of QCMs in polymer microfluidic cartridges. Our novel approach comprises two key innovations: the batch reaction injection molding of microfluidic parts; and the integration of the cartridge components by direct, unassisted bonding. We demonstrate molding of batches of 12 off-stoichiometry thiol-ene epoxy polymer (OSTE+) polymer parts in a single molding cycle using an adapted reaction injection molding process; and the direct bonding of the OSTE+  parts to other OSTE+  substrates, to printed circuit boards, and to QCMs. The microfluidic QCM OSTE+  cartridges were successfully evaluated in terms of liquid sealing as well as electrical properties, and the sensor performance characteristics are on par with those of a commercially available QCM biosensor cartridge. The simplified manufacturing of QCM sensors with maintained performance potentializes novel application areas, e.g. as disposable devices in a point of care setting. Moreover, our results can be extended to simplifying the fabrication of other microfluidic devices with multiple heterogeneously integrated components.

  10. Fabrication And Determination Of Coefficient Absorption Of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon By Direct Evaporation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Agus; Darsono; Sujitno, Tjipto; Suprapto

    1996-01-01

    Fabrication and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by direct evaporation method have been done. The experiment was carried out at pressure conditions of 2 x 10-5 torr, RF frequency of 13.56 MHz, hydrogen gas flow of 0,8 1/minute, electrode distance of 2.48 cm. voltage electrode of 700 volt and evaporation time 1.45 minute. Using UV-VIS spectrophotometer, it is found that at wavelength of 359 nm, the absorbance degree of material that was by direct hydrogenated method was 0,886. This means that more hydrogen are absorbed by direct method While, if the hydrogenation is carried out by means of indirect method, the degree of absorbance at the wavelength of 359 nm is 0,103. From this result, it can be concluded that the direct methods is better than indirect method

  11. Research progress of III-V laser bonding to Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Ren; Yan, Hou; Yanan, Liang

    2016-12-01

    The vigorous development of silicon photonics makes a silicon-based light source essential for optoelectronics' integration. Bonding of III-V/Si hybrid laser has developed rapidly in the last ten years. In the tireless efforts of researchers, we are privileged to see these bonding methods, such as direct bonding, medium adhesive bonding and low temperature eutectic bonding. They have been developed and applied to the research and fabrication of III-V/Si hybrid lasers. Some research groups have made remarkable progress. Tanabe Katsuaki of Tokyo University successfully implemented a silicon-based InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser with direct bonding method in 2012. They have bonded the InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser to the silicon substrate and the silicon ridge waveguide, respectively. The threshold current of the device is as low as 200 A/cm2. Stevan Stanković and Sui Shaoshuai successfully produced a variety of hybrid III-V/Si laser with the method of BCB bonding, respectively. BCB has high light transmittance and it can provide high bonding strength. Researchers of Tokyo University and Peking University have realized III-V/Si hybrid lasers with metal bonding method. We describe the progress in the fabrication of III-V/Si hybrid lasers with bonding methods by various research groups in recent years. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are presented. We also introduce the progress of the growth of III-V epitaxial layer on silicon substrate, which is also a promising method to realize silicon-based light source. I hope that readers can have a general understanding of this field from this article and we can attract more researchers to focus on the study in this field.

  12. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  13. Electrostatic bonding of thin (cycle sine 3 mil) 7070 cover glass to Ta2O5 AR-coated thin (cycle sine 2 mil) silicon wafers and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelkrout, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding of thin cover glass to thin solar cells was researched. Silicon solar cells, wafers, and Corning 7070 glass of from about 0.002" to about 0.003" in thickness were used in the investigation to establish optimum parameters for producing mechanically acceptable bonds while minimizing thermal stresses and resultant solar cell electrical parameter degradation.

  14. Broadband Silicon-On-Insulator directional couplers using a combination of straight and curved waveguide sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, George F R; Ong, Jun Rong; Ang, Thomas Y L; Lim, Soon Thor; Png, Ching Eng; Tan, Dawn T H

    2017-08-03

    Broadband Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) directional couplers are designed based on a combination of curved and straight coupled waveguide sections. A design methodology based on the transfer matrix method (TMM) is used to determine the required coupler section lengths, radii, and waveguide cross-sections. A 50/50 power splitter with a measured bandwidth of 88 nm is designed and fabricated, with a device footprint of 20 μm × 3 μm. In addition, a balanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer is fabricated showing an extinction ratio of >16 dB over 100 nm of bandwidth.

  15. Directly-deposited blocking filters for high-performance silicon x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, M.; Kissel, S.; Masterson, R.; Ryu, K.; Suntharalingam, V.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon X-ray detectors often require blocking filters to mitigate noise and out-of-band signal from UV and visible backgrounds. Such filters must be thin to minimize X-ray absorption, so direct deposition of filter material on the detector entrance surface is an attractive approach to fabrication of robust filters. On the other hand, the soft (E OD 6) care must be taken to prevent light from entering the sides and mounting surfaces of the detector. Our methods have been used to deposit filters on the detectors of the REXIS instrument scheduled to fly on OSIRIS-ReX later this year.

  16. Investigation of silicon width (p, p') resonance scattering in left angle 110 right angle channeling direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditroi, F.; Meyer, J.D.; Michelmann, R.; Kislat, D.; Bethge, K.

    1994-01-01

    Crystalline silicon samples were investigated both in channeling and random directions by using the (p, p') resonance scattering at 2.3 MeV bombarding energy. The samples were positioned in the scattering chamber of a VdG accelerator after 2 m collimating path. The peaks due to the resonance at 2.1 MeV were measured at different angles in the vicinity of the channeling and random directions. A peak shift and broadening was seen at the channeling and near channeling directions compared with the random one. The spectra were also simulated using our modified Monte Carlo calculation method for stopping, range and energy distribution in highly ordered materials. The energy shift and the broadening between the random and the channeling spectra were compared and explained. (orig.)

  17. The application of bonded magnet MQP-0 on an electrical direct current motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridwan; Mujamilah; Gunawan

    2002-01-01

    Isotropic bonded magnet materials using NdFeB produced by rapid quench method, has advantages that can be easily adapted to the costumer demand. The synthesized bonded magnets are mixed of cpoxy resin or polyester as matrix binder with powder magnet of MQP-O The proportions of polymer and magnetic powder are 4060; 50:50; and 6040 volume % of magnet composites. The characterization of magnetic properties was determined by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) at P3IB-BATAN and the density was measured by piknometer. The highest energy product maximum, (BH) m ax of magnet composite synthesized by P3IB-BATAN in this activity is 435 MGOeThe quality of magnet components has been tested empirically by changing the magnetic components of an electric direct current motor found in the local market by magnetic components synthesized by P 3IB-BA TAN. The max imum rotation resulted by using P3IB-BATAN is 40 0 00 rpm The magnetic components synthesized in these research activities are functionally work and comparatively the same with the magnetic components found in the local market as an import commodities

  18. Directionality of Cation/Molecule Bonding in Lewis Bases Containing the Carbonyl Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeigi, Younes; Gal, Jean-François

    2017-09-14

    Relationship between the C═O-X + (X = H, Li, Na, K, Al, Cu) angle and covalent characteristic of the X + -M (M = CH 2 O, CH 3 CHO, acetone, imidazol-2-one (C 2 H 2 N 2 O), cytosine, γ-butyrolactone) was investigated, theoretically. The calculated electron densities ρ at the bond critical points revealed that the covalency of the M-X + interaction depended on the nature of the cation and varied as H + > Cu + > Al + > Li + > Na + > K + . The alkali cations tended to participate in electrostatic interactions and aligned with the direction of the molecule dipole or local dipole of C═O group to form linear C═O-X geometries. Because of overlapping with lone-pair electrons of the sp 2 carbonyl oxygen, the H + and Cu + formed a bent C═O-X angle. Al + displayed an intermediate behavior; the C═O-Al angle was 180° in [CH 2 O/Al] + (mainly electrostatic), but when the angle was bent (146°) under the effect of local dipole of an adjacent imine group in cytosine, the covalency of the CO-Al + interaction increased. The C═O-X angles in M/X + adduct ions were scanned in different O-X bond lengths. It was found that the most favorable C═O-X angle depended on the O-X bond length. This dependency was attributed to variation of covalent and electrostatic contributions with O-X distance. In addition, the structures of [CH 2 S/X] + and [CH 2 Se/X] + were studied, and only bent C═S-X and C═Se-X angles were obtained for all cations, although the dipole vectors of CH 2 S and CH 2 Se coincide with the C═S and C═Se bonds. The bending of the C═S-X and C═Se-X angles was attributed to the covalent characteristic of S-X and Se-X interactions due to high polarizability of S and Se atoms.

  19. The direct determination of double bond positions in lipid mixtures by liquid chromatography/in-line ozonolysis/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Chenxing; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Curtis, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An ozonolysis reactor was coupled in-line with mass spectrometry (O 3 -MS). ► Double bond positions in FAME were determined unambiguously without standards. ► LC directly connected to O 3 -MS allowed double bond localization in lipid mixtures. ► LC/O 3 -MS applied to bovine fat demonstrated practical use in lipid analysis. -- Abstract: The direct determination of double bond positions in unsaturated lipids using in-line ozonolysis-mass spectrometry (O 3 -MS) is described. In this experiment, ozone penetrates through the semi-permeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing containing a flow of a solution of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Unsaturated FAME are thus oxidized by the ozone and cleaved at the double bond positions. The ozonolysis products then flow directly into the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source of a mass spectrometer for analysis. Aldehyde products retaining the methyl ester group are indicative of the double bond positions in unsaturated FAME. For the first time, O 3 -MS is able to couple directly to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), making the double bond localization in lipid mixtures possible. The application of LC/O 3 -MS has been demonstrated for a fat sample from bovine adipose tissue. A total of 9 unsaturated FAME including 6 positional isomers were identified unambiguously, without comparison to standards. The in-line ozonolysis reaction apparatus is applicable to most mass spectrometers without instrumental modification; it is also directly compatible with various LC columns. The LC/O 3 -MS method described here is thus a practical, versatile and easy to use new approach to the direct determination of double bond positions in lipids, even in complex mixtures

  20. The direct determination of double bond positions in lipid mixtures by liquid chromatography/in-line ozonolysis/mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Chenxing; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan [Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2P5 (Canada); Curtis, Jonathan M., E-mail: jcurtis1@ualberta.ca [Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2P5 (Canada)

    2013-01-31

    Highlights: ► An ozonolysis reactor was coupled in-line with mass spectrometry (O{sub 3}-MS). ► Double bond positions in FAME were determined unambiguously without standards. ► LC directly connected to O{sub 3}-MS allowed double bond localization in lipid mixtures. ► LC/O{sub 3}-MS applied to bovine fat demonstrated practical use in lipid analysis. -- Abstract: The direct determination of double bond positions in unsaturated lipids using in-line ozonolysis-mass spectrometry (O{sub 3}-MS) is described. In this experiment, ozone penetrates through the semi-permeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing containing a flow of a solution of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Unsaturated FAME are thus oxidized by the ozone and cleaved at the double bond positions. The ozonolysis products then flow directly into the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source of a mass spectrometer for analysis. Aldehyde products retaining the methyl ester group are indicative of the double bond positions in unsaturated FAME. For the first time, O{sub 3}-MS is able to couple directly to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), making the double bond localization in lipid mixtures possible. The application of LC/O{sub 3}-MS has been demonstrated for a fat sample from bovine adipose tissue. A total of 9 unsaturated FAME including 6 positional isomers were identified unambiguously, without comparison to standards. The in-line ozonolysis reaction apparatus is applicable to most mass spectrometers without instrumental modification; it is also directly compatible with various LC columns. The LC/O{sub 3}-MS method described here is thus a practical, versatile and easy to use new approach to the direct determination of double bond positions in lipids, even in complex mixtures.

  1. Direct {sup 13}C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürtig, Boris, E-mail: fuertig@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ), Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (Germany); Kovacs, Helena [Bruker BioSpin (Switzerland); Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ), Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond {sup 1}H detection. Here, we develop {sup 13}C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for {sup 13}C direct detection allows correlations of donor–acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed {sup 13}C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  2. Carbon out-diffusion mechanism for direct graphene growth on a silicon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung-Sung; Lee, Jong Woon; Jang, Yamujin; Choi, Soon Hyung; Cha, Seung Nam; Sohn, Jung Inn; Kim, Jong Min; Joo, Won-Jae; Hwang, Sungwoo; Whang, Dongmok

    2015-01-01

    Direct growth of graphene on silicon (Si) through chemical vapor deposition has predominantly focused on surface-mediated processes due to the low carbon (C) solubility in Si. However, a considerable quantity of C atoms was incorporated in Si and formed Si 1−x C x alloy with a reduced lattice dimension even in the initial stage of direct graphene growth. Subsequent high temperature annealing promoted active C out-diffusion, resulting in the formation of a graphitic layer on the Si surface. Furthermore, the significantly low thermal conductivity of the Si 1−x C x alloy shows that the incorporated C atoms affect the properties of a semiconductor adjacent to the graphene. These findings provide a key guideline for controlling desirable properties of graphene and designing hybrid semiconductor/graphene architectures for various applications

  3. Temperature and directional dependences of the infrared dielectric function of free standing silicon nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazan, M.; Bruyant, A.; Sedaghat, Z.; Arnaud, L.; Blaize, S.; Royer, P. [Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, Institut Charles Delaunay, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, CNRS FRE 2848, 12 Rue Marie Curie, 10010 Troyes, Cedex (France)

    2011-03-15

    An approach to calculate the infrared dielectric function of semiconductor nanostructures is presented and applied to silicon (Si) nanowires (NW's). The phonon modes symmetries and frequencies are calculated by means of the elastic continuum medium theory. The modes strengths and damping are calculated from a model for lattice dynamics and perturbation theory. The data are used in anisotropic Lorentz oscillator model to generate the temperature and directional dependences of the infrared dielectric function of free standing Si NW's. Our results showed that in the direction perpendicular to the NW axis, the complex dielectric function is identical to that of bulk Si. However, along the NW axis, the infrared dielectric function is a strong function of the wavelength. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Fabrication of 2 × 8 power splitters in silica-on-silicon by the direct UV writing technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivero, Massimo; Svalgaard, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, we present the first demonstration of 2 × 8 power splitters made in silica-on-silicon by direct ultraviolet (UV) writing. The fabricated components are compact and exhibit good performance in terms of loss, uniformity, and bandwidth, showing that direct UV writing can become...

  5. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  6. Formation and growth of crystal defects in directionally solidified multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryningen, Birgit

    2008-07-01

    Included in this thesis are five publications and one report. The common theme is characterisation of directionally solidified multicrystalline silicon for solar cells. Material characterisation of solar cell silicon is naturally closely linked to both the casting process and to the solar cell processing: Many of the material properties are determined by the casting process, and the solar cell processing will to some extend determine which properties will influence the solar cell performance. Solar grade silicon (SoG-Si) made by metallurgical refining route and supplied by Elkem Solar was directionally solidified and subsequently characterised, and a simple solar cell process was applied. Except from some metallic co-precipitates in the top of the ingot, no abnormalities were found, and it is suggested that within the limits of the tests performed in this thesis, the casting and the solar cell processing, rather than the assumed higher impurity content, was the limiting factor. It is suggested in this thesis that the main quality problem in multicrystalline silicon wafers is the existence of dislocation clusters covering large wafer areas. The clusters will reduce the effect of gettering and even if gettering could be performed successfully, the clusters will still reduce the minority carrier mobility and hence the solar cell performance. It has further been pointed out that ingots solidified under seemingly equal conditions might have a pronounced difference in minority carrier lifetime. Ingots with low minority carrier lifetime have high dislocation densities. The ingots with the substantially higher lifetime seem all to be dominated by twins. It is also found a link between a higher undercooling and the ingots dominated by twins. It is suggested that the two types of ingots are subject to different nucleation and crystal growth mechanisms: For the ingots dominated by dislocations, which are over represented, the crystal growth is randomly nucleated at the

  7. Control of the Gas Flow in an Industrial Directional Solidification Furnace for Production of High Purity Multicrystalline Silicon Ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A crucible cover was designed as gas guidance to control the gas flow in an industrial directional solidification furnace for producing high purity multicrystalline silicon. Three cover designs were compared to investigate their effect on impurity transport in the furnace and contamination of the silicon melt. Global simulations of coupled oxygen (O and carbon (C transport were carried out to predict the SiO and CO gases in the furnace as well as the O and C distributions in the silicon melt. Cases with and without chemical reaction on the cover surfaces were investigated. It was found that the cover design has little effect on the O concentration in the silicon melt; however, it significantly influences CO gas transport in the furnace chamber and C contamination in the melt. For covers made of metal or with a coating on their surfaces, an optimal cover design can produce a silicon melt free of C contamination. Even for a graphite cover without a coating, the carbon concentration in the silicon melt can be reduced by one order of magnitude. The simulation results demonstrate a method to control the contamination of C impurities in an industrial directional solidification furnace by crucible cover design.

  8. Incorporation of in-plane interconnects to reflow bonding for electrical functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moğulkoç, B; Jansen, H V; Ter Brake, H J M; Elwenspoek, M C

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of in-plane electrical interconnects to reflow bonding is studied to provide electrical functionality to lab-on-a-chip or microfluidic devices. Reflow bonding is the packaging technology, in which glass tubes are joined to silicon substrates at elevated temperatures. The tubes are used to interface the silicon-based fluidic devices and are directly compatible with standard Swagelok® connectors. After the bonding, the electrically conductive lines will allow probing into the volume confined by the tube, where the fluidic device operates. Therefore methods for fabricating electrical interconnects that survive the bonding procedure at elevated temperature and do not alter the properties of the bond interface are investigated

  9. Directing polyallylamine adsorption on microlens array patterned silicon for microarray fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Gaurav; Gates, Richard; Asplund, Matthew C; Blair, Steve; Attavar, Sachin; Linford, Matthew R

    2009-06-21

    The selective adsorption of reagents is often essential for bioarray and lab-on-a-chip type devices. As the starting point for a bioarray, alkyl monolayer terminated silicon shards were photopatterned in a few nanoseconds with thousands of wells (spots) using an optical element, a microlens array. Polyallylamine (PAAm), a primary amine containing polymer, adsorbed with little selectivity to the spots, i.e., silicon oxide, over the hydrophobic background. However, at appropriate concentrations, addition of a cationic surfactant to the PAAm deposition solution, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, prevented the nonspecific adsorption of PAAm onto the hydrophobic monolayer, while directing it effectively to the active spots on the device. A nonionic surfactant was less effective in preventing the nonspecific adsorption of PAAm onto the hydrophobic monolayer. The localized reactions/interactions of adsorbed PAAm with four species that are useful for bioconjugate chemistry: glutaric anhydride, phenylenediisothiocyanate, biotin NHS ester, and an oligonucleotide (DNA) were shown in the spots of an array. The reactivity of PAAm was further demonstrated with an isocyanate. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) played an important role in confirming selective surface reactivity and adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spectroscopic ellipsometry, and wetting confirmed PAAm reactivity on planar substrates.

  10. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  11. Biofunctionalization on Alkylated Silicon Substrate Surfaces via “Click” Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Guoting; Santos, Catherine; Zhang, Wen; Li, Yan; Kumar, Amit; Erasquin, Uriel J.; Liu, Kai; Muradov, Pavel; Trautner, Barbara Wells; Cai, Chengzhi

    2010-01-01

    Biofunctionalization of silicon substrates is important to the development of silicon-based biosensors and devices. Compared to conventional organosiloxane films on silicon oxide intermediate layers, organic monolayers directly bound to the non-oxidized silicon substrates via Si-C bonds enhance the sensitivity of detection and the stability against hydrolytic cleavage. Such monolayers presenting a high density of terminal alkynyl groups for bioconjugation via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3...

  12. Design, simulation and fabrication of a flexible bond pad with a hollow annular protuberance to improve the thermal fatigue lifetime for through-silicon vias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guilian; Ding, Guifu; Luo, Jiangbo; Niu, Di; Zhao, Junhong; Zhao, Xiaolin; Wang, Yan; Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a flexible bond pad (FBP) with a hollow annular protuberance to improve the thermal fatigue lifetime for its application to through-silicon vias (TSVs). The hollow annular protuberance structure across the interface between the filled copper in TSV and silicon substrate not only isolates the FBP from stress/strain concentration regions (the corners of the TSV) but also disperses TSV-induced deformation. The plastic strain distributions of the FBP and conventional plate-type bond pad (CPBP) were simulated by finite element method (FEM) under the temperature cycles. Based on the simulation results, the thermal fatigue lifetimes of the CPBP and the FBP with different TSV diameters were predicted by the Coffin–Manson equation. The results indicate that thermal fatigue lifetimes of the FBP are significantly greater than those of the CPBP and their fatigue lifetimes both decrease with the increase of TSV diameter. To examine the reliability of the predicted results, the CPBP and the FBP with TSV diameter of 100 µm were fabricated by MEMS technology and temperature cycling tests (TCTs) were performed to obtain their thermal fatigue lifetimes. The test results are in good agreement with the numerical simulation results, and it shows that the proposed FBP can effectively improve the thermal fatigue lifetime for TSVs. (paper)

  13. Direct measurements of the velocity and thickness of ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Pennycook, S.J.; Withrow, S.P.; Mashburn, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous infrared (1152 nm) and visible (633 nm) reflectivity measurements with nanosecond resolution were used to study the initial formation and subsequent motion of pulsed KrF laser-induced ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in ion implantation-amorphized silicon. The buried layer velocity decreases with depth below the surface, but increases with KrF laser energy density; a maximum velocity of about 14 m/s was observed, implying an undercooling-velocity relationship of approx. 14 K/(m/s). Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to form a direct chemical image of implanted Cu ions transported by the buried layer and showed that the final buried layer thickness was <15 nm

  14. Towards graphite-free hot zone for directional solidification of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropka, Natasha; Buchovska, Iryna; Herrmann-Geppert, Iris; Klimm, Detlef; Kiessling, Frank M.; Degenhardt, Ulrich

    2018-06-01

    The reduction of SiC, Si3N4 and transition metals impurities in directionally solidified Si ingots poses one of the crucial challenges in the solar cells production. Particularly strong contamination comes from the graphite parts in the hot zone. Therefore, we selected three massive ceramic materials to replace graphite, developed the novel design of the crucible support and cover and compared the crystals grown in them with ingots from the standard graphite design. The experiments were performed for phosphorus n-doped silicon of G0 size. The ingots were compared with respect to O- and C-content, metal impurities, resistivity and lifetime. The superior performance of TiC relative to other ceramics was observed, particularly due to the lower concentration of substitutional carbon in Si ingot (up to 2.6 times) and the higher minority carrier lifetime of (up to 4.4 times) with narrow red zones.

  15. Laser etching of enamel for direct bonding - An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh K Reddy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the shear bond strength of mesh shaped stainless steel orthodontic brackets, bonded to acid etched enamel and laser etched enamel and to compare the shear bond strength following acid etching and laser etching. 50 non carious extracted premolar teeth divided in to 5 groups of 10 each were employed in the study. The buccal surfaces of group - I were subjected to conventional etching using 37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds, while the other four groups were subjected to Nd:YAG laser etching at different power settings of 80mj, 100mj, 150mj and 200mj respectively for 15 seconds. Brackets were later bonded on to these teeth using Ultimate- light curing primer and adhesive. The shear bond strength of each sample was determined using a universal testing machine and the results were evaluated.

  16. Locally measuring the adhesion of InP directly bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantzas, K; Patriarche, G; Beaudoin, G; Itawi, A; Sagnes, I; Talneau, A; Bourhis, E Le; Troadec, D

    2016-01-01

    A nano-scale analogue to the double cantilever experiment that combines instrumented nano-indentation and atomic force microscopy is used to precisely and locally measure the adhesion of InP bonded on sub-100 nm patterned Si using oxide-free or oxide-mediated bonding. Surface-bonding energies of 0.548 and 0.628 J m"−"2, respectively, are reported. These energies correspond in turn to 51% and 57% of the surface bonding energy measured in unpatterned regions on the same samples, i.e. the proportion of unetched Si surface in the patterned areas. The results show that bonding on patterned surfaces can be as robust as on unpatterned surfaces, provided care is taken with the post-patterning surface preparation process and, therefore, open the path towards innovative designs that include patterns embedded in the Si guiding layer of hybrid III-V/Si photonic integrated circuits. (paper)

  17. Comprehensive Die Shear Test of Silicon Packages Bonded by Thermocompression of Al Layers with Thin Sn Capping or Insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Satoh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermocompression bonding for wafer-level hermetic packaging was demonstrated at the lowest temperature of 370 to 390 °C ever reported using Al films with thin Sn capping or insertions as bonding layer. For shrinking the chip size of MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems, a smaller size of wafer-level packaging and MEMS–ASIC (application specific integrated circuit integration are of great importance. Metal-based bonding under the temperature of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor backend process is a key technology, and Al is one of the best candidates for bonding metal in terms of CMOS compatibility. In this study, after the thermocompression bonding of two substrates, the shear fracture strength of dies was measured by a bonding tester, and the shear-fractured surfaces were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope, EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and a surface profiler to clarify where the shear fracture took place. We confirmed two kinds of fracture mode. One mode is Si bulk fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 41.6 to 209 MPa, proportionally depending on the area of Si fracture. The other mode is bonding interface fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 32.8 to 97.4 MPa. Regardless of the fracture modes, the minimum die shear strength is practical for wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  18. Analysis of Silicones Released from Household Items and Baby Articles by Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jürgen H.

    2015-03-01

    Direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS) enables screening of articles of daily use made of polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS), commonly known as silicone rubber, to assess their tendency to release low molecular weight silicone oligomers. DART-MS analyses were performed on a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Flexible silicone baking molds, a watch band, and a dough scraper, as baby articles different brands of pacifiers, nipples, and a teething ring have been examined. While somewhat arbitrarily chosen, the set can be regarded as representative of household items, baby articles, and other objects made of silicone rubber. For comparison, two brands of silicone septa and as blanks a glass slide and a latex pacifier were included. Differences between the objects were mainly observed in terms of molecular weight distribution and occasional release of other compounds in addition to PDMS. Other than that, all objects made of silicone rubber released significant amounts of PDMS during DART analysis. To provide a coarse quantification, a calibration based on silicone oil was established, which delivered PDMS losses from 20 μg to >100 μg during the 16-s period per measurement. Also, the extraction of baking molds in rapeseed oil demonstrated a PDMS release at the level of 1 μg mg-1. These findings indicate a potential health hazard from frequent or long-term use of such items. This work does not intend to blame certain brands of such articles. Nonetheless, a higher level of awareness of this source of daily silicone intake is suggested.

  19. Self-assembly of alkanethiolates directs sulfur bonding with GaAs(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancheno-Posso, Pablo; Muscat, Anthony J., E-mail: muscat@email.arizona.edu

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Alkanethiolate monolayers were formed on GaAs(100) using a 20 min liquid immersion. • The longest chain containing 20 CH{sub 2} groups protected the surface for 30 min from reoxidation. • A reaction-diffusion model shows that oxygen diffusion through the carbon chains is fast. • Alkanethiolates protect the surface by reducing the reaction rate of oxygen with the surface. • Assembly of the alkane chains directs sulfur atoms to bond to the surface. - Abstract: Molecules that contain linear alkane chains self-assemble on a variety of surfaces changing the degree of wetting, lubricity, and reactivity. We report on the reoxidation of GaAs(100) in air after adsorbing five alkanethiols (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}-SH where n = 3, 6, 12, 18, 20) and one alkanedithiol (HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}-SH) deposited from the liquid phase. The alignment of the alkane chains forms a self-assembled layer, however, air diffuses readily through the carbon layer and reaches the surface. The impact of alignment is to improve the bonding of sulfur with the surface atoms which reduces the oxidation rate based on fitting the data to a reaction-diffusion model. The layer thickness and molecular density scale linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the alkane chain. The thickness of the alkanethiolate (RS{sup −}) layer grows by 0.87 ± 0.06 Å for each C atom in the chain and the surface density by 0.13 ± 0.03 molecule per nm{sup 2} per C atom up to a coverage of 5.0 molecules/nm{sup 2} for n = 20 or 0.8 monolayer. The surface coverage increases with length because interactions between methylene (CH{sub 2}) groups in neighboring chains reduce the tilt angle of the molecules with the surface normal. The tight packing yields areas per alkanethiolate as low as 20 Å{sup 2} for n = 20. The amount of C in the layer divided by the chain length is approximately constant up to n = 12 but increases sharply by a factor of 2–4× for n = 18 and 20 based on the C 1s X

  20. Micromachined silicon acoustic delay line with improved structural stability and acoustic directivity for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young; Kumar, Akhil; Xu, Song; Zou, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that micromachined silicon acoustic delay lines can provide a promising solution to achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography without the need for complex transducer arrays and data acquisition electronics. However, as its length increases to provide longer delay time, the delay line becomes more vulnerable to structural instability due to reduced mechanical stiffness. In addition, the small cross-section area of the delay line results in a large acoustic acceptance angle and therefore poor directivity. To address these two issues, this paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a new silicon acoustic delay line enhanced with 3D printed polymer micro linker structures. First, mechanical deformation of the silicon acoustic delay line (with and without linker structures) under gravity was simulated by using finite element method. Second, the acoustic crosstalk and acoustic attenuation caused by the polymer micro linker structures were evaluated with both numerical simulation and ultrasound transmission testing. The result shows that the use of the polymer micro linker structures significantly improves the structural stability of the silicon acoustic delay lines without creating additional acoustic attenuation and crosstalk. In addition, a new tapered design for the input terminal of the delay line was also investigate to improve its acoustic directivity by reducing the acoustic acceptance angle. These two improvements are expected to provide an effective solution to eliminate current limitations on the achievable acoustic delay time and out-of-plane imaging resolution of micromachined silicon acoustic delay line arrays.

  1. Temperature-dependent interface characteristic of silicon wafer bonding based on an amorphous germanium layer deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shaoying; Lin, Shaoming; Ye, Yujie; Mao, Danfeng; Huang, Wei; Xu, Jianfang; Li, Cheng; Chen, Songyan

    2018-03-01

    We report a near-bubble-free low-temperature silicon (Si) wafer bonding with a thin amorphous Ge (a-Ge) intermediate layer. The DC-magnetron-sputtered a-Ge film on Si is demonstrated to be extremely flat (RMS = 0.28 nm) and hydrophilic (contact angle = 3°). The effect of the post-annealing temperature on the surface morphology and crystallinity of a-Ge film at the bonded interface is systematically identified. The relationship among the bubble density, annealing temperature, and crystallinity of a-Ge film is also clearly clarified. The crystallization of a-Ge film firstly appears at the bubble region. More interesting feature is that the crystallization starts from the center of the bubbles and sprawls to the bubble edge gradually. The H2 by-product is finally absorbed by intermediate Ge layer with crystalline phase after post annealing. Moreover, the whole a-Ge film out of the bubble totally crystallizes when the annealing time increases. This Ge integration at the bubble region leads to the decrease of the bubble density, which in turn increases the bonding strength.

  2. The Covalent Binding of Photosensitive Dyes to Monocrystalline Silicon Surface and Their Spectral Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭志新; 郝纪祥; 张祖训; 曹子祥

    1993-01-01

    A chemical method is proposed to bond photo-sensitive dyes directly to the surface of polished monocrystalline silicon. A methincyanine dye and a trimethincyanine dye have been bonded covalently onto silicon surface through Si—N bond, which are characterized by XPS technique and laser Raman spectra. Photovoltaic effect has been observed with the In/dye/n-Si sandwich devices composed of the dye-bonded n-Si wafers. Significant spectral response shows the characteristic absorptance maxima of the bonded dyes.

  3. Development and Property Evaluation of Selected HfO2-Silicon and Rare Earth-Silicon Based Bond Coats and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si and rare earth Si based EBC bond coat EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. High temperature properties of the advanced EBC systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep and oxidation resistance have been studied and summarized. The advanced NASA EBC systems showed some promise to achieve 1500C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and durability.

  4. Direct approaches to nitriles via highly efficient nitrogenation strategy through C-H or C-C bond cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Jiao, Ning

    2014-04-15

    Because of the importance of nitrogen-containing compounds in chemistry and biology, organic chemists have long focused on the development of novel methodologies for their synthesis. For example, nitrogen-containing compounds show up within functional materials, as top-selling drugs, and as bioactive molecules. To synthesize these compounds in a green and sustainable way, researchers have focused on the direct functionalization of hydrocarbons via C-H or C-C bond cleavage. Although researchers have made significant progress in the direct functionalization of simple hydrocarbons, direct C-N bond formation via C-H or C-C bond cleavage remains challenging, in part because of the unstable character of some N-nucleophiles under oxidative conditions. The nitriles are versatile building blocks and precursors in organic synthesis. Recently, chemists have achieved the direct C-H cyanation with toxic cyanide salts in the presence of stoichiometric metal oxidants. In this Account, we describe recent progress made by our group in nitrile synthesis. C-H or C-C bond cleavage is a key process in our strategy, and azides or DMF serve as the nitrogen source. In these reactions, we successfully realized direct nitrile synthesis using a variety of hydrocarbon groups as nitrile precursors, including methyl, alkenyl, and alkynyl groups. We could carry out C(sp(3))-H functionalization on benzylic, allylic, and propargylic C-H bonds to produce diverse valuable synthetic nitriles. Mild oxidation of C═C double-bonds and C≡C triple-bonds also produced nitriles. The incorporation of nitrogen within the carbon skeleton typically involved the participation of azide reagents. Although some mechanistic details remain unclear, studies of these nitrogenation reactions implicate the involvement of a cation or radical intermediate, and an oxidative rearrangement of azide intermediate produced the nitrile. We also explored environmentally friendly oxidants, such as molecular oxygen, to make our

  5. Direct and inverse Staebler-Wronski effects observed in carbon-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon photo-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C.; Brochero, J.; Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M.G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.

    2011-01-01

    The photo-response behaviour of Amorphous Silicon Position Detectors (ASPDs) under prolonged illumination with a 681 nm diode-laser and a 633 nm He-Ne laser is presented. Both direct and inverse Staebler-Wronski effects are observed.

  6. Direct exchange between silicon nanocrystals and tunnel oxide traps under illumination on single electron photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatbouri, S., E-mail: Samir.chatbouri@yahoo.com; Troudi, M.; Sghaier, N.; Kalboussi, A. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Aimez, V. [Université de Sherbrooke, Laboratoire Nanotechnologies et Nanosystémes (UMI-LN2 3463), Université de Sherbrooke—CNRS—INSA de Lyon-ECL-UJF-CPE Lyon, Institut Interdisciplinaire d’Innovation Technologique (Canada); Drouin, D. [Avenue de I’environnement, Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro électronique et Instrumentation (LR13ES12), Faculté des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Souifi, A. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon—site INSA de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270 (France)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present the trapping of photogenerated charge carriers for 300 s resulted by their direct exchange under illumination between a few silicon nanocrystals (ncs-Si) embedded in an oxide tunnel layer (SiO{sub x} = 1.5) and the tunnel oxide traps levels for a single electron photodetector (photo-SET or nanopixel). At first place, the presence of a photocurrent limited in the inversion zone under illumination in the I–V curves confirms the creation of a pair electron/hole (e–h) at high energy. This photogenerated charge carriers can be trapped in the oxide. Using the capacitance-voltage under illumination (the photo-CV measurements) we show a hysteresis chargement limited in the inversion area, indicating that the photo-generated charge carriers are stored at traps levels at the interface and within ncs-Si. The direct exchange of the photogenerated charge carriers between the interface traps levels and the ncs-Si contributed on the photomemory effect for 300 s for our nanopixel at room temperature.

  7. Predicting the valley physics of silicon quantum dots directly from a device layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John King; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Bacewski, Andrew D.; Nielsen, Erik; Montaño, Inès; Rudolph, Martin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Muller, Richard P.

    Qubits made from electrostatically-defined quantum dots in Si-based systems are excellent candidates for quantum information processing applications. However, the multi-valley structure of silicon's band structure provides additional challenges for the few-electron physics critical to qubit manipulation. Here, we present a theory for valley physics that is predictive, in that we take as input the real physical device geometry and experimental voltage operation schedule, and with minimal approximation compute the resulting valley physics. We present both effective mass theory and atomistic tight-binding calculations for two distinct metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) quantum dot systems, directly comparing them to experimental measurements of the valley splitting. We conclude by assessing these detailed simulations' utility for engineering desired valley physics in future devices. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellowship Program, which is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program.

  8. Silicon: Potential to Promote Direct and Indirect Effects on Plant Defense Against Arthropod Pests in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Olivia L; Padula, Matthew P; Zeng, Rensen; Gurr, Geoff M

    2016-01-01

    Silicon has generally not been considered essential for plant growth, although it is well recognized that many plants, particularly Poaceae, have substantial plant tissue concentrations of this element. Recently, however, the International Plant Nutrition Institute [IPNI] (2015), Georgia, USA has listed it as a "beneficial substance". This reflects that numerous studies have now established that silicon may alleviate both biotic and abiotic stress. This paper explores the existing knowledge and recent advances in elucidating the role of silicon in plant defense against biotic stress, particularly against arthropod pests in agriculture and attraction of beneficial insects. Silicon confers resistance to herbivores via two described mechanisms: physical and biochemical/molecular. Until recently, studies have mainly centered on two trophic levels; the herbivore and plant. However, several studies now describe tri-trophic effects involving silicon that operate by attracting predators or parasitoids to plants under herbivore attack. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that silicon-treated, arthropod-attacked plants display increased attractiveness to natural enemies, an effect that was reflected in elevated biological control in the field. The reported relationships between soluble silicon and the jasmonic acid (JA) defense pathway, and JA and herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) suggest that soluble silicon may enhance the production of HIPVs. Further, it is feasible that silicon uptake may affect protein expression (or modify proteins structurally) so that they can produce additional, or modify, the HIPV profile of plants. Ultimately, understanding silicon under plant ecological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular contexts will assist in fully elucidating the mechanisms behind silicon and plant response to biotic stress at both the bi- and tri-trophic levels.

  9. Silicon: Potential to Promote Direct and Indirect Effects on Plant Defense Against Arthropod Pests in Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Olivia L.; Padula, Matthew P.; Zeng, Rensen; Gurr, Geoff M.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon has generally not been considered essential for plant growth, although it is well recognized that many plants, particularly Poaceae, have substantial plant tissue concentrations of this element. Recently, however, the International Plant Nutrition Institute [IPNI] (2015), Georgia, USA has listed it as a “beneficial substance”. This reflects that numerous studies have now established that silicon may alleviate both biotic and abiotic stress. This paper explores the existing knowledge and recent advances in elucidating the role of silicon in plant defense against biotic stress, particularly against arthropod pests in agriculture and attraction of beneficial insects. Silicon confers resistance to herbivores via two described mechanisms: physical and biochemical/molecular. Until recently, studies have mainly centered on two trophic levels; the herbivore and plant. However, several studies now describe tri-trophic effects involving silicon that operate by attracting predators or parasitoids to plants under herbivore attack. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that silicon-treated, arthropod-attacked plants display increased attractiveness to natural enemies, an effect that was reflected in elevated biological control in the field. The reported relationships between soluble silicon and the jasmonic acid (JA) defense pathway, and JA and herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) suggest that soluble silicon may enhance the production of HIPVs. Further, it is feasible that silicon uptake may affect protein expression (or modify proteins structurally) so that they can produce additional, or modify, the HIPV profile of plants. Ultimately, understanding silicon under plant ecological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular contexts will assist in fully elucidating the mechanisms behind silicon and plant response to biotic stress at both the bi- and tri-trophic levels. PMID:27379104

  10. Influence of Crucible Thermal Conductivity on Crystal Growth in an Industrial Directional Solidification Process for Silicon Ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaoyang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We carried out transient global simulations of heating, melting, growing, annealing, and cooling stages for an industrial directional solidification (DS process for silicon ingots. The crucible thermal conductivity is varied in a reasonable range to investigate its influence on the global heat transfer and silicon crystal growth. It is found that the crucible plays an important role in heat transfer, and therefore its thermal conductivity can influence the crystal growth significantly in the entire DS process. Increasing the crucible thermal conductivity can shorten the time for melting of silicon feedstock and growing of silicon crystal significantly, and therefore large thermal conductivity is helpful in saving both production time and power energy. However, the high temperature gradient in the silicon ingots and the locally concave melt-crystal interface shape for large crucible thermal conductivity indicate that high thermal stress and dislocation propagation are likely to occur during both growing and annealing stages. Based on the numerical simulations, some discussions on designing and choosing the crucible thermal conductivity are presented.

  11. Laser direct writing of oxide structures on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen; Grey, Francois

    1996-01-01

    on amorphous and crystalline silicon surfaces in order to determine the depassivation mechanism. The minimum linewidth achieved is about 450 nm using writing speeds of up to 100 mm/s. The process is fully compatible with local oxidation of silicon by scanning probe lithography. Wafer-scale patterns can...

  12. Porous silicon in solar cell structures : a review of achievements and modern directions of further use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yerokhov, VY; Melnyk, [No Value

    1999-01-01

    Porous silicon, which is being obtained by electrochemical etching of silicon wafers in electrolytes on the base of hydrofluoric acid, recently attracted the attention of specialists in photovoltaics even more due to a number of its unique properties. However, at present, acceptable results are

  13. Plasma-assisted quartz-to-quartz direct bonding for the fabrication of a multilayered quartz template for nanoimprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jihye; Ali, Altun; Kim, Ki-don; Choi, Dae-guen; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Jeong, Jun-ho; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a low-temperature plasma-assisted process is developed to realize a uniform, ultraviolet (UV) transparent and chemically inert quartz-to-quartz direct bonding. Two sets of pretests are performed in order to understand how the bond surface energy changes with the plasma exposure time and the wet etching of quartz, respectively. The developed technique is used to fabricate a multilayered quartz template for UV nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL). The multilayered quartz template is fabricated by bonding a square piece of a standard quartz wafer, which is about 625 µm in thickness, to a wet-etched 6.35 mm thick quartz photomask plate. A fabricated multilayered template is loaded to the commercial UV-NIL tool Imprio(TM) 100, and NIL was performed successfully. The developed direct bonding technique makes it possible for standard quartz wafers, which are compatible with high-resolution semiconductor fabrication processes, to be utilized as the templates in commercial UV-NIL machines with enhanced mechanical stability.

  14. Cavity-assisted quantum computing in a silicon nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Bao; Qin Hao; Zhang Rong; Xue Peng; Liu Jin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We present a scheme of quantum computing with charge qubits corresponding to one excess electron shared between dangling-bond pairs of surface silicon atoms that couple to a microwave stripline resonator on a chip. By choosing a certain evolution time, we propose the realization of a set of universal single- and two-qubit logical gates. Due to its intrinsic stability and scalability, the silicon dangling-bond charge qubit can be regarded as one of the most promising candidates for quantum computation. Compared to the previous schemes on quantum computing with silicon bulk systems, our scheme shows such advantages as a long coherent time and direct control and readout. (general)

  15. 29-Silicon NMR evidence for the improved chromatographic siloxane bond stability of bulky alkylsilane ligands on a silica surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.B.; Haan, de J.W.; Claessens, H.A.; Ven, van de L.J.M.; Cramers, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    A stable bond stationary phase for reversed-phase HPLC, with a diisobutyl-n-octadecylsilane derivatized surface, was studied using 29Si CPMAS NMR. Fumed silica surfaces (Aerosil), trimethylsilylated to different extents, were used to illustrate the effect of ligand surface loading on the hydrogen

  16. Direct measurement and modulation of single-molecule coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhu, Nan; Gschneidtner, Tina

    2013-01-01

    remain a daunting challenge. Here we demonstrate an interdisciplinary and systematic approach that enables measurement and modulation of the coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex. Terpyridine is derived with a thiol linker, facilitating covalent attachment of this ligand on both gold...... substrate surfaces and gold-coated atomic force microscopy tips. The coordination and bond breaking between terpyridine and osmium are followed in situ by electrochemically controlled atomic force microscopy at the single-molecule level. The redox state of the central metal atom is found to have...

  17. Stable configurations of graphene on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Ravikumar, Abhilash [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India); Hegde, G.M. [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Rizwan, M.R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal 575025 (India)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Simulations of epitaxial growth process for silicon–graphene system is performed. • Identified the most favourable orientation of graphene sheet on silicon substrate. • Atomic local strain due to the silicon–carbon bond formation is analyzed. - Abstract: Integration of graphene on silicon-based nanostructures is crucial in advancing graphene based nanoelectronic device technologies. The present paper provides a new insight on the combined effect of graphene structure and silicon (001) substrate on their two-dimensional anisotropic interface. Molecular dynamics simulations involving the sub-nanoscale interface reveal a most favourable set of temperature independent orientations of the monolayer graphene sheet with an angle of ∽15° between its armchair direction and [010] axis of the silicon substrate. While computing the favorable stable orientations, both the translation and the rotational vibrations of graphene are included. The possible interactions between the graphene atoms and the silicon atoms are identified from their coordination. Graphene sheet shows maximum bonding density with bond length 0.195 nm and minimum bond energy when interfaced with silicon substrate at 15° orientation. Local deformation analysis reveals probability distribution with maximum strain levels of 0.134, 0.047 and 0.029 for 900 K, 300 K and 100 K, respectively in silicon surface for 15° oriented graphene whereas the maximum probable strain in graphene is about 0.041 irrespective of temperature. Silicon–silicon dimer formation is changed due to silicon–carbon bonding. These results may help further in band structure engineering of silicon–graphene lattice.

  18. Hysteresis-free high-temperature precise bimorph actuators produced by direct bonding of lithium niobate wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Baturin, I. S.; Mingaliev, E. A.; Zorikhin, D. V.; Udalov, A. R.; Greshnyakov, E. D. [Ferroelectric Laboratory, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 51 Lenin Ave., 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-02

    The current paper presents a piezoelectric bimorph actuator produced by direct bonding of lithium niobate wafers with the mirrored Y and Z axes. Direct bonding technology allowed to fabricate bidomain plate with precise positioning of ideally flat domain boundary. By optimizing the cutting angle (128° Y-cut), the piezoelectric constant became as large as 27.3 pC/N. Investigation of voltage dependence of bending displacement confirmed that bimorph actuator has excellent linearity and hysteresis-free. Decrease of the applied voltage down to mV range showed the perfect linearity up to the sub-nm deflection amplitude. The frequency and temperature dependences of electromechanical transmission coefficient in wide temperature range (from 300 to 900 K) were investigated.

  19. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  20. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Priyatha, E-mail: priyatha.premnath@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tavangar, Amirhossein, E-mail: atavanga@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tan, Bo, E-mail: tanbo@ryerson.ca [Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan, E-mail: venkat@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  1. Directed deposition of silicon nanowires using neopentasilane as precursor and gold as catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Kämpken

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the applicability of neopentasilane (Si(SiH34 as a precursor for the formation of silicon nanowires by using gold nanoparticles as a catalyst has been explored. The growth proceeds via the formation of liquid gold/silicon alloy droplets, which excrete the silicon nanowires upon continued decomposition of the precursor. This mechanism determines the diameter of the Si nanowires. Different sources for the gold nanoparticles have been tested: the spontaneous dewetting of gold films, thermally annealed gold films, deposition of preformed gold nanoparticles, and the use of “liquid bright gold”, a material historically used for the gilding of porcelain and glass. The latter does not only form gold nanoparticles when deposited as a thin film and thermally annealed, but can also be patterned by using UV irradiation, providing access to laterally structured layers of silicon nanowires.

  2. Electrical, structural, and bonding changes induced in silicon by H, Ar, and Kr ion-beam etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Fonash, S.J.; Ashok, S.; Caplan, P.; Shappirio, J.; Hage-Ali, M.; Ponpon, J.

    1983-01-01

    A study to elucidate the role of processing-induced changes in Si, subjected to ion-beam etching has been made. It is shown that these changes can be related to the primary ion beam used in ion-beam etching. Using ESR, trivalently bonded Si has been shown to be present. Fe and Cr have been found to be the main contaminants. An annealing study revealed that the damage can be annealed out at relatively high temperatures

  3. Direct α-C-H bond functionalization of unprotected cyclic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Ma, Longle; Paul, Anirudra; Seidel, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Cyclic amines are ubiquitous core structures of bioactive natural products and pharmaceutical drugs. Although the site-selective abstraction of C-H bonds is an attractive strategy for preparing valuable functionalized amines from their readily available parent heterocycles, this approach has largely been limited to substrates that require protection of the amine nitrogen atom. In addition, most methods rely on transition metals and are incompatible with the presence of amine N-H bonds. Here we introduce a protecting-group-free approach for the α-functionalization of cyclic secondary amines. An operationally simple one-pot procedure generates products via a process that involves intermolecular hydride transfer to generate an imine intermediate that is subsequently captured by a nucleophile, such as an alkyl or aryl lithium compound. Reactions are regioselective and stereospecific and enable the rapid preparation of bioactive amines, as exemplified by the facile synthesis of anabasine and (-)-solenopsin A.

  4. Eosin Y as a Direct Hydrogen Atom Transfer Photocatalyst for the Functionalization of C-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuan-Zi; Rong, Jia-Wei; Wu, Hao-Lin; Zhou, Quan; Deng, Hong-Ping; Tan, Jin Da; Xue, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tao, Hai-Rong; Wu, Jie

    2018-05-02

    Eosin Y, a well-known economical alternative to metal catalysts in visible-light-driven single-electron transfer-based organic transformations, can behave as an effective direct hydrogen atom transfer catalyst for C-H activation. Using the alkylation of C-H bonds with electron-deficient alkenes as a model study revealed an extremely broad substrate scope, enabling easy access to a variety of important synthons. This eosin Y-based photocatalytic hydrogen atom transfer strategy is promising for diverse functionalization of a wide range of native C-H bonds in a green and sustainable manner. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Laser-Direct Writing of Silver Metal Electrodes on Transparent Flexible Substrates with High-Bonding Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiping; Bai, Shi; Ma, Ying; Ma, Delong; Hou, Tingxiu; Shi, Xiaomin; Hu, Anming

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate a novel approach to rapidly fabricate conductive silver electrodes on transparent flexible substrates with high-bonding strength by laser-direct writing. A new type of silver ink composed of silver nitrate, sodium citrate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared in this work. The role of PVP was elucidated for improving the quality of silver electrodes. Silver nanoparticles and sintered microstructures were simultaneously synthesized and patterned on a substrate using a focused 405 nm continuous wave laser. The writing was completed through the transparent flexible substrate with a programmed 2D scanning sample stage. Silver electrodes fabricated by this approach exhibit a remarkable bonding strength, which can withstand an adhesive tape test at least 50 times. After a 1500 time bending test, the resistance only increased 5.2%. With laser-induced in-situ synthesis, sintering, and simultaneous patterning of silver nanoparticles, this technology is promising for the facile fabrication of conducting electronic devices on flexible substrates.

  6. GaN microring waveguide resonators bonded to silicon substrate by a two-step polymer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Ryohei; Sasaki, Takashi; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2018-03-20

    Using a polymer bonding technique, GaN microring waveguide resonators were fabricated on a Si substrate for future hybrid integration of GaN and Si photonic devices. The designed GaN microring consisted of a rib waveguide having a core of 510 nm in thickness, 1000 nm in width, and a clad of 240 nm in thickness. A GaN crystalline layer of 1000 nm in thickness was grown on a Si(111) substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition using a buffer layer of 300 nm in thickness for the compensation of lattice constant mismatch between GaN and Si crystals. The GaN/Si wafer was bonded to a Si(100) wafer by a two-step polymer process to prevent it from trapping air bubbles. The bonded GaN layer was thinned from the backside by a fast atom beam etching to remove the buffer layer and to generate the rib waveguides. The transmission characteristics of the GaN microring waveguide resonators were measured. The losses of the straight waveguides were measured to be 4.0±1.7  dB/mm around a wavelength of 1.55 μm. The microring radii ranged from 30 to 60 μm, where the measured free-spectral ranges varied from 2.58 to 5.30 nm. The quality factors of the microring waveguide resonators were from 1710 to 2820.

  7. High energy X-ray diffraction analysis of strain and residual stress in silicon nitride ceramic diffusion bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, M.; Prieto, C.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M.I.; Terry, A.E.; Vaughan, G.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    High resolution X-ray scanning diffractometry is used to study the residual stress in binary metal/ceramic (Ni/Si 3 N 4 ) diffusion bonds fabricated by simultaneous high temperature heating and uniaxial pressing. In order to diminish the experimental error on the stress determination, the method consists of three steps: (i) to measure the axial and radial strains following some selected lines at the inner volume of the ceramic; (ii) to fit the strain data using finite element method (FEM) analysis and (iii) to determinate stresses by using the results obtained from the FEM method in the strain calculation

  8. Hydrides of Alkaline Earth–Tetrel (AeTt) Zintl Phases: Covalent Tt–H Bonds from Silicon to Tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Henry; Guehne, Robin; Bertmer, Marko; Weber, Sebastian; Wenderoth, Patrick; Hansen, Thomas Christian; Haase, Jürgen; Kohlmann, Holger (Leipzig); (Saarland-MED); (ILL)

    2017-01-18

    Zintl phases form hydrides either by incorporating hydride anions (interstitial hydrides) or by covalent bonding of H to the polyanion (polyanionic hydrides), which yields a variety of different compositions and bonding situations. Hydrides (deuterides) of SrGe, BaSi, and BaSn were prepared by hydrogenation (deuteration) of the CrB-type Zintl phases AeTt and characterized by laboratory X-ray, synchrotron, and neutron diffraction, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum-chemical calculations. SrGeD4/3–x and BaSnD4/3–x show condensed boatlike six-membered rings of Tt atoms, formed by joining three of the zigzag chains contained in the Zintl phase. These new polyanionic motifs are terminated by covalently bound H atoms with d(Ge–D) = 1.521(9) Å and d(Sn–D) = 1.858(8) Å. Additional hydride anions are located in Ae4 tetrahedra; thus, the features of both interstitial hydrides and polyanionic hydrides are represented. BaSiD2–x retains the zigzag Si chain as in the parent Zintl phase, but in the hydride (deuteride), it is terminated by H (D) atoms, thus forming a linear (SiD) chain with d(Si–D) = 1.641(5) Å.

  9. Cu-catalyzed C(sp³)-H bond activation reaction for direct preparation of cycloallyl esters from cycloalkanes and aromatic aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jincan; Fang, Hong; Han, Jianlin; Pan, Yi

    2014-05-02

    Cu-catalyzed dehydrogenation-olefination and esterification of C(sp(3))-H bonds of cycloalkanes with TBHP as an oxidant has been developed. The reaction involves four C-H bond activations and gives cycloallyl ester products directly from cycloalkanes and aromatic aldehydes.

  10. High aspect ratio silicon nanomoulds for UV embossing fabricated by directional thermal oxidation using an oxidation mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L Q; Chan-Park, Mary B; Yan, Y H; Zhang Qing; Li, C M; Zhang Jun

    2007-01-01

    Nanomoulding is simple and economical but moulds with nanoscale features are usually prohibitively expensive to fabricate because nanolithographic techniques are mostly serial and time-consuming for large-area patterning. This paper describes a novel, simple and inexpensive parallel technique for fabricating nanoscale pattern moulds by silicon etching followed by thermal oxidation. The mask pattern can be made by direct photolithography or photolithography followed by metal overetching for submicron- and nanoscale features, respectively. To successfully make nanoscale channels having a post-oxidation cross-sectional shape similar to that of the original channel, an oxidation mask to promote unidirectional (specifically horizontal) oxide growth is found to be essential. A silicon nitride or metal mask layer prevents vertical oxidation of the Si directly beneath it. Without this mask, rectangular channels become smaller but are V-shaped after oxidation. By controlling the silicon etch depth and oxidation time, moulds with high aspect ratio channels having widths ranging from 500 to 50 nm and smaller can be obtained. The nanomould, when passivated with a Teflon-like layer, can be used for first-generation replication using ultraviolet (UV) nanoembossing and second-generation replication in other materials, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS stamp, which was subsequently coated with Au, was used for transfer printing of Au electrodes with a 600 nm gap which will find applications in plastics nanoelectronics

  11. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnat, S; King, H; Hubbard, T; Wasay, A; Sameoto, D

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x - y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µ m and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ∼15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µ m s −1 and 20 µ m s −1 . (technical note)

  12. Influence of additional heat exchanger block on directional solidification system for growing multi-crystalline silicon ingot - A simulation investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, S. G.; Srinivasan, M.; Aravinth, K.; Ramasamy, P.

    2018-04-01

    Transient simulation has been carried out for analyzing the heat transfer properties of Directional Solidification (DS) furnace. The simulation results revealed that the additional heat exchanger block under the bottom insulation on the DS furnace has enhanced the control of solidification of the silicon melt. Controlled Heat extraction rate during the solidification of silicon melt is requisite for growing good quality ingots which has been achieved by the additional heat exchanger block. As an additional heat exchanger block, the water circulating plate has been placed under the bottom insulation. The heat flux analysis of DS system and the temperature distribution studies of grown ingot confirm that the established additional heat exchanger block on the DS system gives additional benefit to the mc-Si ingot.

  13. Use of cyanopropyl-bonded hplc column for bioassay-directed fractionation of organic extracts from incinerator emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMarini, D.M.; Williams, R.W.; Brooks, L.R.; Taylor, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The present study has shown that cyanopropyl-(CN) bonded silica HPLC columns are applicable for the fractionation of mass and mutagenic activity of organic extracts from some incinerator emissions. Dichloromethane-extractable organics from particles emitted by two different municipal waste incinerators and by a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator that was combusting polyethylene were fractionated by HPLC, and the mutagenicity of the fractions was determined by means of a microsuspension mutagenicity assay with Salmonella TA98. The CN-bonded silica columns provided high (80-100 percent) mass and mutagenicity recoveries for most emission extracts, and it fractionated the mutagenic activity. The results suggest that the emissions from municipal waste incinerators contain a high amount of direct-acting (-S9) mutagenic activity that is resolvable by HPLC using CN-bonded silica. Sub-fractionation of selected mutagenic HPLC fractions and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy can be used to identify mutagenic species within complex incinerator emissions. The coupling of microsuspension bioassays to HPLC fractionation should be a useful tool for this type of analysis

  14. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fibre reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  15. Direct examination of cadmium bonding in rat tissues dosed with mine wastes and cadmium-containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    Direct examination by XANES and EXAFS of metal bonding in tissue can be demonstrated by examining cadmium uptake and bonding in animal tissue maintained at cryogenic temperatures. XANES at the K-edge of cadmium were collected at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Rats fed with 1g mine waste containing 8-400 mg/kg cadmium per 200g body weight (b.w.) or dosed by oral gavage with either cadmium chloride solution alone (at 6 mg/kg b.w.) or in combination with other salts (As, Cu or Zn), 5 days/week for 6 weeks, had 0.1-7.5 and 8-86 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney, respectively. Rats given intraperitoneally (ip) or intravenously (iv) 1-4 times with 1 mg/kg b.w. cadmium solution had 30-120 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney. Tissues from rats were kept and transferred at cryogenic temperature and XANES were recorded at 20 K. The spectra for rat liver samples suggested conjugation of cadmium with glutathione or association with the sulfide bond (Cd-S) of proteins and peptides. EXAFS of rat liver fed by Cd and Zn solutions showed that Cd was clearly bound to S ligands with an inter-atomic distance of 2.54 A ring for Cd-S that was similar to cadmium sulfide with an inter-atomic distance of 2.52 A ring for Cd-S. Liver or kidney of rats fed with mine wastes did not give an edge in the XANES spectra indicating little uptake of cadmium by the animals. Longer and higher dosing regimen may be required in order to observe the same Cd-S bond in the rat tissue from mine wastes, including confirmation by EXAFS.

  16. Controllable chemical vapor deposition of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene directly on silicon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Cole, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinholes...

  17. Bright trions in direct-bandgap silicon nanocrystals revealed bylow-temperature single-nanocrystal spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, Oct (2015), e336 ISSN 2047-7538 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * single-nanocrystal spectroscopy * luminescing trions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.600, year: 2015

  18. Orthogonal decomposition of core loss along rolling and transverse directions of non-grain oriented silicon steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhi Wan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rotational core loss of the silicon steel laminations are measured under elliptical rotating excitation. The core loss decomposition model is very important in magnetic core design, in which the decomposition coefficients are calculated through the measurement data. By using the transformation of trigonometric function, the elliptical rotational magnetic flux can be decomposed into two parts along two directions. It is assumed that the rotating core loss is the sum of alternating core losses along rolling and transverse directions. The magnetic strength vector H of non-grain oriented (NGO silicon steel 35WW270 along rolling and transverse directions is measured by a novel designed 3-D magnetic properties tester. Alternating core loss along the rolling, transverse directions and rotating core loss in the xoy-plane of this specimen in different frequencies such as 50 Hz, 100 Hz, and 200 Hz. Experimental results show that the core loss model is more accurate and useful to predict the total core loss.

  19. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  20. Toward three-dimensional microelectronic systems: directed self-assembly of silicon microcubes via DNA surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerhardt, Nico; Merzsch, Stephan; Ledig, Johannes; Bora, Achyut; Waag, Andreas; Tornow, Marc; Mischnick, Petra

    2013-07-02

    The huge and intelligent processing power of three-dimensional (3D) biological "processors" like the human brain with clock speeds of only 0.1 kHz is an extremely fascinating property, which is based on a massively parallel interconnect strategy. Artificial silicon microprocessors are 7 orders of magnitude faster. Nevertheless, they do not show any indication of intelligent processing power, mostly due to their very limited interconnectivity. Massively parallel interconnectivity can only be realized in three dimensions. Three-dimensional artificial processors would therefore be at the root of fabricating artificially intelligent systems. A first step in this direction would be the self-assembly of silicon based building blocks into 3D structures. We report on the self-assembly of such building blocks by molecular recognition, and on the electrical characterization of the formed assemblies. First, planar silicon substrates were functionalized with self-assembling monolayers of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane for coupling of oligonucleotides (single stranded DNA) with glutaric aldehyde. The oligonucleotide immobilization was confirmed and quantified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled complementary oligonucleotides. After the individual processing steps, the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. Patterned DNA-functionalized layers were fabricated by microcontact printing (μCP) and photolithography. Silicon microcubes of 3 μm edge length as model objects for first 3D self-assembly experiments were fabricated out of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by a combination of reactive ion etching (RIE) and selective wet etching. The microcubes were then surface-functionalized using the same protocol as on planar substrates, and their self-assembly was demonstrated both on patterned silicon surfaces (88% correctly placed cubes), and to cube aggregates by complementary DNA

  1. Knudsen pump produced via silicon deep RIE, thermal oxidation, and anodic bonding processes for on-chip vacuum pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Toan, Nguyen; Inomata, Naoki; Trung, Nguyen Huu; Ono, Takahito

    2018-05-01

    This work describes the fabrication and evaluation of the Knudsen pump for on-chip vacuum pumping that works based on the principle of a thermal transpiration. Three AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers are integrated into small chambers with a size of 5 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  0.4 mm for the pump’s evaluation. Knudsen pump is fabricated using deep RIE (reactive ion etching), wet thermal oxidation and anodic bonding processes. The fabricated device is evaluated by monitoring the quality (Q) factor of the integrated cantilevers. The Q factor of the cantilever is increased from 300 -1150 in cases without and with a temperature difference approximately 25 °C between the top (the hot side at 40 °C) and bottom (the cold side at 15 °C) sides of the fabricated device, respectively. The evacuated chamber pressure of around 10 kPa is estimated from the Q factor of the integrated cantilevers.

  2. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, I; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the homogeneity and strength of fusion bond. High pressure testing shows that the bond strength is large enough for most applications of fluidic interconnects. The bond strength for 525 µm thick silicon, with glass tubes having an outer diameter of 6 mm and with a wall thickness of 2 mm, is more than 60 bars after annealing at a temperature of 800 °C

  3. Silicon nanocrystal-based photonic crystal slabs with broadband and efficient directional light emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Varga, Marián; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.; Kromka, Alexander; Elliman, R. G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 5763. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09692Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15003 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photonic crystal slab * silicon nanocrystals * light emission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  4. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  5. Direct-current substrate bias effects on amorphous silicon sputter-deposited films for thin film transistor fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Seung-Ik; Rack, Philip D.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    The effect that direct current (dc) substrate bias has on radio frequency-sputter-deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si) films has been investigated. The substrate bias produces a denser a-Si film with fewer defects compared to unbiased films. The reduced number of defects results in a higher resistivity because defect-mediated conduction paths are reduced. Thin film transistors (TFTs) that were completely sputter deposited were fabricated and characterized. The TFT with the biased a-Si film showed lower leakage (off-state) current, higher on/off current ratio, and higher transconductance (field effect mobility) than the TFT with the unbiased a-Si film

  6. On the ultrafast charge migration and subsequent charge directed reactivity in Cl⋯N halogen-bonded clusters following vertical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Periyasamy, Ganga

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we have presented ultrafast charge transfer dynamics through halogen bonds following vertical ionization of representative halogen bonded clusters. Subsequent hole directed reactivity of the radical cations of halogen bonded clusters is also discussed. Furthermore, we have examined effect of the halogen bond strength on the electron-electron correlation- and relaxation-driven charge migration in halogen bonded complexes. For this study, we have selected A-Cl (A represents F, OH, CN, NH 2 , CF 3 , and COOH substituents) molecules paired with NH 3 (referred as ACl:NH 3 complex): these complexes exhibit halogen bonds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on purely electron correlation- and relaxation-driven ultrafast (attosecond) charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds. Both density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field theory with 6-31 + G(d, p) basis set are employed for this work. Upon vertical ionization of NCCl⋯NH 3 complex, the hole is predicted to migrate from the NH 3 -end to the ClCN-end of the NCCl⋯NH 3 complex in approximately 0.5 fs on the D 0 cationic surface. This hole migration leads to structural rearrangement of the halogen bonded complex, yielding hydrogen bonding interaction stronger than the halogen bonding interaction on the same cationic surface. Other halogen bonded complexes, such as H 2 NCl:NH 3 , F 3 CCl:NH 3 , and HOOCCl:NH 3 , exhibit similar charge migration following vertical ionization. On the contrary, FCl:NH 3 and HOCl:NH 3 complexes do not exhibit any charge migration following vertical ionization to the D 0 cation state, pointing to interesting halogen bond strength-dependent charge migration

  7. On the ultrafast charge migration and subsequent charge directed reactivity in Cl⋯N halogen-bonded clusters following vertical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Bhattacharya, Atanu, E-mail: atanub@ipc.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Periyasamy, Ganga [Department of Chemistry, Central College Campus, Bangalore University, Bangalore (India)

    2015-06-28

    In this article, we have presented ultrafast charge transfer dynamics through halogen bonds following vertical ionization of representative halogen bonded clusters. Subsequent hole directed reactivity of the radical cations of halogen bonded clusters is also discussed. Furthermore, we have examined effect of the halogen bond strength on the electron-electron correlation- and relaxation-driven charge migration in halogen bonded complexes. For this study, we have selected A-Cl (A represents F, OH, CN, NH{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}, and COOH substituents) molecules paired with NH{sub 3} (referred as ACl:NH{sub 3} complex): these complexes exhibit halogen bonds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on purely electron correlation- and relaxation-driven ultrafast (attosecond) charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds. Both density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field theory with 6-31 + G(d, p) basis set are employed for this work. Upon vertical ionization of NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex, the hole is predicted to migrate from the NH{sub 3}-end to the ClCN-end of the NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex in approximately 0.5 fs on the D{sub 0} cationic surface. This hole migration leads to structural rearrangement of the halogen bonded complex, yielding hydrogen bonding interaction stronger than the halogen bonding interaction on the same cationic surface. Other halogen bonded complexes, such as H{sub 2}NCl:NH{sub 3}, F{sub 3}CCl:NH{sub 3}, and HOOCCl:NH{sub 3}, exhibit similar charge migration following vertical ionization. On the contrary, FCl:NH{sub 3} and HOCl:NH{sub 3} complexes do not exhibit any charge migration following vertical ionization to the D{sub 0} cation state, pointing to interesting halogen bond strength-dependent charge migration.

  8. Nanodiamond resonators fabricated on 8″ Si substrates using adhesive wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V.; Lisec, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Reusch, M.; Iankov, D.; Giese, C.; Žukauskaitė, A.; Cimalla, V.; Ambacher, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the adhesive wafer bonding of diamond thin films onto 8″ silicon substrates is reported. In order to characterize bonded nano-crystalline diamond layers, vibrometry and interferometry studies of micro-fabricated flexural beam and disk resonators were carried out. In particular, surface topology along with resonant frequencies, eigenmodes and mechanical quality factors were recorded and analyzed in order to obtain physical parameters of the transferred films. The vibration properties of the bonded resonators were compared to those fabricated directly on 3″ silicon substrates.

  9. Direct Detection of a Chemical Equilibrium between a Localized Singlet Diradical and Its σ-Bonded Species by Time-Resolved UV/Vis and IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidomi, Shohei; Mishima, Megumi; Seyama, Shin; Abe, Manabu; Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Ishibashi, Taka-Aki

    2017-03-06

    Localized singlet diradicals are key intermediates in bond homolyses. The singlet diradicals are energetically much less stable than the σ-bonded species. In general, only one-way reactions from diradicals to σ-bonded species are observed. In this study, a thermal equilibrium between a singlet 1,2-diazacyclopentane-3,5-diyl diradical and the corresponding σ-bonded species was directly observed. The singlet diradical was more stable than the σ-bonded species. The solvent effect clarified key features, such as the zwitterionic character of the singlet diradical. The effect of the nitrogen atoms is discussed in detail. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of the nitrogen unshared electron pair on the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constant of a neighboring bond in oximes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, V.V.; Krivdin, L.B.; Kalabin, G.A.; Trofimov, B.A.

    1986-11-20

    The authors have previously established that the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C coupling constants are stereospecific relative to the orientation of unshared electron pairs (UEP) of nitrogen and oxygen atoms. Here they show that the nitrogen UEP produces a positive contribution to the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C coupling constant of an adjacent syn-periplanar carbon-carbon bond and not to a negative contribution of the corresponding constant of the anti-periplanar bond. Thus, the observed effect is not a consequence of the interaction of the heteroatom UEP with the anti-bonding orbital of the adjacent anti-periplanar bond (n/sub o-o/* interaction) as in the case of anomeric and related effects.

  11. Method to improve commercial bonded SOI material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Humphrey John; Sadana, Devendra Kumar

    2000-07-11

    A method of improving the bonding characteristics of a previously bonded silicon on insulator (SOI) structure is provided. The improvement in the bonding characteristics is achieved in the present invention by, optionally, forming an oxide cap layer on the silicon surface of the bonded SOI structure and then annealing either the uncapped or oxide capped structure in a slightly oxidizing ambient at temperatures greater than 1200.degree. C. Also provided herein is a method for detecting the bonding characteristics of previously bonded SOI structures. According to this aspect of the present invention, a pico-second laser pulse technique is employed to determine the bonding imperfections of previously bonded SOI structures.

  12. Direct patterning of silver particles on porous silicon by inkjet printing of a silver salt via in-situ reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiolerio, Alessandro; Virga, Alessandro; Pandolfi, Paolo; Martino, Paola; Rivolo, Paola; Geobaldo, Francesco; Giorgis, Fabrizio

    2012-09-06

    We have developed a method for obtaining a direct pattern of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on porous silicon (p-Si) by means of inkjet printing (IjP) of a silver salt. Silver NPs were obtained by p-Si mediated in-situ reduction of Ag+ cations using solutions based on AgNO3 which were directly printed on p-Si according to specific geometries and process parameters. The main difference with respect to existing literature is that normally, inkjet printing is applied to silver (metal) NP suspensions, while in our experiment the NPs are formed after jetting the solution on the reactive substrate. We performed both optical and scanning electron microscopes on the NPs traces, correlating the morphology features with the IjP parameters, giving an insight on the synthesis kinetics. The patterned NPs show good performances as SERS substrates.

  13. Silicon hybrid integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianyao; Yuan Taonu; Shao Shiqian; Shi Zujun; Wang Yi; Yu Yude; Yu Jinzhong

    2011-01-01

    Recently,much attention has concentrated on silicon based photonic integrated circuits (PICs), which provide a cost-effective solution for high speed, wide bandwidth optical interconnection and optical communication.To integrate III-V compounds and germanium semiconductors on silicon substrates,at present there are two kinds of manufacturing methods, i.e., heteroepitaxy and bonding. Low-temperature wafer bonding which can overcome the high growth temperature, lattice mismatch,and incompatibility of thermal expansion coefficients during heteroepitaxy, has offered the possibility for large-scale heterogeneous integration. In this paper, several commonly used bonding methods are reviewed, and the future trends of low temperature wafer bonding envisaged. (authors)

  14. Various vibration modes in a silicon ring resonator driven by p–n diode actuators formed in the lateral direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Takafumi; Asahi, Yoichi; Tanigawa, Hiroshi; Furutsuka, Takashi; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we describe p–n diode actuators that are formed in the lateral direction on resonators. Because previously reported p–n diode actuators, which were driven by a force parallel to the electrostatic force induced in a p–n diode, were fabricated in the perpendicular direction to the surface, the fabrication process to satisfy the requirement of realizing a p–n junction set in the middle of the plate thickness has been difficult. The resonators in this work are driven by p–n diodes formed in the lateral direction, making the process easy. We have fabricated a silicon ring resonator that has in-plane vibration using p–n–p and n–p–n diode actuators formed in the lateral direction. First, we consider a space charge model that can sufficiently accurately describe the force induced in p–n diode actuators and compare it with the capacitance model used in most computer simulations. Then, we show that multiplying the vibration amplitude calculated by computer simulation by the modification coefficient of 4/3 provides the vibration amplitude in the p–n diode actuators. Good agreement of the theory with experimental results of the in-plane vibration measured for silicon ring resonators is obtained. The computer simulation is very useful for evaluating various vibration modes in resonators driven by the p–n diode actuators. The small amplitude of the p–n diode actuator measured in this work is expected to increase greatly with increased doping of the actuator.

  15. Self-Healing, High-Permittivity Silicone Dielectric Elastomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2016-01-01

    possesses high dielectric permittivity and consists of an interpenetrating polymer network of silicone elastomer and ionic silicone species that are cross-linked through proton exchange between amines and acids. The ionically cross-linked silicone provides self-healing properties after electrical breakdown...... or cuts made directly to the material due to the reassembly of the ionic bonds that are broken during damage. The dielectric elastomers presented in this paper pave the way to increased lifetimes and the ability of dielectric elastomers to survive millions of cycles in high-voltage conditions....

  16. Three dimensional modelling of grain boundary interaction and evolution during directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, T.; Lin, H. K.; Lan, C. W.

    2018-03-01

    The development of grain structures during directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) plays a crucial role in the materials quality for silicon solar cells. Three dimensional (3D) modelling of the grain boundary (GB) interaction and evolution based on phase fields by considering anisotropic GB energy and mobility for mc-Si is carried out for the first time to elucidate the process. The energy and mobility of GBs are allowed to depend on misorientation and the GB plane. To examine the correctness of our method, the known the coincident site lattice (CSL) combinations such as (∑ a + ∑ b → ∑ a × b) or (∑ a + ∑ b → ∑ a / b) are verified. We frther discuss how to use the GB normal to characterize a ∑ 3 twin GB into a tilt or a twist one, and show the interaction between tilt and twist ∑ 3 twin GBs. Two experimental scenarios are considered for comparison and the results are in good agreement with the experiments as well as the theoretical predictions.

  17. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Bowers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  18. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Bowers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  19. C-H Bond Functionalization via Hydride Transfer: Direct Coupling of Unactivated Alkynes and sp3 C-H Bonds Catalyzed by Platinum Tetraiodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadola, Paul A.; Sames, Dalibor

    2010-01-01

    We report a catalytic intramolecular coupling between terminal unactivated alkynes and sp3 C-H bonds via the through-space hydride transfer (HT-cyclization of alkynes). This method enables one-step preparation of complex heterocyclic compounds by α-alkenylation of readily available cyclic ethers and amines. We show that PtI4 is an effective Lewis acid catalyst for the activation of terminal alkynes for the hydride attack and subsequent C-C bond formation. In addition, we have shown that the activity of neutral platinum salts (PtXn) can be modulated by the halide ligands. This modulation in turn allows for fine-tuning of the platinum center reactivity to match the reactivity and stability of selected substrates and products. PMID:19852462

  20. Direct measurement of free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Frank G.

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to measure the free-energy barrier W(sup *), the activation energy, and activation entropy to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous solids, independent of the energy barrier to growth. The method allows one to determine the temperature dependence of W(sup *), and the effect of the preparation conditions of the initial amorphous phase, the dopants, and the crystallization methds on W(sup *). The method is applied to determine the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. For thermally induced nucleation in a-Si thin films with annealing temperatures in the range of from 824 to 983 K, the free-energy barrier W(sup *) to nucleation of silicon crystals is about 2.0 - 2.1 eV regardless of the preparation conditions of the films. The observation supports the idea that a-Si transforms into an intermediate amorphous state through the structural relaxation prior to the onset of nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. The observation also indicates that the activation entropy may be an insignificant part of the free-energy barrier for the nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. Compared with the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in undoped a-Si films, a significant reduction is observed in the free-energy barrier to nucleation in Cu-doped a-Si films. For a-Si under irradiation of Xe(2+) at 10(exp 5) eV, the free-energy barrier to ion-induced nucleation of crystallites is shown to be about half of the value associated with thermal-induced nucleation of crystallites in a-Si under the otherwise same conditions, which is much more significant than previously expected. The present method has a general kinetic basis; it thus should be equally applicable to nucleation of crystallites in any amorphous elemental semiconductors and semiconductor alloys, metallic and polymeric glasses, and to nucleation of crystallites in melts and solutions.

  1. Endodontic treatment and esthetic management of a primary double tooth with direct composite using silicone buildup guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Kumar Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemination and fusion are morphological dental anomalies, characterized by the formation of a clinically wide tooth. Gemination occurs when one tooth bud tries to divide, while fusion occurs if two buds unite. The terms double teeth, double formation, conjoined teeth, geminifusion, vicinifusion and dental twinning are often used to describe fusion and gemination. Double teeth are associated with clinical problems such as poor esthetics, spacing problems and caries susceptibility. Management of such cases requires a comprehensive knowledge of the clinical entity as well as the problems associated with it. This report presents a case of primary double tooth in a 6-year-old boy involving maxillary left central incisor. The anomalous tooth was carious and pulpally involved. This was treated conservatively by endodontic treatment and esthetic rehabilitation was done with direct composite restoration using a silicone buildup guide. The treated tooth was followed up until exfoliation.

  2. Silicate bonding properties: Investigation through thermal conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, M; Cesarini, E; Cagnoli, G; Campagna, E; Losurdo, G; Martelli, F; Piergiovanni, F; Vetrano, F [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Haughian, K; Hough, J; Martin, I; Reid, S; Rowan, S; Veggel, A A van, E-mail: lorenzini@fi.infn.i [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kelvin Building G12 8QQ Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    A direct approach to reduce the thermal noise contribution to the sensitivity limit of a GW interferometric detector is the cryogenic cooling of the mirrors and mirrors suspensions. Future generations of detectors are foreseen to implement this solution. Silicon has been proposed as a candidate material, thanks to its very low intrinsic loss angle at low temperatures and due to its very high thermal conductivity, allowing the heat deposited in the mirrors by high power lasers to be efficiently extracted. To accomplish such a scheme, both mirror masses and suspension elements must be made of silicon, then bonded together forming a quasi-monolithic stage. Elements can be assembled using hydroxide-catalysis silicate bonding, as for silica monolithic joints. The effect of Si to Si bonding on suspension thermal conductance has therefore to be experimentally studied. A measurement of the effect of silicate bonding on thermal conductance carried out on 1 inch thick silicon bonded samples, from room temperature down to 77 K, is reported. In the explored temperature range, the silicate bonding does not seem to affect in a relevant way the sample conductance.

  3. Optimization of heat transfer during the directional solidification process of 1600 kg silicon feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chieh; Chen, Jyh Chen; Nguyen, Thi Hoai Thu; Hou, Zhi Zhong; Chen, Chun Hung; Huang, Yen Hao; Yang, Michael

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the power ratio between the top and side heaters and the moving velocity of the side insulation are designed to control the shape of the crystal-melt interface during the growth process of a 1600 kg multi-crystalline silicon ingot. The power ratio and insulation gap are adjusted to ensure solidification of the melt. To ensure that the crystal-melt interface is slightly convex in relation to the melt during the entire solidification process, the power ratio should be augmented gradually in the initial stages while being held to a constant value in the middle stages. Initially the gap between the side and the bottom insulation is kept small to reduce thermal stress inside the seed crystals. However, the growth rate will be slow in the early stages of the solidification process. Therefore, the movement of the side insulation is fast in the initial stages but slower in the middle stages. In the later stages, the side insulation gap is fixed. With these modifications, the convexity of the crystal-melt interface in relation to the melt can be maintained during the growth process with an approximately 41% reduction in the thermal stress inside the growing ingot and an 80% reduction in dislocation density along the center line of the ingot compared with the original case.

  4. Estudo in vitro da resistência ao cisalhamento da colagem direta de tubos ortodônticos em molares In vitro study of shear bond strength in direct bonding of orthodontic molar tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina Maio Pinzan Vercelino

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: apesar da colagem direta despender menor tempo clínico, com maior preservação da integridade gengival, ainda hoje se observa uma alta incidência de bandagem dos molares. Portanto, torna-se interessante a idealização de recursos para o aumento da eficiência desse procedimento para dentes submetidos a maiores impactos mastigatórios, como, por exemplo, os molares. OBJETIVO: esse estudo teve o propósito de avaliar se a resistência à adesão com a aplicação de uma camada de resina adicional na região oclusal da interface tubo/dente aumenta a qualidade do procedimento de colagem direta de tubos em molares. MÉTODOS: selecionou-se uma amostra composta por 40 terceiros molares inferiores, que foram aleatoriamente divididos em 2 grupos: Grupo 1 - colagem direta convencional, seguida pela aplicação de uma camada de resina na oclusal da interface tubo/dente; e Grupo 2 - colagem direta convencional. O teste de resistência ao cisalhamento foi realizado 24 horas após a colagem, utilizando-se uma máquina de ensaio universal, operando a uma velocidade de 0,5mm/min. Os resultados foram analisados por meio do teste t independente. RESULTADOS: os valores médios obtidos nos testes de cisalhamento foram: 17,08MPa para o Grupo 1 e 12,60MPa para o Grupo 2. O Grupo 1 apresentou uma resistência ao cisalhamento estatisticamente significativa mais alta do que o Grupo 2. CONCLUSÃO: a aplicação de uma camada adicional de resina na oclusal da interface tubo/dente aumenta a qualidade da adesão do procedimento de colagem direta de tubos ortodônticos em molares.OBJECTIVE: Although direct bonding takes up less clinical time and ensures increased preservation of gingival health, the banding of molar teeth is still widespread nowadays. It would therefore be convenient to devise methods capable of increasing the efficiency of this procedure, notably for teeth subjected to substantial masticatory impact, such as molars. This study was

  5. Angular sensitivity of modeled scientific silicon charge-coupled devices to initial electron direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plimley, Brian, E-mail: brian.plimley@gmail.com [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Coffer, Amy; Zhang, Yigong [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vetter, Kai [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Previously, scientific silicon charge-coupled devices (CCDs) with 10.5-μm pixel pitch and a thick (650 μm), fully depleted bulk have been used to measure gamma-ray-induced fast electrons and demonstrate electron track Compton imaging. A model of the response of this CCD was also developed and benchmarked to experiment using Monte Carlo electron tracks. We now examine the trade-off in pixel pitch and electronic noise. We extend our CCD response model to different pixel pitch and readout noise per pixel, including pixel pitch of 2.5 μm, 5 μm, 10.5 μm, 20 μm, and 40 μm, and readout noise from 0 eV/pixel to 2 keV/pixel for 10.5 μm pixel pitch. The CCD images generated by this model using simulated electron tracks are processed by our trajectory reconstruction algorithm. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm defines the expected angular sensitivity as a function of electron energy, CCD pixel pitch, and readout noise per pixel. Results show that our existing pixel pitch of 10.5 μm is near optimal for our approach, because smaller pixels add little new information but are subject to greater statistical noise. In addition, we measured the readout noise per pixel for two different device temperatures in order to estimate the effect of temperature on the reconstruction algorithm performance, although the readout is not optimized for higher temperatures. The noise in our device at 240 K increases the FWHM of angular measurement error by no more than a factor of 2, from 26° to 49° FWHM for electrons between 425 keV and 480 keV. Therefore, a CCD could be used for electron-track-based imaging in a Peltier-cooled device.

  6. Ionic liquid [OMIm][OAc] directly inducing oxidation cleavage of the β-O-4 bond of lignin model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingying; Fan, Honglei; Meng, Qinglei; Zhang, Zhaofu; Yang, Guanying; Han, Buxing

    2017-08-03

    We explored the oxidation reactions of lignin model compounds directly induced by ionic liquids under metal-free conditions. In this work, it was found that ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate as a solvent could promote the aerobic oxidation of lignin model compound 2-phenoxyacetophenone (1) and the yields of phenol and benzoic acid from 1 could be as high as 96% and 86%, respectively. A possible reaction pathway was proposed based on a series of control experiments. An acetate anion from the ionic liquid attacked the hydrogen from the β-carbon thereby inducing the cleavage of the C-O bond of the aromatic ether. Furthermore, it was found that 2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-phenylethanone (4) with a methoxyl group could also be transformed into aromatic products in this simple reaction system and the yields of phenol and benzoic acid from 4 could be as high as 98% and 85%, respectively. This work provides a simple way for efficient transformation of lignin model compounds.

  7. Role of direct covalent bonding in enhanced heat dissipation property of flexible graphene oxide–carbon nanotube hybrid film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yongseon; Kim, Myeongjin; Kim, Jooheon

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of graphene oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotube (GO/MWCNT) hybrid films with and without covalent bonding is examined in this study. To fabricate chemically bonded GO/MWCNT hybrid films, chlorinated GO and amino-functionalized MWCNTs are bonded covalently. The mixtures of surface modified GO and MWCNT were filtered and then subjected to hot pressing to fabricate stacked films. Examination of these chemically bonded hybrid films reveal that chlorine-doped GO exhibits enhanced electrical properties because it creates hole charge carriers by attracting the electrons in GO towards chlorine. Enhanced electrical conductivity and low sheet resistance are observed also with increasing MWCNT loadings. On comparing the through-plane thermal properties, the chemically bonded hybrid films were found to exhibit higher thermal conductivity than do the physically bonded hybrid films because of the synergetic interaction of functional groups in GO and MWCNTs in the former films. However, excess addition of MWCNTs to the films leads to an increasing phonon scattering density and a decreased thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (GO/CNT) films are bonded covalently. • GO/CNT hybrid films are prepared through filtering and hot-pressing method. • Chemically bonded hybrid films exhibit enhanced electrical and thermal properties. • Enhanced thermal conductivity is explained according to increasing CNT contents

  8. Selective Hydrogen Atom Abstraction through Induced Bond Polarization: Direct α-Arylation of Alcohols through Photoredox, HAT, and Nickel Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilton, Jack; Christensen, Melodie; DiRocco, Daniel A; Ruck, Rebecca T; Davies, Ian W; MacMillan, David W C

    2018-05-04

    The combination of nickel metallaphotoredox catalysis, hydrogen atom transfer catalysis, and a Lewis acid activation mode, has led to the development of an arylation method for the selective functionalization of alcohol α-hydroxy C-H bonds. This approach employs zinc-mediated alcohol deprotonation to activate α-hydroxy C-H bonds while simultaneously suppressing C-O bond formation by inhibiting the formation of nickel alkoxide species. The use of Zn-based Lewis acids also deactivates other hydridic bonds such as α-amino and α-oxy C-H bonds. This approach facilitates rapid access to benzylic alcohols, an important motif in drug discovery. A 3-step synthesis of the drug Prozac exemplifies the utility of this new method. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations.

  10. Pd-Catalyzed Acetoxylation of γ-C(sp3)-H Bonds of Amines Directed by a Removable Bts-Protecting Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong; Song, Weibin; Zhu, Yefu; Wei, Bole; Xuan, Lijiang

    2018-02-16

    Pd-catalyzed acetoxylation of γ-C(sp 3 )-H bonds directed by Bts-protected amines using inexpensive PhI(OAc) 2 as oxidant is reported. The Bts-protecting group is easily introduced and removed under mild conditions. This protocol provides an important strategy for the construction of γ-hydroxyl amine derivatives.

  11. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming; Bings, Nicolas H.; Broekaert, Jose A.C.

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS TM spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm -2 and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower μg g -1 range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 μg g -1

  12. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Bings, Nicolas H. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: bings@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Broekaert, Jose A.C. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS{sup TM} spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm{sup -2} and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower {mu}g g{sup -1} range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 {mu}g g{sup -1}.

  13. Separation followed by direct SERS detection of explosives on a novel black silicon multifunctional nanostructured surface prepared in a microfluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Hübner, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the multifunctionality of a novel black silicon (BS) nanostructured surface covered with a thin layer of noble metal prepared in the a microfluidic channel. It is focused on the separation properties of the BS substrate with direct detection of the separated analytes utilizing...

  14. Note: Anodic bonding with cooling of heat-sensitive areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj

    2010-01-01

    Anodic bonding of silicon to glass always involves heating the glass and device to high temperatures so that cations become mobile in the electric field. We present a simple way of bonding thin silicon samples to borosilicate glass by means of heating from the glass side while locally cooling hea......-sensitive areas from the silicon side. Despite the high thermal conductivity of silicon, this method allows a strong anodic bond to form just millimeters away from areas essentially at room temperature....

  15. Directly UV written silica-on-silicon planar waveguides with low insertion loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zauner, Dan; Svalgaard, Mikael; Kristensen, Martin

    1998-01-01

    in waveguide geometry, and excellent control of the refractive index step. Direct UV writing of waveguides became a realistic alternative to other fabrication methods when propagation losses below 0.2 dB/cm were reported in single-mode waveguides. However, the coupling loss to optical fibers remained high......, typically 1.8 dB/facet, which is significantly more than that obtained with other techniques. In this paper we present results in which the coupling loss to optical fibers has been lowered substantially. In addition, the glass photosensitivity has been increased, thus permitting shorter fabrication times......The photosensitive properties of germanosilica may be utilized to directly induce waveguide patterns into thin-film structures using ultraviolet (UV) light. The advantages of fabricating planar waveguides with UV light include the absence of photolithography and reactive ion etching, flexibility...

  16. A full-wafer fabrication process for glass microfluidic chips with integrated electroplated electrodes by direct bonding of dry film resist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulto, Paul; Urban, G A; Huesgen, Till; Albrecht, Björn

    2009-01-01

    A full-wafer process is presented for fast and simple fabrication of glass microfluidic chips with integrated electroplated electrodes. The process employs the permanent dry film resist (DFR) Ordyl SY300 to create microfluidic channels, followed by electroplating of silver and subsequent chlorination. The dry film resist is bonded directly to a second substrate, without intermediate gluing layers, only by applying pressure and moderate heating. The process of microfluidic channel fabrication, electroplating and wafer bonding can be completed within 1 day, thus making it one of the fastest and simplest full-wafer fabrication processes. (note)

  17. Controlled Directional Solidification of Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Comparison Between Samples Processed on Earth and in the Microgravity Environment Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Tewari, Surendra N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the international "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys" (MICAST) program is given. Directional solidification processing of metals and alloys is described, and why experiments conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are expected to promote our understanding of this commercially relevant practice. Microstructural differences observed when comparing the aluminum - 7 wt% silicon alloys directionally solidified on Earth to those aboard the ISS are presented and discussed.

  18. Characterisation of micro direct methanol fuel cells with silicon plate supported integrated ionomer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Kallesee, C.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the investigation and fabrication of Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries such as lithium......-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density in the range 240 Wh/L to 300 Wh/L Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density, with pure methanol having an energy density of 4400 Wh/L. Using a liquid fuel also allows refueling, which can be achieved much faster than battery...

  19. Directionally Solidified Aluminum - 7 wt% Silicon Alloys: Comparison of Earth and International Space Station Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N,; Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, R. S.; Erdman, Robert; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Primary dendrite arm spacings of Al-7 wt% Si alloy directionally solidified in low gravity environment of space (MICAST-6 and MICAST-7: Thermal gradient approx. 19 to 26 K/cm, Growth speeds varying from 5 to 50 microns/s show good agreement with the Hunt-Lu model. Primary dendrite trunk diameters of the ISS processed samples show a good fit with a simple analytical model based on Kirkwood s approach, proposed here. Natural convection, a) decreases primary dendrite arm spacing. b) appears to increase primary dendrite trunk diameter.

  20. Room temperature direct bonding of LiNbO3 crystal layers and its application to high-voltage optical sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulli, D; Janner, D; Pruneri, V

    2011-01-01

    LiNbO 3 is a crystal widely used in photonics and acoustics, for example in electro-optic modulation, nonlinear optical frequency conversion, electric field sensing and surface acoustic wave filtering. It often needs to be combined with other materials and used in thin layers to achieve the adequate device performance. In this paper, we investigate direct bonding of LiNbO 3 crystals with other dielectric materials, such as Si and fused silica (SiO 2 ), and we show that specific surface chemical cleaning, together with Ar or O 2 plasma activation, can be used to increase the surface free energy and achieve effective bonding at room temperature. The resulting hybrid material bonding is very strong, making the dicing and grinding of LiNbO 3 layers as thin as 15 µm possible. To demonstrate the application potentials of the proposed bonding technique, we have fabricated and characterized a high-voltage field sensor with high sensitivity in a domain inverted and bonded LiNbO 3 waveguide substrate

  1. Self-Assembly of Chip-Size Components with Cavity Structures: High-Precision Alignment and Direct Bonding without Thermal Compression for Hetero Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsumasa Koyanagi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available New surface mounting and packaging technologies, using self-assembly with chips having cavity structures, were investigated for three-dimensional (3D and hetero integration of complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS. By the surface tension of small droplets of 0.5 wt% hydrogen fluoride (HF aqueous solution, the cavity chips, with a side length of 3 mm, were precisely aligned to hydrophilic bonding regions on the surface of plateaus formed on Si substrates. The plateaus have micro-channels to readily evaporate and fully remove the liquid from the cavities. The average alignment accuracy of the chips with a 1 mm square cavity was found to be 0.4 mm. The alignment accuracy depends, not only on the area of the bonding regions on the substrates and the length of chip periphery without the widths of channels in the plateaus, but also the area wetted by the liquid on the bonding regions. The precisely aligned chips were then directly bonded to the substrates at room temperature without thermal compression, resulting in a high shear bonding strength of more than 10 MPa.

  2. Synthesis of silicon containing materials using liquid hydrosilane compositions through direct injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Guruvenket; Sailer, Robert A.; Hoey, Justin

    2018-03-13

    An apparatus and a non-vapor-pressure dependent method of chemical vapor deposition of Si based materials using direct injection of liquid hydrosilane(s) are presented. Liquid silane precursor solutions may also include metal, non-metal or metalloid dopants, nanomaterials and solvents. An illustrative apparatus has a precursor solution and carrier gas system, atomizer and deposit head with interior chamber and a hot plate supporting the substrate. Atomized liquid silane precursor solutions and carrier gas moves through a confined reaction zone that may be heated and the aerosol and vapor are deposited on a substrate to form a thin film. The substrate may be heated prior to deposition. The deposited film may be processed further with thermal or laser processing.

  3. Direct reading spectrochemical determination of aluminium, iron and silicon in fluorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1966-01-01

    A quantitative spectrochemical method for the determination of Al, Fe and Si in fluorite has been worked out. The sample was supported in a graphite electrode with crater of 5 mm. in diameter, 2,5 mm deep, and burned by a d.c. are in a direct reading spectrometer. The excitation of samples has been studied without dilution as well as using graphite powder as diluent in the ratios 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9; the latter factor was chosen. Ag, Ca, Co, Cr, Mo and Sn were tested as internal standards. It has not been found any significant inter element effect. It is necessary to use natural fluorite as base material for the standards. (Author) 5 refs

  4. Broadband silicon polarization beam splitter with a high extinction ratio using a triple-bent-waveguide directional coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jun Rong; Ang, Thomas Y L; Sahin, Ezgi; Pawlina, Bryan; Chen, G F R; Tan, D T H; Lim, Soon Thor; Png, Ching Eng

    2017-11-01

    We report on the design and experimental demonstration of a broadband silicon polarization beam splitter (PBS) with a high extinction ratio (ER)≥30  dB. This was achieved using triple-bent-waveguide directional coupling in a single PBS, and cascaded PBS topology. For the single PBS, the bandwidths for an ER≥30  dB are 20 nm for the quasi-TE mode, and 70 nm for the quasi-TM mode when a broadband light source (1520-1610 nm) was employed. The insertion loss (IL) varies from 0.2 to 1 dB for the quasi-TE mode and 0.2-2 dB for the quasi-TM mode. The cascaded PBS improved the bandwidth of the quasi-TE mode for an ER≥30  dB to 90 nm, with a low IL of 0.2-2 dB. To the best of our knowledge, our PBS system is one of the best broadband PBSs with an ER as high as ∼42  dB and a low IL below 1 dB around the central wavelength, and experimentally demonstrated using edge-coupling.

  5. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  6. Structural and electrical properties of the GexSi1-x/Si heterojunctions obtained by the method of direct bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argunova, T. S.; Belyakova, E. I.; Grekhov, I. V.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Kostina, L. S.; Sorokin, L. M.; Shmidt, N. M.; Yi, J. M.; Jung, J. W.; Je, J. H.; Abrosimov, N. V.

    2007-01-01

    The results of studying the structural and electrical properties of structures produced by the method of direct bonding of Ge x Si 1-x and Si wafers are reported. The wafers were cut from the crystals grown by the Czochralski method. Continuity of the interface and the crystal-lattice defects were studied by X-ray methods using synchrotron radiation and by scanning electron microscopy. Measurements of the forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics of the p-Ge x Si 1-x /n-Si diodes made it possible to assess the effect of the crystallattice defects on the electrical properties of heterojunctions. Satisfactory electrical parameters suggest that the technology of direct bonding is promising for the fabrication of large-area Ge x Si 1-x /Si heterojunctions

  7. Substituent-directed structural and physicochemical controls of diruthenium catecholate complexes with ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Chol; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2005-05-30

    A family of diruthenium complexes with ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds has been systematically synthesized, and their crystal structures and physical properties have been examined. A simple, useful reaction between Ru2(OAc)4Cl (OAc- = acetate) and catechol derivatives in the presence of bases afforded a variety of diruthenium complexes, generally formulated as [Na(n){Ru2(R4Cat)4}] (n = 2 or 3; R4 = -F4, -Cl4, -Br4, -H4, -3,5-di-t-Bu, and -3,6-di-t-Bu; Cat(2-) = catecholate). The most characteristic feature of the complexes is the formation of short ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds (2.140-2.273 A). These comprehensive studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of the oxidation states and the substituents governing the molecular structures and physicochemical properties. The Ru-Ru bond distances, rotational conformations, and bending structures of the complexes were successfully varied. The results presented in this manuscript clearly demonstrate that the complexes with ligand-unsupported Ru-Ru bonds can sensitively respond to redox reactions and ligand substituents on the basis of the greater degree of freedom in their molecular structures.

  8. Shift of semimetal-semiconductor bond direction on “0 1 1” to “1 1 1” Bismuth quazi-two-dimension system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Ahmad; Hamreh, Sajad

    2018-03-01

    The electronic structure of the nanocrystallines and quasi-two-dimensional systems strongly impressed by the thermodynamic- behavior mainly due to excess of hidden surface free energy. Therefore, the stability of crystalline structure’s change could be related to band-offset of bond rupturing of atomic displacements. whereas for the electronic-structure of "Bi" it seams the competition of L.S and bond exchange should be effectively dominated. Besides all of the characters behave spatial like strong sensitive oxidation here it is supposed that strong correlated electronic structure in the absence of oxygen is resulted on direction of redistribution of surface chemical bond formation before any reconstructive structure. Where • The metallic direction of electronic structure “0 1 1” is changed to “1 1 1” semiconductor direction. • the effect of L.S is more evident on the local density of state while it is not observable around the fermi level. • Strong effect of spin-orbit interaction on splitting of the valance to nearly conduction band around the fermi level is more evident.

  9. Nano-laminate vs. direct deposition of high permittivity gadolinium scandate on silicon by high pressure sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feijoo, P.C., E-mail: pedronska@fis.ucm.es [Dpto. Física Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electrónica), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Fac. de CC. Físicas. Av/Complutense S/N, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Pampillón, M.A.; San Andrés, E. [Dpto. Física Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electrónica), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Fac. de CC. Físicas. Av/Complutense S/N, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, C/Marie Curie 2, E-28049 Cantoblanco (Spain)

    2015-10-30

    In this work we use the high pressure sputtering technique to deposit the high permittivity dielectric gadolinium scandate on silicon substrates. This nonconventional deposition technique prevents substrate damage and allows for growth of ternary compounds with controlled composition. Two different approaches were assessed: the first one consists of depositing the material directly from a stoichiometric GdScO{sub 3} target; in the second one, we anneal a nano-laminate of < 0.5 nm thick Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} films in order to control the composition of the scandate. Metal–insulator–semiconductor capacitors were fabricated with platinum gates for electrical characterization. Accordingly, we grew a Gd-rich Gd{sub 2−x}Sc{sub x}O{sub 3} film that, in spite of higher leakage currents, presents a better effective relative permittivity of 21 and lower density of defects. - Highlights: • GdScO is deposited on Si as a high permittivity dielectric by two procedures. • Films sputtered from GdScO{sub 3} target are Sc-rich and present thick interface SiO{sub x}. • Gd-rich GdScO is obtained from a nano-laminate sputtered from Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Gd{sub 1.8}Sc{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} shows good effective permittivity and electrical properties.

  10. Investigations into the impact of bond pads and p-stop implants on the detection efficiency of silicon micro-strip sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, Luise; Lohwasser, Kristin; Blue, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    The High Luminosity Upgrade of the LHC will require the replacement of the Inner Detector of ATLAS with the Inner Tracker (ITk) in order to cope with higher radiation levels and higher track densities. Prototype silicon strip detector modules are currently developed and their performance is studied in both particle test beams and X-ray beams. In previous test beam studies of prototype modules, silicon sensor strips were found to respond in regions varying from the strip pitch of 74.5 μm. The variations have been linked to local features of the sensor architecture. This paper presents results of detailed sensor measurements in both X-ray and particle beams investigating the impact of sensor features (metal pads and p-stops) on the responding area of a sensor strip.

  11. Investigations into the impact of bond pads and p-stop implants on the detection efficiency of silicon micro-strip sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poley, Luise; Lohwasser, Kristin [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Blue, Andrew [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy; and others

    2016-11-15

    The High Luminosity Upgrade of the LHC will require the replacement of the Inner Detector of ATLAS with the Inner Tracker (ITk) in order to cope with higher radiation levels and higher track densities. Prototype silicon strip detector modules are currently developed and their performance is studied in both particle test beams and X-ray beams. In previous test beam studies of prototype modules, silicon sensor strips were found to respond in regions varying from the strip pitch of 74.5 μm. The variations have been linked to local features of the sensor architecture. This paper presents results of detailed sensor measurements in both X-ray and particle beams investigating the impact of sensor features (metal pads and p-stops) on the responding area of a sensor strip.

  12. Sensitivity enhanced NMR spectroscopy by quenching scalar coupling mediated relaxation: Application to the direct observation of hydrogen bonds in 13C/15N-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Aizhuo; Hu Weidong; Qamar, Seema; Majumdar, Ananya [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Cellular Biochemistry and Biophysics Program (United States)

    2000-05-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the sensitivity of triple-resonance NMR experiments can be enhanced significantly through quenching scalar coupling mediated relaxation by using composite-pulse decoupling (CPD) or an adiabatic decoupling sequence on aliphatic, in particular alpha-carbons in {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins. The CPD-HNCO experiment renders 50% sensitivity enhancement over the conventional CT-HNCO experiment performed on a 12 kDa FK506 binding protein, when a total of 266 ms of amide nitrogen-carbonyl carbon defocusing and refocusing periods is employed. This is a typical time period for the direct detection of hydrogen bonds in proteins via trans-hydrogen bond {sup 3h}J{sub NC'} couplings. The experimental data fit theoretical analysis well. The significant enhancement in sensitivity makes the experiment more applicable to larger-sized proteins without resorting to perdeuteration.

  13. Exploring the Nature of Silicon-Noble Gas Bonds in H3SiNgNSi and HSiNgNSi Compounds (Ng = Xe, Rn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Pan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio and density functional theory-based computations are performed to investigate the structure and stability of H3SiNgNSi and HSiNgNSi compounds (Ng = Xe, Rn. They are thermochemically unstable with respect to the dissociation channel producing Ng and H3SiNSi or HSiNSi. However, they are kinetically stable with respect to this dissociation channel having activation free energy barriers of 19.3 and 23.3 kcal/mol for H3SiXeNSi and H3SiRnNSi, respectively, and 9.2 and 12.8 kcal/mol for HSiXeNSi and HSiRnNSi, respectively. The rest of the possible dissociation channels are endergonic in nature at room temperature for Rn analogues. However, one three-body dissociation channel for H3SiXeNSi and one two-body and one three-body dissociation channels for HSiXeNSi are slightly exergonic in nature at room temperature. They become endergonic at slightly lower temperature. The nature of bonding between Ng and Si/N is analyzed by natural bond order, electron density and energy decomposition analyses. Natural population analysis indicates that they could be best represented as (H3SiNg+(NSi− and (HSiNg+(NSi−. Energy decomposition analysis further reveals that the contribution from the orbital term (ΔEorb is dominant (ca. 67%–75% towards the total attraction energy associated with the Si-Ng bond, whereas the electrostatic term (ΔEelstat contributes the maximum (ca. 66%–68% for the same in the Ng–N bond, implying the covalent nature of the former bond and the ionic nature of the latter.

  14. Detachment of Tertiary Dendrite Arms during Controlled Directional Solidification in Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Observations from Ground-based and Microgravity Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Erdman, Robert; Van Hoose, James R.; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Electron Back Scattered Diffraction results from cross-sections of directionally solidified aluminum 7wt% silicon alloys unexpectedly revealed tertiary dendrite arms that were detached and mis-oriented from their parent arm. More surprisingly, the same phenomenon was observed in a sample similarly processed in the quiescent microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in support of the joint US-European MICAST investigation. The work presented here includes a brief introduction to MICAST and the directional solidification facilities, and their capabilities, available aboard the ISS. Results from the ground-based and microgravity processed samples are compared and possible mechanisms for the observed tertiary arm detachment are suggested.

  15. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH 1 ) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon

  16. Detection of polydimethylsiloxanes transferred from silicone-coated parchment paper to baked goods using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Andreas; Crawford, Elizabeth A; Gross, Jürgen H

    2016-04-01

    The non-stick properties of parchment papers are achieved by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coatings. During baking, PDMS can thus be extracted from the silicone-coated parchment into the baked goods. Positive-ion direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry (MS) is highly efficient for the analysis of PDMS. A DART-SVP source was coupled to a quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect PDMS on the contact surface of baked goods after use of silicone-coated parchment papers. DART spectra from the bottom surface of baked cookies and pizzas exhibited signals because of PDMS ions of the general formula [(C2H6SiO)n  + NH4 ](+) in the m/z 800-1900 range. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Direct comparison of the electrical properties in metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon and metal/aluminum oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon capacitors with equivalent oxide thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Ho-Myoung; Seo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Kyoung Chan; Kim, Jong-Guk [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Won-Ju; Koh, Jung-Hyuk [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Yun Mo [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.k [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-31

    We examine the electrical properties of metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS) capacitors with two different blocking oxides, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, under the influence of the same electric field. The thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is set to 150 A, which is electrically equivalent to a thickness of the SiO{sub 2} layer of 65 A, in the MONOS structure for this purpose. The capacitor with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer shows a larger capacitance-voltage memory window of 8.6 V, lower program voltage of 7 V, faster program/erase speeds of 10 ms/1 {mu}s, lower leakage current of 100 pA and longer data retention than the one with the SiO{sub 2} blocking layer does. These improvements are attributed to the suppression of the carrier transport to the gate electrode afforded by the use of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer physically thicker than the SiO{sub 2} one, as well as the effective charge-trapping by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the deep energy levels in the nitride layer.

  18. Influence of Heat-Treatment on the Adhesive Strength between a Micro-Sized Bonded Component and a Silicon Substrate under Bend and Shear Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Chiemi

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive bend and shear tests of micro-sized bonded component have been performed to clarify the relationship between effects of heat-treatment on the adhesive strength and the bonded specimen shape using Weibull analysis. Multiple micro-sized SU-8 columns with four different diameters were fabricated on a Si substrate under the same fabrication condition. Heat-treatment can improve both of the adhesive bend and shear strength. The improvement rate of the adhesive shear strength is much larger than that of the adhesive bend strength, because the residual stress, which must change by heat-treatment, should effect more strongly on the shear loading. In case of bend type test, the adhesive bend strength in the smaller diameters (50 and 75 μm) widely vary, because the critical size of the natural defect (micro-crack) should vary more widely in the smaller diameters. In contrast, in case of shear type test, the adhesive shear strengths in each diameter of the columns little vary. This suggests that the size of the natural defects may not strongly influence on the adhesive shear strength. All the result suggests that both of the adhesive bend and shear strengths should be complicatedly affected by heat-treatment and the bonded columnar diameter

  19. Direct Carboxylation of the Diazo Group ipso-C(sp2)-H bond with Carbon Dioxide: Access to Unsymmetrical Diazomalonates and Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianyi; Li, Man; Xiong, Rui; Mo, Fanyang

    2017-12-15

    The direct carboxylation of the ipso-C(sp 2 )-H bond of a diazo compound with carbon dioxide under mild reaction conditions is described. This method is transition-metal-free, uses a weak base, and proceeds at ambient temperature under atmospheric pressure in carbon dioxide. The carboxylation exhibits high reactivity and is amenable to subsequent diversification. A series of unsymmetrical 1,3-diester/keto/amide diazo compounds are obtained with moderate to excellent yields (up to 99%) with good functional group compatibility.

  20. Observation of Vacancies, Faults, and Superstructures in Ln5Mo2O12 (Ln = La, Y, and Lu) Compounds with Direct Mo-Mo Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colabello, Diane M; Sobalvarro, Elizabeth M; Sheckelton, John P; Neuefeind, Joerg C; McQueen, Tyrel M; Khalifah, Peter G

    2017-11-06

    Among oxide compounds with direct metal-metal bonding, the Y 5 Mo 2 O 12 (A 5 B 2 O 12 ) structural family of compounds has a particularly intriguing low-dimensional structure due to the presence of bioctahedral B 2 O 10 dimers arranged in one-dimensional edge-sharing chains along the direction of the metal-metal bonds. Furthermore, these compounds can have a local magnetic moment due to the noninteger oxidation state (+4.5) of the transition metal, in contrast to the conspicuous lack of a local moment that is commonly observed when oxide compounds with direct metal-metal bonding have integer oxidation states resulting from the lifting of orbital degeneracy typically induced by the metal-metal bonding. Although a monoclinic C2/m structure has been previously proposed for Ln 5 Mo 2 O 12 (Ln = La-Lu and Y) members of this family based on prior single crystal diffraction data, it is found that this structural model misses many important structural features. On the basis of synchrotron powder diffraction data, it is shown that the C2/m monoclinic unit cell represents a superstructure relative to a previously unrecognized orthorhombic Immm subcell and that the superstructure derives from the ordering of interchangeable Mo 2 O 10 and LaO 6 building blocks. The superstructure for this reason is typically highly faulted, as evidenced by the increased breadth of superstructure diffraction peaks associated with a coherence length of 1-2 nm in the c* direction. Finally, it is shown that oxygen vacancies can occur when Ln = La, producing an oxygen deficient stoichiometry of La 5 Mo 2 O 11.55 and an approximately 10-fold reduction in the number of unpaired electrons due to the reduction of the average Mo valence from +4.5 to +4.05, a result confirmed by magnetic susceptibility measurements. This represents the first observation of oxygen vacancies in this family of compounds and provides an important means of continuously tuning the magnetic interactions within the one

  1. Thiocarbamate-Directed Tandem Olefination-Intramolecular Sulfuration of Two Ortho C-H Bonds: Application to Synthesis of a COX-2 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wendong; Zhao, Yingwei; Mai, Shaoyu; Song, Qiuling

    2018-02-16

    A palladium-catalyzed dual ortho C-H bond activation of aryl thiocarbamates is developed. This tandem reaction initiates by thiocarbamate-directed ortho C-H palladation, which leads to favorable olefin insertion rather than reductive elimination. The oxidative Heck reaction followed by another C-H activation and sulfuration affords the dual-functionalized products. This reaction provides a concise route to the S,O,C multisubstituted benzene skeleton which could be successfully applied for the synthesis of a COX-2 inhibitor.

  2. Direct observation and measurements of neutron induced deep levels responsible for N{sub eff} changes in high resistivity silicon detectors using TCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.; Li, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E. [AN SSSR, Leningrad (Russian Federation). Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.

    1996-03-01

    Neutron induced deep levels responsible for changes of space charge concentration {ital N{sub eff}} in high resistivity silicon detectors have been observed directly using the transient current technique (TCT). It has been observed by TCT that the absolute value and sign of {ital N{sub eff}} experience changes due to the trapping of non- equilibrium free carriers generated near the surface (about 5 micrometers depth into the silicon) by short wavelength laser pulses in fully depleted detectors. Electron trapping causes {ital N{sub eff}} to change toward negative direction (or more acceptor-like space charges) and hole trapping causes {ital N{sub eff}} to change toward positive direction (or more donor-like space charges). The specific temperature associated with these {ital N{sub eff}} changes are those of the frozen-up temperatures for carrier emission of the corresponding deep levels. The carrier capture cross sections of various deep levels have been measured directly using different free carrier injection schemes. 10 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Metal-ceramic bond strength between a feldspathic porcelain and a Co-Cr alloy fabricated with Direct Metal Laser Sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Spyropoulos, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to record the metal-ceramic bond strength of a feldspathic dental porcelain and a Co-Cr alloy, using the Direct Metal Laser Sintering technique (DMLS) for the fabrication of metal substrates. Ten metal substrates were fabricated with powder of a dental Co-Cr alloy using DMLS technique (test group) in dimensions according to ISO 9693. Another ten substrates were fabricated with a casing dental Co-Cr alloy using classic casting technique (control group) for comparison. Another three substrates were fabricated using each technique to record the Modulus of Elasticity ( E ) of the used alloys. All substrates were examined to record external and internal porosity. Feldspathic porcelain was applied on the substrates. Specimens were tested using the three-point bending test. The failure mode was determined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The statistical analysis was performed using t-test. Substrates prepared using DMLS technique did not show internal porosity as compared to those produced using the casting technique. The E of control and test group was 222 ± 5.13 GPa and 227 ± 3 GPa, respectively. The bond strength was 51.87 ± 7.50 MPa for test group and 54.60 ± 6.20 MPa for control group. No statistically significant differences between the two groups were recorded. The mode of failure was mainly cohesive for all specimens. Specimens produced by the DMLS technique cover the lowest acceptable metal-ceramic bond strength of 25 MPa specified in ISO 9693 and present satisfactory bond strength for clinical use.

  4. Removal of inclusions from silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftja, Arjan; Engh, Thorvald Abel; Tangstad, Merete; Kvithyld, Anne; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes

    2009-11-01

    The removal of inclusions from molten silicon is necessary to satisfy the purity requirements for solar grade silicon. This paper summarizes two methods that are investigated: (i) settling of the inclusions followed by subsequent directional solidification and (infiltration by ceramic foam filters. Settling of inclusions followed by directional solidification is of industrial importance for production of low-cost solar grade silicon. Filtration is reported as the most efficient method for removal of inclusions from the top-cut silicon scrap.

  5. High-resolution computer-generated reflection holograms with three-dimensional effects written directly on a silicon surface by a femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wædegaard, Kristian J; Balling, Peter

    2011-02-14

    An infrared femtosecond laser has been used to write computer-generated holograms directly on a silicon surface. The high resolution offered by short-pulse laser ablation is employed to write highly detailed holograms with resolution up to 111 kpixels/mm2. It is demonstrated how three-dimensional effects can be realized in computer-generated holograms. Three-dimensional effects are visualized as a relative motion between different parts of the holographic reconstruction, when the hologram is moved relative to the reconstructing laser beam. Potential security applications are briefly discussed.

  6. The conserved His8 of the Moloney murine leukemia virus Env SU subunit directs the activity of the SU-TM disulphide bond isomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Ekstroem, Maria; Wallin, Michael; Garoff, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) fusion is controlled by isomerization of the disulphide bond between the receptor-binding surface (SU) and fusion-active transmembrane subunits of the Env-complex. The bond is in SU linked to a CXXC motif. This carries a free thiol that upon receptor binding can be activated (ionized) to attack the disulphide and rearrange it into a disulphide isomer within the motif. To find out whether His8 in the conserved SPHQ sequence of Env directs thiol activation, we analyzed its ionization in MLV vectors with wtEnv and Env with His8 deleted or substituted for Tyr or Arg, which partially or completely arrests fusion. The ionization was monitored by following the pH effect on isomerization in vitro by Ca 2+ depletion or in vivo by receptor binding. We found that wtEnv isomerized optimally at slightly basic pH whereas the partially active mutant required higher and the inactive mutants still higher pH. This suggests that His8 directs the ionization of the CXXC thiol

  7. Metallic and/or oxygen ion implantation into AlN ceramics as a method of preparation for its direct bonding with copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlak, M.; Borkowska, K.; Olesinska, W.; Kalinski, D.; Piekoszewski, J.; Werner, Z.; Jagielski, J.; Sartowska, B.

    2006-01-01

    Direct bonding (DB) process is recently getting an increasing interest as a method for producing high quality joints between aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics and copper. The metallic ions were implanted using an MEVVA type TITAN implanter with unseparated beam. Oxygen ions were implanted using a semi-industrial ion implanter without mass separation equipped with a gaseous ion source. The substrate temperature did not exceed 200 o C. Ions were implanted at two acceleration voltages, i.e. 15 and 70 kV. The fluence range was between 1·E16 and 1·E18 cm -2 . After implantation, some of the samples were characterized by the Rutherford backscattering (RBS) method. In conclusion: (a) The investigations performed in the present work confirm an assumption that ion implantation is a very promising technique as a pretreatment of AlN ceramics for the formation of the joints with copper in direct bonding process. (b) It has been shown that titanium implantation gives the best results in comparison to other metals examined (Fe, Cr, Cu) but also in comparison to double Ti+O and O+Ti implantations

  8. Physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.

    2014-01-01

    bonding. For this work, low temperature corresponds to bonding temperatures below 200°C. Combining the findings gained from physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu bonding and low temperature plasma activated silicon direct bonding (not shown here), a solid foundation for the highly commercially relevant Cu/SiO 2 hybrid bonding at low temperature conditions was achieved. (author) [de

  9. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  10. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SiC/RBSN) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  11. Direct growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on silicon substrate by spray pyrolysis of Glycine max oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Karthikeyan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis from Glycine max oil on silicon substrate using ferrocene as catalyst at 650 °C. Glycine max oil, a plant-based hydrocarbon precursor was used as a source of carbon and argon as a carrier gas. The as-grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopic images reveal that the dense bundles of aligned carbon nanotubes. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations indicate that as-grown aligned carbon nanotubes are well graphitized.

  12. 75 FR 78900 - Regulations Governing Book-Entry Treasury Bonds, Notes and Bills Held in Legacy Treasury Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... marketable security to a broker or financial institution in order to effect a sale of the security prior to... bypassing the need to transfer their securities to a broker or financial institution for sale. When Treasury...Direct, less than 1.5 percent of holdings. Alternative services by brokers or financial institutions are...

  13. Silicon web process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  14. Optical and passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for application on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, Daniel Nilsen

    2008-07-01

    quality, etch rate. The response of these parameters to high temperature anneals were correlated with structural changes in the silicon nitride films as measured by using the hydrogen bond concentration. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition allows continuous variation in nearly all deposition parameters. The parameters studied in this work are the gas flow ratios and excitation power. In both direct and remote deposition systems, the increase in deposition power density lead to higher activation of ammonia which in turn lead to augmented incorporation of nitrogen into the films and thus lower refractive index. For a direct system, the same parameter change lead to a drastic fall in passivation quality of Czochralski silicon attributed to an increase in ion bombardment as well as the general observation that as deposited passivation tends to increase with refractive index. Silicon nitride films with variations in refractive index were also made by varying the silane-to-ammonia gas flow ratio. This simple parameter adjustment makes plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride applicable to double layer anti-reflective coatings simulated in this work. The films were found to have an etch rate in 5% hydrofluoric acid that decreased with increasing refractive index. This behaviour is attributed to the decreasing concentration of nitrogen-to-hydrogen bonds in the films. Such bonds at the surface of silicon nitride have been suggested to be involved in the main reaction mechanism when etching silicon nitride in hydrofluoric acid. Annealing the films lead to a drastic fall in etch rates and was linked to the release of hydrogen from the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds. (author). 115 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Extending Moore’s Law for Silicon CMOS using More-Moore and More-than-Moore Technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2016-01-01

    , promises to increase the performance per area of a silicon chip. We report a process for stacking and bonding these pieces with polymeric bonding and interconnecting them using copper through silicon vias (TSVs). We report a process for fabricating through

  16. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronuzzi, J.; Mapelli, A.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set in full depletion. In a first step, Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD is used to evaluate the soundness of this technique for interface traps characterization such as it may happen in bonded interfaces. Next, an analytical model is developed in details to give a better insight into the physics behind the TCT for interface layers. Further, this can be used as a simple tool to evidence what are the relevant parameters influencing the TCT signal and to set the basis for preliminary characterizations.

  17. Bond Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  18. Direct determination of protonation states and visualization of hydrogen bonding in a glycoside hydrolase with neutron crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qun; Parks, Jerry M.; Hanson, B. Leif; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias E.; Graham, David E.; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes apply acid/base chemistry to catalyze the decomposition of complex carbohydrates. These ubiquitous enzymes accept protons from solvent and donate them to substrates at close to neutral pH by modulating the pKa values of key side chains during catalysis. However, it is not known how the catalytic acid residue acquires a proton and transfers it efficiently to the substrate. To better understand GH chemistry, we used macromolecular neutron crystallography to directly determine protonation and ionization states of the active site residues of a family 11 GH at multiple pD (pD = pH + 0.4) values. The general acid glutamate (Glu) cycles between two conformations, upward and downward, but is protonated only in the downward orientation. We performed continuum electrostatics calculations to estimate the pKa values of the catalytic Glu residues in both the apo- and substrate-bound states of the enzyme. The calculated pKa of the Glu increases substantially when the side chain moves down. The energy barrier required to rotate the catalytic Glu residue back to the upward conformation, where it can protonate the glycosidic oxygen of the substrate, is 4.3 kcal/mol according to free energy simulations. These findings shed light on the initial stage of the glycoside hydrolysis reaction in which molecular motion enables the general acid catalyst to obtain a proton from the bulk solvent and deliver it to the glycosidic oxygen. PMID:26392527

  19. Direct, CMOS In-Line Process Flow Compatible, Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu Thermocompression Bonding Using Stress Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Asisa Kumar; Ghosh, Tamal; Kumar, C. Hemanth; Singh, Shiv Govind; Vanjari, Siva Rama Krishna

    2018-05-01

    Diffusion of atoms across the boundary between two bonding layers is the key for achieving excellent thermocompression Wafer on Wafer bonding. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel mechanism to increase the diffusion across the bonding interface and also shows the CMOS in-line process flow compatible Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu bonding which is devoid of Cu surface treatment prior to bonding. The stress in sputtered Cu thin films was engineered by adjusting the Argon in-let pressure in such a way that one film had a compressive stress while the other film had tensile stress. Due to this stress gradient, a nominal pressure (2 kN) and temperature (75 °C) was enough to achieve a good quality thermocompression bonding having a bond strength of 149 MPa and very low specific contact resistance of 1.5 × 10-8 Ω-cm2. These excellent mechanical and electrical properties are resultant of a high quality Cu-Cu bonding having grain growth between the Cu films across the boundary and extended throughout the bonded region as revealed by Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy. In addition, reliability assessment of Cu-Cu bonding with stress engineering was demonstrated using multiple current stressing and temperature cycling test, suggests excellent reliable bonding without electrical performance degradation.

  20. Direct, CMOS In-Line Process Flow Compatible, Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu Thermocompression Bonding Using Stress Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Asisa Kumar; Ghosh, Tamal; Kumar, C. Hemanth; Singh, Shiv Govind; Vanjari, Siva Rama Krishna

    2018-03-01

    Diffusion of atoms across the boundary between two bonding layers is the key for achieving excellent thermocompression Wafer on Wafer bonding. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel mechanism to increase the diffusion across the bonding interface and also shows the CMOS in-line process flow compatible Sub 100 °C Cu-Cu bonding which is devoid of Cu surface treatment prior to bonding. The stress in sputtered Cu thin films was engineered by adjusting the Argon in-let pressure in such a way that one film had a compressive stress while the other film had tensile stress. Due to this stress gradient, a nominal pressure (2 kN) and temperature (75 °C) was enough to achieve a good quality thermocompression bonding having a bond strength of 149 MPa and very low specific contact resistance of 1.5 × 10-8 Ω-cm2. These excellent mechanical and electrical properties are resultant of a high quality Cu-Cu bonding having grain growth between the Cu films across the boundary and extended throughout the bonded region as revealed by Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy. In addition, reliability assessment of Cu-Cu bonding with stress engineering was demonstrated using multiple current stressing and temperature cycling test, suggests excellent reliable bonding without electrical performance degradation.

  1. Continuous-wave operation and 10-Gb/s direct modulation of InAsP/InP sub-wavelength nanowire laser on silicon photonic crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Takiguchi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated sub-wavelength (∼111 nm diameter single nanowire (NW continuous wave (CW lasers on silicon photonic crystal in the telecom-band with direct modulation at 10 Gb/s by optical pumping at cryogenic temperatures. To estimate the small signal response and pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS modulation of our CW lasers, we employed a new signal detection technique that employs a superconducting single photon detector and a time-correlated single photon counting module. The results showed that our NW laser was unambiguously modulated at above 10 Gb/s and an open eye pattern was obtained. This is the first demonstration of a telecom-band CW NW laser with high-speed PRBS modulation.

  2. Mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, R.; Li, Q.; Pan, B.C.; Yoon, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Tight-binding molecular-dynamics calculations reveal a mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen diffuses through the network by successively bonding with nearby silicons and breaking their Si endash Si bonds. The diffusing hydrogen carries with it a newly created dangling bond. These intermediate transporting states are densely populated in the network, have lower energies than H at the center of stretched Si endash Si bonds, and can play a crucial role in hydrogen diffusion. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  3. Direct detection of illicit drugs from biological fluids by desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with nanoporous silicon microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, T M; Kirkbride, P; Della Vedova, C B; Kershaw, S G; Kobus, H; Voelcker, N H

    2015-12-07

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) is a high throughput analytical technique capable of detecting low molecular weight analytes, including illicit drugs, and with potential applications in forensic toxicology as well as athlete and workplace testing, particularly for biological fluids (oral fluids, urine and blood). However, successful detection of illicit drugs using SALDI-MS often requires extraction steps to reduce the inherent complexity of biological fluids. Here, we demonstrate an all-in-one extraction and analytical system consisting of hydrophobically functionalized porous silicon microparticles (pSi-MPs) for affinity SALDI-MS of prescription and illicit drugs. This novel approach allows for the analysis of drugs from multiple biological fluids without sample preparation protocols. The effect of pSi-MP size, pore diameter, pore depth and functionalization on analytical performance is investigated. pSi-MPs were optimized for the rapid and high sensitivity detection of methadone, cocaine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). This optimized system allowed extraction and detection of methadone from spiked saliva and clinical urine samples. Furthermore, by detecting oxycodone in additional clinical saliva and plasma samples, we were able to demonstrate the versatility of the pSi-MP SALDI-MS technique.

  4. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  5. Fabrication of a Schottky junction diode with direct growth graphene on silicon by a solid phase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, Golap; Hirano, Ryo; Ayhan, Muhammed E; Tanemura, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate fabrication of a Schottky junction diode with direct growth graphene on n-Si by the solid phase reaction approach. Metal-assisted crystallization of a-C thin film was performed to synthesize transfer-free graphene directly on a SiO 2 patterned n-Si substrate. Graphene formation at the substrate and catalyst layer interface is achieved in presence of a Co catalytic and CoO carbon diffusion barrier layer. The as-synthesized material shows a linear current–voltage characteristic confirming the metallic behaviour of the graphene structure. The direct grown graphene on n-Si substrate creates a Schottky junction with a potential barrier of 0.44 eV and rectification diode characteristic. Our finding shows that the directly synthesized graphene on Si substrate by a solid phase reaction process can be a promising technique to fabricate an efficient Schottky junction device. (paper)

  6. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  7. Bond markets in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Mu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available African bond markets have been steadily growing in recent years, but nonetheless remain undeveloped. African countries would benefit from greater access to financing and deeper financial markets. This paper compiles a unique set of data on government securities and corporate bond markets in Africa. It then applies an econometric model to analyze the key determinants of African government securities market and corporate bond market capitalization. Government securities market capitalization is directly related to better institutions and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to smaller fiscal deficits, higher interest rate spreads, exchange rate volatility, and current and capital account openness. Corporate bond market capitalization is directly linked to economic size, the level of development of the economy and financial markets, better institutions, and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to higher interest rate spreads and current account openness. Policy implications follow.

  8. Metal-oxide-semiconductor devices based on epitaxial germanium-carbon layers grown directly on silicon substrates by ultra-high-vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, David Quest

    After the integrated circuit was invented in 1959, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology soon became the mainstay of the semiconductor industry. Silicon-based CMOS has dominated logic technologies for decades. During this time, chip performance has grown at an exponential rate at the cost of higher power consumption and increased process complexity. The performance gains have been made possible through scaling down circuit dimensions by improvements in lithography capabilities. Since scaling cannot continue forever, researchers have vigorously pursued new ways of improving the performance of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) without having to shrink gate lengths and reduce the gate insulator thickness. Strained silicon, with its ability to boost transistor current by improving the channel mobility, is one of the methods that has already found its way into production. Although not yet in production, high-kappa dielectrics have also drawn wide interest in industry since they allow for the reduction of the electrical oxide thickness of the gate stack without having to reduce the physical thickness of the dielectric. Further out on the horizon is the incorporation of high-mobility materials such as germanium (Ge), silicon-germanium (Si1-xGe x), and the III-V semiconductors. Among the high-mobility materials, Ge has drawn the most attention because it has been shown to be compatible with high-kappa dielectrics and to produce high drive currents compared to Si. Among the most difficult challenges for integrating Ge on Si is finding a suitable method for reducing the number of crystal defects. The use of strain-relaxed Si1- xGex buffers has proven successful for reducing the threading dislocation density in Ge epitaxial layers, but questions remain as to the viability of this method in terms of cost and process complexity. This dissertation presents research on thin germanium-carbon (Ge 1-yCy layers on Si for the fabrication

  9. Single-crystal micromachining using multiple fusion-bonded layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alan; O'Neill, Garry; Blackstone, Scott C.

    2000-08-01

    Multi-layer structures have been fabricated using Fusion bonding. The paper shows void free layers of between 2 and 100 microns that have been bonded to form multi-layer structures. Silicon layers have been bonded both with and without interfacial oxide layers.

  10. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehezkel, O.

    1983-01-01

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  11. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Bronuzzi, J.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set ...

  12. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  13. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  14. Magneto-optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon waveguide optical non-reciprocal devices based on the magneto-optical effect are reviewed. The non-reciprocal phase shift caused by the first-order magneto-optical effect is effective in realizing optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon waveguide platforms. In a silicon-on-insulator waveguide, the low refractive index of the buried oxide layer enhances the magneto-optical phase shift, which reduces the device footprints. A surface activated direct bonding technique was developed to integrate a magneto-optical garnet crystal on the silicon waveguides. A silicon waveguide optical isolator based on the magneto-optical phase shift was demonstrated with an optical isolation of 30 dB and insertion loss of 13 dB at a wavelength of 1548 nm. Furthermore, a four port optical circulator was demonstrated with maximum isolations of 15.3 and 9.3 dB in cross and bar ports, respectively, at a wavelength of 1531 nm.

  15. Fabrication and optical characteristics of silicon-based two-dimensional wavelength division multiplexing splitter with photonic crystal directional waveguide couplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Cheng-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystals have many potential applications because of their ability to control lightwave propagation. We report on the fabrication and optical properties of quasi-two-dimensional photonic crystals with triangular lattice of dielectric rods in air. Rod-type photonic crystal structures were fabricated in silicon by electron beam lithography and dry-etching techniques. Wavelength division multiplexing splitters were fabricated from two-dimensional photonic crystal directional waveguide couplers. Transmission spectra were measured and device operation was shown to be in agreement with theoretical calculations. The splitters can be used in visible light region. Such an approach to photonic element systems should enable new applications for designing components in photonic integrated circuits. -- Highlights: → We report the fabrication and optical properties of rod-type photonic crystal. → The splitter was fabricated by electron beam lithography and dry-etching techniques. → The splitter was composed of directional waveguide couplers. → Measured transmission spectra are in agreement with theoretical calculations. → The splitters can be used in visible light region.

  16. Hydroxyapatite-coated double network hydrogel directly bondable to the bone: Biological and biomechanical evaluations of the bonding property in an osteochondral defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Susumu; Kitamura, Nobuto; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Kiyama, Ryuji; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2016-10-15

    We have developed a novel hydroxyapatite (HAp)-coated double-network (DN) hydrogel (HAp/DN gel). The purpose of this study was to determine details of the cell and tissue responses around the implanted HAp/DN gel and to determine how quickly and strongly the HAp/DN gel bonds to the bone in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Immature osteoid tissue was formed in the space between the HAp/DN gel and the bone at 2weeks, and the osteoid tissue was mineralized at 4weeks. The push-out load of the HAp/DN gel averaged 37.54N and 42.15N at 4 and 12weeks, respectively, while the push-out load of the DN gel averaged less than 5N. The bonding area of the HAp/DN gel to the bone was above 80% by 4weeks, and above 90% at 12weeks. This study demonstrated that the HAp/DN gel enhanced osseointegration at an early stage after implantation. The presence of nanoscale structures in addition to osseointegration of HAp promoted osteoblast adhesion onto the surface of the HAp/DN gel. The HAp/DN gel has the potential to improve the implant-tissue interface in next-generation orthopaedic implants such as artificial cartilage. Recent studies have reported the development of various hydrogels that are sufficiently tough for application as soft supporting tissues. However, fixation of hydrogels on bone surfaces with appropriate strength is a great challenge. We have developed a novel, tough hydrogel hybridizing hydroxyapatite (HAp/DN gel), which is directly bondable to the bone. The present study demonstrated that the HAp/DN gel enhanced osseointegration in the early stage after implantation. The presence of nanoscale structures in addition to the osseointegration ability of hydroxyapatite promoted osteoblast adhesion onto the surface of the HAp/DN gel. The HAp/DN gel has the potential to improve the implant-tissue interface in next-generation orthopaedic implants such as artificial cartilage. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct 3-D morphological measurements of silicone rubber impression using micro-focus X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamegawa, Masayuki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Fukui, Yu; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Hojo, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer models of dental arches play a significant role in prosthetic dentistry. The microfocus X-ray CT scanner has the advantage of capturing precise 3D shapes of deep fossa, and we propose a new method of measuring the three-dimensional morphology of a dental impression directly, which will eliminate the conversion process to dental casts. Measurement precision and accuracy were evaluated using a standard gage comprised of steel balls which simulate the dental arch. Measurement accuracy, standard deviation of distance distribution of superimposed models, was determined as +/-0.050 mm in comparison with a CAD model. Impressions and casts of an actual dental arch were scanned by microfocus X-ray CT and three-dimensional models were compared. The impression model had finer morphology, especially around the cervical margins of teeth. Within the limitations of the current study, direct three-dimensional impression modeling was successfully demonstrated using microfocus X-ray CT.

  18. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  19. A method of coupling the Paternò-Büchi reaction with direct infusion ESI-MS/MS for locating the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond in glycerophospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2016-06-21

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with soft ionization is established as an essential platform for lipid analysis; however, determining high order structural information, such as the carbon-carbon double bond (C[double bond, length as m-dash]C) location, remains challenging. Recently, our group demonstrated a method for sensitive and confident lipid C[double bond, length as m-dash]C location determination by coupling online the Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction with nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) and MS/MS. Herein, we aimed to expand the scope of the PB reaction for lipid analysis by enabling the reaction with infusion ESI-MS/MS at much higher flow rates than demonstrated in the nanoESI setup (∼20 nL min(-1)). In the new design, the PB reaction was effected in a fused silica capillary solution transfer line, which also served as a microflow UV reactor, prior to ESI. This setup allowed PB reaction optimization and kinetics studies. Under optimized conditions, a maximum of 50% PB reaction yield could be achieved for a standard glycerophosphocholine (PC) within 6 s of UV exposure over a wide flow rate range (0.1-10 μL min(-1)). A solvent composition of 7 : 3 acetone : H2O (with 1% acid or base modifier) allowed the highest PB yields and good lipid ionization, while lower yields were obtained with an addition of a variety of organic solvents. Radical induced lipid peroxidation was identified to induce undesirable side reactions, which could be effectively suppressed by eliminating trace oxygen in the solution via N2 purge. Finally, the utility of coupling the PB reaction with infusion ESI-MS/MS was demonstrated by analyzing a yeast polar lipid extract where C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond locations were revealed for 35 glycerophospholipids (GPs).

  20. Electrochemically etched nanoporous silicon membrane for separation of biological molecules in mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burham, Norhafizah; Azlan Hamzah, Azrul; Yunas, Jumril; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a technique for separating biological molecules in mixture using nanoporous silicon membrane. Nanopores were formed using electrochemical etching process (ECE) by etching a prefabricated silicon membrane in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and ethanol, and then directly bonding it with PDMS to form a complete filtration system for separating biological molecules. Tygon S3™ tubings were used as fluid interconnection between PDMS molds and silicon membrane during testing. Electrochemical etching parameters were manipulated to control pore structure and size. In this work, nanopores with sizes of less than 50 nm, embedded on top of columnar structures have been fabricated using high current densities and variable HF concentrations. Zinc oxide was diluted with deionized (DI) water and mixed with biological molecules and non-biological particles, namely protein standard, serum albumin and sodium chloride. Zinc oxide particles were trapped on the nanoporous silicon surface, while biological molecules of sizes up to 12 nm penetrated the nanoporous silicon membrane. The filtered particles were inspected using a Zetasizer Nano SP for particle size measurement and count. The Zetasizer Nano SP results revealed that more than 95% of the biological molecules in the mixture were filtered out by the nanoporous silicon membrane. The nanoporous silicon membrane fabricated in this work is integratable into bio-MEMS and Lab-on-Chip components to separate two or more types of biomolecules at once. The membrane is especially useful for the development of artificial kidney.

  1. Nickel-Catalyzed C–O Bond-Cleaving Alkylation of Esters: Direct Replacement of the Ester Moiety by Functionalized Alkyl Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiangqian; Jia, Jiaqi; Rueping, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Two efficient protocols for the nickel-catalyzed aryl–alkyl cross-coupling reactions using esters as coupling components have been established. The methods enable the selective oxidative addition of nickel to acyl C–O and aryl C–O bonds and allow the aryl–alkyl cross-coupling via decarbonylative bond cleavage or through cleavage of a C–O bond with high efficiency and good functional group compatibility. The protocols allow the streamlined, unconventional utilization of widespread ester groups and their precursors, carboxylic acids and phenols, in synthetic organic chemistry.

  2. Nickel-Catalyzed C–O Bond-Cleaving Alkylation of Esters: Direct Replacement of the Ester Moiety by Functionalized Alkyl Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiangqian

    2017-06-07

    Two efficient protocols for the nickel-catalyzed aryl–alkyl cross-coupling reactions using esters as coupling components have been established. The methods enable the selective oxidative addition of nickel to acyl C–O and aryl C–O bonds and allow the aryl–alkyl cross-coupling via decarbonylative bond cleavage or through cleavage of a C–O bond with high efficiency and good functional group compatibility. The protocols allow the streamlined, unconventional utilization of widespread ester groups and their precursors, carboxylic acids and phenols, in synthetic organic chemistry.

  3. Performance characterization of silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, M. J.; Kraft, S.; Günther, R.; Maddox, E.; Beijersbergen, M.; Bavdaz, M.; Lumb, D.; Wallace, K.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Freyberg, M.

    2006-06-01

    The characteristics of the latest generation of assembled silicon pore X-ray optics are discussed in this paper. These very light, stiff and modular high performance pore optics (HPO) have been developed [1] for the next generation of astronomical X-ray telescopes, which require large collecting areas whilst achieving angular resolutions better than 5 arcseconds. The suitability of 12 inch silicon wafers as high quality optical mirrors and the automated assembly process are discussed elsewhere in this conference. HPOs with several tens of ribbed silicon plates are assembled by bending the plates into an accurate cylindrical shape and directly bonding them on top of each other. The achievable figure accuracy is measured during assembly and in test campaigns at X-ray testing facilities like BESSY-II and PANTER. Pencil beam measurements allow gaining information on the quality achieved by the production process with high spatial resolution. In combination with full beam illumination a complete picture of the excellent performance of these optics can be derived. Experimental results are presented and discussed in detail. The results of such campaigns are used to further improve the production process in order to match the challenging XEUS requirements [2] for imaging resolution and mass.

  4. Transistors using crystalline silicon devices on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating transistors using single-crystal silicon devices on glass. This method overcomes the potential damage that may be caused to the device during high voltage bonding and employs a metal layer which may be incorporated as part of the transistor. This is accomplished such that when the bonding of the silicon wafer or substrate to the glass substrate is performed, the voltage and current pass through areas where transistors will not be fabricated. After removal of the silicon substrate, further metal may be deposited to form electrical contact or add functionality to the devices. By this method both single and gate-all-around devices may be formed.

  5. Process for making silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  6. Direct Covalent Grafting of Phytate to Titanium Surfaces through Ti-O-P Bonding Shows Bone Stimulating Surface Properties and Decreased Bacterial Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Alba; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Perelló, Joan; Isern, Bernat; González-Martín, María Luisa; Monjo, Marta; Ramis, Joana M

    2016-05-11

    Myo-inositol hexaphosphate, also called phytic acid or phytate (IP6), is a natural molecule abundant in vegetable seeds and legumes. Among other functions, IP6 inhibits bone resorption. It is adsorbed on the surface of hydroxyapatite, inhibiting its dissolution and decreasing the progressive loss of bone mass. We present here a method to directly functionalize Ti surfaces covalently with IP6, without using a cross-linker molecule, through the reaction of the phosphate groups of IP6 with the TiO2 layer of Ti substrates. The grafting reaction consisted of an immersion in an IP6 solution to allow the physisorption of the molecules onto the substrate, followed by a heating step to obtain its chemisorption, in an adaptation of the T-Bag method. The reaction was highly dependent on the IP6 solution pH, only achieving a covalent Ti-O-P bond at pH 0. We evaluated two acidic pretreatments of the Ti surface, to increase its hydroxylic content, HNO3 30% and HF 0.2%. The structure of the coated surfaces was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and ellipsometry. The stability of the IP6 coating after three months of storage and after sterilization with γ-irradiation was also determined. Then, we evaluated the biological effect of Ti-IP6 surfaces in vitro on MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, showing an osteogenic effect. Finally, the effect of the surfaces on the adhesion and biofilm viability of oral microorganisms S. mutans and S. sanguinis was also studied, and we found that Ti-IP6 surfaces decreased the adhesion of S. sanguinis. A surface that actively improves osseointegration while decreasing the bacterial adhesion could be suitable for use in bone implants.

  7. Indirect vs direct bonding of mandibular fixed retainers in orthodontic patients: Comparison of retainer failures and posttreatment stability. A 2-year follow-up of a single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Fabienne; Bovali, Efstathia; Kiliaridis, Stavros; Cornelis, Marie A

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this 2-arm parallel trial were to compare the numbers of failures of mandibular fixed retainers bonded with indirect and direct methods and to investigate the posttreatment changes 2 years after placement. Sixty-four consecutive patients from the postgraduate orthodontic clinic of the University of Geneva in Switzerland were randomly allocated to either an indirect or a traditional direct bonding procedure of a mandibular fixed retainer at the end of their orthodontic treatment (T0). Eligibility criteria were the presence of the 4 mandibular incisors and the 2 mandibular canines, and no active caries, restorations, fractures, or periodontal disease of these teeth. The patients were randomized in blocks of 4 (using an online randomization service) with allocation concealment secured by contacting the sequence generator for assignment. The patients were recalled 12 months and 24 months (T3) after retainer bonding. The main outcome was any first-time failure of retainers (ie, at least 1 composite pad debonded or fractured); unexpected posttreatment changes of the mandibular incisors and canines were a secondary outcome. Impressions and lateral cephalograms were taken at T0 and T3: changes in mandibular intercanine and interpremolar distances and mandibular incisor inclination were assessed. Blinding was applicable for outcome assessment only. The chi-square test and Cox regression were used to compare the survival rates of the retainers bonded with direct and indirect methods. Paired t tests were used to assess differences in intercanine and interpremolar distances and mandibular incisor inclination at T0 and T3. Significance was set at P direct bonding group (log-rank test, P = 0.64). The hazard ratio was 1.26 (95% confidence interval, 0.56-2.81; P = 0.58). Bond failures occurred mainly during the first year. There were no clinically significant changes in mandibular intercanine distance, interpremolar distance, and incisor inclination

  8. X-ray-to-current signal conversion characteristics of trench-structured photodiodes for direct-conversion-type silicon X-ray sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Tetsuya; Funaki, Shota; Sakamoto, Kenji; Baba, Akiyoshi; Arima, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the radiation dose required in medical X-ray diagnoses, we propose a high-sensitivity direct-conversion-type silicon X-ray sensor that uses trench-structured photodiodes. This sensor is advantageous in terms of its long device lifetime, noise immunity, and low power consumption because of its low bias voltage. With this sensor, it is possible to detect X-rays with almost 100% efficiency; sensitivity can therefore be improved by approximately 10 times when compared with conventional indirect-conversion-type sensors. In this study, a test chip was fabricated using a single-poly single-metal 0.35 μm process. The formed trench photodiodes for the X-ray sensor were approximately 170 and 300 μm deep. At a bias voltage of 25 V, the absorbed X-ray-to-current signal conversion efficiencies were 89.3% (theoretical limit; 96.7%) at a trench depth of 170 μm and 91.1% (theoretical limit; 94.3%) at a trench depth of 300 μm. (author)

  9. Reliable and repeatable bonding technology for high temperature automotive power modules for electrified vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Won; Shiozaki, Koji; Glover, Michael D; Mantooth, H Alan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the feasibility of highly reliable and repeatable copper–tin transient liquid phase (Cu–Sn TLP) bonding as applied to die attachment in high temperature operational power modules. Electrified vehicles are attracting particular interest as eco-friendly vehicles, but their power modules are challenged because of increasing power densities which lead to high temperatures. Such high temperature operation addresses the importance of advanced bonding technology that is highly reliable (for high temperature operation) and repeatable (for fabrication of advanced structures). Cu–Sn TLP bonding is employed herein because of its high remelting temperature and desirable thermal and electrical conductivities. The bonding starts with a stack of Cu–Sn–Cu metal layers that eventually transforms to Cu–Sn alloys. As the alloys have melting temperatures (Cu 3 Sn: > 600 °C, Cu 6 Sn 5 : > 400 °C) significantly higher than the process temperature, the process can be repeated without damaging previously bonded layers. A Cu–Sn TLP bonding process was developed using thin Sn metal sheets inserted between copper layers on silicon die and direct bonded copper substrates, emulating the process used to construct automotive power modules. Bond quality is characterized using (1) proof-of-concept fabrication, (2) material identification using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, and (3) optical analysis using optical microscopy and scanning acoustic microscope. The feasibility of multiple-sided Cu–Sn TLP bonding is demonstrated by the absence of bondline damage in multiple test samples fabricated with double- or four-sided bonding using the TLP bonding process. (paper)

  10. Advances in silicon nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Pu, Minhao

    Silicon has long been established as an ideal material for passive integrated optical circuitry due to its high refractive index, with corresponding strong optical confinement ability, and its low-cost CMOS-compatible manufacturability. However, the inversion symmetry of the silicon crystal lattice.......g. in high-bit-rate optical communication circuits and networks, it is vital that the nonlinear optical effects of silicon are being strongly enhanced. This can among others be achieved in photonic-crystal slow-light waveguides and in nano-engineered photonic-wires (Fig. 1). In this talk I shall present some...... recent advances in this direction. The efficient coupling of light between optical fibers and the planar silicon devices and circuits is of crucial importance. Both end-coupling (Fig. 1) and grating-coupling solutions will be discussed along with polarization issues. A new scheme for a hybrid III...

  11. Sealing of cavities with lateral feed-throughs by anodic bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fléron, René; Jensen, Flemming

    2003-01-01

    The SESiBon(1)) project under the EU Growth programme has focussed on the investigation and exploitation of various silicon bonding techniques. Both standard silicon to pyrex wafer bonding and the more advanced silicon-to-silicon thin film anodic bonding has been investigated. Here we present...... the results of the work done to enable bonding of structured wafer surfaces, allowing lateral feed-throughs into sealed cavities.Lateral feed throughs are formed by means of RIE in a high-doped poly-silicon film deposited on an oxidized 4" silicon wafer. Next a BPSG (Boron Phosphorus Silicate Glass) layer...... is deposited in a PECVD reaction chamber onto the structured surface. The BPSG is used as an intermediate planarization layer. Planarization is done by annealing the wafer in a N2-O2-H2O ambient for 4 - 8h @ 900 degreesC. After planarization the two wafers are bonded together, sealing the cavities.Our work...

  12. Relationship between defect density and charge carrier transport in amorphous and microcrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astakhov, Oleksandr; Carius, Reinhard; Finger, Friedhelm; Petrusenko, Yuri; Borysenko, Valery; Barankov, Dmytro

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dangling-bond defects and the position of the Fermi level on the charge carrier transport properties in undoped and phosphorous doped thin-film silicon with structure compositions all the way from highly crystalline to amorphous is investigated. The dangling-bond density is varied reproducibly over several orders of magnitude by electron bombardment and subsequent annealing. The defects are investigated by electron-spin-resonance and photoconductivity spectroscopies. Comparing intrinsic amorphous and microcrystalline silicon, it is found that the relationship between defect density and photoconductivity is different in both undoped materials, while a similar strong influence of the position of the Fermi level on photoconductivity via the charge carrier lifetime is found in the doped materials. The latter allows a quantitative determination of the value of the transport gap energy in microcrystalline silicon. The photoconductivity in intrinsic microcrystalline silicon is, on one hand, considerably less affected by the bombardment but, on the other hand, does not generally recover with annealing of the defects and is independent from the spin density which itself can be annealed back to the as-deposited level. For amorphous silicon and material prepared close to the crystalline growth regime, the results for nonequilibrium transport fit perfectly to a recombination model based on direct capture into neutral dangling bonds over a wide range of defect densities. For the heterogeneous microcrystalline silicon, this model fails completely. The application of photoconductivity spectroscopy in the constant photocurrent mode (CPM) is explored for the entire structure composition range over a wide variation in defect densities. For amorphous silicon previously reported linear correlation between the spin density and the subgap absorption is confirmed for defect densities below 10 18 cm -3 . Beyond this defect level, a sublinear relation is found i.e., not

  13. Vibrational zero point energy for H-doped silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazhanov, S. Zh.; Ganchenkova, M.; Marstein, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    Most of the studies addressed to computations of hydrogen parameters in semiconductor systems, such as silicon, are performed at zero temperature T = 0 K and do not account for contribution of vibrational zero point energy (ZPE). For light weight atoms such as hydrogen (H), however, magnitude of this parameter might be not negligible. This Letter is devoted to clarify the importance of accounting the zero-point vibrations when analyzing hydrogen behavior in silicon and its effect on silicon electronic properties. For this, we estimate the ZPE for different locations and charge states of H in Si. We show that the main contribution to the ZPE is coming from vibrations along the Si-H bonds whereas contributions from other Si atoms apart from the direct Si-H bonds play no role. It is demonstrated that accounting the ZPE reduces the hydrogen formation energy by ˜0.17 eV meaning that neglecting ZPE at low temperatures one can underestimate hydrogen solubility by few orders of magnitude. In contrast, the effect of the ZPE on the ionization energy of H in Si is negligible. The results can have important implications for characterization of vibrational properties of Si by inelastic neutron scattering, as well as for theoretical estimations of H concentration in Si.

  14. Influence of germanium on thermal dewetting and agglomeration of the silicon template layer in thin silicon-on-insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P P; Yang, B; Rugheimer, P P; Roberts, M M; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Liu Feng

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the influence of heteroepitaxially grown Ge on the thermal dewetting and agglomeration of the Si(0 0 1) template layer in ultrathin silicon-on-insulator (SOI). We show that increasing Ge coverage gradually destroys the long-range ordering of 3D nanocrystals along the (1 3 0) directions and the 3D nanocrystal shape anisotropy that are observed in the dewetting and agglomeration of pure SOI(0 0 1). The results are qualitatively explained by Ge-induced bond weakening and decreased surface energy anisotropy. Ge lowers the dewetting and agglomeration temperature to as low as 700 0 C.

  15. Luneburg lens in silicon photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Falco, Andrea; Kehr, Susanne C; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-03-14

    The Luneburg lens is an aberration-free lens that focuses light from all directions equally well. We fabricated and tested a Luneburg lens in silicon photonics. Such fully-integrated lenses may become the building blocks of compact Fourier optics on chips. Furthermore, our fabrication technique is sufficiently versatile for making perfect imaging devices on silicon platforms.

  16. Micromachined silicon acoustic delay line with 3D-printed micro linkers and tapered input for improved structural stability and acoustic directivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y; Kumar, A; Xu, S; Zou, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that micromachined silicon acoustic delay lines can provide a promising solution to achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography without the need for complex transducer arrays and data acquisition electronics. To achieve deeper imaging depth and wider field of view, a longer delay time and therefore delay length are required. However, as the length of the delay line increases, it becomes more vulnerable to structural instability due to reduced mechanical stiffness. In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and testing of a new silicon acoustic delay line enhanced with 3D printed polymer micro linker structures. First, mechanical deformation of the silicon acoustic delay line (with and without linker structures) under gravity was simulated by using finite element method. Second, the acoustic crosstalk and acoustic attenuation caused by the polymer micro linker structures were evaluated with both numerical simulation and ultrasound transmission testing. The result shows that the use of the polymer micro linker structures significantly improves the structural stability of the silicon acoustic delay lines without creating additional acoustic attenuation and crosstalk. In addition, the improvement of the acoustic acceptance angle of the silicon acoustic delay lines was also investigated to better suppress the reception of unwanted ultrasound signals outside of the imaging plane. These two improvements are expected to provide an effective solution to eliminate current limitations on the achievable acoustic delay time and out-of-plane imaging resolution of micromachined silicon acoustic delay line arrays. (paper)

  17. Communication: Visualization and spectroscopy of defects induced by dehydrogenation in individual silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Mills, Jon M.; Kocevski, Vancho; Chiu, Sheng-Kuei; DeBenedetti, William J. I.; Gervasi, Christian F.; Taber, Benjamen N.; Rosenfield, Ariel E.; Eriksson, Olle; Rusz, Ján; Goforth, Andrea M.; Nazin, George V.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) study of the impact of dehydrogenation on the electronic structures of hydrogen-passivated silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) supported on the Au(111) surface. Gradual dehydrogenation is achieved by injecting high-energy electrons into individual SiNCs, which results, initially, in reduction of the electronic bandgap, and eventually produces midgap electronic states. We use theoretical calculations to show that the STS spectra of midgap states are consistent with the presence of silicon dangling bonds, which are found in different charge states. Our calculations also suggest that the observed initial reduction of the electronic bandgap is attributable to the SiNC surface reconstruction induced by conversion of surface dihydrides to monohydrides due to hydrogen desorption. Our results thus provide the first visualization of the SiNC electronic structure evolution induced by dehydrogenation and provide direct evidence for the existence of diverse dangling bond states on the SiNC surfaces.

  18. Subwavelength silicon photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheben, P.; Bock, P.J.; Schmid, J.H.; Lapointe, J.; Janz, S.; Xu, D.-X.; Densmore, A.; Delage, A.; Lamontagne, B.; Florjanczyk, M.; Ma, R.

    2011-01-01

    With the goal of developing photonic components that are compatible with silicon microelectronic integrated circuits, silicon photonics has been the subject of intense research activity. Silicon is an excellent material for confining and manipulating light at the submicrometer scale. Silicon optoelectronic integrated devices have the potential to be miniaturized and mass-produced at affordable cost for many applications, including telecommunications, optical interconnects, medical screening, and biological and chemical sensing. We review recent advances in silicon photonics research at the National Research Council Canada. A new type of optical waveguide is presented, exploiting subwavelength grating (SWG) effect. We demonstrate subwavelength grating waveguides made of silicon, including practical components operating at telecom wavelengths: input couplers, waveguide crossings and spectrometer chips. SWG technique avoids loss and wavelength resonances due to diffraction effects and allows for single-mode operation with direct control of the mode confinement by changing the refractive index of a waveguide core over a range as broad as 1.6 - 3.5 simply by lithographic patterning. The light can be launched to these waveguides with a coupling loss as small as 0.5 dB and with minimal wavelength dependence, using coupling structures similar to that shown in Fig. 1. The subwavelength grating waveguides can cross each other with minimal loss and negligible crosstalk which allows massive photonic circuit connectivity to overcome the limits of electrical interconnects. These results suggest that the SWG waveguides could become key elements for future integrated photonic circuits. (authors)

  19. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  20. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskiene, V.; Miskinis, J.

    2007-04-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  1. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raciukaitis, G; Brikas, M; Kazlauskiene, V; Miskinis, J

    2007-01-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting

  2. Bonds Boom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar…

  3. Biofunctionalization on alkylated silicon substrate surfaces via "click" chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guoting; Santos, Catherine; Zhang, Wen; Li, Yan; Kumar, Amit; Erasquin, Uriel J; Liu, Kai; Muradov, Pavel; Trautner, Barbara Wells; Cai, Chengzhi

    2010-11-24

    Biofunctionalization of silicon substrates is important to the development of silicon-based biosensors and devices. Compared to conventional organosiloxane films on silicon oxide intermediate layers, organic monolayers directly bound to the nonoxidized silicon substrates via Si-C bonds enhance the sensitivity of detection and the stability against hydrolytic cleavage. Such monolayers presenting a high density of terminal alkynyl groups for bioconjugation via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, a "click" reaction) were reported. However, yields of the CuAAC reactions on these monolayer platforms were low. Also, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins on the resultant surfaces remained a major obstacle for many potential biological applications. Herein, we report a new type of "clickable" monolayers grown by selective, photoactivated surface hydrosilylation of α,ω-alkenynes, where the alkynyl terminal is protected with a trimethylgermanyl (TMG) group, on hydrogen-terminated silicon substrates. The TMG groups on the film are readily removed in aqueous solutions in the presence of Cu(I). Significantly, the degermanylation and the subsequent CuAAC reaction with various azides could be combined into a single step in good yields. Thus, oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) with an azido tag was attached to the TMG-alkyne surfaces, leading to OEG-terminated surfaces that reduced the nonspecific adsorption of protein (fibrinogen) by >98%. The CuAAC reaction could be performed in microarray format to generate arrays of mannose and biotin with varied densities on the protein-resistant OEG background. We also demonstrated that the monolayer platform could be functionalized with mannose for highly specific capturing of living targets (Escherichia coli expressing fimbriae) onto the silicon substrates.

  4. Thermally robust and biomolecule-friendly room-temperature bonding for the fabrication of elastomer-plastic hybrid microdevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T P O; Tran, B M; Lee, N Y

    2016-08-16

    Here, we introduce a simple and fast method for bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) silicone elastomer to different plastics. In this technique, surface modification and subsequent bonding processes are performed at room temperature. Furthermore, only one chemical is needed, and no surface oxidation step is necessary prior to bonding. This bonding method is particularly suitable for encapsulating biomolecules that are sensitive to external stimuli, such as heat or plasma treatment, and for embedding fracturable materials prior to the bonding step. Microchannel-fabricated PDMS was first oxidized by plasma treatment and reacted with aminosilane by forming strong siloxane bonds (Si-O-Si) at room temperature. Without the surface oxidation of the amine-terminated PDMS and plastic, the two heterogeneous substrates were brought into intimate physical contact and left at room temperature. Subsequently, aminolysis occurred, leading to the generation of a permanent seal via the formation of robust urethane bonds after only 5 min of assembling. Using this method, large-area (10 × 10 cm) bonding was successfully realized. The surface was characterized by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, and the bonding strength was analyzed by performing peel, delamination, leak, and burst tests. The bond strength of the PDMS-polycarbonate (PC) assembly was approximately 409 ± 6.6 kPa, and the assembly withstood the injection of a tremendous amount of liquid with the per-minute injection volume exceeding 2000 times its total internal volume. The thermal stability of the bonded microdevice was confirmed by performing a chamber-type multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of two major foodborne pathogens - Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium - and assessing the possibility for on-site direct detection of PCR amplicons. This bonding method demonstrated high potential for the stable construction of closed microfluidic systems

  5. Porous silicon technology for integrated microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Jin Zheng

    With the development of micro systems, there is an increasing demand for integrable porous materials. In addition to those conventional applications, such as filtration, wicking, and insulating, many new micro devices, including micro reactors, sensors, actuators, and optical components, can benefit from porous materials. Conventional porous materials, such as ceramics and polymers, however, cannot meet the challenges posed by micro systems, due to their incompatibility with standard micro-fabrication processes. In an effort to produce porous materials that can be used in micro systems, porous silicon (PS) generated by anodization of single crystalline silicon has been investigated. In this work, the PS formation process has been extensively studied and characterized as a function of substrate type, crystal orientation, doping concentration, current density and surfactant concentration and type. Anodization conditions have been optimized for producing very thick porous silicon layers with uniform pore size, and for obtaining ideal pore morphologies. Three different types of porous silicon materials: meso porous silicon, macro porous silicon with straight pores, and macro porous silicon with tortuous pores, have been successfully produced. Regular pore arrays with controllable pore size in the range of 2mum to 6mum have been demonstrated as well. Localized PS formation has been achieved by using oxide/nitride/polysilicon stack as masking materials, which can withstand anodization in hydrofluoric acid up to twenty hours. A special etching cell with electrolytic liquid backside contact along with two process flows has been developed to enable the fabrication of thick macro porous silicon membranes with though wafer pores. For device assembly, Si-Au and In-Au bonding technologies have been developed. Very low bonding temperature (˜200°C) and thick/soft bonding layers (˜6mum) have been achieved by In-Au bonding technology, which is able to compensate the potentially

  6. Study of a solid state micro-dosemeter based on a monolithic silicon telescope: Irradiations with low-energy neutrons and direct comparison with a cylindrical TEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Colautti, P.; Fanton, I.; Fazzi, A.; Introini, M. V.; Moro, D.; Pola, A.; Varoli, V.

    2011-01-01

    A silicon device based on the monolithic silicon telescope technology coupled to a tissue-equivalent converter was proposed and investigated for solid state microdosimetry. The detector is constituted by a DE stage about 2 μm in thickness geometrically segmented in a matrix of micrometric diodes and a residual-energy measurement stage E about 500 μm in thickness. Each thin diode has a cylindrical sensitive volume 9 μm in nominal diameter, similar to that of a cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). The silicon device and a cylindrical TEPC were irradiated in the same experimental conditions with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energy between 0.64 and 2.3 MeV at the INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories (LNLINFN, Legnaro (Italy)). The aim was to study the capability of the silicon-based system of reproducing microdosimetric spectra similar to those measured by a reference micro-dosemeter. The TEPC was set in order to simulate a tissue site about 2 μm in diameter. The spectra of the energy imparted to the ΔE stage of the silicon telescope were corrected for tissue-equivalence through an optimized procedure that exploits the information from the residual energy measurement stage E. A geometrical correction based on parametric criteria for shape-equivalence was also applied. The agreement between the dose distributions of lineal energy and the corresponding mean values is satisfactory at each neutron energy considered. (authors)

  7. Characterization of electrical and optical properties of silicon based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Guobin

    2009-12-04

    characteristic DRL lines D1 to D4 has been detected, indicating the dislocations in the Alile sample are relatively clean. Test p-n junction diodes with dislocation networks (DNs) produced by silicon wafer direct bonding have been investigated by EBIC technique. Charge carriers collection and electrical conduction phenomena by the DNs were observed. Inhomogeneities in the charge collection were detected in n- and p-type samples under appropriate beam energy. The diffusion lengths in the thin top layer of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) have been measured by EBIC with full suppression of the surface recombination at the buried oxide (BOX) layer and at surface of the top layer by biasing method. The measured diffusion length is several times larger than the layer thickness. Silicon nanostructures are another important subject of this work. Electrical and optical properties of various silicon based materials like silicon nanowires, silicon nano rods, porous silicon, and Si/SiO{sub 2} multi quantum wells (MQWs) samples were investigated in this work. Silicon sub-bandgap infrared (IR) luminescence around 1570 nm was found in silicon nanowires, nano rods and porous silicon. PL measurements with samples immersed in different liquid media, for example, in aqueous HF (50%), concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (98%) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} established that the subbandgap IR luminescence originated from the Si/SiO{sub x} interface. EL in the sub-bandgap IR range has been observed in simple devices prepared on porous silicon and MQWs at room temperature. (orig.)

  8. Low-temperature Au/a-Si wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Errong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    The Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, which can also be used for the bonding of non-silicon material, was investigated for the first time in this paper. The bond quality test showed that the bond yield, bond repeatability and average shear strength are higher for this bonding structure. The interfacial microstructure analysis indicated that the Au-induced crystallization of the amorphous silicon process leads to big Si grains extending across the bond interface and Au filling the other regions of the bond interface, which result into a strong and void-free bond interface. In addition, the Au-induced crystallization reaction leads to a change in the IR images of the bond interface. Therefore, the IR microscope can be used to evaluate and compare the different bond strengths qualitatively. Furthermore, in order to verify the superiority of the bonding structure, the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si (i.e. no Ti/Au layer on the a-Si surface) and Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structures (i.e. Au thermocompression bonding) were also investigated. For the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is due to the native oxide layer on the a-Si surface, and for the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is caused by the wafer surface roughness which prevents intimate contact and limits the interdiffusion at the bond interface.

  9. FTIR studies of swift silicon and oxygen ion irradiated porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhave, Tejashree M.; Hullavarad, S.S.; Bhoraskar, S.V.; Hegde, S.G.; Kanjilal, D.

    1999-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy has been used to study the bond restructuring in silicon and oxygen irradiated porous silicon. Boron doped p-type (1 1 1) porous silicon was irradiated with 10 MeV silicon and a 14 MeV oxygen ions at different doses ranging between 10 12 and 10 14 ions cm -2 . The yield of PL in porous silicon irradiated samples was observed to increase considerably while in oxygen irradiated samples it was seen to improve only by a small extent for lower doses whereas it decreased for higher doses. The results were interpreted in view of the relative intensities of the absorption peaks associated with O-Si-H and Si-H stretch bonds

  10. Interstellar hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the first extensive study of the existence and effects of interstellar hydrogen bonding. The reactions that occur on the surface of the interstellar dust grains are the dominant processes by which interstellar molecules are formed. Water molecules constitute about 70% of the interstellar ice. These water molecules serve as the platform for hydrogen bonding. High level quantum chemical simulations for the hydrogen bond interaction between 20 interstellar molecules (known and possible) and water are carried out using different ab-intio methods. It is evident that if the formation of these species is mainly governed by the ice phase reactions, there is a direct correlation between the binding energies of these complexes and the gas phase abundances of these interstellar molecules. Interstellar hydrogen bonding may cause lower gas abundance of the complex organic molecules (COMs) at the low temperature. From these results, ketenes whose less stable isomers that are more strongly bonded to the surface of the interstellar dust grains have been observed are proposed as suitable candidates for astronomical observations.

  11. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  12. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  13. Efficient Near-Infrared-Transparent Perovskite Solar Cells Enabling Direct Comparison of 4-Terminal and Monolithic Perovskite/Silicon Tandem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Jérémie; Barraud, Loris; Walter, Arnaud; Bräuninger, Matthias; Sahli, Florent; Sacchetto, Davide; Tétreault, Nicolas; Paviet-Salomon, Bertrand; Moon, Soo-Jin; Allebé, Christophe; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; De Wolf, Stefaan; Niesen, Bjoern; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Combining market-proven silicon solar cell technology with an efficient wide band gap top cell into a tandem device is an attractive approach to reduce the cost of photovoltaic systems. For this, perovskite solar cells are promising high-efficiency top cell candidates, but their typical device size (

  14. Influence of Chemical Composition and Structure in Silicon Dielectric Materials on Passivation of Thin Crystalline Silicon on Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, Sonya; Gabriel, Onno; Rothert, Inga; Werth, Matteo; Ring, Sven; Stannowski, Bernd; Schlatmann, Rutger

    2015-09-02

    In this study, various silicon dielectric films, namely, a-SiOx:H, a-SiNx:H, and a-SiOxNy:H, grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) were evaluated for use as interlayers (ILs) between crystalline silicon and glass. Chemical bonding analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that high values of oxidant gases (CO2 and/or N2), added to SiH4 during PECVD, reduced the Si-H and N-H bond density in the silicon dielectrics. Various three layer stacks combining the silicon dielectric materials were designed to minimize optical losses between silicon and glass in rear side contacted heterojunction pn test cells. The PECVD grown silicon dielectrics retained their functionality despite being subjected to harsh subsequent processing such as crystallization of the silicon at 1414 °C or above. High values of short circuit current density (Jsc; without additional hydrogen passivation) required a high density of Si-H bonds and for the nitrogen containing films, additionally, a high N-H bond density. Concurrently high values of both Jsc and open circuit voltage Voc were only observed when [Si-H] was equal to or exceeded [N-H]. Generally, Voc correlated with a high density of [Si-H] bonds in the silicon dielectric; otherwise, additional hydrogen passivation using an active plasma process was required. The highest Voc ∼ 560 mV, for a silicon acceptor concentration of about 10(16) cm(-3), was observed for stacks where an a-SiOxNy:H film was adjacent to the silicon. Regardless of the cell absorber thickness, field effect passivation of the buried silicon surface by the silicon dielectric was mandatory for efficient collection of carriers generated from short wavelength light (in the vicinity of the glass-Si interface). However, additional hydrogen passivation was obligatory for an increased diffusion length of the photogenerated carriers and thus Jsc in solar cells with thicker absorbers.

  15. Hydrogen-Bond Directed Regioselective Pd-Catalyzed Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation: The Construction of Chiral α-Amino Acids with Vicinal Tertiary and Quaternary Stereocenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xuan; Liu, Delong; An, Qianjin; Zhang, Wanbin

    2015-12-04

    A Pd-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation of azlactones with 4-arylvinyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-ones was developed, providing "branched" chiral α-amino acids with vicinal tertiary and quaternary stereocenters, in high yields and with excellent selectivities. Mechanistic studies revealed that the formation of a hydrogen bond between the Pd-allylic complex and azlactone isomer is responsible for the excellent regioselectivities. This asymmetric alkylation can be carried out on a gram scale without a loss of catalytic efficiency, and the resulting product can be further transformed to a chiral azetidine in two simple steps.

  16. Adhesion enhancement for liquid silicone rubber and different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Adhesion property; platinum catalyst; liquid silicone rubber; vinyltrimethoxysilane. ... 2003), elastomeric housing materials of composite insula- .... formula given below: ... surface was cured to generate Al–O–Si covalent bond on the.

  17. Direct, simple derivatization of disulfide bonds in proteins with organic mercury in alkaline medium without any chemical pre-reducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-09-16

    Highlights: • A simple procedure for the derivatization of proteins disulfide bonds. • Cysteine groups in several proteins derivatised with pHMB in alkaline media. • 75–100% labelling of cysteines in proteins with pHMB. - Abstract: In this work we have studied the derivatization of protein disulfide bonds with p-Hydroxymercurybenzoate (pHMB) in strong alkaline medium without any preliminary reduction. The reaction has been followed by the determination of the protein–pHMB complex using size exclusion chromatography coupled to a microwave/UV mercury oxidation system for the on-line oxidation of free and protein-complexed pHMB and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SEC–CVG–AFS) detection. The reaction has been optimized by an experimental design using lysozyme as a model protein and applied to several thiolic proteins. The proposed method reports, for the first time, that it is possible to label 75–100% cysteines of proteins and, thus, to determine thiolic proteins without the need of any reducing step to obtain reduced -SH groups before mercury labelling. We obtained a detection limit of 100 nmol L{sup −1} based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for unbound and complexed pHMB, corresponding to a detection limit of proteins ranged between 3 and 360 nmol L{sup −1}, depending on the number of cysteines in the protein sequence.

  18. Direct, simple derivatization of disulfide bonds in proteins with organic mercury in alkaline medium without any chemical pre-reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Ferrari, Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple procedure for the derivatization of proteins disulfide bonds. • Cysteine groups in several proteins derivatised with pHMB in alkaline media. • 75–100% labelling of cysteines in proteins with pHMB. - Abstract: In this work we have studied the derivatization of protein disulfide bonds with p-Hydroxymercurybenzoate (pHMB) in strong alkaline medium without any preliminary reduction. The reaction has been followed by the determination of the protein–pHMB complex using size exclusion chromatography coupled to a microwave/UV mercury oxidation system for the on-line oxidation of free and protein-complexed pHMB and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SEC–CVG–AFS) detection. The reaction has been optimized by an experimental design using lysozyme as a model protein and applied to several thiolic proteins. The proposed method reports, for the first time, that it is possible to label 75–100% cysteines of proteins and, thus, to determine thiolic proteins without the need of any reducing step to obtain reduced -SH groups before mercury labelling. We obtained a detection limit of 100 nmol L −1 based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for unbound and complexed pHMB, corresponding to a detection limit of proteins ranged between 3 and 360 nmol L −1 , depending on the number of cysteines in the protein sequence

  19. Quantum mechanical theory of epitaxial transformation of silicon to silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, S A; Osipov, A V

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on the study of transformation of silicon crystal into silicon carbide crystal via substitution reaction with carbon monoxide gas. As an example, the Si(1 0 0) surface is considered. The cross section of the potential energy surface of the first stage of transformation along the reaction pathway is calculated by the method of nudged elastic bands. It is found that in addition to intermediate states associated with adsorption of CO and SiO molecules on the surface, there is also an intermediate state in which all the atoms are strongly bonded to each other. This intermediate state significantly reduces the activation barrier of transformation down to 2.6 eV. The single imaginary frequencies corresponding to the two transition states of this transformation are calculated, one of which is reactant-like, whereas the other is product-like. By methods of quantum chemistry of solids, the second stage of this transformation is described, namely, the transformation of precarbide silicon into silicon carbide. Energy reduction per one cell is calculated for this ‘collapse’ process, and bond breaking energy is also found. Hence, it is concluded that the smallest size of the collapsing islet is 30 nm. It is shown that the chemical bonds of the initial silicon crystal are coordinately replaced by the bonds between Si and C in silicon carbide, which leads to a high quality of epitaxy and a low concentration of misfit dislocations. (paper)

  20. Threshold defect production in silicon determined by density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, E.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.

    2008-01-01

    We studied threshold displacement energies for creating stable Frenkel pairs in silicon using density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations. The average threshold energy over all lattice directions was found to be 36±2 STAT ±2 SYST eV, and thresholds in the directions and were found to be 20±2 SYST eV and 12.5±1.5 SYST eV, respectively. Moreover, we found that in most studied lattice directions, a bond defect complex is formed with a lower threshold than a Frenkel pair. The average threshold energy for producing either a bond defect or a Frenkel pair was found to be 24±1 STAT ±2 SYST eV

  1. Characterization of silicon-on-insulator wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Hoon

    The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) is attracting more interest as it is being used for an advanced complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and a base substrate for novel devices to overcome present obstacles in bulk Si scaling. Furthermore, SOI fabrication technology has improved greatly in recent years and industries produce high quality wafers with high yield. This dissertation investigated SOI material properties with simple, yet accurate methods. The electrical properties of as-grown wafers such as electron and hole mobilities, buried oxide (BOX) charges, interface trap densities, and carrier lifetimes were mainly studied. For this, various electrical measurement techniques were utilized such as pseudo-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (PseudoMOSFET) static current-voltage (I-V) and transient drain current (I-t), Hall effect, and MOS capacitance-voltage/capacitance-time (C-V/C-t). The electrical characterization, however, mainly depends on the pseudo-MOSFET method, which takes advantage of the intrinsic SOI structure. From the static current-voltage and pulsed measurement, carrier mobilities, lifetimes and interface trap densities were extracted. During the course of this study, a pseudo-MOSFET drain current hysteresis regarding different gate voltage sweeping directions was discovered and the cause was revealed through systematic experiments and simulations. In addition to characterization of normal SOI, strain relaxation of strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) was also measured. As sSOI takes advantage of wafer bonding in its fabrication process, the tenacity of bonding between the sSOI and the BOX layer was investigated by means of thermal treatment and high dose energetic gamma-ray irradiation. It was found that the strain did not relax with processes more severe than standard CMOS processes, such as anneals at temperature as high as 1350 degree Celsius.

  2. Doping of silicon with carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskienė, V.; Miškinis, J.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material in silicon was investigated. It was found that laser cutting of wafers in the air induced the doping of silicon with carbon. The effect was more distinct when using higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon atoms in the depth of the material. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion to clarify its depth profile in silicon was performed. Photochemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be the reason of the reduced machining quality. The controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  3. An improved method for preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A desired shape is formed from a polysilane and the shape is heated in an inert atmosphere or under vacuum to 1150 to 1600 0 C until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent of (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent of CH 3 Si units. The remaining bonds on silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a chlorine or bromine atom, such that the polysilane contains from 10 to 43 weight percent of hydrolyzable chlorine or from 21 to 63 weight percent of hydrolyzable bromine. (author)

  4. Impact of SiO2 on Al–Al thermocompression wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Nishant; Finstad, Terje G; Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari; Poppe, Erik U; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2015-01-01

    Al–Al thermocompression bonding suitable for wafer level sealing of MEMS devices has been investigated. This paper presents a comparison of thermocompression bonding of Al films deposited on Si with and without a thermal oxide (SiO 2 film). Laminates of diameter 150 mm containing device sealing frames of width 200 µm were realized. The wafers were bonded by applying a bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 300–550 °C for bonding times of 15, 30 or 60 min. The effects of these process variations on the quality of the bonded laminates have been studied. The bond quality was estimated by measurements of dicing yield, tensile strength, amount of cohesive fracture in Si and interfacial characterization. The mean bond strength of the tested structures ranged from 18–61 MPa. The laminates with an SiO 2 film had higher dicing yield and bond strength than the laminates without SiO 2 for a 400 °C bonding temperature. The bond strength increased with increasing bonding temperature and bond force. The laminates bonded for 30 and 60 min at 400 °C and 60 kN had similar bond strength and amount of cohesive fracture in the bulk silicon, while the laminates bonded for 15 min had significantly lower bond strength and amount of cohesive fracture in the bulk silicon. (paper)

  5. An improved method of preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing silicon carbide is described which comprises forming a desired shape from a polysilane of the average formula:[(CH 3 ) 2 Si][CH 3 Si]. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent CH 3 Si units. The remaining bonds on the silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a halogen atom in such manner that the average ratio of halogen to silicon in the polysilane is from 0.3:1 to 1:1. The polysilane has a melt viscosity at 150 0 C of from 0.005 to 500 Pa.s and an intrinsic viscosity in toluene of from 0.0001 to 0.1. The shaped polysilane is heated in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum to an elevated temperature until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. (author)

  6. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  7. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma; Deposition assistee par un plasma a arc a haut courant continu de couches minces de Nitrure de Bore et de Silicium microcristallin hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 {sup o}C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 1'}3 cm{sup -3}. For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind

  8. Origins of hole traps in hydrogenated nanocrystalline and amorphous silicon revealed through machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tim; Johlin, Eric; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-03-01

    Genetic programming is used to identify the structural features most strongly associated with hole traps in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon with very low crystalline volume fraction. The genetic programming algorithm reveals that hole traps are most strongly associated with local structures within the amorphous region in which a single hydrogen atom is bound to two silicon atoms (bridge bonds), near fivefold coordinated silicon (floating bonds), or where there is a particularly dense cluster of many silicon atoms. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism by which deep hole traps associated with bridge bonds may contribute to the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  9. Melting and related precursor cooperative phenomena in chemically bonded assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2004-09-01

    A number of experimental studies of condensed matter assemblies with different types of chemical bonding will provide the focus of this work. Condensed compounds X(CH 3 ) 4 , with X = C,Si or Ge, are the first of such assemblies; two phase boundaries in the pressure temperature plane being studied: melting and a solid phase boundary heralding orientational disordering of molecules still however on a lattice. Secondly, directionally bonded d-electron transition metals such as Ni, Pd and Nb will be treated. Here, melting is the main focus, but the precursor transition is now the separation of a high-temperature ductile solid from a lower temperature mechanically brittle phase. A dislocation-mediated model of these transitions is discussed, leading into the third area of covalently bonded solids graphite and silicon. Here topological defect models again provide the focus; both dislocations and rotation-dislocations now being invoked. Some qualitative suggestions are made to interpret the melting curve of graphite subjected to high pressure. (author)

  10. Assembly and validation of the SSD silicon microstrip detector of ALICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A.P.; Kuijer, P.G.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Oskamp, C.J.; Sokolov, A.N.; van den Brink, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) forms the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE. The SSD detector consists of 1698 double-sided silicon microstrip modules. The electrical connection between silicon sensor and front-end electronics is made via TAB-bonded

  11. Silicon Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, Thaddeus D. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States); Carroll, Malcolm S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Silicon is a promising material candidate for qubits due to the combination of worldwide infrastructure in silicon microelectronics fabrication and the capability to drastically reduce decohering noise channels via chemical purification and isotopic enhancement. However, a variety of challenges in fabrication, control, and measurement leaves unclear the best strategy for fully realizing this material’s future potential. In this article, we survey three basic qubit types: those based on substitutional donors, on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, and on Si/SiGe heterostructures. We also discuss the multiple schema used to define and control Si qubits, which may exploit the manipulation and detection of a single electron charge, the state of a single electron spin, or the collective states of multiple spins. Far from being comprehensive, this article provides a brief orientation to the rapidly evolving field of silicon qubit technology and is intended as an approachable entry point for a researcher new to this field.

  12. Influence of cold rolling direction on texture, inhibitor and magnetic properties in strip-cast grain-oriented 3% silicon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, F., E-mail: fangfengdbdx@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Lu, X.; Zhang, Y.X.; Wang, Y.; Jiao, H.T.; Cao, G.M.; Yuan, G.; Xu, Y.B. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, EL Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Wang, G.D. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2017-02-15

    An unconventional cold rolling scheme (inclined rolling at 0°, 30°, 45°, 90° during second-stage cold rolling process) was adopted to process grain-oriented silicon steel based on strip casting process. The influences of inclination angles on microstructure, texture, inhibitor and magnetic properties were studied by a combination of EBSD, XRD and TEM. It was found that the α-fiber texture was weakened and γ-fiber was strengthened in cold rolled sheet with increase in inclination angle. The primary recrystallization sheet exhibited more homogeneous microstructure with relatively strong γ-fiber, medium α-fiber texture, weak λ-fiber texture and Goss component at high inclination angles. Fine and homogeneous inhibitors were obtained after primary annealing with increase in inclination angle from 0° to 90° because of more uniform deformation after inclined rolling. The grain-oriented silicon steel experienced completely secondary recrystallization at various inclination angles after final annealing process, with superior magnetic properties at 0° and 90°. Furthermore, Goss nuclei capable of final secondary recrystallization in strip casting process newly formed both in-grain shear bands and grain boundaries region during second-stage cold rolling and subsequent annealing process, which is different from the well-accepted results that Goss texture originated from the subsurface layer of the hot rolled sheet or during intermediate annealing process. In addition, the Goss texture that nucleated in-grain shear bands was weaker but more accurate as compared to that in grain boundaries region. - Highlights: • Inclined cold rolling was adopted to process strip-cast grain-oriented silicon steel. • Influence of inclination angles on texture, inhibitor and magnetic properties was studied. • The initial texture was changed with respect to the inclination angle. • Homogeneous inhibitors were obtained after primary annealing at various inclination angles.

  13. Electrometallurgy of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    wind, plants, and water impounded in elevated reservoirs. Photovoltaic or solar cells, which convert sunlight directly to electricity, belongs tc, the...on record is that of St. Claire DeVille, who claimed that silicon was produced by electrolysing an impure melt of NaAlC14, but his material did not...this composition and purified melts were electrolysed at about 14500C in graphite crucible and using graphite electrodes. Applied potentials were

  14. The silicon shower maximum detector for the STIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1995-01-01

    The structure of a shashlik calorimeter allows the insertion of tracking detectors within the longitudinal sampling to improve the accuracy in the determination of the direction of the showering particle and the e/π separation ability. The new forward calorimeter of the DELPHI detector has been equipped with two planes of silicon pad detectors respectively after 4 and 7.4 radiation lengths. The novelty of these silicon detectors is that to cope with the shashlik readout fibers, they had to incorporate 1.4 mm holes every cm 2 . The detector consists of circular strips with a radial pitch of 1.7 mm and an angular granularity of 22.5 , read out by means of the MX4 preamplifier. The preamplifier is located at 35 cm from the silicon detector and the signal is carried by Kapton cables bonded to the detector. The matching to the MX4 input pitch of 44 μm was made by a specially developed fanin hybrid. (orig.)

  15. Chemical bond activation observed with an x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    The concept of bonding and anti-bonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Lastly, we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding–anti-bonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultra short optical laser pulse.

  16. Bond strength of masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, van der R.; Vermeltfoort, A.Th.

    1992-01-01

    Bond strength is not a well defined property of masonry. Normally three types of bond strength can be distinguished: - tensile bond strength, - shear (and torsional) bond strength, - flexural bond strength. In this contribution the behaviour and strength of masonry in deformation controlled uniaxial

  17. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The bump-bonded silicon pixel detector, developed at CERN by the EP-MIC group, is shown here in its ceramic carrier. Both represent the ISPA-tube anode. The chip features between 1024 (called OMEGA-1) and 8196 (ALICE-1) active pixels.

  18. Apparatus for making molten silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  19. A MoTe2-based light-emitting diode and photodetector for silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Ya-Qing; Grosso, Gabriele; Heuck, Mikkel; Furchi, Marco M; Cao, Yuan; Zheng, Jiabao; Bunandar, Darius; Navarro-Moratalla, Efren; Zhou, Lin; Efetov, Dmitri K; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kong, Jing; Englund, Dirk; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2017-12-01

    One of the current challenges in photonics is developing high-speed, power-efficient, chip-integrated optical communications devices to address the interconnects bottleneck in high-speed computing systems. Silicon photonics has emerged as a leading architecture, in part because of the promise that many components, such as waveguides, couplers, interferometers and modulators, could be directly integrated on silicon-based processors. However, light sources and photodetectors present ongoing challenges. Common approaches for light sources include one or few off-chip or wafer-bonded lasers based on III-V materials, but recent system architecture studies show advantages for the use of many directly modulated light sources positioned at the transmitter location. The most advanced photodetectors in the silicon photonic process are based on germanium, but this requires additional germanium growth, which increases the system cost. The emerging two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) offer a path for optical interconnect components that can be integrated with silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) processing by back-end-of-the-line steps. Here, we demonstrate a silicon waveguide-integrated light source and photodetector based on a p-n junction of bilayer MoTe 2 , a TMD semiconductor with an infrared bandgap. This state-of-the-art fabrication technology provides new opportunities for integrated optoelectronic systems.

  20. A MoTe2-based light-emitting diode and photodetector for silicon photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Ya-Qing; Grosso, Gabriele; Heuck, Mikkel; Furchi, Marco M.; Cao, Yuan; Zheng, Jiabao; Bunandar, Darius; Navarro-Moratalla, Efren; Zhou, Lin; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kong, Jing; Englund, Dirk; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2017-12-01

    One of the current challenges in photonics is developing high-speed, power-efficient, chip-integrated optical communications devices to address the interconnects bottleneck in high-speed computing systems. Silicon photonics has emerged as a leading architecture, in part because of the promise that many components, such as waveguides, couplers, interferometers and modulators, could be directly integrated on silicon-based processors. However, light sources and photodetectors present ongoing challenges. Common approaches for light sources include one or few off-chip or wafer-bonded lasers based on III-V materials, but recent system architecture studies show advantages for the use of many directly modulated light sources positioned at the transmitter location. The most advanced photodetectors in the silicon photonic process are based on germanium, but this requires additional germanium growth, which increases the system cost. The emerging two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) offer a path for optical interconnect components that can be integrated with silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) processing by back-end-of-the-line steps. Here, we demonstrate a silicon waveguide-integrated light source and photodetector based on a p-n junction of bilayer MoTe2, a TMD semiconductor with an infrared bandgap. This state-of-the-art fabrication technology provides new opportunities for integrated optoelectronic systems.

  1. Shear Bond Strength of Composite and Ceromer Superstructures to Direct Laser Sintered and Ni-Cr-Based Infrastructures Treated with KTP, Nd:YAG, and Er:YAG Lasers: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorler, Oguzhan; Hubbezoglu, Ihsan; Ulgey, Melih; Zan, Recai; Guner, Kubra

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the shear bond strength (SBS) of ceromer and nanohybrid composite to direct laser sintered (DLS) Cr-Co and Ni-Cr-based metal infrastructures treated with erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG), and potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser modalities in in vitro settings. Experimental specimens had four sets (n = 32) including two DLS infrastructures with ceromer and nanohybrid composite superstructures and two Ni-Cr-based infrastructures with ceromer and nanohybrid composite superstructures. Of each infrastructure set, the specimens randomized into four treatment modalities (n = 8): no treatment (controls) and Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers. The infrastructures were prepared in the final dimensions of 7 × 3 mm. Ceromer and nanohybrid composite was applied to the infrastructures after their surface treatments according to randomization. The SBS of specimens was measured to test the efficacy of surface treatments. Representative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images after laser treatments were obtained. Overall, in current experimental settings, Nd:YAG, KTP, and Er:YAG lasers, in order of efficacy, are effective to improve the bonding of ceromer and nanohybrid composite to the DLS and Ni-Cr-based infrastructures (p laser is more effective in the DLS/ceromer infrastructures (p laser, as second more effective preparation, is more effective in the DLS/ceromer infrastructures (p laser modalities, in order of success, Nd:YAG, KTP, and Er:YAG, are effective to increase bonding of these structures.

  2. Emerging heterogeneous integrated photonic platforms on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathpour Sasan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics has been established as a mature and promising technology for optoelectronic integrated circuits, mostly based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI waveguide platform. However, not all optical functionalities can be satisfactorily achieved merely based on silicon, in general, and on the SOI platform, in particular. Long-known shortcomings of silicon-based integrated photonics are optical absorption (in the telecommunication wavelengths and feasibility of electrically-injected lasers (at least at room temperature. More recently, high two-photon and free-carrier absorptions required at high optical intensities for third-order optical nonlinear effects, inherent lack of second-order optical nonlinearity, low extinction ratio of modulators based on the free-carrier plasma effect, and the loss of the buried oxide layer of the SOI waveguides at mid-infrared wavelengths have been recognized as other shortcomings. Accordingly, several novel waveguide platforms have been developing to address these shortcomings of the SOI platform. Most of these emerging platforms are based on heterogeneous integration of other material systems on silicon substrates, and in some cases silicon is integrated on other substrates. Germanium and its binary alloys with silicon, III–V compound semiconductors, silicon nitride, tantalum pentoxide and other high-index dielectric or glass materials, as well as lithium niobate are some of the materials heterogeneously integrated on silicon substrates. The materials are typically integrated by a variety of epitaxial growth, bonding, ion implantation and slicing, etch back, spin-on-glass or other techniques. These wide range of efforts are reviewed here holistically to stress that there is no pure silicon or even group IV photonics per se. Rather, the future of the field of integrated photonics appears to be one of heterogenization, where a variety of different materials and waveguide platforms will be used for

  3. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  4. Understanding Bonds - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimmer, Nina Røhr

    2016-01-01

    Undervisningsmateriale. A bond is a debt security, similar to an ”I Owe You document” (IOU). When you purchase a bond, you are lending money to a government, municipality, corporation, federal agency or other entity known as the issuer. In return for the loan, the issuer promises to pay you...... a specified rate of interest during the life of the bond and to repay the face value of the bond (the principal) when it “matures,” or comes due. Among the types of bonds you can choose from are: Government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage and asset-backed securities, federal agency...... securities and foreign government bonds....

  5. Synthesis and characterization of carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Ted V.

    Silicon nanoparticles are of great interest in a great number of fields. Silicon nanoparticles show great promise particularly in the field of bioimaging. Carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles have the ability to covalently bond to biomolecules through the conjugation of the carboxylic acid to an amine functionalized biomolecule. This thesis explores the synthesis of silicon nanoparticles functionalized by both carboxylic acids and alkenes and their carboxylic acid functionality. Also discussed is the characterization of the silicon nanoparticles by the use of x-ray spectroscopy. Finally, the nature of the Si-H bond that is observed on the surface of the silicon nanoparticles will be investigated using photoassisted exciton mediated hydrosilation reactions. The silicon nanoparticles are synthesized from both carboxylic acids and alkenes. However, the lack of solubility of diacids is a significant barrier to carboxylic acid functionalization by a mixture of monoacids and diacids. A synthesis route to overcome this obstacle is to synthesize silicon nanoparticles with terminal vinyl group. This terminal vinyl group is distal to the surface of the silicon nanoparticle. The conversion of the vinyl group to a carboxylic acid is accomplished by oxidative cleavage using ozonolysis. The carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles were then successfully conjugated to amine functionalized DNA strand through an n-hydroxy succinimide ester activation step, which promotes the formation of the amide bond. Conjugation was characterized by TEM and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The PAGE results show that the silicon nanoparticle conjugates move slower through the polyacrylamide gel, resulting in a significant separation from the nonconjugated DNA. The silicon nanoparticles were then characterized by the use of x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (Xanes) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the bonding and chemical

  6. Structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of amorphous silicon: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Car, R.; Parrinello, M.

    1988-01-18

    An amorphous silicon structure is obtained with a computer simulation based on a new molecular-dynamics technique in which the interatomic potential is derived from a parameter-free quantum mechanical method. Our results for the atomic structure, the phonon spectrum, and the electronic properties are in excellent agreement with experiment. In addition we study details of the microscopic dynamics which are not directly accessible to experiment. We find in particular that structural defects are associated with weak bonds. These may give rise to low-frequency vibrational modes.

  7. Synthesis and reactions of imines of α,β-ethylenic silicon-containing aldehydes with complex metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surnin, V.A.; Stadnichuk, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Imines of 3-trimethylsilyl-2-propenal or its hydrocarbon analog are reduced chemoselectively at the C=N double bond by sodium borohydride. The direction of lithium aluminum hydride reduction of these imines is not influenced by the nature of the element attached to the C=C bond silicon versus carbon, but rather is determined by the nature of the radical group attached to the nitrogen atom; N-arylimines undergo addition with lithium aluminum hydride at the C=N bond exclusively, whereas for N-alkylimines the addition reactions occur either partially or in full in the 1,4-position, depending on the reaction conditions, to give imines of saturated aldehydes after demetallation

  8. Local structure reconstruction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon from angular correlation and synchrotron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, D.T.; Minani, E.; Knoesen, D.; Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Furlan, F.; Giles, C.; Haerting, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a widely used thin film semiconductor material which is still incompletely understood. It is generally assumed to form a continuous random network, with a high concentration of coordination defects (dangling bonds), which are hydrogen terminated. Neither the exact nature of these sites nor the degree of medium range order has been fully determined. In this paper, we present the first results for the local structure, from a combined study using angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR) and synchrotron radiation diffraction. Reciprocal space information is obtained directly, for the mesoscale structure and the local defect structure, from the orientation dependent diffraction and 2D-ACAR patterns, respectively. Furthermore, inversion of both patterns yields a comparison of real space information through maps of the silicon-silicon pair correlation function and the electron-positron autocorrelation function B 2γ (r). From this information, it is possible to identify the dominant structural defect as a vacancy-size dangling bond cluster, around which the network strain is fully relaxed

  9. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  10. High yield silicon carbide from alkylated or arylated pre-ceramic polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.; Gaul, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Alkylated or arylated methylpolysilanes which exhibit ease of handling and are used to obtain silicon carbide ceramic materials in high yields contain 0 to 60 mole percent (CH 3 ) 2 Si double bond units and 40 to 100 mole percent CH 3 Si triple bond units, wherein there is also bonded to the silicon atoms other silicon atoms and additional alkyl radicals of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or phenyl. They may be prepared by reaction of a Grignard reagent RMgX, where X is halogen and R is Csub(1-4)-alkyl or phenyl, with a starting material which is a solid at 25 0 C, and is identical to the product except that the remaining bonds on the silicon atoms are attached to another silicon atom, or a chlorine or a bromine atom. Ceramics result from heating the polysilane products to 1200 0 C, optionally with fillers. (author)

  11. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce Burckel, D.; Finnegan, Patrick S.; David Henry, M.; Resnick, Paul J.; Jarecki, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicon topography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  12. Direct Vinylation of Alcohols or Aldehydes Employing Alkynes as Vinyl Donors: A Ruthenium Catalyzed C-C Bond Forming Transfer Hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patman, Ryan L.; Chaulagain, Mani Raj; Williams, Vanessa M.; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Under the conditions of ruthenium catalyzed transfer hydrogenation, 2-butyne couples to benzylic and aliphatic alcohols 1a–1i to furnish allylic alcohols 2a–2i, constituting a direct C-H vinylation of alcohols employing alkynes as vinyl donors. Under related transfer hydrogenation conditions employing formic acid as terminal reductant, 2-butyne couples to aldehydes 4a, 4b, and 4e to furnish identical products of carbonyl vinylation 2a, 2b, and 2e. Thus, carbonyl vinylation is achieved from the alcohol or the aldehyde oxidation level in the absence of any stoichiometric metallic reagents. Nonsymmetric alkynes 6a–6c couple efficiently to aldehyde 4b to provide allylic alcohols 2m–2o as single regioisomers. Acetylenic aldehyde 7a engages in efficient intramolecular coupling to deliver cyclic allylic alcohol 8a. PMID:19173651

  13. Investigation of ball bond integrity for 0.8 mil (20 microns) diameter gold bonding wire on low k die in wire bonding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudtarkar, Santosh Anil

    structures on 90 nm silicon technology, bonding wires with different percentage of doping element (palladium), and different levels of bonding process parameters. An empirical model to understand the high temperature effects for bonds formed using the low diameter wire was also developed.

  14. Mechatronic modeling and simulation using bond graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Shuvra

    2009-01-01

    Introduction to Mechatronics and System ModelingWhat Is Mechatronics?What Is a System and Why Model Systems?Mathematical Modeling Techniques Used in PracticeSoftwareBond Graphs: What Are They?Engineering SystemsPortsGeneralized VariablesBond GraphsBasic Components in SystemsA Brief Note about Bond Graph Power DirectionsSummary of Bond Direction RulesDrawing Bond Graphs for Simple Systems: Electrical and MechanicalSimplification Rules for Junction StructureDrawing Bond Graphs for Electrical SystemsDrawing Bond Graphs for Mechanical SystemsCausalityDrawing Bond Graphs for Hydraulic and Electronic Components and SystemsSome Basic Properties and Concepts for FluidsBond Graph Model of Hydraulic SystemsElectronic SystemsDeriving System Equations from Bond GraphsSystem VariablesDeriving System EquationsTackling Differential CausalityAlgebraic LoopsSolution of Model Equations and Their InterpretationZeroth Order SystemsFirst Order SystemsSecond Order SystemTransfer Functions and Frequency ResponsesNumerical Solution ...

  15. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  16. Controlled growth of periodically aligned copper-silicide nanocrystal arrays on silicon directed by laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberger, Philipp; Reinhardt, Hendrik M.; Rhinow, Daniel; Riedel, René; Werner, Simon; Hampp, Norbert A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a versatile tool for the controlled growth and alignment of copper-silicide nanocrystals. The method takes advantage of a unique self-organization phenomenon denoted as laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). Copper films (3 ± 0.2 nm) are sputter-deposited onto single crystal silicon (100) substrates with a thin oxide layer (4 ± 0.2 nm), and subsequently exposed to linearly polarized nanosecond laser pulses (τ ≈ 6 ns) at a central wavelength of 532 nm. The irradiation triggers dewetting of the Cu film and simultaneous formation of periodic Cu nanowires (LIPSS), which partially penetrate the oxide layer to the Si substrate. These LIPSS act as nucleation centers for the growth of Cu-Si crystals during thermal processing at 500 °C under forming gas 95/5 atmosphere. Exemplified by our model system Cu/SiO2/Si, LIPSS are demonstrated to facilitate the diffusion reaction between Cu and underlying Si. Moreover, adjustment of the laser polarization allows us to precisely control the nanocrystal alignment with respect to the LIPSS orientation. Potential applications and conceivable alternatives of this process are discussed.

  17. Quantum Coherent States and Path Integral Method to Stochastically Determine the Anisotropic Volume Expansion in Lithiated Silicon Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Boone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This computational research study will analyze the multi-physics of lithium ion insertion into a silicon nanowire in an attempt to explain the electrochemical kinetics at the nanoscale and quantum level. The electron coherent states and a quantum field version of photon density waves will be the joining theories that will explain the electron-photon interaction within the lithium-silicon lattice structure. These two quantum particles will be responsible for the photon absorption rate of silicon atoms that are hypothesized to be the leading cause of breaking diatomic silicon covalent bonds that ultimately leads to volume expansion. It will be demonstrated through the combination of Maxwell stress tensor, optical amplification and path integrals that a stochastic analyze using a variety of Poisson distributions that the anisotropic expansion rates in the <110>, <111> and <112> orthogonal directions confirms the findings ascertained in previous works made by other research groups. The computational findings presented in this work are similar to those which were discovered experimentally using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and simulation models that used density functional theory (DFT and molecular dynamics (MD. The refractive index and electric susceptibility parameters of lithiated silicon are interwoven in the first principle theoretical equations and appears frequently throughout this research presentation, which should serve to demonstrate the importance of these parameters in the understanding of this component in lithium ion batteries.

  18. Hydrogen, oxygen and hydroxyl on porous silicon surface: A joint density-functional perturbation theory and infrared spectroscopy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, Pedro; Palavicini, Alessio; Wang, Chumin

    2014-01-01

    Based on the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT), infrared absorption spectra of porous silicon are calculated by using an ordered pore model, in which columns of silicon atoms are removed along the [001] direction and dangling bonds are initially saturated with hydrogen atoms. When these atoms on the pore surface are gradually replaced by oxygen ones, the ab-initio infrared absorption spectra reveal oxygen, hydroxyl, and coupled hydrogen–oxygen vibrational modes. In a parallel way, freestanding porous silicon samples were prepared by using electrochemical etching and they were further thermally oxidized in a dry oxygen ambient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate the surface modifications caused by oxygen adsorption. In particular, the predicted hydroxyl and oxygen bound to the silicon pore surface are confirmed. Finally, a global analysis of measured transmittance spectra has been performed by means of a combined DFPT and thin-film optics approach. - Highlights: • The density functional perturbation theory is used to study infrared absorption. • An ordered pore model is used to investigate the oxidation in porous silicon (PSi). • Infrared transmittance spectra of oxidized PSi freestanding samples are measured

  19. Structures of sub-monolayered silicon carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Shimoyama, I.; Nath, Krishna G.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic and geometrical structures of silicon carbide thin films are presented. The films were deposited on graphite by ion-beam deposition using tetramethylsilane (TMS) as an ion source. In the Si K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra for sub-monolayered film, sharp peaks due to the resonance from Si 1s to π*-like orbitals were observed, suggesting the existence of Si=C double bonds. On the basis of the polarization dependencies of the Si 1s → π* peak intensities, it is elucidated that the direction of the π*-like orbitals is just perpendicular to the surface. We conclude that the sub-monolayered SiC x film has a flat-lying hexagonal structure of which configuration is analogous to the single sheet of graphite

  20. Double stabilization of nanocrystalline silicon: a bonus from solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolyagin, Y. G.; Zakharov, V. N.; Yatsenko, A. V.; Paseshnichenko, K. A.; Savilov, S. V.; Aslanov, L. A., E-mail: aslanov.38@mail.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Double stabilization of the silicon nanocrystals was observed for the first time by {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. The role of solvent, 1,2-dimethoxyethane (glyme), in formation and stabilization of silicon nanocrystals as well as mechanism of modification of the surface of silicon nanocrystals by nitrogen-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) was studied in this research. It was shown that silicon nanocrystals were stabilized by the products of cleavage of the C–O bonds in ethers and similar compounds. The fact of stabilization of silicon nanoparticles with NHC ligands in glyme was experimentally detected. It was demonstrated that MAS NMR spectroscopy is rather informative for study of the surface of silicon nanoparticles but it needs very pure samples.

  1. On the molecular basis of the activity of the antimalarial drug chloroquine: EXAFS-assisted DFT evidence of a direct Fe–N bond with free heme in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macetti, Giovanni; Rizzato, Silvia; Beghi, Fabio; Presti, Leonardo Lo; Silvestrini, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    4-aminoquinoline antiplasmodials interfere with the biocrystallization of the malaria pigment, a key step of the malaria parasite metabolism. It is commonly believed that these drugs set stacking π···π interactions with the Fe-protoporphyrin scaffold of the free heme, even though the details of the heme:drug recognition process remain elusive. In this work, the local coordination of Fe(III) ions in acidic solutions of hematin at room temperature was investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 4.0–5.5 pH range, both in the presence and in the absence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine. EXAFS results were complemented by DFT simulations in polarizable continuum media to model solvent effects. We found evidence that a complex where the drug quinoline nitrogen is coordinated with the iron center might coexist with formerly proposed adduct geometries, based on stacking interactions. Charge-assisted hydrogen bonds among lateral chains of the two molecules play a crucial role in stabilizing this complex, whose formation is favored by the presence of lipid micelles. The direct Fe–N bond could reversibly block the axial position in the Fe 1st coordination shell in free heme, acting as an inhibitor for the crystallization of the malaria pigment without permanently hampering the catalytic activity of the redox center. These findings are discussed in the light of possible implications on the engineering of drugs able to thwart the adaptability of the malaria parasite against classical aminoquinoline-based therapies. (invited comment)

  2. On the molecular basis of the activity of the antimalarial drug chloroquine: EXAFS-assisted DFT evidence of a direct Fe-N bond with free heme in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macetti, Giovanni; Rizzato, Silvia; Beghi, Fabio; Silvestrini, Lucia; Lo Presti, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    4-aminoquinoline antiplasmodials interfere with the biocrystallization of the malaria pigment, a key step of the malaria parasite metabolism. It is commonly believed that these drugs set stacking π···π interactions with the Fe-protoporphyrin scaffold of the free heme, even though the details of the heme:drug recognition process remain elusive. In this work, the local coordination of Fe(III) ions in acidic solutions of hematin at room temperature was investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 4.0-5.5 pH range, both in the presence and in the absence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine. EXAFS results were complemented by DFT simulations in polarizable continuum media to model solvent effects. We found evidence that a complex where the drug quinoline nitrogen is coordinated with the iron center might coexist with formerly proposed adduct geometries, based on stacking interactions. Charge-assisted hydrogen bonds among lateral chains of the two molecules play a crucial role in stabilizing this complex, whose formation is favored by the presence of lipid micelles. The direct Fe-N bond could reversibly block the axial position in the Fe 1st coordination shell in free heme, acting as an inhibitor for the crystallization of the malaria pigment without permanently hampering the catalytic activity of the redox center. These findings are discussed in the light of possible implications on the engineering of drugs able to thwart the adaptability of the malaria parasite against classical aminoquinoline-based therapies.

  3. Ab initio simulation of amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N.C.; McKenzie, D.R.; Goringe, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: A first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous silicon is presented. Density Functional Theory is used to describe the forces between the atoms in a 64 atom supercell which is periodically repeated throughout space in order to generate an infinite network of atoms (a good approximation to a real solid). A quench from the liquid phase is used to achieve a quenched amorphous structure, which is subjected to an annealing cycle to improve its stability. The final, annealed network is in better agreement with experiment than any previous simulation of amorphous silicon. Significantly, the predicted average first-coordination numbers of 3.56 and 3.84 for the quenched and annealed structures from this simulation agree very closely with the experimental values of 3.55 and 3.90 respectively, whereas all previous simulations yielded first coordination numbers greater than 4. This improved agreement in coordination numbers is important because it supports the experimental finding that dangling bonds (which are associated with under-coordinated atoms) are more prevalent than floating bonds (the strained, longer bond of a five coordinate atom) in pure amorphous silicon. Finally, the effect of adding hydrogen to amorphous silicon was investigated by specifically placing hydrogen atoms at the likely defect sites. After a structural relaxation to optimise the positions of these hydrogen atoms, the localised electronic states associated with these defects are absent. Thus hydrogen is responsible for removing these defect states (which are able to trap carriers) from the edge of the band gap of the amorphous silicon. These results confirm the widely held ideas about the effect of hydrogen in producing remarkable improvements in the electronic properties of amorphous silicon

  4. Energy Calibration of a Silicon-Strip Detector for Photon-Counting Spectral CT by Direct Usage of the X-ray Tube Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats; Karlsson, Staffan; Persson, Mats; Xu, Cheng; Huber, Ben

    2015-02-01

    The variation among energy thresholds in a multibin detector for photon-counting spectral CT can lead to ring artefacts in the reconstructed images. Calibration of the energy thresholds can be used to achieve homogeneous threshold settings or to develop compensation methods to reduce the artefacts. We have developed an energy-calibration method for the different comparator thresholds employed in a photon-counting silicon-strip detector. In our case, this corresponds to specifying the linear relation between the threshold positions in units of mV and the actual deposited photon energies in units of keV. This relation is determined by gain and offset values that differ for different detector channels due to variations in the manufacturing process. Typically, the calibration is accomplished by correlating the peak positions of obtained pulse-height spectra to known photon energies, e.g. with the aid of mono-energetic x rays from synchrotron radiation, radioactive isotopes or fluorescence materials. Instead of mono-energetic x rays, the calibration method presented in this paper makes use of a broad x-ray spectrum provided by commercial x-ray tubes. Gain and offset as the calibration parameters are obtained by a regression analysis that adjusts a simulated spectrum of deposited energies to a measured pulse-height spectrum. Besides the basic photon interactions such as Rayleigh scattering, Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption, the simulation takes into account the effect of pulse pileup, charge sharing and the electronic noise of the detector channels. We verify the method for different detector channels with the aid of a table-top setup, where we find the uncertainty of the keV-value of a calibrated threshold to be between 0.1 and 0.2 keV.

  5. Direct growth of large grain polycrystalline silicon films on aluminum-induced crystallization seed layer using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bing-Rui; Lo, Shih-Yung; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Ou, Sin-Liang; Mao, Hsin-Yuan; Wang, Jui-Hao; Horng, Ray-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Large grain polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films on glass substrates have been deposited on an aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) seed layer using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). A poly-Si seed layer was first formed by the AIC process and a thicker poly-Si film was subsequently deposited upon the seed layer using HWCVD. The effects of AIC annealing parameters on the structural and electrical properties of the poly-Si seed layers were characterized by Raman scattering spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and Hall measurements. It was found that the crystallinity of seed layer was enhanced with increasing the annealing duration and temperature. The poly-Si seed layer formed at optimum annealing parameters can reach a grain size of 700 nm, hole concentration of 3.5 × 10 18 cm −3 , and Hall mobility of 22 cm 2 /Vs. After forming the seed layer, poly-Si films with good crystalline quality and high growth rate (> 1 nm/s) can be obtained using HWCVD. These results indicated that the HWCVD-deposited poly-Si film on an AIC seed layer could be a promising candidate for thin-film Si photovoltaic applications. - Highlights: ►Poly-Si seed layers are formed by aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) process. ►Poly-Si on AIC seed layers are prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. ►AIC process parameters affect structural properties of poly-Si films. ►Increasing the annealing duration and temperature increases the film crystallinity.

  6. Solvent Bonding for Fabrication of PMMA and COP Microfluidic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Alwin M D; Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2017-01-17

    Thermoplastic microfluidic devices offer many advantages over those made from silicone elastomers, but bonding procedures must be developed for each thermoplastic of interest. Solvent bonding is a simple and versatile method that can be used to fabricate devices from a variety of plastics. An appropriate solvent is added between two device layers to be bonded, and heat and pressure are applied to the device to facilitate the bonding. By using an appropriate combination of solvent, plastic, heat, and pressure, the device can be sealed with a high quality bond, characterized as having high bond coverage, bond strength, optical clarity, durability over time, and low deformation or damage to microfeature geometry. We describe the procedure for bonding devices made from two popular thermoplastics, poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA), and cyclo-olefin polymer (COP), as well as a variety of methods to characterize the quality of the resulting bonds, and strategies to troubleshoot low quality bonds. These methods can be used to develop new solvent bonding protocols for other plastic-solvent systems.

  7. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System (SPD)

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A; Antinori, Federico; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Ceresa, S; Dima, R; Elias, D; Fabris, D; Krivda, Marian; Librizzi, F; Manzari, Vito; Morel, M; Moretto, Sandra; Osmic, F; Pappalardo, G S; Pepato, Adriano; Pulvirenti, A; Riedler, P; Riggi, F; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Torcato De Matos, C; Turrisi, R; Tydesjo, H; Viesti, G; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE silicon pixel detector (SPD) comprises the two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracker system. The SPD includes 120 detector modules (half-staves) each consisting of 10 ALICE pixel chips bump bonded to two silicon sensors and one multi-chip read-out module. Each pixel chip contains 8192 active cells, so that the total number of pixel cells in the SPD is ≈ 107. The on-detector read-out is based on a multi-chip-module containing 4 ASICs and an optical transceiver module. The constraints on material budget and detector module dimensions are very demanding.

  8. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  9. Porous silicon: Synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Awad, F.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of porous silicon by electrochemical etching method of both p and n-type single crystal silicon wafers in HF based solutions has been performed by using three different modes. In addition to DC and pulsed voltage, a novel etching mode is developed to prepare light-emitting porous silicon by applying and holding-up a voltage in gradient steps form periodically, between the silicon wafer and a graphite electrode. Under same equivalent etching conditions, periodic gradient steps voltage etching can yield a porous silicon layer with stronger photoluminescence intensity and blue shift than the porous silicon layer prepared by DC or pulsed voltage etching. It has been found that the holding-up of the applied voltage during the etching process for defined interval of time is another significant future of this method, which highly affects the blue shift. This can be used for tailoring a porous layer with novel properties. The actual mechanism behind the blue shift is not clear exactly, even the experimental observation of atomic force microscope and purist measurements in support with quantum confinement model. It has been seen also from Fourier Transform Infrared study that interplays between O-Si-H and Si-H bond intensities play key role in deciding the efficiency of photoluminescence emission. Study of relative humidity sensing and photonic crystal properties of pours silicon samples has confirmed the advantages of the new adopted etching mode. The sensitivity at room temperature of porous silicon prepared by periodic gradient steps voltage etching was found to be about 70% as compared to 51% and 45% for the porous silicon prepared by DC and pulsed voltage etching, respectively. (author)

  10. Porous silicon: Synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Awad, F.

    2006-06-01

    Formation of porous silicon by electrochemical etching method of both p and n-type single crystal silicon wafers in HF based solutions has been performed by using three different modes. In addition to DC and pulsed voltage, a novel etching mode is developed to prepare light-emitting porous silicon by applying and holding-up a voltage in gradient steps form periodically, between the silicon wafer and a graphite electrode. Under same equivalent etching conditions, periodic gradient steps voltage etching can yield a porous silicon layer with stronger photoluminescence intensity and blue shift than the porous silicon layer prepared by DC or pulsed voltage etching. It has been found that the holding-up of the applied voltage during the etching process for defined interval of time is another significant future of this method, which highly affects the blue shift. This can be used for tailoring a porous layer with novel properties. The actual mechanism behind the blue shift is not clear exactly, even the experimental observation of atomic force microscope and purist measurements in support with quantum confinement model. It has been seen also from Fourier Transform Infrared study that interplays between O-Si-H and Si-H bond intensities play key role in deciding the efficiency of photoluminescence emission. Study of relative humidity sensing and photonic crystal properties of pours silicon samples has confirmed the advantages of the new adopted etching mode. The sensitivity at room temperature of porous silicon prepared by periodic gradient steps voltage etching was found to be about 70% as compared to 51% and 45% for the porous silicon prepared by DC and pulsed voltage etching, respectively. (author)

  11. 1366 Project Silicon: Reclaiming US Silicon PV Leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Adam [1366 Technologies, Bedford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-16

    1366 Technologies’ Project Silicon addresses two of the major goals of the DOE’s PV Manufacturing Initiative Part 2 program: 1) How to reclaim a strong silicon PV manufacturing presence and; 2) How to lower the levelized cost of electricity (“LCOE”) for solar to $0.05-$0.07/kWh, enabling wide-scale U.S. market adoption. To achieve these two goals, US companies must commercialize disruptive, high-value technologies that are capable of rapid scaling, defensible from foreign competition, and suited for US manufacturing. These are the aims of 1366 Technologies Direct Wafer ™ process. The research conducted during Project Silicon led to the first industrial scaling of 1366’s Direct Wafer™ process – an innovative, US-friendly (efficient, low-labor content) manufacturing process that destroys the main cost barrier limiting silicon PV cost-reductions: the 35-year-old grand challenge of making quality wafers (40% of the cost of modules) without the cost and waste of sawing. The SunPath program made it possible for 1366 Technologies to build its demonstration factory, a key and critical step in the Company’s evolution. The demonstration factory allowed 1366 to build every step of the process flow at production size, eliminating potential risk and ensuring the success of the Company’s subsequent scaling for a 1 GW factory to be constructed in Western New York in 2016 and 2017. Moreover, the commercial viability of the Direct Wafer process and its resulting wafers were established as 1366 formed key strategic partnerships, gained entry into the $8B/year multi-Si wafer market, and installed modules featuring Direct Wafer products – the veritable proving grounds for the technology. The program also contributed to the development of three Generation 3 Direct Wafer furnaces. These furnaces are the platform for copying intelligently and preparing our supply chain – large-scale expansion will not require a bigger machine but more machines. SunPath filled the

  12. Electro-optical properties of dislocations in silicon and their possible application for light emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguirov, Tzanimir Vladimirov

    2007-10-14

    and annealing, (2) epitaxially grown SiGe buffer, and (3) direct wafer bonding. The most promising dislocation-based emitter appears the utilization of a dislocation network produced by wafer bonding. It is shown, that monochromatic D1 radiation (wavelength 1.5 {mu}m) can be generated in a well localised depth of the wafer. (orig.)

  13. Structure and physical properties of silicon clusters and of vacancy clusters in bulk silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieck, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis the growth-pattern of free silicon clusters and vacancy clusters in bulk silicon is investigated. The aim is to describe and to better understand the cluster to bulk transition. Silicon structures in between clusters and solids feature new interesting physical properties. The structure and physical properties of silicon clusters can be revealed by a combination of theory and experiment, only. Low-energy clusters are determined with different optimization techniques and a density-functional based tight-binding method. Additionally, infrared and Raman spectra, and polarizabilities calculated within self-consistent field density-functional theory are provided for the smaller clusters. For clusters with 25 to 35 atoms an analysis of the shape of the clusters and the related mobilities in a buffer gas is given. Finally, the clusters observed in low-temperature experiments are identified via the best match between calculated properties and experimental data. Silicon clusters with 10 to 15 atoms have a tricapped trigonal prism as a common subunit. Clusters with up to about 25 atoms follow a prolate growth-path. In the range from 24 to 30 atoms the geometry of the clusters undergoes a transition towards compact spherical structures. Low-energy clusters with up to 240 atoms feature a bonding pattern strikingly different from the tetrahedral bonding in the solid. It follows that structures with dimensions of several Angstroem have electrical and optical properties different from the solid. The calculated stabilities and positron-lifetimes of vacancy clusters in bulk silicon indicate the positron-lifetimes of about 435 ps detected in irradiated silicon to be related to clusters of 9 or 10 vacancies. The vacancies in these clusters form neighboring hexa-rings and, therefore, minimize the number of dangling bonds. (orig.)

  14. A Novel Silicon Micromachined Integrated MCM Thermal Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, M. J.; Henderson, H. T.; Gerner, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    "Micromachining" is a chemical means of etching three-dimensional structures, typically in single- crystalline silicon. These techniques are leading toward what is coming to be referred to as MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems), where in addition to the ordinary two-dimensional (planar) microelectronics, it is possible to build three-dimensional n-ticromotors, electrically- actuated raicrovalves, hydraulic systems and much more on the same microchip. These techniques become possible because of differential etching rates of various crystallographic planes and materials used for semiconductor n-ticrofabfication. The University of Cincinnati group in collaboration with Karl Baker at NASA Lewis were the first to form micro heat pipes in silicon by the above techniques. Current work now in progress using MEMS technology is now directed towards the development of the next generation in MCM (Multi Chip Module) packaging. Here we propose to develop a complete electronic thermal management system which will allow densifica6on in chip stacking by perhaps two orders of magnitude. Furthermore the proposed technique will allow ordinary conu-nercial integrated chips to be utilized. Basically, the new technique involves etching square holes into a silicon substrate and then inserting and bonding commercially available integrated chips into these holes. For example, over a 100 1/4 in. by 1 /4 in. integrated chips can be placed on a 4 in. by 4 in. silicon substrate to form a Multi-Chip Module (MCM). Placing these MCM's in-line within an integrated rack then allows for three-diniensional stacking. Increased miniaturization of microelectronic circuits will lead to very high local heat fluxes. A high performance thermal management system will be specifically designed to remove the generated energy. More specifically, a compact heat exchanger with milli / microchannels will be developed and tested to remove the heat through the back side of this MCM assembly for moderate and high

  15. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  16. Design and implementation of a novel conical electrode for fast anodic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chii-Rong; Chang, Long-Yin; Wu, Jim-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Anodic bonding is a frequently used nonintermediate wafer-bonding technique for use in MEMS. However, it has a minimum bonding time for a 4 in silicon/glass wafer that is generally limited to the order of several minutes because of the gas-trapping problem that occurs in the bonded interface when a conventional bonding electrode is used. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a novel conical bonding electrode, which shortens the bonding time and solves the gas-trapping problem of the bonded interface. The 4 in silicon/glass wafers fitted with the proposed electrode exhibited a bonding ratio of 99.89% and an average bonding strength of around 15 MPa, which was attained within 15 s, at a bonding voltage of 900 V and a bonding temperature of 400 °C. A comprehensive series of experiments was performed to validate the excellent bonding performance of the proposed conical electrode. (paper)

  17. Structural, bonding, anisotropic mechanical and thermal properties of Al4SiC4 and Al4Si2C5 by first-principles investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural, bonding, electronic, mechanical and thermal properties of ternary aluminum silicon carbides Al4SiC4 and Al4Si2C5 are investigated by first-principles calculations combined with the Debye quasi-harmonic approximation. All the calculated mechanical constants like bulk, shear and Young's modulus are in good agreement with experimental values. Both compounds show distinct anisotropic elastic properties along different crystalline directions, and the intrinsic brittleness of both compounds is also confirmed. The elastic anisotropy of both aluminum silicon carbides originates from their bonding structures. The calculated band gap is obtained as 1.12 and 1.04 eV for Al4SiC4 and Al4Si2C5 respectively. From the total electron density distribution map, the obvious covalent bonds exist between Al and C atoms. A distinct electron density deficiency sits between AlC bond along c axis among Al4SiC4, which leads to its limited tensile strength. Meanwhile, the anisotropy of acoustic velocities for both compounds is also calculated and discussed.

  18. Hydrogen isotopic substitution experiments in nanostructured porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, W.D. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Koropecki, R.R. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: rkoro@intec.ceride.gov.ar; Arce, R.D. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Busso, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina)

    2008-04-30

    Nanostructured porous silicon is usually prepared by electrochemical anodization of monocrystalline silicon using a fluorine-rich electrolyte. As a result of this process, the silicon atoms conserve their original crystalline location, and many of the dangling bonds appearing on the surface of the nanostructure are saturated by hydrogen coming from the electrolyte. This work presents an IR study of the effects produced by partial substitution of water in the electrolytic solution by deuterium oxide. The isotopic effects on the IR spectra are analyzed for the as-prepared samples and for the samples subjected to partial thermal effusion of hydrogen and deuterium. We demonstrate that, although deuterium is chemically indistinguishable from hydrogen, it presents a singular behaviour when used in porous silicon preparation. We found that deuterium preferentially bonds forming Si-DH groups. A possible explanation of the phenomenon is presented, based on the different diffusivities of hydrogen and deuterium.

  19. Hydrogen isotopic substitution experiments in nanostructured porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, W.D.; Koropecki, R.R.; Arce, R.D.; Busso, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured porous silicon is usually prepared by electrochemical anodization of monocrystalline silicon using a fluorine-rich electrolyte. As a result of this process, the silicon atoms conserve their original crystalline location, and many of the dangling bonds appearing on the surface of the nanostructure are saturated by hydrogen coming from the electrolyte. This work presents an IR study of the effects produced by partial substitution of water in the electrolytic solution by deuterium oxide. The isotopic effects on the IR spectra are analyzed for the as-prepared samples and for the samples subjected to partial thermal effusion of hydrogen and deuterium. We demonstrate that, although deuterium is chemically indistinguishable from hydrogen, it presents a singular behaviour when used in porous silicon preparation. We found that deuterium preferentially bonds forming Si-DH groups. A possible explanation of the phenomenon is presented, based on the different diffusivities of hydrogen and deuterium

  20. Deriving the bond pricing equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kožul Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the recent focus on Eurozone debt crisis and the credit rating downgrade not only of US debt, but that of other countries and many UK major banking institutions, this paper aims to explain the concept of bond yield, its different measures and bond pricing equation. Yields on capital market instruments are rarely quoted on the same basis, which makes direct comparison between different as investment choices impossible. Some debt instruments are quoted on discount basis, whilst coupon-bearing ones accrue interest differently, offer different compounding opportunities, have different coupon payment frequencies, and manage non-business day maturity dates differently. Moreover, rules governing debt vary across countries, markets and currencies, making yield calculation and comparison a rather complex issue. Thus, some fundamental concepts applicable to debt instrument yield measurement, with focus on bond equation, are presented here. In addition, bond equation expressed in annuity form and used to apply Newton-Raphson algorithm to derive true bond yield is also shown.

  1. Bonding with Your Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the future bonding of the child and parent. Adoptive parents may be concerned about bonding with their ... general emotional support. And it's OK to ask family members and friends for help in the days — ...

  2. Sacrificial wafer bonding for planarization after very deep etching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiering, V.L.; Spiering, Vincent L.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    A new technique is presented that provides planarization after a very deep etching step in silicon. This offers the possibility for as well resist spinning and layer patterning as realization of bridges or cantilevers across deep holes or grooves. The sacrificial wafer bonding technique contains a

  3. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Anil V. Mishra; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  4. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  5. Extremely improved InP template and GaInAsP system growth on directly-bonded InP/SiO2-Si and InP/glass substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Makino, Tatsunori; Kimura, Katsuya; Shimomura, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an ultrathin InP template with low defect density on SiO 2 -Si and glass substrate by employing wet etching and wafer direct bonding technique. We have demonstrated epitaxial growth on these substrates and GaInAs/InP multiple quantum well layers were grown by low pressure metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. Photoluminescence measurements of the layers show that they are optically active and we have obtained almost the same intensity from these substrates compared to the InP substrate. These results may be attributed to improvement of InP template quality and should provide further improvements in device performance realized on SiO 2 -Si and glass substrate. And, these are promising results in terms of integration of InP-based several functional optical devices on SiO 2 -Si and glass substrate. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  7. Phenylacetylene and H bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... all resembling H bonds. Non-linear H bonds due to secondary interactions. C-H stretching frequency shows blue shift. Heavy atom distances are longer than the sum of van der Waals radii. Formed a task group through IUPAC to come up with a modern definition of H bond. 15 international experts including Desiraju.

  8. Annealing and deposition effects of the chemical composition of silicon rich nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Stimpel-Lindner, T.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon-rich nitride, deposited by LPCVD, is a low stress amorphous material with a high refractive index. After deposition the silicon-rich nitride thin film is annealed at temperatures above 1100 oC to break N-H bonds, which have absorption peaks in the wavelength band important for optical...... in optical waveguides. This means that the annealing temperature must be high enough to break the N-H bonds, but no so high as to produce clusters. Therefore, the process window for an annealing step lies between 1100 and 1150 oC. The chemical composition of amorphous silicon-rich nitride has been...... investigated by Rutherford back scattering (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The influence of deposition parameters and annealing temperatures on the stoichiometry and the chemical bonds will be discussed. The origin of the clusters has been found to be silicon due to severe silicon out...

  9. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  10. Design and Fabrication of Silicon-on-Silicon-Carbide Substrates and Power Devices for Space Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammon P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of power electronic semiconductor devices are being developed for the benefit of space and terrestrial harsh-environment applications. 200-600 V lateral transistors and diodes are being fabricated in a thin layer of silicon (Si wafer bonded to silicon carbide (SiC. This novel silicon-on-silicon-carbide (Si/SiC substrate solution promises to combine the benefits of silicon-on-insulator (SOI technology (i.e device confinement, radiation tolerance, high and low temperature performance with that of SiC (i.e. high thermal conductivity, radiation hardness, high temperature performance. Details of a process are given that produces thin films of silicon 1, 2 and 5 μm thick on semi-insulating 4H-SiC. Simulations of the hybrid Si/SiC substrate show that the high thermal conductivity of the SiC offers a junction-to-case temperature ca. 4× less that an equivalent SOI device; reducing the effects of self-heating, and allowing much greater power density. Extensive electrical simulations are used to optimise a 600 V laterally diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (LDMOSFET implemented entirely within the silicon thin film, and highlight the differences between Si/SiC and SOI solutions.

  11. SOI silicon on glass for optical MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Pontoppidan; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    and a final sealing at the interconnects can be performed using a suitable polymer. Packaged MEMS on glass are advantageous within Optical MEMS and for sensitive capacitive devices. We report on experiences with bonding SOI to Pyrex. Uniform DRIE shallow and deep etching was achieved by a combination......A newly developed fabrication method for fabrication of single crystalline Si (SCS) components on glass, utilizing Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) of a Silicon On Insulator (SOI) wafer is presented. The devices are packaged at wafer level in a glass-silicon-glass (GSG) stack by anodic bonding...... of an optimized device layout and an optimized process recipe. The behavior of the buried oxide membrane when used as an etch stop for the through-hole etch is described. No harmful buckling or fracture of the membrane is observed for an oxide thickness below 1 μm, but larger and more fragile released structures...

  12. Sequential C-Si Bond Formations from Diphenylsilane: Application to Silanediol Peptide Isostere Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lone; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2008-01-01

    and the first new carbon-silicon bond. The next step is the reduction of this hydridosilane with lithium metal providing a silyl lithium reagent, which undergoes a highly diastereoselective addition to an optically active tert-butanesulfinimine, thus generating the second C-Si bond. This method allows...

  13. Joining technique of silicon nitride and silicon carbide in a mixture and/or in contact with high-melting metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Zell, A.

    1980-01-01

    The following work gives a survey on possible joining techniques of silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) and silicon carbide (SiC) in a mixture and/or in contact with high-melting metals and alloys. The problem arose because special ceramic materials such as Si 3 N 4 and SiC are to be used in gas turbines. The special ceramics in use may unavoidably come into contact with metals or the one hand, or form intended composite systems with them on the other hand, like e.g. the joining of a Si 3 N 4 disc with a metallic drive axis or ceramic blades with a metal wheel. The mixed body of X% ceramic (Si 3 N 4 , SiC) and Y% metal powder were prepared depending on the material combination at 1200 0 C-1750 0 C by hot-pressing or at 1200 0 C-2050 0 C by hot-pressing or pressureless sintering. The following possible ways were chosen as interlaminar bonding ceramic/metal/ceramic: on the one hand pressure welding (composite hot pressing) and the solid-state bonding in direct contact and by means of artificially included transition mixed layers, as well as material intermediate layers between metal and ceramic and on the other hand, soldering with active solder with molten phase. (orig./RW) [de

  14. High-Throughput Multiple Dies-to-Wafer Bonding Technology and III/V-on-Si Hybrid Lasers for Heterogeneous Integration of Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianshu eLuo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated optical light source on silicon is one of the key building blocks for optical interconnect technology. Great research efforts have been devoting worldwide to explore various approaches to integrate optical light source onto the silicon substrate. The achievements so far include the successful demonstration of III/V-on-Si hybrid lasers through III/V-gain material to silicon wafer bonding technology. However, for potential large-scale integration, leveraging on mature silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS fabrication technology and infrastructure, more effective bonding scheme with high bonding yield is in great demand considering manufacturing needs. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a high-throughput multiple dies-to-wafer (D2W bonding technology which is then applied for the demonstration of hybrid silicon lasers. By temporarily bonding III/V dies to a handle silicon wafer for simultaneous batch processing, it is expected to bond unlimited III/V dies to silicon device wafer with high yield. As proof-of-concept, more than 100 III/V dies bonding to 200 mm silicon wafer is demonstrated. The high performance of the bonding interface is examined with various characterization techniques. Repeatable demonstrations of 16-III/V-die bonding to pre-patterned 200 mm silicon wafers have been performed for various hybrid silicon lasers, in which device library including Fabry-Perot (FP laser, lateral-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB laser with side wall grating, and mode-locked laser (MLL. From these results, the presented multiple D2W bonding technology can be a key enabler towards the large-scale heterogeneous integration of optoelectronic integrated circuits (H-OEIC.

  15. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures.Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22 according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C. Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm(2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group.Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength.

  16. Silicon crystal growth using a liquid-feeding Czochralski method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kurosaka, Shoei; Imai, Masato

    1996-09-01

    Silicon single crystals with uniformity along the growth direction were grown using a new continuous Czochralski (CCZ) method. Polycrystalline silicon rods used as charge materials are melted by carbon heaters over a crucible without contact between the raw material and other substances. Using this method, silicon crystals with diameters as large as 6 or 8 inch and good uniformity along the growth direction were grown.

  17. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  18. Combination of silicon nitride and porous silicon induced optoelectronic features enhancement of multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabha, Mohamed Ben; Dimassi, Wissem; Gaidi, Mounir; Ezzaouia, Hatem; Bessais, Brahim [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2011-06-15

    The effects of antireflection (ARC) and surface passivation films on optoelectronic features of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) were investigated in order to perform high efficiency solar cells. A double layer consisting of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) on porous silicon (PS) was achieved on mc-Si surfaces. It was found that this treatment decreases the total surface reflectivity from about 25% to around 6% in the 450-1100 nm wavelength range. As a result, the effective minority carrier diffusion length, estimated from the Laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) method, was found to increase from 312 {mu}m for PS-treated cells to about 798 {mu}m for SiN{sub x}/PS-treated ones. The deposition of SiN{sub x} was found to impressively enhance the minority carrier diffusion length probably due to hydrogen passivation of surface, grain boundaries and bulk defects. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) shows that the vibration modes of the highly suitable passivating Si-H bonds exhibit frequency shifts toward higher wavenumber, depending on the x ratio of the introduced N atoms neighbors. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Nanoshaving and Nanografting of Water Soluble Polymers on Glass and Silicon Dioxide Surfaces with Applications to DNA Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian; Conley, Hiram; Ochoa, Rosie; Hurd, Katie; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Robert C.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical surface patterning at the nanoscale is a critical component of chemically directed assembly of nanoscale devices or sensitive biological molecules onto surfaces. Here we present a scanning probe lithography technique that allows for patterning of aqueous polymers on glass or silicon dioxide surfaces. The surfaces were functionalized by covalently bonding a silane monolayer with a known surface charge to either a glass slide or a silicon wafer. A polymer layer less then 2 nm in thickness was electrostatically bound to the silane layer, passivating the functionalized surface. An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) probe was used to remove a portion of the polymer layer, exposing the functional silane layer underneath. Employing this method we made chemically active submicron regions. These regions were backfilled with a fluorescent polymer and Lambda-DNA. Chemical differentiation was verified through tapping mode AFM and optical fluorescent microscopy. Lines with a pitch as small as 20nm were observed with AFM height and phase mode data.

  20. Nanoscale fabrication and characterization of chemically modified silicon surfaces using conductive atomic force microscopy in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Christopher Reagan

    This dissertation examines the modification and characterization of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces in organic liquids. Conductive atomic force microscope (cAFM) lithography is used to fabricate structures with sub-100 nm line width on H:Si(111) in n-alkanes, 1-alkenes, and 1-alkanes. Nanopatterning is accomplished by applying a positive (n-alkanes and 1-alkenes) or a negative (1-alkanes) voltage pulse to the silicon substrate with the cAFM tip connected to ground. The chemical and kinetic behavior of the patterned features is characterized using AFM, lateral force microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF SIMS), and chemical etching. Features patterned in hexadecane, 1-octadecene, and undecylenic acid methyl ester exhibited chemical and kinetic behavior consistent with AFM field induced oxidation. The oxide features are formed due to capillary condensation of a water meniscus at the AFM tip-sample junction. A space-charge limited growth model is proposed to explain the observed growth kinetics. Surface modifications produced in the presence of neat 1-dodecyne and 1-octadecyne exhibited a reduced lateral force compared to the background H:Si(111) substrate and were resistant to a hydrofluoric acid etch, characteristics which indicate that the patterned features are not due to field induced oxidation and which are consistent with the presence of the methyl-terminated 1-alkyne bound directly to the silicon surface through silicon-carbon bonds. In addition to the cAFM patterned surfaces, full monolayers of undecylenic acid methyl ester (SAM-1) and undec-10-enoic acid 2-bromoethyl ester (SAM-2) were grown on H:Si(111) substrates using ultraviolet light. The structure and chemistry of the monolayers were characterized using AFM, TOF SIMS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), X-ray standing waves (XSW), and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These combined analyses provide evidence that SAM-1 and SAM-2 form dense monolayers

  1. Bond charge approximation for valence electron density in elemental semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashenov, V.K.; Gorbachov, V.E.; Marvakov, D.I.

    1985-07-01

    The spatial valence electron distribution in silicon and diamond is calculated in adiabatic bond charge approximation at zero temperature when bond charges have the Gaussian shape and their tensor character is taken into account. An agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved. For this purpose Xia's ionic pseudopotentials and Schulze-Unger's dielectric function are used. By two additional parameters Asub(B) and Zsub(B)sup(') we describe the spatial extent of the bond charge and local-field corrections, respectively. The parameter Zsub(B)sup(') accounts for the ratio between the Coulomb and exchange correlation interactions of the valence electrons and its silicon and diamond values have different signs. (author)

  2. Surface thiolation of silicon for antifouling application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Gao, Pei; Hollimon, Valerie; Brodus, DaShan; Johnson, Arion; Hu, Hongmei

    2018-02-07

    Thiol groups grafted silicon surface was prepared as previously described. 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol (PFDT) molecules were then immobilized on such a surface through disulfide bonds formation. To investigate the contribution of PFDT coating to antifouling, the adhesion behaviors of Botryococcus braunii (B. braunii) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) were studied through biofouling assays in the laboratory. The representative microscope images suggest reduced B. braunii and E. coli accumulation densities on PFDT integrated silicon substrate. However, the antifouling performance of PFDT integrated silicon substrate decreased over time. By incubating the aged substrate in 10 mM TCEP·HCl solution for 1 h, the fouled PFDT coating could be removed as the disulfide bonds were cleaved, resulting in reduced absorption of algal cells and exposure of non-fouled silicon substrate surface. Our results indicate that the thiol-terminated substrate can be potentially useful for restoring the fouled surface, as well as maximizing the effective usage of the substrate.

  3. Direct reading spectrochemical determination of aluminium, iron and silicon in fluorite; Determinacion espectroquimica de lectura directa de aluminio, hierro y silicio en fluorita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M

    1966-07-01

    A quantitative spectrochemical method for the determination of Al, Fe and Si in fluorite has been worked out. The sample was supported in a graphite electrode with crater of 5 mm. in diameter, 2,5 mm deep, and burned by a d.c. are in a direct reading spectrometer. The excitation of samples has been studied without dilution as well as using graphite powder as diluent in the ratios 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9; the latter factor was chosen. Ag, Ca, Co, Cr, Mo and Sn were tested as internal standards. It has not been found any significant inter element effect. It is necessary to use natural fluorite as base material for the standards. (Author) 5 refs.

  4. Enhanced photoluminescence from porous silicon by hydrogen-plasma etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Gu, C.Z.; Li, J.J.; Wang, Z.L.; Shi, C.Y.; Xu, P.; Zhu, K.; Liu, Y.L.

    2005-01-01

    Porous silicon (PS) was etched by hydrogen plasma. On the surface a large number of silicon nanocone arrays and nanocrystallites were formed. It is found that the photoluminescence of the H-etched porous silicon is highly enhanced. Correspondingly, three emission centers including red, green, and blue emissions are shown to contribute to the enhanced photoluminescence of the H-etched PS, which originate from the recombination of trapped electrons with free holes due to Si=O bonding at the surface of the silicon nanocrystallites, the quantum size confinement effect, and oxygen vacancy in the surface SiO 2 layer, respectively. In particular, the increase of SiO x (x<2) formed on the surface of the H-etched porous silicon plays a very important role in enhancing the photoluminescence properties

  5. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam′s non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05 Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  6. From silicon to organic nanoparticle memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukalas, D

    2009-10-28

    After introducing the operational principle of nanoparticle memory devices, their current status in silicon technology is briefly presented in this work. The discussion then focuses on hybrid technologies, where silicon and organic materials have been combined together in a nanoparticle memory device, and finally concludes with the recent development of organic nanoparticle memories. The review is focused on the nanoparticle memory concept as an extension of the current flash memory device. Organic nanoparticle memories are at a very early stage of research and have not yet found applications. When this happens, it is expected that they will not directly compete with mature silicon technology but will find their own areas of application.

  7. High temperature corrosion of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in the presence of chloride compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNallan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are resistant to oxidation because a protective silicon dioxide films on their surfaces in most oxidizing environments. Chloride compounds can attack the surface in two ways: 1) chlorine can attack the silicon directly to form a volatile silicon chloride compound or 2) alkali compounds combined with the chlorine can be transported to the surface where they flux the silica layer by forming stable alkali silicates. Alkali halides have enough vapor pressure that a sufficient quantity of alkali species to cause accelerated corrosion can be transported to the ceramic surface without the formation of a chloride deposit. When silicon carbide is attacked simultaneously by chlorine and oxygen, the corrosion products include both volatile and condensed spices. Silicon nitride is much more resistance to this type of attack than silicon carbide. Silicon based ceramics are exposed to oxidizing gases in the presence of alkali chloride vapors, the rate of corrosion is controlled primarily by the driving force for the formation of alkali silicate, which can be quantified as the activity of the alkali oxide in equilibrium with the corrosive gas mixture. In a gas mixture containing a fixed partial pressure of KCl, the rate of corrosion is accelerated by increasing the concentration of water vapor and inhibited by increasing the concentration of HCl. Similar results have been obtained for mixtures containing other alkalis and halogens. (Orig./A.B.)

  8. Effect of intercritical deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-silicon aluminum-added hot-rolled directly quenched and partitioned steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiao-Dong, E-mail: tan.x@mpie.de [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Xu, Yun-Bo, E-mail: yunbo_xu@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Ponge, Dirk [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Yang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Zhi-Ping; Peng, Fei [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Ju, Xiao-Wei [CERI LONG PRODUCT CO., LTD., Beijing 100176 (China); Wu, Di [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Raabe, Dierk [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2016-02-22

    Here, we applied hot-rolling in conjunction with direct quenching and partitioning (HDQ&P) processes with different rolling schedules to a low-C low-Si Al-added steel. Ferrite was introduced into the steel by intercritical rolling and air cooling after hot-rolling. The effect of intercritcal deformation on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties was investigated. The promotion of austenite stabilization and the optimization of the TRIP effect due to a moderate degree of intercritical deformation were systematically explored. The results show that the addition of 1.46 wt% of Al can effectively promote ferrite formation. An intercritical deformation above 800 °C can result in a pronounced bimodal grain size distribution of ferrite and some elongated ferrite grains containing sub-grains. The residual strain states of both austenite and ferrite and the occurrence of bainite transformation jointly increase the retained austenite fraction due to its mechanical stabilization and the enhanced carbon partitioning into austenite from its surrounding phases. An intercritical deformation below 800 °C can profoundly increase the ferrite fraction and promote the recrystallization of deformed ferrite. The formation of this large fraction of ferrite enhances the carbon enrichment in the untransformed austenite and retards the bainite transformation during the partitioning process and finally enhances martensite transformation and decreases the retained austenite fraction. The efficient TRIP effect of retained austenite and the possible strain partitioning of bainite jointly improve the work hardening and formability of the steel and lead to the excellent mechanical properties with relatively high tensile strength (905 MPa), low yield ratio (0.60) and high total elongation (25.2%).

  9. Fluorine-enhanced low-temperature wafer bonding of native-oxide covered Si wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Q.-Y.; Gan, Q.; Fountain, G.; Enquist, P.; Scholz, R.; Gösele, U.

    2004-10-01

    The bonding energy of bonded native-oxide-covered silicon wafers treated in the HNO3/H2O/HF or the HNO3/HF solution prior to room-temperature contact is significantly higher than bonded standard RCA1 cleaned wafer pairs after low-temperature annealing. The bonding energy reaches over 2000mJ/m2 after annealing at 100 °C. The very slight etching and fluorine in the chemically grown oxide are believed to be the main contributors to the enhanced bonding energy. Transmission-electron-microscopic images have shown that the chemically formed native oxide at bonding interface is embedded with many flake-like cavities. The cavities can absorb the by-products of the interfacial reactions that result in covalent bond formation at low temperatures allowing the strong bond to be retained.

  10. Dislocation dynamics of web type silicon ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Jr, O W; Tsai, C T; DeAngelis, R J

    1987-03-01

    Silicon ribbon grown by the dendritic web process passes through a rapidly changing thermal profile in the growth direction. This rapidly changing profile induces stresses which produce changes in the dislocation density in the ribbon. A viscoplastic material response function (Haasen-Sumino model) is used herein to calculate the stresses and the dislocation density at each point in the silicon ribbon. The residual stresses are also calculated.

  11. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  12. HR-EELS study of hydrogen bonding configuration, chemical and thermal stability of detonation nanodiamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, Sh.; Akhvlediani, R. [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Petit, T.; Girard, H.A.; Arnault, J.C. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Hoffman, A., E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-06-01

    Nano-diamond films composed of 3–10 nm grains prepared by the detonation method and deposited onto silicon substrates by drop-casting were examined by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The impact of (i) ex-situ ambient annealing at 400 °C and (ii) ex-situ hydrogenation on hydrogen bonding and its thermal stability were examined. In order to clarify the changes in hydrogen bonding configuration detected on the different surfaces as a function of thermal annealing, in-situ hydrogenation by thermally activated atomic hydrogen was performed and examined. This study provides direct evidence that the exposure to ambient conditions and medium temperature ambient annealing have a pronounced effect on the hydrogen-carbon bonding configuration onto the nano-diamond surfaces. In-situ 1000 °C annealing results in irreversible changes of the film surface and partial nano-diamond silicidation.

  13. Materials preparation and fabrication of pyroelectric polymer/silicon MOSFET detector arrays. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have delivered several 64-element linear arrays of pyroelectric elements fully integrated on silicon wafers with MOS readout devices. They have delivered detailed drawings of the linear arrays to LANL. They have processed a series of two inch wafers per submitted design. Each two inch wafer contains two 64 element arrays. After spin-coating copolymer onto the arrays, vacuum depositing the top electrodes, and polarizing the copolymer films so as to make them pyroelectrically active, each wafer was split in half. The authors developed a thicker oxide coating separating the extended gate electrode (beneath the polymer detector) from the silicon. This should reduce its parasitic capacitance and hence improve the S/N. They provided LANL three processed 64 element sensor arrays. Each array was affixed to a connector panel and selected solder pads of the common ground, the common source voltage supply connections, the 64 individual drain connections, and the 64 drain connections (for direct pyroelectric sensing response rather than the MOSFET action) were wire bonded to the connector panel solder pads. This entails (64 + 64 + 1 + 1) = 130 possible bond connections per 64 element array. This report now details the processing steps and the progress of the individual wafers as they were carried through from beginning to end

  14. Stretchable and foldable silicon-based electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Cavazos Sepulveda, Adrian Cesar

    2017-03-30

    Flexible and stretchable semiconducting substrates provide the foundation for novel electronic applications. Usually, ultra-thin, flexible but often fragile substrates are used in such applications. Here, we describe flexible, stretchable, and foldable 500-μm-thick bulk mono-crystalline silicon (100) “islands” that are interconnected via extremely compliant 30-μm-thick connectors made of silicon. The thick mono-crystalline segments create a stand-alone silicon array that is capable of bending to a radius of 130 μm. The bending radius of the array does not depend on the overall substrate thickness because the ultra-flexible silicon connectors are patterned. We use fracture propagation to release the islands. Because they allow for three-dimensional monolithic stacking of integrated circuits or other electronics without any through-silicon vias, our mono-crystalline islands can be used as a “more-than-Moore” strategy and to develop wearable electronics that are sufficiently robust to be compatible with flip-chip bonding.

  15. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries. PMID:26400671

  16. Stretchable and foldable silicon-based electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Cavazos Sepulveda, Adrian Cesar; Diaz Cordero, M. S.; Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Nassar, Joanna M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Flexible and stretchable semiconducting substrates provide the foundation for novel electronic applications. Usually, ultra-thin, flexible but often fragile substrates are used in such applications. Here, we describe flexible, stretchable, and foldable 500-μm-thick bulk mono-crystalline silicon (100) “islands” that are interconnected via extremely compliant 30-μm-thick connectors made of silicon. The thick mono-crystalline segments create a stand-alone silicon array that is capable of bending to a radius of 130 μm. The bending radius of the array does not depend on the overall substrate thickness because the ultra-flexible silicon connectors are patterned. We use fracture propagation to release the islands. Because they allow for three-dimensional monolithic stacking of integrated circuits or other electronics without any through-silicon vias, our mono-crystalline islands can be used as a “more-than-Moore” strategy and to develop wearable electronics that are sufficiently robust to be compatible with flip-chip bonding.

  17. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity

  18. Strained interface defects in silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Benjamin G.; Stradins, Paul [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hiller, Daniel; Zacharias, Margit [IMTEK - Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg (Germany); Luo, Jun-Wei; Beard, Matthew C. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Semonin, Octavi E. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-08-07

    The surface of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an oxide matrix can contain numerous interface defects. These defects strongly affect the nanocrystals' photoluminescence efficiency and optical absorption. Dangling-bond defects are nearly eliminated by H{sub 2} passivation, thus decreasing absorption below the quantum-confined bandgap and enhancing PL efficiency by an order of magnitude. However, there remain numerous other defects seen in absorption by photothermal deflection spectroscopy; these defects cause non-radiative recombination that limits the PL efficiency to <15%. Using atomistic pseudopotential simulations, we attribute these defects to two specific types of distorted bonds: Si-Si and bridging Si-O-Si bonds between two Si atoms at the nanocrystal surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Study of aluminum-doped silicon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Shichang; Li Baoxing; Yang Jiansong

    2007-01-01

    Using full-muffin-tin-orbital molecular-dynamics (FP-LMTO-MD) method, we have investigated the effect of aluminum heteroatoms on the geometric structures and bond characteristics of Si n (n=5-10) clusters in detail. It is found that the geometric framework of the ground state structures for Si n (n=5-10) clusters change to some extent upon the substitution of Al atoms in some Si atoms. The effect of aluminum doping on the silicon clusters depends on the geometric structures of Si n (n=5-10) clusters. In particular, the calculations suggest that the aluminum doping would improve the bond strength of some Si-Si bonds in the mixed Si n - m Al m clusters

  20. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Vladilo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a “covalent-bond stage” to a “hydrogen-bond stage” in prebiotic chemistry.