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Sample records for silico regulatory analysis

  1. In Silico Expression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar, Julio; Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Information on the specificity of cis-sequences enables the design of functional synthetic plant promoters that are responsive to specific stresses. Potential cis-sequences may be experimentally tested, however, correlation of genomic sequence with gene expression data enables an in silico expression analysis approach to bioinformatically assess the stress specificity of candidate cis-sequences prior to experimental verification. The present chapter demonstrates an example for the in silico validation of a potential cis-regulatory sequence responsive to cold stress. The described online tool can be applied for the bioinformatic assessment of cis-sequences responsive to most abiotic and biotic stresses of plants. Furthermore, a method is presented based on a reverted in silico expression analysis approach that predicts highly specific potentially functional cis-regulatory elements for a given stress.

  2. In silico discovery of transcription regulatory elements in Plasmodium falciparum

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    Le Roch Karine G

    2008-02-01

    were conducted. Conclusion This GEMS analysis demonstrates that in silico regulatory element discovery can be successfully applied to challenging repeat-sequence-rich, base-biased genomes such as that of P. falciparum. The fact that regulatory elements were predicted from a diverse range of functional gene clusters supports the hypothesis that cis-regulatory elements play a role in the transcriptional control of many P. falciparum biological processes. The putative regulatory elements described represent promising candidates for future biological investigation into the underlying transcriptional control mechanisms of gene regulation in malaria parasites.

  3. PlantCARE, a database of plant cis-acting regulatory elements and a portal to tools for in silico analysis of promoter sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Lescot, Magali; Déhais, Patrice; Thijs, Gert; Marchal, Kathleen; Moreau, Yves; Van de Peer, Yves; Rouzé, Pierre; Rombauts, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    PlantCARE is a database of plant cis-acting regulatory elements, enhancers and repressors. Regulatory elements are represented by positional matrices, consensus sequences and individual sites on particular promoter sequences. Links to the EMBL, TRANSFAC and MEDLINE databases are provided when available. Data about the transcription sites are extracted mainly from the literature, supplemented with an increasing number of in silico predicted data. Apart from a general description for specific t...

  4. In silico analysis of cis-acting regulatory elements in 5' regulatory regions of sucrose transporter gene families in rice (Oryza sativa Japonica) and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibraheem, Omodele; Botha, Christiaan E J; Bradley, Graeme

    2010-12-01

    The regulation of gene expression involves a multifarious regulatory system. Each gene contains a unique combination of cis-acting regulatory sequence elements in the 5' regulatory region that determines its temporal and spatial expression. Cis-acting regulatory elements are essential transcriptional gene regulatory units; they control many biological processes and stress responses. Thus a full understanding of the transcriptional gene regulation system will depend on successful functional analyses of cis-acting elements. Cis-acting regulatory elements present within the 5' regulatory region of the sucrose transporter gene families in rice (Oryza sativa Japonica cultivar-group) and Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified using a bioinformatics approach. The possible cis-acting regulatory elements were predicted by scanning 1.5kbp of 5' regulatory regions of the sucrose transporter genes translational start sites, using Plant CARE, PLACE and Genomatix Matinspector professional databases. Several cis-acting regulatory elements that are associated with plant development, plant hormonal regulation and stress response were identified, and were present in varying frequencies within the 1.5kbp of 5' regulatory region, among which are; A-box, RY, CAT, Pyrimidine-box, Sucrose-box, ABRE, ARF, ERE, GARE, Me-JA, ARE, DRE, GA-motif, GATA, GT-1, MYC, MYB, W-box, and I-box. This result reveals the probable cis-acting regulatory elements that possibly are involved in the expression and regulation of sucrose transporter gene families in rice and Arabidopsis thaliana during cellular development or environmental stress conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Complexity of Posttranscriptional Small RNA Regulatory Networks Revealed by In Silico Analysis of Gossypium arboreum L. Leaf, Flower and Boll Small Regulatory RNAs.

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    Hongtao Hu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs and secondary small interfering RNAs (principally phased siRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs are two distinct subfamilies of small RNAs (sRNAs that are emerging as key regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression in plants. Both miRNAs and secondary-siRNAs (sec-siRNAs are processed from longer RNA precursors by DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs. Gossypium arboreum L., also known as tree cotton or Asian cotton, is a diploid, possibly ancestral relative of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., the predominant type of commercially grown cotton worldwide known as upland cotton. To understand the biological significance of these gene regulators in G. arboreum, a bioinformatics analysis was performed on G. arboreum small RNAs produced from G. arboreum leaf, flower, and boll tissues. Consequently, 263 miRNAs derived from 353 precursors, including 155 conserved miRNAs (cs-miRNAs and 108 novel lineage-specific miRNAs (ls-miRNAs. Along with miRNAs, 2,033 miRNA variants (isomiRNAs were identified as well. Those isomiRNAs with variation at the 3'-miRNA end were expressed at the highest levels, compared to other types of variants. In addition, 755 pha-siRNAs derived 319 pha-siRNA gene transcripts (PGTs were identified, and the potential pha-siRNA initiators were predicted. Also, 2,251 non-phased siRNAs were found as well, of which 1,088 appeared to be produced by so-called cis- or trans-cleavage of the PGTs observed at positions differing from pha-siRNAs. Of those sRNAs, 148 miRNAs/isomiRNAs and 274 phased/non-phased siRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more pairs of tissues examined. Target analysis revealed that target genes for both miRNAs and pha-siRNAs are involved a broad range of metabolic and enzymatic activities. We demonstrate that secondary siRNA production could result from initial cleavage of precursors by both miRNAs or isomiRNAs, and that subsequently produced phased and unphased siRNAs could result that also serve as triggers

  6. The Complexity of Posttranscriptional Small RNA Regulatory Networks Revealed by In Silico Analysis of Gossypium arboreum L. Leaf, Flower and Boll Small Regulatory RNAs.

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    Hu, Hongtao; Rashotte, Aaron M; Singh, Narendra K; Weaver, David B; Goertzen, Leslie R; Singh, Shree R; Locy, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and secondary small interfering RNAs (principally phased siRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs) are two distinct subfamilies of small RNAs (sRNAs) that are emerging as key regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression in plants. Both miRNAs and secondary-siRNAs (sec-siRNAs) are processed from longer RNA precursors by DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs). Gossypium arboreum L., also known as tree cotton or Asian cotton, is a diploid, possibly ancestral relative of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., the predominant type of commercially grown cotton worldwide known as upland cotton. To understand the biological significance of these gene regulators in G. arboreum, a bioinformatics analysis was performed on G. arboreum small RNAs produced from G. arboreum leaf, flower, and boll tissues. Consequently, 263 miRNAs derived from 353 precursors, including 155 conserved miRNAs (cs-miRNAs) and 108 novel lineage-specific miRNAs (ls-miRNAs). Along with miRNAs, 2,033 miRNA variants (isomiRNAs) were identified as well. Those isomiRNAs with variation at the 3'-miRNA end were expressed at the highest levels, compared to other types of variants. In addition, 755 pha-siRNAs derived 319 pha-siRNA gene transcripts (PGTs) were identified, and the potential pha-siRNA initiators were predicted. Also, 2,251 non-phased siRNAs were found as well, of which 1,088 appeared to be produced by so-called cis- or trans-cleavage of the PGTs observed at positions differing from pha-siRNAs. Of those sRNAs, 148 miRNAs/isomiRNAs and 274 phased/non-phased siRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more pairs of tissues examined. Target analysis revealed that target genes for both miRNAs and pha-siRNAs are involved a broad range of metabolic and enzymatic activities. We demonstrate that secondary siRNA production could result from initial cleavage of precursors by both miRNAs or isomiRNAs, and that subsequently produced phased and unphased siRNAs could result that also serve as triggers of a second

  7. A Comprehensive in Silico Analysis of Regulatory SNPs of Human CLEC7A Gene and Its Validation as Genotypic and Phenotypic Disease Marker in Recurrent Vulvovaginal Infections

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    Namarta Kalia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent Vulvovaginal infections (RVVI are the commonly reported microbiological syndrome affecting millions of women globally. Various molecules of innate immune system are instrumental in clearance of these microbial pathogens, thus suggested as one of the most important contributing factor in determining the disease outcome. Dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-1 (Dectin-1 is an important molecule of innate immunity that is primarily known for its role in antifungal defenses. However, role of dectin-1 in recognition of other pathogens is also documented. The intracellular expression of dectin-1 was shown to be up-regulated by Mannose Binding Lectin (MBL-mediated opsonophagocytosis of pathogens. Dectin-1 is encoded by CLEC7A, postulated to be a candidate gene in modulating risk of developing RVVI. In this study, we identified CLEC7A causal variants using in silico analysis. To assess their impact on susceptibility to RVVI, these causal variants along with serum dectin-1 levels (sDectin-1 were investigated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP and Enzyme Linked Immnosorbent Assay (ELISA respectively, under a case-control design. Furthermore, effect of these polymorphisms was also assessed on sMBL levels. In silico analysis revealed 9 putative functional conserved SNPs of CLEC7A. Association analysis revealed a significantly lower risk of developing RVVI and its types in carriers of CLEC7A rs3901533 G allele and its homozygous genotypes (p < 0.05. The heterozygous genotype was associated with significant protection against RVVI (p = 0.004. Haplotypes GGG and GTA showed significant protection against RVVI (p < 0.0001; p = 0.0003, Bacterial Vaginosis (p = 0.03; p = 0.002, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (p = 0.03; p = 0.01 and Mixed Infections (p = 0.007; p = 0.04. Mean sDectin-1 levels were significantly high in RVVI and its types compared to controls (p < 0.05. Further, genotype

  8. In silico transcriptional regulatory networks involved in tomato fruit ripening

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    Stilianos Arhondakis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTTomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37 and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening.

  9. In silico comparative genomic analysis of GABAA receptor transcriptional regulation

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    Joyce Christopher J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtypes of the GABAA receptor subunit exhibit diverse temporal and spatial expression patterns. In silico comparative analysis was used to predict transcriptional regulatory features in individual mammalian GABAA receptor subunit genes, and to identify potential transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of the GABAA receptor gene clusters. Results Previously unreported putative promoters were identified for the β2, γ1, γ3, ε, θ and π subunit genes. Putative core elements and proximal transcriptional factors were identified within these predicted promoters, and within the experimentally determined promoters of other subunit genes. Conserved intergenic regions of sequence in the mammalian GABAA receptor gene cluster comprising the α1, β2, γ2 and α6 subunits were identified as potential long range transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes. A region of predicted DNase I hypersensitive sites within the cluster may contain transcriptional regulatory features coordinating gene expression. A novel model is proposed for the coordinate control of the gene cluster and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunits, based upon the selective action of putative Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs. Conclusion The putative regulatory features identified by genomic analysis of GABAA receptor genes were substantiated by cross-species comparative analysis and now require experimental verification. The proposed model for the coordinate regulation of genes in the cluster accounts for the head-to-head orientation and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunit genes, and for the disruption of transcription caused by insertion of a neomycin gene in the close vicinity of the α6 gene, which is proximal to a putative critical S/MAR.

  10. In silico analysis, mapping of regulatory elements and corresponding dna-protein interaction in polyphenol oxidase gene promoter from different rice varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, T.; Rehman, M.; Aziz, E.

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an important enzyme that has positive impact regarding plant resistance against different biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study PPO promoter from six different rice varieties was amplified and then analyzed for cis- and trans-acting elements. The study revealed a total of 79 different cis-acting regulatory elements including 11 elements restricted to only one or other variety. Among six varieties Pakhal-Basmati had highest number (5) of these elements, whereas C-622 and Rachna-Basmati have no such sequences. Rachna-Basmati, IR-36-Basmati and Kashmir- Basmati had 1, 2 and 3 unique elements, respectively. Different elementsrelated to pathogen, salt and water stresses were found, which may be helpful in controlling PPO activity according to changing environment. Moreover, HADDOCK was used to understand molecular mechanism of PPO regulation and it was found that DNA-protein interactions are stabilized by many potential hydrogen bonds. Adenine and arginine were the most reactive residues in DNA and proteins respectively.Structural comparison of different protein-DNA complexes show that even a highly conserved transcriptional factor can adopt different conformations when they contact a different DNA binding sequence, however their stable interactions depend on the number of hydrogen bonds formed and distance. (author)

  11. In-silico analysis of cis-acting regulatory elements of pathogenesis-related proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

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    Kaur, Amritpreet; Pati, Pratap Kumar; Pati, Aparna Maitra; Nagpal, Avinash Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are low molecular weight family of proteins induced in plants under various biotic and abiotic stresses. They play an important role in plant-defense mechanism. PRs have wide range of functions, acting as hydrolases, peroxidases, chitinases, anti-fungal, protease inhibitors etc. In the present study, an attempt has been made to analyze promoter regions of PR1, PR2, PR5, PR9, PR10 and PR12 of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. Analysis of cis-element distribution revealed the functional multiplicity of PRs and provides insight into the gene regulation. CpG islands are observed only in rice PRs, which indicates that monocot genome contains more GC rich motifs than dicots. Tandem repeats were also observed in 5' UTR of PR genes. Thus, the present study provides an understanding of regulation of PR genes and their versatile roles in plants.

  12. Association of rs1801157 single nucleotide polymorphism of CXCL12 gene in breast cancer in Pakistan and in-silico expression analysis of CXCL12–CXCR4 associated biological regulatory network

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    Samra Khalid

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12 has important implications in breast cancer (BC pathogenesis. It is selectively expressed on B and T lymphocytes and is involved in hematopoiesis, thymocyte trafficking, stem cell motility, neovascularization, and tumorigenesis. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1801157 of CXCL12 gene has been found to be associated with higher risk of BC. Methods Our study focuses on the genotypic and allelic distribution of SNP (rs1801157; G/A in Pakistani population as well as its association with the clinico-pathological features. The association between rs1801157 genotypes (G/A and BC risks was assessed by a multivariate logistic regression (MLR analysis. Genotyping was performed in both healthy individuals and patients of BC using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. Furthermore, in-silico approaches were adapted to investigate the association of CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 with genes/proteins involved in BC signalling. Results Significant differences in allelic and genotypic distribution between BC patients and healthy individuals of genotype (G/G and (A/G (p  0.05 was assessed. In a MLR analysis, a number of variables including age, weight of an individual, affected lymph nodes, hormonal status (estrogen and progesterone receptor, alcohol consumption and family history associated with the GG genotype (GG:AA, odds ratio (OR = 1.30, 95% CI [1.06–1.60] were found to be independent risk factors for BC. Our in-vitro results suggest that genotype GG is possibly increasing the risk of BC in Pakistani cohorts. in-silico analysis finds that CXCL12–CXCR4 is associated with an increased expression of PDZK1, PI3k and Akt which lead the breast tumor towards metastasis. Conclusion Multiple targets such as CXCL12, CXCR4, PDZK1, PI3k and Akt can be inhibited in combined strategies to treat BC metastasis.

  13. In silico Analysis of osr40c1 Promoter Sequence Isolated from Indica Variety Pokkali

    OpenAIRE

    W.S.I. de Silva; M.M.N. Perera; K.L.N.S. Perera; A.M. Wickramasuriya; G.A.U. Jayasekera

    2017-01-01

    The promoter region of a drought and abscisic acid (ABA) inducible gene, osr40c1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant indica rice variety Pokkali, which is 670 bp upstream of the putative translation start codon. In silico promoter analysis of resulted sequence showed that at least 15 types of putative motifs were distributed within the sequence, including two types of common promoter elements, TATA and CAAT boxes. Additionally, several putative cis-acing regulatory elements which may be involv...

  14. In silico regenerative medicine: how computational tools allow regulatory and financial challenges to be addressed in a volatile market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geris, L; Guyot, Y; Schrooten, J; Papantoniou, I

    2016-04-06

    The cell therapy market is a highly volatile one, due to the use of disruptive technologies, the current economic situation and the small size of the market. In such a market, companies as well as academic research institutes are in need of tools to advance their understanding and, at the same time, reduce their R&D costs, increase product quality and productivity, and reduce the time to market. An additional difficulty is the regulatory path that needs to be followed, which is challenging in the case of cell-based therapeutic products and should rely on the implementation of quality by design (QbD) principles. In silico modelling is a tool that allows the above-mentioned challenges to be addressed in the field of regenerative medicine. This review discusses such in silico models and focuses more specifically on the bioprocess. Three (clusters of) examples related to this subject are discussed. The first example comes from the pharmaceutical engineering field where QbD principles and their implementation through the use of in silico models are both a regulatory and economic necessity. The second example is related to the production of red blood cells. The described in silico model is mainly used to investigate the manufacturing process of the cell-therapeutic product, and pays special attention to the economic viability of the process. Finally, we describe the set-up of a model capturing essential events in the development of a tissue-engineered combination product in the context of bone tissue engineering. For each of the examples, a short introduction to some economic aspects is given, followed by a description of the in silico tool or tools that have been developed to allow the implementation of QbD principles and optimal design.

  15. In Silico Analysis of FMR1 Gene Missense SNPs.

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    Tekcan, Akin

    2016-06-01

    The FMR1 gene, a member of the fragile X-related gene family, is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS). Missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are responsible for many complex diseases. The effect of FMR1 gene missense SNPs is unknown. The aim of this study, using in silico techniques, was to analyze all known missense mutations that can affect the functionality of the FMR1 gene, leading to mental retardation (MR) and FXS. Data on the human FMR1 gene were collected from the Ensembl database (release 81), National Centre for Biological Information dbSNP Short Genetic Variations database, 1000 Genomes Browser, and NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project Exome Variant Server. In silico analysis was then performed. One hundred-twenty different missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene were determined. Of these, 11.66 % of the FMR1 gene missense SNPs were in highly conserved domains, and 83.33 % were in domains with high variety. The results of the in silico prediction analysis showed that 31.66 % of the FMR1 gene SNPs were disease related and that 50 % of SNPs had a pathogenic effect. The results of the structural and functional analysis revealed that although the R138Q mutation did not seem to have a damaging effect on the protein, the G266E and I304N SNPs appeared to disturb the interaction between the domains and affect the function of the protein. This is the first study to analyze all missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene. The results indicate the applicability of a bioinformatics approach to FXS and other FMR1-related diseases. I think that the analysis of FMR1 gene missense SNPs using bioinformatics methods would help diagnosis of FXS and other FMR1-related diseases.

  16. In silico analysis of Eucalyptus thioredoxins

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    Aulus Estevão Barbosa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Eucalyptus Genome Sequencing Project (FORESTs, an initiative from the Brazilian ONSA consortium (Organization for Nucleotide Sequencing and Analysis, has achieved the sequencing of 123.889 EST clones from 18 different cDNA libraries. We have investigated the FORESTs data set to identify EST clusters potentially encoding thioredoxins (TRX. Two types of thioredoxin families described in plants, chloroplastic (TRXm/f/x/y and cytosolic (TRXh, have been found in the transcriptome. Putative typical TRXs have been identified in fifteen clusters, four m-type, seven h-type, two f-type, one cluster for each x/y-types and one putative homologue of the TDX gene from Arabidopsis thaliana. One cluster presents an atypical active site WCMPS, different from the conserved WCGPC present in the other 15 clusters, and corresponds to a subgroup of cytosolic thioredoxins. Except in specific libraries from callus, roots, seedlings and wood tissues, thioredoxin deduced ESTs are found in all remaining libraries. According to the calculated frequencies of ESTs, chloroplastic thioredoxins are preferentially present in green tissues such as leaves whilst cytoplasmic thioredoxins are more general but demonstrate elevated frequencies in seedlings and flower tissues. TRX frequency patterns in the Eucalyptus transcriptome seem to indicate a good coherence with data from Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression.

  17. Phenotype prediction for mucopolysaccharidosis type I by in silico analysis.

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    Ou, Li; Przybilla, Michael J; Whitley, Chester B

    2017-07-04

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of α-L-iduronidase (IDUA), a lysosomal enzyme that degrades glycosaminoglycans (GAG) heparan and dermatan sulfate. To achieve optimal clinical outcomes, early and proper treatment is essential, which requires early diagnosis and phenotype severity prediction. To establish a genotype/phenotype correlation of MPS I disease, a combination of bioinformatics tools including SIFT, PolyPhen, I-Mutant, PROVEAN, PANTHER, SNPs&GO and PHD-SNP are utilized. Through analyzing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by these in silico approaches, 28 out of 285 missense SNPs were predicted to be damaging. By integrating outcomes from these in silico approaches, a prediction algorithm (sensitivity 94%, specificity 80%) was thereby developed. Three dimensional structural analysis of 5 candidate SNPs (P533R, P496R, L346R, D349G, T374P) were performed by SWISS PDB viewer, which revealed specific structural changes responsible for the functional impacts of these SNPs. Additionally, SNPs in the untranslated region were analyzed by UTRscan and PolymiRTS. Moreover, by investigating known pathogenic mutations and relevant patient phenotypes in previous publications, phenotype severity (severe, intermediate or mild) of each mutation was deduced. Collectively, these results identified potential candidate SNPs with functional significance for studying MPS I disease. This study also demonstrates the effectiveness, reliability and simplicity of these in silico approaches in addressing complexity of underlying genetic basis of MPS I disease. Further, a step-by-step guideline for phenotype prediction of MPS I disease is established, which can be broadly applied in other lysosomal diseases or genetic disorders.

  18. Genes co-regulated with LBD16 in nematode feeding sites inferred from in silico analysis show similarities to regulatory circuits mediated by the auxin/cytokinin balance in Arabidopsis.

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    Cabrera, Javier; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Plant endoparasitic nematodes, root-knot and cyst nematodes (RKNs and CNs) induce within the root vascular cylinder transfer cells used for nourishing, termed giant cells (GCs) and syncytia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind this process is essential to develop tools for nematode control. Based on the crucial role in gall development of LBD16, also a key component of the auxin pathway leading to the divisions in the xylem pole pericycle during lateral root (LR) formation, we investigated genes co-regulated with LBD16 in different transcriptomes and analyzed their similarities and differences with those of RKNs and CNs feeding sites (FS). This analysis confirmed LBD16 and its co-regulated genes, integrated in signaling cascades mediated by auxins during LR and callus formation, as a particular feature of RKN-FS distinct to CNs. However, LBD16, and its positively co-regulated genes, were repressed in syncytia, suggesting a selective down- regulation of the LBD16 auxin mediated pathways in CNs-FS. Interestingly, cytokinin-induced genes are enriched in syncytia and we encountered similarities between the transcriptome of shoot regeneration from callus, modulated by cytokinins, and that of syncytia. These findings establish differences in the regulatory networks leading to both FS formation, probably modulated by the auxin/cytokinin balance.

  19. In silico Analysis of osr40c1 Promoter Sequence Isolated from Indica Variety Pokkali

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    W.S.I. de Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The promoter region of a drought and abscisic acid (ABA inducible gene, osr40c1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant indica rice variety Pokkali, which is 670 bp upstream of the putative translation start codon. In silico promoter analysis of resulted sequence showed that at least 15 types of putative motifs were distributed within the sequence, including two types of common promoter elements, TATA and CAAT boxes. Additionally, several putative cis-acing regulatory elements which may be involved in regulation of osr40c1 expression under different conditions were found in the 5′-upstream region of osr40c1. These are ABA-responsive element, light-responsive elements (ATCT-motif, Box I, G-box, GT1-motif, Gap-box and Sp1, myeloblastosis oncogene response element (CCAAT-box, auxin responsive element (TGA-element, gibberellin-responsive element (GARE-motif and fungal-elicitor responsive elements (Box E and Box-W1. A putative regulatory element, required for endosperm-specific pattern of gene expression designated as Skn-1 motif, was also detected in the Pokkali osr40c1 promoter region. In conclusion, the bioinformatic analysis of osr40c1 promoter region isolated from indica rice variety Pokkali led to the identification of several important stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements, and therefore, the isolated promoter sequence could be employed in rice genetic transformation to mediate expression of abiotic stress induced genes.

  20. Metabolic flux balance analysis and the in silico analysis of Escherichia coli K-12 gene deletions

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    Edwards Jeremy S

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and bioinformatics are producing detailed lists of the molecular components contained in many prokaryotic organisms. From this 'parts catalogue' of a microbial cell, in silico representations of integrated metabolic functions can be constructed and analyzed using flux balance analysis (FBA. FBA is particularly well-suited to study metabolic networks based on genomic, biochemical, and strain specific information. Results Herein, we have utilized FBA to interpret and analyze the metabolic capabilities of Escherichia coli. We have computationally mapped the metabolic capabilities of E. coli using FBA and examined the optimal utilization of the E. coli metabolic pathways as a function of environmental variables. We have used an in silico analysis to identify seven gene products of central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, electron transport system essential for aerobic growth of E. coli on glucose minimal media, and 15 gene products essential for anaerobic growth on glucose minimal media. The in silico tpi-, zwf, and pta- mutant strains were examined in more detail by mapping the capabilities of these in silico isogenic strains. Conclusions We found that computational models of E. coli metabolism based on physicochemical constraints can be used to interpret mutant behavior. These in silica results lead to a further understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype relation. Supplementary information: http://gcrg.ucsd.edu/supplementary_data/DeletionAnalysis/main.htm

  1. In silico modeling of epigenetic-induced changes in photoreceptor cis-regulatory elements.

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    Hossain, Reafa A; Dunham, Nicholas R; Enke, Raymond A; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic repressor of mRNA transcription in many plant and vertebrate systems. However, the mechanism of this repression is not fully understood. The process of transcription is controlled by proteins that regulate recruitment and activity of RNA polymerase by binding to specific cis-regulatory sequences. Cone-rod homeobox (CRX) is a well-characterized mammalian transcription factor that controls photoreceptor cell-specific gene expression. Although much is known about the functions and DNA binding specificity of CRX, little is known about how DNA methylation modulates CRX binding affinity to genomic cis-regulatory elements. We used bisulfite pyrosequencing of human ocular tissues to measure DNA methylation levels of the regulatory regions of RHO , PDE6B, PAX6 , and LINE1 retrotransposon repeats. To describe the molecular mechanism of repression, we used molecular modeling to illustrate the effect of DNA methylation on human RHO regulatory sequences. In this study, we demonstrate an inverse correlation between DNA methylation in regulatory regions adjacent to the human RHO and PDE6B genes and their subsequent transcription in human ocular tissues. Docking of CRX to the DNA models shows that CRX interacts with the grooves of these sequences, suggesting changes in groove structure could regulate binding. Molecular dynamics simulations of the RHO promoter and enhancer regions show changes in the flexibility and groove width upon epigenetic modification. Models also demonstrate changes in the local dynamics of CRX binding sites within RHO regulatory sequences which may account for the repression of CRX-dependent transcription. Collectively, these data demonstrate epigenetic regulation of CRX binding sites in human retinal tissue and provide insight into the mechanism of this mode of epigenetic regulation to be tested in future experiments.

  2. An in silico approach reveals associations between genetic and epigenetic factors within regulatory elements in B cells from primary Sjögren’s syndrome patients

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    Orsia D. Konsta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genetics have highlighted several regions and candidate genes associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS, a systemic autoimmune epithelitis that combines exocrine gland dysfunctions, and focal lymphocytic infiltrations. In addition to genetic factors, it is now clear that epigenetic deregulations are present during SS and restricted to specific cell type subsets such as lymphocytes and salivary gland epithelial cells. In this study, 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with 43 SS gene risk factors were selected from publicly available and peer reviewed literature for further in silico analysis. SS risk variant location was tested revealing a broad distribution in coding sequences (5.6%, intronic sequences (55.6%, upstream/downstream genic regions (30.5%, and intergenic regions (8.3%. Moreover, a significant enrichment of regulatory motifs (promoter, enhancer, insulator, DNAse peak and eQTL characterizes SS risk variants (94.4%. Next, screening SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 ≥ 0.8 in Caucasians revealed 645 new variants including 5 SNPs with missense mutations, and indicated an enrichment of transcriptionally active motifs according to the cell type (B cells > monocytes > T cells >> A549. Finally, we looked at SS risk variants for histone markers in B cells (GM12878, monocytes (CD14+ and epithelial cells (A548. Active histone markers were associated with SS risk variants at both promoters and enhancers in B cells, and within enhancers in monocytes. In conclusion and based on the obtained in silico results, that need further confirmation, associations were observed between SS genetic risk factors and epigenetic factors and these associations predominate in B cells such as those observed at the FAM167A-BLK locus.

  3. A novel method for in silico identification of regulatory SNPs in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Zhong, Dexing; Liu, Ruiling; Lv, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xinman; Liu, Jun; Han, Jiuqiang

    2017-02-21

    Regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs), kind of functional noncoding genetic variants, can affect gene expression in a regulatory way, and they are thought to be associated with increased susceptibilities to complex diseases. Here a novel computational approach to identify potential rSNPs is presented. Different from most other rSNPs finding methods which based on hypothesis that SNPs causing large allele-specific changes in transcription factor binding affinities are more likely to play regulatory functions, we use a set of documented experimentally verified rSNPs and nonfunctional background SNPs to train classifiers, so the discriminating features are found. To characterize variants, an extensive range of characteristics, such as sequence context, DNA structure and evolutionary conservation etc. are analyzed. Support vector machine is adopted to build the classifier model together with an ensemble method to deal with unbalanced data. 10-fold cross-validation result shows that our method can achieve accuracy with sensitivity of ~78% and specificity of ~82%. Furthermore, our method performances better than some other algorithms based on aforementioned hypothesis in handling false positives. The original data and the source matlab codes involved are available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/rsnppredict/. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A functional genomics approach using metabolomics and in silico pathway analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Jochen; Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    analysis techniques and changes in the genotype will in many cases lead to different metabolite profiles. Here, a theoretical framework that may be applied to identify the function of orphan genes is presented. The approach is based on a combination of metabolome analysis combined with in silico pathway...

  5. Unveiling combinatorial regulation through the combination of ChIP information and in silico cis-regulatory module detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Guns, Tias; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Thorrez, Lieven; Nijssen, Siegfried; Marchal, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Computationally retrieving biologically relevant cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is not straightforward. Because of the large number of candidates and the imperfection of the screening methods, many spurious CRMs are detected that are as high scoring as the biologically true ones. Using ChIP-information allows not only to reduce the regions in which the binding sites of the assayed transcription factor (TF) should be located, but also allows restricting the valid CRMs to those that contain the assayed TF (here referred to as applying CRM detection in a query-based mode). In this study, we show that exploiting ChIP-information in a query-based way makes in silico CRM detection a much more feasible endeavor. To be able to handle the large datasets, the query-based setting and other specificities proper to CRM detection on ChIP-Seq based data, we developed a novel powerful CRM detection method ‘CPModule’. By applying it on a well-studied ChIP-Seq data set involved in self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells, we demonstrate how our tool can recover combinatorial regulation of five known TFs that are key in the self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells. Additionally, we make a number of new predictions on combinatorial regulation of these five key TFs with other TFs documented in TRANSFAC. PMID:22422841

  6. Genome wide in silico SNP-tumor association analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Ping; Wang, Luquan; Kostich, Mitch; Ding, Wei; Simon, Jason S; Greene, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    Carcinogenesis occurs, at least in part, due to the accumulation of mutations in critical genes that control the mechanisms of cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Publicly accessible databases contain millions of expressed sequence tag (EST) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) records, which have the potential to assist in the identification of SNPs overrepresented in tumor tissue. An in silico SNP-tumor association study was performed utilizing tissue library and SNP information available in NCBI's dbEST (release 092002) and dbSNP (build 106). A total of 4865 SNPs were identified which were present at higher allele frequencies in tumor compared to normal tissues. A subset of 327 (6.7%) SNPs induce amino acid changes to the protein coding sequences. This approach identified several SNPs which have been previously associated with carcinogenesis, as well as a number of SNPs that now warrant further investigation This novel in silico approach can assist in prioritization of genes and SNPs in the effort to elucidate the genetic mechanisms underlying the development of cancer

  7. In silico toxicology protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Glenn J; Ahlberg, Ernst; Akahori, Yumi; Allen, David; Amberg, Alexander; Anger, Lennart T; Aptula, Aynur; Auerbach, Scott; Beilke, Lisa; Bellion, Phillip; Benigni, Romualdo; Bercu, Joel; Booth, Ewan D; Bower, Dave; Brigo, Alessandro; Burden, Natalie; Cammerer, Zoryana; Cronin, Mark T D; Cross, Kevin P; Custer, Laura; Dettwiler, Magdalena; Dobo, Krista; Ford, Kevin A; Fortin, Marie C; Gad-McDonald, Samantha E; Gellatly, Nichola; Gervais, Véronique; Glover, Kyle P; Glowienke, Susanne; Van Gompel, Jacky; Gutsell, Steve; Hardy, Barry; Harvey, James S; Hillegass, Jedd; Honma, Masamitsu; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Hughes, Kathy; Johnson, Candice; Jolly, Robert; Jones, David; Kemper, Ray; Kenyon, Michelle O; Kim, Marlene T; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Kulkarni, Sunil A; Kümmerer, Klaus; Leavitt, Penny; Majer, Bernhard; Masten, Scott; Miller, Scott; Moser, Janet; Mumtaz, Moiz; Muster, Wolfgang; Neilson, Louise; Oprea, Tudor I; Patlewicz, Grace; Paulino, Alexandre; Lo Piparo, Elena; Powley, Mark; Quigley, Donald P; Reddy, M Vijayaraj; Richarz, Andrea-Nicole; Ruiz, Patricia; Schilter, Benoit; Serafimova, Rositsa; Simpson, Wendy; Stavitskaya, Lidiya; Stidl, Reinhard; Suarez-Rodriguez, Diana; Szabo, David T; Teasdale, Andrew; Trejo-Martin, Alejandra; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Vuorinen, Anna; Wall, Brian A; Watts, Pete; White, Angela T; Wichard, Joerg; Witt, Kristine L; Woolley, Adam; Woolley, David; Zwickl, Craig; Hasselgren, Catrin

    2018-04-17

    The present publication surveys several applications of in silico (i.e., computational) toxicology approaches across different industries and institutions. It highlights the need to develop standardized protocols when conducting toxicity-related predictions. This contribution articulates the information needed for protocols to support in silico predictions for major toxicological endpoints of concern (e.g., genetic toxicity, carcinogenicity, acute toxicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity) across several industries and regulatory bodies. Such novel in silico toxicology (IST) protocols, when fully developed and implemented, will ensure in silico toxicological assessments are performed and evaluated in a consistent, reproducible, and well-documented manner across industries and regulatory bodies to support wider uptake and acceptance of the approaches. The development of IST protocols is an initiative developed through a collaboration among an international consortium to reflect the state-of-the-art in in silico toxicology for hazard identification and characterization. A general outline for describing the development of such protocols is included and it is based on in silico predictions and/or available experimental data for a defined series of relevant toxicological effects or mechanisms. The publication presents a novel approach for determining the reliability of in silico predictions alongside experimental data. In addition, we discuss how to determine the level of confidence in the assessment based on the relevance and reliability of the information. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Altered retinal microRNA expression profiles in early diabetic retinopathy: an in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fen; Du, Xinhua; Hu, Jianyan; Li, Tingting; Du, Shanshan; Wu, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) - as negative regulators of target genes - are associated with various human diseases, but their precise role(s) in diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to elucidate the involvement of miRNAs in early DR using in silico analysis to explore their gene expression patterns. We used the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat to investigate the roles of miRNAs in early DR. Retinal miRNA expression profiles from diabetic versus healthy control rats were examined by miRNA array analysis. Based on several bioinformatic systems, specifically, gene ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways, we identified signatures of the potential pathological processes, gene functions, and signaling pathways that are influenced by dysregulated miRNAs. We used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to validate six (i.e. those with significant changes in expression levels) of the 17 miRNAs that were detected in the miRNA array. We also describe the significant role of the miRNA-gene network, which is based on the interactions between miRNAs and target genes. GO analysis of the 17 miRNAs detected in the miRNA array analysis revealed the most prevalent miRNAs to be those related to biological processes, olfactory bulb development and axonogenesis. These miRNAs also exert significant influence on additional pathways, including the mitogen-activated protein and calcium signaling pathways. Six of the seventeen miRNAs were chosen for qRT-PCR validation. With the exception of a slight difference in miRNA-350, our results are in close agreement with the differential expressions detected by array analysis. This study, which describes miRNA expression during the early developmental phases of DR, revealed extensive miRNA interactions. Based on both their target genes and signaling pathways, we suggest that miRNAs perform critical regulatory functions during the early stages of DR

  9. Safety analysis - current and future regulatory challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, T., E-mail: Terry.Jamieson@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    'Full text:' The current and future regulatory challenges associated with deterministic safety analysis are reviewed, including: 1. The CNSC's and safety control areas. 2. Traditional safety analysis approach. 3. Experience gained and impact. 4. Current analysis and regulatory approaches. 5. Current status. 6. Complexity and challenges In particular, the technical, regulatory and strategic aspects of these challenges are discussed. (author)

  10. Safety analysis - current and future regulatory challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, T.

    2015-01-01

    'Full text:' The current and future regulatory challenges associated with deterministic safety analysis are reviewed, including: 1. The CNSC's and safety control areas. 2. Traditional safety analysis approach. 3. Experience gained and impact. 4. Current analysis and regulatory approaches. 5. Current status. 6. Complexity and challenges In particular, the technical, regulatory and strategic aspects of these challenges are discussed. (author)

  11. Putative 3-nitrotyrosine detoxifying genes identified in the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii: In silico search of regulatory sequences responsive to salt and nitrogen stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela E. Castro

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: D. hansenii can grow in the presence of 3-nitrotyrosine as the only nitrogen source and has a high specific denitrase activity to degrade 3-nitrotyrosine in 1 and 2 M NaCl stress conditions. The results suggest that given the lack of information on transcriptional factors in D. hansenii, the genes identified in our in silico analysis may help explain 3-nitrotyrosine assimilation mechanisms.

  12. In-silico analysis of Aspergillus niger beta-glucosidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo S., L.; Shazilah, K.; Suhaila, S.; Abu Bakar F., D.; Murad A. M., A.

    2014-09-01

    Genomic data mining was carried out and revealed a total of seventeen β-glucosidases in filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger. Two of them belonged to glycoside hydrolase family 1 (GH1) while the rest belonged to genes in family 3 (GH3). These proteins were then named according to the nomenclature as proposed by the International Union of Biochemistry (IUB), starting from the lowest pI and glycoside hydrolase family. Their properties were predicted using various bionformatic tools showing the presence of domains for signal peptide and active sites. Interestingly, one particular domain, PA14 (protective antigen) was present in four of the enzymes, predicted to be involved in carbohydrate binding. A phylogenetic tree grouped the two glycoside hydrolase families with GH1 and GH3 related organisms. This study showed that the various domains present in these β-glucosidases are postulated to be crucial for the survival of this fungus, as supported by other analysis.

  13. In silico tools for the analysis of antibiotic biosynthetic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    Natural products of bacteria and fungi are the most important source for antimicrobial drug leads. For decades, such compounds were exclusively found by chemical/bioactivity-guided screening approaches. The rapid progress in sequencing technologies only recently allowed the development of novel...... screening methods based on the genome sequences of potential producing organisms. The basic principle of such genome mining approaches is to identify genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of such molecules, and to predict the products of the identified pathways. Thus, bioinformatics methods...... and tools are crucial for genome mining. In this review, a comprehensive overview is given on programs and databases for the identification and analysis of antibiotic biosynthesis gene clusters in genomic data....

  14. In silico analysis of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) genes that involved in pathogen and disease responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agung, Muhammad Budi; Budiarsa, I. Made; Suwastika, I. Nengah

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa bean is one of the main commodities from Indonesia for the world, which still have problem regarding yield degradation due to pathogens and disease attack. Developing robust cacao plant that genetically resistant to pathogen and disease attack is an ideal solution in over taking on this problem. The aim of this study was to identify Theobroma cacao genes on database of cacao genome that homolog to response genes of pathogen and disease attack in other plant, through in silico analysis. Basic information survey and gene identification were performed in GenBank and The Arabidopsis Information Resource database. The In silico analysis contains protein BLAST, homology test of each gene's protein candidates, and identification of homologue gene in Cacao Genome Database using data source "Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6 v1.1" genome. Identification found that Thecc1EG011959t1 (EDS1), Thecc1EG006803t1 (EDS5), Thecc1EG013842t1 (ICS1), and Thecc1EG015614t1 (BG_PPAP) gene of Cacao Genome Database were Theobroma cacao genes that homolog to plant's resistance genes which highly possible to have similar functions of each gene's homologue gene.

  15. In-silico Metabolome Target Analysis Towards PanC-based Antimycobacterial Agent Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshkholgh-Sima, Baharak; Sardari, Soroush; Izadi Mobarakeh, Jalal; Khavari-Nejad, Ramezan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main cause of tuberculosis (TB), has still remained a global health crisis especially in developing countries. Tuberculosis treatment is a laborious and lengthy process with high risk of noncompliance, cytotoxicity adverse events and drug resistance in patient. Recently, there has been an alarming rise of drug resistant in TB. In this regard, it is an unmet need to develop novel antitubercular medicines that target new or more effective biochemical pathways to prevent drug resistant Mycobacterium. Integrated study of metabolic pathways through in-silico approach played a key role in antimycobacterial design process in this study. Our results suggest that pantothenate synthetase (PanC), anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (TrpD) and 3-isopropylmalate dehydratase (LeuD) might be appropriate drug targets. In the next step, in-silico ligand analysis was used for more detailed study of chemical tractability of targets. This was helpful to identify pantothenate synthetase (PanC, Rv3602c) as the best target for antimycobacterial design procedure. Virtual library screening on the best ligand of PanC was then performed for inhibitory ligand design. At the end, five chemical intermediates showed significant inhibition of Mycobacterium bovis with good selectivity indices (SI) ≥10 according to Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition & Coordinating Facility of US criteria for antimycobacterial screening programs.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides of Meat Origin - An In silico and In vitro Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keska, Paulina; Stadnik, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of meat protein-derived peptides against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The in silico and in vitro approach was combined to determine the potency of antimicrobial peptides derived from pig (Sus scrofa) and cow (Bos taurus) proteins. The in silico studies consisted of an analysis of the amino acid composition of peptides obtained from the CAMPR database, their molecular weight and other physicochemical properties (isoelectric point, molar extinction coefficient, instability index, aliphatic index, hydropathy index and net charge). The degree of similarity was estimated between the antimicrobial peptide sequences derived from the slaughtered animals and the main meat proteins. Antimicrobial activity of peptides isolated from dry-cured meat products was analysed (in vitro) against two strains of pathogenic bacteria using the disc diffusion method. There was no evidence of growthinhibitory properties of peptides isolated from dry-cured meat products against Escherichia coli K12 ATCC 10798 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. [Pharmacological mechanism analysis of oligopeptide from Pinctada fucata based on in silico proteolysis and protein interaction network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Kun; Qiao, Lian-Sheng; Huo, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Xu; Han, Na; Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2017-09-01

    Pinctada fucata oligopeptide is one of key pharmaceutical effective constituents of P. fucata. It is significant to analyze its pharmacological effect and mechanism. This study aims to discover the potential oligopeptides from P. fucata and analyze the mechanism of P. fucata oligopeptide based on in silico technologies and protein interaction network(PIN). First, main protein sequences of P. fucata were collected, and oligopeptides were obtained using in silico gastrointestinal tract proteolysis. Then, key potential targets of P. fucata oligopeptides were obtained through pharmacophore screening. The protein-protein interaction(PPI) of targets was achieved and implemented to construct PIN and analyze the mechanism of P. fucata oligopeptides. P. fucata oligopeptide database was constructed based on in silico technologies, including 458 oligopeptides. Twelve modules were identified from PIN by a graph theoretic clustering algorithm Molecular Complex Detection(MCODE) and analyzed by Gene ontology(GO) enrichment. The results indicated that P. fucata oligopeptides have an effect in treating neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. In silico proteolysis could be used to analyze the protein sequences of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM). According to the combination of in silico proteolysis and PIN, the biological activity of oligopeptides could be interpreted rapidly based on the known TCM protein sequence. The study provides the methodology basis for rapidly and efficiently implementing the mechanism analysis of TCM oligopeptides. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  18. In silico analysis and verification of S100 gene expression in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ji; Li, Xue; Dong, Guang-Long; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Chen, Dong-Li; Du, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Jian-Yong; Li, Ji-Peng; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    The S100 protein family comprises 22 members whose protein sequences encompass at least one EF-hand Ca 2+ binding motif. They were involved in the regulation of a number of cellular processes such as cell cycle progression and differentiation. However, the expression status of S100 family members in gastric cancer was not known yet. Combined with analysis of series analysis of gene expression, virtual Northern blot and microarray data, the expression levels of S100 family members in normal and malignant stomach tissues were systematically investigated. The expression of S100A3 was further evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. At least 5 S100 genes were found to be upregulated in gastric cance by in silico analysis. Among them, four genes, including S100A2, S100A4, S100A7 and S100A10, were reported to overexpressed in gastric cancer previously. The expression of S100A3 in eighty patients of gastric cancer was further examined. The results showed that the mean expression levels of S100A3 in gastric cancer tissues were 2.5 times as high as in adjacent non-tumorous tissues. S100A3 expression was correlated with tumor differentiation and TNM (Tumor-Node-Metastasis) stage of gastric cancer, which was relatively highly expressed in poorly differentiated and advanced gastric cancer tissues (P < 0.05). To our knowledge this is the first report of systematic evaluation of S100 gene expressions in gastric cancers by multiple in silico analysis. The results indicated that overexpression of S100 gene family members were characteristics of gastric cancers and S100A3 might play important roles in differentiation and progression of gastric cancer

  19. Towards prediction of metabolic products of polyketide synthases: an in silico analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Yadav

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Sequence data arising from an increasing number of partial and complete genome projects is revealing the presence of the polyketide synthase (PKS family of genes not only in microbes and fungi but also in plants and other eukaryotes. PKSs are huge multifunctional megasynthases that use a variety of biosynthetic paradigms to generate enormously diverse arrays of polyketide products that posses several pharmaceutically important properties. The remarkable conservation of these gene clusters across organisms offers abundant scope for obtaining novel insights into PKS biosynthetic code by computational analysis. We have carried out a comprehensive in silico analysis of modular and iterative gene clusters to test whether chemical structures of the secondary metabolites can be predicted from PKS protein sequences. Here, we report the success of our method and demonstrate the feasibility of deciphering the putative metabolic products of uncharacterized PKS clusters found in newly sequenced genomes. Profile Hidden Markov Model analysis has revealed distinct sequence features that can distinguish modular PKS proteins from their iterative counterparts. For iterative PKS proteins, structural models of iterative ketosynthase (KS domains have revealed novel correlations between the size of the polyketide products and volume of the active site pocket. Furthermore, we have identified key residues in the substrate binding pocket that control the number of chain extensions in iterative PKSs. For modular PKS proteins, we describe for the first time an automated method based on crucial intermolecular contacts that can distinguish the correct biosynthetic order of substrate channeling from a large number of non-cognate combinatorial possibilities. Taken together, our in silico analysis provides valuable clues for formulating rules for predicting polyketide products of iterative as well as modular PKS clusters. These results have promising potential for discovery of

  20. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC's Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available

  1. In silico analysis suggests interaction between Ebola virus and the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko eVeljkovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The worst Ebola virus (EV outbreak in history has hit Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea hardest and the trendlines in this crisis are grave, and now represents global public health threat concern. Limited therapeutic and/or prophylactic options which are available for humans suffering from Ebola virus disease (EVD further complicate situation. Previous studies suggested that the EV glycoprotein (GP is the main determinant causing structural damage of endothelial cells that triggers the hemorrhagic diathesis, but molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remains elusive. Using the informational spectrum method (ISM, a virtual spectroscopy method for analysis of the protein-protein interactions, the interaction of GP with endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM was investigated. Presented results of this in silico study suggest that Elastin Microfibril Interface Located Proteins (EMILINs are involved in interaction between GP and ECM. This finding could contribute to better understanding of EV/endothelium interaction and its role in pathogenesis, prevention and therapy of EVD.

  2. In silico analysis of glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase inhibition by PY873, PY899 and DIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Batool

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In humans, purine de novo synthesis pathway consists of multi-functional enzymes. Nucleotide metabolism enzymes are potential drug targets for treating cancer and autoimmune diseases. Glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase (GART is one of the most important trifunctional enzymes involved in purine synthesis. Previous studies have demonstrated the role of folate inhibitors against tumor activity. In this present study, three components of GART enzyme were targeted as receptor dataset and in silico analysis was carried out with folate ligand dataset. To accomplish the task, Autodock 4.2 was used for determining the docking compatibilities of ligand and receptor dataset. Taken together, it has been suggested that folate ligands could be potentially used as inhibitors of GART.

  3. Isolation and in silico analysis of Fe-superoxide dismutase in the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesheri, Minu; Kanchan, Swarna; Richa; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2014-12-15

    Cyanobacteria are known to endure various stress conditions due to the inbuilt potential for oxidative stress alleviation owing to the presence of an array of antioxidants. The present study shows that Antarctic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune possesses two antioxidative enzymes viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase that jointly cope with environmental stresses prevailing at its natural habitat. Native-PAGE analysis illustrates the presence of a single prominent isoform recognized as Fe-SOD and three distinct isoforms of catalase. The protein sequence of Fe-SOD in N. commune retrieved from NCBI protein sequence database was used for in silico analysis. 3D structure of N. commune was predicted by comparative modeling using MODELLER 9v11. Further, this model was validated for its quality by Ramachandran plot, ERRAT, Verify 3D and ProSA-web which revealed good structure quality of the model. Multiple sequence alignment showed high conservation in N and C-terminal domain regions along with all metal binding positions in Fe-SOD which were also found to be highly conserved in all 28 cyanobacterial species under study, including N. commune. In silico prediction of isoelectric point and molecular weight of Fe-SOD was found to be 5.48 and 22,342.98Da respectively. The phylogenetic tree revealed that among 28 cyanobacterial species, Fe-SOD in N. commune was the closest evolutionary homolog of Fe-SOD in Nostoc punctiforme as evident by strong bootstrap value. Thus, N. commune may serve as a good biological model for studies related to survival of life under extreme conditions prevailing at the Antarctic region. Moreover cyanobacteria may be exploited for biochemical and biotechnological applications of enzymatic antioxidants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. First Comprehensive In Silico Analysis of the Functional and Structural Consequences of SNPs in Human GalNAc-T1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Sheikh Ali Mohamoud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GalNAc-T1, a key candidate of GalNac-transferases genes family that is involved in mucin-type O-linked glycosylation pathway, is expressed in most biological tissues and cell types. Despite the reported association of GalNAc-T1 gene mutations with human disease susceptibility, the comprehensive computational analysis of coding, noncoding and regulatory SNPs, and their functional impacts on protein level, still remains unknown. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed to screen the entire listed coding SNPs of GalNAc-T1 gene in order to identify and characterize them. Our concordant in silico analysis by SIFT, PolyPhen-2, PANTHER-cSNP, and SNPeffect tools, identified the potential nsSNPs (S143P, G258V, and Y414D variants from 18 nsSNPs of GalNAc-T1. Additionally, 2 regulatory SNPs (rs72964406 and #x26; rs34304568 were also identified in GalNAc-T1 by using FastSNP tool. Using multiple computational approaches, we have systematically classified the functional mutations in regulatory and coding regions that can modify expression and function of GalNAc-T1 enzyme. These genetic variants can further assist in better understanding the wide range of disease susceptibility associated with the mucin-based cell signalling and pathogenic binding, and may help to develop novel therapeutic elements for associated diseases.

  5. In silico analysis of a novel MKRN3 missense mutation in familial central precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neocleous, Vassos; Shammas, Christos; Phelan, Marie M; Nicolaou, Stella; Phylactou, Leonidas A; Skordis, Nicos

    2016-01-01

    The onset of puberty is influenced by the interplay of stimulating and restraining factors, many of which have a genetic origin. Premature activation of the GnRH secretion in central precocious puberty (CPP) may arise either from gain-of-function mutations of the KISS1 and KISS1R genes or from loss-of-function manner mutations of the MKRN3 gene leading to MKRN3 deficiency. To explore the genetic causes responsible for CPP and the potential role of the RING finger protein 3 (MKRN3) gene. We investigated potential sequence variations in the intronless MKRN3 gene by Sanger sequencing of the entire 507 amino acid coding region of exon 1 in a family with two affected girls presented with CPP at the age of 6 and 5·7 years, respectively. A novel heterozygous g.Gly312Asp missense mutation in the MKRN3 gene was identified in these siblings. The imprinted MKRN3 missense mutation was also identified as expected in the unaffected father and followed as expected an imprinted mode of inheritance. In silico analysis of the altered missense variant using the computational algorithms Polyphen2, SIFT and Mutation Taster predicted a damage and pathogenic alteration causing CPP. The pathogenicity of the alteration at the protein level via an in silico structural model is also explored. A novel mutation in the MKRN3 gene in two sisters with CPP was identified, supporting the fundamental role of this gene in the suppression of the hypothalamic GnRH neurons. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. In Silico analysis of perturbed steroidogenesis and gonad growth in fathead minnows (P. promelas) exposed to 17α-ethynylestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, David; Petersen, Lene H; Martinović, Dalma; Huggett, Duane B

    2015-06-01

    The multi-factorial nature of adverse reproductive effects mediated by endocrine disrupting compounds (or EDCs) makes understanding the mechanistic basis of reproductive dysfunction a highly pertinent area of research. As a consequence, a main motivator for continued research is to integrate 'multi-leveled' complexity (i.e., from genes to phenotype) using mathematical methods capable of encapsulating properties of physiological relevance. In this study, an in silico stoichiometric model of piscine steroidogenesis was augmented with a 'biomass' reaction associating the underlying stoichiometry of steroidogenesis with a reaction representative of gonad growth. The ability of the in silico model to predict perturbed steroidogenesis and subsequent effects on gonad growth was tested by exposing reproductively active male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to 88 ng/L of the synthetic estrogen, 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2). The in silico model was parameterized (or constrained) with experimentally quantified concentrations of selected steroid hormones (using mass spectrometry) and fold changes in gene expression (using RT-qPCR) for selected steroidogenic enzyme genes, in gonads of male and female fish. Once constrained, the optimization framework of flux balance analysis (FBA) was used to calculate an optimal flux through the biomass reaction (analogous to gonad growth) and associated steroidogenic flux distributions required to generate biomass. FBA successfully predicted effects of EE2 exposure on fathead minnow gonad growth (%gonadosomatic index or %GSI) and perturbed production of steroid hormones. Specifically, FBA accurately predicted no effects of exposure on male %GSI and a significant reduction for female %GSI. Furthermore, in silico simulations accurately identified disrupted reaction fluxes catalyzing productions of androgens (in male fish) and progestogens (in female fish), an observation which agreed with in vivo experimentation. The analyses

  7. Behavioral economics and regulatory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lisa A; Hammitt, James K

    2011-09-01

    Behavioral economics has captured the interest of scholars and the general public by demonstrating ways in which individuals make decisions that appear irrational. While increasing attention is being focused on the implications of this research for the design of risk-reducing policies, less attention has been paid to how it affects the economic valuation of policy consequences. This article considers the latter issue, reviewing the behavioral economics literature and discussing its implications for the conduct of benefit-cost analysis, particularly in the context of environmental, health, and safety regulations. We explore three concerns: using estimates of willingness to pay or willingness to accept compensation for valuation, considering the psychological aspects of risk when valuing mortality-risk reductions, and discounting future consequences. In each case, we take the perspective that analysts should avoid making judgments about whether values are "rational" or "irrational." Instead, they should make every effort to rely on well-designed studies, using ranges, sensitivity analysis, or probabilistic modeling to reflect uncertainty. More generally, behavioral research has led some to argue for a more paternalistic approach to policy analysis. We argue instead for continued focus on describing the preferences of those affected, while working to ensure that these preferences are based on knowledge and careful reflection. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  8. FORECAST: Regulatory effects cost analysis software annual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, B.; Sciacca, F.W.

    1991-11-01

    Over the past several years the NRC has developed a generic cost methodology for the quantification of cost/economic impacts associated with a wide range of new or revised regulatory requirements. This methodology has been developed to aid the NRC in preparing Regulatory Impact Analyses (RIAs). These generic costing methods can be useful in quantifying impacts both to industry and to the NRC. The FORECAST program was developed to facilitate the use of the generic costing methodology. This PC program integrates the major cost considerations that may be required because of a regulatory change. FORECAST automates much of the calculations typically needed in an RIA and thus reduces the time and labor required to perform these analysis. More importantly, its integrated and consistent treatment of the different cost elements should help assure comprehensiveness, uniformity, and accuracy in the preparation of needed cost estimates

  9. Transcriptome Profiling and In Silico Analysis of the Antimicrobial Peptides of the Grasshopper Oxya chinensis sinuosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Woo; Markkandan, Kesavan; Lee, Joon Ha; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yoo, Seungil; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-11-28

    Antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs) are present in all types of organisms, from microbes and plants to vertebrates and invertebrates such as insects. The grasshopper Oxya chinensis sinuosa is an insect species that is widely consumed around the world for its broad medicinal value. However, the lack of available genetic information for this species is an obstacle to understanding the full potential of its AMPs. Analysis of the O. chinensis sinuosa transcriptome and expression profile is essential for extending the available genetic information resources. In this study, we determined the whole-body transcriptome of O. chinensis sinuosa and analyzed the potential AMPs induced by bacterial immunization. A high-throughput RNA-Seq approach generated 94,348 contigs and 66,555 unigenes. Of these unigenes, 36,032 (54.14%) matched known proteins in the NCBI database in a BLAST search. Functional analysis demonstrated that 38,219 unigenes were clustered into 5,499 gene ontology terms. In addition, 26 cDNAs encoding novel AMPs were identified by an in silico approach using public databases. Our transcriptome dataset and AMP profile greatly improve our understanding of O. chinensis sinuosa genetics and provide a huge number of gene sequences for further study, including genes of known importance and genes of unknown function.

  10. In silico pattern-based analysis of the human cytomegalovirus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoutsos, Isidore; Novotny, Jiri; Huynh, Tien; Chin-Bow, Stephen T; Parida, Laxmi; Platt, Daniel; Coleman, David; Shenk, Thomas

    2003-04-01

    More than 200 open reading frames (ORFs) from the human cytomegalovirus genome have been reported as potentially coding for proteins. We have used two pattern-based in silico approaches to analyze this set of putative viral genes. With the help of an objective annotation method that is based on the Bio-Dictionary, a comprehensive collection of amino acid patterns that describes the currently known natural sequence space of proteins, we have reannotated all of the previously reported putative genes of the human cytomegalovirus. Also, with the help of MUSCA, a pattern-based multiple sequence alignment algorithm, we have reexamined the original human cytomegalovirus gene family definitions. Our analysis of the genome shows that many of the coded proteins comprise amino acid combinations that are unique to either the human cytomegalovirus or the larger group of herpesviruses. We have confirmed that a surprisingly large portion of the analyzed ORFs encode membrane proteins, and we have discovered a significant number of previously uncharacterized proteins that are predicted to be G-protein-coupled receptor homologues. The analysis also indicates that many of the encoded proteins undergo posttranslational modifications such as hydroxylation, phosphorylation, and glycosylation. ORFs encoding proteins with similar functional behavior appear in neighboring regions of the human cytomegalovirus genome. All of the results of the present study can be found and interactively explored online (http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/virus/).

  11. In silico proteome analysis to facilitate proteomics experiments using mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindo Micheal

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Proteomics experiments typically involve protein or peptide separation steps coupled to the identification of many hundreds to thousands of peptides by mass spectrometry. Development of methodology and instrumentation in this field is proceeding rapidly, and effective software is needed to link the different stages of proteomic analysis. We have developed an application, proteogest, written in Perl that generates descriptive and statistical analyses of the biophysical properties of multiple (e.g. thousands protein sequences submitted by the user, for instance protein sequences inferred from the complete genome sequence of a model organism. The application also carries out in silico proteolytic digestion of the submitted proteomes, or subsets thereof, and the distribution of biophysical properties of the resulting peptides is presented. proteogest is customizable, the user being able to select many options, for instance the cleavage pattern of the digestion treatment or the presence of modifications to specific amino acid residues. We show how proteogest can be used to compare the proteomes and digested proteome products of model organisms, to examine the added complexity generated by modification of residues, and to facilitate the design of proteomics experiments for optimal representation of component proteins.

  12. In Silico Analysis of Putrefaction Pathways in Bacteria and Its Implication in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrisham Kaur

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of undigested proteins in human gastrointestinal tract (gut by the resident microbiota, a process called bacterial putrefaction, can sometimes disrupt the gut homeostasis. In this process, essential amino acids (e.g., histidine, tryptophan, etc. that are required by the host may be utilized by the gut microbes. In addition, some of the products of putrefaction, like ammonia, putrescine, cresol, indole, phenol, etc., have been implicated in the disease pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC. We have investigated bacterial putrefaction pathways that are known to be associated with such metabolites. Results of the comprehensive in silico analysis of the selected putrefaction pathways across bacterial genomes revealed presence of these pathways in limited bacterial groups. Majority of these bacteria are commonly found in human gut. These include Bacillus, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Fusobacterium, Salmonella, etc. Interestingly, while pathogens utilize almost all the analyzed pathways, commensals prefer putrescine and H2S production pathways for metabolizing the undigested proteins. Further, comparison of the putrefaction pathways in the gut microbiomes of healthy, carcinoma and adenoma datasets indicate higher abundances of putrefying bacteria in the carcinoma stage of CRC. The insights obtained from the present study indicate utilization of possible microbiome-based therapies to minimize the adverse effects of gut microbiome in enteric diseases.

  13. Structural modeling and in silico analysis of human superoxide dismutase 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Dias Castela de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Aging in the world population has increased every year. Superoxide dismutase 2 (Mn-SOD or SOD2 protects against oxidative stress, a main factor influencing cellular longevity. Polymorphisms in SOD2 have been associated with the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, as well as psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder. In this study, all of the described natural variants (S10I, A16V, E66V, G76R, I82T and R156W of SOD2 were subjected to in silico analysis using eight different algorithms: SNPeffect, PolyPhen-2, PhD-SNP, PMUT, SIFT, SNAP, SNPs&GO and nsSNPAnalyzer. This analysis revealed disparate results for a few of the algorithms. The results showed that, from at least one algorithm, each amino acid substitution appears to harmfully affect the protein. Structural theoretical models were created for variants through comparative modelling performed using the MHOLline server (which includes MODELLER and PROCHECK and ab initio modelling, using the I-Tasser server. The predicted models were evaluated using TM-align, and the results show that the models were constructed with high accuracy. The RMSD values of the modelled mutants indicated likely pathogenicity for all missense mutations. Structural phylogenetic analysis using ConSurf revealed that human SOD2 is highly conserved. As a result, a human-curated database was generated that enables biologists and clinicians to explore SOD2 nsSNPs, including predictions of their effects and visualisation of the alignment of both the wild-type and mutant structures. The database is freely available at http://bioinfogroup.com/database and will be regularly updated.

  14. Reconstruction and in silico analysis of metabolic network for an oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Pan

    Full Text Available With the emergence of energy scarcity, the use of renewable energy sources such as biodiesel is becoming increasingly necessary. Recently, many researchers have focused their minds on Yarrowia lipolytica, a model oleaginous yeast, which can be employed to accumulate large amounts of lipids that could be further converted to biodiesel. In order to understand the metabolic characteristics of Y. lipolytica at a systems level and to examine the potential for enhanced lipid production, a genome-scale compartmentalized metabolic network was reconstructed based on a combination of genome annotation and the detailed biochemical knowledge from multiple databases such as KEGG, ENZYME and BIGG. The information about protein and reaction associations of all the organisms in KEGG and Expasy-ENZYME database was arranged into an EXCEL file that can then be regarded as a new useful database to generate other reconstructions. The generated model iYL619_PCP accounts for 619 genes, 843 metabolites and 1,142 reactions including 236 transport reactions, 125 exchange reactions and 13 spontaneous reactions. The in silico model successfully predicted the minimal media and the growing abilities on different substrates. With flux balance analysis, single gene knockouts were also simulated to predict the essential genes and partially essential genes. In addition, flux variability analysis was applied to design new mutant strains that will redirect fluxes through the network and may enhance the production of lipid. This genome-scale metabolic model of Y. lipolytica can facilitate system-level metabolic analysis as well as strain development for improving the production of biodiesels and other valuable products by Y. lipolytica and other closely related oleaginous yeasts.

  15. Identification and in silico analysis of the Citrus HSP70 molecular chaperone gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano G. Fietto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the genome sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana model system provided a powerful molecular tool for comparative analysis of gene families present in the genome of economically relevant plant species. In this investigation, we used the sequences of the Arabidopsis Hsp70 gene family to identify and annotate the Citrus Hsp70 genes represented in the CitEST database. Based on sequence comparison analysis, we identified 18 clusters that were further divided into 5 subgroups encoding four mitochondrial mtHsp70s, three plastid csHsp70s, one ER luminal Hsp70 BiP, two HSP110/SSE-related proteins and eight cytosolic Hsp/Hsc70s. We also analyzed the expression profile by digital Northern of each Hsp70 transcript in different organs and in response to stress conditions. The EST database revealed a distinct population distribution of Hsp70 ESTs among isoforms and across the organs surveyed. The Hsp70-5 isoform was highly expressed in seeds, whereas BiP, mitochondrial and plastid HSp70 mRNAs displayed a similar expression profile in the organs analyzed, and were predominantly represented in flowers. Distinct Hsp70 mRNAs were also differentially expressed during Xylella infection and Citrus tristeza viral infection as well as during water deficit. This in silico study sets the groundwork for future investigations to fully characterize functionally the Citrus Hsp70 family and underscores the relevance of Hsp70s in response to abiotic and biotic stresses in Citrus.

  16. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC

  17. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya, E-mail: sathiyapandi@gmail.com; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  18. Comparative analysis of chromatin landscape in regulatory regions of human housekeeping and tissue specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Dipayan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global regulatory mechanisms involving chromatin assembly and remodelling in the promoter regions of genes is implicated in eukaryotic transcription control especially for genes subjected to spatial and temporal regulation. The potential to utilise global regulatory mechanisms for controlling gene expression might depend upon the architecture of the chromatin in and around the gene. In-silico analysis can yield important insights into this aspect, facilitating comparison of two or more classes of genes comprising of a large number of genes within each group. Results In the present study, we carried out a comparative analysis of chromatin characteristics in terms of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions, nucleosome formation potential and the occurrence of repetitive sequences, in the upstream regulatory regions of housekeeping and tissue specific genes. Our data show that putative scaffold/matrix attachment regions are more abundant and nucleosome formation potential is higher in the 5' regions of tissue specific genes as compared to the housekeeping genes. Conclusion The differences in the chromatin features between the two groups of genes indicate the involvement of chromatin organisation in the control of gene expression. The presence of global regulatory mechanisms mediated through chromatin organisation can decrease the burden of invoking gene specific regulators for maintenance of the active/silenced state of gene expression. This could partially explain the lower number of genes estimated in the human genome.

  19. Integrated In Silico Analysis of Pathway Designs for Synthetic Photo-Electro-Autotrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Volpers

    Full Text Available The strong advances in synthetic biology enable the engineering of novel functions and complex biological features in unprecedented ways, such as implementing synthetic autotrophic metabolism into heterotrophic hosts. A key challenge for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals entails the engineering of synthetic autotrophic organisms that can effectively and efficiently fix carbon dioxide by using sustainable energy sources. This challenge involves the integration of carbon fixation and energy uptake systems. A variety of carbon fixation pathways and several types of photosystems and other energy uptake systems can be chosen and, potentially, modularly combined to design synthetic autotrophic metabolism. Prior to implementation, these designs can be evaluated by the combination of several computational pathway analysis techniques. Here we present a systematic, integrated in silico analysis of photo-electro-autotrophic pathway designs, consisting of natural and synthetic carbon fixation pathways, a proton-pumping rhodopsin photosystem for ATP regeneration and an electron uptake pathway. We integrated Flux Balance Analysis of the heterotrophic chassis Escherichia coli with kinetic pathway analysis and thermodynamic pathway analysis (Max-min Driving Force. The photo-electro-autotrophic designs are predicted to have a limited potential for anaerobic, autotrophic growth of E. coli, given the relatively low ATP regenerating capacity of the proton pumping rhodopsin photosystems and the high ATP maintenance of E. coli. If these factors can be tackled, our analysis indicates the highest growth potential for the natural reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle and the synthetic pyruvate synthase-pyruvate carboxylate -glyoxylate bicycle. Both carbon fixation cycles are very ATP efficient, while maintaining fast kinetics, which also results in relatively low estimated protein costs for these pathways. Furthermore, the synthetic bicycles are highly

  20. The starch-binding domain family CBM41 - an in silico analysis of evolutionary relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Majzlová, Katarína; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Within the CAZy database, there are 81 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families. A CBM represents a non-catalytic domain in a modular arrangement of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). The present in silico study has been focused on starch-binding domains from the family CBM41 that are usually part...

  1. Discovery of DPP IV inhibitors by pharmacophore modeling and QSAR analysis followed by in silico screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masri, Ihab M; Mohammad, Mohammad K; Taha, Mutasem O

    2008-11-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) deactivates the natural hypoglycemic incretin hormones. Inhibition of this enzyme should restore glucose homeostasis in diabetic patients making it an attractive target for the development of new antidiabetic drugs. With this in mind, the pharmacophoric space of DPP IV was explored using a set of 358 known inhibitors. Thereafter, genetic algorithm and multiple linear regression analysis were employed to select an optimal combination of pharmacophoric models and physicochemical descriptors that yield selfconsistent and predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) (r(2) (287)=0.74, F-statistic=44.5, r(2) (BS)=0.74, r(2) (LOO)=0.69, r(2) (PRESS) against 71 external testing inhibitors=0.51). Two orthogonal pharmacophores (of cross-correlation r(2)=0.23) emerged in the QSAR equation suggesting the existence of at least two distinct binding modes accessible to ligands within the DPP IV binding pocket. Docking experiments supported the binding modes suggested by QSAR/pharmacophore analyses. The validity of the QSAR equation and the associated pharmacophore models were established by the identification of new low-micromolar anti-DPP IV leads retrieved by in silico screening. One of our interesting potent anti-DPP IV hits is the fluoroquinolone gemifloxacin (IC(50)=1.12 muM). The fact that gemifloxacin was recently reported to potently inhibit the prodiabetic target glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) suggests that gemifloxacin is an excellent lead for the development of novel dual antidiabetic inhibitors against DPP IV and GSK-3beta.

  2. In silico analysis of the polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 from apple, Malus domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsaunyane, Lerato Bt; Oelofse, Dean; Dubery, Ian A

    2015-03-11

    The Malus domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1) gene, encoding the M. domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1), was isolated from the Granny Smith apple cultivar (GenBank accession no. DQ185063). The gene was used to transform tobacco and potato for enhanced resistance against fungal diseases. Analysis of the MdPGIP1 nucleotide sequence revealed that the gene comprises 993 nucleotides that encode a 330 amino acid polypeptide. In silico characterization of the MdPGIP1 polypeptide revealed domains typical of PGIP proteins, which include a 24 amino acid putative signal peptide, a potential cleavage site [Alanine-Leucine-Serine (ALS)] for the signal peptide, a 238 amino acid leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, a 46 amino acid N-terminal domain and a 22 amino acid C-terminal domain. The hydropathic evaluation of MdPGIP1 indicated a repetitive hydrophobic motif in the LRR domain and a hydrophilic surface area consistent with a globular protein. The typical consensus glycosylation sequence of Asn-X-Ser/Thr was identified in MdPGIP1, indicating potential N-linked glycosylation of MdPGIP1. The molecular mass of non-glycosylated MdPGIP1 was calculated as 36.615 kDa and the theoretical isoelectric point as 6.98. Furthermore, the secondary and tertiary structure of MdPGIP1 was modelled, and revealed that MdPGIP1 is a curved and elongated molecule that contains sheet B1, sheet B2 and 310-helices on its LRR domain. The overall properties of the MdPGIP1 protein is similar to that of the prototypical Phaseolus vulgaris PGIP 2 (PvPGIP2), and the detected differences supported its use in biotechnological applications as an inhibitor of targeted fungal polygalacturonases (PGs).

  3. In Silico Analysis of the Regulation of the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain in C3 Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alejandro; Yin, Xinyou; Harbinson, Jeremy; Driever, Steven M; Molenaar, Jaap; Kramer, David M; Struik, Paul C

    2018-02-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport), and regulation of Rubisco activity leads to emergent behaviors that may affect the operation and regulation of photosynthesis under different dynamic environmental conditions. The model was parameterized with experimental results in the literature, with a focus on Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ). A dataset was constructed from multiple sources, including measurements of steady-state and dynamic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy under different light intensities and CO 2 , to test predictions of the model under different experimental conditions. Simulations suggested that there are strong interactions between cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport and that an excess capacity for alternative electron transport is required to ensure adequate redox state and lumen pH. Furthermore, the model predicted that, under specific conditions, reduction of ferredoxin by plastoquinol is possible after a rapid increase in light intensity. Further analysis also revealed that the relationship between ATP synthesis and proton motive force was highly regulated by the concentrations of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate, and this facilitated an increase in nonphotochemical quenching and proton motive force under conditions where metabolism was limiting, such as low CO 2 , high light intensity, or combined high CO 2 and high light intensity. The model may be used as an in silico platform for future research on the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Genotype, phenotype and in silico pathogenicity analysis of HEXB mutations: Panel based sequencing for differential diagnosis of gangliosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Mikaeeli, Sahar; Tavasoli, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Zahra; Maleki, Majid; Rabbani, Bahareh

    2018-04-01

    Gangliosidosis is an inherited metabolic disorder causing neurodegeneration and motor regression. Preventive diagnosis is the first choice for the affected families due to lack of straightforward therapy. Genetic studies could confirm the diagnosis and help families for carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis. An update of HEXB gene variants concerning genotype, phenotype and in silico analysis are presented. Panel based next generation sequencing and direct sequencing of four cases were performed to confirm the clinical diagnosis and for reproductive planning. Bioinformatic analyses of the HEXB mutation database were also performed. Direct sequencing of HEXA and HEXB genes showed recurrent homozygous variants at c.509G>A (p.Arg170Gln) and c.850C>T (p.Arg284Ter), respectively. A novel variant at c.416T>A (p.Leu139Gln) was identified in the GLB1 gene. Panel based next generation sequencing was performed for an undiagnosed patient which showed a novel mutation at c.1602C>A (p.Cys534Ter) of HEXB gene. Bioinformatic analysis of the HEXB mutation database showed 97% consistency of in silico genotype analysis with the phenotype. Bioinformatic analysis of the novel variants predicted to be disease causing. In silico structural and functional analysis of the novel variants showed structural effect of HEXB and functional effect of GLB1 variants which would provide fast analysis of novel variants. Panel based studies could be performed for overlapping symptomatic patients. Consequently, genetic testing would help affected families for patients' management, carrier detection, and family planning's. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of WGS data for O-specific antigen analysis and in silico serotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Lund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    aeruginosa serotyper (PAst) program, which enabled in silico serotyping of P. aeruginosa isolates using WGS data. PAst has been made publically available as a web-service, and aptly facilitate high-throughput serotyping analysis. The program overcomes critical issues such as the loss of in vitro typeability...... often associated with P. aeruginosa isolates from chronic infections, and quickly determines the serogroup of an isolate based on the sequence of the O-specific antigen (OSA) gene cluster. Here, PAst analysis of 1649 genomes resulted in successful serogroup assignments in 99.27% of the cases...

  6. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Seob Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  7. XcisClique: analysis of regulatory bicliques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grene Ruth

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling of cis-elements or regulatory motifs in promoter (upstream regions of genes is a challenging computational problem. In this work, set of regulatory motifs simultaneously present in the promoters of a set of genes is modeled as a biclique in a suitably defined bipartite graph. A biologically meaningful co-occurrence of multiple cis-elements in a gene promoter is assessed by the combined analysis of genomic and gene expression data. Greater statistical significance is associated with a set of genes that shares a common set of regulatory motifs, while simultaneously exhibiting highly correlated gene expression under given experimental conditions. Methods XcisClique, the system developed in this work, is a comprehensive infrastructure that associates annotated genome and gene expression data, models known cis-elements as regular expressions, identifies maximal bicliques in a bipartite gene-motif graph; and ranks bicliques based on their computed statistical significance. Significance is a function of the probability of occurrence of those motifs in a biclique (a hypergeometric distribution, and on the new sum of absolute values statistic (SAV that uses Spearman correlations of gene expression vectors. SAV is a statistic well-suited for this purpose as described in the discussion. Results XcisClique identifies new motif and gene combinations that might indicate as yet unidentified involvement of sets of genes in biological functions and processes. It currently supports Arabidopsis thaliana and can be adapted to other organisms, assuming the existence of annotated genomic sequences, suitable gene expression data, and identified regulatory motifs. A subset of Xcis Clique functionalities, including the motif visualization component MotifSee, source code, and supplementary material are available at https://bioinformatics.cs.vt.edu/xcisclique/.

  8. In silico detection of sequence variations modifying transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin C Andersen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of functional genetic variation associated with increased susceptibility to complex diseases can elucidate genes and underlying biochemical mechanisms linked to disease onset and progression. For genes linked to genetic diseases, most identified causal mutations alter an encoded protein sequence. Technological advances for measuring RNA abundance suggest that a significant number of undiscovered causal mutations may alter the regulation of gene transcription. However, it remains a challenge to separate causal genetic variations from linked neutral variations. Here we present an in silico driven approach to identify possible genetic variation in regulatory sequences. The approach combines phylogenetic footprinting and transcription factor binding site prediction to identify variation in candidate cis-regulatory elements. The bioinformatics approach has been tested on a set of SNPs that are reported to have a regulatory function, as well as background SNPs. In the absence of additional information about an analyzed gene, the poor specificity of binding site prediction is prohibitive to its application. However, when additional data is available that can give guidance on which transcription factor is involved in the regulation of the gene, the in silico binding site prediction improves the selection of candidate regulatory polymorphisms for further analyses. The bioinformatics software generated for the analysis has been implemented as a Web-based application system entitled RAVEN (regulatory analysis of variation in enhancers. The RAVEN system is available at http://www.cisreg.ca for all researchers interested in the detection and characterization of regulatory sequence variation.

  9. In Silico Detection of Sequence Variations Modifying Transcriptional Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Malin C; Engström, Pär G; Lithwick, Stuart; Arenillas, David; Eriksson, Per; Lenhard, Boris; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Odeberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Identification of functional genetic variation associated with increased susceptibility to complex diseases can elucidate genes and underlying biochemical mechanisms linked to disease onset and progression. For genes linked to genetic diseases, most identified causal mutations alter an encoded protein sequence. Technological advances for measuring RNA abundance suggest that a significant number of undiscovered causal mutations may alter the regulation of gene transcription. However, it remains a challenge to separate causal genetic variations from linked neutral variations. Here we present an in silico driven approach to identify possible genetic variation in regulatory sequences. The approach combines phylogenetic footprinting and transcription factor binding site prediction to identify variation in candidate cis-regulatory elements. The bioinformatics approach has been tested on a set of SNPs that are reported to have a regulatory function, as well as background SNPs. In the absence of additional information about an analyzed gene, the poor specificity of binding site prediction is prohibitive to its application. However, when additional data is available that can give guidance on which transcription factor is involved in the regulation of the gene, the in silico binding site prediction improves the selection of candidate regulatory polymorphisms for further analyses. The bioinformatics software generated for the analysis has been implemented as a Web-based application system entitled RAVEN (regulatory analysis of variation in enhancers). The RAVEN system is available at http://www.cisreg.ca for all researchers interested in the detection and characterization of regulatory sequence variation. PMID:18208319

  10. In silico identification, phylogeny and expression analysis of expansin superfamily in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expansins are important components of plant cell walls, which are involved in the process of cell wall loosening under low extracellular pH. By using a combinational method for homology search and protein domain analysis, a total of 42 expansin genes were identified from Medicago truncatula genome in this study. They were divided into four families, based on sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. Gene duplication events were identified in the expansins superfamily, especially in the extension of α-expansin family. By analysis of RNA-sequencing data from National Center for Biotechnology Information, the expansin (EXP genes expressed during tissues development were characterized. Meanwhile, lots of cis-acting regulatory DNA elements in the EXP superfamily were identified, which were mainly related to plant growth and development processes. The results presented in this study are expected to facilitate further research works on this gene superfamily and provide new insights about the molecular mechanisms of expansins in M. truncatula.

  11. In silico SNP analysis of the breast cancer antigen NY-BR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaloglu, Zeynep; Bitzer, Julia; Halama, Niels; Huang, Zhiqin; Zapatka, Marc; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Jäger, Dirk; Zörnig, Inka

    2016-11-18

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies with increasing incidences every year and a leading cause of death among women. Although early stage breast cancer can be effectively treated, there are limited numbers of treatment options available for patients with advanced and metastatic disease. The novel breast cancer associated antigen NY-BR-1 was identified by SEREX analysis and is expressed in the majority (>70%) of breast tumors as well as metastases, in normal breast tissue, in testis and occasionally in prostate tissue. The biological function and regulation of NY-BR-1 is up to date unknown. We performed an in silico analysis on the genetic variations of the NY-BR-1 gene using data available in public SNP databases and the tools SIFT, Polyphen and Provean to find possible functional SNPs. Additionally, we considered the allele frequency of the found damaging SNPs and also analyzed data from an in-house sequencing project of 55 breast cancer samples for recurring SNPs, recorded in dbSNP. Over 2800 SNPs are recorded in the dbSNP and NHLBI ESP databases for the NY-BR-1 gene. Of these, 65 (2.07%) are synonymous SNPs, 191 (6.09%) are non-synoymous SNPs, and 2430 (77.48%) are noncoding intronic SNPs. As a result, 69 non-synoymous SNPs were predicted to be damaging by at least two, and 16 SNPs were predicted as damaging by all three of the used tools. The SNPs rs200639888, rs367841401 and rs377750885 were categorized as highly damaging by all three tools. Eight damaging SNPs are located in the ankyrin repeat domain (ANK), a domain known for its frequent involvement in protein-protein interactions. No distinctive features could be observed in the allele frequency of the analyzed SNPs. Considering these results we expect to gain more insights into the variations of the NY-BR-1 gene and their possible impact on giving rise to splice variants and therefore influence the function of NY-BR-1 in healthy tissue as well as in breast cancer.

  12. In silico analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs in human β-globin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alanazi

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in the globin chain are the most common forms of genetic variations that produce hemoglobinopathies--the most widespread inherited disorders worldwide. Several hemoglobinopathies result from homozygosity or compound heterozygosity to beta-globin (HBB gene mutations, such as that producing sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS, HbC, HbD and HbE. Several of these mutations are deleterious and result in moderate to severe hemolytic anemia, with associated complications, requiring lifelong care and management. Even though many hemoglobinopathies result from single amino acid changes producing similar structural abnormalities, there are functional differences in the generated variants. Using in silico methods, we examined the genetic variations that can alter the expression and function of the HBB gene. Using a sequence homology-based Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT server we have searched for the SNPs, which showed that 200 (80% non-synonymous polymorphism were found to be deleterious. The structure-based method via PolyPhen server indicated that 135 (40% non-synonymous polymorphism may modify protein function and structure. The Pupa Suite software showed that the SNPs will have a phenotypic consequence on the structure and function of the altered protein. Structure analysis was performed on the key mutations that occur in the native protein coded by the HBB gene that causes hemoglobinopathies such as: HbC (E→K, HbD (E→Q, HbE (E→K and HbS (E→V. Atomic Non-Local Environment Assessment (ANOLEA, Yet Another Scientific Artificial Reality Application (YASARA, CHARMM-GUI webserver for macromolecular dynamics and mechanics, and Normal Mode Analysis, Deformation and Refinement (NOMAD-Ref of Gromacs server were used to perform molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization calculations on β-Chain residue of the HBB gene before and after mutation. Furthermore, in the native and altered protein models, amino acid

  13. In Silico Identification, Phylogenetic and Bioinformatic Analysis of Argonaute Genes in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mirzaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Argonaute protein family is the key players in pathways of gene silencing and small regulatory RNAs in different organisms. Argonaute proteins can bind small noncoding RNAs and control protein synthesis, affect messenger RNA stability, and even participate in the production of new forms of small RNAs. The aim of this study was to characterize and perform bioinformatic analysis of Argonaute proteins in 32 plant species that their genome was sequenced. A total of 437 Argonaute genes were identified and were analyzed based on lengths, gene structure, and protein structure. Results showed that Argonaute proteins were highly conserved across plant kingdom. Phylogenic analysis divided plant Argonautes into three classes. Argonaute proteins have three conserved domains PAZ, MID and PIWI. In addition to three conserved domains namely, PAZ, MID, and PIWI, we identified few more domains in AGO of some plant species. Expression profile analysis of Argonaute proteins showed that expression of these genes varies in most of tissues, which means that these proteins are involved in regulation of most pathways of the plant system. Numbers of alternative transcripts of Argonaute genes were highly variable among the plants. A thorough analysis of large number of putative Argonaute genes revealed several interesting aspects associated with this protein and brought novel information with promising usefulness for both basic and biotechnological applications.

  14. Extending in silico mechanism-of-action analysis by annotating targets with pathways: application to cellular cytotoxicity readouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggi, Sonia; Drakakis, Georgios; Koutsoukas, Alexios; Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Martínez-Alonso, Patricia; Malliavin, Thérèse E; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Brewerton, Suzanne C; Bodkin, Michael J; Evans, David A; Glen, Robert C; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Bender, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    An in silico mechanism-of-action analysis protocol was developed, comprising molecule bioactivity profiling, annotation of predicted targets with pathways and calculation of enrichment factors to highlight targets and pathways more likely to be implicated in the studied phenotype. The method was applied to a cytotoxicity phenotypic endpoint, with enriched targets/pathways found to be statistically significant when compared with 100 random datasets. Application on a smaller apoptotic set (10 molecules) did not allowed to obtain statistically relevant results, suggesting that the protocol requires modification such as analysis of the most frequently predicted targets/annotated pathways. Pathway annotations improved the mechanism-of-action information gained by target prediction alone, allowing a better interpretation of the predictions and providing better mapping of targets onto pathways.

  15. Large-scale evaluation of in silico gene deletions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Jochen; Famili, Iman; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2003-01-01

    evaluation was solely based on the topological properties of the metabolic network which is based on well-established reaction stoichiometry. No interaction or regulatory information was accounted for in the in silico model. False predictions were analyzed on a case-by-case basis for four possible...... inadequacies of the in silico model: (1) incomplete media composition, (2) substitutable biomass components, (3) incomplete biochemical information, and (4) missing regulation. This analysis eliminated a number of false predictions and suggested a number of experimentally testable hypotheses. A genome...

  16. In-silico analysis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD GWAS loci to novel connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mesbah-Uddin

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs for many complex diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, produced hundreds of disease-associated loci-the majority of which are noncoding. The number of GWAS loci is increasing very rapidly, but the process of translating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from these loci to genomic medicine is lagging. In this study, we investigated 4,734 variants from 152 IBD associated GWAS loci (IBD associated 152 lead noncoding SNPs identified from pooled GWAS results + 4,582 variants in strong linkage-disequilibrium (LD (r2 ≥0.8 for EUR population of 1K Genomes Project using four publicly available bioinformatics tools, e.g. dbPSHP, CADD, GWAVA, and RegulomeDB, to annotate and prioritize putative regulatory variants. Of the 152 lead noncoding SNPs, around 11% are under strong negative selection (GERP++ RS ≥2; and ~30% are under balancing selection (Tajima's D score >2 in CEU population (1K Genomes Project--though these regions are positively selected (GERP++ RS <0 in mammalian evolution. The analysis of 4,734 variants using three integrative annotation tools produced 929 putative functional SNPs, of which 18 SNPs (from 15 GWAS loci are in concordance with all three classifiers. These prioritized noncoding SNPs may contribute to IBD pathogenesis by dysregulating the expression of nearby genes. This study showed the usefulness of integrative annotation for prioritizing fewer functional variants from a large number of GWAS markers.

  17. Essential pathway identification: from in silico analysis to potential antifungal targets in Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykær, Jette; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Baker, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    with the reactions, we identified orthologous candidate essential genes in Aspergillus fumigatus. Our predictions are validated in part by the modes of action for some antifungal drugs and by molecular genetic studies of essential genes in A. fumigatus and other fungi. The use of metabolic models to predict...... of 1190 biochemically unique reactions that are associated with 871 open reading frames. Through a systematic in silico deletion of single metabolic reactions using this model, several essential metabolic pathways were identified for A. niger. A total of 138 reactions were identified as being essential...... biochemical reactions during growth on a minimal glucose medium. The majority of the reactions grouped into essential biochemical pathways covering cell wall biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, energy metabolism and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Based on the A. niger open reading frames associated...

  18. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegné r, Jesper N.; Bjö rkegren, Johan L M; Ravasi, Timothy; Bajic, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical

  19. In vitro fatigue tests and in silico finite element analysis of dental implants with different fixture/abutment joint types using computer-aided design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Machado, Lucas S; Matsumoto, Shuji; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Imazato, Satoshi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fatigue resistance of dental fixtures with two different fixture-abutment connections by in vitro fatigue testing and in silico three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) using original computer-aided design (CAD) models. Dental implant fixtures with external connection (EX) or internal connection (IN) abutments were fabricated from original CAD models using grade IV titanium and step-stress accelerated life testing was performed. Fatigue cycles and loads were assessed by Weibull analysis, and fatigue cracking was observed by micro-computed tomography and a stereomicroscope with high dynamic range software. Using the same CAD models, displacement vectors of implant components were also analyzed by 3D FEA. Angles of the fractured line occurring at fixture platforms in vitro and of displacement vectors corresponding to the fractured line in silico were compared by two-way ANOVA. Fatigue testing showed significantly greater reliability for IN than EX (pimplant fixture platforms. FEA demonstrated that crack lines of both implant systems in vitro were observed in the same direction as displacement vectors of the implant fixtures in silico. In silico displacement vectors in the implant fixture are insightful for geometric development of dental implants to reduce complex interactions leading to fatigue failure. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Global Analysis of Photosynthesis Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis. PMID:25503406

  1. Global analysis of photosynthesis transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed Imam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888, which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis.

  2. SPO11-C631T Gene Polymorphism: Association With Male Infertility and an in Silico-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Karimian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association of C631T single nucleotide polymorphisms in SPO11 gene with male infertilityfollowed by an in silico approach. SPO11 is a gene involved in meiosis and spermatogenesis process, which in humans, this gene is located on chromosome 20 (20q13.2-13.3 with 13 exons.Materials and methods: In a case-control study, 200 blood samples were collected from the IVF center (Kashan, Iran including; 100 infertile and 100 healthy control men. SPO11-C631T were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method.The effects of C631T transition on the structure of mRNA and protein of SPO11 was evaluated by bioinformatics tools.Results: Our data revealed that all subjects were wild-type homozygous inC631T positionsand just a sample from fertile group was heterozygousin C631T (OR: 0.3300, 95% CI: 0.0133 to 8.1992, p = 0.4988.Our in silico-analysis revealed that C631T transition could make fundamental changes in the structure of the mRNA (Score: 0.1983 and protein (PROVEAN Score: -3.371; Reliability Index: 4; Expected Accuracy: 82% of SPO11. Also, C631T substitution could change the aggregation prone regions of the SPO11 protein (dTANGO = 209.99.Conclusion: So even though the SPO11-C631T don’t increase the risk of male infertility, it could be deleterious for themRNA and protein.

  3. A Meta-Analysis of Multiple Matched Copy Number and Transcriptomics Data Sets for Inferring Gene Regulatory Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    Inferring gene regulatory relationships from observational data is challenging. Manipulation and intervention is often required to unravel causal relationships unambiguously. However, gene copy number changes, as they frequently occur in cancer cells, might be considered natural manipulation experiments on gene expression. An increasing number of data sets on matched array comparative genomic hybridisation and transcriptomics experiments from a variety of cancer pathologies are becoming publicly available. Here we explore the potential of a meta-analysis of thirty such data sets. The aim of our analysis was to assess the potential of in silico inference of trans-acting gene regulatory relationships from this type of data. We found sufficient correlation signal in the data to infer gene regulatory relationships, with interesting similarities between data sets. A number of genes had highly correlated copy number and expression changes in many of the data sets and we present predicted potential trans-acted regulatory relationships for each of these genes. The study also investigates to what extent heterogeneity between cell types and between pathologies determines the number of statistically significant predictions available from a meta-analysis of experiments. PMID:25148247

  4. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In silico analysis of ESTs from roots of Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia Osbeck under water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel L. Boscariol-Camargo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CitEST project resulted in the construction of cDNA libraries from different Citrus sp. tissues under various physiological conditions. Among them, plantlets of Rangpur lime were exposed to hydroponic conditions with and without water stress using PEG6000. RNA from roots was obtained and generated a total of 4,130 valid cDNA reads, with 2,020 from the non-stressed condition and 2,110 from the stressed set. Bioinformatic analyses measured the frequency of each read in the libraries and yielded an in silico transcriptional profile for each condition. A total of 40 contigs were differentially expressed and allowed to detect up-regulated homologue sequences to well known genes involved in stress response, such as aquaporins, dehydrin, sucrose synthase, and proline-related synthase. Some sequences could not be classified by using FunCat and remained with an unknown function. A large number of sequences presented high similarities to annotated genes involved with cell energy, protein synthesis and cellular transport, suggesting that Rangpur lime may sustain active cell growth under stressed condition. The presence of membrane transporters and cell signaling components could be an indication of a coordinated morphological adaptation and biochemical response during drought, helping to explain the higher tolerance of this rootstock to water stress.

  6. In-silico analysis of amotosalen hydrochloride binding to CD-61 of platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, H.T.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the docking of Amotosalen hydrochloride (AH) at CD-61 of platelets, and to suggest the cause of bleeding in AH treated platelets transfusion. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical College, Taif University, Taif, Saudi Arabia, from October 2014 to May 2015. Methodology: The study was carried out in-silico. PDB (protein data bank) code of Tirofiban bound to CD-61 was 2vdm. CD-61 was docked with Tirofiban using online docking tools, i.e. Patchdock and Firedock. Then, Amotosalen hydrochloride and CD-61 were also docked. Best docking poses to active sites of 2vdm were found. Ligplot of interactions of ligands and CD-61 were obtained. Then comparison of hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bond lengths, and hydrophobic bonds of 2vdm molecule and best poses of docking results were done. Patchdock and Firedock results of best poses were also analysed using SPSS version 16. Results: More amino acids were involved in hydrogen and hydrophobic bonds in Patchdock and Firedock docking of Amotosalen hydrochloride with CD-61 than Patchdock and Firedock docking of CD-61 with Tirofiban. The binding energy was more in latter than former. Conclusion: Amotosalen hydrochloride binds to the active site of CD-61 with weaker binding force. Haemorrhage seen in Amotosalen hydrochloride-treated platelets might be due to binding of Amotosalen hydrochloride to CD-61. (author)

  7. In silico characterization and transcriptomic analysis of nif family genes from Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar

    2017-10-01

    In silico approaches in conjunction with morphology, nitrogenase activity, and qRT-PCR explore the impact of selected abiotic stressor such as arsenic, salt, cadmium, copper, and butachlor on nitrogen fixing (nif family) genes of diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. A total of 19 nif genes are present within the Anabaena genome that is involved in the process of nitrogen fixation. Docking studies revealed the interaction between these nif gene-encoded proteins and the selected abiotic stressors which were further validated through decreased heterocyst frequency, fragmentation of filaments, and downregulation of nitrogenase activity under these stresses indicating towards their toxic impact on nitrogen fixation potential of filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Another appealing finding of this study is even though having similar binding energy and similar interacting residues between arsenic/salt and copper/cadmium to nif-encoded proteins, arsenic and cadmium are more toxic than salt and copper for nitrogenase activity of Anabaena which is crucial for growth and yield of rice paddy and soil reclamation.

  8. In vitro HIV-1 evolution in response to triple reverse transcriptase inhibitors & in silico phenotypic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Rath

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of ART regimens strongly depends upon complex interactions between the selective pressure of drugs and the evolution of mutations that allow or restrict drug resistance.Four clinical isolates from NRTI-exposed, NNRTI-naive subjects were passaged in increasing concentrations of NVP in combination with 1 µM 3 TC and 2 µM ADV to assess selective pressures of multi-drug treatment. A novel parameter inference procedure, based on a stochastic viral growth model, was used to estimate phenotypic resistance and fitness from in vitro combination passage experiments.Newly developed mathematical methods estimated key phenotypic parameters of mutations arising through selective pressure exerted by 3 TC and NVP. Concentrations of 1 µM 3 TC maintained the M184V mutation, which was associated with intrinsic fitness deficits. Increasing NVP concentrations selected major NNRTI resistance mutations. The evolutionary pathway of NVP resistance was highly dependent on the viral genetic background, epistasis as well as stochasticity. Parameter estimation indicated that the previously unrecognized mutation L228Q was associated with NVP resistance in some isolates.Serial passage of viruses in the presence of multiple drugs may resemble the selection of mutations observed among treated individuals and populations in vivo and indicate evolutionary preferences and restrictions. Phenotypic resistance estimated here "in silico" from in vitro passage experiments agreed well with previous knowledge, suggesting that the unique combination of "wet-" and "dry-lab" experimentation may improve our understanding of HIV-1 resistance evolution in the future.

  9. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  10. In silico analysis of bacterial arsenic islands reveals remarkable synteny and functional relatedness between arsenate and phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hang; Li, Mingshun; Huang, Yinyan

    2013-01-01

    In order to construct a more universal model for understanding the genetic requirements for bacterial AsIII oxidation, an in silico examination of the available sequences in the GenBank was assessed and revealed 21 conserved 5-71 kb arsenic islands within phylogenetically diverse bacterial genomes....... The arsenic islands included the AsIII oxidase structural genes aioBA, ars operons (e.g., arsRCB) which code for arsenic resistance, and pho, pst, and phn genes known to be part of the classical phosphate stress response and that encode functions associated with regulating and acquiring organic and inorganic...... phosphorus. The regulatory genes aioXSR were also an island component, but only in Proteobacteria and orientated differently depending on whether they were in a-Proteobacteria or β-/γ-Proteobacteria. Curiously though, while these regulatory genes have been shown to be essential to AsIII oxidation...

  11. Contribution of a fuzzy expert system to regulatory impact analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antônio da Cunha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA has been consolidating in Brazilian regulatory agencies throughout the last decades. The RIA methodology aims to examine the regulatory process, measure the costs and benefits generated, as well as other effects of social, political or economic nature caused by a new or an existing regulation. By analysing each regulatory option, the expert or regulator faces a myriad of variables, usually of qualitative nature, that are difficult to measure and with a high degree of uncertainty. This research complements the existing literature, given the scarcity of decision support models in RIA that – regardless of the problem treated – incorporate the tacit knowledge of the regulation expert. This paper proposes an exploratory approach using a Fuzzy Expert System, which therefore helps to enrich the decision process in the final stage of comparison of the regulatory options.

  12. Eucalyptus microsatellites mined in silico

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/087/01/0021-0025 ... Eucalyptus is an important short rotation pulpy woody plant, grown widely in the tropics. ... In this study, in silico analysis of 15,285 sequences representing partial and full-length mRNA from Eucalyptus species for their use in developing SSRs or microsatellites ...

  13. Comprehensive in silico prediction and analysis of chlamydial outer membrane proteins reflects evolution and life style of the Chlamydiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Garry

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria comprising some of the most important bacterial pathogens of animals and humans. Although chlamydial outer membrane proteins play a key role for attachment to and entry into host cells, only few have been described so far. We developed a comprehensive, multiphasic in silico approach, including the calculation of clusters of orthologues, to predict outer membrane proteins using conservative criteria. We tested this approach using Escherichia coli (positive control and Bacillus subtilis (negative control, and applied it to five chlamydial species; Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia muridarum, Chlamydia (a.k.a. Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia (a.k.a. Chlamydophila caviae, and Protochlamydia amoebophila. Results In total, 312 chlamydial outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins in 88 orthologous clusters were identified, including 238 proteins not previously recognized to be located in the outer membrane. Analysis of their taxonomic distribution revealed an evolutionary conservation among Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae and Planctomycetes as well as lifestyle-dependent conservation of the chlamydial outer membrane protein composition. Conclusion This analysis suggested a correlation between the outer membrane protein composition and the host range of chlamydiae and revealed a common set of outer membrane proteins shared by these intracellular bacteria. The collection of predicted chlamydial outer membrane proteins is available at the online database pCOMP http://www.microbial-ecology.net/pcomp and might provide future guidance in the quest for anti-chlamydial vaccines.

  14. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  15. In Silico Analysis of the Structural and Biochemical Features of the NMD Factor UPF1 in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Martínez-Montiel

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms regulating the accuracy of gene expression are still not fully understood. Among these mechanisms, Nonsense-mediated Decay (NMD is a quality control process that detects post-transcriptionally abnormal transcripts and leads them to degradation. The UPF1 protein lays at the heart of NMD as shown by several structural and functional features reported for this factor mainly for Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This process is highly conserved in eukaryotes but functional diversity can be observed in various species. Ustilago maydis is a basidiomycete and the best-known smut, which has become a model to study molecular and cellular eukaryotic mechanisms. In this study, we performed in silico analysis to investigate the structural and biochemical properties of the putative UPF1 homolog in Ustilago maydis. The putative homolog for UPF1 was recognized in the annotated genome for the basidiomycete, exhibiting 66% identity with its human counterpart at the protein level. The known structural and functional domains characteristic of UPF1 homologs were also found. Based on the crystal structures available for UPF1, we constructed different three-dimensional models for umUPF1 in order to analyze the secondary and tertiary structural features of this factor. Using these models, we studied the spatial arrangement of umUPF1 and its capability to interact with UPF2. Moreover, we identified the critical amino acids that mediate the interaction of umUPF1 with UPF2, ATP, RNA and with UPF1 itself. Mutating these amino acids in silico showed an important effect over the native structure. Finally, we performed molecular dynamic simulations for UPF1 proteins from H. sapiens and U. maydis and the results obtained show a similar behavior and physicochemical properties for the protein in both organisms. Overall, our results indicate that the putative UPF1 identified in U. maydis shows a very similar sequence, structural organization

  16. In Silico Analysis of the Structural and Biochemical Features of the NMD Factor UPF1 in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Montiel, Nancy; Morales-Lara, Laura; Hernández-Pérez, Julio M; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca D

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the accuracy of gene expression are still not fully understood. Among these mechanisms, Nonsense-mediated Decay (NMD) is a quality control process that detects post-transcriptionally abnormal transcripts and leads them to degradation. The UPF1 protein lays at the heart of NMD as shown by several structural and functional features reported for this factor mainly for Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This process is highly conserved in eukaryotes but functional diversity can be observed in various species. Ustilago maydis is a basidiomycete and the best-known smut, which has become a model to study molecular and cellular eukaryotic mechanisms. In this study, we performed in silico analysis to investigate the structural and biochemical properties of the putative UPF1 homolog in Ustilago maydis. The putative homolog for UPF1 was recognized in the annotated genome for the basidiomycete, exhibiting 66% identity with its human counterpart at the protein level. The known structural and functional domains characteristic of UPF1 homologs were also found. Based on the crystal structures available for UPF1, we constructed different three-dimensional models for umUPF1 in order to analyze the secondary and tertiary structural features of this factor. Using these models, we studied the spatial arrangement of umUPF1 and its capability to interact with UPF2. Moreover, we identified the critical amino acids that mediate the interaction of umUPF1 with UPF2, ATP, RNA and with UPF1 itself. Mutating these amino acids in silico showed an important effect over the native structure. Finally, we performed molecular dynamic simulations for UPF1 proteins from H. sapiens and U. maydis and the results obtained show a similar behavior and physicochemical properties for the protein in both organisms. Overall, our results indicate that the putative UPF1 identified in U. maydis shows a very similar sequence, structural organization, mechanical stability

  17. Identification and Analysis of Jasmonate Pathway Genes in Coffea canephora (Robusta Coffee) by In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Kosaraju; Sreenath, H L

    2017-07-01

    bioinformatic approaches confirming the conserved nature of the pathway in coffee. The findings are useful to understand the defense mechanisms of C. canephora and coffee breeding in the long run. JA is a plant hormone that plays an important role in plant defense against insect pests. Genes coding for the 4 key enzymes involved in the production of JA viz., LOX, AOS, AOC and OPR were identified and analyzed in C. canephora (robusta coffee) by in silico approach. The study has confirmed the conserved nature of JA pathway in coffee; the findings are useful to further explore the defense mechanisms of coffee plants. Abbreviations used: C. canephora : Coffea canephora ; C. arabica : Coffea arabica ; JA: Jasmonic acid; CGH: Coffee Genome Hub; NCBI: National Centre for Biotechnology Information; BLAST: Basic Local Alignment Search Tool; A. thaliana : Arabidopsis thaliana ; LOX: Lipoxygenase, AOS: Allene oxide synthase; AOC: Allene oxide cyclase; OPR: 12 oxo phytodienoic reductase.

  18. In silico and in vivo analysis of Toxoplasma gondii epitopes by correlating survival data with peptide-MHC-I binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Si-Yang; Jensen, Maria Risager; Rosenberg, Carina Agerbo; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Petersen, Eskild; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Protein antigens comprising peptide motifs with high binding affinity to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are expected to induce a stronger cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and thus provide better protection against infection with microorganisms where cytotoxic T-cells are the main effector arm of the immune system. Data on cyst formation and survival were extracted from past studies on the DNA immunization of mice with plasmids coding for Toxoplasma gondii antigens. From in silico analyses of the vaccine antigens, the correlation was tested between the predicted affinity for MHC-I molecules of the vaccine peptides and the survival of immunized mice after challenge with T. gondii. ELISPOT analysis was used for the experimental testing of peptide immunogenicity. Predictions for the Db MHC-I molecule produced a strong, negative correlation between survival and the dissociation constant of vaccine-derived peptides. The in silico analyses of nine T. gondii antigens identified peptides with a predicted dissociation constant in the interval from 10nM to 40μM. ELISPOT assays with splenocytes from T. gondii-infected mice further supported the importance of the peptide affinity for MHC-I. In silico analysis clearly helped the search for protective vaccine antigens. The ELISPOT analysis confirmed that the predicted T-cell epitopes were immunogenic by their ability to release interferon gamma in spleen cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. In silico analysis of compounds characterized from ethanolic extract of Cucurbita pepo with NF-κB-inhibitory potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon O. Rotimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available NF-κB controls cellular growth properties of cells and its regulation is key to the management of disease like cancer. Although plant-derived bioactives have been reported to inhibit NF-κB, there is limited knowledge on the interactions between the phytochemicals and NF-κB. In this study, we identified the phytochemicals in ethanolic extract of Cucurbita pepo using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy technique and used in silico approach to understand the interaction between the identified phytochemicals and NF-κB using Molegro Virtual Docker. The docking algorithm showed that nine phytochemicals fit well into the pocket on NF-κB. Our analysis showed that Lys144 is a prominent residue by involving in the binding of 9-octadecenoic acid (Z-, methyl ester, hexadecanoic acid, methyl ester and octadecanoic acid, methyl ester with the moldock score of -55.5264, -57.4634 and -61.1258 respectively. Hence, the binding of these phytochemicals to NF-κB could be responsible for the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer property of C. pepo.

  20. Global Transcriptome Analysis of Combined Abiotic Stress Signaling Genes Unravels Key Players in Oryza sativa L.: An In silico Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandiyan Muthuramalingam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Combined abiotic stress (CAbS affects the field grown plants simultaneously. The multigenic and quantitative nature of uncontrollable abiotic stresses complicates the process of understanding the stress response by plants. Considering this, we analyzed the CAbS response of C3 model plant, Oryza sativa by meta-analysis. The datasets of commonly expressed genes by drought, salinity, submergence, metal, natural expression, biotic, and abiotic stresses were data mined through publically accessible transcriptomic abiotic stress (AbS responsive datasets. Of which 1,175, 12,821, and 42,877 genes were commonly expressed in meta differential, individual differential, and unchanged expressions respectively. Highly regulated 100 differentially expressed AbS genes were derived through integrative meta-analysis of expression data (INMEX. Of this 30 genes were identified from AbS gene families through expression atlas that were computationally analyzed for their physicochemical properties. All AbS genes were physically mapped against O. sativa genome. Comparative mapping of these genes demonstrated the orthologous relationship with related C4 panicoid genome. In silico expression analysis of these genes showed differential expression patterns in different developmental tissues. Protein–protein interaction of these genes, represented the complexity of AbS. Computational expression profiling of candidate genes in response to multiple stresses suggested the putative involvement of OS05G0350900, OS02G0612700, OS05G0104200, OS03G0596200, OS12G0225900, OS07G0152000, OS08G0119500, OS06G0594700, and Os01g0393100 in CAbS. These potential candidate genes need to be studied further to decipher their functional roles in AbS dynamics.

  1. In silico Analysis and Experimental Validation of Lignan Extracts from Kadsura longipedunculata for Potential 5-HT1AR Agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxin Zheng

    Full Text Available Kadsura longipedunculata (KL has been widely used for the treatment of insomnia in traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of the sedative and hypnotic effects of KL.The content of KL was evaluated by HPLC-TOF-MS, and a potential target was found and used to construct its 3D structure to screen for potential ligands among the compounds in KL by using bioinformatics analysis, including similarity ensemble approach (SEA docking, homology modeling, molecular docking and ligand-based pharmacophore. The PCPA-induced insomnia rat model was then applied to confirm the potential targets related to the sedative effects of KL by performing the forced swimming test (FST, the tail suspension test (TST and the measurement of target-related proteins using western blotting and immunofluorescence.Bioinformatics analysis showed that most of lignan compounds in KL were optimal ligands for the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR, and they were found to be potential targets related to sedative effects; the main lignan content of KL extracts was characterized by HPLC-TOF-MS, with 7 proposed lignans detected. Administration of KL could significantly reduce FST and TST immobility time in the PCPA-induced 5HT-depleted insomnia rat model. The expressions of proteins related to the 5-HT1AR pathway were regulated by extracts of KL in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that extracts of KL had 5-HT1AR agonist-like effects.In silico analysis and experimental validation together demonstrated that lignan extracts from KL can target 5-HT1AR in insomniac rats, which could shed light on its use as a potential 5-HT1AR agonist drug.

  2. Extensive in silico analysis of Mimivirus coded Rab GTPase homolog suggests a possible role in virion membrane biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrutraj eZade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rab GTPases are the key regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotes. Many viruses and intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to hijack the host Rab GTPase functions, mainly through activators and effector proteins, for their benefit. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV is one of the largest viruses and belongs to the monophyletic clade of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV. The inner membrane lining is integral to the APMV virion structure. APMV assembly involves extensive host membrane modifications, like vesicle budding and fusion, leading to the formation of a membrane sheet that is incorporated into the virion. Intriguingly, APMV and all group I members of the Mimiviridae family code for a putative Rab GTPase protein. APMV is the first reported virus to code for a Rab GTPase (encoded by R214 gene. Our thorough in silico analysis of the subfamily specific (SF region of Mimiviridae Rab GTPase sequences suggests that they are related to Rab5, a member of the group II Rab GTPases, of lower eukaryotes. Because of their high divergence from the existing three isoforms, A, B and C of the Rab5-family, we suggest that Mimiviridae Rabs constitute a new isoform, Rab5D. Phylogenetic analysis indicated probable horizontal acquisition from a lower eukaryotic ancestor followed by selection and divergence. Furthermore, interaction network analysis suggests that vps34 (a Class III P13K homolog, coded by APMV L615, Atg-8 and dynamin (host proteins are recruited by APMV Rab GTPase during capsid assembly. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that APMV Rab plays a role in the acquisition of inner membrane during virion assembly.

  3. Regulatory analysis for USI A-1, Water Hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, A.W.

    1984-03-01

    This is the staff's regulatory analysis dealing with the resolution of the Unresolved Safety Issue A-1, Water Hammer. This report contains the value-impact analysis for this issue, public comments received, and staff response, or action taken, in response to those comments. The staff's technical findings regarding water hammer in nuclear power plants are contained in NUREG-0927

  4. in silico identification of cross affinity towards Cry1Ac pesticidal protein with receptor enzyme in Bos taurus and sequence, structure analysis of crystal proteins for stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, King Solomon; Nachimuthu, Ramesh; Thiagarajan, Prabha; Velu, Rajesh Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Any novel protein introduced into the GM crops need to be evaluated for cross affinity on living organisms. Many researchers are currently focusing on the impact of Bacillus thuringiensis cotton on soil and microbial diversity by field experiments. In spite of this, in silico approach might be helpful to elucidate the impact of cry genes. The crystal a protein which was produced by Bt at the time of sporulation has been used as a biological pesticide to target the insectivorous pests like Cry1Ac for Helicoverpa armigera and Cry2Ab for Spodoptera sp. and Heliothis sp. Here, we present the comprehensive in silico analysis of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab proteins with available in silico tools, databases and docking servers. Molecular docking of Cry1Ac with procarboxypeptidase from Helicoverpa armigera and Cry1Ac with Leucine aminopeptidase from Bos taurus has showed the 125(th) amino acid position to be the preference site of Cry1Ac protein. The structures were compared with each other and it showed 5% of similarity. The cross affinity of this toxin that have confirmed the earlier reports of ill effects of Bt cotton consumed by cattle.

  5. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In supplementary table 1, all the results of the lipid binding region analysis for SecA from a number of ..... For those interested, a more detailed description will now be given for this particular analysis. First of ... MCPep Job Status Page Finished.

  6. In silico analysis of human metabolism: Reconstruction, contextualization and application of genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Jun; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The arising prevalence of metabolic diseases calls for a holistic approach for analysis of the underlying nature of abnormalities in cellular functions. Through mathematic representation and topological analysis of cellular metabolism, GEnome scale metabolic Models (GEMs) provide a promising fram...... that correctly describe interactions between cells or tissues, and we therefore discuss how GEMs can be integrated with blood circulation models. Finally, we end the review with proposing some possible future research directions....

  7. Comparing Distributions of Environmental Outcomes for Regulatory Environmental Justice Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Sheriff

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Economists have long been interested in measuring distributional impacts of policy interventions. As environmental justice (EJ emerged as an ethical issue in the 1970s, the academic literature has provided statistical analyses of the incidence and causes of various environmental outcomes as they relate to race, income, and other demographic variables. In the context of regulatory impacts, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding what information is relevant for EJ analysis, and how best to present it. This paper helps frame the discussion by suggesting a set of questions fundamental to regulatory EJ analysis, reviewing past approaches to quantifying distributional equity, and discussing the potential for adapting existing tools to the regulatory context.

  8. In silico analysis of usher encoding genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae and characterization of their role in adhesion and colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fida Khater

    Full Text Available Chaperone/usher (CU assembly pathway is used by a wide range of Enterobacteriaceae to assemble adhesive surface structures called pili or fimbriae that play a role in bacteria-host cell interactions. In silico analysis revealed that the genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae LM21 harbors eight chromosomal CU loci belonging to γκп and ϭ clusters. Of these, only two correspond to previously described operons, namely type 1 and type 3-encoding operons. Isogenic usher deletion mutants of K. pneumoniae LM21 were constructed for each locus and their role in adhesion to animal (Intestine 407 and plant (Arabidopsis thaliana cells, biofilm formation and murine intestinal colonization was investigated. Type 3 pili usher deleted mutant was impaired in all assays, whereas type 1 pili usher deleted mutant only showed attenuation in adhesion to plant cells and in intestinal colonization. The LM21ΔkpjC mutant was impaired in its capacity to adhere to Arabidopsis cells and to colonize the murine intestine, either alone or in co-inoculation experiments. Deletion of LM21kpgC induced a significant decrease in biofilm formation, in adhesion to animal cells and in colonization of the mice intestine. The LM21∆kpaC and LM21∆kpeC mutants were only attenuated in biofilm formation and the adhesion abilities to Arabidopsis cells, respectively. No clear in vitro or in vivo effect was observed for LM21∆kpbC and LM21∆kpdC mutants. The multiplicity of CU loci in K. pneumoniae genome and their specific adhesion pattern probably reflect the ability of the bacteria to adhere to different substrates in its diverse ecological niches.

  9. In Silico Analysis of Usher Encoding Genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Characterization of Their Role in Adhesion and Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Fida; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Dufayard, Jean François; Brisse, Sylvain; Forestier, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone/usher (CU) assembly pathway is used by a wide range of Enterobacteriaceae to assemble adhesive surface structures called pili or fimbriae that play a role in bacteria-host cell interactions. In silico analysis revealed that the genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae LM21 harbors eight chromosomal CU loci belonging to γκп and ϭ clusters. Of these, only two correspond to previously described operons, namely type 1 and type 3-encoding operons. Isogenic usher deletion mutants of K. pneumoniae LM21 were constructed for each locus and their role in adhesion to animal (Intestine 407) and plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, biofilm formation and murine intestinal colonization was investigated. Type 3 pili usher deleted mutant was impaired in all assays, whereas type 1 pili usher deleted mutant only showed attenuation in adhesion to plant cells and in intestinal colonization. The LM21ΔkpjC mutant was impaired in its capacity to adhere to Arabidopsis cells and to colonize the murine intestine, either alone or in co-inoculation experiments. Deletion of LM21kpgC induced a significant decrease in biofilm formation, in adhesion to animal cells and in colonization of the mice intestine. The LM21∆kpaC and LM21∆kpeC mutants were only attenuated in biofilm formation and the adhesion abilities to Arabidopsis cells, respectively. No clear in vitro or in vivo effect was observed for LM21∆kpbC and LM21∆kpdC mutants. The multiplicity of CU loci in K. pneumoniae genome and their specific adhesion pattern probably reflect the ability of the bacteria to adhere to different substrates in its diverse ecological niches. PMID:25751658

  10. In-silico gene co-expression network analysis in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with reference to haloacid dehalogenase superfamily hydrolase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Satpathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a dimorphic fungus is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a disease globally affecting millions of people. The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD superfamily hydrolases enzyme in the fungi, in particular, is known to be responsible in the pathogenesis by adhering to the tissue. Hence, identification of novel drug targets is essential. Aims: In-silico based identification of co-expressed genes along with HAD superfamily hydrolase in P. brasiliensis during the morphogenesis from mycelium to yeast to identify possible genes as drug targets. Materials and Methods: In total, four datasets were retrieved from the NCBI-gene expression omnibus (GEO database, each containing 4340 genes, followed by gene filtration expression of the data set. Further co-expression (CE study was performed individually and then a combination these genes were visualized in the Cytoscape 2. 8.3. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and standard deviation value of the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene was obtained from the expression data and this value was subsequently used for the CE calculation purpose by selecting specific correlation power and filtering threshold. Results: The 23 genes that were thus obtained are common with respect to the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene. A significant network was selected from the Cytoscape network visualization that contains total 7 genes out of which 5 genes, which do not have significant protein hits, obtained from gene annotation of the expressed sequence tags by BLAST X. For all the protein PSI-BLAST was performed against human genome to find the homology. Conclusions: The gene co-expression network was obtained with respect to HAD superfamily dehalogenase gene in P. Brasiliensis.

  11. In Silico Analysis of the Regulation of the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain in C3 Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport), and regulation of Rubisco activity leads to emergent behaviors that may affect the operation and regulation of photosynthesis under different dynamic environmental conditions. The model was parameterized with experimental results in the literature, with a focus on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A dataset was constructed from multiple sources, including measurements of steady-state and dynamic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy under different light intensities and CO2, to test predictions of the model under different experimental conditions. Simulations suggested that there are strong interactions between cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport and that an excess capacity for alternative electron transport is required to ensure adequate redox state and lumen pH. Furthermore, the model predicted that, under specific conditions, reduction of ferredoxin by plastoquinol is possible after a rapid increase in light intensity. Further analysis also revealed that the relationship between ATP synthesis and proton motive force was highly regulated by the concentrations of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate, and this facilitated an increase in nonphotochemical quenching and proton motive force under conditions where metabolism was limiting, such as low CO2, high light intensity, or combined high CO2 and high light intensity. The model may be used as an in silico platform for future research on the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:28924017

  12. Economic analysis requirements in support of orbital debris regulatory policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joel S.

    1996-10-01

    As the number of Earth orbiting objects increases so does the potential for generating orbital debris with the consequent increase in the likelihood of impacting and damaging operating satellites. Various debris remediation approaches are being considered that encompass both in-orbit and return-to-Earth schema and have varying degrees of operations, cost, international competitiveness, and safety implications. Because of the diversity of issues, concerns and long-term impacts, there is a clear need for the setting of government policies that will lead to an orderly abatement of the potential orbital debris hazards. These policies may require the establishment of a supportive regulatory regime. The Department of Transportation is likely to have regulatory responsibilities relating to orbital debris stemming from its charge to protect the public health and safety, safety of property, and national security interests and foreign policy interests of the United States. This paper describes DOT's potential regulatory role relating to orbital debris remediation, the myriad of issues concerning the need for establishing government policies relating to orbital debris remediation and their regulatory implications, the proposed technological solutions and their economic and safety implications. Particular emphasis is placed upon addressing cost-effectiveness and economic analyses as they relate to economic impact analysis in support of regulatory impact analysis.

  13. Analysis of Large Genomic Data in Silico: The EPICNorfolk Study of Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jing Hua; Luan, Jian'an; Tan, Qihua

    In human genetics, large-scale data are now available with advances in genotyping technologies and international collaborative projects. Our ongoing study of obesity involves Affymetrix 500k genechips on approximately 7000 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC......) Norfolk study. Although the scale of our data is well beyond the ability of many software systems, we have successfully performed the analysis using the statistical analysis system (SAS) software. Our implementation trades memory with computing time and requires moderate hardware configuration. By using...

  14. In silico modelling and analysis of ribosome kinetics and aa-tRNA competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bošnački, D.; Pronk, T.E.; de Vink, E.P.

    2008-01-01

    We present a formal analysis of ribosome kinetics using probabilistic model checking and the tool Prism. We compute different parameters of the model, like probabilities of translation errors and average insertion times per codon. The model predicts strong correlation to the quotient of the

  15. In silico comparative analysis of EST-SSRs in three cotton genomes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 6

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... Furthermore, they are polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based ..... A and AD genomes. Blast (E-value≤1e-15) analysis was performed to search .... absent in Gh-ESTs; 'trans-porter activity' was also absent in Ga-ESTs (Figure ...

  16. In silico identification and analysis of phytoene synthase genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Zheng, Q S; Wei, Y P; Chen, J; Liu, R; Wan, H J

    2015-08-14

    In this study, we examined phytoene synthetase (PSY), the first key limiting enzyme in the synthesis of carotenoids and catalyzing the formation of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in terpenoid biosynthesis. We used known amino acid sequences of the PSY gene in tomato plants to conduct a genome-wide search and identify putative candidates in 34 sequenced plants. A total of 101 homologous genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PSY evolved independently in algae as well as monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Our results showed that the amino acid structures exhibited 5 motifs (motifs 1 to 5) in algae and those in higher plants were highly conserved. The PSY gene structures showed that the number of intron in algae varied widely, while the number of introns in higher plants was 4 to 5. Identification of PSY genes in plants and the analysis of the gene structure may provide a theoretical basis for studying evolutionary relationships in future analyses.

  17. In silico analysis of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in OCA and OA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Balu; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-12-01

    Albinism is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to low secretion of melanin. The oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and ocular albinism (OA) genes are responsible for melanin production and also act as a potential targets for miRNAs. The role of miRNA is to inhibit the protein synthesis partially or completely by binding with the 3'UTR of the mRNA thus regulating gene expression. In this analysis, we predicted the genetic variation that occurred in 3'UTR of the transcript which can be a reason for low melanin production thus causing albinism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3'UTR cause more new binding sites for miRNA which binds with mRNA which leads to inhibit the translation process either partially or completely. The SNPs in the mRNA of OCA and OA genes can create new binding sites for miRNA which may control the gene expression and lead to hypopigmentation. We have developed a computational procedure to determine the SNPs in the 3'UTR region of mRNA of OCA (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2) and OA (GPR143) genes which will be a potential cause for albinism. We identified 37 SNPs in five genes that are predicted to create 87 new binding sites on mRNA, which may lead to abrogation of the translation process. Expression analysis confirms that these genes are highly expressed in skin and eye regions. It is well supported by enrichment analysis that these genes are mainly involved in eye pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis process. The network analysis also shows how the genes are interacting and expressing in a complex network. This insight provides clue to wet-lab researches to understand the expression pattern of OCA and OA genes and binding phenomenon of mRNA and miRNA upon mutation, which is responsible for inhibition of translation process at genomic levels.

  18. In silico polymorphism analysis for the development of simple sequence repeat and transposon markers and construction of linkage map in cultivated peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Kenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea is an autogamous allotetraploid legume (2n = 4x = 40 that is widely cultivated as a food and oil crop. More than 6,000 DNA markers have been developed in Arachis spp., but high-density linkage maps useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding have not been constructed due to extremely low genetic diversity. Polymorphic marker loci are useful for the construction of such high-density linkage maps. The present study used in silico analysis to develop simple sequence repeat-based and transposon-based markers. Results The use of in silico analysis increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development by more than 3-fold. In total, 926 (34.2% of 2,702 markers showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the mapping population. Linkage analysis of the 926 markers along with 253 polymorphic markers selected from 4,449 published markers generated 21 linkage groups covering 2,166.4 cM with 1,114 loci. Based on the map thus produced, 23 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for 15 agronomical traits were detected. Another linkage map with 326 loci was also constructed and revealed a relationship between the genotypes of the FAD2 genes and the ratio of oleic/linoleic acid in peanut seed. Conclusions In silico analysis of polymorphisms increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development, and contributed to the construction of high-density linkage maps in cultivated peanut. The resultant maps were applicable to QTL analysis. Marker subsets and linkage maps developed in this study should be useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding in Arachis. The data are available at the Kazusa DNA Marker Database (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp.

  19. Safety analysis in support of regulatory decision marking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomier Baez, L.; Troncoso Fleitas, M.; Valhuerdi Debesa, C.; Valle Cepero, R.; Hernandez, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Features of different safety analysis techniques by means of calculation thermohydraulic a probabilistic and severe accidents used in the safety assessment, as well as the development of these techniques in Cuba and their use in support of regulatory decision making are presented

  20. Sensitivity analysis for missing data in regulatory submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permutt, Thomas

    2016-07-30

    The National Research Council Panel on Handling Missing Data in Clinical Trials recommended that sensitivity analyses have to be part of the primary reporting of findings from clinical trials. Their specific recommendations, however, seem not to have been taken up rapidly by sponsors of regulatory submissions. The NRC report's detailed suggestions are along rather different lines than what has been called sensitivity analysis in the regulatory setting up to now. Furthermore, the role of sensitivity analysis in regulatory decision-making, although discussed briefly in the NRC report, remains unclear. This paper will examine previous ideas of sensitivity analysis with a view to explaining how the NRC panel's recommendations are different and possibly better suited to coping with present problems of missing data in the regulatory setting. It will also discuss, in more detail than the NRC report, the relevance of sensitivity analysis to decision-making, both for applicants and for regulators. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Regulatory control analysis and design for sewer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Ane Loft; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Thornberg, Dines

    2015-01-01

    A systematic methodology for regulatory control analysis and design is adapted for sewer system operation and evaluated. The main challenge with adapting the methodology is the handling of the stochastic and transient nature of the rainfall disturbances, inherent to sewer system operation...

  2. 7 CFR 1700.32 - Program Accounting and Regulatory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator with respect to management, information systems, budgets, and other such matters. (a) The... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program Accounting and Regulatory Analysis. 1700.32... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.32 Program...

  3. Regulatory activities of government: analysis of determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Pevcin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available International comparisons show that large cross-country differences exist in the overall macro extent of regulation of the economy. In this context, the main purpose of the article is to investigate, why such differences exist by identifying and empirically verifying the effect of various factors that could potentially shape those differences. Empirical analysis based on the sample of 32 developed and democratic countries revealed that almost 70 % of variation in the macro extent of regulation could be explained with 7 statistically significant explanatory variables. The econometric analysis revealed that the macro extent of regulation decreases with income inequality in society, with the level of economic development, with the sizeof economy, with the share of transfer spending in GDP and with the share of government employment in labour force. On the other hand, the extent of regulation is positively related to government ownership of enterprises and to presidential political regime

  4. Differential Bees Flux Balance Analysis with OptKnock for in silico microbial strains optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Wen Choon

    Full Text Available Microbial strains optimization for the overproduction of desired phenotype has been a popular topic in recent years. The strains can be optimized through several techniques in the field of genetic engineering. Gene knockout is a genetic engineering technique that can engineer the metabolism of microbial cells with the objective to obtain desirable phenotypes. However, the complexities of the metabolic networks have made the process to identify the effects of genetic modification on the desirable phenotypes challenging. Furthermore, a vast number of reactions in cellular metabolism often lead to the combinatorial problem in obtaining optimal gene deletion strategy. Basically, the size of a genome-scale metabolic model is usually large. As the size of the problem increases, the computation time increases exponentially. In this paper, we propose Differential Bees Flux Balance Analysis (DBFBA with OptKnock to identify optimal gene knockout strategies for maximizing the production yield of desired phenotypes while sustaining the growth rate. This proposed method functions by improving the performance of a hybrid of Bees Algorithm and Flux Balance Analysis (BAFBA by hybridizing Differential Evolution (DE algorithm into neighborhood searching strategy of BAFBA. In addition, DBFBA is integrated with OptKnock to validate the results for improving the reliability the work. Through several experiments conducted on Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium thermocellum as the model organisms, DBFBA has shown a better performance in terms of computational time, stability, growth rate, and production yield of desired phenotypes compared to the methods used in previous works.

  5. In Silico Genome Comparison and Distribution Analysis of Simple Sequences Repeats in Cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Vásquez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a SSRs density analysis in different cassava genomic regions. The information obtained was useful to establish comparisons between cassava’s SSRs genomic distribution and those of poplar, flax, and Jatropha. In general, cassava has a low SSR density (~50 SSRs/Mbp and has a high proportion of pentanucleotides, (24,2 SSRs/Mbp. It was found that coding sequences have 15,5 SSRs/Mbp, introns have 82,3 SSRs/Mbp, 5′ UTRs have 196,1 SSRs/Mbp, and 3′ UTRs have 50,5 SSRs/Mbp. Through motif analysis of cassava’s genome SSRs, the most abundant motif was AT/AT while in intron sequences and UTRs regions it was AG/CT. In addition, in coding sequences the motif AAG/CTT was also found to occur most frequently; in fact, it is the third most used codon in cassava. Sequences containing SSRs were classified according to their functional annotation of Gene Ontology categories. The identified SSRs here may be a valuable addition for genetic mapping and future studies in phylogenetic analyses and genomic evolution.

  6. In Silico Analysis of Mobilome Response to Salt Stress in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behcet İNAL

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Common bean is an important legume that grown and consumed as animal feed and for human nutrition. It is also an important source of protein in developing countries. Transposable elements (TEs constitute a large part of the genome in various eukaryotic species. TE was described as garbage DNA by researchers for a long time. Recently, it has been found that TEs can move near stress response genes and they have known effects on plant resistance to diverse stresses. With the acquisition of common bean genome sequence, one of the next step is to annotate the genome and define the functional DNA elements. TEs are the most abundant genetic elements of plant genomes and have an important impact on genome stress evolution and genetic variation. So, it is important to determine TEs in the common bean genome. In the current study, genome-wide transposon annotation and definition were achieved in root and leaf tissues of common bean under salt stress. Homology and sequence structure-based methods were used. Tont2-I-Copia and Copia-39 Copia retrotransposons were found to be more in salt-treated roots and leaves respectively. As a result of the analysis, we found TEs number ranging from 46 to 50 belonging to about twenty different plants. Gene ontology analysis of transposon sequences brought the light on diverse important pathways related to abiotic stress conditions.

  7. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of Worldwide Regulatory Framework for On-Line Maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Kyu; Oh, Kyu Myung; Lee, Chang Ju

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing economic pressures being faced and the potential for shortening outage times under the conditions of deregulated electricity markets in the world, licensees are motivated to get an increasing amount of online maintenance (OLM). OLM means a kind of planned maintenance of nuclear reactor facilities, including structure, systems, and components (SSCs), during power operation. In Korea, a similar situation is made up, so it needs to establish a regulatory framework for OLM. A few years ago, foreign countries' practices related to OLM were surveyed by the Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) of OECD/NEA/CNRA. The survey results and additional new information of countries' status will be helpful to establish our own regulatory framework for OLM, which are analyzed in this paper. From the analysis, some considerable points to be addressed for establishing a regulatory framework for OLM are suggested

  9. In silico Analysis for Laccase-mediated Bioremediation of the Emerging Pharmaceutical Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Laccases, a copper oxidase enzyme, has been employed for bioremediation of anthropogenic pollutants in the recent past. Laccase has a broad range of substrate specificity which offers the prospect for screening in numerable xenobiotics. The present study was aimed to use protein-ligand docking as a tool for prediction of biodegradation of selected pharmaceutical pollutants. A comparative study was also done to determine the binding efficacy of bacterial and fungal laccase for those selected pollutants. The laccase-pollutant docking was carried out using HEX software. The docking scores of bacterial and fungal laccase for predefined pollutants were comparable to ABTS, a substrate for laccase, which suggested that laccase might be able to degrade emerging pharmaceutical pollutants. The docking analysis approach can be useful in prediction of binding competence of pharmaceutical pollutants with laccase for in situ laccase-mediated bioremediation.

  10. An in silico analysis of the key genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in Citrus sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano R. Lucheta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus species are known by their high content of phenolic compounds, including a wide range of flavonoids. In plants, these compounds are involved in protection against biotic and abiotic stresses, cell structure, UV protection, attraction of pollinators and seed dispersal. In humans, flavonoid consumption has been related to increasing overall health and fighting some important diseases. The goals of this study were to identify expressed sequence tags (EST in Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck corresponding to genes involved in general phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and the key genes involved in the main flavonoids pathways (flavanones, flavones, flavonols, leucoanthocyanidins, anthocyanins and isoflavonoids. A thorough analysis of all related putative genes from the Citrus EST (CitEST database revealed several interesting aspects associated to these pathways and brought novel information with promising usefulness for both basic and biotechnological applications.

  11. In silico analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats from chloroplast genomes of Solanaceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Vagner Tambarussi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of chloroplast genome (cpDNA sequences of Atropa belladonna, Nicotiana sylvestris, N.tabacum, N. tomentosiformis, Solanum bulbocastanum, S. lycopersicum and S. tuberosum, which are Solanaceae species,allowed us to analyze the organization of cpSSRs in their genic and intergenic regions. In general, the number of cpSSRs incpDNA ranged from 161 in S. tuberosum to 226 in N. tabacum, and the number of intergenic cpSSRs was higher than geniccpSSRs. The mononucleotide repeats were the most frequent in studied species, but we also identified di-, tri-, tetra-, pentaandhexanucleotide repeats. Multiple alignments of all cpSSRs sequences from Solanaceae species made the identification ofnucleotide variability possible and the phylogeny was estimated by maximum parsimony. Our study showed that the plastomedatabase can be exploited for phylogenetic analysis and biotechnological approaches.

  12. In Silico Prediction Analysis of Idiotope-Driven T–B Cell Collaboration in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune A. Høglund

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Memory B cells acting as antigen-presenting cells are believed to be important in multiple sclerosis (MS, but the antigen they present remains unknown. We hypothesized that B cells may activate CD4+ T cells in the central nervous system of MS patients by presenting idiotopes from their own immunoglobulin variable regions on human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II molecules. Here, we use bioinformatics prediction analysis of B cell immunoglobulin variable regions from 11 MS patients and 6 controls with other inflammatory neurological disorders (OINDs, to assess whether the prerequisites for such idiotope-driven T–B cell collaboration are present. Our findings indicate that idiotopes from the complementarity determining region (CDR 3 of MS patients on average have high predicted affinities for disease associated HLA-DRB1*15:01 molecules and are predicted to be endosomally processed by cathepsin S and L in positions that allows such HLA binding to occur. Additionally, complementarity determining region 3 sequences from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF B cells from MS patients contain on average more rare T cell-exposed motifs that could potentially escape tolerance and stimulate CD4+ T cells than CSF B cells from OIND patients. Many of these features were associated with preferential use of the IGHV4 gene family by CSF B cells from MS patients. This is the first study to combine high-throughput sequencing of patient immune repertoires with large-scale prediction analysis and provides key indicators for future in vitro and in vivo analyses.

  13. In Silico Analysis of Putative Sugar Transporter Genes in Aspergillus niger Using Phylogeny and Comparative Transcriptomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Peng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus niger is one of the most widely used fungi to study the conversion of the lignocellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars. Understanding the sugar uptake system of A. niger is essential to improve the efficiency of the process of fungal plant biomass degradation. In this study, we report a comprehensive characterization of the sugar transportome of A. niger by combining phylogenetic and comparative transcriptomic analyses. We identified 86 putative sugar transporter (ST genes based on a conserved protein domain search. All these candidates were then classified into nine subfamilies and their functional motifs and possible sugar-specificity were annotated according to phylogenetic analysis and literature mining. Furthermore, we comparatively analyzed the ST gene expression on a large set of fungal growth conditions including mono-, di- and polysaccharides, and mutants of transcriptional regulators. This revealed that transporter genes from the same phylogenetic clade displayed very diverse expression patterns and were regulated by different transcriptional factors. The genome-wide study of STs of A. niger provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying an extremely flexible metabolism and high nutritional versatility of A. niger and will facilitate further biochemical characterization and industrial applications of these candidate STs.

  14. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  15. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kurotani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  16. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-08-20

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  17. Molecular cloning, expression, and in silico structural analysis of guinea pig IL-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirisala, Vijaya R; Jeevan, Amminikutty; Ramasamy, Suresh K; McMurray, David N

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and the signature cytokine of Th17 cells, a subset which is involved in cytokine and chemokine production, neutrophil recruitment, promotion of T cell priming, and antibody production. IL-17 may play an important role in tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. In preparation for investigating its role in the highly relevant guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis, we cloned guinea pig IL-17A for the first time. The complete coding sequence of the guinea pig IL-17A gene (477 nucleotides; 159 amino acids) was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression vector (pET-30a) resulting in the expression of a 17 kDa recombinant guinea pig IL-17A protein which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis. Homology modeling of guinea pig IL-17A revealed that the three-dimensional structure resembles that of human IL-17A. The secondary structure predicted for this protein showed the presence of one extra helix in the N-terminal region. The expression profile of IL-17A was analyzed quantitatively in spleen, lymph node, and lung cells from BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs by real-time PCR. The guinea pig IL-17A cDNA and its recombinant protein will serve as valuable tools for molecular and immunological studies in the guinea pig model of pulmonary TB and other human diseases.

  18. An in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of small molecule modulators of PDZ-peptide interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Tiwari

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions have important implications in a variety of biological processes including treatment of cancer and Parkinson's disease. Even though experimental studies have reported characterization of peptidomimetic inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions, the binding modes for most of them have not been characterized by structural studies. In this study we have attempted to understand the structural basis of the small molecule-PDZ interactions by in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of a set of 38 small molecules with known K(i or K(d values for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains of PSD-95 protein. These two PDZ domains show differential selectivity for these compounds despite having a high degree of sequence similarity and almost identical peptide binding pockets. Optimum binding modes for these ligands for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains were identified by using a novel combination of semi-flexible docking and explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Analysis of the binding modes revealed most of the peptidomimectic ligands which had high K(i or K(d moved away from the peptide binding pocket, while ligands with high binding affinities remained in the peptide binding pocket. The differential specificities of the PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains primarily arise from differences in the conformation of the loop connecting βB and βC strands, because this loop interacts with the N-terminal chemical moieties of the ligands. We have also computed the MM/PBSA binding free energy values for these 38 compounds with both the PDZ domains from multiple 5 ns MD trajectories on each complex i.e. a total of 228 MD trajectories of 5 ns length each. Interestingly, computational binding free energies show good agreement with experimental binding free energies with a correlation coefficient of approximately 0.6. Thus our study demonstrates that combined use of docking and MD simulations can help in identification of potent inhibitors

  19. In silico analysis of the potential mechanism of telocinobufagin on breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yi-Wu; Lin, Peng; Liu, Li-Min; He, Rong-Quan; Zhang, Li-Jie; Peng, Zhi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Jiao; Chen, Gang

    2018-05-01

    The extractives from a ChanSu, traditional Chinese medicine, have been discovered to possess anti-inflammatory and tumor-suppressing abilities. However, the molecular mechanism of telocinobufagin, a compound extracted from ChanSu, on breast cancer cells has not been clarified. The aim of this study is to investigate the underlying mechanism of telocinobufagin on breast cancer cells. The differentially expressed genes after telocinobufagin treatment on breast cancer cells were searched and downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), ArrayExpress and literatures. Bioinformatics tools were applied to further explore the potential mechanism of telocinobufagin in breast cancer using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway, Gene ontology (GO) enrichment, panther, and protein-protein interaction analyses. To better comprehend the role of telocinobufagin in breast cancer, we also queried the Connectivity Map using the gene expression profiles of telocinobufagin treatment. One GEO accession (GSE85871) provided 1251 differentially expressed genes after telocinobufagin treatment on MCF-7 cells. The pathway of neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), intestinal immune network for IgA production, hematopoietic cell lineage and calcium signaling pathway were the key pathways from KEGG analysis. IGF1 and KSR1, owning to higher protein levels in breast cancer tissues, IGF1 and KSR1 could be the hub genes related to telocinobufagin treatment. It was indicated that the molecular mechanism of telocinobufagin resembled that of fenspiride. Telocinobufagin might regulate neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway to exert its influences in breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and its molecular mechanism might share some similarities with fenspiride. This study only presented a comprehensive picture of the role of telocinobufagin in breast cancer MCF-7 cells using big data. However, more thorough and deeper researches are required to add

  20. A conventional PCR for differentiating common taeniid species of dogs based on in silico microsatellite analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Shamsaddini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Canine taeniids are among the major tapeworms with remarkable medical and economic significance. Reliable diagnosis and differentiation of dog taeniids using simple and sensitive tools are of paramount importance for establishing an efficient surveillance system. Microsatellites as abundant unique tandem repeats of short DNA motifs are useful genetic markers for molecular epidemiological studies. The purpose of the present study was to find a primer pair for rapid differentiation of major tapeworms of dogs, Taenia hydatigena, T. multiceps, T. ovis and Echinococcus granulosus, by screening existing nucleotide data. All the mitochondrial genome records as well as non-coding ITS1 sequences of Taeniidae species were downloaded from Nucleotide database from NCBI. For prediction and analysis of potential loci of STR/SSR in ITS1 as well as mitochondrial regions, we used ChloroMitoSSRDB 2.0 and GMATo v1.2. software. Different tapeworm species were categorized according to different motif sequences and type and size of each microsatellite locus. Three primer sets were designed and tested for differentiating taeniid species and evaluated in a conventional PCR system. Four taeniid species were successfully differentiated using a primer pair in a simple conventional PCR system. We predicted 2-19 and 1-4 microsatellite loci in ITS1 and mitochondrial genome, respectively. In ITS1, 41 Di and 21 Tri motifs were found in the taeniids while the majority of the motifs in the mitochondrial genome were Tetra (89 and Tri (70. It is documented that the number and diversity of microsatellite loci is higher in nuclear ITS1 region than mostly coding mitochondrial genome.

  1. Cost-benefit considerations in regulatory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubayi, V.; Sailor, V.; Anandalingam, G.

    1995-10-01

    Justification for safety enhancements at nuclear facilities, e.g., a compulsory backfit to nuclear power plants, requires a value-impact analysis of the increase in overall public protection versus the cost of implementation. It has been customary to assess the benefits in terms of radiation dose to the public averted by the introduction of the safety enhancement. Comparison of such benefits with the costs of the enhancement then requires an estimate of the monetary value of averted dose (dollars/person rem). This report reviews available information on a variety of factors that affect this valuation and assesses the continuing validity of the figure of $1000/person-rem averted, which has been widely used as a guideline in performing value-impact analyses. Factors that bear on this valuation include the health risks of radiation doses, especially the higher risk estimates of the BEIR V committee, recent calculations of doses and offsite costs by consequence codes for hypothesized severe accidents at U.S. nuclear power plants under the NUREG-1150 program, and recent information on the economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in the Soviet Union and estimates of risk avoidance based on the willingness-to-pay criterion. The report analyzes these factors and presents results on the dollars/person-rem ratio arising from different assumptions on the values of these factors.

  2. Cost-benefit considerations in regulatory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubayi, V.; Sailor, V.; Anandalingam, G.

    1995-10-01

    Justification for safety enhancements at nuclear facilities, e.g., a compulsory backfit to nuclear power plants, requires a value-impact analysis of the increase in overall public protection versus the cost of implementation. It has been customary to assess the benefits in terms of radiation dose to the public averted by the introduction of the safety enhancement. Comparison of such benefits with the costs of the enhancement then requires an estimate of the monetary value of averted dose (dollars/person rem). This report reviews available information on a variety of factors that affect this valuation and assesses the continuing validity of the figure of $1000/person-rem averted, which has been widely used as a guideline in performing value-impact analyses. Factors that bear on this valuation include the health risks of radiation doses, especially the higher risk estimates of the BEIR V committee, recent calculations of doses and offsite costs by consequence codes for hypothesized severe accidents at U.S. nuclear power plants under the NUREG-1150 program, and recent information on the economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in the Soviet Union and estimates of risk avoidance based on the willingness-to-pay criterion. The report analyzes these factors and presents results on the dollars/person-rem ratio arising from different assumptions on the values of these factors

  3. Human MTHFR-G1793A transition may be a protective mutation against male infertility: a genetic association study and in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the association of the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)-G1793A transition with male infertility using a case-control study, a meta-analysis and an in silico analysis. In the case-control study, 308 blood samples (169 infertile and 139 fertile men) were collected. MTHFR-G1793A genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP. The study revealed a significant protective association between the GA genotype (OR: 0.3737, 95%CI: 0.1874-0.7452, p = 0.0052) and A allele (OR: 0.4266, 95%CI: 0.2267-0.8030, p = 0.0083) with male infertility. Meta-analysis showed that the G1793A transition might be a protective mutation against male infertility in both A vs. G (OR: 0.608, 95%CI: 0.466-0.792, p silico-analysis revealed that although G1793A could not make fundamental changes in the function and structure of MTHFR, it could modify the structure of the mRNA (Distance =0.1809, p = 0.1095; p < 0.2 is significant). The results suggest that G1793A substitution might be a protective genetic factor against male infertility. However, further case-control studies are required to provide a more robust conclusion.

  4. Association of Human Methionine Synthase-A2756G Transition With Prostate Cancer: A Case-Control Study and in Silico Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezou Ebrahimi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Methionine synthase (MTR is one of the key enzymes of folate pathway, which play a key role in the construction, repair, and methylation of DNA. In this study, an association of MTR A2756G gene transition with prostate cancer in men populations of Kashan-Iran was investigated by a case-control study and an in silico analysis. The 200 samples including 100 patients with prostate cancer, as case group and 100 healthy men, as control group included in this study. MTR-A2756G genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP technique. Some in silico tools used to evaluate the effects of A2756G transition on the structure and function of MTR. Results showed that the AG genotype (OR: 2.4014, 95% CI: 1.3216-4.3636, P=0.0040, and GG genotype (OR: 3.6324, 95% CI: 1.2629-10.4475, P=0.0167 and G allele (OR: 2.0120, 95% CI: 1.3098-3.0905, P=0.0014 were associated with prostate cancer. In silico analysis showed that polymorphisms of the enzyme protein might change properties of MTR such as relative mutability and flexibility, which leads to alteration of stability and function of the enzyme. Based on the results, an MTR-A2756G polymorphism which changes activity and stability of the methionine synthase associated with prostate cancer in men. It is a preliminary study and is presenting data for future comprehensive study for making a clinical conclusion that this gene transition is a biomarker for susceptibility to prostate cancer.

  5. Identification of transcriptional macromolecular associations in human bone using browser based in silico analysis in a giant correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppe, Sjur; Sachse, Daniel; Olstad, Ole K; Gautvik, Vigdis T; Sanderson, Paul; Datta, Harish K; Berg, Jens P; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2013-03-01

    Intracellular signaling is critically dependent on gene regulatory networks comprising physical molecular interactions. Presently, there is a lack of comprehensive databases for most human tissue types to verify such macromolecular interactions. We present a user friendly browser which helps to identify functional macromolecular interactions in human bone as significant correlations at the transcriptional level. The molecular skeletal phenotype has been characterized by transcriptome analysis of iliac crest bone biopsies from 84 postmenopausal women through quantifications of ~23,000 mRNA species. When the signal levels were inter-correlated, an array containing >260 million correlations was generated, thus recognizing the human bone interactome at the RNA level. The matrix correlation and p values were made easily accessible by a freely available online browser. We show that significant correlations within the giant matrix are reproduced in a replica set of 13 male vertebral biopsies. The identified correlations differ somewhat from transcriptional interactions identified in cell culture experiments and transgenic mice, thus demonstrating that care should be taken in extrapolating such results to the in vivo situation in human bone. The current giant matrix and web browser are a valuable tool for easy access to the human bone transcriptome and molecular interactions represented as significant correlations at the RNA-level. The browser and matrix should be a valuable hypothesis generating tool for identification of regulatory mechanisms and serve as a library of transcript relationships in human bone, a relatively inaccessible tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. "How much realism is needed?" - the wrong question in silico imagers have been asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo

    2017-05-01

    To discuss the use of realism as a first approximation for assessing computational imaging methods. Although in silico methods are increasingly becoming promising surrogates to physical experimentation for various stages of device development, their acceptance remains challenging. Realism is often considered as a first approximation for assessing computational imaging methods. However, realism is subjective and does not always ensure that key features of the methodologies reflect relevant aspects of devices of interest to imaging scientists, regulators, and medical practitioners. Moreover, in some cases (e.g., in computerized image analysis applications where human interpretation is not needed) how realistic in silico images are is irrelevant and perhaps misleading. I emphasize a divergence from this methodology by providing a rationale for evaluating in silico imaging methods and tools in an objective and measurable manner. Improved approaches for in silico imaging will lead to the rapid advancement and acceptance of computational techniques in medical imaging primarily but not limited to the regulatory evaluation of new imaging products. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Development of Regulatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis System (RETAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Seung-Hoon; Kim, In-Goo; Kim, Hho-Jung; Cho, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    A review is provided of the reasons why the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety needs improvement of the existing codes employed for a regulatory audit. The proposed new organization of the codes, developed or to be developed, is presented together with illustrative applications. Inspection of the quality assurance activities is planned to ensure the robustness of MARS (Multi-dimensional Analysis for Reactor Safety) code, served as a pivot of the organization.

  8. Development of Regulatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis System (RETAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung-Hoon; Kim, In-Goo; Kim, Hho-Jung; Cho, Yong Jin

    2007-01-01

    A review is provided of the reasons why the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety needs improvement of the existing codes employed for a regulatory audit. The proposed new organization of the codes, developed or to be developed, is presented together with illustrative applications. Inspection of the quality assurance activities is planned to ensure the robustness of MARS (Multi-dimensional Analysis for Reactor Safety) code, served as a pivot of the organization

  9. Analysis of NRC Regulatory Guide 1.21 Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Yook, Dae Sik; Lee, Byung Soo [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It is essential to have a degree of uniformity in the methods used for measuring, evaluating, recording, and reporting data on radioactive material in effluents and solid wastes. For this purpose, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a revised version of the Regulatory Guide 1.21 'Measuring, evaluating, and reporting radioactive material in liquid and gaseous effluents and solid waste' (revision 2) in 2009, updating the revision 1 version released in 1974. This study compares the previous revision 1 (1974) version with the revision 2 (2009) version to elaborate on the application of the guidelines to Korea. This study consists of an analysis of the 2009 Revision 2 version of the U.S. NRC Regulatory Guidelines 1.21 and an exposition of methods for its application in the domestic environment. Major revisions were made to allow for the adoption of a risk informed approach. Radionuclides with lower than 1% contribution to emission or radiation levels can be selected as principal radionuclides. Requirements for analysis of leaks and spills have been reinforced, with additional groundwater monitoring and hydrological data analysis becoming necessary.

  10. CGUG: in silico proteome and genome parsing tool for the determination of "core" and unique genes in the analysis of genomes up to ca. 1.9 Mb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan Padmanabhan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses and small-genome bacteria (~2 megabases and smaller comprise a considerable population in the biosphere and are of interest to many researchers. These genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and require complementary computational tools to analyze. "CoreGenesUniqueGenes" (CGUG is an in silico genome data mining tool that determines a "core" set of genes from two to five organisms with genomes in this size range. Core and unique genes may reflect similar niches and needs, and may be used in classifying organisms. Findings CGUG is available at http://binf.gmu.edu/geneorder.html as a web-based on-the-fly tool that performs iterative BLASTP analyses using a reference genome and up to four query genomes to provide a table of genes common to these genomes. The result is an in silico display of genomes and their proteomes, allowing for further analysis. CGUG can be used for "genome annotation by homology", as demonstrated with Chlamydophila and Francisella genomes. Conclusion CGUG is used to reanalyze the ICTV-based classifications of bacteriophages, to reconfirm long-standing relationships and to explore new classifications. These genomes have been problematic in the past, due largely to horizontal gene transfers. CGUG is validated as a tool for reannotating small genome bacteria using more up-to-date annotations by similarity or homology. These serve as an entry point for wet-bench experiments to confirm the functions of these "hypothetical" and "unknown" proteins.

  11. In Silico Systems Biology Analysis of Variants of Uncertain Significance in Lynch Syndrome Supports the Prioritization of Functional Molecular Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, Ester; Chang, Kyle; Pande, Mala; Cuddy, Amanda; Bosch, Jennifer L; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Taggart, Melissa W; Lynch, Patrick M; You, Y Nancy; Vilar, Eduardo

    2017-10-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a genetic condition secondary to germline alterations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes with 30% of changes being variants of uncertain significance (VUS). Our aim was to perform an in silico reclassification of VUS from a large single institutional cohort that will help prioritizing functional validation. A total of 54 VUS were detected with 33 (61%) novel variants. We integrated family history, pathology, and genetic information along with supporting evidence from eight different in silico tools at the RNA and protein level. Our assessment allowed us to reclassify 54% (29/54) of the VUS as probably damaging, 13% (7/54) as possibly damaging, and 28% (15/54) as probably neutral. There are more than 1,000 VUS reported in MMR genes and our approach facilitates the prioritization of further functional efforts to assess the pathogenicity to those classified as probably damaging. Cancer Prev Res; 10(10); 580-7. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Regenerative orthopaedics: in vitro, in vivo...in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-09-01

    In silico, defined in analogy to in vitro and in vivo as those studies that are performed on a computer, is an essential step in problem-solving and product development in classical engineering fields. The use of in silico models is now slowly easing its way into medicine. In silico models are already used in orthopaedics for the planning of complicated surgeries, personalised implant design and the analysis of gait measurements. However, these in silico models often lack the simulation of the response of the biological system over time. In silico models focusing on the response of the biological systems are in full development. This review starts with an introduction into in silico models of orthopaedic processes. Special attention is paid to the classification of models according to their spatiotemporal scale (gene/protein to population) and the information they were built on (data vs hypotheses). Subsequently, the review focuses on the in silico models used in regenerative orthopaedics research. Contributions of in silico models to an enhanced understanding and optimisation of four key elements-cells, carriers, culture and clinics-are illustrated. Finally, a number of challenges are identified, related to the computational aspects but also to the integration of in silico tools into clinical practice.

  13. In silico Coding Sequence Analysis of Walnut GAI and PIP2 Genes and Comparison with Different Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mohseniazar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dwarfism is one of the important traits in breeding of crops and horticulture plants. A dwarfing rootstock will produce trees with 15-50% of standard trees size. In modern intensive fruit tree orchards, dwarfing rootstocks are commonly used to reduce trees size, enabling high-density planting and easy management, thus achieving higher yield. Trees on dwarfing rootstocks can also exhibit other economically important traits, such as precocious flowering, increased yield and increased disease resistance. Dwarf rootstocks have been extensively studied and released in stone and pome fruits, because of presence of genetic materials and the simplicity of budding methods. Control of tree size using genetically dwarf rootstocks for achievement to higher density and mechanized orchard systems is now very important for walnut production in the world especially in Iran. Many different genes can be involved in appear of this. Mutations in GAI and PIP2 genes cause dwarf trait by two different mechanisms in some plant species. In this case, we study in silico analysis of GAI and PIP2 genes consist of conserved sequences and domains, exon and intron number, function of their proteins, targeting, secondary and tertiary structure, and post translational modification. Materials and methods: The GAI and PIP2 mRNA and protein sequences (FASTA format belonging to 17 monocotyledon and dicotyledon were downloaded from NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov accessed, on September 2014. Several online web services and software were used for analysis of GAI and PIP2 mRNA and Proteins in plants. Comparative and bioinformatics analyses of PIP2 and GAI proteins were performed online at two websites NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nih.gov and EXPASY (http://expasy.org/tools. Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA; version 4 program and CLUSTAL-W with default parameters were used for multiple alignments of sequences. The phylogenetic analysis of GAI and PIP2 protein was

  14. In silico Coding Sequence Analysis of Walnut GAI and PIP2 Genes and Comparison with Different Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mohseniazar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dwarfism is one of the important traits in breeding of crops and horticulture plants. A dwarfing rootstock will produce trees with 15-50% of standard trees size. In modern intensive fruit tree orchards, dwarfing rootstocks are commonly used to reduce trees size, enabling high-density planting and easy management, thus achieving higher yield. Trees on dwarfing rootstocks can also exhibit other economically important traits, such as precocious flowering, increased yield and increased disease resistance. Dwarf rootstocks have been extensively studied and released in stone and pome fruits, because of presence of genetic materials and the simplicity of budding methods. Control of tree size using genetically dwarf rootstocks for achievement to higher density and mechanized orchard systems is now very important for walnut production in the world especially in Iran. Many different genes can be involved in appear of this. Mutations in GAI and PIP2 genes cause dwarf trait by two different mechanisms in some plant species. In this case, we study in silico analysis of GAI and PIP2 genes consist of conserved sequences and domains, exon and intron number, function of their proteins, targeting, secondary and tertiary structure, and post translational modification. Materials and methods: The GAI and PIP2 mRNA and protein sequences (FASTA format belonging to 17 monocotyledon and dicotyledon were downloaded from NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov accessed, on September 2014. Several online web services and software were used for analysis of GAI and PIP2 mRNA and Proteins in plants. Comparative and bioinformatics analyses of PIP2 and GAI proteins were performed online at two websites NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nih.gov and EXPASY (http://expasy.org/tools. Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA; version 4 program and CLUSTAL-W with default parameters were used for multiple alignments of sequences. The phylogenetic analysis of GAI and PIP2 protein was

  15. Transmembrane START domain proteins: in silico identification, characterization and expression analysis under stress conditions in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheesh, Viswanathan; Chidambaranathan, Parameswaran; Jagannadham, Prasanth Tejkumar; Kumar, Vajinder; Jain, Pradeep K; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bhat, Shripad R; Srinivasan, R

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory related transfer (StART) proteins that are involved in transport of lipid molecules, play a myriad of functions in insects, mammals and plants. These proteins consist of a modular START domain of approximately 200 amino acids which binds and transfers the lipids. In the present study we have performed a genome-wide search for all START domain proteins in chickpea. The search identified 36 chickpea genes belonging to the START domain family. Through a phylogenetic tree reconstructed with Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean START proteins, we were able to identify four transmembrane START (TM-START) proteins in chickpea. These four proteins are homologous to the highly conserved mammalian phosphatidylcholine transfer proteins. Multiple sequence alignment of all the transmembrane containing START proteins from Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean revealed that the amino acid residues to which phosphatidylcholine binds in mammals, is also conserved in all these plant species, implying an important functional role and a very similar mode of action of all these proteins across dicots and monocots. This study characterizes a few of the not so well studied transmembrane START superfamily genes that may be involved in stress signaling. Expression analysis in various tissues showed that these genes are predominantly expressed in flowers and roots of chickpea. Three of the chickpea TM-START genes showed induced expression in response to drought, salt, wound and heat stress, suggesting their role in stress response.

  16. Analysis of deterministic cyclic gene regulatory network models with delays

    CERN Document Server

    Ahsen, Mehmet Eren; Niculescu, Silviu-Iulian

    2015-01-01

    This brief examines a deterministic, ODE-based model for gene regulatory networks (GRN) that incorporates nonlinearities and time-delayed feedback. An introductory chapter provides some insights into molecular biology and GRNs. The mathematical tools necessary for studying the GRN model are then reviewed, in particular Hill functions and Schwarzian derivatives. One chapter is devoted to the analysis of GRNs under negative feedback with time delays and a special case of a homogenous GRN is considered. Asymptotic stability analysis of GRNs under positive feedback is then considered in a separate chapter, in which conditions leading to bi-stability are derived. Graduate and advanced undergraduate students and researchers in control engineering, applied mathematics, systems biology and synthetic biology will find this brief to be a clear and concise introduction to the modeling and analysis of GRNs.

  17. Altered expression of circulating microRNA in plasma of patients with primary osteoarthritis and in silico analysis of their pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica M Borgonio Cuadra

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze a set of circulating microRNA (miRNA in plasma from patients with primary Osteoarthritis (OA and describe the biological significance of altered miRNA in OA based on an in silico analysis of their target genes. METHODS: miRNA expression was analyzed using TaqMan Low Density Arrays and independent assays. The search for potential messenger RNA (mRNA targets of the differentially expressed miRNA was performed by means of the miRWalk and miRecords database; we conducted the biological relevance of the predicted miRNA targets by pathway analysis with the Reactome and DAVID databases. RESULTS: We measured the expression of 380 miRNA in OA; 12 miRNA were overexpressed under the OA condition (p value, ≤0.05; fold change, >2. These results were validated by the detection of some selected miRNA by quantitative PCR (qPCR. In silico analysis showed that target messenger RNA (mRNA were potentially regulated by these miRNA, including genes such as SMAD1, IL-1B, COL3A, VEGFA, and FGFR1, important in chondrocyte maintenance and differentiation. Some metabolic pathways affected by the miRNA: mRNA ratio are signaling Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP, Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, and Nerve growth factor (NGF, these latter two involved in the process of pain. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 12 miRNA in the plasma of patients with primary OA. Specific miRNA that are altered in the disease could be released into plasma, either due to cartilage damage or to an inherent cellular mechanism. Several miRNA could regulate genes and pathways related with development of the disease; eight of these circulating miRNA are described, to our knowledge, for first time in OA.

  18. Development of regulatory technology for thermal-hydraulic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Lee, S. H.; Ryu, Y. H.

    2001-02-01

    The present study aims to develop the regulation capability in thermal-hydraulic safety analysis which was required for the reasonable safety regulation in the current NPP, the next generation reactors, and the future-type reactors. The fourth fiscal year of the first phase of the research was focused on the following research topics: Investigation on the current status of the thermal-hydraulic safety analysis technology outside and inside of the country; Review on the improved features of the thermal-hydraulic safety analysis regulatory audit code, RELAP5/MOD3; Assessments of code with LOFT L9-3 ATWS experiment and LSTF SB-SG-10 multiple SGTR experiment; Application of the RELAP5/CANDU code to analyses of SLB and LBLOCA and evaluation of its effect on safety; Application of the code to IAEA PHWR ISP analysis; Assessments of RELAP5 and TRAC with UPTF downcomer injection test and Analysis of LBLOCA with RELAP5 for the performance evaluation of KNGR DVI; Setup of a coupled 3-D kinetics and thermal-hydraulics and application it to a reactivity accident analysis; and Extension of database and improvement of plant input decks. For supporting the resolution of safety issues, loss of RHR event during midloop operation was analyzed for Kori Unit 3, issues on high burnup fuel were reviewed and performance of FRAPCON-3 assessed. Also MSLB was analyzed to figure out the sensitivity of downcomer temperature supporting the PTS risk evaluation of Kori Unit 1. Thermal stratification in pipe was analyzed using the method proposed. And a method predicting the thermal-hydraulic performance of IRWST of KNGR was explored. The PWR ECCS performance criteria was issued as a MOST Article 200-19.and a regulatory guide on evaluation methodology was improved to cover concerns raised from the related licensing review process

  19. The Reconstruction and Analysis of Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guangyong; Huang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    In post-genomic era, an important task is to explore the function of individual biological molecules (i.e., gene, noncoding RNA, protein, metabolite) and their organization in living cells. For this end, gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are constructed to show relationship between biological molecules, in which the vertices of network denote biological molecules and the edges of network present connection between nodes (Strogatz, Nature 410:268-276, 2001; Bray, Science 301:1864-1865, 2003). Biologists can understand not only the function of biological molecules but also the organization of components of living cells through interpreting the GRNs, since a gene regulatory network is a comprehensively physiological map of living cells and reflects influence of genetic and epigenetic factors (Strogatz, Nature 410:268-276, 2001; Bray, Science 301:1864-1865, 2003). In this paper, we will review the inference methods of GRN reconstruction and analysis approaches of network structure. As a powerful tool for studying complex diseases and biological processes, the applications of the network method in pathway analysis and disease gene identification will be introduced.

  20. Singular Perturbation Analysis and Gene Regulatory Networks with Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlykova, Irina; Ponosov, Arcady

    2009-09-01

    There are different ways of how to model gene regulatory networks. Differential equations allow for a detailed description of the network's dynamics and provide an explicit model of the gene concentration changes over time. Production and relative degradation rate functions used in such models depend on the vector of steeply sloped threshold functions which characterize the activity of genes. The most popular example of the threshold functions comes from the Boolean network approach, where the threshold functions are given by step functions. The system of differential equations becomes then piecewise linear. The dynamics of this system can be described very easily between the thresholds, but not in the switching domains. For instance this approach fails to analyze stationary points of the system and to define continuous solutions in the switching domains. These problems were studied in [2], [3], but the proposed model did not take into account a time delay in cellular systems. However, analysis of real gene expression data shows a considerable number of time-delayed interactions suggesting that time delay is essential in gene regulation. Therefore, delays may have a great effect on the dynamics of the system presenting one of the critical factors that should be considered in reconstruction of gene regulatory networks. The goal of this work is to apply the singular perturbation analysis to certain systems with delay and to obtain an analog of Tikhonov's theorem, which provides sufficient conditions for constracting the limit system in the delay case.

  1. Transcriptome mining and in silico structural and functional analysis of ascorbic acid and tartaric acid biosynthesis pathway enzymes in rose-scanted geranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narnoliya, Lokesh K; Sangwan, Rajender S; Singh, Sudhir P

    2018-06-01

    Rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.) is widely known as aromatic and medicinal herb, accumulating specialized metabolites of high economic importance, such as essential oils, ascorbic acid, and tartaric acid. Ascorbic acid and tartaric acid are multifunctional metabolites of human value to be used as vital antioxidants and flavor enhancing agents in food products. No information is available related to the structural and functional properties of the enzymes involved in ascorbic acid and tartaric acid biosynthesis in rose-scented geranium. In the present study, transcriptome mining was done to identify full-length genes, followed by their bioinformatic and molecular modeling investigations and understanding of in silico structural and functional properties of these enzymes. Evolutionary conserved domains were identified in the pathway enzymes. In silico physicochemical characterization of the catalytic enzymes revealed isoelectric point (pI), instability index, aliphatic index, and grand average hydropathy (GRAVY) values of the enzymes. Secondary structural prediction revealed abundant proportion of alpha helix and random coil confirmations in the pathway enzymes. Three-dimensional homology models were developed for these enzymes. The predicted structures showed significant structural similarity with their respective templates in root mean square deviation analysis. Ramachandran plot analysis of the modeled enzymes revealed that more than 84% of the amino acid residues were within the favored regions. Further, functionally important residues were identified corresponding to catalytic sites located in the enzymes. To, our best knowledge, this is the first report which provides a foundation on functional annotation and structural determination of ascorbic acid and tartaric acid pathway enzymes in rose-scanted geranium.

  2. Identification of novel dipeptidyl peptidase-IV and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from meat proteins using in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarga, Tomas; O'Connor, Paula; Hayes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I, EC 3.4.15.1), renin (EC 3.4.23.15), and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5) play key roles in the control of hypertension and the development of type-2 diabetes and other diseases associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to utilize known in silico methodologies, peptide databases and software including ProtParam (http://web.expasy.org/protparam/), Basic Local Alignment Tool (BLAST), ExPASy PeptideCutter (http://web.expasy.org/peptide_cutter/) and BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/pl/biopep) to assess the release of potentially bioactive DPP-IV, renin and ACE-I inhibitory peptides from bovine and porcine meat proteins including hemoglobin, collagen and serum albumin. These proteins were chosen as they are found commonly in meat by-products such as bone, blood and low-value meat cuts. In addition, the bioactivities of identified peptides were confirmed using chemical synthesis and in vitro bioassays. The concentration of peptide required to inhibit the activity of ACE-I and DPP-IV by 50% was determined for selected, active peptides. Novel ACE-I and DPP-IV inhibitory peptides were identified in this study using both in silico analysis and a literature search to streamline enzyme selection for peptide production. These novel peptides included the ACE-I inhibitory tri-peptide Ile-Ile-Tyr and the DPP-IV inhibitory tri-peptide Pro-Pro-Leu corresponding to sequences f (182-184) and f (326-328) of both porcine and bovine serum albumin which can be released following hydrolysis with the enzymes papain and pepsin, respectively. This work demonstrates that meat proteins are a suitable resource for the generation of bioactive peptides and further demonstrates the usefulness of in silico methodologies to streamline identification and generation of bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Carotid artery wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound using adaptive block matching: in silico evaluation and in vivo application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastounioti, A; Stoitsis, J S; Nikita, K S; Golemati, S

    2013-01-01

    Valid risk stratification for carotid atherosclerotic plaques represents a crucial public health issue toward preventing fatal cerebrovascular events. Although motion analysis (MA) provides useful information about arterial wall dynamics, the identification of motion-based risk markers remains a significant challenge. Considering that the ability of a motion estimator (ME) to handle changes in the appearance of motion targets has a major effect on accuracy in MA, we investigated the potential of adaptive block matching (ABM) MEs, which consider changes in image intensities over time. To assure the validity in MA, we optimized and evaluated the ABM MEs in the context of a specially designed in silico framework. ABM FIRF2 , which takes advantage of the periodicity characterizing the arterial wall motion, was the most effective ABM algorithm, yielding a 47% accuracy increase with respect to the conventional block matching. The in vivo application of ABM FIRF2 revealed five potential risk markers: low movement amplitude of the normal part of the wall adjacent to the plaques in the radial (RMA PWL ) and longitudinal (LMA PWL ) directions, high radial motion amplitude of the plaque top surface (RMA PTS ), and high relative movement, expressed in terms of radial strain (RSI PL ) and longitudinal shear strain (LSSI PL ), between plaque top and bottom surfaces. The in vivo results were reproduced by OF LK(WLS) and ABM KF-K2 , MEs previously proposed by the authors and with remarkable in silico performances, thereby reinforcing the clinical values of the markers and the potential of those MEs. Future in vivo studies will elucidate with confidence the full potential of the markers. (paper)

  4. Analysis of 30 putative BRCA1 splicing mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families identifies exonic splice site mutations that escape in silico prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wappenschmidt

    Full Text Available Screening for pathogenic mutations in breast and ovarian cancer genes such as BRCA1/2, CHEK2 and RAD51C is common practice for individuals from high-risk families. However, test results may be ambiguous due to the presence of unclassified variants (UCV in the concurrent absence of clearly cancer-predisposing mutations. Especially the presence of intronic or exonic variants within these genes that possibly affect proper pre-mRNA processing poses a challenge as their functional implications are not immediately apparent. Therefore, it appears necessary to characterize potential splicing UCV and to develop appropriate classification tools. We investigated 30 distinct BRCA1 variants, both intronic and exonic, regarding their spliceogenic potential by commonly used in silico prediction algorithms (HSF, MaxEntScan along with in vitro transcript analyses. A total of 25 variants were identified spliceogenic, either causing/enhancing exon skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites, or both. Except from a single intronic variant causing minor effects on BRCA1 pre-mRNA processing in our analyses, 23 out of 24 intronic variants were correctly predicted by MaxEntScan, while HSF was less accurate in this cohort. Among the 6 exonic variants analyzed, 4 severely impair correct pre-mRNA processing, while the remaining two have partial effects. In contrast to the intronic alterations investigated, only half of the spliceogenic exonic variants were correctly predicted by HSF and/or MaxEntScan. These data support the idea that exonic splicing mutations are commonly disease-causing and concurrently prone to escape in silico prediction, hence necessitating experimental in vitro splicing analysis.

  5. In silico serine β-lactamases analysis reveals a huge potential resistome in environmental and pathogenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christian; Braun, Sascha D; Stein, Claudia; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf; Pletz, Mathias W; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2017-02-24

    The secretion of antimicrobial compounds is an ancient mechanism with clear survival benefits for microbes competing with other microorganisms. Consequently, mechanisms that confer resistance are also ancient and may represent an underestimated reservoir in environmental bacteria. In this context, β-lactamases (BLs) are of great interest due to their long-term presence and diversification in the hospital environment, leading to the emergence of Gram-negative pathogens that are resistant to cephalosporins (extended spectrum BLs = ESBLs) and carbapenems (carbapenemases). In the current study, protein sequence databases were used to analyze BLs, and the results revealed a substantial number of unknown and functionally uncharacterized BLs in a multitude of environmental and pathogenic species. Together, these BLs represent an uncharacterized reservoir of potentially transferable resistance genes. Considering all available data, in silico approaches appear to more adequately reflect a given resistome than analyses of limited datasets. This approach leads to a more precise definition of BL clades and conserved motifs. Moreover, it may support the prediction of new resistance determinants and improve the tailored development of robust molecular diagnostics.

  6. In silico analysis highlights the frequency and diversity of type 1 lantibiotic gene clusters in genome sequenced bacteria

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marsh, Alan J

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Lantibiotics are lanthionine-containing, post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides. These peptides have significant, but largely untapped, potential as preservatives and chemotherapeutic agents. Type 1 lantibiotics are those in which lanthionine residues are introduced into the structural peptide (LanA) through the activity of separate lanthionine dehydratase (LanB) and lanthionine synthetase (LanC) enzymes. Here we take advantage of the conserved nature of LanC enzymes to devise an in silico approach to identify potential lantibiotic-encoding gene clusters in genome sequenced bacteria. Results In total 49 novel type 1 lantibiotic clusters were identified which unexpectedly were associated with species, genera and even phyla of bacteria which have not previously been associated with lantibiotic production. Conclusions Multiple type 1 lantibiotic gene clusters were identified at a frequency that suggests that these antimicrobials are much more widespread than previously thought. These clusters represent a rich repository which can yield a large number of valuable novel antimicrobials and biosynthetic enzymes.

  7. Regulatory reform in Turkish energy industry: An analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogdu, Erkan

    2007-01-01

    The Republic of Turkey has initiated an ambitious reform program in the most important segments of her energy market; which requires privatization, liberalization as well as a radical restructuring of these industries. However, there is no consensus that the measures introduced are optimal. The present article attempts, first, to evaluate the regulatory framework created by the laws of 2001 in terms of economic efficiency considerations; and second, to determine what still needs to be done to improve the current situation. The paper not only provides an analysis of these reforms but also lists some policy suggestions. The study concludes that despite relatively good legislative framework, in practice, the reforms in Turkey are far from ideal as they are mainly in the form of 'textbook reforms'; and therefore a significant amount of work still lies ahead of Turkey to set up a fully fledged energy market

  8. Stability analysis of delayed genetic regulatory networks with stochastic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Qi, E-mail: zhouqilhy@yahoo.com.c [School of Automation, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu (China); Xu Shengyuan [School of Automation, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, Jiangsu (China); Chen Bing [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071, Shandong (China); Li Hongyi [Space Control and Inertial Technology Research Center, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chu Yuming [Department of Mathematics, Huzhou Teacher' s College, Huzhou 313000, Zhejiang (China)

    2009-10-05

    This Letter considers the problem of stability analysis of a class of delayed genetic regulatory networks with stochastic disturbances. The delays are assumed to be time-varying and bounded. By utilizing Ito's differential formula and Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, delay-range-dependent and rate-dependent (rate-independent) stability criteria are proposed in terms of linear matrices inequalities. An important feature of the proposed results is that all the stability conditions are dependent on the upper and lower bounds of the delays. Another important feature is that the obtained stability conditions are less conservative than certain existing ones in the literature due to introducing some appropriate free-weighting matrices. A simulation example is employed to illustrate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  9. Risk Analysis as Regulatory Science: Toward The Establishment of Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Michio

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how to establish standards is essential for risk communication and also provides perspectives for further study. In this paper, the concept of risk analysis as regulatory science for the establishment of standards is demonstrated through examples of standards for evacuation and provisional regulation values in foods and drinking water. Moreover, academic needs for further studies related to standards are extracted. The concepts of the traditional 'Standard I', which has a paternalistic orientation, and 'Standard II', established through stakeholder consensus, are then systemized by introducing the current status of the new standards-related movement that developed after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, and the perspectives of the standards are discussed. Preparation of standards on the basis of stakeholder consensus through intensive risk dialogue before a potential nuclear power plant accident is suggested to be a promising approach to ensure a safe society and enhance subjective well-being. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Pharmacokinetics for regulatory risk analysis: the case of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, K T

    1988-12-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models describing the uptake, metabolism, and excretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are now proposed for use in regulatory health-risk assessment. A steady-state analysis of one such model is shown to provide simple, convenient predicted relationships between an applied dose and the corresponding toxicologically effective, metabolized dose for certain VOCs like trichloroethylene (TCE). A version of this PBPK model was fit to data on human metabolism of TCE to urinary metabolites in chronically exposed workers, yielding a direct estimate of PBPK parameters governing human capacity to metabolize TCE. It is shown that this estimate is consistent with others based on experimental studies of TCE metabolism in humans exposed to TCE by inhalation for short periods. These results are applied to human cancer-risk assessment using rodent bioassay data on TCE-induced tumorigenesis.

  11. Identification of conserved regulatory elements by comparative genome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jareborg Niclas

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For genes that have been successfully delineated within the human genome sequence, most regulatory sequences remain to be elucidated. The annotation and interpretation process requires additional data resources and significant improvements in computational methods for the detection of regulatory regions. One approach of growing popularity is based on the preferential conservation of functional sequences over the course of evolution by selective pressure, termed 'phylogenetic footprinting'. Mutations are more likely to be disruptive if they appear in functional sites, resulting in a measurable difference in evolution rates between functional and non-functional genomic segments. Results We have devised a flexible suite of methods for the identification and visualization of conserved transcription-factor-binding sites. The system reports those putative transcription-factor-binding sites that are both situated in conserved regions and located as pairs of sites in equivalent positions in alignments between two orthologous sequences. An underlying collection of metazoan transcription-factor-binding profiles was assembled to facilitate the study. This approach results in a significant improvement in the detection of transcription-factor-binding sites because of an increased signal-to-noise ratio, as demonstrated with two sets of promoter sequences. The method is implemented as a graphical web application, ConSite, which is at the disposal of the scientific community at http://www.phylofoot.org/. Conclusions Phylogenetic footprinting dramatically improves the predictive selectivity of bioinformatic approaches to the analysis of promoter sequences. ConSite delivers unparalleled performance using a novel database of high-quality binding models for metazoan transcription factors. With a dynamic interface, this bioinformatics tool provides broad access to promoter analysis with phylogenetic footprinting.

  12. Proposed standby gasoline rationing plan. Economic and regulatory analysis draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    This economic and regulatory analysis meets the requirements of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, which calls for an evaluation of the potential economic impacts of the gasoline rationing contingency plan. In addition, this analysis is intended to satisfy the requirements of the President's Executive Order No. 12044 of March 23, 1978, regarding government regulations, and provides an inflationary impact statement for the proposed rationing plan. To perform the analysis of rationing program impacts on the total national economy, three separate projections were required. First, a projection is made of the ''normal'' U.S. economy for a future period--the last quarter of 1980 through the third quarter of 1981 in this analysis. Second, a projection is made of the impacts which a petroleum supply interruption would have on the U.S. economy during this future period, assuming that DOE's standby allocation and price control regulations were implemented for crude oil and products. Third, and most significant, an estimate is made of the incremental impacts of the gasoline rationing program on this already-perturbed future U.S. economy.

  13. Toward Understanding the Cold, Hot, and Neutral Nature of Chinese Medicines Using in Silico Mode-of-Action Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xianjun; Mervin, Lewis H; Li, Xuebo; Yu, Huayun; Li, Jiaoyang; Mohamad Zobir, Siti Zuraidah; Zoufir, Azedine; Zhou, Yang; Song, Yongmei; Wang, Zhenguo; Bender, Andreas

    2017-03-27

    One important, however, poorly understood, concept of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is that of hot, cold, and neutral nature of its bioactive principles. To advance the field, in this study, we analyzed compound-nature pairs from TCM on a large scale (>23 000 structures) via chemical space visualizations to understand its physicochemical domain and in silico target prediction to understand differences related to their modes-of-action (MoA) against proteins. We found that overall TCM natures spread into different subclusters with specific molecular patterns, as opposed to forming coherent global groups. Compounds associated with cold nature had a lower clogP and contain more aliphatic rings than the other groups and were found to control detoxification, heat-clearing, heart development processes, and have sedative function, associated with "Mental and behavioural disorders" diseases. While compounds associated with hot nature were on average of lower molecular weight, have more aromatic ring systems than other groups, frequently seemed to control body temperature, have cardio-protection function, improve fertility and sexual function, and represent excitatory or activating effects, associated with "endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases" and "diseases of the circulatory system". Compounds associated with neutral nature had a higher polar surface area and contain more cyclohexene moieties than other groups and seem to be related to memory function, suggesting that their nature may be a useful guide for their utility in neural degenerative diseases. We were hence able to elucidate the difference between different nature classes in TCM on the molecular level, and on a large data set, for the first time, thereby helping a better understanding of TCM nature theory and bridging the gap between traditional medicine and our current understanding of the human body.

  14. Directed evolution and in silico analysis of reaction centre proteins reveal molecular signatures of photosynthesis adaptation to radiation pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Rea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary mechanisms adopted by the photosynthetic apparatus to modifications in the Earth's atmosphere on a geological time-scale remain a focus of intense research. The photosynthetic machinery has had to cope with continuously changing environmental conditions and particularly with the complex ionizing radiation emitted by solar flares. The photosynthetic D1 protein, being the site of electron tunneling-mediated charge separation and solar energy transduction, is a hot spot for the generation of radiation-induced radical injuries. We explored the possibility to produce D1 variants tolerant to ionizing radiation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and clarified the effect of radiation-induced oxidative damage on the photosynthetic proteins evolution. In vitro directed evolution strategies targeted at the D1 protein were adopted to create libraries of chlamydomonas random mutants, subsequently selected by exposures to radical-generating proton or neutron sources. The common trend observed in the D1 aminoacidic substitutions was the replacement of less polar by more polar amino acids. The applied selection pressure forced replacement of residues more sensitive to oxidative damage with less sensitive ones, suggesting that ionizing radiation may have been one of the driving forces in the evolution of the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus. A set of the identified aminoacidic substitutions, close to the secondary plastoquinone binding niche and oxygen evolving complex, were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in un-transformed strains, and their sensitivity to free radicals attack analyzed. Mutants displayed reduced electron transport efficiency in physiological conditions, and increased photosynthetic performance stability and oxygen evolution capacity in stressful high-light conditions. Finally, comparative in silico analyses of D1 aminoacidic sequences of organisms differently located in the evolution chain, revealed a higher ratio of residues

  15. Identification and analysis of the RNA degrading complexes and machinery of Giardia lamblia using an in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher W; Elmendorf, Heidi G

    2011-11-29

    RNA degradation is critical to the survival of all cells. With increasing evidence for pervasive transcription in cells, RNA degradation has gained recognition as a means of regulating gene expression. Yet, RNA degradation machinery has been studied extensively in only a few eukaryotic organisms, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans. Giardia lamblia is a parasitic protist with unusual genomic traits: it is binucleated and tetraploid, has a very compact genome, displays a theme of genomic minimalism with cellular machinery commonly comprised of a reduced number of protein components, and has a remarkably large population of long, stable, noncoding, antisense RNAs. Here we use in silico approaches to investigate the major RNA degradation machinery in Giardia lamblia and compare it to a broad array of other parasitic protists. We have found key constituents of the deadenylation and decapping machinery and of the 5'-3' RNA degradation pathway. We have similarly found that all of the major 3'-5' RNA degradation pathways are present in Giardia, including both exosome-dependent and exosome-independent machinery. However, we observe significant loss of RNA degradation machinery genes that will result in important differences in the protein composition, and potentially functionality, of the various RNA degradation pathways. This is most apparent in the exosome, the central mediator of 3'-5' degradation, which apparently contains an altered core configuration in both Giardia and Plasmodium, with only four, instead of the canonical six, distinct subunits. Additionally the exosome in Giardia is missing both the Rrp6, Nab3, and Nrd1 proteins, known to be key regulators of noncoding transcript stability in other cells. These findings suggest that although the full complement of the major RNA degradation mechanisms were present - and likely functional - early in eukaryotic evolution, the composition and function of the complexes is more variable than previously

  16. Formal modeling and analysis of ER-α associated Biological Regulatory Network in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samra Khalid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Breast cancer (BC is one of the leading cause of death among females worldwide. The increasing incidence of BC is due to various genetic and environmental changes which lead to the disruption of cellular signaling network(s. It is a complex disease in which several interlinking signaling cascades play a crucial role in establishing a complex regulatory network. The logical modeling approach of René Thomas has been applied to analyze the behavior of estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α associated Biological Regulatory Network (BRN for a small part of complex events that leads to BC metastasis. Methods A discrete model was constructed using the kinetic logic formalism and its set of logical parameters were obtained using the model checking technique implemented in the SMBioNet software which is consistent with biological observations. The discrete model was further enriched with continuous dynamics by converting it into an equivalent Petri Net (PN to analyze the logical parameters of the involved entities. Results In-silico based discrete and continuous modeling of ER-α associated signaling network involved in BC provides information about behaviors and gene-gene interaction in detail. The dynamics of discrete model revealed, imperative behaviors represented as cyclic paths and trajectories leading to pathogenic states such as metastasis. Results suggest that the increased expressions of receptors ER-α, IGF-1R and EGFR slow down the activity of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs such as BRCA1, p53 and Mdm2 which can lead to metastasis. Therefore, IGF-1R and EGFR are considered as important inhibitory targets to control the metastasis in BC. Conclusion The in-silico approaches allow us to increase our understanding of the functional properties of living organisms. It opens new avenues of investigations of multiple inhibitory targets (ER-α, IGF-1R and EGFR for wet lab experiments as well as provided valuable insights in the treatment of cancers

  17. In silico analysis and experimental validation of azelastine hydrochloride (N4) targeting sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) in HBV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L-L; Liu, J; Chen, Y; Wang, F-T; Wen, X; Liu, H-Q; Wang, M-Y; Ouyang, L; Huang, J; Bao, J-K; Wei, Y-Q

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) exerting its function with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and its targeted candidate compounds, in HBV therapy. Identification of NTCP as a novel HBV target for screening candidate small molecules, was used by phylogenetic analysis, network construction, molecular modelling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In vitro virological examination, q-PCR, western blotting and cytotoxicity studies were used for validating efficacy of the candidate compound. We used the phylogenetic analysis of NTCP and constructed its protein-protein network. Also, we screened compounds from Drugbank and ZINC, among which five were validated for their authentication in HepG 2.2.15 cells. Then, we selected compound N4 (azelastine hydrochloride) as the most potent of them. This showed good inhibitory activity against HBsAg (IC50 = 7.5 μm) and HBeAg (IC50 = 3.7 μm), as well as high SI value (SI = 4.68). Further MD simulation results supported good interaction between compound N4 and NTCP. In silico analysis and experimental validation together demonstrated that compound N4 can target NTCP in HepG2.2.15 cells, which may shed light on exploring it as a potential anti-HBV drug. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. In Silico Toxicology – Non-Testing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raunio, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    In silico toxicology in its broadest sense means “anything that we can do with a computer in toxicology.” Many different types of in silico methods have been developed to characterize and predict toxic outcomes in humans and environment. The term non-testing methods denote grouping approaches, structure–activity relationship, and expert systems. These methods are already used for regulatory purposes and it is anticipated that their role will be much more prominent in the near future. This Perspective will delineate the basic principles of non-testing methods and evaluate their role in current and future risk assessment of chemical compounds. PMID:21772821

  19. Regulatory analysis for resolution of USI A-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, D.F.

    1989-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the regulatory analysis conducted by the NRC staff to evaluate the value and impact of potential alternatives for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-17, ''Systems Interactions in Nuclear Power Plants.'' The NRC staff's proposed resolution offered in this report is based on this analysis. The staff's technical finding regarding interactions can be found in NUREG-1174. Adverse systems interactions (ASIs) involve subtle and often very complicated plant-specific dependencies between components and systems, possible compounded by inducing erroneous human intervention. The staff has identified actions to be taken by licensees and the NRC to resolve USI A-17; the staff has also made the judgment that these actions, together with other ongoing activities, would reduce the risk from adverse systems interactions. As discussed further in this report, the staff judgment that the actions are sufficient is not based on the assertion that all systems interactions have been identified, but rather that the A-17 actions, plus other activities by the licensees and staff, will identify precursors to potentially risk-significant interactions so that the action can be taken if deemed necessary

  20. LNG development across Europe: Infrastructural and regulatory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorigoni, Susanna; Portatadino, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a cross-section infrastructural and regulatory analysis of the European LNG sector is presented. The LNG chain is maintained as being a good tool to enlarge the number of natural gas exporters to Europe, adding in this way to competition and to the achievement of the targets of the liberalisation process, which is a decrease in price for final customers and security of supply. The main reason for this is to be identified in the minor specificity of the regasification-plant-related investment compared with pipeline transportation. As a matter of fact, as the infrastructural analysis will show, the construction of new LNG receiving terminals is likely to bring about an increase in the number of importers fostering competition among them and shrinking their margins among the value chain. In this context, regulation is meant to play a key role in promoting investments without hindering competition. Nevertheless it is questionable whether LNG will be able to introduce competition beyond the European border (that is among producers) according to the forecasted supply and demand balance that is leading to a seller's market in the upstream sector. In this case, a huger part of the rent would go to the exporters leaving minor scope for competition down the European border. (author)

  1. NASA's Agency-Wide Strategy for Environmental Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Sharon; Duda, Kristen

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA's risk analysis communication programs associated with changing environmental policies. The topics include: 1) NASA Program Transition; 2) Principal Center for Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication (RRAC PC); and 3) Regulatory Tracking and Communication Process.

  2. 78 FR 27235 - Technical Guidance for Assessing Environmental Justice in Regulatory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Justice in Regulatory Analysis.'' The purpose of this guidance is to provide EPA analysts with technical...-566-2363. Mail: Technical Guidance for Assessing Environmental Justice in Regulatory Analysis... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OA-2013-0320; FRL-9810-5] Technical Guidance for Assessing...

  3. Regulatory pathway analysis by high-throughput in situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Visel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Automated in situ hybridization enables the construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. Such atlases can become Web-searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and thus offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. Towards this end, an atlas housing approximately 1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the midgestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising >90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This process ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflects the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded 12 distinct groups of expression patterns. Because of the similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of each group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on the group containing Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of development. Seventeen of the 82 genes in this group showed a change of expression in the developing neocortex of Pax6-deficient embryos. Electromobility shift assays were used to test for the presence of Pax6-paired domain binding sites. This led to the identification of 12 genes not previously known as potential targets of Pax6 regulation. These findings suggest that cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by automated in situ hybridization is a novel approach for identifying components of signaling cascades.

  4. In silico and in situ characterization of the zebrafish (Danio rerio gnrh3 (sGnRH gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husebye Harald

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH is responsible for stimulation of gonadotropic hormone (GtH in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG. The regulatory mechanisms responsible for brain specificity make the promoter attractive for in silico analysis and reporter gene studies in zebrafish (Danio rerio. Results We have characterized a zebrafish [Trp7, Leu8] or salmon (s GnRH variant, gnrh3. The gene includes a 1.6 Kb upstream regulatory region and displays the conserved structure of 4 exons and 3 introns, as seen in other species. An in silico defined enhancer at -976 in the zebrafish promoter, containing adjacent binding sites for Oct-1, CREB and Sp1, was predicted in 2 mammalian and 5 teleost GnRH promoters. Reporter gene studies confirmed the importance of this enhancer for cell specific expression in zebrafish. Interestingly the promoter of human GnRH-I, known as mammalian GnRH (mGnRH, was shown capable of driving cell specific reporter gene expression in transgenic zebrafish. Conclusions The characterized zebrafish Gnrh3 decapeptide exhibits complete homology to the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar GnRH-III variant. In silico analysis of mammalian and teleost GnRH promoters revealed a conserved enhancer possessing binding sites for Oct-1, CREB and Sp1. Transgenic and transient reporter gene expression in zebrafish larvae, confirmed the importance of the in silico defined zebrafish enhancer at -976. The capability of the human GnRH-I promoter of directing cell specific reporter gene expression in zebrafish supports orthology between GnRH-I and GnRH-III.

  5. A Regulatory Network Analysis of Orphan Genes in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pramesh; Chen, Tianlong; Arendsee, Zebulun; Wurtele, Eve S.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    Orphan genes, which are genes unique to each particular species, have recently drawn significant attention for their potential usefulness for organismal robustness. Their origin and regulatory interaction patterns remain largely undiscovered. Recently, methods that use the context likelihood of relatedness to infer a network followed by modularity maximizing community detection algorithms on the inferred network to find the functional structure of regulatory networks were shown to be effective. We apply improved versions of these methods to gene expression data from Arabidopsis thaliana, identify groups (clusters) of interacting genes with related patterns of expression and analyze the structure within those groups. Focusing on clusters that contain orphan genes, we compare the identified clusters to gene ontology (GO) terms, regulons, and pathway designations and analyze their hierarchical structure. We predict new regulatory interactions and unravel the structure of the regulatory interaction patterns of orphan genes. Work supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1507371 and IOS-1546858.

  6. Genome-wide in silico identification of GPI proteins in Mycosphaerella fijiensis and transcriptional analysis of two GPI-anchored β-1,3-glucanosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantún-Moreno, Nuvia; Vázquez-Euán, Roberto; Tzec-Simá, Miguel; Peraza-Echeverría, Leticia; Grijalva-Arango, Rosa; Rodríguez-García, Cecilia; James, Andrew C; Ramírez-Prado, Jorge; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Canto-Canché, Blondy

    2013-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the causal agent of black Sigatoka (BS), the most devastating foliar disease in banana (Musa spp.) worldwide. Little is known about genes that are important during M. fijiensis-Musa sp. interaction. The fungal cell wall is an attractive area of study because it is essential for maintenance of cellular homeostasis and it is the most external structure in the fungal cell and therefore mediates the interaction of the pathogen with the host. In this manuscript we describe the in silico identification of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-protein (GPI) family in M. fijiensis, and the analysis of two β-1,3-glucanosyltrans-ferases (Gas), selected by homology with fungal pathogenicity factors. Potential roles in pathogenesis were evaluated through analyzing expression during different stages of black Sigatoka disease, comparing expression data with BS symptoms and fungal biomass inside leaves. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed nearly constant expression of MfGAS1 with slightly increases (about threefold) in conidia and at speck-necrotrophic stage during banana-pathogen interaction. Conversely, MfGAS2 expression was increased during biotrophy (about seven times) and reached a maximum at speck (about 23 times) followed by a progressive decrease in next stages, suggesting an active role in M. fijiensis pathogenesis.

  7. Eight novel F13A1 gene missense mutations in patients with mild FXIII deficiency: in silico analysis suggests changes in FXIII-A subunit structure/function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Thomas, Anne; Varvenne, Michael; Brand, Brigitte; Rott, Hannelore; Haussels, Iris; Ruehl, Heiko; Scholz, Ute; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Mild FXIII deficiency is an under-diagnosed disorder because the carriers of this deficiency are often asymptomatic and reveal a phenotype only under special circumstances like surgery or induced trauma. Mutational reports from this type of deficiency have been rare. In this study, we present the phenotypic and genotypic data of nine patients showing mild FXIII-A deficiency caused by eight novel heterozygous missense mutations (Pro166Leu, Arg171Gln, His342Tyr, Gln415Arg, Leu529Pro, Gln601Lys, Arg703Gln and Arg715Gly) in the F13A1 gene. None of these variants were seen in 200 healthy controls. In silico structural analysis of the local wild-type protein structures (activated and non-activated) from X-ray crystallographic models downloaded from the protein databank identified potential structural/functional effects for the identified mutations. The missense mutations in the core domain are suggested to be directly influencing the catalytic triad. Mutations on other domains might influence other critical factors such as activation peptide cleavage or the barrel domain integrity. In vitro expression and subsequent biochemical studies in the future will be able to confirm the pathophysiological mechanisms proposed for the mutations in this article.

  8. Genome-wide comparative in silico analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in Zea mays and Glycine max: a comparison with Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruirui; Zhang, Shizhong; Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-01-01

    RNA helicases are enzymes that are thought to unwind double-stranded RNA molecules in an energy-dependent fashion through the hydrolysis of NTP. RNA helicases are associated with all processes involving RNA molecules, including nuclear transcription, editing, splicing, ribosome biogenesis, RNA export, and organelle gene expression. The involvement of RNA helicase in response to stress and in plant growth and development has been reported previously. While their importance in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa has been partially studied, the function of RNA helicase proteins is poorly understood in Zea mays and Glycine max. In this study, we identified a total of RNA helicase genes in Arabidopsis and other crop species genome by genome-wide comparative in silico analysis. We classified the RNA helicase genes into three subfamilies according to the structural features of the motif II region, such as DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box, and different species showed different patterns of alternative splicing. Secondly, chromosome location analysis showed that the RNA helicase protein genes were distributed across all chromosomes with different densities in the four species. Thirdly, phylogenetic tree analyses identified the relevant homologs of DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box RNA helicase proteins in each of the four species. Fourthly, microarray expression data showed that many of these predicted RNA helicase genes were expressed in different developmental stages and different tissues under normal growth conditions. Finally, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of 10 genes in Arabidopsis and 13 genes in Zea mays were in close agreement with the microarray expression data. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a comparative genome-wide analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays and Glycine max. This study provides valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of

  9. Interaction of silico-12-molybdic acid with acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvaev, V.F.; Pinchuk, I.N.; Gubin, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of thermal analysis, mass-spectrometry, IR, PMR, ESR spectroscopy are used to investigate interaction processes of silico-12-molybdic acid H 4 SiMo 12 O 40 with acetone. Reactions in solution and with participation of solid heteropolyacid are studied. Organic products of catalytic and oxidation-reduction reactions are identified. The effect of conditions on the formation of different condensation and oxidation products and the sequence of appropriate reactions is discussed. Transformations of silico-12-molybolic acid are considered

  10. Nuclear reactor decommissioning: an analysis of the regulatory environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, R.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to highlight some of the current and likely regulations that will significantly affect the costs, technical alternatives and financing schemes for reactor decommissioning encountered by electric utilities and their customers. The paper includes a general review of the decommissioning literature, as well as information on specific regulations at the federal, state, and utility levels. Available estimated costs for the decommissioning of individual reactors are also presented. Finally, classification of the specific policies into common trends and practices among the various regulatory bodies is used to examine more general regulatory environments and their potential financial implications

  11. In silico study of protein to protein interaction analysis of AMP-activated protein kinase and mitochondrial activity in three different farm animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, S.; Widyas, N.

    2018-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is cellular energy censor which works based on ATP and AMP concentration. This protein interacts with mitochondria in determine its activity to generate energy for cell metabolism purposes. For that, this paper aims to compare the protein to protein interaction of AMPK and mitochondrial activity genes in the metabolism of known animal farm (domesticated) that are cattle (Bos taurus), pig (Sus scrofa) and chicken (Gallus gallus). In silico study was done using STRING V.10 as prominent protein interaction database, followed with biological function comparison in KEGG PATHWAY database. Set of genes (12 in total) were used as input analysis that are PRKAA1, PRKAA2, PRKAB1, PRKAB2, PRKAG1, PRKAG2, PRKAG3, PPARGC1, ACC, CPT1B, NRF2 and SOD. The first 7 genes belong to gene in AMPK family, while the last 5 belong to mitochondrial activity genes. The protein interaction result shows 11, 8 and 5 metabolism pathways in Bos taurus, Sus scrofa and Gallus gallus, respectively. The top pathway in Bos taurus is AMPK signaling pathway (10 genes), Sus scrofa is Adipocytokine signaling pathway (8 genes) and Gallus gallus is FoxO signaling pathway (5 genes). Moreover, the common pathways found in those 3 species are Adipocytokine signaling pathway, Insulin signaling pathway and FoxO signaling pathway. Genes clustered in Adipocytokine and Insulin signaling pathway are PRKAA2, PPARGC1A, PRKAB1 and PRKAG2. While, in FoxO signaling pathway are PRKAA2, PRKAB1, PRKAG2. According to that, we found PRKAA2, PRKAB1 and PRKAG2 are the common genes. Based on the bioinformatics analysis, we can demonstrate that protein to protein interaction shows distinct different of metabolism in different species. However, further validation is needed to give a clear explanation.

  12. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Saleha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS: A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH. To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. RESULTS: By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. CONCLUSION: The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment.

  13. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleha, Shamim; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jamil, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A) of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment.

  14. Role of in-house safety analysis and research activities in regulatory decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Santosh K.; Nagrale, Dhanesh B.; Gaikwad, Avinash J.

    2015-01-01

    Achievement of an acceptable level of nuclear safety is an essential requirement for the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. The success of Global Nuclear Safety Regime is built upon a foundation of research. Such research has been sponsored by Governments and industry and has led to improved designs, safer and more reliable plant operation, and improvements in operating plant efficiency. A key element of this research has been the nuclear safety research performed or sponsored by regulatory organizations. In part, it has been the safety research performed or sponsored by regulatory organizations that has contributed to improved safety and has laid the foundation for activities such as risk-informed regulation, plant life extension, improved plant performance (e.g. power uprates) and new plant designs. The regulatory research program is meant to improve the regulatory authority’s knowledge where uncertainty exists, where safety margins are not well-characterized, and where regulatory decisions need to be confirmed in existing or new designs and technologies. The regulatory body get research initiated either in-house or by the licensee or through technical support organizations (TSOs). Research and analysis carried out within the regulatory body is of immense value in this context. This could be in the form of analysis of safety significant events, analysis of severe accidents, review of operating experience, independent checks of critical designs and even review of operator responses under different situations towards arriving at modifications to training programmes and licensing procedures for operating personnel. A latent benefit of regulatory research carried out by the regulators themselves is that it improves their technical competence considerably which in turn leads to high quality safety reviews and improved regulation in general. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of role of regulatory research and the in-house regulatory safety

  15. FORECAST: Regulatory effects cost analysis software manual -- Version 4.1. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, B.; Sciacca, F.W.

    1996-07-01

    The FORECAST program was developed to facilitate the preparation of the value-impact portion of NRC regulatory analyses. This PC program integrates the major cost and benefit considerations that may result from a proposed regulatory change. FORECAST automates much of the calculations typically needed in a regulatory analysis and thus reduces the time and labor required to perform these analyses. More importantly, its integrated and consistent treatment of the different value-impact considerations should help assure comprehensiveness, uniformity, and accuracy in the preparation of NRC regulatory analyses. The Current FORECAST Version 4.1 has been upgraded from the previous version and now includes an uncertainty package, an automatic cost escalation package, and other improvements. In addition, it now explicitly addresses public health impacts, occupational health impacts, onsite property damage, and government costs. Thus, FORECAST Version 4.1 can treat all attributes normally quantified in a regulatory analysis

  16. CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF IPBR/XYLS HYBRID REGULATORY PROTEINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    IpbR and XylS are related regulatory proteins (having 56% identity). IpbR responds to isopropylbenzene as well as to a variety of hydrophobic chemicals to activate expression of the isopropylbenzene catabolic pathway operon of pRE4 from ipbOP. XylS responds to substituted benzoic...

  17. Comparative analysis of regulatory elements in different germin-like ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was observed that these promoters have important regulatory elements, which are involved in various important functions. These elements have been compared on the basis of location, copy number, and distributed on positive and negative strands. It was also observed that some of these elements are common and ...

  18. Genomic analysis of the hierarchical structure of regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyuan; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how the cell uses transcription factors (TFs) to coordinate the expression of thousands of genes in response to various stimuli. The relationships between TFs and their target genes can be modeled in terms of directed regulatory networks. These relationships, in turn, can be readily compared with commonplace “chain-of-command” structures in social networks, which have characteristic hierarchical layouts. Here, we develop algorithms for identifying generalized hierarchies (allowing for various loop structures) and use these approaches to illuminate extensive pyramid-shaped hierarchical structures existing in the regulatory networks of representative prokaryotes (Escherichia coli) and eukaryotes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with most TFs at the bottom levels and only a few master TFs on top. These masters are situated near the center of the protein–protein interaction network, a different type of network from the regulatory one, and they receive most of the input for the whole regulatory hierarchy through protein interactions. Moreover, they have maximal influence over other genes, in terms of affecting expression-level changes. Surprisingly, however, TFs at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy are more essential to the viability of the cell. Finally, one might think master TFs achieve their wide influence through directly regulating many targets, but TFs with most direct targets are in the middle of the hierarchy. We find, in fact, that these midlevel TFs are “control bottlenecks” in the hierarchy, and this great degree of control for “middle managers” has parallels in efficient social structures in various corporate and governmental settings. PMID:17003135

  19. In silico prediction of genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichard, Jörg D

    2017-08-01

    The in silico prediction of genotoxicity has made considerable progress during the last years. The main driver for the pharmaceutical industry is the ICH M7 guideline about the assessment of DNA reactive impurities. An important component of this guideline is the use of in silico models as an alternative approach to experimental testing. The in silico prediction of genotoxicity provides an established and accepted method that defines the first step in the assessment of DNA reactive impurities. This was made possible by the growing amount of reliable Ames screening data, the attempts to understand the activity pathways and the subsequent development of computer-based prediction systems. This paper gives an overview of how the in silico prediction of genotoxicity is performed under the ICH M7 guideline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lauric acid and myristic acid from Allium sativum inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra: in silico analysis reveals possible binding to protein kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Rajiniraja; Gurunathan, Jayaraman

    2016-12-01

    The bulb of Allium sativum Linn (Alliaceae) has numerous medicinal values. Though the petroleum ether extract of the bulb has shown to exhibit antimycobacterial activity, the phytochemical(s) responsible for this inhibitory activity is not known. To characterize the bioactive compounds in the petroleum ether extract of Allium sativum (garlic) that inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Bioactivity-guided fractionation was employed to isolate the bioactive compounds. Antimycobacterial activity was evaluated by well-diffusion method and microplate alamar blue assay (MABA). Infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to characterize the bioactive compounds. Autodock was used to obtain information on molecular recognition, and molecular dynamics simulation was performed using GROMACS. The bioactive compounds that inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Ra were found to be lauric acid (LA) and myristic acid (MA). The minimal inhibitory concentration of LA and MA was found to be 22.2 and 66.7 μg/mL, respectively. In silico analysis revealed that these fatty acids could bind at the cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the cytosolic domain of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PknB). The inhibition activity was dependent on the alkyl chain length of the fatty acid, and the amino acid residues involved in binding to fatty acid was found to be conserved across the Pkn family of proteins. The study indicates the possibility of using fatty acid derivatives, involving Pkn family of proteins, to inhibit the signal transduction processes in M. tuberculosis.

  1. Isolation, identification and in silico analysis of alpha-amylase gene of Aspergillus niger strain CSA35 obtained from cassava undergoing spoilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oghenetega J. Avwioroko

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, a gene (CDF_Amyl encoding extracellular α-amylase in Aspergillus niger strain CSA35 associated with cassava spoilage was amplified using specific primers and characterized in silico. The gene had a partial nucleotide sequence of 968 bp and encoded a protein of 222 aa residues with a molecular weight and isoelectric point of 25.13 kDa and 4.17, respectively. Its catalytic site was located in the active site domain. BLASTp analysis showed that the protein primary sequence of the α-amylase gene had 98% and 99% homologies with the α-amylase of A. niger and A. oryzae RIB40, respectively. The gene is more closely related to α-amylase genes from fungi than to bacterial, plant, or animal α-amylase genes. Restriction mapping of the gene showed it can be digested with restriction enzymes like NcoI, PstI, SmaI, and BcLI among others but not with EcoRI and EcoRV. Its protein product had a hydrophobicity score of − 0.43 but no transmembrane helix. The CDF_Amyl protein was subcellularly localized in the secretory pathway, an indication of its release into extracellular space after secretion. Also, the 3D structure of the CDF-Amyl protein was barrel-shaped with domains characteristic of α-amylases. The encoded α-amylase Vmax is 6.90 U/mg protein and Km is 6.70 mg/ml. It was concluded that the unique characteristics of the CDF_Amyl gene and its deduced protein could find applications in biotechnological, food and pharmaceutical industries where cloning and further modification of this gene would be required for product development and improvement.

  2. In silico analysis of the fucosylation-associated genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni: cloning and characterization of the fucosyltransferase multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Nathan A; Anderson, Tavis K; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2013-01-01

    Fucosylated glycans of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni play key roles in its development and immunobiology. In the present study we used a genome-wide homology-based bioinformatics approach to search for genes that contribute to fucosylated glycan expression in S. mansoni, specifically the α2-, α3-, and α6-fucosyltransferases (FucTs), which transfer L-fucose from a GDP-L-fucose donor to an oligosaccharide acceptor. We identified and in silico characterized several novel schistosome FucT homologs, including six α3-FucTs and six α6-FucTs, as well as two protein O-FucTs that catalyze the unrelated transfer of L-fucose to serine and threonine residues of epidermal growth factor- and thrombospondin-type repeats. No α2-FucTs were observed. Primary sequence analyses identified key conserved FucT motifs as well as characteristic transmembrane domains, consistent with their putative roles as fucosyltransferases. Most genes exhibit alternative splicing, with multiple transcript variants generated. A phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that schistosome α3- and α6-FucTs form monophyletic clades within their respective gene families, suggesting multiple gene duplications following the separation of the schistosome lineage from the main evolutionary tree. Quantitative decreases in steady-state transcript levels of some FucTs during early larval development suggest a possible mechanism for differential expression of fucosylated glycans in schistosomes. This study systematically identifies the complete repertoire of FucT homologs in S. mansoni and provides fundamental information regarding their genomic organization, genetic variation, developmental expression, and evolutionary history.

  3. Analysis and evaluation of regulatory uncertainties in 10 CFR 60 subparts B and E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiner, R.F.; Patrick, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an attribute analysis scheme for prioritizing the resolution of regulatory uncertainties. Attributes are presented which assist in identifying the need for timeliness and durability of the resolution of an uncertainty

  4. Modeling Dynamic Regulatory Processes in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Jason E.; Jarman, Kenneth; Taylor, Ronald; Lancaster, Mary; Shankaran, Harish; Vartanian, Keri B.; Stevens, Susan L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P.; Sanfilippo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The ability to examine the behavior of biological systems in silico has the potential to greatly accelerate the pace of discovery in diseases, such as stroke, where in vivo analysis is time intensive and costly. In this paper we describe an approach for in silico examination of responses of the blood transcriptome to neuroprotective agents and subsequent stroke through the development of dynamic models of the regulatory processes observed in the experimental gene expression data. First, we identified functional gene clusters from these data. Next, we derived ordinary differential equations (ODEs) from the data relating these functional clusters to each other in terms of their regulatory influence on one another. Dynamic models were developed by coupling these ODEs into a model that simulates the expression of regulated functional clusters. By changing the magnitude of gene expression in the initial input state it was possible to assess the behavior of the networks through time under varying conditions since the dynamic model only requires an initial starting state, and does not require measurement of regulatory influences at each time point in order to make accurate predictions. We discuss the implications of our models on neuroprotection in stroke, explore the limitations of the approach, and report that an optimized dynamic model can provide accurate predictions of overall system behavior under several different neuroprotective paradigms. PMID:23071432

  5. Genomic characterization of plant cell wall degrading enzymes and in silico analysis of xylanses and polygalacturonases of Fusarium virguliforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are important effectors for plant pathogens to invade plants. In this study, the composition of PCWDEs in Fusarium virguliforme that were grown for 5-days and 20 days in liquid medium was determined by RNA-Seq. Differential expression analysis showed more P...

  6. In vitro and in silico cloning of Xenopus laevis SOD2 cDNA and its phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrello, Michele; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Ragusa, Marco; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Di Pietro, Valentina; Emmanuele, Giovanni; Travali, Salvo; Scalia, Marina; Shasha, Dennis; Ferro, Alfredo

    2005-02-01

    By using the methodology of both wet and dry biology (i.e., RT-PCR and cycle sequencing, and biocomputational technology, respectively) and the data obtained through the Genome Projects, we have cloned Xenopus laevis SOD2 (MnSOD) cDNA and determined its nucleotide sequence. These data and the deduced protein primary structure were compared with all the other SOD2 nucleotide and amino acid sequences from eukaryotes and prokaryotes, published in public databases. The analysis was performed by using both Clustal W, a well known and widely used program for sequence analysis, and AntiClustAl, a new algorithm recently created and implemented by our group. Our results demonstrate a very high conservation of the enzyme amino acid sequence during evolution, which proves a close structure-function relationship. This is to be expected for very ancient molecules endowed with critical biological functions, performed through a specific structural organization. The nucleotide sequence conservation is less pronounced: this too was foreseeable, due to neutral mutations and to the species-specific codon usage. The data obtained by using AntiClustAl are comparable with those produced with Clustal W, which validates this algorithm as an important new tool for biocomputational analysis. Finally, it is noteworthy that evolutionary trees, drawn by using all the available data on SOD2 nucleotide sequences and amino acid and either Clustal W or AntiClustAl, are comparable to those obtained through phylogenetic analysis based on fossil records.

  7. Analysis of regulatory structure for a potential fusion reactor industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The report is divided into eight sections. The preface describes the authors of the report, the methodology used in its preparation, and some basic legal terms. The summary describes the principal features of the proposed regulatory system and also includes two flow charts comparing our model with present NRC practices and a summary table briefly outlining the reasoning behind our recommendations. The main body of the report is divided into six sections. This part of the report discusses the existing federal and state programs for regulating electric energy, describes NRC operations and the criticisms of that agency, discusses the features of our proposed regulatory model, recommends certain steps for implementing the proposed model, and states the conclusions of the report.

  8. Nuclear reactor decommissioning: an analysis of the regulatory environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, R.

    1986-08-01

    In the next several decades, the electric utility industry will be faced withthe retirement of 50,000 megawatts (mW) of nuclear capacity. Responsibility for the financial and technical burdens this activity entails has been delegated to the utilities operating the reactors. However, the operators will have to perform the tasks of reactor decommissioning within the regulatory environment dictated by federal, state and local regulations. The purpose of this study was to highlight some of the current and likely trends in regulations and regulatory practices that will significantly affect the costs, technical alternatives and financing schemes encountered by the electric utilities and their customers. To identify significant trends and practices among regulatory bodies and utilities, a reviw of these factors was undertaken at various levels in the regulatory hierarchy. The technical policies were examined in reference to their treatment of allowed technical modes, restoration of the plant site including any specific recognition of the residual radioactivity levels, and planning requirements. The financial policies were examined for specification of acceptable financing arrangements, mechanisms which adjust for changes in the important parameters used to establish the fund, tax and rate-base treatments of the payments to and earnings on the fund, and whether or not escalation and/or discounting were considered in the estimates of decommissioning costs. The attitudes of regulators toward financial risk, the tax treatment of the decommissioning fund, and the time distribution of the technical mode were found to have the greatest effect on the discounted revenue requirements. Under plausible assumptions, the cost of a highly restricted environment is about seven times that of the minimum revenue requirement environment for the plants that must be decommissioned in the next three decades

  9. Heart morphogenesis gene regulatory networks revealed by temporal expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathon T; Demarest, Bradley; Gorsi, Bushra; Smith, Megan; Yost, H Joseph

    2017-10-01

    During embryogenesis the heart forms as a linear tube that then undergoes multiple simultaneous morphogenetic events to obtain its mature shape. To understand the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) driving this phase of heart development, during which many congenital heart disease malformations likely arise, we conducted an RNA-seq timecourse in zebrafish from 30 hpf to 72 hpf and identified 5861 genes with altered expression. We clustered the genes by temporal expression pattern, identified transcription factor binding motifs enriched in each cluster, and generated a model GRN for the major gene batteries in heart morphogenesis. This approach predicted hundreds of regulatory interactions and found batteries enriched in specific cell and tissue types, indicating that the approach can be used to narrow the search for novel genetic markers and regulatory interactions. Subsequent analyses confirmed the GRN using two mutants, Tbx5 and nkx2-5 , and identified sets of duplicated zebrafish genes that do not show temporal subfunctionalization. This dataset provides an essential resource for future studies on the genetic/epigenetic pathways implicated in congenital heart defects and the mechanisms of cardiac transcriptional regulation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. In Silico Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Modelling Study of 2-Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzymes from Bacterial and Fungal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Satpathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzymes have broad range of applications, starting from bioremediation to chemical synthesis of useful compounds that are widely distributed in fungi and bacteria. In the present study, a total of 81 full-length protein sequences of 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase from bacteria and fungi were retrieved from NCBI database. Sequence analysis such as multiple sequence alignment (MSA, conserved motif identification, computation of amino acid composition, and phylogenetic tree construction were performed on these primary sequences. From MSA analysis, it was observed that the sequences share conserved lysine (K and aspartate (D residues in them. Also, phylogenetic tree indicated a subcluster comprised of both fungal and bacterial species. Due to nonavailability of experimental 3D structure for fungal 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase in the PDB, molecular modelling study was performed for both fungal and bacterial sources of enzymes present in the subcluster. Further structural analysis revealed a common evolutionary topology shared between both fungal and bacterial enzymes. Studies on the buried amino acids showed highly conserved Leu and Ser in the core, despite variation in their amino acid percentage. Additionally, a surface exposed tryptophan was conserved in all of these selected models.

  11. In silico cancer research towards 3R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Quartier, Claire; Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jurisica, Igor; Holzinger, Andreas

    2018-04-12

    Improving our understanding of cancer and other complex diseases requires integrating diverse data sets and algorithms. Intertwining in vivo and in vitro data and in silico models are paramount to overcome intrinsic difficulties given by data complexity. Importantly, this approach also helps to uncover underlying molecular mechanisms. Over the years, research has introduced multiple biochemical and computational methods to study the disease, many of which require animal experiments. However, modeling systems and the comparison of cellular processes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes help to understand specific aspects of uncontrolled cell growth, eventually leading to improved planning of future experiments. According to the principles for humane techniques milestones in alternative animal testing involve in vitro methods such as cell-based models and microfluidic chips, as well as clinical tests of microdosing and imaging. Up-to-date, the range of alternative methods has expanded towards computational approaches, based on the use of information from past in vitro and in vivo experiments. In fact, in silico techniques are often underrated but can be vital to understanding fundamental processes in cancer. They can rival accuracy of biological assays, and they can provide essential focus and direction to reduce experimental cost. We give an overview on in vivo, in vitro and in silico methods used in cancer research. Common models as cell-lines, xenografts, or genetically modified rodents reflect relevant pathological processes to a different degree, but can not replicate the full spectrum of human disease. There is an increasing importance of computational biology, advancing from the task of assisting biological analysis with network biology approaches as the basis for understanding a cell's functional organization up to model building for predictive systems. Underlining and extending the in silico approach with respect to the 3Rs for replacement, reduction and

  12. Alkaline active cyanide dihydratase of Flavobacterium indicum MTCC 6936: Growth optimization, purification, characterization and in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Virender; Kumar, Vijay; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2018-05-15

    The present work explores a rare cyanide dihydratase of Flavobacterium indicum MTCC 6936 for its potential of cyanide degradation. The enzyme is purified to 12 fold with a yield of 76%. SDS and native-PAGE analysis revealed that enzyme was monomer of 40 kDa size. The enzyme works well in mesophilic range at wide array of pH. The thermostability profile of cyanide dihydratase revealed that the enzyme is quite stable at 30 °C and 35 °C with half-life of 6 h 30 min and 5 h respectively. K m and V max for cyanide dihydratase of F. indicum was measured to be 4.76 mM and 45 U mg -1 with k cat calculated to be 27.3 s -1 and specificity constant (k cat /K m ) to be around 5.67 mM -1  s -1 . MALDI-TOF analysis of purified protein revealed that the amino acid sequence has 50% and 43% sequence identity with putative amino acid sequence of F. indicum and earlier reported cyanide dihydratase of Bacillus pumilus respectively. Homology modeling studies of cyanide dihydratase of F. indicum predicted the catalytic triad of the enzyme indicating Cys at 164, Glu at 46 and Lys at 130th position. The purified enzyme has potential applications in bioremediation and analytical sector. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. In silico analysis of consequences of non-synonymous SNPs of Slc11a2 gene in Indian bovines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya M. Patel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyze the consequences of non-synonymous SNPs in Slc11a2 gene using bioinformatic tools. There is a current need of efficient bioinformatic tools for in-depth analysis of data generated by the next generation sequencing technologies. SNPs are known to play an imperative role in understanding the genetic basis of many genetic diseases. Slc11a2 is one of the major metal transporter families in mammals and plays a critical role in host defenses. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the impact of all non-synonymous SNPs in this gene using multiple tools like SIFT, PROVEAN, I-Mutant and PANTHER. Among the total 124 SNPs obtained from amplicon sequencing of Slc11a2 gene by Ion Torrent PGM involving 10 individuals of Gir cattle and Murrah buffalo each, we found 22 non-synonymous. Comparing the prediction of these 4 methods, 5 nsSNPs (G369R, Y374C, A377V, Q385H and N492S were identified as deleterious. In addition, while tested out for polar interactions with other amino acids in the protein, from above 5, Y374C, Q385H and N492S showed a change in interaction pattern and further confirmed by an increase in total energy after energy minimizations in case of mutant protein compared to the native.

  14. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silveira Carlos H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR. We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI, ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine residues (with some exceptions. Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the

  15. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cristina; Togawa, Roberto C; Neshich, Izabella A P; Mazoni, Ivan; Mancini, Adauto L; Minardi, Raquel C de Melo; da Silveira, Carlos H; Jardine, José G; Santoro, Marcelo M; Neshich, Goran

    2010-10-20

    Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes. The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the "miscellaneous-virus" subfamily

  16. Promiscuous prediction and conservancy analysis of CTL binding epitopes of HCV 3a viral proteome from Punjab Pakistan: an In Silico Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrees Muhammad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HCV is a positive sense RNA virus affecting approximately 180 million people world wide and about 10 million Pakistani populations. HCV genotype 3a is the major cause of infection in Pakistani population. One of the major problems of HCV infection especially in the developing countries that limits the limits the antiviral therapy is the long term treatment, high dosage and side effects. Studies of antigenic epitopes of viral sequences of a specific origin can provide an effective way to overcome the mutation rate and to determine the promiscuous binders to be used for epitope based subunit vaccine design. An in silico approach was applied for the analysis of entire HCV proteome of Pakistani origin, aimed to identify the viral epitopes and their conservancy in HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3 of diverse origin. Results Immunoinformatic tools were applied for the predictive analysis of HCV 3a antigenic epitopes of Pakistani origin. All the predicted epitopes were then subjected for their conservancy analysis in HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3 of diverse origin (worldwide. Using freely available web servers, 150 MHC II epitopes were predicted as promiscuous binders against 51 subjected alleles. E2 protein represented the 20% of all the predicted MHC II epitopes. 75.33% of the predicted MHC II epitopes were (77-100% conserve in genotype 3; 47.33% and 40.66% in genotype 1 and 2 respectively. 69 MHC I epitopes were predicted as promiscuous binders against 47 subjected alleles. NS4b represented 26% of all the MHC I predicted epitopes. Significantly higher epitope conservancy was represented by genotype 3 i.e. 78.26% and 21.05% for genotype 1 and 2. Conclusions The study revealed comprehensive catalogue of potential HCV derived CTL epitopes from viral proteome of Pakistan origin. A considerable number of predicted epitopes were found to be conserved in different HCV genotype. However, the number of conserved epitopes in HCV genotype 3 was

  17. An in silico analysis of oxygen uptake of a mild COPD patient during rest and exercise using a portable oxygen concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz I

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ira Katz,1,2 Marine Pichelin,1 Spyridon Montesantos,1 Min-Yeong Kang,3 Bernard Sapoval,3,4 Kaixian Zhu,5 Charles-Philippe Thevenin,5 Robert McCoy,6 Andrew R Martin,7 Georges Caillibotte1 1Medical R&D, Air Liquide Santé International, Centre de Recherche Paris-Saclay, Les Loges-en-Josas, France; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA; 3Physique de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, 4Centre de Mathématiques et de leurs Applications, CNRS, UniverSud, Cachan, 5Centre Explor!, Air Liquide Healthcare, Gentilly, France; 6Valley Inspired Products, Inc, Apple Valley, MN, USA; 7Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Oxygen treatment based on intermittent-flow devices with pulse delivery modes available from portable oxygen concentrators (POCs depends on the characteristics of the delivered pulse such as volume, pulse width (the time of the pulse to be delivered, and pulse delay (the time for the pulse to be initiated from the start of inhalation as well as a patient’s breathing characteristics, disease state, and respiratory morphology. This article presents a physiological-based analysis of the performance, in terms of blood oxygenation, of a commercial POC at different settings using an in silico model of a COPD patient at rest and during exercise. The analysis encompasses experimental measurements of pulse volume, width, and time delay of the POC at three different settings and two breathing rates related to rest and exercise. These experimental data of device performance are inputs to a physiological-based model of oxygen uptake that takes into account the real dynamic nature of gas exchange to illustrate how device- and patient-specific factors can affect patient oxygenation. This type of physiological analysis that considers the true effectiveness of oxygen transfer to the blood, as opposed to delivery to the nose (or mouth, can be

  18. The substitution of the implant and abutment for their analogs in mechanical studies: In vitro and in silico analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Rafael Soares; Bergamo, Edmara Tatiely Pedroso; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2017-01-01

    The use of analogs could reduce the cost of mechanical tests involving implant-supported crowns, but it is unclear if it would negatively affect the data accuracy. This study evaluated the substitution of the implant by implants analogs or abutment analogs as a support for crowns in mechanical tests, taking into account stress distribution and fracture load of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns. Thirty lithium disilicate monolithic crowns were randomized into three groups according to the set: Implant + abutment (IA); implant analog + abutment (IAA); abutment analog (AA). The specimens were subjected to mechanical fatigue (10 6 cycles, 200 N, 2 Hz) and thermal fatigue (10 4 cycles, 5°–55 °C). A final compression load was applied and the maximum fracture load was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). The experiment was validated by finite element analysis and the maximum principal stress was recorded. No statistically significant difference was observed in the mean fracture load among groups (P > 0.05). The failure mode was similar for all groups with the origin of crack propagation located at the load point application. Finite element analysis showed similar stress distribution and stress peak values for all groups. The use of implant's or abutment's analog does not influence the fracture load and stress distribution for cemented implant-supported crowns. - Highlights: • A less costly methodology for evaluate implant-supported crowns is proposed. • It is suggested the substitution of the implant or abutment for their analogs. • The outcomes of fracture load are not influenced by these replacements.

  19. The substitution of the implant and abutment for their analogs in mechanical studies: In vitro and in silico analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Rafael Soares; Bergamo, Edmara Tatiely Pedroso; Bordin, Dimorvan; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha, E-mail: altair@unicamp.br

    2017-06-01

    The use of analogs could reduce the cost of mechanical tests involving implant-supported crowns, but it is unclear if it would negatively affect the data accuracy. This study evaluated the substitution of the implant by implants analogs or abutment analogs as a support for crowns in mechanical tests, taking into account stress distribution and fracture load of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns. Thirty lithium disilicate monolithic crowns were randomized into three groups according to the set: Implant + abutment (IA); implant analog + abutment (IAA); abutment analog (AA). The specimens were subjected to mechanical fatigue (10{sup 6} cycles, 200 N, 2 Hz) and thermal fatigue (10{sup 4} cycles, 5°–55 °C). A final compression load was applied and the maximum fracture load was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). The experiment was validated by finite element analysis and the maximum principal stress was recorded. No statistically significant difference was observed in the mean fracture load among groups (P > 0.05). The failure mode was similar for all groups with the origin of crack propagation located at the load point application. Finite element analysis showed similar stress distribution and stress peak values for all groups. The use of implant's or abutment's analog does not influence the fracture load and stress distribution for cemented implant-supported crowns. - Highlights: • A less costly methodology for evaluate implant-supported crowns is proposed. • It is suggested the substitution of the implant or abutment for their analogs. • The outcomes of fracture load are not influenced by these replacements.

  20. In silico analysis of candidate proteins sharing homology with Streptococcus agalactiae proteins and their role in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Rajeshwari; Samanta, Luna

    2017-02-01

    Leukocytospermia is a physiologic condition defined as human semen with a leukocyte count of >1 x 10 6 cells/ml that is often correlated with male infertility. Moreover, bacteriospermia has been associated with leukocytospermia ultimately leading to male infertility. We have found that semen samples with >1 x 10 6 /ml leukocytes and/or bacteriospermia have oxidative predominance as evidenced by augmented protein carbonyl and lipid peroxidation status of the semen which is implicated in sperm dysfunction. It has been reported that Streptococcus agalactiae is present in bacteriospermic samples. Previous research has shown that human leukocyte antigen beta chain paralog (HLA-DRB) alleles interact best with the infected sperm cells rather than the non-infected cells. Little is known about the interaction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) present on leukocytes with the sperm upon bacterial infection and how it induces an immunological response which we have addressed by epitope mapping. Therefore, we examined MHC class II derived bacterial peptides which might have human sperm-related functional aspects. Twenty-two S. agalactiae proteins were obtained from PUBMED protein database for our study. Protein sequences with more than two accession numbers were aligned using CLUSTAL Omega to check their conservation pattern. Each protein sequence was then analyzed for T-cell epitope prediction against HLA-DRB alleles using the immune epitope database (IEDB) analysis tool. Out of a plethora of peptides obtained from this analysis, peptides corresponding to proteins of interest such as DNA binding response regulator, hyaluronate lyase and laminin binding protein were screened against the human proteome using Blastp. Interestingly, we have found bacterial peptides sharing homology with human peptides deciphering some of the important sperm functions. Antibodies raised against these probable bacterial antigens of fertility will not only help us understand the mechanism of

  1. In silico sequence analysis and homology modeling of predicted beta-amylase 7-like protein in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERTUĞRUL FILIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Beta-amylase (β-amylase, EC 3.2.1.2 is an enzyme that catalyses hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds in polysaccharides. In this study, we analyzed protein sequence of predicted beta-amylase 7-like protein in Brachypodium distachyon. pI (isoelectric point value was found as 5.23 in acidic character, while the instability index (II was found as 50.28 with accepted unstable protein. The prediction of subcellular localization was revealed that the protein may reside in chloroplast by using CELLO v.2.5. The 3D structure of protein was performed using comparative homology modeling with SWISS-MODEL. The accuracy of the predicted 3D structure was checked using Ramachandran plot analysis showed that 95.4% in favored region. The results of our study contribute to understanding of β-amylase protein structure in grass species and will be scientific base for 3D modeling of beta-amylase proteins in further studies.

  2. Molecular cloning and in silico analysis of three somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase mRNA from date palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekik Imen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the isolation and characterizations of three somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase (PhSERK genes from palm date by a rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE approach. PhSERKs belong to a small family of receptor kinase genes, share a conserved structure and extensive sequence homology with previously reported plant SERK genes. Sequence analysis of these genes revealed the sequence size of 11051 pb (PhSERK1, 7981 pb (PhSERK2 and 10510 pb (PhSERK3. The open reading frames of PhSERK1, PhSERK2 and PhSERK3 are 1914 pb, 1797 pb and 1719 pb respectively. PhSERKs belongs to the LRR-type cell surface RLKs, which possess a number of characteristic domains. These include an extracellular domain (EX containing a variable number of LRR units, signal pepetide (SP immediately followed by a single transmembrane domain (TM and an intracellular kinase domain. The phylogenetic tree shows that the protein PhSERK1, PhSERK2 and PhSERK3 clustered within monocots SERKs proteins groups. We also predicted the secondary and tertiary with ligand binding sites structure of the protein PhSERKs.

  3. Comprehensive reconstruction and in silico analysis of Aspergillus niger genome-scale metabolic network model that accounts for 1210 ORFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongzhong; Cao, Weiqiang; Ouyang, Liming; Xia, Jianye; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang; Noorman, Henk

    2017-03-01

    Aspergillus niger is one of the most important cell factories for industrial enzymes and organic acids production. A comprehensive genome-scale metabolic network model (GSMM) with high quality is crucial for efficient strain improvement and process optimization. The lack of accurate reaction equations and gene-protein-reaction associations (GPRs) in the current best model of A. niger named GSMM iMA871, however, limits its application scope. To overcome these limitations, we updated the A. niger GSMM by combining the latest genome annotation and literature mining technology. Compared with iMA871, the number of reactions in iHL1210 was increased from 1,380 to 1,764, and the number of unique ORFs from 871 to 1,210. With the aid of our transcriptomics analysis, the existence of 63% ORFs and 68% reactions in iHL1210 can be verified when glucose was used as the only carbon source. Physiological data from chemostat cultivations, 13 C-labeled and molecular experiments from the published literature were further used to check the performance of iHL1210. The average correlation coefficients between the predicted fluxes and estimated fluxes from 13 C-labeling data were sufficiently high (above 0.89) and the prediction of cell growth on most of the reported carbon and nitrogen sources was consistent. Using the updated genome-scale model, we evaluated gene essentiality on synthetic and yeast extract medium, as well as the effects of NADPH supply on glucoamylase production in A. niger. In summary, the new A. niger GSMM iHL1210 contains significant improvements with respect to the metabolic coverage and prediction performance, which paves the way for systematic metabolic engineering of A. niger. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 685-695. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cancer Digital Slide Archive: an informatics resource to support integrated in silico analysis of TCGA pathology data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, David A; Cobb, Jake; Somanna, Dhananjaya; Park, Yuna; Wang, Fusheng; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel H; Brat, Daniel J; Cooper, Lee A D

    2013-01-01

    Background The integration and visualization of multimodal datasets is a common challenge in biomedical informatics. Several recent studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data have illustrated important relationships between morphology observed in whole-slide images, outcome, and genetic events. The pairing of genomics and rich clinical descriptions with whole-slide imaging provided by TCGA presents a unique opportunity to perform these correlative studies. However, better tools are needed to integrate the vast and disparate data types. Objective To build an integrated web-based platform supporting whole-slide pathology image visualization and data integration. Materials and methods All images and genomic data were directly obtained from the TCGA and National Cancer Institute (NCI) websites. Results The Cancer Digital Slide Archive (CDSA) produced is accessible to the public (http://cancer.digitalslidearchive.net) and currently hosts more than 20 000 whole-slide images from 22 cancer types. Discussion The capabilities of CDSA are demonstrated using TCGA datasets to integrate pathology imaging with associated clinical, genomic and MRI measurements in glioblastomas and can be extended to other tumor types. CDSA also allows URL-based sharing of whole-slide images, and has preliminary support for directly sharing regions of interest and other annotations. Images can also be selected on the basis of other metadata, such as mutational profile, patient age, and other relevant characteristics. Conclusions With the increasing availability of whole-slide scanners, analysis of digitized pathology images will become increasingly important in linking morphologic observations with genomic and clinical endpoints. PMID:23893318

  5. Molecular phylogeny of Cyclophyllidea (Cestoda: Eucestoda): an in-silico analysis based on mtCOI gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil; Lyngdoh, Damanbha; Roy, Bishnupada; Tandon, Veena

    2016-09-01

    Order Cyclophyllidea (of cestode platyhelminths) has a rich diversity of parasites and includes many families and species that are known to cause serious medical condition in humans and domestic and wild animals. Despite various attempts to resolve phylogenetic relationships at the inter-family level, uncertainty remains. In order to add resolution to the existing phylogeny of the order, we generated partial mtCO1 sequences for some commonly occurring cyclophyllidean cestodes and combined them with available sequences from GenBank. Phylogeny was inferred taking a total 83 representative species spanning 8 families using Bayesian analysis. The phylogenetic tree revealed Dilepididae as the most basal taxon and showed early divergence in the phylogenetic tree. Paruterinidae, Taeniidae and Anoplocephalidae showed non-monophyletic assemblage; our result suggests that the family Paruterinidae may represent a polyphyletic group. The diverse family Taeniidae appeared in two separate clades; while one of them included all the members of the genus Echinococcus and also Versteria, the representatives of the genera Taenia and Hydatigera clubbed in the other clade. A close affinity of Dipylidiidae with Taenia and Hydatigera was seen, whereas existence of a close relationship between Mesocestoididae and Echinococcus (of Taeniidae) is also demonstrated. The crown group comprised the families Anoplocephalidae, Davaineidae, Hymenolepididae and Mesocestoididae, and also all species of the genus Echinococcus and Versteria mustelae; monophyly of these families (excepting Anolplocephalidae) and the genus Echinococcus as well as its sister-taxon relation with V. mustelae is also confirmed. Furthermore, non-monophyly of Anoplocephalidae is suggested to be correlated with divergence in the host selection.

  6. Barcoded DNA-tag reporters for multiplex cis-regulatory analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmin Nam

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory DNA sequences causally mediate patterns of gene expression, but efficient experimental analysis of these control systems has remained challenging. Here we develop a new version of "barcoded" DNA-tag reporters, "Nanotags" that permit simultaneous quantitative analysis of up to 130 distinct cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. The activities of these reporters are measured in single experiments by the NanoString RNA counting method and other quantitative procedures. We demonstrate the efficiency of the Nanotag method by simultaneously measuring hourly temporal activities of 126 CRMs from 46 genes in the developing sea urchin embryo, otherwise a virtually impossible task. Nanotags are also used in gene perturbation experiments to reveal cis-regulatory responses of many CRMs at once. Nanotag methodology can be applied to many research areas, ranging from gene regulatory networks to functional and evolutionary genomics.

  7. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Type 20 - In Silico Analysis and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of hnRNPA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Baumgarten Krebs

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects the upper and lower motor neurons. 5-10% of cases are genetically inherited, including ALS type 20, which is caused by mutations in the hnRNPA1 gene. The goals of this work are to analyze the effects of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs on hnRNPA1 protein function, to model the complete tridimensional structure of the protein using computational methods and to assess structural and functional differences between the wild type and its variants through Molecular Dynamics simulations. nsSNP, PhD-SNP, Polyphen2, SIFT, SNAP, SNPs&GO, SNPeffect and PROVEAN were used to predict the functional effects of nsSNPs. Ab initio modeling of hnRNPA1 was made using Rosetta and refined using KoBaMIN. The structure was validated by PROCHECK, Rampage, ERRAT, Verify3D, ProSA and Qmean. TM-align was used for the structural alignment. FoldIndex, DICHOT, ELM, D2P2, Disopred and DisEMBL were used to predict disordered regions within the protein. Amino acid conservation analysis was assessed by Consurf, and the molecular dynamics simulations were performed using GROMACS. Mutations D314V and D314N were predicted to increase amyloid propensity, and predicted as deleterious by at least three algorithms, while mutation N73S was predicted as neutral by all the algorithms. D314N and D314V occur in a highly conserved amino acid. The Molecular Dynamics results indicate that all mutations increase protein stability when compared to the wild type. Mutants D314N and N319S showed higher overall dimensions and accessible surface when compared to the wild type. The flexibility level of the C-terminal residues of hnRNPA1 is affected by all mutations, which may affect protein function, especially regarding the protein ability to interact with other proteins.

  8. Rational design of novel, fluorescent, tagged glutamic acid dendrimers with different terminal groups and in silico analysis of their properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinho N

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nuno Martinho,1–3 Liana C Silva,1,4 Helena F Florindo,1 Steve Brocchini,2 Mire Zloh,3 Teresa S Barata2 1Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, UCL School of Pharmacy, London, 3School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK; 4Centro de Química-Física Molecular and IN – Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal Abstract: Dendrimers are hyperbranched polymers with a multifunctional architecture that can be tailored for the use in various biomedical applications. Peptide dendrimers are particularly relevant for drug delivery applications due to their versatility and safety profile. The overall lack of knowledge of their three-dimensional structure, conformational behavior and structure–activity relationship has slowed down their development. Fluorophores are often conjugated to dendrimers to study their interaction with biomolecules and provide information about their mechanism of action at the molecular level. However, these probes can change dendrimer surface properties and have a direct impact on their interactions with biomolecules and with lipid membranes. In this study, we have used computer-aided molecular design and molecular dynamics simulations to identify optimal topology of a poly(L-glutamic acid (PG backbone dendrimer that allows incorporation of fluorophores in the core with minimal availability for undesired interactions. Extensive all-atom molecular dynamic simulations with the CHARMM force field were carried out for different generations of PG dendrimers with the core modified with a fluorophore (nitrobenzoxadiazole and Oregon Green 488 and various surface groups (glutamic acid, lysine and tryptophan. Analysis of structural and topological features of all designed dendrimers provided information about their size, shape

  9. Association analysis identifies ZNF750 regulatory variants in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birnbaum Ramon Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the ZNF750 promoter and coding regions have been previously associated with Mendelian forms of psoriasis and psoriasiform dermatitis. ZNF750 encodes a putative zinc finger transcription factor that is highly expressed in keratinocytes and represents a candidate psoriasis gene. Methods We examined whether ZNF750 variants were associated with psoriasis in a large case-control population. We sequenced the promoter and exon regions of ZNF750 in 716 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 397 Caucasian controls. Results We identified a total of 47 variants, including 38 rare variants of which 35 were novel. Association testing identified two ZNF750 haplotypes associated with psoriasis (p ZNF750 promoter and 5' UTR variants displayed a 35-55% reduction of ZNF750 promoter activity, consistent with the promoter activity reduction seen in a Mendelian psoriasis family with a ZNF750 promoter variant. However, the rare promoter and 5' UTR variants identified in this study did not strictly segregate with the psoriasis phenotype within families. Conclusions Two haplotypes of ZNF750 and rare 5' regulatory variants of ZNF750 were found to be associated with psoriasis. These rare 5' regulatory variants, though not causal, might serve as a genetic modifier of psoriasis.

  10. A flood-based information flow analysis and network minimization method for gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlogiannis, Andreas; Mozhayskiy, Vadim; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2013-04-24

    Biological networks tend to have high interconnectivity, complex topologies and multiple types of interactions. This renders difficult the identification of sub-networks that are involved in condition- specific responses. In addition, we generally lack scalable methods that can reveal the information flow in gene regulatory and biochemical pathways. Doing so will help us to identify key participants and paths under specific environmental and cellular context. This paper introduces the theory of network flooding, which aims to address the problem of network minimization and regulatory information flow in gene regulatory networks. Given a regulatory biological network, a set of source (input) nodes and optionally a set of sink (output) nodes, our task is to find (a) the minimal sub-network that encodes the regulatory program involving all input and output nodes and (b) the information flow from the source to the sink nodes of the network. Here, we describe a novel, scalable, network traversal algorithm and we assess its potential to achieve significant network size reduction in both synthetic and E. coli networks. Scalability and sensitivity analysis show that the proposed method scales well with the size of the network, and is robust to noise and missing data. The method of network flooding proves to be a useful, practical approach towards information flow analysis in gene regulatory networks. Further extension of the proposed theory has the potential to lead in a unifying framework for the simultaneous network minimization and information flow analysis across various "omics" levels.

  11. Radiology in silico-tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of a decreasing number of new cases of silico-tuberculosis even today there still remains a serious complication of silicosis. The job of radiology is to recognise the disease, evaluate the course of the disease during therapy and classify the disease for compensation purposes. Due to the pathogenetic and pathomorphologic similarities of silicosis and tuberculosis, it is often difficult and sometimes even impossible to recognise the presence of tuberculosis in cases of silicoses or to identify and isolate the TB component in silico-tuberculosis. Careful consideration of all radiological and clinical parameters improves the accuracy of diagnosis. Since the radiographic examination provides the only method of evaluating the morphologic state of the disease, radiology will keep its central position in the diagnosis of silico-tuberculosis. (orig.) [de

  12. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  13. Probabilistic risk analysis and its role in regulatory activity in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo-Sanchez, C.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses the criterion adopted for regulatory activity in a developing country with a nuclear power plant. He describes the problems that have to be overcome as a result of changes in the regulations during construction of the plant. There is discussion of the action taken by the regulatory body when introducing the method of probabilistic risk analysis. The part played by this form of analysis in quantifying the safety objectives proposed in the USA together with its limitations and the problems involved in this methodology are examined. Lastly, the author gives an opinion on the use that probabilistic risk analysis should be put to in developing countries such as Mexico. (author)

  14. Regulatory compliance analysis for the closure of single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.H.; Boomer, K.D.; Letourneau, M.; Oakes, L.; Lorang, R.

    1991-08-01

    This document provides a regulatory compliance analysis of the baseline environmental protection requirements for the closure of single-shell tanks. In preparing this document, the Westinghouse Hanford Company has analyzed the regulatory pathways and decisions points that have been identified to data through systems engineering and related studies as they relate to environmental protection. This regulatory compliance analysis has resulted in several conclusions that will aid the US Department of Energy in managing the single-shell tank waste and in developing strategies for the closure of these tanks. These conclusions include likely outcomes of current strategies, regulatory rulings that are required for future actions, variances and exemptions to be pursued, where appropriate, and potential rulings that may affect systems engineering and other portions of the single-shell tank closure effort. The conclusions and recommendations presented here are based on analysis of current regulations, regulatory exemptions and variances, and federal facility agreements. Because the remediation of the single-shell tanks will span 30 years, regulations that have yet to be promulgated and future interpretations of existing laws and regulations may impact the recommendations and conclusions presented here. 50 refs., 22 figs

  15. Regulatory reforms and productivity: An empirical analysis of the Japanese electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Makiko; Managi, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The Japanese electricity industry has experienced regulatory reforms since the mid-1990s. This article measures productivity in Japan's steam power-generation sector and examines the effect of reforms on the productivity of this industry over the period 1978-2003. We estimate the Luenberger productivity indicator, which is a generalization of the commonly used Malmquist productivity index, using a data envelopment analysis approach. Factors associated with productivity change are investigated through dynamic generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation of panel data. Our empirical analysis shows that the regulatory reforms have contributed to productivity growth in the steam power-generation sector in Japan

  16. Sociotechnical systems as a framework for regulatory system design and evaluation: Using Work Domain Analysis to examine a new regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Tony; Goode, Natassia; Read, Gemma J M; Salmon, Paul M

    2017-03-15

    Like most work systems, the domain of adventure activities has seen a series of serious incidents and subsequent calls to improve regulation. Safety regulation systems aim to promote safety and reduce accidents. However, there is scant evidence they have led to improved safety outcomes. In fact there is some evidence that the poor integration of regulatory system components has led to adverse safety outcomes in some contexts. Despite this, there is an absence of methods for evaluating regulatory and compliance systems. This article argues that sociotechnical systems theory and methods provide a suitable framework for evaluating regulatory systems. This is demonstrated through an analysis of a recently introduced set of adventure activity regulations. Work Domain Analysis (WDA) was used to describe the regulatory system in terms of its functional purposes, values and priority measures, purpose-related functions, object-related processes and cognitive objects. This allowed judgement to be made on the nature of the new regulatory system and on the constraints that may impact its efficacy following implementation. Importantly, the analysis suggests that the new system's functional purpose of ensuring safe activities is not fully supported in terms of the functions and objects available to fulfil them. Potential improvements to the design of the system are discussed along with the implications for regulatory system design and evaluation across the safety critical domains generally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Guideline for regulatory agencies in evaluating contents of root cause analysis by operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Takaya; Makino, Maomi; Kosaka, Atsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    'Guideline for Regulatory Agencies in Evaluating Contents of Root cause Analysis by Operators' was enacted as the policy for new inspection system in Japan. The objective is to indicate the view point to verify the appropriateness of the corrective actions and preventive actions implemented by operators based on root cause analysis and its analysis results. This guideline is leading to take four points into special consideration for adequate application. They are encouragement of further activities of the operators, flexible interpretation of the intention, versatility of the analysis methods and concepts and consideration of no blame culture. Moreover, as view point for regulatory agencies, it indicates with special emphasis that neutrality of the analyzing party, objectivity of analysis result, and logicality of the analysis method are ensured. This guideline shall be continuously reviewed through integration of lessons learned from active use in future. (author)

  18. Comparative analysis of regulatory elements in different germin-like ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    INTRODUCTION. Germin and germin-like proteins (GLPs) is a member of ..... analysis of germin-like protein gene 2 promoter from Oryza sativa L. ssp. Indica. ... esculenta Crantz) root proteome: Protein identification and differential expression.

  19. RESEARCH Analysis of time to regulatory and ethical approval of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    against TB.5-7 As a result of this work, the SATVI clinical research site in Worcester, Western ... TB vaccine in 2004 were included in this analysis. ..... Bollyky TJ, Cockburn IM, Berndt E. Bridging the gap: improving clinical development and the.

  20. Large Dataset of Acute Oral Toxicity Data Created for Testing in Silico Models (ASCCT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute toxicity data is a common requirement for substance registration in the US. Currently only data derived from animal tests are accepted by regulatory agencies, and the standard in vivo tests use lethality as the endpoint. Non-animal alternatives such as in silico models are ...

  1. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed great lakes water quality guidance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raucher, R.; Dixon, A.; Trabka, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Regulatory Impact Analysis provides direction to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on minimum water quality standards and contains numerical water quality criteria for 32 pollutants as well as methodologies for the development of water quality criteria for additional pollutants discharged to these waters. It also provides guidance to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on antidegradation policies and standards and implementation procedures

  2. 78 FR 39284 - Technical Guidance for Assessing Environmental Justice in Regulatory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OA-2013-0320; FRL-9830-1] Technical Guidance for Assessing Environmental Justice in Regulatory Analysis AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued for public comment a document entitled, ``Technical Guidance for...

  3. A Holistic In silico Approach to Develop Novel Inhibitors Targeting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To design a dual inhibitor of natural origin capable of targeting ErbB1 and ErbB2 kinases for the treatment of lung cancer. Method: Advanced In silico drug designing techniques were explored in this study. Sequence and structure analysis of ErbB1 and ErbB2 was followed by three dimensional (3D) ...

  4. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchi eSmita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MYB transcription factor (TF is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by top down and guide gene approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under fifty experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via top down approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL. To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by guide gene approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought

  5. Radioactivity analysis of KAMINI reactor coolant from regulatory perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, T.K.; Sulthan, Bajeer; Sarangapani, R.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.; Thilagam, L.

    2016-01-01

    KAMINI (a 30kWt) research reactor is operated for neutron radiography of fuel subassemblies and pyro devices and activation analysis of various samples. The reactor is fueled by 233 U and DM water is used as the coolant. During reactor operation, fission product noble gasses (FPNGs) such as 85m Kr, 87 Kr, 88 Kr, 135 Xe, 135m Xe and 138 Xe are detected in the coolant water. In order to detect clad failure, the water is sampled during reactor operation at regular intervals as per the technical specifications. In the present work, analysis of measured activities in coolant samples collected during reactor operation at 25 kWt are presented and compared with computed values obtained using ORIGEN (Isotope Generation) code

  6. Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Li, Hao-ming

    2009-08-05

    Lovastatin is an effective drug for treatment of hyperlipidemia. This study aimed to clone lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE and analyze the structure and function of its encoding protein. According to the lovastatin synthase gene sequence from genebank, primers were designed to amplify and clone the lovastatin biosynthesis regulatory gene lovE from Aspergillus terrus genomic DNA. Bioinformatic analysis of lovE and its encoding animo acid sequence was performed through internet resources and software like DNAMAN. Target fragment lovE, almost 1500 bp in length, was amplified from Aspergillus terrus genomic DNA and the secondary and three-dimensional structures of LovE protein were predicted. In the lovastatin biosynthesis process lovE is a regulatory gene and LovE protein is a GAL4-like transcriptional factor.

  7. An overview of the UK regulatory expectation for design basis accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimble, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The UK Health and Safety Executive published its most recent regulatory expectations in the 2006 version of it's safety assessment principles (SAPs). This built on experience regulating the full range of facilities for which it is responsible. Thus the principles underpinning all regulatory safety case assessment are the same but the implementation differs depending on the application. This paper will describe the published design basis accident analysis (DBAA) logic in context with other technical aspects of the regulatory expectation for safety cases. It will further illustrate the DBAA methodology with practical examples from actual experience on reprocessing plant gained over the last 15 years or so. Among the examples will be the relevance of conventional safety fault initiators to nuclear safety assessment. It will further demonstrate the derivation of facility limits and conditions necessary for nuclear safety. (authors)

  8. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues

  9. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G.; Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL

  10. A population dynamics analysis of the interaction between adaptive regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fouchet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks that can be accomplished by a network. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mathematical model to describe a interaction network of adaptive regulatory T cells, in which mature precursor T cells may differentiate into either adaptive regulatory T cells or effector T cells, depending on the activation state of the cell by which the antigen was presented. Using an equilibrium analysis of the mathematical model we show that, for some parameters, the network has two stable equilibrium states: one in which effector T cells are strongly regulated by regulatory T cells and another in which effector T cells are not regulated because the regulatory T cell population is vanishingly small. We then simulate different types of perturbations, such as the introduction of an antigen into a virgin system, and look at the state into which the system falls. We find that whether or not the interaction network switches from the regulated (tolerant state to the unregulated state depends on the strength of the antigenic stimulus and the state from which the network has been perturbed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the interaction network studied in this paper plays an essential part in generating and maintaining tolerance against allergens and self-antigens.

  11. In silico identification of miRNAs and their target genes and analysis of gene co-expression network in saffron (Crocus sativus L.) stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinati, Zahra; Shamloo-Dashtpagerdi, Roohollah; Behpouri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    As an aromatic and colorful plant of substantive taste, saffron (Crocus sativus L.) owes such properties of matter to growing class of the secondary metabolites derived from the carotenoids, apocarotenoids. Regarding the critical role of microRNAs in secondary metabolic synthesis and the limited number of identified miRNAs in C. sativus, on the other hand, one may see the point how the characterization of miRNAs along with the corresponding target genes in C. sativus might expand our perspectives on the roles of miRNAs in carotenoid/apocarotenoid biosynthetic pathway. A computational analysis was used to identify miRNAs and their targets using EST (Expressed Sequence Tag) library from mature saffron stigmas. Then, a gene co- expression network was constructed to identify genes which are potentially involved in carotenoid/apocarotenoid biosynthetic pathways. EST analysis led to the identification of two putative miRNAs (miR414 and miR837-5p) along with the corresponding stem- looped precursors. To our knowledge, this is the first report on miR414 and miR837-5p in C. sativus. Co-expression network analysis indicated that miR414 and miR837-5p may play roles in C. sativus metabolic pathways and led to identification of candidate genes including six transcription factors and one protein kinase probably involved in carotenoid/apocarotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Presence of transcription factors, miRNAs and protein kinase in the network indicated multiple layers of regulation in saffron stigma. The candidate genes from this study may help unraveling regulatory networks underlying the carotenoid/apocarotenoid biosynthesis in saffron and designing metabolic engineering for enhanced secondary metabolites. PMID:28261627

  12. The Consultancy Activity on In Silico Models for Genotoxic Prediction of Pharmaceutical Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Manuela; Kovarich, Simona; Bassan, Arianna; Broccardo, Lorenza; Yang, Chihae; Fioravanzo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological assessment of DNA-reactive/mutagenic or clastogenic impurities plays an important role in the regulatory process for pharmaceuticals; in this context, in silico structure-based approaches are applied as primary tools for the evaluation of the mutagenic potential of the drug impurities. The general recommendations regarding such use of in silico methods are provided in the recent ICH M7 guideline stating that computational (in silico) toxicology assessment should be performed using two (Q)SAR prediction methodologies complementing each other: a statistical-based method and an expert rule-based method.Based on our consultant experience, we describe here a framework for in silico assessment of mutagenic potential of drug impurities. Two main applications of in silico methods are presented: (1) support and optimization of drug synthesis processes by providing early indication of potential genotoxic impurities and (2) regulatory evaluation of genotoxic potential of impurities in compliance with the ICH M7 guideline. Some critical case studies are also discussed.

  13. Towards in silico prognosis using big data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohs Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical diagnosis and prognosis usually rely on few or even single measurements despite clinical big data being available. This limits the exploration of complex diseases such as adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS where the associated low bone mass remains unexplained. Observed low physical activity and increased RANKL/OPG, however, both indicate a mechanobiological cause. To deepen disease understanding, we propose an in silico prognosis approach using clinical big data, i.e. medical images, serum markers, questionnaires and live style data from mobile monitoring devices and explore the role of inadequate physical activity in a first AIS prototype. It employs a cellular automaton (CA to represent the medical image, micro-finite element analysis to calculate loading, and a Boolean network to integrate the other biomarkers. Medical images of the distal tibia, physical activity scores, and vitamin D and PTH levels were integrated as measured clinically while the time development of bone density and RANKL/OPG was observed. Simulation of an AIS patient with normal physical activity and patient-specific vitamin D and PTH levels showed minor changes in bone density whereas the simulation of the same AIS patient but with reduced physical activity led to low density. Both showed unchanged RANKL/OPG and considerable cortical resorption. We conclude that our integrative in silico approach allows to account for a variety of clinical big data to study complex diseases.

  14. Russian regulatory approaches to seismic design and seismic analysis of NPP piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliberda, Y.V.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of Russian regulatory approaches to seismic design and seismic analysis of NPP piping. The paper is focused on categorization and seismic analysis of nuclear power plant items (piping, equipment, supports, valves, but not building structures). The paper outlines the current seismic recommendations, corresponding methods with the examples of calculation models. The paper considers calculation results of the mechanisms of dynamic behavior and the problems of developing a rational and economical approaches to seismic design and seismic protection. (author)

  15. In Silico Analysis of Gene Expression Network Components Underlying Pigmentation Phenotypes in the Python Identified Evolutionarily Conserved Clusters of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher J. L. Irizarry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Color variation provides the opportunity to investigate the genetic basis of evolution and selection. Reptiles are less studied than mammals. Comparative genomics approaches allow for knowledge gained in one species to be leveraged for use in another species. We describe a comparative vertebrate analysis of conserved regulatory modules in pythons aimed at assessing bioinformatics evidence that transcription factors important in mammalian pigmentation phenotypes may also be important in python pigmentation phenotypes. We identified 23 python orthologs of mammalian genes associated with variation in coat color phenotypes for which we assessed the extent of pairwise protein sequence identity between pythons and mouse, dog, horse, cow, chicken, anole lizard, and garter snake. We next identified a set of melanocyte/pigment associated transcription factors (CREB, FOXD3, LEF-1, MITF, POU3F2, and USF-1 that exhibit relatively conserved sequence similarity within their DNA binding regions across species based on orthologous alignments across multiple species. Finally, we identified 27 evolutionarily conserved clusters of transcription factor binding sites within ~200-nucleotide intervals of the 1500-nucleotide upstream regions of AIM1, DCT, MC1R, MITF, MLANA, OA1, PMEL, RAB27A, and TYR from Python bivittatus. Our results provide insight into pigment phenotypes in pythons.

  16. Identification of novel potential scaffold for class I HDACs inhibition: An in-silico protocol based on virtual screening, molecular dynamics, mathematical analysis and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Cong; Huang, Yanxin

    2017-09-23

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) family has been widely reported as an important class of enzyme targets for cancer therapy. Much effort has been made in discovery of novel scaffolds for HDACs inhibition besides existing hydroxamic acids, cyclic peptides, benzamides, and short-chain fatty acids. Herein we set up an in-silico protocol which not only could detect potential Zn 2+ chelation bonds but also still adopted non-bonded model to be effective in discovery of Class I HDACs inhibitors, with little human's subjective visual judgment involved. We applied the protocol to screening of Chembridge database and selected out 7 scaffolds, 3 with probability of more than 99%. Biological assay results demonstrated that two of them exhibited HDAC-inhibitory activity and are thus considerable for structure modification to further improve their bio-activity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Lack of detectable allergenicity in genetically modified maize containing "Cry" proteins as compared to native maize based on in silico & in vitro analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandni Mathur

    Full Text Available Genetically modified, (GM crops with potential allergens must be evaluated for safety and endogenous IgE binding pattern compared to native variety, prior to market release.To compare endogenous IgE binding proteins of three GM maize seeds containing Cry 1Ab,1Ac,1C transgenic proteins with non GM maize.An integrated approach of in silico & in vitro methods was employed. Cry proteins were tested for presence of allergen sequence by FASTA in allergen databases. Biochemical assays for maize extracts were performed. Specific IgE (sIgE and Immunoblot using food sensitized patients sera (n = 39 to non GM and GM maize antigens was performed.In silico approaches, confirmed for non sequence similarity of stated transgenic proteins in allergen databases. An insignificant (p> 0.05 variation in protein content between GM and non GM maize was observed. Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF revealed reduced number of stable protein fractions in GM then non GM maize which might be due to shift of constituent protein expression. Specific IgE values from patients showed insignificant difference in non GM and GM maize extracts. Five maize sensitized cases, recognized same 7 protein fractions of 88-28 kD as IgE bindng in both GM and non-GM maize, signifying absence of variation. Four of the reported IgE binding proteins were also found to be stable by SGF.Cry proteins did not indicate any significant similarity of >35% in allergen databases. Immunoassays also did not identify appreciable differences in endogenous IgE binding in GM and non GM maize.

  18. Lack of Detectable Allergenicity in Genetically Modified Maize Containing “Cry” Proteins as Compared to Native Maize Based on In Silico & In Vitro Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Chandni; Kathuria, Pooran C.; Dahiya, Pushpa; Singh, Anand B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetically modified, (GM) crops with potential allergens must be evaluated for safety and endogenous IgE binding pattern compared to native variety, prior to market release. Objective To compare endogenous IgE binding proteins of three GM maize seeds containing Cry 1Ab,1Ac,1C transgenic proteins with non GM maize. Methods An integrated approach of in silico & in vitro methods was employed. Cry proteins were tested for presence of allergen sequence by FASTA in allergen databases. Biochemical assays for maize extracts were performed. Specific IgE (sIgE) and Immunoblot using food sensitized patients sera (n = 39) to non GM and GM maize antigens was performed. Results In silico approaches, confirmed for non sequence similarity of stated transgenic proteins in allergen databases. An insignificant (p> 0.05) variation in protein content between GM and non GM maize was observed. Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF) revealed reduced number of stable protein fractions in GM then non GM maize which might be due to shift of constituent protein expression. Specific IgE values from patients showed insignificant difference in non GM and GM maize extracts. Five maize sensitized cases, recognized same 7 protein fractions of 88-28 kD as IgE bindng in both GM and non-GM maize, signifying absence of variation. Four of the reported IgE binding proteins were also found to be stable by SGF. Conclusion Cry proteins did not indicate any significant similarity of >35% in allergen databases. Immunoassays also did not identify appreciable differences in endogenous IgE binding in GM and non GM maize. PMID:25706412

  19. Analysis of metastasis associated signal regulatory network in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2018-06-18

    Metastasis is a key factor that affects the survival and prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. To elucidate molecular mechanism associated with the metastasis of colorectal cancer, genes related to the metastasis time of colorectal cancer were screened. Then, a network was constructed with this genes. Data was obtained from colorectal cancer expression profile. Molecular mechanism elucidated the time of tumor metastasis and the expression of genes related to colorectal cancer. We found that metastasis-promoting and metastasis-inhibiting networks included protein hubs of high connectivity. These protein hubs were components of organelles. Some ribosomal proteins promoted the metastasis of colorectal cancer. In some components of organelles, such as proteasomes, mitochondrial ribosome, ATP synthase, and splicing factors, the metastasis of colorectal cancer was inhibited by some sections of these organelles. After performing survival analysis of proteins in organelles, joint survival curve of proteins was constructed in ribosomal network. This joint survival curve showed metastasis was promoted in patients with colorectal cancer (P = 0.0022939). Joint survival curve of proteins was plotted against proteasomes (P = 7 e-07), mitochondrial ribosome (P = 0.0001157), ATP synthase (P = 0.0001936), and splicing factors (P = 1.35e-05). These curves indicate that metastasis of colorectal cancer can be inhibited. After analyzing proteins that bind with organelle components, we also found that some proteins were associated with the time of colorectal cancer metastasis. Hence, different cellular components play different roles in the metastasis of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Flow cytometric analysis of regulatory T cells during hyposensitization of acquired allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kathleen; Abbas, Mariam; Hull, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that repeated intradermal steroid injections administered at weekly intervals into positive patch-test sites induce hyposensitization and desensitization. To examine changes in CD4CD25CD127lo/ regulatory T cells during the attenuation of the patch-test response. Ten patients with known allergic contact dermatitis were patch tested weekly for 10 weeks. The patch-test site was injected intradermally with 2 mg triamcinolone. At weeks 1 and 7, a biopsy was performed on the patch-test site in 6 patients, and flow cytometry was performed assessing CD4CD25CD127lo/ regulatory T cells. Secondary outcomes were clinical score, reaction size, erythema, and temperature. Statistical analysis included regression, correlation, and repeated-measures analysis of variance. The percentage of CD4CD25CD127lo/ regulatory T cells, measured by flow cytometry, increased from week 1 to week 7 by an average of 19.2%. The average grade of patch-test reaction decreased from +++ (vesicular reaction) to ++ (palpable erythema). The mean drop in temperature following treatment was 0.28°C per week. The mean area decreased 8.6 mm/wk over 10 weeks. Intradermal steroid injections of weekly patch-test reactions resulted in hyposensitization of the allergic contact dermatitis reaction. CD4CD25CD127lo/ regulatory T cells showed a tendency to increase; however, further studies are needed to determine if this is significant.

  1. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brian J; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam; Washietl, Stefan; Wen, Jiayu; Kellis, Manolis; Breaker, Ronald; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2011-11-01

    Regulatory RNA structures are often members of families with multiple paralogous instances across the genome. Family members share functional and structural properties, which allow them to be studied as a whole, facilitating both bioinformatic and experimental characterization. We have developed a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein-coding regions comprising 725 individual structures, including 48 families with known structural RNA elements. Known families identified include both noncoding RNAs, e.g., miRNAs and the recently identified MALAT1/MEN β lincRNA family; and cis-regulatory structures, e.g., iron-responsive elements. We also identify tens of new families supported by strong evolutionary evidence and other statistical evidence, such as GO term enrichments. For some of these, detailed analysis has led to the formulation of specific functional hypotheses. Examples include two hypothesized auto-regulatory feedback mechanisms: one involving six long hairpins in the 3'-UTR of MAT2A, a key metabolic gene that produces the primary human methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine; the other involving a tRNA-like structure in the intron of the tRNA maturation gene POP1. We experimentally validate the predicted MAT2A structures. Finally, we identify potential new regulatory networks, including large families of short hairpins enriched in immunity-related genes, e.g., TNF, FOS, and CTLA4, which include known transcript destabilizing elements. Our findings exemplify the diversity of post-transcriptional regulation and provide a resource for further characterization of new regulatory mechanisms and families of noncoding RNAs.

  2. GeneNetWeaver: in silico benchmark generation and performance profiling of network inference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffter, Thomas; Marbach, Daniel; Floreano, Dario

    2011-08-15

    Over the last decade, numerous methods have been developed for inference of regulatory networks from gene expression data. However, accurate and systematic evaluation of these methods is hampered by the difficulty of constructing adequate benchmarks and the lack of tools for a differentiated analysis of network predictions on such benchmarks. Here, we describe a novel and comprehensive method for in silico benchmark generation and performance profiling of network inference methods available to the community as an open-source software called GeneNetWeaver (GNW). In addition to the generation of detailed dynamical models of gene regulatory networks to be used as benchmarks, GNW provides a network motif analysis that reveals systematic prediction errors, thereby indicating potential ways of improving inference methods. The accuracy of network inference methods is evaluated using standard metrics such as precision-recall and receiver operating characteristic curves. We show how GNW can be used to assess the performance and identify the strengths and weaknesses of six inference methods. Furthermore, we used GNW to provide the international Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods (DREAM) competition with three network inference challenges (DREAM3, DREAM4 and DREAM5). GNW is available at http://gnw.sourceforge.net along with its Java source code, user manual and supporting data. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. dario.floreano@epfl.ch.

  3. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals human-mouse regulatory landscape and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denas, Olgert; Sandstrom, Richard; Cheng, Yong; Beal, Kathryn; Herrero, Javier; Hardison, Ross C; Taylor, James

    2015-02-14

    Because species-specific gene expression is driven by species-specific regulation, understanding the relationship between sequence and function of the regulatory regions in different species will help elucidate how differences among species arise. Despite active experimental and computational research, relationships among sequence, conservation, and function are still poorly understood. We compared transcription factor occupied segments (TFos) for 116 human and 35 mouse TFs in 546 human and 125 mouse cell types and tissues from the Human and the Mouse ENCODE projects. We based the map between human and mouse TFos on a one-to-one nucleotide cross-species mapper, bnMapper, that utilizes whole genome alignments (WGA). Our analysis shows that TFos are under evolutionary constraint, but a substantial portion (25.1% of mouse and 25.85% of human on average) of the TFos does not have a homologous sequence on the other species; this portion varies among cell types and TFs. Furthermore, 47.67% and 57.01% of the homologous TFos sequence shows binding activity on the other species for human and mouse respectively. However, 79.87% and 69.22% is repurposed such that it binds the same TF in different cells or different TFs in the same cells. Remarkably, within the set of repurposed TFos, the corresponding genome regions in the other species are preferred locations of novel TFos. These events suggest exaptation of some functional regulatory sequences into new function. Despite TFos repurposing, we did not find substantial changes in their predicted target genes, suggesting that CRMs buffer evolutionary events allowing little or no change in the TFos - target gene associations. Thus, the small portion of TFos with strictly conserved occupancy underestimates the degree of conservation of regulatory interactions. We mapped regulatory sequences from an extensive number of TFs and cell types between human and mouse using WGA. A comparative analysis of this correspondence unveiled the

  4. Integrative Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Uncovers Regulatory Mechanisms of Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooshtari, Parisa; Huang, Hailiang; Cotsapas, Chris

    2017-07-06

    Genome-wide association studies in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases (AID) have uncovered hundreds of loci mediating risk. These associations are preferentially located in non-coding DNA regions and in particular in tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitivity sites (DHSs). While these analyses clearly demonstrate the overall enrichment of disease risk alleles on gene regulatory regions, they are not designed to identify individual regulatory regions mediating risk or the genes under their control, and thus uncover the specific molecular events driving disease risk. To do so we have departed from standard practice by identifying regulatory regions which replicate across samples and connect them to the genes they control through robust re-analysis of public data. We find significant evidence of regulatory potential in 78/301 (26%) risk loci across nine autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and we find that individual genes are targeted by these effects in 53/78 (68%) of these. Thus, we are able to generate testable mechanistic hypotheses of the molecular changes that drive disease risk. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Propagating annotations of molecular networks using in silico fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo R; Wang, Mingxun; Nothias, Louis-Félix; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Caraballo-Rodríguez, Andrés Mauricio; Fox, Evan; Balunas, Marcy J; Klassen, Jonathan L; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2018-04-18

    The annotation of small molecules is one of the most challenging and important steps in untargeted mass spectrometry analysis, as most of our biological interpretations rely on structural annotations. Molecular networking has emerged as a structured way to organize and mine data from untargeted tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments and has been widely applied to propagate annotations. However, propagation is done through manual inspection of MS/MS spectra connected in the spectral networks and is only possible when a reference library spectrum is available. One of the alternative approaches used to annotate an unknown fragmentation mass spectrum is through the use of in silico predictions. One of the challenges of in silico annotation is the uncertainty around the correct structure among the predicted candidate lists. Here we show how molecular networking can be used to improve the accuracy of in silico predictions through propagation of structural annotations, even when there is no match to a MS/MS spectrum in spectral libraries. This is accomplished through creating a network consensus of re-ranked structural candidates using the molecular network topology and structural similarity to improve in silico annotations. The Network Annotation Propagation (NAP) tool is accessible through the GNPS web-platform https://gnps.ucsd.edu/ProteoSAFe/static/gnps-theoretical.jsp.

  6. Meta-Analysis of Single-Case Design Research on Self-Regulatory Interventions for Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Valerie; Albeg, Loren; Tung, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of self-regulatory interventions on reading, writing, and math by conducting a meta-analysis of single-case design research. Self-regulatory interventions have promise as an effective approach that is both minimally invasive and involves minimal resources. Effects of the interventions were analyzed by…

  7. Evaluation of transport safety analysis processes of radioactive material performed by a regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattar, Patricia Morais

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive substances have many beneficial applications, ranging from power generation to uses in medicine, industry and agriculture. As a rule, they are produced in different places from where they are used, needing to be transported. In order for transport to take place safely and efficiently, national and international standards must be complied with. This research aims to assess the safety analysis processes for the transport of radioactive material carried out by the regulatory body in Brazil, from the point of view of their compliance with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards. The self-assessment methodology named SARIS, developed by the AIEA, was used. The following steps were carried out: evaluation of the Diagnosis and Processes Mapping; responses to the SARIS Question Set and complementary questions; SWOT analysis; interviews with stakeholders and evaluation of a TranSAS mission conducted by the IAEA in 2002. Considering only SARIS questions, processes are 100% adherent. The deepening of the research, however, led to the development of twenty-two improvement proposals and the identification of nine good practices. The results showed that the safety analysis processes of the transport of radioactive material are being carried out in a structured, safe and reliable way but also that there is much opportunity for improvement. The formulation of an action plan, based on the presented proposals, can bring to the regulatory body many benefits. This would be an important step towards convening an external evaluation, providing greater reliability and transparency to the regulatory body´s processes. (author)

  8. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

  9. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants

  10. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants

  11. Designing and conducting in silico analysis for identifying of Echinococcus spp. with discrimination of novel haplotypes: an approach to better understanding of parasite taxonomic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotin, Adel; Gholami, Shirzad; Nasab, Abbas Najafi; Fallah, Esmaeil; Oskouei, Mahmoud Mahami; Semnani, Vahid; Shariatzadeh, Seyyed Ali; Shahbazi, Abbas

    2015-04-01

    The definitive identification of Echinococcus species is currently carried out by sequencing and phylogenetic strategies. However, the application of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) patterns is not broadly used as a result of heterogeneity traits of Echinococcus genome in different regions of the world. Therefore, designing and conducting a standardized pattern should indigenously be considered in under-studied areas. In this investigation, an in silico mapping was designed and developed for eight Echinococcus spp. on the basis of regional sequences in Iran and the world. The numbers of 60 Echinococcus isolates were collected from the liver and lungs of 15 human, 15 sheep, 15 cattle, and 15 camel cases in Semnan province, Central Iran. DNA samples were extracted and examined by polymerase chain reaction of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and PCR-RFLP via Rsa1 endonuclease enzyme. Moreover, 15 amplicons of cytochrome oxidase 1 (Cox1) were directly sequenced in order to identify the strains/haplotypes. PCR-RFLP and phylogenetic analyses revealed firmly the presence of the G1 and G6 genotypes with heterogeneity (three novel haplotypes) of Cox1 gene although no other expected genotypes were found in the region. Finding shows that the identification of novel haplotypes along with discrimination of Echinococcus spp. through regional patterns can unambiguously illustrate the real taxonomic status of parasite in Central Iran.

  12. In silico identification of a therapeutic target for photo-activated disinfection with indocyanine green: Modeling and virtual screening analysis of Arg-gingipain from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a momentous bacterial etiological agent associated with periodontitis, peri-implantitis as well as endodontic infections. The potential advantage of Photo-activated disinfection (PAD) as a promising novel approach is the choice of a suitable target site, specific photosensitizer, and wavelength of light for delivery of the light from source to target. Since Arg-gingipain is a cysteine proteinase that is involved in the virulence of P. gingivalis, it was evaluated as a target site for PAD with indocyanine green (ICG) as a photosensitizer. In this study, we used a range of in silico strategies, bioinformatics tools, biological databases, and computer simulation molecular modeling to evaluate the capacity of Arg-gingipain. The predicted structure of Arg-gingipain indicated that it is located outside the cell and has nine domains and 17 ligands, including two calcium ions and three sodium ions with positive charges which can be a site of interaction for anionic ICG. Based on the results of this study, anionic ICG desires to bind and interact with residues of Arg-gingipain during PAD as a main site to enhance the yield of treatment of endo-periodontal lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High throughput virtual screening and in silico ADMET analysis for rapid and efficient identification of potential PAP248-286 aggregation inhibitors as anti-HIV agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ruchi; Bunkar, Devendra; Choudhary, Bhanwar Singh; Srivastava, Shubham; Mehta, Pakhuri; Sharma, Manish

    2016-10-01

    Human semen is principal vehicle for transmission of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses. Several endogenous peptides present in semen, including a 39-amino acid fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286) assemble into amyloid fibrils named as semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) that promote virion attachment to target cells which dramatically enhance HIV virus infection by up to 105-fold. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound, is the major catechin found in green tea which disaggregates existing SEVI fibers, and inhibits the formation of SEVI fibers. The aim of this study was to screen a number of relevant polyphenols to develop a rational approach for designing PAP248-286 aggregation inhibitors as potential anti-HIV agents. The molecular docking based virtual screening results showed that polyphenolic compounds 2-6 possessed good docking score and interacted well with the active site residues of PAP248-286. Amino acid residues of binding site namely; Lys255, Ser256, Leu258 and Asn265 are involved in binding of these compounds. In silico ADMET prediction studies on these hits were also found to be promising. Polyphenolic compounds 2-6 identified as hits may act as novel leads for inhibiting aggregation of PAP248-286 into SEVI.

  14. In-silico mining, type and frequency analysis of genic microsatellites of finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.): a comparative genomic analysis of NBS-LRR regions of finger millet with rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyana Babu, B; Pandey, Dinesh; Agrawal, P K; Sood, Salej; Kumar, Anil

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the increased availability of the DNA sequences has given the possibility to develop and explore the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived SSR markers. In the present study, a total of 1956 ESTs of finger millet were used to find the microsatellite type, distribution, frequency and developed a total of 545 primer pairs from the ESTs of finger millet. Thirty-two EST sequences had more than two microsatellites and 1357 sequences did not have any SSR repeats. The most frequent type of repeats was trimeric motif, however the second place was occupied by dimeric motif followed by tetra-, hexa- and penta repeat motifs. The most common dimer repeat motif was GA and in case of trimeric SSRs, it was CGG. The EST sequences of NBS-LRR region of finger millet and rice showed higher synteny and were found on nearly same positions on the rice chromosome map. A total of eight, out of 15 EST based SSR primers were polymorphic among the selected resistant and susceptible finger millet genotypes. The primer FMBLEST5 could able to differentiate them into resistant and susceptible genotypes. The alleles specific to the resistant and susceptible genotypes were sequenced using the ABI 3130XL genetic analyzer and found similarity to NBS-LRR regions of rice and finger millet and contained the characteristic kinase-2 and kinase 3a motifs of plant R-genes belonged to NBS-LRR region. The In-silico and comparative analysis showed that the genes responsible for blast resistance can be identified, mapped and further introgressed through molecular breeding approaches for enhancing the blast resistance in finger millet.

  15. Pre-salt new regulatory mark and the economic order: constitutionality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, Marcela Brasil Pedrosa; Araujo, Mayara de Carvalho; Xavier, Yanko Marcius; Guimaraes, Patricia Borba Vilar

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of vast reserves of hydrocarbons in the pre-salt layer that extends from Espirito Santo to Santa Catarina, added with the economic and strategic value of oil and natural gas, has brought discussion about the reasonableness of the regulatory model adopted so far. Would be prudent to explore these resources through the concession model? From detailed analysis of the doctrinal and bills that aim to inaugurate the new regulatory bills, we sought to answer this question, based majorly on the principles of economic activity applied in our constitutional system. Motivated by the analysis of these constitutional principles proposed, the State is seen as a regulating agent of the economic activities, fulfilling its role to supervise, encourage and plan the direction of national economic system. The sharing model gives greater state involvement and is able to convert the wealth of pre-salt in citizenship, but only if well implemented. Thus, based on constitutional principles and the notion of development as freedom, the conclusion of this paperwork is for the constitutionality of the new regulatory bills. (author)

  16. Evolving phenotypic networks in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Evolved gene networks are constrained by natural selection. Their structures and functions are consequently far from being random, as exemplified by the multiple instances of parallel/convergent evolution. One can thus ask if features of actual gene networks can be recovered from evolutionary first principles. I review a method for in silico evolution of small models of gene networks aiming at performing predefined biological functions. I summarize the current implementation of the algorithm, insisting on the construction of a proper "fitness" function. I illustrate the approach on three examples: biochemical adaptation, ligand discrimination and vertebrate segmentation (somitogenesis). While the structure of the evolved networks is variable, dynamics of our evolved networks are usually constrained and present many similar features to actual gene networks, including properties that were not explicitly selected for. In silico evolution can thus be used to predict biological behaviours without a detailed knowledge of the mapping between genotype and phenotype. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulatory analysis for final rule on nuclear power plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for the final rule (10 CFR Part 54) that defines the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's requirements for renewing the operating licenses of commercial nuclear power plants. A set of four specific alternatives for the safety review of license renewal applications is defined and evaluated. These are: Alternative A-current licensing basis; Alternative B-extension of Alternative A to require assessment and managing of aging; Alternative C -- extension of Alternative B to require assessment of design differences against selected new-plant standards using probabilistic risk assessment; and Alternative D -- extension of Alternative B to require compliance with all new-plant standards. A quantitative comparison of the four alternatives in terms of impact-to-value ratio is presented, and Alternative B is the most cost-beneficial safety review alternative

  18. Regulatory analysis for Generic Issue 23: Reactor coolant pump seal failure. Draft report for comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaukat, S K; Jackson, J E; Thatcher, D F

    1991-04-01

    This report presents the regulatory/backfit analysis for Generic Issue 23 (GI-23), 'Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Failure'. A backfit analysis in accordance with 10 CFR 50.109 is presented in Appendix E. The proposed resolution includes quality assurance provisions for reactor coolant pump seals, instrumentation and procedures for monitoring seal performance, and provisions for seal cooling during off-normal plant conditions involving loss of all seal cooling such as station blackout. Research, technical data, and other analyses supporting the resolution of this issue are summarized in the technical findings report (NUREG/CR-4948) and cost/benefit report (NUREG/CR-5167). (author)

  19. Characterization of the bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein gene family – analysis of gene sequences, regulatory regions within the promoter and expression of selected genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs belong to a large family of aspartic peptidases expressed exclusively in the placenta of species in the Artiodactyla order. In cattle, the PAG gene family is comprised of at least 22 transcribed genes, as well as some variants. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that the PAG family segregates into 'ancient' and 'modern' groupings. Along with sequence differences between family members, there are clear distinctions in their spatio-temporal distribution and in their relative level of expression. In this report, 1 we performed an in silico analysis of the bovine genome to further characterize the PAG gene family, 2 we scrutinized proximal promoter sequences of the PAG genes to evaluate the evolution pressures operating on them and to identify putative regulatory regions, 3 we determined relative transcript abundance of selected PAGs during pregnancy and, 4 we performed preliminary characterization of the putative regulatory elements for one of the candidate PAGs, bovine (bo PAG-2. Results From our analysis of the bovine genome, we identified 18 distinct PAG genes and 14 pseudogenes. We observed that the first 500 base pairs upstream of the translational start site contained multiple regions that are conserved among all boPAGs. However, a preponderance of conserved regions, that harbor recognition sites for putative transcriptional factors (TFs, were found to be unique to the modern boPAG grouping, but not the ancient boPAGs. We gathered evidence by means of Q-PCR and screening of EST databases to show that boPAG-2 is the most abundant of all boPAG transcripts. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence for the role of ETS- and DDVL-related TFs in the regulation of the boPAG-2 gene. Conclusion PAGs represent a relatively large gene family in the bovine genome. The proximal promoter regions of these genes display differences in putative TF binding sites, likely contributing to observed

  20. In silico analysis of HIV-1 Env-gp120 reveals structural bases for viral adaptation in growth-restrictive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eYokoyama

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Variable V1/V2 and V3 loops on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope-gp120 core play key roles in modulating viral competence to recognize two infection receptors, CD4 and chemokine-receptors. However, molecular bases for the modulation largely remain unclear. To address these issues, we constructed structural models for a full-length gp120 in CD4-free and -bound states. The models showed topologies of gp120 surface loop that agree with those in reported structural data. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that in the unliganded state, V1/V2 loop settled into a thermodynamically stable arrangement near V3 loop for conformational masking of V3 tip, a potent neutralization epitope. In the CD4-bound state, however, V1/V2 loop was rearranged near the bound CD4 to support CD4 binding. In parallel, cell-based adaptation in the absence of anti-viral antibody pressures led to the identification of amino acid substitutions that individually enhance viral entry and growth efficiencies in association with reduced sensitivity to CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. Notably, all these substitutions were positioned on the receptors binding surfaces in V1/V2 or V3 loop. In silico structural studies predicted some physical changes of gp120 by substitutions with alterations in viral replication phenotypes. These data suggest that V1/V2 loop is critical for creating a gp120 structure that masks co-receptor binding site compatible with maintenance of viral infectivity, and for tuning a functional balance of gp120 between immune escape ability and infectivity to optimize HIV-1 replication fitness.

  1. The structural insights of stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit interaction with tyrosine phosphatase-2 (Shp-2: An in silico analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudutta Gangenahalli U

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cell factor (SCF receptor c-Kit is recognized as a key signaling molecule, which transduces signals for the proliferation, differentiation and survival of stem cells. Binding of SCF to its receptor triggers transactivation, leading to the recruitment of kinases and phosphatases to the docking platforms of c-Kit catalytic domain. Tyrosine phosphatase-1 (Shp-1 deactivates/attenuates 'Kit' kinase activity. Whereas, Asp816Val mutation in the Kit activation loop transforms kinase domain to a constitutively activated state (switch off-to-on state, in a ligand-independent manner. This phenomenon completely abrogates negative regulation of Shp-1. To predict the possible molecular basis of interaction between c-Kit and Shp-1, we have performed an in silico protein-protein docking study between crystal structure of activated c-Kit (phosphorylated c-Kit and full length crystal structure of Shp-2, a close structural counterpart of Shp-1. Findings Study revealed a stretch of conserved amino acids (Lys818 to Ser821 in the Kit activation domain, which makes decisive H-bonds with N-sh2 and phosphotyrosine binding pocket residues of the phosphatase. These H-bonds may impose an inhibitory steric hindrance to the catalytic domain of c-Kit, there by blocking further interaction of the activation loop molecules with incoming kinases. We have also predicted a phosphotyrosine binding pocket in SH2 domains of Shp-1, which is found to be predominantly closer to a catalytic groove like structure in c-Kit kinase domain. Conclusions This study predicts that crucial hydrogen bonding between N-sh2 domain of Shp-1 and Kit activation loop can modulate the negative regulation of c-Kit kinase by Shp-1. Thus, this finding is expected to play a significant role in designing suitable gain-of-function c-Kit mutants for inducing conditional proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells.

  2. Inferring Drosophila gap gene regulatory network: Pattern analysis of simulated gene expression profiles and stability analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fomekong-Nanfack, Y.; Postma, M.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) requires accurate data, a method to simulate the expression patterns and an efficient optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters. Using this approach it is possible to obtain alternative circuits without making any a priori

  3. Sheep skeletal muscle transcriptome analysis reveals muscle growth regulatory lncRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tianle; Ji, Zhibin; Hou, Lei; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Chunlan; Wang, Guizhi; Wang, Jianmin

    2018-01-01

    As widely distributed domestic animals, sheep are an important species and the source of mutton. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the regulatory lncRNAs associated with muscle growth and development between high production mutton sheep (Dorper sheep and Qianhua Mutton Merino sheep) and low production mutton sheep (Small-tailed Han sheep). In total, 39 lncRNAs were found to be differentially expressed. Using co-expression analysis and functional annotation, 1,206 co-expression interactions were found between 32 lncRNAs and 369 genes, and 29 of these lncRNAs were found to be associated with muscle development, metabolism, cell proliferation and apoptosis. lncRNA-mRNA interactions revealed 6 lncRNAs as hub lncRNAs. Moreover, three lncRNAs and their associated co-expressed genes were demonstrated by cis-regulatory gene analyses, and we also found a potential regulatory relationship between the pseudogene lncRNA LOC101121401 and its parent gene FTH1. This study provides a genome-wide resolution of lncRNA and mRNA regulation in muscles from mutton sheep.

  4. Designing regulatory frameworks for merchant transmission investments by real options analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pringles, Rolando; Olsina, Fernando; Garcés, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In deregulated electricity markets, the transmission network is a key infrastructure for enabling competition in the generation sector. A deficient expansion of the transmission grid prevents the realization of the benefits in terms of efficiency associated with market mechanisms. Consequently, it is essential to provide clear investment policies and economic signals to attract timely and efficient transmission investments in order to develop the system at minimum cost meeting the requirements of generators and consumers, while keeping adequate levels of service quality and reliability. This paper proposes a modern tool of economic evaluation based on real options analysis that provides the regulator the ability to assess various incentives that would lead transmission investors to make efficient decisions in highly uncertain environments. Real options properly values partially irreversible investment decisions, such as to defer, modify or abandon an investment project in response to the arrival of new information or as uncertainties are resolved. Decisions are evaluated from the point of view of a transmission investor trying to maximize its own profits in the time period set to recover the capital invested. The results allow the study of the behavior of transmission investors regarding their decision making when they have the possibility to manage the option to defer, under different regulatory schemes that encourage the expansion of the transmission system. - Highlights: • Regulatory frameworks for efficient and timely transmission expansions are designed. • Irreversibility and uncertainty of transmission investment is properly accounted for. • Response of network investors to regulatory incentives is quantitatively established

  5. The pairwise disconnectivity index as a new metric for the topological analysis of regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wingender Edgar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there is a gap between purely theoretical studies of the topology of large bioregulatory networks and the practical traditions and interests of experimentalists. While the theoretical approaches emphasize the global characterization of regulatory systems, the practical approaches focus on the role of distinct molecules and genes in regulation. To bridge the gap between these opposite approaches, one needs to combine 'general' with 'particular' properties and translate abstract topological features of large systems into testable functional characteristics of individual components. Here, we propose a new topological parameter – the pairwise disconnectivity index of a network's element – that is capable of such bridging. Results The pairwise disconnectivity index quantifies how crucial an individual element is for sustaining the communication ability between connected pairs of vertices in a network that is displayed as a directed graph. Such an element might be a vertex (i.e., molecules, genes, an edge (i.e., reactions, interactions, as well as a group of vertices and/or edges. The index can be viewed as a measure of topological redundancy of regulatory paths which connect different parts of a given network and as a measure of sensitivity (robustness of this network to the presence (absence of each individual element. Accordingly, we introduce the notion of a path-degree of a vertex in terms of its corresponding incoming, outgoing and mediated paths, respectively. The pairwise disconnectivity index has been applied to the analysis of several regulatory networks from various organisms. The importance of an individual vertex or edge for the coherence of the network is determined by the particular position of the given element in the whole network. Conclusion Our approach enables to evaluate the effect of removing each element (i.e., vertex, edge, or their combinations from a network. The greatest potential value of

  6. Stochastic models for the in silico simulation of synaptic processes

    OpenAIRE

    Bracciali, Andrea; Brunelli, Marcello; Cataldo, Enrico; Degano, Pierpaolo

    2008-01-01

    Background Research in life sciences is benefiting from a large availability of formal description techniques and analysis methodologies. These allow both the phenomena investigated to be precisely modeled and virtual experiments to be performed in silico. Such experiments may result in easier, faster, and satisfying approximations of their in vitro/vivo counterparts. A promising approach is represented by the study of biological phenomena as a collection of interactive entities through proce...

  7. In-silico ADME Studies for New Drug Discovery: From Chemical Compounds to Chinese Herbal Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guojun; Wang, Xiaobing; Chen, Zhou; Wu, Xianhui; Pan, Jinhuo; Huang, Yushen; Wan, Gang; Yang, Zhaogang

    2017-07-21

    Nowadays, in silico tools are widely used to provide the potential structure of the metabolites formed depending on the site of metabolism. These methods can also highlight the molecular moieties that help to direct the molecule into the cytochrome cavity so that the site of metabolism is in proximity to the catalytic center. In this minireview, we summarized three aspects of the in silico methods in the application of prediction of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) properties of compounds: structure-based approaches for predicting molecular modeling of drug metabolizing enzymes; in silico metabolite prediction; and pharmacophore models for analysis substrate specificity. Moreover, we also extended the in silico studies in Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) research. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. A Benefit-Risk Analysis Approach to Capture Regulatory Decision-Making: Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, G K; Gurumurthi, Karthik; Domike, Reuben; Kazandjian, Dickran; Landgren, Ola; Blumenthal, Gideon M; Farrell, Ann; Pazdur, Richard; Woodcock, Janet

    2018-01-01

    Drug regulators around the world make decisions about drug approvability based on qualitative benefit-risk analysis. In this work, a quantitative benefit-risk analysis approach captures regulatory decision-making about new drugs to treat multiple myeloma (MM). MM assessments have been based on endpoints such as time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and objective response rate (ORR) which are different than benefit-risk analysis based on overall survival (OS). Twenty-three FDA decisions on MM drugs submitted to FDA between 2003 and 2016 were identified and analyzed. The benefits and risks were quantified relative to comparators (typically the control arm of the clinical trial) to estimate whether the median benefit-risk was positive or negative. A sensitivity analysis was demonstrated using ixazomib to explore the magnitude of uncertainty. FDA approval decision outcomes were consistent and logical using this benefit-risk framework. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  9. In Silico Analysis of Small RNAs Suggest Roles for Novel and Conserved miRNAs in the Formation of Epigenetic Memory in Somatic Embryos of Norway Spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Igor A; Fossdal, Carl G

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in Norway spruce affects the timing of bud burst and bud set, vitally important adaptive traits for this long-lived forest species. Epigenetic memory is established in response to the temperature conditions during embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis at different epitype inducing (EpI) temperatures closely mimics the natural processes of epigenetic memory formation in seeds, giving rise to epigenetically different clonal plants in a reproducible and predictable manner, with respect to altered bud phenology. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and other small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) play an essential role in the regulation of plant gene expression and may affect this epigenetic mechanism. We used NGS sequencing and computational in silico methods to identify and profile conserved and novel miRNAs among small RNAs in embryogenic tissues of Norway spruce at three EpI temperatures (18, 23 and 28°C). We detected three predominant classes of sRNAs related to a length of 24 nt, followed by a 21-22 nt class and a third 31 nt class of sRNAs. More than 2100 different miRNAs within the prevailing length 21-22 nt were identified. Profiling these putative miRNAs allowed identification of 1053 highly expressed miRNAs, including 523 conserved and 530 novels. 654 of these miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed (DEM) depending on EpI temperature. For most DEMs, we defined their putative mRNA targets. The targets represented mostly by transcripts of multiple-repeats proteins, like TIR, NBS-LRR, PPR and TPR repeat, Clathrin/VPS proteins, Myb-like, AP2, etc. Notably, 124 DE miRNAs targeted 203 differentially expressed epigenetic regulators. Developing Norway spruce embryos possess a more complex sRNA structure than that reported for somatic tissues. A variety of the predicted miRNAs showed distinct EpI temperature dependent expression patterns. These putative EpI miRNAs target spruce genes with a wide range of functions, including genes known to be involved in epigenetic

  10. In Silico Analysis of Small RNAs Suggest Roles for Novel and Conserved miRNAs in the Formation of Epigenetic Memory in Somatic Embryos of Norway Spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Yakovlev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic memory in Norway spruce affects the timing of bud burst and bud set, vitally important adaptive traits for this long-lived forest species. Epigenetic memory is established in response to the temperature conditions during embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis at different epitype inducing (EpI temperatures closely mimics the natural processes of epigenetic memory formation in seeds, giving rise to epigenetically different clonal plants in a reproducible and predictable manner, with respect to altered bud phenology. MicroRNAs (miRNAs and other small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs play an essential role in the regulation of plant gene expression and may affect this epigenetic mechanism. We used NGS sequencing and computational in silico methods to identify and profile conserved and novel miRNAs among small RNAs in embryogenic tissues of Norway spruce at three EpI temperatures (18, 23 and 28°C. We detected three predominant classes of sRNAs related to a length of 24 nt, followed by a 21–22 nt class and a third 31 nt class of sRNAs. More than 2100 different miRNAs within the prevailing length 21–22 nt were identified. Profiling these putative miRNAs allowed identification of 1053 highly expressed miRNAs, including 523 conserved and 530 novels. 654 of these miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed (DEM depending on EpI temperature. For most DEMs, we defined their putative mRNA targets. The targets represented mostly by transcripts of multiple-repeats proteins, like TIR, NBS-LRR, PPR and TPR repeat, Clathrin/VPS proteins, Myb-like, AP2, etc. Notably, 124 DE miRNAs targeted 203 differentially expressed epigenetic regulators. Developing Norway spruce embryos possess a more complex sRNA structure than that reported for somatic tissues. A variety of the predicted miRNAs showed distinct EpI temperature dependent expression patterns. These putative EpI miRNAs target spruce genes with a wide range of functions, including genes known to be

  11. Genome-scale reconstruction and in silico analysis of the Ralstonia eutropha H16 for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, lithoautotrophic growth, and 2-methyl citric acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Tae

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ralstonia eutropha H16, found in both soil and water, is a Gram-negative lithoautotrophic bacterium that can utillize CO2 and H2 as its sources of carbon and energy in the absence of organic substrates. R. eutropha H16 can reach high cell densities either under lithoautotrophic or heterotrophic conditions, which makes it suitable for a number of biotechnological applications. It is the best known and most promising producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs from various carbon substrates and is an environmentally important bacterium that can degrade aromatic compounds. In order to make R. eutropha H16 a more efficient and robust biofactory, system-wide metabolic engineering to improve its metabolic performance is essential. Thus, it is necessary to analyze its metabolic characteristics systematically and optimize the entire metabolic network at systems level. Results We present the lithoautotrophic genome-scale metabolic model of R. eutropha H16 based on the annotated genome with biochemical and physiological information. The stoichiometic model, RehMBEL1391, is composed of 1391 reactions including 229 transport reactions and 1171 metabolites. Constraints-based flux analyses were performed to refine and validate the genome-scale metabolic model under environmental and genetic perturbations. First, the lithoautotrophic growth characteristics of R. eutropha H16 were investigated under varying feeding ratios of gas mixture. Second, the genome-scale metabolic model was used to design the strategies for the production of poly[R-(--3hydroxybutyrate] (PHB under different pH values and carbon/nitrogen source uptake ratios. It was also used to analyze the metabolic characteristics of R. eutropha when the phosphofructokinase gene was expressed. Finally, in silico gene knockout simulations were performed to identify targets for metabolic engineering essential for the production of 2-methylcitric acid in R. eutropha H16. Conclusion The

  12. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Andrew C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1 leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA

  13. Inferring Drosophila gap gene regulatory network: Pattern analysis of simulated gene expression profiles and stability analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fomekong-Nanfack, Y.; Postma, M.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) requires accurate data, a method to simulate the expression patterns and an efficient optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters. Using this approach it is possible to obtain alternative circuits without making any a priori assumptions about the interactions, which all simulate the observed patterns. It is important to analyze the properties of the circuits. Findings We have analyzed the simulated gene expression ...

  14. Aggregate analysis of regulatory authority assessors' comments to improve the quality of periodic safety update reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullian, Sandra; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Pfannkuche, Hans-Jürgen; Parker, Jeremy; Lalande-Luesink, Isabelle; Lewis, David J; Close, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Marketing authorization holders (MAHs) are expected to provide high-quality periodic safety update reports (PSURs) on their pharmaceutical products to health authorities (HAs). We present a novel instrument aiming at improving quality of PSURs based on standardized analysis of PSUR assessment reports (ARs) received from the European Union HAs across products and therapeutic areas. All HA comments were classified into one of three categories: "Request for regulatory actions," "Request for medical and scientific information," or "Data deficiencies." The comments were graded according to their impact on patients' safety, the drug's benefit-risk profile, and the MAH's pharmacovigilance system. A total of 476 comments were identified through the analysis of 63 PSUR HA ARs received in 2013 and 2014; 47 (10%) were classified as "Requests for regulatory actions," 309 (65%) as "Requests for medical and scientific information," and 118 (25%) comments were related to "Data deficiencies." The most frequent comments were requests for labeling changes (35 HA comments in 19 ARs). The aggregate analysis revealed commonly raised issues and prompted changes of the MAH's procedures related to the preparation of PSURs. The authors believe that this novel instrument based on the evaluation of PSUR HA ARs serves as a valuable mechanism to enhance the quality of PSURs and decisions about optimization of the use of the products and, therefore, contributes to improve further the MAH's pharmacovigilance system and patient safety. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Comparative in silico profiling of epigenetic modifiers in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mi-Young; Jung, Cho-Rok; Kim, Dae-Soo; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2018-04-06

    The technology of tissue differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells has attracted attention as a useful resource for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug development. Recent studies have suggested various key factors and specific culture methods to improve the successful tissue differentiation and efficient generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells. Among these methods, epigenetic regulation and epigenetic signatures are regarded as an important hurdle to overcome during reprogramming and differentiation. Thus, in this study, we developed an in silico epigenetic panel and performed a comparative analysis of epigenetic modifiers in the RNA-seq results of 32 human tissues. We demonstrated that an in silico epigenetic panel can identify epigenetic modifiers in order to overcome epigenetic barriers to tissue-specific differentiation.

  16. Ancestral regulatory circuits governing ectoderm patterning downstream of Nodal and BMP2/4 revealed by gene regulatory network analysis in an echinoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Saudemont

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderms, which are phylogenetically related to vertebrates and produce large numbers of transparent embryos that can be experimentally manipulated, offer many advantages for the analysis of the gene regulatory networks (GRN regulating germ layer formation. During development of the sea urchin embryo, the ectoderm is the source of signals that pattern all three germ layers along the dorsal-ventral axis. How this signaling center controls patterning and morphogenesis of the embryo is not understood. Here, we report a large-scale analysis of the GRN deployed in response to the activity of this signaling center in the embryos of the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, in which studies with high spatial resolution are possible. By using a combination of in situ hybridization screening, overexpression of mRNA, recombinant ligand treatments, and morpholino-based loss-of-function studies, we identified a cohort of transcription factors and signaling molecules expressed in the ventral ectoderm, dorsal ectoderm, and interposed neurogenic ("ciliary band" region in response to the known key signaling molecules Nodal and BMP2/4 and defined the epistatic relationships between the most important genes. The resultant GRN showed a number of striking features. First, Nodal was found to be essential for the expression of all ventral and dorsal marker genes, and BMP2/4 for all dorsal genes. Second, goosecoid was identified as a central player in a regulatory sub-circuit controlling mouth formation, while tbx2/3 emerged as a critical factor for differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm. Finally, and unexpectedly, a neurogenic ectoderm regulatory circuit characterized by expression of "ciliary band" genes was triggered in the absence of TGF beta signaling. We propose a novel model for ectoderm regionalization, in which neural ectoderm is the default fate in the absence of TGF beta signaling, and suggest that the stomodeal and neural subcircuits that we

  17. In Silico Screening for Biothreat Countermeasures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Westerhoff, Lance M

    2006-01-01

    The current state of the art of in silico drug discovery or computer aided drug discovery relies almost exclusively on molecular mechanics force fields, such as AMBER and CHARMM, and empirical potentials...

  18. Accumulation of multiple mutations in linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis causing bloodstream infections; in silico analysis of L3 amino acid substitutions that might confer high-level linezolid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonomidis, Alexandros; Grapsa, Anastasia; Pavlioglou, Charikleia; Demiri, Antonia; Batarli, Alexandra; Panopoulou, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Fifty-six Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical isolates, showing high-level linezolid resistance and causing bacteremia in critically ill patients, were studied. All isolates belonged to ST22 clone and carried the T2504A and C2534T mutations in gene coding for 23SrRNA as well as the C189A, G208A, C209T and G384C missense mutations in L3 protein which resulted in Asp159Tyr, Gly152Asp and Leu94Val substitutions. Other silent mutations were also detected in genes coding for ribosomal proteins L3 and L22. In silico analysis of missense mutations showed that although L3 protein retained the sequence of secondary motifs, the tertiary structure was influenced. The observed alteration in L3 protein folding provides an indication on the putative role of L3-coding gene mutations in high-level linezolid resistance. Furthermore, linezolid pressure in health care settings where linezolid consumption is of high rates might lead to the selection of resistant mutants possessing L3 mutations that might confer high-level linezolid resistance.

  19. In silico fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konteatis, Zenon D

    2010-11-01

    In silico fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a relatively new approach inspired by the success of the biophysical fragment-based drug discovery field. Here, we review the progress made by this approach in the last decade and showcase how it complements and expands the capabilities of biophysical FBDD and structure-based drug design to generate diverse, efficient drug candidates. Advancements in several areas of research that have enabled the development of in silico FBDD and some applications in drug discovery projects are reviewed. The reader is introduced to various computational methods that are used for in silico FBDD, the fragment library composition for this technique, special applications used to identify binding sites on the surface of proteins and how to assess the druggability of these sites. In addition, the reader will gain insight into the proper application of this approach from examples of successful programs. In silico FBDD captures a much larger chemical space than high-throughput screening and biophysical FBDD increasing the probability of developing more diverse, patentable and efficient molecules that can become oral drugs. The application of in silico FBDD holds great promise for historically challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. Future advances in force fields, scoring functions and automated methods for determining synthetic accessibility will all aid in delivering more successes with in silico FBDD.

  20. Using network component analysis to dissect regulatory networks mediated by transcription factors in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between genetic variation and gene expression is a central question in genetics. With the availability of data from high-throughput technologies such as ChIP-Chip, expression, and genotyping arrays, we can begin to not only identify associations but to understand how genetic variations perturb the underlying transcription regulatory networks to induce differential gene expression. In this study, we describe a simple model of transcription regulation where the expression of a gene is completely characterized by two properties: the concentrations and promoter affinities of active transcription factors. We devise a method that extends Network Component Analysis (NCA to determine how genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs perturb these two properties. Applying our method to a segregating population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found statistically significant examples of trans-acting SNPs located in regulatory hotspots that perturb transcription factor concentrations and affinities for target promoters to cause global differential expression and cis-acting genetic variations that perturb the promoter affinities of transcription factors on a single gene to cause local differential expression. Although many genetic variations linked to gene expressions have been identified, it is not clear how they perturb the underlying regulatory networks that govern gene expression. Our work begins to fill this void by showing that many genetic variations affect the concentrations of active transcription factors in a cell and their affinities for target promoters. Understanding the effects of these perturbations can help us to paint a more complete picture of the complex landscape of transcription regulation. The software package implementing the algorithms discussed in this work is available as a MATLAB package upon request.

  1. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986

  2. Genome-wide analysis of regulatory proteases sequences identified through bioinformatics data mining in Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Bin; Lou, Zhong-Zi; Li, Li; Brindley, Paul J; Zheng, Yadong; Luo, Xuenong; Hou, Junling; Guo, Aijiang; Jia, Wan-Zhong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-06-04

    Cysticercosis remains a major neglected tropical disease of humanity in many regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, Central America and elsewhere. Owing to the emerging drug resistance and the inability of current drugs to prevent re-infection, identification of novel vaccines and chemotherapeutic agents against Taenia solium and related helminth pathogens is a public health priority. The T. solium genome and the predicted proteome were reported recently, providing a wealth of information from which new interventional targets might be identified. In order to characterize and classify the entire repertoire of protease-encoding genes of T. solium, which act fundamental biological roles in all life processes, we analyzed the predicted proteins of this cestode through a combination of bioinformatics tools. Functional annotation was performed to yield insights into the signaling processes relevant to the complex developmental cycle of this tapeworm and to highlight a suite of the proteases as potential intervention targets. Within the genome of this helminth parasite, we identified 200 open reading frames encoding proteases from five clans, which correspond to 1.68% of the 11,902 protein-encoding genes predicted to be present in its genome. These proteases include calpains, cytosolic, mitochondrial signal peptidases, ubiquitylation related proteins, and others. Many not only show significant similarity to proteases in the Conserved Domain Database but have conserved active sites and catalytic domains. KEGG Automatic Annotation Server (KAAS) analysis indicated that ~60% of these proteases share strong sequence identities with proteins of the KEGG database, which are involved in human disease, metabolic pathways, genetic information processes, cellular processes, environmental information processes and organismal systems. Also, we identified signal peptides and transmembrane helices through comparative analysis with classes of important regulatory proteases

  3. GIS-assisted spatial analysis for urban regulatory detailed planning: designer's dimension in the Chinese code system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zeng, Zheng

    2009-10-01

    By discussing the causes behind the high amendments ratio in the implementation of urban regulatory detailed plans in China despite its law-ensured status, the study aims to reconcile conflict between the legal authority of regulatory detailed planning and the insufficient scientific support in its decision-making and compilation by introducing into the process spatial analysis based on GIS technology and 3D modeling thus present a more scientific and flexible approach to regulatory detailed planning in China. The study first points out that the current compilation process of urban regulatory detailed plan in China employs mainly an empirical approach which renders it constantly subjected to amendments; the study then discusses the need and current utilization of GIS in the Chinese system and proposes the framework of a GIS-assisted 3D spatial analysis process from the designer's perspective which can be regarded as an alternating processes between the descriptive codes and physical design in the compilation of regulatory detailed planning. With a case study of the processes and results from the application of the framework, the paper concludes that the proposed framework can be an effective instrument which provides more rationality, flexibility and thus more efficiency to the compilation and decision-making process of urban regulatory detailed plan in China.

  4. Performing SELEX experiments in silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondergem, J. A. J.; Schiessel, H.; Tompitak, M.

    2017-11-01

    Due to the sequence-dependent nature of the elasticity of DNA, many protein-DNA complexes and other systems in which DNA molecules must be deformed have preferences for the type of DNA sequence they interact with. SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) experiments and similar sequence selection experiments have been used extensively to examine the (indirect readout) sequence preferences of, e.g., nucleosomes (protein spools around which DNA is wound for compactification) and DNA rings. We show how recently developed computational and theoretical tools can be used to emulate such experiments in silico. Opening up this possibility comes with several benefits. First, it allows us a better understanding of our models and systems, specifically about the roles played by the simulation temperature and the selection pressure on the sequences. Second, it allows us to compare the predictions made by the model of choice with experimental results. We find agreement on important features between predictions of the rigid base-pair model and experimental results for DNA rings and interesting differences that point out open questions in the field. Finally, our simulations allow application of the SELEX methodology to systems that are experimentally difficult to realize because they come with high energetic costs and are therefore unlikely to form spontaneously, such as very short or overwound DNA rings.

  5. Analysis for making a regulatory decision to equipment of industrial gammagraphy in Argentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermacora, Marcela G.; Vidal, Dora N.; Alonso, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial gammagraphy is a practice widely used as a nondestructive testing technique in Argentina. Experience worldwide has shown the need for an improvement in the intrinsic safety of the equipment used in this lab. In response to this reason, the board of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) has considered a proposal to withdraw service movement and much of the equipment inventory scan belonging to industrial facilities nationwide. The main objective of this paper is to present the results of the analysis performed to support the above proposal. The main elements of evaluation can be summarized as follows: I) the teams that do not conform to international recommendations regarding compliance with key safety requirements of international standards such as ISO 3999:2004 (E) R adiation protection - Industrial Apparatus for gamma radiography - Specifications for performance, design and tests ; II) the decision by some manufacturers to discontinue production of certain models of equipment and the provision of spare parts, and III) the validity of certificates bulk type B (U) for transport. In conclusion, it highlights the importance of a regulatory decision supplementary to the Standard AR 7.9.1 concerning the operation of scan equipment industry, based on current international recommendations and Argentina's commitment to good practice and safety culture which can lead to a positive impact on radiation safety in this art

  6. Regulatory analysis for resolution of USI [Unresolved Safety Issue] A-47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szukiewicz, A.J.

    1989-07-01

    This report presents a summary of the regulatory analysis conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff to evaluate the value/impact of alternatives for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-47, ''Safety Implications of Control Systems.'' The NRC staff's resolution presented herein is based on these analyses and on the technical findings and conclusions presented in NUREG-1217, the companion document to this report. The staff has concluded that certain actions should be taken to improve safety in light-water reactor plants. The staff recommended that certain plants improve their control systems to preclude reactor vessel/steam generator overfill events and to prevent steam generator dryout, modify their technical specifications to verify operability of such systems, and modify selected emergency procedures to ensure safe shutdown of the plant following a small-break loss-of-coolant accident. This report was issued as a draft for public comment on May 27, 1988. As a result of the public comments received, this report was revised. The NRC staff's responses to and resolution of the public comments are included as Appendix C to the final report, NUREG-1217

  7. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    ''Station Blackout'' is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory analysis for USI A-44. It includes: (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the proposed technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, and (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements

  8. The Cold War legacy of regulatory risk analysis: The Atomic Energy Commission and radiation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Joseph B.

    From its inception in 1946 the Atomic Energy Commission pioneered the use of risk analysis as a mode of regulatory rationality and political rhetoric, yet historical treatments of risk analysis nearly always overlook the important role it played in the administration of atomic energy during the early Cold War. How this absence from history has been achieved and why it characterizes most historical accounts are the subjects of Chapter II. From there, this study goes on to develop the thesis that the advent of the atomic bomb was a world-shattering event that forced the Truman administration to choose between two novel alternatives: (1) movement towards global governance based initially on cooperative control of atomic energy or (2) unsparing pursuit of nuclear superiority. I refer to these as nuclear internationalism and nuclear nationalism, respectively. Each defined a social risk hierarchy. With the triumph of nuclear nationalism, nuclear annihilation was designated the greatest risk and a strong nuclear defense the primary means of prevention. The AEC's mission in the 1950s consisted of the rapid development of a nuclear arsenal, continual improvements in weapons technologies, and the promotion of nuclear power. The agency developed a risk-based regulatory framework through its dominant position within the National Committee on Radiation Protection. It embraced a technocratic model of risk analysis whose articulation and application it controlled, largely in secret. It used this to undergird a public rhetoric of reassurance and risk minimization. In practice, safety officials adjusted exposure levels within often wide parameters and with considerable fluidity in order to prevent safety concerns from interfering with operations. Secrecy, the political climate of the time, and a lack of accountability enabled the agency to meld technical assessments with social value judgments in a manner reflective of nuclear nationalism's risk hierarchy. In the late fifties

  9. An integer optimization algorithm for robust identification of non-linear gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemmangattuvalappil Nishanth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse engineering gene networks and identifying regulatory interactions are integral to understanding cellular decision making processes. Advancement in high throughput experimental techniques has initiated innovative data driven analysis of gene regulatory networks. However, inherent noise associated with biological systems requires numerous experimental replicates for reliable conclusions. Furthermore, evidence of robust algorithms directly exploiting basic biological traits are few. Such algorithms are expected to be efficient in their performance and robust in their prediction. Results We have developed a network identification algorithm to accurately infer both the topology and strength of regulatory interactions from time series gene expression data in the presence of significant experimental noise and non-linear behavior. In this novel formulism, we have addressed data variability in biological systems by integrating network identification with the bootstrap resampling technique, hence predicting robust interactions from limited experimental replicates subjected to noise. Furthermore, we have incorporated non-linearity in gene dynamics using the S-system formulation. The basic network identification formulation exploits the trait of sparsity of biological interactions. Towards that, the identification algorithm is formulated as an integer-programming problem by introducing binary variables for each network component. The objective function is targeted to minimize the network connections subjected to the constraint of maximal agreement between the experimental and predicted gene dynamics. The developed algorithm is validated using both in silico and experimental data-sets. These studies show that the algorithm can accurately predict the topology and connection strength of the in silico networks, as quantified by high precision and recall, and small discrepancy between the actual and predicted kinetic parameters

  10. Application of risk-based value-impact analysis in a nuclear regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinnie, Keith; Land, Ronald; Stella, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Value-impact analysis (VIA) is a quantitative process that examines the benefits of proposed actions and the costs of implementing those actions to determine the potential for a net beneficial result. There is a point beyond which efforts to improve nuclear plant safety by implementing design changes will be unjustifiably expensive for the societal benefits obtained. Resources that would be used to obtain marginal improvements in public safety can then be used to obtain greater benefits for society in other areas. VIA can help to identify this point. What can not be accomplished by VIA is the definition of the level of risk (or safety) above which cost-benefit considerations are not applicable. This must be established separately, by political action or through promulgation of acceptable risk levels and safety goals by regulatory agencies. 18 refs

  11. Draft regulatory analysis: notice of proposed rulemaking motor gasoline allocation revisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The Draft Regulatory Analysis is prepared for those proposed regulations which either may have a major impact on the general economy, individual industries, or geographic regions and levels of government, or may be significant in that they affect important DOE policy concerns and are the object of public interest. The problems and proposed solutions for the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Hearings on the Motor Gasoline Allocation Program are examined. The ERA's mandate for this program is set out in the Emergency Petroleum Allocation Act of 1973. Under this Act, the President is empowered to enforce, at his discretion, price and allocation controls on petroleum and petroleum products, including gasoline, through September 30, 1981. The Act sets the following allocation goals: protect public health; maintain public services and agricultural operations; foster competition in the petroleum industry; distribute petroleum among industry sectors and US regions equitably; and minimize economic disruption and unnecessary interference wth market mechanisms.

  12. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1987: Nonreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactor events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1980-1987

  13. Regulatory Analysis on the Safety Assessment of NPPs against Aircraft Crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Yun; Park, Jong Seuk; Chung, Yun Suk; Jung, Rae Young

    2011-01-01

    Following the 9/11 terror, a new regulation (10CFR 50.150) was enacted in June 2009 in the United States mandating the assessment of new nuclear power plants (NPPs) against intentional aircraft crashes, along with a regulation (10CFR 50.54 (h)(h)) in March 2009 that requires the establishment of accident mitigation measures for NPPs in operation. The UAE requested that the Korean NPP (APR 1400) design meet the U.S.'s new requirements related to the intentional aircraft crash. During the UAE NPP contract bidding process, France claimed that the Korean NPP is vulnerable to aircraft crashes comparing with the French NPP (EPR). Under these international and domestic environments, the necessity to establish a domestic regulation concerning the intentional aircraft crash was raised. This paper proposes a draft regulatory position on this issue through a comprehensive analysis of various influencing factors

  14. Applicability of in silico genotoxicity models on food and feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Anna; Bellion, Phillip; Beilstein, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of food and feed ingredients is required in the development of new substances and for their registration. In addition to in vitro and in vivo assays, in silico tools such as expert alert-based and statistical models can be used for data generation. These in silico models are commonly used among the pharmaceutical industry, whereas the food industry has not widely adopted them. In this study, the applicability of in silico tools for predicting genotoxicity was evaluated, with a focus on bacterial mutagenicity, in vitro and in vivo chromosome damage assays. For this purpose, a test set of 27 food and feed ingredients including vitamins, carotenoids, and nutraceuticals with experimental genotoxicity data was constructed from proprietary data. This dataset was run through multiple models and the model applicability was analyzed. The compounds were generally within the applicability domain of the models and the models predicted the compounds correctly in most of the cases. Although the regulatory acceptance of in silico tools as single data source is still limited, the models are applicable and can be used in the safety evaluation of food and feed ingredients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulatory Impact Analysis: Amendments to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and New Source Perofrmance Standards (NSPS) for the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the regulatory process, EPA is required to develop a regulatory impact analysis (RIA). This August 2010 RIA includes an economic impact analysis (EIA) and a small entity impacts analysis and documents the RIA methods and results for the 2010 rules

  16. Safety culture in regulatory expert organization : analysis result of survey for KINS employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, G. S.; Choi, Y. S.

    2003-01-01

    Much has been discussed on safety culture of operating organizations, however, little has been done on that of regulatory organization. Current issues and activities related to nuclear safety culture at IAEA, OECD/NEA, etc. were investigated and relevant literatures were reviewed. Elements essential for safety culture of regulatory organization were proposed and survey questionnaire for employees of regulatory expert organization, KINS, was developed based on the elements proposed. The survey result was presented and its implications were discussed. Based on the result, elements of safety culture in regulatory organization were proposed. The result of this survey can be used in developing safety culture model of regulatory organization, measurement method and also promotion of safety culture in regulatory organization

  17. Combining structure-based pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and in silico ADMET analysis to discover novel tetrahydro-quinoline based pyruvate kinase isozyme M2 activators with antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Can Chen,1,2,* Ting Wang,1,3,* Fengbo Wu,1,* Wei Huang,4 Gu He,1 Liang Ouyang,1 Mingli Xiang,1 Cheng Peng,4 Qinglin Jiang1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Department of Pharmacy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 2College of Pharmacy and the First Affiliated Hospital, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu, 3Department of Cardiology, Genenal Hospital of Chengdu Military Command, Chengdu, 4State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Systematic Research, Development and Utilization of Chinese Medicine, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells upregulate the expression of pyruvate kinase isozyme M2 (PKM2 to support glycolytic intermediates for anabolic processes, including the synthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids, and lipids. In this study, a combination of the structure-based pharmacophore modeling and a hybrid protocol of virtual screening methods comprised of pharmacophore model-based virtual screening, docking-based virtual screening, and in silico ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity analysis were used to retrieve novel PKM2 activators from commercially available chemical databases. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives were identified as potential scaffolds of PKM2 activators. Thus, the hybrid virtual screening approach was applied to screen the focused tetrahydroquinoline derivatives embedded in the ZINC database. Six hit compounds were selected from the final hits and experimental studies were then performed. Compound 8 displayed a potent inhibitory effect on human lung cancer cells. Following treatment with Compound 8, cell viability, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS production were examined in A549 cells. Finally, we evaluated the effects of Compound 8 on mice xenograft tumor models in vivo. These results may provide important

  18. Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

  19. Analysis of replies to an IAEA questionnaire on inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    At a Special Session of the IAEA General Conference in September 1986, it was suggested that the IAEA could play a role in assisting Member States in the enhancement of their regulatory practices with the objective of increasing the confidence of the international community in the safety of nuclear power programmes. As the first stage of this assistance, the Agency initiated an IAEA Questionnaire on Regulatory Practices in Member States with Nuclear Power Programmes and summarized the results of an analysis of replies to the questionnaire, issued as IAEA-TECDOC--485 (October 1988). The IAEA Questionnaire on Inspection and Enforcement by the Regulatory Body for Nuclear Power Plants, drafted by a group of consultants and IAEA staff members in August 1989, was initiated as a follow-up to the general questionnaire on regulatory practices. This questionnaire on inspection and enforcement was sent on 3 October 1989 to 31 Member States in which nuclear power plants are under construction and/or in operation. Replies to the questionnaire received from 26 Member States were analysed by IAEA staff members with the assistance of consultants in order to identify the main differences in approach and important aspects of inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body for nuclear power plants. This report is the summary report on the results of the analysis of the replies to the questionnaire from 26 Member States. 12 tabs

  20. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members

  1. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D. [Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

  2. Toward Synthetic Biology Strategies for Adipic Acid Production: An in Silico Tool for Combined Thermodynamics and Stoichiometric Analysis of Metabolic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Averesch, Nils J. H.; Martínez, Verónica S.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2018-01-01

    Adipic acid, a nylon-6,6 precursor, has recently gained popularity in synthetic biology. Here, 16 different production routes to adipic acid were evaluated using a novel tool for network-embedded thermodynamic analysis of elementary flux modes. The tool distinguishes between thermodynamically...

  3. In vitro/in silico investigation of failure criteria to predict flexural strength of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Mehdawi, Idris Mohamed; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Inoue, Sayuri; Imazato, Satoshi

    2018-01-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate a failure criterion to predict flexural strengths of composite resins (CR) by three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Models of flexural strength for test specimens of CR and rods comprising a three-point loading were designed. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of CR were conducted using a modified McGee-McCullough model. Using the experimental CR, flexural strengths were measured by three-point bending tests with crosshead speed 1.0 mm/min and compared with the values determined by in silico analysis. The flexural strengths of experimental CR calculated using the maximum principal strain significantly correlated with those obtained in silico amongst the four types of failure criteria applied. The in silico analytical model established in this study was found to be effective to predict the flexural strengths of CR incorporating various silica filler contents by maximum principal strain.

  4. From microarray to biology: an integrated experimental, statistical and in silico analysis of how the extracellular matrix modulates the phenotype of cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Centola Michael B; Dozmorov Igor; Buethe David D; Saban Ricardo; Hauser Paul J; Kyker Kimberly D; Dozmorov Mikhail G; Culkin Daniel J; Hurst Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Abstract A statistically robust and biologically-based approach for analysis of microarray data is described that integrates independent biological knowledge and data with a global F-test for finding genes of interest that minimizes the need for replicates when used for hypothesis generation. First, each microarray is normalized to its noise level around zero. The microarray dataset is then globally adjusted by robust linear regression. Second, genes of interest that capture significant respo...

  5. Global Regulatory T-Cell Research from 2000 to 2015: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Zongyi

    Full Text Available We aimed to analyze the global scientific output of regulatory T-cell (Treg research and built a model to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate publications from 2000 to 2015. Data were obtained from the Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC of Thomson Reuters on January 1, 2016. The bibliometric method and Citespace III were used to analyze authors, journals, publication outputs, institutions, countries, research areas, research hotspots, and trends. In total, we identified 35,741 publications on Treg research from 2000 to 2015, and observed that the annual publication rate increased with time. The Journal of Immunology published the highest number of articles, the leading country was the USA, and the leading institute was Harvard University. Sakaguchi, Hori, Fontenot, and Wang were the top authors in Treg research. Immunology accounted for the highest number of publications, followed by oncology, experimental medicine, cell biology, and hematology. Keyword analysis indicated that autoimmunity, inflammation, cytokine, gene expression, foxp3, and immunotherapy were the research hotspots, whereas autoimmune inflammation, gene therapy, granzyme B, RORγt, and th17 were the frontiers of Treg research. This bibliometric analysis revealed that Treg-related studies are still research hotspots, and that Treg-related clinical therapies are the research frontiers; however, further study and collaborations are needed worldwide. Overall, our findings provide valuable information for the editors of immunology journals to identify new perspectives and shape future research directions.

  6. Analysis of a Plant Transcriptional Regulatory Network Using Transient Expression Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Triviño, Sara; Long, Yuchen; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2017-01-01

    In plant biology, transient expression systems have become valuable approaches used routinely to rapidly study protein expression, subcellular localization, protein-protein interactions, and transcriptional activity prior to in vivo studies. When studying transcriptional regulation, luciferase reporter assays offer a sensitive readout for assaying promoter behavior in response to different regulators or environmental contexts and to confirm and assess the functional relevance of predicted binding sites in target promoters. This chapter aims to provide detailed methods for using luciferase reporter system as a rapid, efficient, and versatile assay to analyze transcriptional regulation of target genes by transcriptional regulators. We describe a series of optimized transient expression systems consisting of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts, infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, and human HeLa cells to study the transcriptional regulations of two well-characterized transcriptional regulators SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT-ROOT (SHR) on one of their targets, CYCLIN D6 (CYCD6).Here, we illustrate similarities and differences in outcomes when using different systems. The plant-based systems revealed that the SCR-SHR complex enhances CYCD6 transcription, while analysis in HeLa cells showed that the complex is not sufficient to strongly induce CYCD6 transcription, suggesting that additional, plant-specific regulators are required for full activation. These results highlight the importance of the system and suggest that including heterologous systems, such as HeLa cells, can provide a more comprehensive analysis of a complex gene regulatory network.

  7. Uncovering transcription factor and microRNA risk regulatory pathways associated with osteoarthritis by network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhenhua; Zhang, Chi; He, Lingxiao; Sui, Yanfang; Lin, Xiafei; Pan, Jingjing

    2018-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. The development of inflammation have been considered to play a key role during the progression of OA. Regulatory pathways are known to play crucial roles in many pathogenic processes. Thus, deciphering these risk regulatory pathways is critical for elucidating the mechanisms underlying OA. We constructed an OA-specific regulatory network by integrating comprehensive curated transcription and post-transcriptional resource involving transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA). To deepen our understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms of OA, we developed an integrated systems approach to identify OA-specific risk regulatory pathways. In this study, we identified 89 significantly differentially expressed genes between normal and inflamed areas of OA patients. We found the OA-specific regulatory network was a standard scale-free network with small-world properties. It significant enriched many immune response-related functions including leukocyte differentiation, myeloid differentiation and T cell activation. Finally, 141 risk regulatory pathways were identified based on OA-specific regulatory network, which contains some known regulator of OA. The risk regulatory pathways may provide clues for the etiology of OA and be a potential resource for the discovery of novel OA-associated disease genes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 115, enhancement of the reliability of the Westinghouse Solid State Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdekas, D.L.

    1989-05-01

    Generic Issue 115 addresses a concern related to the reliability of the Westinghouse reactor protection system for plants using the Westinghouse Solid State Protection System (SSPS). Several options for improving the reliability of the Westinghouse reactor trip function for these plants and their effect on core damage frequency (CDF) and overall risk were evaluated. This regulatory analysis includes a quantitative assessment of the costs and benefits associated with the various options for enhancing the reliability of the Westinghouse SSPS and provides insights for consideration and industry initiatives. No new regulatory requirements are proposed. 25 refs., 11 tabs

  9. Causality analysis detects the regulatory role of maternal effect genes in the early Drosophila embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Ghodsi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In developmental studies, inferring regulatory interactions of segmentation genetic network play a vital role in unveiling the mechanism of pattern formation. As such, there exists an opportune demand for theoretical developments and new mathematical models which can result in a more accurate illustration of this genetic network. Accordingly, this paper seeks to extract the meaningful regulatory role of the maternal effect genes using a variety of causality detection techniques and to explore whether these methods can suggest a new analytical view to the gene regulatory networks. We evaluate the use of three different powerful and widely-used models representing time and frequency domain Granger causality and convergent cross mapping technique with the results being thoroughly evaluated for statistical significance. Our findings show that the regulatory role of maternal effect genes is detectable in different time classes and thereby the method is applicable to infer the possible regulatory interactions present among the other genes of this network.

  10. Analysis of replies to an IAEA questionnaire on regulatory practices in Member States with nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The survey of regulatory practices in Member States with nuclear power programmes by means of a questionnaire is the first stage of the programme developed by the IAEA to assist the Member States in the enhancement of their regulatory practices. The questionnaire, drafted by IAEA staff members and consultants, consisted of 120 detailed questions and its structure corresponds approximately to the Structure of Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Governmental Organizations (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-G-Rev.1). The questionnaire was sent to 64 Member States on 7 July 1987 and the replies received from 44 Member States have been analysed by IAEA staff members with the assistance of two consultants in order to identify the main differences in approach and the important features of regulatory practices in Member States. This technical document is the summary report of this analysis

  11. Association between SPARC mRNA expression, prognosis and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer: a pooled in-silico analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem A Azim

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: SPARC is an important regulator of the extracellular matrix and has been suggested to improve delivery of albumin-bound cytotoxics. However, little is known regarding its role in breast cancer (BC. METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of publically available datasets, in which BC patients who received no systemic therapy or received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were eligible. Patients were assigned to molecular subtypes using PAM-50. We computed a SPARC module (SPARC7, composed of genes with an absolute correlation with SPARC >0.7. In the systemically untreated cohort, we evaluated 1 expression of SPARC/SPARC7 according to breast cancer subtype, 2 association between SPARC/SPARC7 and biological processes related to proliferation, immune and stroma, and 3 association between SPARC/SPARC7 and relapse-free survival in a Cox model in all patients and in the different molecular subtypes adjusted for tumor size, nodal status, histological grade, and age. In the neoadjuvant cohort, we evaluated the association between SPARC and pCR in a logistic regression model, adjusted for the same clinicopathologic factors. RESULTS: 948 (10 datasets, and 791 (8 datasets patients were included in the systemically untreated and neoadjuvant cohorts, respectively. High SPARC expression was associated with small tumor size, low histological grade and luminal-A tumors (all p<0.0001. There was a positive correlation between SPARC and stroma-related modules but negative correlation with proliferation modules. High SPARC expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with basal and HER2+ breast cancer even after adjusting for clinicopathologic parameters. In the neoadjuvant cohort, a subgroup analysis suggested that high SPARC is associated with low rates of pCR in the HER2 subtype. Same results were observed on replacing SPARC by SPARC7. CONCLUSION: This analysis suggests a potential role of SPARC in determining prognosis and response to primary

  12. Molecular identification of aiiA homologous gene from endophytic Enterobacter species and in silico analysis of putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2014-01-03

    The aiiA homologous gene known to encode AHL- lactonase enzyme which hydrolyze the N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signaling molecules produced by Gram negative bacteria. In this study, the degradation of AHL molecules was determined by cell-free lysate of endophytic Enterobacter species. The percentage of quorum quenching was confirmed and quantified by HPLC method (pEnterobacter asburiae VT65, Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 and Enterobacter ludwigii VT70 strains. Sequence alignment analysis revealed the presence of two zinc binding sites, "HXHXDH" motif as well as tyrosine residue at the position 194. Based on known template available at Swiss-Model, putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase was constructed. The result showed that novel endophytic strains of Enterobacter genera encode the novel aiiA homologous gene and its structural importance for future study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Amino Acids Sequence Based in Silico Analysis of RuBisCO (Ribulose-1,5 Bisphosphate Carboxylase Oxygenase Proteins in Some Carthamus L. ssp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre SEVİNDİK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available RuBisCO is an important enzyme for plants to photosynthesize and balance carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study aimed to perform sequence, physicochemical, phylogenetic and 3D (three-dimensional comparative analyses of RuBisCO proteins in the Carthamus ssp. using various bioinformatics tools. The sequence lengths of the RuBisCO proteins were between 166 and 477 amino acids, with an average length of 411.8 amino acids. Their molecular weights (Mw ranged from 18711.47 to 52843.09 Da; the most acidic and basic protein sequences were detected in C. tinctorius (pI = 5.99 and in C. tenuis (pI = 6.92, respectively. The extinction coefficients of RuBisCO proteins at 280 nm ranged from 17,670 to 69,830 M-1 cm-1, the instability index (II values for RuBisCO proteins ranged from 33.31 to 39.39, while the GRAVY values of RuBisCO proteins ranged from -0.313 to -0.250. The most abundant amino acid in the RuBisCO protein was Gly (9.7%, while the least amino acid ratio was Trp (1.6 %. The putative phosphorylation sites of RuBisCO proteins were determined by NetPhos 2.0. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RuBisCO proteins formed two main clades. A RAMPAGE analysis revealed that 96.3%-97.6% of residues were located in the favoured region of RuBisCO proteins. To predict the three dimensional (3D structure of the RuBisCO proteins PyMOL was used. The results of the current study provide insights into fundamental characteristic of RuBisCO proteins in Carthamus ssp.

  14. In silico analysis and gene expression of TgNAC01 transcription factor involved in xylogenesis and abiotic stress in Tectona grandis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Camel Paucar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary xylem is the most abundant component of plant biomass. Therefore, knowing the genes that regulate its formation would help to design strategies for wood genetic improvement. Thus, the objective of this work was to perform computational analysis of the primary and secondary structure of the TgNAC01 transcription factor (FT of Tectona grandis, and to evaluate its evolutionary history, conserved domains and gene expression in lignified tissues of 12 and 60 years. For this, an ion-electron interaction potential (IEP was evaluated using the information-spectrum method (IEM using the R-Project and SFAPS library, followed by structural modeling using the MODELLER software and visualized by PyMol program. In addition, the analysis of multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny was performed using Bioedit and MrBayes software, respectively. We also evaluated the qRT-PCR levels of TgNAC01. As results, it was found that TgNAC01 maintains a twisted antiparallel β-sheet structure, which is compacted against an α-helix in the N-terminal region, having three α-helix domains and seven folded β-domains. Also, through the IEM, it was demonstrated that it has about five biological functions, and mutations on amino acids with higher IEP, which leads to evolutions on genetic regulation networks. Finally, the FT TgNAC01 plays an esential role in the organization and development of the parts that make up the sapwood, such as the radial cells of the cambial zone, the vessels, fibers and the growth rings.

  15. Supplementary data: Eucalyptus microsatellites mined in silico ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Eucalyptus microsatellites mined in silico: survey and evaluation. R. Yasodha, R. Sumathi, P. Chezhian, S. Kavitha and M. Ghosh. J. Genet. 87, XX-XX. Tm. CT. 2222. NA. 60 125. 192. Table 1. List of EST-SSR primers developed for E. globulus. No. of. Tm Product. Acc. no. SSR repeats. Forward primer.

  16. Mutation-based structural modification and dynamics study of amyloid beta peptide (1–42: An in-silico-based analysis to cognize the mechanism of aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Kumar Panda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the prevalent cause of premature senility, a progressive mental disorder due to degeneration in brain and deposition of amyloid β peptide (1–42, a misfolded protein in the form of aggregation that prevails for a prolonged time and obstructs every aspect of life. One of the primary hallmarks of the neuropathological disease is the accretion of amyloid β peptide in the brain that leads to Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanism is still a mystery. Several investigations have shown that mutations at specific positions have a significant impact in stability of the peptide as predicted from aggregation profiles. Here in our study, we have analyzed the mutations by substituting residues at position A22G, E22G, E22K, E22Q, D23N, L34V and molecular dynamics have been performed to check the deviation in stability and conformation of the peptide. The results validated that the mutations at specific positions lead to instability and the proline substitution at E22P and L34P stalled the aggregation of the peptide. Keywords: Amyloid β peptide, Alzheimer's disease, Aggregation, Mutational analysis, NAMD, UCSF Chimera, Discovery Studio Visualizer

  17. In Silico Affinity Profiling of Neuroactive Polyphenols for Post-Traumatic Calpain Inactivation: A Molecular Docking and Atomistic Simulation Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-activated nonlysosomal neutral proteases, calpains, are believed to be early mediators of neuronal damage associated with neuron death and axonal degeneration after traumatic neural injuries. In this study, a library of biologically active small molecular weight calpain inhibitors was used for model validation and inhibition site recognition. Subsequently, two natural neuroactive polyphenols, curcumin and quercetin, were tested for their sensitivity and activity towards calpain’s proteolytic sequence and compared with the known calpain inhibitors via detailed molecular mechanics (MM, molecular dynamics (MD, and docking simulations. The MM and MD energy profiles (SJA6017 < AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < quercetin < leupeptin < PD150606 < curcumin < ALLN < ALLM < MDL-28170 < calpeptin and the docking analysis (AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < ALLN < PD150606 < curcumin < leupeptin < quercetin < calpeptin < SJA6017 < MDL-28170 < ALLM demonstrated that polyphenols conferred comparable calpain inhibition profiling. The modeling paradigm used in this study provides the first detailed account of corroboration of enzyme inhibition efficacy of calpain inhibitors and the respective calpain–calpain inhibitor molecular complexes’ energetic landscape and in addition stimulates the polyphenol bioactive paradigm for post-SCI intervention with implications reaching to experimental in vitro, in cyto, and in vivo studies.

  18. Phylogenetic reconstruction in the order Nymphaeales: ITS2 secondary structure analysis and in silico testing of maturase k (matK) as a potential marker for DNA bar coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Debnath, Manish; Kumar, Shakti; Tandon, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    The Nymphaeales (waterlilly and relatives) lineage has diverged as the second branch of basal angiosperms and comprises of two families: Cabombaceae and Nymphaceae. The classification of Nymphaeales and phylogeny within the flowering plants are quite intriguing as several systems (Thorne system, Dahlgren system, Cronquist system, Takhtajan system and APG III system (Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III system) have attempted to redefine the Nymphaeales taxonomy. There have been also fossil records consisting especially of seeds, pollen, stems, leaves and flowers as early as the lower Cretaceous. Here we present an in silico study of the order Nymphaeales taking maturaseK (matK) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) as biomarkers for phylogeny reconstruction (using character-based methods and Bayesian approach) and identification of motifs for DNA barcoding. The Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian approach yielded congruent fully resolved and well-supported trees using a concatenated (ITS2+ matK) supermatrix aligned dataset. The taxon sampling corroborates the monophyly of Cabombaceae. Nuphar emerges as a monophyletic clade in the family Nymphaeaceae while there are slight discrepancies in the monophyletic nature of the genera Nymphaea owing to Victoria-Euryale and Ondinea grouping in the same node of Nymphaeaceae. ITS2 secondary structures alignment corroborate the primary sequence analysis. Hydatellaceae emerged as a sister clade to Nymphaeaceae and had a basal lineage amongst the water lilly clades. Species from Cycas and Ginkgo were taken as outgroups and were rooted in the overall tree topology from various methods. MatK genes are fast evolving highly variant regions of plant chloroplast DNA that can serve as potential biomarkers for DNA barcoding and also in generating primers for angiosperms with identification of unique motif regions. We have reported unique genus specific motif regions in the Order Nymphaeles from matK dataset which can be further validated for

  19. Fracture strength and probability of survival of narrow and extra-narrow dental implants after fatigue testing: In vitro and in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Dimorvan; Bergamo, Edmara T P; Fardin, Vinicius P; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2017-07-01

    To assess the probability of survival (reliability) and failure modes of narrow implants with different diameters. For fatigue testing, 42 implants with the same macrogeometry and internal conical connection were divided, according to diameter, as follows: narrow (Ø3.3×10mm) and extra-narrow (Ø2.9×10mm) (21 per group). Identical abutments were torqued to the implants and standardized maxillary incisor crowns were cemented and subjected to step-stress accelerated life testing (SSALT) in water. The use-level probability Weibull curves, and reliability for a mission of 50,000 and 100,000 cycles at 50N, 100, 150 and 180N were calculated. For the finite element analysis (FEA), two virtual models, simulating the samples tested in fatigue, were constructed. Loading at 50N and 100N were applied 30° off-axis at the crown. The von-Mises stress was calculated for implant and abutment. The beta (β) values were: 0.67 for narrow and 1.32 for extra-narrow implants, indicating that failure rates did not increase with fatigue in the former, but more likely were associated with damage accumulation and wear-out failures in the latter. Both groups showed high reliability (up to 97.5%) at 50 and 100N. A decreased reliability was observed for both groups at 150 and 180N (ranging from 0 to 82.3%), but no significant difference was observed between groups. Failure predominantly involved abutment fracture for both groups. FEA at 50N-load, Ø3.3mm showed higher von-Mises stress for abutment (7.75%) and implant (2%) when compared to the Ø2.9mm. There was no significant difference between narrow and extra-narrow implants regarding probability of survival. The failure mode was similar for both groups, restricted to abutment fracture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Review and research analysis of computational target methods using BioRuby and in silico screening of herbal lead compounds against pancreatic cancer using R programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadeepa, R M; Ray, Ankita; Naik, Dhaval; Sanyal, Debendra Nath; Shah, Disha

    2014-01-01

    Plants and their natural components sophisticated with the cornerstone of traditional conventional medicinal system throughout the globe for many years and extend to furnish mankind with latest remedies. Natural Products act as lead molecules for the synthesis of various potent drugs. In the current research a study is conducted on herbal small molecule and their potential binding chemical affinity to the effect or molecules of major diseases such as pancreatic cancer. Clinical studies demonstrate correlation between Cyclin- Dependent Kinase 4 (CDK4) and malignant progression of Pancreatic Cancer. Using Bioruby Gem's we were able to analyze better characteristics of the target protein. VegaZZ and NAMD were used to minimize the energy of the target protein. Therefore identification of effective, well- tolerated targets was analyzed. Further the target protein was subjected to docking with the anti cancer inhibitors which represents a rational chemo preventive strategy using AutoDock Vina. Later using the dock score top ranked phytochemicals were analyzed for Toxicity Analysis. Using the BioRuby gem we were able to measure the distance between the amino acid. Various R scripting libraries were used to hunt the best leads, as in this case the phytochemicals. Phytochemicals such as Wedelolactones and Catechin were analyzed computationally. This study has presented the various effects of naturally occurring anti pancreatic cancer compounds Catechin, Wedelolactones that inhibits Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4. The study results reveal that compounds use less binding energy to CDK4 and inhibit its activity. Future investigation of other various wet lab studies such as cell line studies will confirm results of these two herbal chemical formulations potential ones for treating Pancreatic Cancer.

  1. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    % for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control...... motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles...

  2. In silico assessment of biomedical products: The conundrum of rare but not so rare events in two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconti, Marco; Cobelli, Claudio; Haddad, Tarek; Himes, Adam; Kovatchev, Boris; Palmer, Mark

    2017-05-01

    In silico clinical trials, defined as "The use of individualized computer simulation in the development or regulatory evaluation of a medicinal product, medical device, or medical intervention," have been proposed as a possible strategy to reduce the regulatory costs of innovation and the time to market for biomedical products. We review some of the the literature on this topic, focusing in particular on those applications where the current practice is recognized as inadequate, as for example, the detection of unexpected severe adverse events too rare to be detected in a clinical trial, but still likely enough to be of concern. We then describe with more details two case studies, two successful applications of in silico clinical trial approaches, one relative to the University of Virginia/Padova simulator that the Food and Drug Administration has accepted as possible replacement for animal testing in the preclinical assessment of artificial pancreas technologies, and the second, an investigation of the probability of cardiac lead fracture, where a Bayesian network was used to combine in vivo and in silico observations, suggesting a whole new strategy of in silico-augmented clinical trials, to be used to increase the numerosity where recruitment is impossible, or to explore patients' phenotypes that are unlikely to appear in the trial cohort, but are still frequent enough to be of concern.

  3. Construction and analysis of circular RNA molecular regulatory networks in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shuangchun; Xin, Zhuoyuan; Xu, Yinyan; Xu, Jianting; Wang, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Liver cancer is the sixth most prevalent cancer, and the third most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Circular RNAs (circRNAs), a kind of special endogenous ncRNAs, have been coming back to the forefront of cancer genomics research. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to construct and analyze the circRNA molecular regulatory networks in the context of liver cancer. We detected a total of 127 differentially expressed circRNAs and 3,235 differentially expressed mRNAs. We selected the top-5 upregulated circRNAs to construct a circRNA-miRNA-mRNA network. We enriched the pathways and gene ontology items and determined their participation in cancer-related pathways such as p53 signaling pathway and pathways involved in angiogenesis and cell cycle. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify the top-five circRNAs. ROC analysis showed circZFR, circFUT8, circIPO11 could significantly distinguish the cancer samples, with an AUC of 0.7069, 0.7575, and 0.7103, respectively. Our results suggest the circRNA-miRNA-mRNA network may help us further understand the molecular mechanisms of tumor progression in liver cancer, and reveal novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  4. A regulatory analysis on emergency preparedness for fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question this Regulatory Analysis sought to answer is: should the NRC impose additional emergency preparedness requirements on certain fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees for dealing with accidents that might have offsite releases of radioactive material. To answer the question, we analyzed potential accidents for 15 types of fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees. An appropriate plan would: (1) identify accidents for which protective actions should be taken by people offsite; (2) list the licensee's responsibilities for each type of accident, including notification of local authorities (fire and police generally); and (3) give sample messages for local authorities including protective action recommendations. This approach more closely follows the approach used for research reactors than for power reactors. The low potential offsite doses (acute fatalities and injuries not possible except possibly for UF 6 releases), the small areas where actions would be warranted, the small number of people involved, and the fact that the local police and fire departments would be doing essentially the same things they normally do, are all factors that tend to make a simple plan adequate. This report discusses the potentially hazardous accidents, and the likely effects of these accidents in terms of personnel danger

  5. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  6. Framework for the quantitative weight-of-evidence analysis of 'omics data for regulatory purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Jim; Sauer, Ursula G; Buesen, Roland; Deferme, Lize; Tollefsen, Knut E; Tralau, Tewes; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Poole, Alan; Pemberton, Mark

    2017-12-01

    A framework for the quantitative weight-of-evidence (QWoE) analysis of 'omics data for regulatory purposes is presented. The QWoE framework encompasses seven steps to evaluate 'omics data (also together with non-'omics data): (1) Hypothesis formulation, identification and weighting of lines of evidence (LoEs). LoEs conjoin different (types of) studies that are used to critically test the hypothesis. As an essential component of the QWoE framework, step 1 includes the development of templates for scoring sheets that predefine scoring criteria with scores of 0-4 to enable a quantitative determination of study quality and data relevance; (2) literature searches and categorisation of studies into the pre-defined LoEs; (3) and (4) quantitative assessment of study quality and data relevance using the respective pre-defined scoring sheets for each study; (5) evaluation of LoE-specific strength of evidence based upon the study quality and study relevance scores of the studies conjoined in the respective LoE; (6) integration of the strength of evidence from the individual LoEs to determine the overall strength of evidence; (7) characterisation of uncertainties and conclusion on the QWoE. To put the QWoE framework in practice, case studies are recommended to confirm the relevance of its different steps, or to adapt them as necessary. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Systematic Analysis of RNA Regulatory Network in Rat Brain after Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although extensive studies have identified large number of microRNAs (miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in ischemic stroke, the RNA regulation network response to focal ischemia remains poorly understood. In this study, we simultaneously interrogate the expression profiles of lncRNAs, miRNAs, and mRNAs changes during focal ischemia induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. A set of 1924 novel lncRNAs were identified and may involve brain injury and DNA repair as revealed by coexpression network analysis. Furthermore, many short interspersed elements (SINE mediated lncRNA:mRNA duplexes were identified, implying that lncRNAs mediate Staufen1-mediated mRNA decay (SMD which may play a role during focal ischemia. Moreover, based on the competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA hypothesis, a stroke regulatory ceRNA network which reveals functional lncRNA:miRNA:mRNA interactions was revealed in ischemic stroke. In brief, this work reports a large number of novel lncRNAs responding to focal ischemia and constructs a systematic RNA regulation network which highlighted the role of ncRNAs in ischemic stroke.

  8. A regulatory analysis on emergency preparedness for fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question this Regulatory Analysis sought to answer is: should the NRC impose additional emergency preparedness requirements on certain fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees for dealing with accidents that might have offsite releases of radioactive material. To answer the question, we analyzed potential accidents for 15 types of fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees. An appropriate plan would: (1) identify accidents for which protective actions should be taken by people offsite; (2) list the licensee's responsibilities for each type of accident, including notification of local authorities (fire and police generally); and (3) give sample messages for local authorities including protective action recommendations. This approach more closely follows the approach used for research reactors than for power reactors. The low potential offsite doses (acute fatalities and injuries not possible except possibly for UF/sub 6/ releases), the small areas where actions would be warranted, the small number of people involved, and the fact that the local police and fire departments would be doing essentially the same things they normally do, are all factors that tend to make a simple plan adequate. This report discusses the potentially hazardous accidents, and the likely effects of these accidents in terms of personnel danger.

  9. Analysis of a Gene Regulatory Cascade Mediating Circadian Rhythm in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In the study of circadian rhythms, it has been a puzzle how a limited number of circadian clock genes can control diverse aspects of physiology. Here we investigate circadian gene expression genome-wide using larval zebrafish as a model system. We made use of a spatial gene expression atlas to investigate the expression of circadian genes in various tissues and cell types. Comparison of genome-wide circadian gene expression data between zebrafish and mouse revealed a nearly anti-phase relationship and allowed us to detect novel evolutionarily conserved circadian genes in vertebrates. We identified three groups of zebrafish genes with distinct responses to light entrainment: fast light-induced genes, slow light-induced genes, and dark-induced genes. Our computational analysis of the circadian gene regulatory network revealed several transcription factors (TFs) involved in diverse aspects of circadian physiology through transcriptional cascade. Of these, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor a (mitfa), a dark-induced TF, mediates a circadian rhythm of melanin synthesis, which may be involved in zebrafish's adaptation to daily light cycling. Our study describes a systematic method to discover previously unidentified TFs involved in circadian physiology in complex organisms. PMID:23468616

  10. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE

  11. Transcriptome analysis of all two-component regulatory system mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Taku; Aiba, Hirofumi; Masuda, Yasushi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Sugiura, Masahito; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2002-10-01

    We have systematically examined the mRNA profiles of 36 two-component deletion mutants, which include all two-component regulatory systems of Escherichia coli, under a single growth condition. DNA microarray results revealed that the mutants belong to one of three groups based on their gene expression profiles in Luria-Bertani broth under aerobic conditions: (i) those with no or little change; (ii) those with significant changes; and (iii) those with drastic changes. Under these conditions, the anaeroresponsive ArcB/ArcA system, the osmoresponsive EnvZ/OmpR system and the response regulator UvrY showed the most drastic changes. Cellular functions such as flagellar synthesis and expression of the RpoS regulon were affected by multiple two-component systems. A high correlation coefficient of expression profile was found between several two-component mutants. Together, these results support the view that a network of functional interactions, such as cross-regulation, exists between different two-component systems. The compiled data are avail-able at our website (http://ecoli.aist-nara.ac.jp/xp_analysis/ 2_components).

  12. High accuracy in silico sulfotransferase models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian; Wang, Ting; Falany, Charles N; Leyh, Thomas S

    2013-11-29

    Predicting enzymatic behavior in silico is an integral part of our efforts to understand biology. Hundreds of millions of compounds lie in targeted in silico libraries waiting for their metabolic potential to be discovered. In silico "enzymes" capable of accurately determining whether compounds can inhibit or react is often the missing piece in this endeavor. This problem has now been solved for the cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs). SULTs regulate the bioactivities of thousands of compounds--endogenous metabolites, drugs and other xenobiotics--by transferring the sulfuryl moiety (SO3) from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate to the hydroxyls and primary amines of these acceptors. SULT1A1 and 2A1 catalyze the majority of sulfation that occurs during human Phase II metabolism. Here, recent insights into the structure and dynamics of SULT binding and reactivity are incorporated into in silico models of 1A1 and 2A1 that are used to identify substrates and inhibitors in a structurally diverse set of 1,455 high value compounds: the FDA-approved small molecule drugs. The SULT1A1 models predict 76 substrates. Of these, 53 were known substrates. Of the remaining 23, 21 were tested, and all were sulfated. The SULT2A1 models predict 22 substrates, 14 of which are known substrates. Of the remaining 8, 4 were tested, and all are substrates. The models proved to be 100% accurate in identifying substrates and made no false predictions at Kd thresholds of 100 μM. In total, 23 "new" drug substrates were identified, and new linkages to drug inhibitors are predicted. It now appears to be possible to accurately predict Phase II sulfonation in silico.

  13. Is Increased Susceptibility to Balkan Endemic Nephropathy in Carriers of Common GSTA1 (*A/*B Polymorphism Linked with the Catalytic Role of GSTA1 in Ochratoxin A Biotransformation? Serbian Case Control Study and In Silico Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Reljic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although recent data suggest aristolochic acid as a putative cause of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN, evidence also exists in favor of ochratoxin A (OTA exposure as risk factor for the disease. The potential role of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the glutathione transferases (GSTs, in OTA biotransformation is based on OTA glutathione adducts (OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG in blood and urine of BEN patients. We aimed to analyze the association between common GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 polymorphisms and BEN susceptibility, and thereafter performed an in silico simulation of particular GST enzymes potentially involved in OTA transformations. GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genotypes were determined in 207 BEN patients and 138 non-BEN healthy individuals from endemic regions by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Molecular modeling in silico was performed for GSTA1 protein. Among the GST polymorphisms tested, only GSTA1 was significantly associated with a higher risk of BEN. Namely, carriers of the GSTA1*B gene variant, associated with lower transcriptional activation, were at a 1.6-fold higher BEN risk than those carrying the homozygous GSTA1*A/*A genotype (OR = 1.6; p = 0.037. In in silico modeling, we found four structures, two OTB-SG and two OTHQ-SG, bound in a GSTA1 monomer. We found that GSTA1 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of BEN, and suggested, according to the in silico simulation, that GSTA1-1 might be involved in catalyzing the formation of OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG conjugates.

  14. Regulatory activities; Actividades regulatorias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information.

  15. Identification and Functional Analysis of Gene Regulatory Sequences Interacting with Colorectal Tumor Suppressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Katja; Troelsen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Several tumor suppressors possess gene regulatory activity. Here, we describe how promoter and promoter/enhancer reporter assays can be used to characterize a colorectal tumor suppressor proteins’ gene regulatory activity of possible target genes. In the first part, a bioinformatic approach...... of the quick and efficient In-Fusion cloning method, and how to carry out transient transfections of Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the produced luciferase reporter plasmids using polyethyleneimine (PEI). A plan describing how to set up and carry out the luciferase expression assay is presented. The luciferase...... to identify relevant gene regulatory regions of potential target genes is presented. In the second part, it is demonstrated how to prepare and carry out the functional assay. We explain how to clone the bioinformatically identified gene regulatory regions into luciferase reporter plasmids by the use...

  16. Phos-tag-based analysis of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation in human uterine myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector N Aguilar

    Full Text Available The 'phosphate-binding tag' (phos-tag reagent enables separation of phospho-proteins during SDS-PAGE by impeding migration proportional to their phosphorylation stoichiometry. Western blotting can then be used to detect and quantify the bands corresponding to the phospho-states of a target protein. We present a method for quantification of data regarding phospho-states derived from phos-tag SDS-PAGE. The method incorporates corrections for lane-to-lane loading variability and for the effects of drug vehicles thus enabling the comparison of multiple treatments by using the untreated cellular set-point as a reference. This method is exemplified by quantifying the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC in cultured human uterine myocytes.We have evaluated and validated the concept that, when using an antibody (Ab against the total-protein, the sum of all phosphorylation states in a single lane represents a 'closed system' since all possible phospho-states and phosphoisotypes are detected. Using this approach, we demonstrate that oxytocin (OT and calpeptin (Calp induce RLC kinase (MLCK- and rho-kinase (ROK-dependent enhancements in phosphorylation of RLC at T18 and S19. Treatment of myocytes with a phorbol ester (PMA induced phosphorylation of S1-RLC, which caused a mobility shift in the phos-tag matrices distinct from phosphorylation at S19.We have presented a method for analysis of phospho-state data that facilitates quantitative comparison to a reference control without the use of a traditional 'loading' or 'reference' standard. This analysis is useful for assessing effects of putative agonists and antagonists where all phospho-states are represented in control and experimental samples. We also demonstrated that phosphorylation of RLC at S1 is inducible in intact uterine myocytes, though the signal in the resting samples was not sufficiently abundant to allow quantification by the approach used here.

  17. Bioinformatic analysis of cis-regulatory interactions between progesterone and estrogen receptors in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Khushi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin factors interact with each other in a cell and sequence-specific manner in order to regulate transcription and a wealth of publically available datasets exists describing the genomic locations of these interactions. Our recently published BiSA (Binding Sites Analyser database contains transcription factor binding locations and epigenetic modifications collected from published studies and provides tools to analyse stored and imported data. Using BiSA we investigated the overlapping cis-regulatory role of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and progesterone receptor (PR in the T-47D breast cancer cell line. We found that ERα binding sites overlap with a subset of PR binding sites. To investigate further, we re-analysed raw data to remove any biases introduced by the use of distinct tools in the original publications. We identified 22,152 PR and 18,560 ERα binding sites (<5% false discovery rate with 4,358 overlapping regions among the two datasets. BiSA statistical analysis revealed a non-significant overall overlap correlation between the two factors, suggesting that ERα and PR are not partner factors and do not require each other for binding to occur. However, Monte Carlo simulation by Binary Interval Search (BITS, Relevant Distance, Absolute Distance, Jaccard and Projection tests by Genometricorr revealed a statistically significant spatial correlation of binding regions on chromosome between the two factors. Motif analysis revealed that the shared binding regions were enriched with binding motifs for ERα, PR and a number of other transcription and pioneer factors. Some of these factors are known to co-locate with ERα and PR binding. Therefore spatially close proximity of ERα binding sites with PR binding sites suggests that ERα and PR, in general function independently at the molecular level, but that their activities converge on a specific subset of transcriptional targets.

  18. Discourse-voice regulatory strategies in the psychotherapeutic interaction: a state-space dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomicic, Alemka; Martínez, Claudio; Pérez, J Carola; Hollenstein, Tom; Angulo, Salvador; Gerstmann, Adam; Barroux, Isabelle; Krause, Mariane

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to provide evidence of the dynamics associated with the configurations of discourse-voice regulatory strategies in patient-therapist interactions in relevant episodes within psychotherapeutic sessions. Its central assumption is that discourses manifest themselves differently in terms of their prosodic characteristics according to their regulatory functions in a system of interactions. The association between discourse and vocal quality in patients and therapists was analyzed in a sample of 153 relevant episodes taken from 164 sessions of five psychotherapies using the state space grid (SSG) method, a graphical tool based on the dynamic systems theory (DST). The results showed eight recurrent and stable discourse-voice regulatory strategies of the patients and three of the therapists. Also, four specific groups of these discourse-voice strategies were identified. The latter were interpreted as regulatory configurations, that is to say, as emergent self-organized groups of discourse-voice regulatory strategies constituting specific interactional systems. Both regulatory strategies and their configurations differed between two types of relevant episodes: Change Episodes and Rupture Episodes. As a whole, these results support the assumption that speaking and listening, as dimensions of the interaction that takes place during therapeutic conversation, occur at different levels. The study not only shows that these dimensions are dependent on each other, but also that they function as a complex and dynamic whole in therapeutic dialog, generating relational offers which allow the patient and the therapist to regulate each other and shape the psychotherapeutic process that characterizes each type of relevant episode.

  19. Retention behavior of nickel, copper, cadmium and zinc ions from aqueous solutions on silico-titanate and silico-antimonate used as inorganic ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Mesalam, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Silico-titanate (SiTi) and silico-antimonate (SiSb) have been synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction patterns, infrared and thermal analysis techniques. Divalent cations such as Ni 2+ , Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ and Cu 2+ in the pH range 2 to 8 have been exchanged with the exchangeable active sites of the exchangers using a batch technique. From the results obtained, the equilibrium capacities and distribution coefficient values were calculated indicating high selectivity values for Ni 2+ , Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ and Cu 2+ ions on silico-titanate and silico-antimonate compared to other titanates and antimonates. Also SiTi and SiSb show high chemical stability in H 2 O, nitric and hydrochloric acids. All these results support the suitability of the prepared materials for the removal of the toxic metals concerned from waste waters. Based on the results obtained, practical separation experiments for the above mentioned cations on SiTi and SiSb columns from aqueous waste solutions were carried out. (author)

  20. In silico panning for a non-competitive peptide inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikebukuro Kazunori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide ligands have tremendous therapeutic potential as efficacious drugs. Currently, more than 40 peptides are available in the market for a drug. However, since costly and time-consuming synthesis procedures represent a problem for high-throughput screening, novel procedures to reduce the time and labor involved in screening peptide ligands are required. We propose the novel approach of 'in silico panning' which consists of a two-stage screening, involving affinity selection by docking simulation and evolution of the peptide ligand using genetic algorithms (GAs. In silico panning was successfully applied to the selection of peptide inhibitor for water-soluble quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (PQQGDH. Results The evolution of peptide ligands for a target enzyme was achieved by combining a docking simulation with evolution of the peptide ligand using genetic algorithms (GAs, which mimic Darwinian evolution. Designation of the target area as next to the substrate-binding site of the enzyme in the docking simulation enabled the selection of a non-competitive inhibitor. In all, four rounds of selection were carried out on the computer; the distribution of the docking energy decreased gradually for each generation and improvements in the docking energy were observed over the four rounds of selection. One of the top three selected peptides with the lowest docking energy, 'SERG' showed an inhibitory effect with Ki value of 20 μM. PQQGDH activity, in terms of the Vmax value, was 3-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme in the presence of this peptide. The mechanism of the SERG blockage of the enzyme was identified as non-competitive inhibition. We confirmed the specific binding of the peptide, and its equilibrium dissociation constant (KD value was calculated as 60 μM by surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate an effective methodology of in silico panning for the selection of a non

  1. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  2. OncoPeptTUME – An in silico platform to study tumor micro-environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Manoharan

    2017-12-01

    We applied our in silico platform on the TCGA cancer samples. Our analysis showed that patients with higher CD8 score have better survival in bladder carcinoma, endocervical adenocarcinoma, head & neck, sarcoma, melanoma, thyroid, whereas, patients with higher monocyte score have poor survival in endocervical adenocarcinoma, kidney renal clear cell carcinoma, kidney renal papillary cell carcinoma, lower grade glioma and liver hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Bridging plant and human radiation response and DNA repair through an in silico approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nikitaki, Z.; Pavlopoulou, A.; Holá, Marcela; Donà, M.; Michalopoulos, I.; Balestrazzi, A.; Angelis, Karel; Georgakilas, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2017), č. článku 65. ISSN 2072-6694 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-01137S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Bioinformatics * DNA damage repair * In silico analysis * Ionizing radiation * Plant radiation biodosimeter * Ultraviolet radiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Oncology

  4. In-silico-driven metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas putida for enhanced production of poly-hydroxyalkanoates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poblete-Castro, I.; Binger, D.; Rodrigues, A.; Becker, J.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Wittmann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present systems metabolic engineering driven by in-silico modeling to tailor Pseudomonas putida for synthesis of medium chain length PHAs on glucose. Using physiological properties of the parent wild type as constraints, elementary flux mode analysis of a large-scale model of the metabolism

  5. In Silico survey of functional coding variants in human AEG-1 gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and aims: Non-synonymous (ns)SNPs represent typical genetic variations that may potentially affect the structure or function of expressed proteins and therefore could have an impact on complex disorders. A computational-based (In Silico) analysis has been done to evaluate the phenotypic effect of nsSNPs in ...

  6. Application of isotopic substitution for studing thermal decomposition of silico-12-tungstic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakhinov, V.V.; Pinchuk, I.N.; Tumurova, L.V.; Mokhosoev, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Using the methods of thermal analysis and isotopic substitution, the mechanism of dehydration and decomposition of silico-12-tungstic acid hydrate is studied. It is found that H-D exchange leads to elevation of temperature of heteropoly acid decomposition. The observed isotopic effect shows that proton transfer is the limiting stage of the reaction

  7. In silico modeling predicts drug sensitivity of patient-derived cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingle, Sandeep C; Sultana, Zeba; Pastorino, Sandra; Jiang, Pengfei; Mukthavaram, Rajesh; Chao, Ying; Bharati, Ila Sri; Nomura, Natsuko; Makale, Milan; Abbasi, Taher; Kapoor, Shweta; Kumar, Ansu; Usmani, Shahabuddin; Agrawal, Ashish; Vali, Shireen; Kesari, Santosh

    2014-05-21

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive disease associated with poor survival. It is essential to account for the complexity of GBM biology to improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. This complexity is best represented by the increasing amounts of profiling ("omics") data available due to advances in biotechnology. The challenge of integrating these vast genomic and proteomic data can be addressed by a comprehensive systems modeling approach. Here, we present an in silico model, where we simulate GBM tumor cells using genomic profiling data. We use this in silico tumor model to predict responses of cancer cells to targeted drugs. Initially, we probed the results from a recent hypothesis-independent, empirical study by Garnett and co-workers that analyzed the sensitivity of hundreds of profiled cancer cell lines to 130 different anticancer agents. We then used the tumor model to predict sensitivity of patient-derived GBM cell lines to different targeted therapeutic agents. Among the drug-mutation associations reported in the Garnett study, our in silico model accurately predicted ~85% of the associations. While testing the model in a prospective manner using simulations of patient-derived GBM cell lines, we compared our simulation predictions with experimental data using the same cells in vitro. This analysis yielded a ~75% agreement of in silico drug sensitivity with in vitro experimental findings. These results demonstrate a strong predictability of our simulation approach using the in silico tumor model presented here. Our ultimate goal is to use this model to stratify patients for clinical trials. By accurately predicting responses of cancer cells to targeted agents a priori, this in silico tumor model provides an innovative approach to personalizing therapy and promises to improve clinical management of cancer.

  8. BRCA1/2 missense mutations and the value of in-silico analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Carolin E; Kohlstedt, Daniela; Meisel, Cornelia; Keller, Katja; Becker, Kerstin; Mackenroth, Luisa; Rump, Andreas; Schröck, Evelin; Wimberger, Pauline; Kast, Karin

    2017-11-01

    The clinical implications of genetic variants in BRCA1/2 in healthy and affected individuals are considerable. Variant interpretation, however, is especially challenging for missense variants. The majority of them are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS). Computational (in-silico) predictive programs are easy to access, but represent only one tool out of a wide range of complemental approaches to classify VUS. With this single-center study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of in-silico analyses in a spectrum of different BRCA1/2 missense variants. We conducted mutation analysis of BRCA1/2 in 523 index patients with suspected hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Classification of the genetic variants was performed according to the German Consortium (GC)-HBOC database. Additionally, all missense variants were classified by the following three in-silico prediction tools: SIFT, Mutation Taster (MT2) and PolyPhen2 (PPH2). Overall 201 different variants, 68 of which constituted missense variants were ranked as pathogenic, neutral, or unknown. The classification of missense variants by in-silico tools resulted in a higher amount of pathogenic mutations (25% vs. 13.2%) compared to the GC-HBOC-classification. Altogether, more than fifty percent (38/68, 55.9%) of missense variants were ranked differently. Sensitivity of in-silico-tools for mutation prediction was 88.9% (PPH2), 100% (SIFT) and 100% (MT2). We found a relevant discrepancy in variant classification by using in-silico prediction tools, resulting in potential overestimation and/or underestimation of cancer risk. More reliable, notably gene-specific, prediction tools and functional tests are needed to improve clinical counseling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequence-based model of gap gene regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Konstantin; Gursky, Vitaly; Kulakovskiy, Ivan; Samsonova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The detailed analysis of transcriptional regulation is crucially important for understanding biological processes. The gap gene network in Drosophila attracts large interest among researches studying mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. It implements the most upstream regulatory layer of the segmentation gene network. The knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in gap gene regulation is far less complete than that of genetics of the system. Mathematical modeling goes beyond insights gained by genetics and molecular approaches. It allows us to reconstruct wild-type gene expression patterns in silico, infer underlying regulatory mechanism and prove its sufficiency. We developed a new model that provides a dynamical description of gap gene regulatory systems, using detailed DNA-based information, as well as spatial transcription factor concentration data at varying time points. We showed that this model correctly reproduces gap gene expression patterns in wild type embryos and is able to predict gap expression patterns in Kr mutants and four reporter constructs. We used four-fold cross validation test and fitting to random dataset to validate the model and proof its sufficiency in data description. The identifiability analysis showed that most model parameters are well identifiable. We reconstructed the gap gene network topology and studied the impact of individual transcription factor binding sites on the model output. We measured this impact by calculating the site regulatory weight as a normalized difference between the residual sum of squares error for the set of all annotated sites and for the set with the site of interest excluded. The reconstructed topology of the gap gene network is in agreement with previous modeling results and data from literature. We showed that 1) the regulatory weights of transcription factor binding sites show very weak correlation with their PWM score; 2) sites with low regulatory weight are important for the model output; 3

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rhea Sieber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomic approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detected were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. The proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis macromolecular stability and energy metabolism to S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.

  11. Application of the Gini correlation coefficient to infer regulatory relationships in transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2012-09-01

    One of the computational challenges in plant systems biology is to accurately infer transcriptional regulation relationships based on correlation analyses of gene expression patterns. Despite several correlation methods that are applied in biology to analyze microarray data, concerns regarding the compatibility of these methods with the gene expression data profiled by high-throughput RNA transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology have been raised. These concerns are mainly due to the fact that the distribution of read counts in RNA-Seq experiments is different from that of fluorescence intensities in microarray experiments. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of the existing correlation methods and, if necessary, introduction of novel methods into biology is appropriate. In this study, we compared four existing correlation methods used in microarray analysis and one novel method called the Gini correlation coefficient on previously published microarray-based and sequencing-based gene expression data in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). The comparisons were performed on more than 11,000 regulatory relationships in Arabidopsis, including 8,929 pairs of transcription factors and target genes. Our analyses pinpointed the strengths and weaknesses of each method and indicated that the Gini correlation can compensate for the shortcomings of the Pearson correlation, the Spearman correlation, the Kendall correlation, and the Tukey's biweight correlation. The Gini correlation method, with the other four evaluated methods in this study, was implemented as an R package named rsgcc that can be utilized as an alternative option for biologists to perform clustering analyses of gene expression patterns or transcriptional network analyses.

  12. Application of the Gini Correlation Coefficient to Infer Regulatory Relationships in Transcriptome Analysis[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    One of the computational challenges in plant systems biology is to accurately infer transcriptional regulation relationships based on correlation analyses of gene expression patterns. Despite several correlation methods that are applied in biology to analyze microarray data, concerns regarding the compatibility of these methods with the gene expression data profiled by high-throughput RNA transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology have been raised. These concerns are mainly due to the fact that the distribution of read counts in RNA-Seq experiments is different from that of fluorescence intensities in microarray experiments. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of the existing correlation methods and, if necessary, introduction of novel methods into biology is appropriate. In this study, we compared four existing correlation methods used in microarray analysis and one novel method called the Gini correlation coefficient on previously published microarray-based and sequencing-based gene expression data in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). The comparisons were performed on more than 11,000 regulatory relationships in Arabidopsis, including 8,929 pairs of transcription factors and target genes. Our analyses pinpointed the strengths and weaknesses of each method and indicated that the Gini correlation can compensate for the shortcomings of the Pearson correlation, the Spearman correlation, the Kendall correlation, and the Tukey’s biweight correlation. The Gini correlation method, with the other four evaluated methods in this study, was implemented as an R package named rsgcc that can be utilized as an alternative option for biologists to perform clustering analyses of gene expression patterns or transcriptional network analyses. PMID:22797655

  13. Regulatory analysis for the use of underground barriers at the Hanford Site tank farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampsten, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-seven of the single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, are assumed to have leaked in the past. Some of the waste retrieval options being considered, such as past-practice sluicing (a process that uses hot water to dislodge waste for subsequent removal by pumping), have the potential for increasing releases of dangerous waste from these tanks. Underground barrier systems are being evaluated as a method to mitigate releases of tank waste to the soil and groundwater that may occur during retrieval activities. The following underground barrier system options are among those being evaluated to determine whether their construction at the Single-Shell Tank Farms is viable. (1) A desiccant barrier would be created by circulating air through the subsurface soil to lower and then maintain the water saturation below the levels required for liquids to flow. (2) An injected materials barrier would be created by injecting materials such as grout or silica into the subsurface soils to form a barrier around and under a given tank or tank farm. (3) A cryogenic barrier would be created by freezing subsurface soils in the vicinity of a tank or tank farm. An analysis is provided of the major regulatory requirements that may impact full scale construction and operation of an underground barrier system and a discussion of factors that should be considered throughout the barrier selection process, irrespective of the type of underground barrier system being considered. However, specific barrier systems will be identified when a given regulation will have significant impact on a particular type of barrier technology. Appendix A provides a matrix of requirements applicable to construction and operation of an underground barrier system

  14. An epidemiological analysis of equine welfare data from regulatory inspections by the official competent authorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchens, P L; Hultgren, J; Frössling, J; Emanuelson, U; Keeling, L J

    2017-07-01

    welfare if they also complied with documentation requirements. We present a novel approach for analysis of equine welfare data from regulatory inspections by the official competent authorities, and propose on-going analyses and benchmarking of trends in animal-based measures over time. We also suggest how such a database could be further improved to facilitate future epidemiological analyses of risk factors associated with poor equine welfare. The study has implications for other competent authorities and researchers collaborating in the area of animal welfare epidemiology.

  15. In Silico Screening and In Vitro Activity Measurement of Javamide Analogues as Potential p38 MAPK Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae B

    2017-12-13

    p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is a protein kinase critically involved in the progress of inflammation/stress-associated diseases. Our data suggested that javamide analogues may contain strong anti-inflammation activities, but there is little information about their effects on p38 MAPK. Therefore, in this paper, the effects of thirty javamide analogues on p38 MAPK were investigated using in silico screening and in vitro p38 MAPK assay methods. The javamide analogues were synthesized and their chemical structures were confirmed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. Then, the javamide analogues were screened using an in silico modeling program. The screened analogues demonstrated a wide range of binding energy (ΔE; -20 to -39) and several analogues with ΔE; -34 to -39 showed strong binding affinity to p38 MAPK. In vitro p38 MAPK assay, the kinase was significantly inhibited by the analogues with great binding energy (ΔE; -34 to -39) and in silico scores (Avg. score; -27.5 to -29.3). Furthermore, the comparative analysis of both assays showed a positive correlation between the in silico scores and p38 MAPK inhibition. In fact, the javamide analogues with top five in silico scores (Avg. score; -27.5 to -29.3) were found to inhibit p38 MAPK by 27-31% ( p silico score (Avg. score; -29.2) inhibited p38 MAPK (IC 50 = 9.9 μM) a little better than its methyl ester with best in silico score (Avg. score; -29.3). To support the ability to inhibit p38 MAPK, the treatment of javamide-II-ethyl and -methyl esters could suppress the production of IL-8 and MCP-1 protein significantly by 22-73% ( p silico and in vitro assay approach may be a useful and efficient solution as a functional screening approach in searching new lead compounds for targeted molecules.

  16. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 125.II.7 ''Reevaluate Provision to Automatically Isolate Feedwater from Steam Generator During a Line Break''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdekas, D.L.

    1988-09-01

    Generic Issue 125.II.7 addresses the concern related to the automatic isolation of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) to a steam generator with a broken steam or feedwater line. This regulatory analysis provides a quantitative assessment of the costs and benefits associated with the removal of the AFW automatic isolation and concludes that no new regulatory requirements are warranted. 21 refs., 7 tabs

  17. An Analysis of Regulatory Strategies for Recycling and Re-Use of Metals in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Gumley

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article considers regulatory strategies that promote more efficient use of material inputs within the Australian economy, with particular focus on recycling and recovery of metals, drawing upon the concept of a “circular economy”. It briefly reviews the nature of regulation and trends in regulatory strategies within changing policy contexts, and then examines the regulatory framework applicable to the various phases in the life cycle of metals, ranging from extraction of minerals to processing and assimilation of metals into finished products, through to eventual disposal of products as waste. Discussion focuses upon the regulatory strategies applied in each phase and the changing roles of government and business operators within global distribution networks. It is concluded that the prevailing political agenda favoring deregulation and reduced taxation may be a major barrier to development of new styles of regulation and more effective use of taxation powers that is needed to support a more circular economy in metals. The implication for future research is the need to substantiate the outcomes of reflexive regulatory strategies with well-designed empirical studies.

  18. Nanoparticulate materials and regulatory policy in Europe: An analysis of stakeholder perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helland, Aasgeir; Kastenholz, Hans; Thidell, Aake; Arnfalk, Peter; Deppert, Knut

    2006-01-01

    The novel properties of nanoparticulate materials (NPM) and the rapid development of NPM based products have raised many unanswered questions and concerns by different stakeholders over its consequences for the environment and human health. These concerns have led to an increasing discussion in both the US and Europe about possible regulatory policies for NPM. In this article a comparative study of stakeholders' perceptions on regulatory policy issues with NPM in Europe is presented. It was found that industry wants to regulate this area if the scientific evidence demonstrates that NPM are harmful, but also that the regulatory bodies do not find it necessary at this point of time to regulate until scientific evidence demonstrates that NPM are harmful. This research therefore shows that there will most likely not be any regulatory interventions until there is an established and convincing scientific knowledge base demonstrating that NPM can be hazardous. It is furthermore discussed in this article the different roles and responsibilities of the stakeholders in financing the research required to establish the necessary level of fundamental scientific evidence. It was also found that the activity of the regulatory bodies on this issue differ between the European countries

  19. In Silico Medicine: Social, Technological and Symbolic Mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Carusi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In silico medicine is still forging a road for itself in the current biomedical landscape. Discursively and rhetorically, it is using a three-way positioning, first, deploying discourses of personalised medicine, second, extending the 3Rs from animal to clinical research, and third, aligning its methods with experimental methods. The discursive and rhetorical positioning in promotions and statements of the programme gives us insight into the sociability of the scientific labour of advancing the programme. Its progress depends on complex social, institutional and technological conditions which are not external to its epistemology, but intricately interwoven with it. This article sets out to show that this is the case through an analysis of the process of computational modelling that is at the core of its epistemology. In this paper I show that the very notion of ‘model’ needs to be re-thought for in silico medicine (as indeed, for most forms of computational modelling, and propose a replacement, in the form of the ‘Model-Simulation-Experiment-System’ or MSE-system, which is simultaneously an epistemological, social and technological system. I argue that the MSE-system is radically mediated by social relations, technologies and symbolic systems. We need now to understand how such mediations operate effectively in the construction of robust MSE-systems.

  20. Discourse-Voice Regulatory Strategies in the Psychotherapeutic Interaction: A State-Space Dynamics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemka eTomicic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to provide evidence of the dynamics associated with the configurations of discourse-voice regulatory strategies in patient-therapist interactions in relevant episodes within psychotherapeutic sessions. Its central assumption is that discourses manifest themselves differently in terms of their prosodic characteristics according to their regulatory functions in a system of interactions. The association between discourse and vocal quality in patients and therapists was analyzed in a sample of 153 relevant episodes taken from 164 sessions of five psychotherapies using the State Space Grid (SSG method, a graphical tool based on the Dynamic Systems Theory (DST. The results showed eight recurrent and stable discourse-voice regulatory strategies of the patients and three of the therapists. Also, four specific groups of these discourse-voice strategies were identified. The latter were interpreted as regulatory configurations, that is to say, as emergent self-organized groups of discourse-voice regulatory strategies constituting specific interactional systems. Both regulatory strategies and their configurations differed between two types of relevant episodes: Change Episodes and Rupture Episodes. As a whole, these results support the assumption that speaking and listening, as dimensions of the interaction that takes place during therapeutic conversation, occur at different levels. The study not only shows that these dimensions are dependent on each other, but also that they function as a complex and dynamic whole in therapeutic dialogue, generating relational offers which allow the patient and the therapist to regulate each other and shape the psychotherapeutic process that characterizes each type of relevant episode.

  1. Thorough in silico and in vitro cDNA analysis of 21 putative BRCA1 and BRCA2 splice variants and a complex tandem duplication in BRCA2 allowing the identification of activated cryptic splice donor sites in BRCA2 exon 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Annelot; Machackova, Eva; Coene, Ilse; Cremin, Carol; Turner, Kristin; Portigal-Todd, Cheryl; Asrat, Marie Jill; Nuk, Jennifer; Mindlin, Allison; Young, Sean; MacMillan, Andree; Van Maerken, Tom; Trbusek, Martin; McKinnon, Wendy; Wood, Marie E; Foulkes, William D; Santamariña, Marta; de la Hoya, Miguel; Foretova, Lenka; Poppe, Bruce; Vral, Anne; Rosseel, Toon; De Leeneer, Kim; Vega, Ana; Claes, Kathleen B M

    2018-04-01

    For 21 putative BRCA1 and BRCA2 splice site variants, the concordance between mRNA analysis and predictions by in silico programs was evaluated. Aberrant splicing was confirmed for 12 alterations. In silico prediction tools were helpful to determine for which variants cDNA analysis is warranted, however, predictions for variants in the Cartegni consensus region but outside the canonical sites, were less reliable. Learning algorithms like Adaboost and Random Forest outperformed the classical tools. Further validations are warranted prior to implementation of these novel tools in clinical settings. Additionally, we report here for the first time activated cryptic donor sites in the large exon 11 of BRCA2 by evaluating the effect at the cDNA level of a novel tandem duplication (5' breakpoint in intron 4; 3' breakpoint in exon 11) and of a variant disrupting the splice donor site of exon 11 (c.6841+1G > C). Additional sites were predicted, but not activated. These sites warrant further research to increase our knowledge on cis and trans acting factors involved in the conservation of correct transcription of this large exon. This may contribute to adequate design of ASOs (antisense oligonucleotides), an emerging therapy to render cancer cells sensitive to PARP inhibitor and platinum therapies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Incorporation of in silico biodegradability screening in early drug development--a feasible approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Länge, Reinhard; Heuck, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    The concentration of a pharmaceutical found in the environment is determined by the amount used by the patient, the excretion and metabolism pattern, and eventually by its persistence. Biological degradation or persistence of a pharmaceutical is experimentally tested rather late in the development of a pharmaceutical, often shortly before submission of the dossier to regulatory authorities. To investigate whether the aspect of persistence of a compound could be assessed early during drug development, we investigated whether biodegradation of pharmaceuticals could be predicted with the help of in silico tools. To assess the value of in silico prediction, we collected results for the OECD 301 degradation test ("ready biodegradability") of 42 drugs or drug synthesis intermediates and compared them to the prediction of the in silico tool BIOWIN. Of these compounds, 38 were predictable with BIOWIN, which is a module of the Estimation Programs Interface (EPI) Suite™ provided by the US EPA. The program failed to predict the two drugs which proved to be readily biodegradable in the degradation tests. On the other hand, BIOWIN predicted two compounds to be readily biodegradable which, however, proved to be persistent in the test setting. The comparison of experimental data with the predicted one resulted in a specificity of 94% and a sensitivity of 0%. The results of this study do not indicate that application of the biodegradation prediction tool BIOWIN is a feasible approach to assess the ready biodegradability during early drug development.

  3. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerio, Luis G.

    2009-01-01

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  4. Case Study for Effectiveness Analysis on Nuclear Regulatory Infrastructure Support for Emerging Nuclear Energy Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. E.; Byeon, M. J.; Yoo, J. W.; Lee, J. M.; Lim, J. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The donor countries need to make decisions on various steps such as whether to fully accept newcomers’ requests, the depth of support, and how the supportive action will be carried out. Such is not an easy task due to limited time, resources, manpower, etc. Thus, creating an infrastructure to support emerging nuclear energy countries is needed. This paper suggests the resource portfolio concept used in business management and aims to analyze the validity of supporting the new entrants’ development of regulatory infrastructure as a case study. This study tries to develop a very simple Excel-based tool for assessing the supporting strategy quantitatively and screening the activities that is projected to be less effective and attractive. There are many countries, so called newcomers, which have expressed interests in developing their own nuclear power program. It has been recognized by the international community that every country considering embarking upon their own nuclear power program should establish their nuclear safety infrastructure to sustain a high level of nuclear safety. The newcomers have requested for considerable assistance from the IAEA and they already have bilateral cooperation programs with the advanced countries with matured nuclear regulatory programs. Currently, the regulatory bodies that provide support are confronted with two responsibilities as follows; the primary objective of the regulatory bodies is to ensure that the operator fulfills the responsibility to protect human health.

  5. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam

    2011-01-01

    a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein...

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's antitrust review process: an analysis of the impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) antitrust process is reviewed and its impacts to small systems and applicant systems are studied. This process takes the form of a description of the NRC's antitrust review process as implemented, a generic categorization of potential impacts and individual case-by-case studies of four different utilities

  7. Analysis of time to regulatory and ethical approval of SATVI TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) vaccine trials in South Africa must be approved by the Medicines Control Council (MCC) and by a human research ethics committee (HREC). Delays in regulatory and ethical approval may affect operational and budget planning and clinical development of the product. Aim. Our aim was to ...

  8. Case Study for Effectiveness Analysis on Nuclear Regulatory Infrastructure Support for Emerging Nuclear Energy Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. E.; Byeon, M. J.; Yoo, J. W.; Lee, J. M.; Lim, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The donor countries need to make decisions on various steps such as whether to fully accept newcomers’ requests, the depth of support, and how the supportive action will be carried out. Such is not an easy task due to limited time, resources, manpower, etc. Thus, creating an infrastructure to support emerging nuclear energy countries is needed. This paper suggests the resource portfolio concept used in business management and aims to analyze the validity of supporting the new entrants’ development of regulatory infrastructure as a case study. This study tries to develop a very simple Excel-based tool for assessing the supporting strategy quantitatively and screening the activities that is projected to be less effective and attractive. There are many countries, so called newcomers, which have expressed interests in developing their own nuclear power program. It has been recognized by the international community that every country considering embarking upon their own nuclear power program should establish their nuclear safety infrastructure to sustain a high level of nuclear safety. The newcomers have requested for considerable assistance from the IAEA and they already have bilateral cooperation programs with the advanced countries with matured nuclear regulatory programs. Currently, the regulatory bodies that provide support are confronted with two responsibilities as follows; the primary objective of the regulatory bodies is to ensure that the operator fulfills the responsibility to protect human health

  9. Introduction to the Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Regulatory Commission Federal Housing Finance Agency Federal Maritime Commission Federal Mediation and... that the Regulatory Flexibility Act may require a Regulatory Flexibility Analysis, actions selected for.... Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required -- whether an analysis is required by the Regulatory Flexibility Act...

  10. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation suggests its broad regulatory scope in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Peter; Wagner, Sebastian Alexander; Weinert, Brian Tate

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by lysine acetylation plays important regulatory roles in living cells. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used unicellular eukaryotic model organism in biomedical research. S. cerevisiae contains several evolutionary conserved lysine...... acetyltransferases and deacetylases. However, only a few dozen acetylation sites in S. cerevisiae are known, presenting a major obstacle for further understanding the regulatory roles of acetylation in this organism. Here we use high resolution mass spectrometry to identify about 4000 lysine acetylation sites in S....... cerevisiae. Acetylated proteins are implicated in the regulation of diverse cytoplasmic and nuclear processes including chromatin organization, mitochondrial metabolism, and protein synthesis. Bioinformatic analysis of yeast acetylation sites shows that acetylated lysines are significantly more conserved...

  11. CoryneRegNet 4.0 – A reference database for corynebacterial gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumbach Jan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information on DNA-binding transcription factors (the key players in the regulation of gene expression and on transcriptional regulatory interactions of microorganisms deduced from literature-derived knowledge, computer predictions and global DNA microarray hybridization experiments, has opened the way for the genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks. The large-scale reconstruction of these networks allows the in silico analysis of cell behavior in response to changing environmental conditions. We previously published CoryneRegNet, an ontology-based data warehouse of corynebacterial transcription factors and regulatory networks. Initially, it was designed to provide methods for the analysis and visualization of the gene regulatory network of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Now we introduce CoryneRegNet release 4.0, which integrates data on the gene regulatory networks of 4 corynebacteria, 2 mycobacteria and the model organism Escherichia coli K12. As the previous versions, CoryneRegNet provides a web-based user interface to access the database content, to allow various queries, and to support the reconstruction, analysis and visualization of regulatory networks at different hierarchical levels. In this article, we present the further improved database content of CoryneRegNet along with novel analysis features. The network visualization feature GraphVis now allows the inter-species comparisons of reconstructed gene regulatory networks and the projection of gene expression levels onto that networks. Therefore, we added stimulon data directly into the database, but also provide Web Service access to the DNA microarray analysis platform EMMA. Additionally, CoryneRegNet now provides a SOAP based Web Service server, which can easily be consumed by other bioinformatics software systems. Stimulons (imported from the database, or uploaded by the user can be analyzed in the context of known

  12. In Silico PCR Tools for a Fast Primer, Probe, and Advanced Searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Muterko, Alexandr; Shamekova, Malika; Zhambakin, Kabyl

    2017-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is fundamental to molecular biology and is the most important practical molecular technique for the research laboratory. The principle of this technique has been further used and applied in plenty of other simple or complex nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAAT). In parallel to laboratory "wet bench" experiments for nucleic acid amplification technologies, in silico or virtual (bioinformatics) approaches have been developed, among which in silico PCR analysis. In silico NAAT analysis is a useful and efficient complementary method to ensure the specificity of primers or probes for an extensive range of PCR applications from homology gene discovery, molecular diagnosis, DNA fingerprinting, and repeat searching. Predicting sensitivity and specificity of primers and probes requires a search to determine whether they match a database with an optimal number of mismatches, similarity, and stability. In the development of in silico bioinformatics tools for nucleic acid amplification technologies, the prospects for the development of new NAAT or similar approaches should be taken into account, including forward-looking and comprehensive analysis that is not limited to only one PCR technique variant. The software FastPCR and the online Java web tool are integrated tools for in silico PCR of linear and circular DNA, multiple primer or probe searches in large or small databases and for advanced search. These tools are suitable for processing of batch files that are essential for automation when working with large amounts of data. The FastPCR software is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/fastpcr.html and the online Java version at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html .

  13. In silico identification of NF-kappaB-regulated genes in pancreatic beta-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eizirik Decio L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic beta-cells are the target of an autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This is mediated in part by cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1β and interferon (IFN-γ. These cytokines modify the expression of hundreds of genes, leading to beta-cell dysfunction and death by apoptosis. Several of these cytokine-induced genes are potentially regulated by the IL-1β-activated transcription factor (TF nuclear factor (NF-κB, and previous studies by our group have shown that cytokine-induced NF-κB activation is pro-apoptotic in beta-cells. To identify NF-κB-regulated gene networks in beta-cells we presently used a discriminant analysis-based approach to predict NF-κB responding genes on the basis of putative regulatory elements. Results The performance of linear and quadratic discriminant analysis (LDA, QDA in identifying NF-κB-responding genes was examined on a dataset of 240 positive and negative examples of NF-κB regulation, using stratified cross-validation with an internal leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV loop for automated feature selection and noise reduction. LDA performed slightly better than QDA, achieving 61% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 87% positive predictive value, and allowing the identification of 231, 251 and 580 NF-κB putative target genes in insulin-producing INS-1E cells, primary rat beta-cells and human pancreatic islets, respectively. Predicted NF-κB targets had a significant enrichment in genes regulated by cytokines (IL-1β or IL-1β + IFN-γ and double stranded RNA (dsRNA, as compared to genes not regulated by these NF-κB-dependent stimuli. We increased the confidence of the predictions by selecting only evolutionary stable genes, i.e. genes with homologs predicted as NF-κB targets in rat, mouse, human and chimpanzee. Conclusion The present in silico analysis allowed us to identify novel regulatory targets of NF-κB using a supervised classification method based on

  14. Workshop: Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Modeling Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (2010 - part 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this workshop Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis. focused on conceptual and methodological issues - integrated assessment modeling and valuation.

  15. Workshop: Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Modeling Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (2011 - part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this workshop Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis. focused on conceptual and methodological issues - estimating impacts and valuing damages on a sectoral basis.

  16. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  17. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  18. Analysis of regulatory structure for a potential fusion-reactor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The report is divided into eight sections. The preface describes the authors of the report, the methodology used in its preparation, and some basic legal terms. The summary describes the principal features of the proposed regulatory system and also includes two flow charts comparing our model with present NRC practices and a summary table briefly outlining the reasoning behind our recommendations. The main body of the report is divided into six sections. This part of the report discusses the existing federal and state programs for regulating electric energy, describes NRC operations and the criticisms of that agency, discusses the features of our proposed regulatory model, recommends certain steps for implementing the proposed model, and states the conclusions of the report

  19. Causal structure of oscillations in gene regulatory networks: Boolean analysis of ordinary differential equation attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2013-06-01

    A common approach to the modeling of gene regulatory networks is to represent activating or repressing interactions using ordinary differential equations for target gene concentrations that include Hill function dependences on regulator gene concentrations. An alternative formulation represents the same interactions using Boolean logic with time delays associated with each network link. We consider the attractors that emerge from the two types of models in the case of a simple but nontrivial network: a figure-8 network with one positive and one negative feedback loop. We show that the different modeling approaches give rise to the same qualitative set of attractors with the exception of a possible fixed point in the ordinary differential equation model in which concentrations sit at intermediate values. The properties of the attractors are most easily understood from the Boolean perspective, suggesting that time-delay Boolean modeling is a useful tool for understanding the logic of regulatory networks.

  20. Regulatory analysis of the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program has been developed to identify, demonstrate, test, and evaluate technologies that will provide alternatives to the current underground storage tank remediation program. The UST-ID Program is a national program that consists of five participating US Department of Energy (DOE) sites where technologies can be developed an ultimately demonstrated. Once these technologies are demonstrated, the UST-ID Program will transfer the developed technology system to industry (governmental or industrial) for application or back to Research and Development for further evaluation and modification, as necessary. In order to ensure that the UST-ID Program proceeds without interruption, it will be necessary to identify regulatory requirements along with associated permitting and notification requirements early in the technology development process. This document serves as a baseline for identifying certain federal and state regulatory requirements that may impact the UST-ID Program and the demonstration of any identified technologies

  1. Functional analysis of a potential regulatory K+-binding site in the Na+, K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase functions by actively transporting 3 Na+ ions out of and 2 K+ ions into the cell, thereby creating ion gradients crucial for many physiological processes. Recently, a combined structural and functional study of the closely related Ca2+-ATPase indicated the presence...... of a regulatory K+-binding site in the P-domain of the enzyme, identifying E732 as being of particular importance (Sorensen, Clausen et al. 2004). In addition, P709 is thought to play a significant role in the structural organization of this site. Both E732 and P709 are highly conserved among P-type ATPases (E732...... is present as either glutamic acid or aspartic acid), which supports their importance and additionally raises the question whether this site may play a general role among P-type ATPases. In Na+, K+-ATPase, K+ functions directly as a substrate for membrane binding sites, however, an additional regulatory...

  2. Analysis of regulatory requirement for beyond design basis events of SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. S.; Seol, K. W.

    2000-01-01

    To enhance the safety of SMART reactor, safety and regulatory requirements associated with beyond design basis events (beyond BDE), which were developed and applied to advanced light water reactor designs, were analyzed along with a design status of passive reactor. And, based on these requirements, their applicability on the SMART design was evaluated. In the design aspect, severe accident prevention and mitigation features, containment performance, and accident management were analyzed. The evaluation results show that the requirement related to beyond DBE such as ATWS, loss of residual heat removal during shutdown operation, station blackout, fire, inter-system LOCA, and well-known events from severe accident phenomena is applicable to the SMART design. However, comprehensive approach against beyond DBE is not yet provided in the SMART design, and then it is required to designate and analyze the beyond DBE-related features. This study is expected to contribute to efforts to improve plant safety and to establish regulatory requirements for safety review

  3. Nuclear security regulatory framework analysis for small modular reactors in Canada and abroad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, A., E-mail: amjad.farah@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are gaining global attention as a potential solution for future power plants due to claims of flexibility and cost effectiveness, while maintaining or increasing safety and security. With the change of design and the potential deployment in remote areas, however, challenges arise from a regulatory standpoint, to meet the safety and security regulations while maintaining economic feasibility. This work comprises of a review of the nuclear security regulatory frameworks in place for SMRs in Canada, USA and the IAEA; how they compare to each other, and to those of large reactors. The goal is to gauge what needs to be adjusted in order to address the changes in design between the two reactor sizes. Some key challenges concern the type of reactor, transportation of reactor components and fuel to remote areas, reduced security staff, and increased complexity of emergency planning and evacuation procedures. (author)

  4. Regulatory T cell effects in antitumor laser immunotherapy: a mathematical model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have tremendous influence on treatment outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy for cancerous tumors. We present a mathematical model incorporating the primary cellular and molecular components of antitumor laser immunotherapy. We explicitly model developmental classes of dendritic cells (DCs), cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), primary and metastatic tumor cells, and tumor antigen. Regulatory T cells have been shown to kill antigen presenting cells, to influence dendritic cell maturation and migration, to kill activated killer CTLs in the tumor microenvironment, and to influence CTL proliferation. Since Tregs affect explicitly modeled cells, but we do not explicitly model dynamics of Treg themselves, we use model parameters to analyze effects of Treg immunosuppressive activity. We will outline a systematic method for assigning clinical outcomes to model simulations and use this condition to associate simulated patient treatment outcome with Treg activity.

  5. Nuclear security regulatory framework analysis for small modular reactors in Canada and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, A.

    2015-01-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are gaining global attention as a potential solution for future power plants due to claims of flexibility and cost effectiveness, while maintaining or increasing safety and security. With the change of design and the potential deployment in remote areas, however, challenges arise from a regulatory standpoint, to meet the safety and security regulations while maintaining economic feasibility. This work comprises of a review of the nuclear security regulatory frameworks in place for SMRs in Canada, USA and the IAEA; how they compare to each other, and to those of large reactors. The goal is to gauge what needs to be adjusted in order to address the changes in design between the two reactor sizes. Some key challenges concern the type of reactor, transportation of reactor components and fuel to remote areas, reduced security staff, and increased complexity of emergency planning and evacuation procedures. (author)

  6. Twin-Peak Financial Regulatory Regime in China: A Desirability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Chenchen

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades, the Chinese financial markets have witnessed an unprecedented development and expansion, changing the landscape of the whole financial markets. But it has also drawn controversy with many scholars warning the negative consequences of the behemoth size and the increasing...... speed of the expansion of shadow banking activities. The banking activity expansion and the emergence of financial conglomerates have been challenging the effectiveness of the current institutional regulatory structure: the fragmented "One Bank and Three Commissions" system and the "Joint Meeting...... as a "deep context". By drawing on the Australia experience of the twin-peak reform and discussing the new ecology of the Chinese financial markets, the article attempts to answer the question of the desirability of a twin-peak regulatory regime in China....

  7. Discussion on Safety Analysis and Regulatory Framework for the Future Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Myoung-suk; Oh, Kyemin; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This study aims to secure the core original technologies and expand the base of domestic specialist at a fusion area by pursuing and developing nonprocurement technologies for ITER. From this project, the latest technical data and experiences have been recorded for the development of the safety regulation and safety-related design criteria of the future fusion reactors in Korea. In this context, this paper discusses on the progress of surveying the ITER licensing process and regulatory issues revealed. The regulation and licensing process for a fusion power plant has been expected to be quite different due to unique and unforeseen properties differently from the conventional nuclear facilities. To overcome this, not only various safety issues should be analyzed, but safety objectives, regulatory requirements, and design variables should also be established in detailed design phase. We expect our survey will contribute on the discussion to establish general and technical safety principles for national fusion power plant technology plans.

  8. In silico environmental chemical science: properties and processes from statistical and computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tratnyek, Paul G; Bylaska, Eric J; Weber, Eric J

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have long been used in the environmental sciences. More recently, molecular modeling and chemoinformatic methods have become widespread. These methods have the potential to expand and accelerate advances in environmental chemistry because they complement observational and experimental data with "in silico" results and analysis. The opportunities and challenges that arise at the intersection between statistical and theoretical in silico methods are most apparent in the context of properties that determine the environmental fate and effects of chemical contaminants (degradation rate constants, partition coefficients, toxicities, etc.). The main example of this is the calibration of QSARs using descriptor variable data calculated from molecular modeling, which can make QSARs more useful for predicting property data that are unavailable, but also can make them more powerful tools for diagnosis of fate determining pathways and mechanisms. Emerging opportunities for "in silico environmental chemical science" are to move beyond the calculation of specific chemical properties using statistical models and toward more fully in silico models, prediction of transformation pathways and products, incorporation of environmental factors into model predictions, integration of databases and predictive models into more comprehensive and efficient tools for exposure assessment, and extending the applicability of all the above from chemicals to biologicals and materials.

  9. Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC's review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative

  10. The effect of regulatory governance on efficiency of thermal power generation in India: A stochastic frontier analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Ranjan; Kathuria, Vinish

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of institutional quality – typified as regulatory governance – on the performance of thermal power plants in India. The Indian power sector was reformed in the early 1990s. However, reforms are effective only as much as the regulators are committed in ensuring that they are implemented. We hypothesize that higher the quality of regulation in a federal Indian state, higher is the efficiency of electric generation utilities. A translog stochastic frontier model is estimated using index of state-level independent regulation as one of the determinants of inefficiency. The dataset comprises a panel of 77 coal-based thermal power plants during the reform period covering over 70% of installed electricity generation capacity. The mean technical efficiency of 76.7% indicates there is wide scope for efficiency improvement in the sector. Results are robust to various model specifications and show that state-level regulators have positively impacted plant performance. Technical efficiency is sensitive to both unbundling of state utilities, and regulatory experience. The policy implication is that further reforms which empower independent regulators will have far reaching impacts on power sector performance. - Highlights: • The impact of regulatory governance on Indian generation efficiency is investigated. • Stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) on a panel dataset covering pre and post reform era. • Index of state-wise variation in regulation to explain inefficiency effects. • Results show improved but not very high technical efficiencies. • State-level regulation has positively impacted power plant performance.

  11. CLIP-seq analysis of multi-mapped reads discovers novel functional RNA regulatory sites in the human transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijun; Xing, Yi

    2017-09-19

    Crosslinking or RNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (CLIP-seq or RIP-seq) allows transcriptome-wide discovery of RNA regulatory sites. As CLIP-seq/RIP-seq reads are short, existing computational tools focus on uniquely mapped reads, while reads mapped to multiple loci are discarded. We present CLAM (CLIP-seq Analysis of Multi-mapped reads). CLAM uses an expectation-maximization algorithm to assign multi-mapped reads and calls peaks combining uniquely and multi-mapped reads. To demonstrate the utility of CLAM, we applied it to a wide range of public CLIP-seq/RIP-seq datasets involving numerous splicing factors, microRNAs and m6A RNA methylation. CLAM recovered a large number of novel RNA regulatory sites inaccessible by uniquely mapped reads. The functional significance of these sites was demonstrated by consensus motif patterns and association with alternative splicing (splicing factors), transcript abundance (AGO2) and mRNA half-life (m6A). CLAM provides a useful tool to discover novel protein-RNA interactions and RNA modification sites from CLIP-seq and RIP-seq data, and reveals the significant contribution of repetitive elements to the RNA regulatory landscape of the human transcriptome. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Patient-Focused Benefit-Risk Analysis to Inform Regulatory Decisions: The European Union Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Juhnke, Christin; Beyer, Andrea R; Garner, Sarah

    Regulatory decisions are often based on multiple clinical end points, but the perspectives used to judge the relative importance of those end points are predominantly those of expert decision makers rather than of the patient. However, there is a growing awareness that active patient and public participation can improve decision making, increase acceptance of decisions, and improve adherence to treatments. The assessment of risk versus benefit requires not only information on clinical outcomes but also value judgments about which outcomes are important and whether the potential benefits outweigh the harms. There are a number of mechanisms for capturing the input of patients, and regulatory bodies within the European Union are participating in several initiatives. These can include patients directly participating in the regulatory decision-making process or using information derived from patients in empirical studies as part of the evidence considered. One promising method that is being explored is the elicitation of "patient preferences." Preferences, in this context, refer to the individual's evaluation of health outcomes and can be understood as statements regarding the relative desirability of a range of treatment options, treatment characteristics, and health states. Several methods for preference measurement have been proposed, and pilot studies have been undertaken to use patient preference information in regulatory decision making. This article describes how preferences are currently being considered in the benefit-risk assessment context, and shows how different methods of preference elicitation are used to support decision making within the European context. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulatory analysis on the medical use of ephedrine-related products in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Nan Yu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To prevent ephedrine-related products from being misused to produce amphetamine and/or its analogs, there's a need for more effective and achievable regulatory mechanisms for the health, police, investigational, prosecution and judiciary authorities in Taiwan. This review was conducted to evaluate the international and Taiwan's regulatory policies and management of medical ephedrine-related products through the corresponding information collected from international and Taiwan government agency authorities. The combat of illegal drugs should involve both supply and demand sides to be successful. Health authorities in Taiwan do not have the investigational power to manage the forbidden transformation, abusing and manufacture of the illegal drugs from ephedrine-related products. Take the judicial interventions in the United States and in Japan as the examples, the organizational cooperation in Taiwan can be one of the main key strategies to combat against illegal drugs from ephedrine-related products. It is necessary to integrate the judicial, police and health agencies to prevent the production of illegal drugs from the ephedrine-related products in Taiwan. The efforts and regulatory control measures should be integrated to speed up the collaboration between different government authorities. It might be achieved through reorganization involving Taiwan Food and Drug Administration. Keywords: Ephedrine-related products, Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA, Controlled Drugs Act, Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, Pharmacists Act

  14. Timing Is everything: quantifying regulatory and market readiness levels for technology transition policy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, La Tonya Nicole [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Borns, David James [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you’ll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. This notion of steady installation growth over acute installations of technology to meet policy goals is the core topic of discussion for this research. This research operationalizes this notion by developing the theoretical underpinnings of regulatory and market acceptance delays by building upon the common Technology Readiness Level (TRL) framework and offers two new additions to the research community. The new and novel Regulatory Readiness Level (RRL) and Market Readiness Level (MRL) frameworks were developed. These components, collectively called the Technology, Regulatory and Market (TRM) readiness level framework allow one to build new constraints into existing Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) to address research questions such as, ‘To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?’

  15. Context analysis for a new regulatory model for electric utilities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hage, Fabio S.; Rufín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article examines what would have to change in the Brazilian regulatory framework in order to make utilities profit from energy efficiency and the integration of resources, instead of doing so from traditional consumption growth, as it happens at present. We argue that the Brazilian integrated electric sector resembles a common-pool resources problem, and as such it should incorporate, in addition to the centralized operation for power dispatch already in place, demand side management, behavioral strategies, and smart grids, attained through a new business and regulatory model for utilities. The paper proposes several measures to attain a more sustainable and productive electricity distribution industry: decoupling revenues from volumetric sales through a fixed maximum load fee, which would completely offset current disincentives for energy efficiency; the creation of a market for negawatts (saved megawatts) using the current Brazilian mechanism of public auctions for the acquisition of wholesale energy; and the integration of technologies, especially through the growth of unregulated products and services. Through these measures, we believe that Brazil could improve both energy security and overall sustainability of its power sector in the long run. - Highlights: • Necessary changes in the Brazilian regulatory framework towards energy efficiency. • How to incorporate demand side management, behavioral strategies, and smart grids. • Proposition of a market for negawatts at public auctions. • Measures to attain a more sustainable electricity distribution industry in Brazil.

  16. Genetic analysis of conidiation regulatory pathways in koji-mold Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Masafumi; Jin, Feng Jie; Takahashi, Tadashi; Koyama, Yasuji

    2010-01-01

    Conidia of koji-mold Aspergillus oryzae are often used as starters in the fermented food industry. However, little is known about conidiation regulation in A. oryzae. To improve the productivity of conidia in A. oryzae, it is necessary to understand conidiation regulation in the strain. Therefore, we analyzed the conidiation regulatory system in A. oryzae using 10 kinds of conidiation regulatory gene disruptants. The phenotypes of AorfluG, AorflbA, AorflbB, AorflbC, AorflbD, AorflbE, AorbrlA, AorabaA, AorwetA, and AorfadA mutants are almost identical to those of the corresponding mutants in Aspergillus nidulans. The results indicated that the functions of conidiation regulatory genes are almost conserved between A. oryzae and A. nidulans. However, the severely reduced conidiation phenotype of the AorfluG disruptant in A. oryzae differs from the phenotype of the corresponding mutant in Aspergillus fumigatus in air-exposed culture conditions. These results suggest that A. oryzae, A. nidulans, and A. fumigatus have a G-protein signaling pathway and brlA orthologs in common, and only A. fumigatus has particular brlA activation pathways that are independent of the fluG ortholog. Furthermore, the analyses of AorflbA disruptant and AorfadA dominant-active mutants implicated that AorFadA-mediated G-protein signaling suppresses vegetative growth of A. oryzae.

  17. In Silico Identification of OncomiRs in Different Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Malay; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2012-03-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics of various kinds of cancers are challenging domains of research. Current landmark of cancer research at the molecular level mainly focuses on the regulation of genes for studying cancer pathways. Recent investigations highlight that there is a significant association of a class of short RNAs in the progression of different types of cancer. In this paper, the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small endogenous RNAs, is explored in two categories of cancers in human, one tumor-based and another non-tumorous. A new approach of in silico identification of the miRNAs that might be associated with these cancer types is proposed. The oncomiRs, miRNAs associated with cancer, are identified by analyzing the differentially co-expressed miRNAs and further exploring how they cooperate with each other. Extensive computational analysis on miRNA expression profiles for the discovery of novel oncomiRs is pursued. The results are found to be promising by going deep into the regulatory information available on oncogenes from the up-to-date literature. Some of the miRNAs as oncogenic are identified by the approach like hsa-miR-186 and hsa-miR-154 for leukemia and prostate cancer, respectively, which are not included in standard databases. However, some of the emerging studies give evidences to these findings. Statistical and biological studies, on the other hand, strengthen the effectiveness of the proposed method in futuristic investigations for the exploration of undiscovered oncomiRs. On the whole, these analyses provide insight into the discovery of miRNA markers.

  18. Development of Draft Regulatory Guide on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants with New Safety Design Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Young Seok; Woo, Sweng Woong; Hwang, Tae Suk [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Suk K; Hwang, Min Jeong [Environment and Energy Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The present paper discusses the development process of the draft version of regulatory guide (DRG) on accident analysis of the NPP having the NSFD and its result. Based on the consideration on the lesson learned from the previous licensing review, a draft regulatory guide (DRG) on accident analysis for NPP with new safety design features (NSDF) was developed. New safety design features (NSDF) have been introduced to the new constructing nuclear power plants (NPP) since the early 2000 and the issuance of construction permit of SKN Units 3 and 4. Typical examples of the new safety features includes Fluidic Device (FD) within Safety Injection Tanks (SIT), Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System (PAFS), ECCS Core Barrel Duct (ECBD) which were adopted in APR1400 design and/or APR+ design to improve the safety margin of the plants for the postulated accidents of interest. Also several studies of new concept of the safety system such as Hybrid ECCS design have been reported. General and/or specific guideline of accident analysis considering the NSDF has been requested. Realistic evaluation of the impact of NSDF on accident with uncertainty and separated accident analysis accounting the NSDF impact were specified in the DRG. Per the developmental process, identification of key issues, demonstration of the DRG with specific accident with specific NSDF, and improvement of DGR for the key issues and their resolution will be conducted.

  19. A Benefit-Risk Analysis Approach to Capture Regulatory Decision-Making: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, G K; Gurumurthi, K; Domike, R; Kazandjian, D; Blumenthal, G; Pazdur, R; Woodcock, J

    2016-12-01

    Drug regulators around the world make decisions about drug approvability based on qualitative benefit-risk analyses. There is much interest in quantifying regulatory approaches to benefit and risk. In this work the use of a quantitative benefit-risk analysis was applied to regulatory decision-making about new drugs to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Benefits and risks associated with 20 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decisions associated with a set of candidate treatments submitted between 2003 and 2015 were analyzed. For benefit analysis, the median overall survival (OS) was used where available. When not available, OS was estimated based on overall response rate (ORR) or progression-free survival (PFS). Risks were analyzed based on magnitude (or severity) of harm and likelihood of occurrence. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis was explored to demonstrate analysis of systematic uncertainty. FDA approval decision outcomes considered were found to be consistent with the benefit-risk logic. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. Identifying significant genetic regulatory networks in the prostate cancer from microarray data based on transcription factor analysis and conditional independency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Cheng-Yu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is a world wide leading cancer and it is characterized by its aggressive metastasis. According to the clinical heterogeneity, prostate cancer displays different stages and grades related to the aggressive metastasis disease. Although numerous studies used microarray analysis and traditional clustering method to identify the individual genes during the disease processes, the important gene regulations remain unclear. We present a computational method for inferring genetic regulatory networks from micorarray data automatically with transcription factor analysis and conditional independence testing to explore the potential significant gene regulatory networks that are correlated with cancer, tumor grade and stage in the prostate cancer. Results To deal with missing values in microarray data, we used a K-nearest-neighbors (KNN algorithm to determine the precise expression values. We applied web services technology to wrap the bioinformatics toolkits and databases to automatically extract the promoter regions of DNA sequences and predicted the transcription factors that regulate the gene expressions. We adopt the microarray datasets consists of 62 primary tumors, 41 normal prostate tissues from Stanford Microarray Database (SMD as a target dataset to evaluate our method. The predicted results showed that the possible biomarker genes related to cancer and denoted the androgen functions and processes may be in the development of the prostate cancer and promote the cell death in cell cycle. Our predicted results showed that sub-networks of genes SREBF1, STAT6 and PBX1 are strongly related to a high extent while ETS transcription factors ELK1, JUN and EGR2 are related to a low extent. Gene SLC22A3 may explain clinically the differentiation associated with the high grade cancer compared with low grade cancer. Enhancer of Zeste Homolg 2 (EZH2 regulated by RUNX1 and STAT3 is correlated to the pathological stage

  1. Identifying significant genetic regulatory networks in the prostate cancer from microarray data based on transcription factor analysis and conditional independency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsiang-Yuan; Cheng, Shih-Wu; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yeh, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Shih-Fang; Soo, Von-Wun

    2009-12-21

    Prostate cancer is a world wide leading cancer and it is characterized by its aggressive metastasis. According to the clinical heterogeneity, prostate cancer displays different stages and grades related to the aggressive metastasis disease. Although numerous studies used microarray analysis and traditional clustering method to identify the individual genes during the disease processes, the important gene regulations remain unclear. We present a computational method for inferring genetic regulatory networks from micorarray data automatically with transcription factor analysis and conditional independence testing to explore the potential significant gene regulatory networks that are correlated with cancer, tumor grade and stage in the prostate cancer. To deal with missing values in microarray data, we used a K-nearest-neighbors (KNN) algorithm to determine the precise expression values. We applied web services technology to wrap the bioinformatics toolkits and databases to automatically extract the promoter regions of DNA sequences and predicted the transcription factors that regulate the gene expressions. We adopt the microarray datasets consists of 62 primary tumors, 41 normal prostate tissues from Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) as a target dataset to evaluate our method. The predicted results showed that the possible biomarker genes related to cancer and denoted the androgen functions and processes may be in the development of the prostate cancer and promote the cell death in cell cycle. Our predicted results showed that sub-networks of genes SREBF1, STAT6 and PBX1 are strongly related to a high extent while ETS transcription factors ELK1, JUN and EGR2 are related to a low extent. Gene SLC22A3 may explain clinically the differentiation associated with the high grade cancer compared with low grade cancer. Enhancer of Zeste Homolg 2 (EZH2) regulated by RUNX1 and STAT3 is correlated to the pathological stage. We provide a computational framework to reconstruct

  2. In silico imaging: Definition, possibilities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badano, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    The capability to simulate the imaging performance of new detector concepts is crucial to develop the next generation of medical imaging systems. Proper modeling tools allow for optimal designs that maximize image quality while minimizing patient and occupational radiation doses. In this context, in silico imaging has become an emerging field of imaging research. This paper reviews current progress and challenges in the simulation of imaging systems with a focus on Monte Carlo approaches to X-ray detector modeling, acceleration approaches, and validation strategies.

  3. Development of default uncertainties for the value/benefit attributes in the regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallucci, Raymond H.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Uncertainties for values/benefits. • Upper bound four times higher than mean. • Distributional histograms. - Abstract: NUREG/BR-0184, Regulatory Analysis Technical Evaluation (RATE) Handbook, was produced in 1997 as an update to the original NUREG/CR-3568, A Handbook for Value-Impact Assessment (1983). Both documents, especially the later RATE Handbook, have been used extensively by the USNRC and its contractors not only for regulatory analyses to support backfit considerations but also for similar applications, such as Severe Accident Management Alternative (SAMA) analyses as part of license renewals. While both provided high-level guidance on the performance of uncertainty analyses for the various value/benefit attributes, detailed quantification was not of prime interest at the times of the Handbooks’ development, defaulting only to best estimates with low and high bounds on these attributes. As the USNRC examines the possibility of updating the RATE Handbook, renewed interest in a more quantitative approach to uncertainty analyses for the attributes has surfaced. As the result of an effort to enhance the RATE Handbook to permit at least default uncertainty analyses for the value/benefit attributes, it has proven feasible to assign default uncertainties in terms of 95th %ile upper bounds (and absolute lower bounds) on the five dominant value/benefit attributes, and their sum, when performing a regulatory analysis via the RATE Handbook. Appropriate default lower bounds of zero (no value/benefit) and an upper bound (95th %ile) that is four times higher than the mean (for individual value/benefit attributes) or three times higher (for their summation) can be recommended. Distributions in the form of histograms on the summed value/benefit attributes are also provided which could be combined, after appropriate scaling and most likely via simulation, with their counterpart(s) from the impact/cost analysis to yield a final distribution on the net

  4. Integrated analysis of microRNA and gene expression profiles reveals a functional regulatory module associated with liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Wenshan; Yang, Aiting; Xu, Anjian; Wang, Huan; Cong, Min; Liu, Tianhui; Wang, Ping; You, Hong

    2017-12-15

    Liver fibrosis, characterized with the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, represents the final common pathway of chronic liver inflammation. Ever-increasing evidence indicates microRNAs (miRNAs) dysregulation has important implications in the different stages of liver fibrosis. However, our knowledge of miRNA-gene regulation details pertaining to such disease remains unclear. The publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets of patients suffered from cirrhosis were extracted for integrated analysis. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and genes (DEGs) were identified using GEO2R web tool. Putative target gene prediction of DEMs was carried out using the intersection of five major algorithms: DIANA-microT, TargetScan, miRanda, PICTAR5 and miRWalk. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory network (FMGRN) was constructed based on the computational target predictions at the sequence level and the inverse expression relationships between DEMs and DEGs. DAVID web server was selected to perform KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory module was generated based on the biological interpretation. Internal connections among genes in liver fibrosis-related module were determined using String database. MiRNA-gene regulatory modules related to liver fibrosis were experimentally verified in recombinant human TGFβ1 stimulated and specific miRNA inhibitor treated LX-2 cells. We totally identified 85 and 923 dysregulated miRNAs and genes in liver cirrhosis biopsy samples compared to their normal controls. All evident miRNA-gene pairs were identified and assembled into FMGRN which consisted of 990 regulations between 51 miRNAs and 275 genes, forming two big sub-networks that were defined as down-network and up-network, respectively. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that up-network was prominently involved in several KEGG pathways, in which "Focal adhesion", "PI3K-Akt signaling pathway" and "ECM

  5. Regulating Cannabis Social Clubs: A comparative analysis of legal and self-regulatory practices in Spain, Belgium and Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decorte, Tom; Pardal, Mafalda; Queirolo, Rosario; Boidi, Maria Fernanda; Sánchez Avilés, Constanza; Parés Franquero, Òscar

    2017-05-01

    Cannabis Social Clubs (CSCs) are a model of non-profit production and distribution of cannabis among a closed circuit of adult cannabis users. CSCs are now operating in several countries around the world, albeit under very different legal regimes and in different socio-political contexts. In this paper we describe and compare the legal framework and the self-regulatory practices of Cannabis Social Clubs in three countries (Spain, Belgium, and Uruguay). The objective of our comparative analysis is to investigate how CSCs operate in each of these countries. To foster discussions about how one might regulate CSCs to promote public health objectives, we conclude this paper with a discussion on the balance between adequate governmental control and self-regulatory competences of CSCs. The data used for this analysis stem from independently conducted local studies by the authors in their countries. Although the particular designs of the studies differ, the data in all three countries was collected through similar data collection methods: analysis of (legal and other documents), field visits to the clubs, interviews with staff members, media content analysis. We identified a number of similarities and differences among the CSCs' practices in the three countries. Formal registration as non-profit association seems to be a common standard among CSCs. We found nevertheless great variation in terms of the size of these organisations. Generally, only adult nationals and/or residents are able to join the CSCs, upon the payment of a membership fee. While production seems to be guided by consumption estimates of the members (Spain and Belgium) or by the legal framework (Uruguay), the thresholds applied by the clubs vary significantly across countries. Quality control practices remain an issue in the three settings studied here. The CSCs have developed different arrangements with regards to the distribution of cannabis to their members. By uncovering the current practices of CSCs

  6. In silico prediction of Tetrahymena pyriformis toxicity for diverse industrial chemicals with substructure pattern recognition and machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixiong; Shen, Jie; Yu, Yue; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2011-03-01

    There is an increasing need for the rapid safety assessment of chemicals by both industries and regulatory agencies throughout the world. In silico techniques are practical alternatives in the environmental hazard assessment. It is especially true to address the persistence, bioaccumulative and toxicity potentials of organic chemicals. Tetrahymena pyriformis toxicity is often used as a toxic endpoint. In this study, 1571 diverse unique chemicals were collected from the literature and composed of the largest diverse data set for T. pyriformis toxicity. Classification predictive models of T. pyriformis toxicity were developed by substructure pattern recognition and different machine learning methods, including support vector machine (SVM), C4.5 decision tree, k-nearest neighbors and random forest. The results of a 5-fold cross-validation showed that the SVM method performed better than other algorithms. The overall predictive accuracies of the SVM classification model with radial basis functions kernel was 92.2% for the 5-fold cross-validation and 92.6% for the external validation set, respectively. Furthermore, several representative substructure patterns for characterizing T. pyriformis toxicity were also identified via the information gain analysis methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the regulatory function mediated by the small regulatory psm-mec RNA of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Villaruz, Amer E; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Duong, Anthony C; Yeh, Anthony J; Nguyen, Thuan H; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Queck, S Y; Otto, M

    2014-07-01

    Several methicillin resistance (SCCmec) clusters characteristic of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains harbor the psm-mec locus. In addition to encoding the cytolysin, phenol-soluble modulin (PSM)-mec, this locus has been attributed gene regulatory functions. Here we employed genome-wide transcriptional profiling to define the regulatory function of the psm-mec locus. The immune evasion factor protein A emerged as the primary conserved and strongly regulated target of psm-mec, an effect we show is mediated by the psm-mec RNA. Furthermore, the psm-mec locus exerted regulatory effects that were more moderate in extent. For example, expression of PSM-mec limited expression of mecA, thereby decreasing methicillin resistance. Our study shows that the psm-mec locus has a rare dual regulatory RNA and encoded cytolysin function. Furthermore, our findings reveal a specific mechanism underscoring the recently emerging concept that S. aureus strains balance pronounced virulence and high expression of antibiotic resistance. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Quantitative and functional analysis of CD69+ T regulatory lymphocytes in patients with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitales-Noyola, Marlen; Martínez-Martínez, Rita; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan P; Baranda, Lourdes; Niño-Moreno, Perla; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    Periodontal disease is chronic inflammatory process that affects the attachment structures of the teeth and constitutes a significant cause of tooth loss in adults. Although different bacteria play an important role in the triggering of this condition, the progression and severity of the disease are strongly affected by the host immune response, which is under the control of different immune regulatory mechanisms, including T regulatory (Treg) cells. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and function of CD69 + Treg lymphocytes in patients with chronic periodontal disease. Peripheral blood samples (n = 33) and gingival tissue (n = 9) were obtained from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Blood samples from 25 healthy individuals were also studied. Levels of CD69 + Treg lymphocytes in peripheral blood and gingival tissue were determined by six-color multiparametric flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry. The immune regulatory function of CD69 + Treg cells was tested by an in vitro assay of inhibition of lymphocyte activation. Percentages of CD69 + Treg cells were significantly higher in the peripheral blood from patients with active periodontal disease compared to healthy controls, and these percentages inversely correlated with the periodontal attachment loss. Increased numbers of these Treg cells were detected in the gingival tissue from active PD patients compared to their peripheral blood. However, the suppressive function of CD69 + Treg cells was significantly diminished in patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that CD69 + Treg cells seem to be another important piece in the complex immunopathogenesis of periodontal disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. FASTQSim: platform-independent data characterization and in silico read generation for NGS datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbina, Anna

    2014-08-15

    High-throughput next generation sequencing technologies have enabled rapid characterization of clinical and environmental samples. Consequently, the largest bottleneck to actionable data has become sample processing and bioinformatics analysis, creating a need for accurate and rapid algorithms to process genetic data. Perfectly characterized in silico datasets are a useful tool for evaluating the performance of such algorithms. Background contaminating organisms are observed in sequenced mixtures of organisms. In silico samples provide exact truth. To create the best value for evaluating algorithms, in silico data should mimic actual sequencer data as closely as possible. FASTQSim is a tool that provides the dual functionality of NGS dataset characterization and metagenomic data generation. FASTQSim is sequencing platform-independent, and computes distributions of read length, quality scores, indel rates, single point mutation rates, indel size, and similar statistics for any sequencing platform. To create training or testing datasets, FASTQSim has the ability to convert target sequences into in silico reads with specific error profiles obtained in the characterization step. FASTQSim enables users to assess the quality of NGS datasets. The tool provides information about read length, read quality, repetitive and non-repetitive indel profiles, and single base pair substitutions. FASTQSim allows the user to simulate individual read datasets that can be used as standardized test scenarios for planning sequencing projects or for benchmarking metagenomic software. In this regard, in silico datasets generated with the FASTQsim tool hold several advantages over natural datasets: they are sequencing platform independent, extremely well characterized, and less expensive to generate. Such datasets are valuable in a number of applications, including the training of assemblers for multiple platforms, benchmarking bioinformatics algorithm performance, and creating challenge

  10. Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

    1999-01-04

    Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity.

  11. Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

    1999-01-01

    Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity

  12. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  13. Comparative analysis of regulatory elements between Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by genome-wide transcription start site profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyuk Kim

    Full Text Available Genome-wide transcription start site (TSS profiles of the enterobacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were experimentally determined through modified 5' RACE followed by deep sequencing of intact primary mRNA. This identified 3,746 and 3,143 TSSs for E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively. Experimentally determined TSSs were then used to define promoter regions and 5' UTRs upstream of coding genes. Comparative analysis of these regulatory elements revealed the use of multiple TSSs, identical sequence motifs of promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, reflecting conserved gene expression apparatuses between the two species. In both species, over 70% of primary transcripts were expressed from operons having orthologous genes during exponential growth. However, expressed orthologous genes in E. coli and K. pneumoniae showed a strikingly different organization of upstream regulatory regions with only 20% identical promoters with TSSs in both species. Over 40% of promoters had TSSs identified in only one species, despite conserved promoter sequences existing in the other species. 662 conserved promoters having TSSs in both species resulted in the same number of comparable 5' UTR pairs, and that regulatory element was found to be the most variant region in sequence among promoter, 5' UTR, and ORF. In K. pneumoniae, 48 sRNAs were predicted and 36 of them were expressed during exponential growth. Among them, 34 orthologous sRNAs between two species were analyzed in depth, and the analysis showed that many sRNAs of K. pneumoniae, including pleiotropic sRNAs such as rprA, arcZ, and sgrS, may work in the same way as in E. coli. These results reveal a new dimension of comparative genomics such that a comparison of two genomes needs to be comprehensive over all levels of genome organization.

  14. [Analysis of cis-regulatory element distribution in gene promoters of Gossypium raimondii and Arabidopsis thaliana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gao-Fei; He, Shou-Pu; Du, Xiong-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Cotton genomic studies have boomed since the release of Gossypium raimondii draft genome. In this study, cis-regulatory element (CRE) in 1 kb length sequence upstream 5' UTR of annotated genes were selected and scanned in the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) and Gossypium raimondii (Gr) genomes, based on the database of PLACE (Plant cis-acting Regulatory DNA Elements). According to the definition of this study, 44 (12.3%) and 57 (15.5%) CREs presented "peak-like" distribution in the 1 kb selected sequences of both genomes, respectively. Thirty-four of them were peak-like distributed in both genomes, which could be further categorized into 4 types based on their core sequences. The coincidence of TATABOX peak position and their actual position ((-) -30 bp) indicated that the position of a common CRE was conservative in different genes, which suggested that the peak position of these CREs was their possible actual position of transcription factors. The position of a common CRE was also different between the two genomes due to stronger length variation of 5' UTR in Gr than At. Furthermore, most of the peak-like CREs were located in the region of -110 bp-0 bp, which suggested that concentrated distribution might be conductive to the interaction of transcription factors, and then regulate the gene expression in downstream.

  15. Empirical Bayes conditional independence graphs for regulatory network recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Rami; Madduri, Abishek S.; Wang, Guoqing; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Hackett, Neil R.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Mezey, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Computational inference methods that make use of graphical models to extract regulatory networks from gene expression data can have difficulty reconstructing dense regions of a network, a consequence of both computational complexity and unreliable parameter estimation when sample size is small. As a result, identification of hub genes is of special difficulty for these methods. Methods: We present a new algorithm, Empirical Light Mutual Min (ELMM), for large network reconstruction that has properties well suited for recovery of graphs with high-degree nodes. ELMM reconstructs the undirected graph of a regulatory network using empirical Bayes conditional independence testing with a heuristic relaxation of independence constraints in dense areas of the graph. This relaxation allows only one gene of a pair with a putative relation to be aware of the network connection, an approach that is aimed at easing multiple testing problems associated with recovering densely connected structures. Results: Using in silico data, we show that ELMM has better performance than commonly used network inference algorithms including GeneNet, ARACNE, FOCI, GENIE3 and GLASSO. We also apply ELMM to reconstruct a network among 5492 genes expressed in human lung airway epithelium of healthy non-smokers, healthy smokers and individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease assayed using microarrays. The analysis identifies dense sub-networks that are consistent with known regulatory relationships in the lung airway and also suggests novel hub regulatory relationships among a number of genes that play roles in oxidative stress and secretion. Availability and implementation: Software for running ELMM is made available at http://mezeylab.cb.bscb.cornell.edu/Software.aspx. Contact: ramimahdi@yahoo.com or jgm45@cornell.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22685074

  16. Joint IAEA/NEA workshop proceedings on regulatory review of plant safety analysis - Abstracts, Summary and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, Derek; Drozd, Andrzej; Husarcek, Jan; Modro, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Based on the final discussion, the seminar was a valuable exchange of information and helpful in understanding the safety analysis and regulatory review issues. It gave a chance for some countries to see 'where they are' regulatory-wise with respect to other countries. There was a strong support for a follow-up workshop within the next two years. A general opinion expressed by most of the participants was that the suggested next seminar should be based more on an 'overall safety analysis' review rather than on very detailed presentations on specific issues. Also, there should be more discussions on Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) and emergency planning. In addition, to establish a 'common language', the development of a glossary of terms would be most helpful. In general, all of the participating countries are adapting regulatory and licensing practices previously developed by other countries. Such an approach allows to utilise and rely on a broad experience of countries with a well established nuclear power industry, strong regulatory organisation and licensing practices. Since there are obvious differences in engineering traditions and in countries' legal/regulatory frameworks, questions arise about how to reconcile these differences in adapting and developing practices suitable for a given country. It was advised as a good practice to identify from the very beginning what needs to be done and the goals to be accomplished not only in the perspective of safety and technical requirements but also in the context of the economical, political, legal and regulatory situation in a given country. There has to be a consistency in any approach, but one can never follow 'blindly' the others. It became quite obvious that the needs of countries with a big nuclear program are very different from those of 'small' countries. Adaptation of other countries' rules is a big effort in itself (e.g., Romania applying Canadian regulations). In addition, the French-German co

  17. Nuclear Forensic Science: Analysis of Nuclear Material Out of Regulatory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristo, Michael J.; Gaffney, Amy M.; Marks, Naomi; Knight, Kim; Cassata, William S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear forensic science seeks to identify the origin of nuclear materials found outside regulatory control. It is increasingly recognized as an integral part of a robust nuclear security program. This review highlights areas of active, evolving research in nuclear forensics, with a focus on analytical techniques commonly employed in Earth and planetary sciences. Applications of nuclear forensics to uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) are discussed first. UOCs have become an attractive target for nuclear forensic researchers because of the richness in impurities compared to materials produced later in the fuel cycle. The development of chronometric methods for age dating nuclear materials is then discussed, with an emphasis on improvements in accuracy that have been gained from measurements of multiple radioisotopic systems. Finally, papers that report on casework are reviewed, to provide a window into current scientific practice.

  18. Modeling disease risk through analysis of physical interactions between genetic variants within chromatin regulatory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradin, Olivia; Cohen, Andrea J; Luppino, Jennifer M; Bayles, Ian M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Scacheri, Peter C

    2016-11-01

    SNPs associated with disease susceptibility often reside in enhancer clusters, or super-enhancers. Constituents of these enhancer clusters cooperate to regulate target genes and often extend beyond the linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks containing risk SNPs identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified 'outside variants', defined as SNPs in weak LD with GWAS risk SNPs that physically interact with risk SNPs as part of a target gene's regulatory circuitry. These outside variants further explain variation in target gene expression beyond that explained by GWAS-associated SNPs. Additionally, the clinical risk associated with GWAS SNPs is considerably modified by the genotype of outside variants. Collectively, these findings suggest a potential model in which outside variants and GWAS SNPs that physically interact in 3D chromatin collude to influence target transcript levels as well as clinical risk. This model offers an additional hypothesis for the source of missing heritability for complex traits.

  19. Manager's Discretionary Power and Comparability of Financial Reports: An Analysis of the Regulatory Transition Process in Brazilian Accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Mussoi Ribeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to directly evaluate the impact of the accounting regulatory flexibility movement on the comparability of financial reports. The country chosen for the analysis was Brazil, because it was one of the few countries in the world where a process of regulatory change from a completely rule-based standard with a strong link to tax accounting (Lopes, 2011 to a principle-based standard with greater need for decision by managers who prepare the financial reports took place. To measure comparability, the accounting function similarity model developed by DeFranco, Kothari and Verdi (2011 was used. The companies analyzed were all listed ones with full data for the period concerned having, at least, a pair company within the same economic activity sector. To obtain the research results, we adopted a panel data model where the years 2005 to 2012 were compared to the year 2004. The results obtained prove that, on average, there was no significant decrease in the comparability level within country during the regulatory transition period in Brazil. On the contrary, there was an increase in genuine comparability in the year 2012 when compared to 2004. In the model adjusted by stepwise, the years 2011 and 2012 had a significantly higher average comparability when compared to 2004. The results found corroborate other researches addressing the quality of accounting information (Collins, Pasewark, & Riley, 2012; Psaros & Trotman, 2004; Agoglia, Doupnik, & Tsakumis, 2011 and prove the superiority of the principle-based standard also over the comparability of financial reports. The main conclusion of this research is that increasing manager's discretionary power through flexibility of accounting standards does not decrease the comparability of financial reports.

  20. Applying quantitative benefit-risk analysis to aid regulatory decision making in diagnostic imaging: methods, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapova, Maria; Devine, Emily Beth; Bresnahan, Brian W; Higashi, Mitchell K; Garrison, Louis P

    2014-09-01

    Health agencies making regulatory marketing-authorization decisions use qualitative and quantitative approaches to assess expected benefits and expected risks associated with medical interventions. There is, however, no universal standard approach that regulatory agencies consistently use to conduct benefit-risk assessment (BRA) for pharmaceuticals or medical devices, including for imaging technologies. Economics, health services research, and health outcomes research use quantitative approaches to elicit preferences of stakeholders, identify priorities, and model health conditions and health intervention effects. Challenges to BRA in medical devices are outlined, highlighting additional barriers in radiology. Three quantitative methods--multi-criteria decision analysis, health outcomes modeling and stated-choice survey--are assessed using criteria that are important in balancing benefits and risks of medical devices and imaging technologies. To be useful in regulatory BRA, quantitative methods need to: aggregate multiple benefits and risks, incorporate qualitative considerations, account for uncertainty, and make clear whose preferences/priorities are being used. Each quantitative method performs differently across these criteria and little is known about how BRA estimates and conclusions vary by approach. While no specific quantitative method is likely to be the strongest in all of the important areas, quantitative methods may have a place in BRA of medical devices and radiology. Quantitative BRA approaches have been more widely applied in medicines, with fewer BRAs in devices. Despite substantial differences in characteristics of pharmaceuticals and devices, BRA methods may be as applicable to medical devices and imaging technologies as they are to pharmaceuticals. Further research to guide the development and selection of quantitative BRA methods for medical devices and imaging technologies is needed. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Regulatory impact analysis of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the offshore oil and gas industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    For all major rulemaking actions, Executive Order 12291 requires a Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA), in which benefits of the regulation are compared to costs imposed by the regulation. The report presents the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA, or the Agency) RIA of the final rule on the effluent limitations guidelines for the Offshore Subcategory of the Oil and Gas Extraction Industry. The principal requirement of the Executive Order is that the Agency perform an analysis comparing the benefits of the regulation to the costs that the regulation imposes. Three types of benefits are analyzed in this RIA: quantified and monetized benefits; quantified and non-monetized benefits; and non-quantified and non-monetized benefits

  2. Genome-wide identification of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor using biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Emmitt R

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in computational genomics is the development of methodologies that allow accurate genome-wide prediction of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor. We present a method for target identification that combines experimental characterization of binding requirements with computational genomic analysis. Results Our method identified potential target genes of the transcription factor Ndt80, a key transcriptional regulator involved in yeast sporulation, using the combined information of binding affinity, positional distribution, and conservation of the binding sites across multiple species. We have also developed a mathematical approach to compute the false positive rate and the total number of targets in the genome based on the multiple selection criteria. Conclusion We have shown that combining biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis leads to accurate identification of the genome-wide targets of a transcription factor. The method can be extended to other transcription factors and can complement other genomic approaches to transcriptional regulation.

  3. Mutations in complement regulatory proteins predispose to preeclampsia: a genetic analysis of the PROMISSE cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Salmon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or antiphospholipid antibodies (APL Ab--autoimmune conditions characterized by complement-mediated injury--is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia and miscarriage. Our previous studies in mice indicate that complement activation targeted to the placenta drives angiogenic imbalance and placental insufficiency.We use PROMISSE, a prospective study of 250 pregnant patients with SLE and/or APL Ab, to test the hypothesis in humans that impaired capacity to limit complement activation predisposes to preeclampsia. We sequenced genes encoding three complement regulatory proteins--membrane cofactor protein (MCP, complement factor I (CFI, and complement factor H (CFH--in 40 patients who had preeclampsia and found heterozygous mutations in seven (18%. Five of these patients had risk variants in MCP or CFI that were previously identified in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease characterized by endothelial damage. One had a novel mutation in MCP that impairs regulation of C4b. These findings constitute, to our knowledge, the first genetic defects associated with preeclampsia in SLE and/or APL Ab. We confirmed the association of hypomorphic variants of MCP and CFI in a cohort of non-autoimmune preeclampsia patients in which five of 59 were heterozygous for mutations.The presence of risk variants in complement regulatory proteins in patients with SLE and/or APL Ab who develop preeclampsia, as well as in preeclampsia patients lacking autoimmune disease, links complement activation to disease pathogenesis and suggests new targets for treatment of this important public health problem.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00198068.

  4. Network analysis of transcriptomics expands regulatory landscapes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Ryan S.; Overall, Christopher C.; McDermott, Jason E.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; McCue, Lee Ann; Taylor, Ronald C.; Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2016-08-27

    Cyanobacterial regulation of gene expression must contend with a genome organization that lacks apparent functional context, as the majority of cellular processes and metabolic pathways are encoded by genes found at disparate locations across the genome. In addition, the fact that coordinated regulation of cyanobacterial cellular machinery takes place with significantly fewer transcription factors, compared to other Eubacteria, suggests the involvement of post-transcriptional mechanisms and regulatory adaptations which are not fully understood. Global transcript abundance from model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 grown under 42 different conditions was analyzed using context-likelihood of relatedness. The resulting 903-gene network, which was organized into 11 modules, not only allowed classification of cyanobacterial responses to specific environmental variables but provided insight into the transcriptional network topology and led to the expansion of predicted regulons. When used in conjunction with genome sequence, the global transcript abundance allowed identification of putative post-transcriptional changes in expression as well as novel potential targets of both DNA binding proteins and asRNA regulators. The results offer a new perspective into the multi-level regulation that governs cellular adaptations of fast-growing physiologically robust cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to changing environmental variables. It also extends a methodological knowledge-based framework for studying multi-scale regulatory mechanisms that operate in cyanobacteria. Finally, it provides valuable context for integrating systems-level data to enhance evidence-driven genomic annotation, especially in organisms where traditional context analyses cannot be implemented due to lack of operon-based functional organization.

  5. Differential proteomic analysis reveals sequential heat stress-responsive regulatory network in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) taproot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghua; Mei, Yi; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Yan; Guo, Jun; Liu, Liwang

    2018-05-01

    Differential abundance protein species (DAPS) involved in reducing damage and enhancing thermotolerance in radish were firstly identified. Proteomic analysis and omics association analysis revealed a HS-responsive regulatory network in radish. Heat stress (HS) is a major destructive factor influencing radish production and supply in summer, for radish is a cool season vegetable crop being susceptible to high temperature. In this study, the proteome changes of radish taproots under 40 °C treatment at 0 h (Control), 12 h (Heat12) and 24 h (Heat24) were analyzed using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tag for Relative and Absolute Quantification) approach. In total, 2258 DAPS representing 1542 differentially accumulated uniprotein species which respond to HS were identified. A total of 604, 910 and 744 DAPS was detected in comparison of Control vs. Heat12, Control vs. Heat24, and Heat12 vs. Heat24, respectively. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed that annexin, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, ATP synthase, heat shock protein (HSP) and other stress-related proteins were predominately enriched in signal transduction, stress and defense pathways, photosynthesis and energy metabolic pathways, working cooperatively to reduce stress-induced damage in radish. Based on iTRAQ combined with the transcriptomics analysis, a schematic model of a sequential HS-responsive regulatory network was proposed. The initial sensing of HS occurred at the plasma membrane, and then key components of stress signal transduction triggered heat-responsive genes in the plant protective metabolism to re-establish homeostasis and enhance thermotolerance. These results provide new insights into characteristics of HS-responsive DAPS and facilitate dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying heat tolerance in radish and other root crops.

  6. Mutation analysis of the human CYP3A4 gene 5' regulatory region: population screening using non-radioactive SSCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeiy, Hossein; Vahdati-Mashhadian, Nasser; Edwards, Helen J; Goldfarb, Peter S

    2002-03-20

    Human CYP3A4 is the major cytochrome P450 isoenzyme in adult human liver and is known to metabolise many xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. There is substantial inter-individual variation in the hepatic levels of CYP3A4. Although, polymorphic mutations have been reported in the 5' regulatory region of the CYP3A4 gene, those that have been investigated so far do not appear to have any effect on gene expression. To determine whether other mutations exist in this region of the gene, we have performed a new population screen on a panel of 101 human DNA samples. A 1140 bp section of the 5' proximal regulatory region of the CYP3A4 gene, containing numerous regulatory motifs, was amplified from genomic DNA as three overlapping segments. The 300 bp distal enhancer region at -7.9kb containing additional regulatory motifs was also amplified. Mutation analysis of the resulting PCR products was carried out using non-radioactive single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and confirmatory sequencing of both DNA strands in those samples showing extra SSCP bands. In addition to detection of the previously reported CYP3A4*1B allele in nine subjects, three novel alleles were found: CYP3A4*1E (having a T-->A transversion at -369 in one subject), CYP3A4*1F (having a C-->G tranversion at -747 in 17 subjects) and CYP3A4*15B containing a nine-nucleotide insertion between -845 and -844 linked to an A-->G transition at -392 and a G-->A transition in exon 6 (position 485 in the cDNA) in one subject. All the novel alleles were heterozygous. No mutations were found in the upstream distal enhancer region. Our results clearly indicate that this rapid and simple SSCP approach can reveal mutant alleles in drug metabolising enzyme genes. Detection and determination of the frequency of novel alleles in CYP3A4 will assist investigation of the relationship between genotype, xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity in the CYP3A family of isoenzymes.

  7. Restoration of optimal ellipsoid left ventricular geometry: lessons learnt from in silico surgical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhyapak, Srilakshmi M; Menon, Prahlad G; Rao Parachuri, V

    2014-02-01

    Several issues that are inherent in the surgical techniques of surgical ventricular restoration (SVR) need specialized devices or techniques to overcome them, which may not always result in optimal outcomes. We used a non-invasive novel in silico modelling technique to study left ventricular (LV) morphology and function before and after SVR. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging derived actual pre- and postoperative endocardial morphology and function was compared with the in silico analysis of the same. Cardiac magnetic resonance steady state free precession (SSFP) cine images were employed to segment endocardial surface contours over the cardiac cycle. Using the principle of Hausdorff distance to examine phase-to-phase regional endocardial displacement, dyskinetic/akinetic areas were identified at the instant of peak basal contraction velocity. Using a three-dimensional (3D) surface clipping tool, the maximally scarred, dyskinetic or akinetic LV antero-apical areas were virtually resected and a new apex was created. A virtual rectangular patch was created upon the clipped surface LV model by 3D Delaunay triangulation. Presurgical endocardial mechanical function quantified from cine cardiac magnetic resonance, using a technique of spherical harmonics (SPHARM) surface parameterization, was applied onto the virtually clipped and patched LV surface model. Finally, the in silico model of post-SVR LV shape was analysed for quantification of regional left ventricular volumes (RLVVs) and function. This was tested in 2 patients with post-myocardial infarction antero-apical LV aneuryms. Left ventricular mechanical dysynchrony was evaluated by RLVV analysis of pre-SVR, in silico post-SVR and actual post-SVR LV endocardial surface data. Following exclusion of the scarred areas, the virtual resected LV model demonstrated significantly lesser areas of akinesia. The decreases in regional LV volumes in the in silico modelling were significant and comparable with the actual

  8. State Regulatory Authority (SRA) Coordination of Safety, Security, and Safeguards of Nuclear Facilities: A Framework for Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladineo, S.; Frazar, S.; Kurzrok, A.; Martikka, E.; Hack, T.; Wiander, T.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsored a Technical Meeting on the Interfaces and Synergies in Safety, Security, and Safeguards for the Development of a Nuclear Power Program. The goal of the meeting was to explore whether and how safeguards, safety, and security systems could be coordinated or integrated to support more effective and efficient nonproliferation infrastructures. While no clear consensus emerged, participants identified practical challenges to and opportunities for integrating the three disciplines’ regulations and implementation activities. Simultaneously, participants also recognized that independent implementation of safeguards, safety, and security systems may be more effective or efficient at times. This paper will explore the development of a framework for conducting an assessment of safety-security-safeguards integration within a State. The goal is to examine State regulatory structures to identify conflicts and gaps that hinder management of the three disciplines at nuclear facilities. Such an analysis could be performed by a State Regulatory Authority (SRA) to provide a self-assessment or as part of technical cooperation either with a newcomer State, or to a State with a fully developed SRA.

  9. MutaNET: a tool for automated analysis of genomic mutations in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Markus; Hamed, Mohamed; Helms, Volkhard; Neininger, Kerstin

    2018-03-01

    Mutations in genomic key elements can influence gene expression and function in various ways, and hence greatly contribute to the phenotype. We developed MutaNET to score the impact of individual mutations on gene regulation and function of a given genome. MutaNET performs statistical analyses of mutations in different genomic regions. The tool also incorporates the mutations in a provided gene regulatory network to estimate their global impact. The integration of a next-generation sequencing pipeline enables calling mutations prior to the analyses. As application example, we used MutaNET to analyze the impact of mutations in antibiotic resistance (AR) genes and their potential effect on AR of bacterial strains. MutaNET is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/mutanet/. It is implemented in Python and supported on Mac OS X, Linux and MS Windows. Step-by-step instructions are available at http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/mutanet/. volkhard.helms@bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements

  11. DNA Methylation Analysis of HTR2A Regulatory Region in Leukocytes of Autistic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hranilovic, Dubravka; Blazevic, Sofia; Stefulj, Jasminka; Zill, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Disturbed brain and peripheral serotonin homeostasis is often found in subjects with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The role of the serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) in the regulation of central and peripheral serotonin homeostasis, as well as its altered expression in autistic subjects, have implicated the HTR2A gene as a major candidate for the serotonin disturbance seen in autism. Several studies, yielding so far inconclusive results, have attempted to associate autism with a functional SNP -1438 G/A (rs6311) in the HTR2A promoter region, while possible contribution of epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, to HTR2A dysregulation in autism has not yet been investigated. In this study, we compared the mean DNA methylation within the regulatory region of the HTR2A gene between autistic and control subjects. DNA methylation was analysed in peripheral blood leukocytes using bisulfite conversion and sequencing of the HTR2A region containing rs6311 polymorphism. Autistic subjects of rs6311 AG genotype displayed higher mean methylation levels within the analysed region than the corresponding controls (P epigenetic mechanisms might contribute to HTR2A dysregulation observed in individuals with ASD. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of regulatory T cells in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpakou, Vassiliki E; Ioannidou, Heleni-Dikaia; Konsta, Eugene; Vikentiou, Myrofora; Spathis, Aris; Kontsioti, Frieda; Kontos, Christos K; Velentzas, Athanassios D; Papageorgiou, Sotiris; Vasilatou, Diamantina; Gkontopoulos, Konstantinos; Glezou, Irene; Stavroulaki, Georgia; Mpazani, Efthimia; Kokkori, Stella; Kyriakou, Elias; Karakitsos, Petros; Dimitriadis, George; Pappa, Vasiliki

    2017-09-01

    Accumulated data indicate a significant role of T cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In CLL, regulatory T cells are significantly higher and show lower apoptotic levels compared to healthy donors. We demonstrate that CLL derived CD4 + CD25 - CD127 - and CD4 + CD25 low CD127 - subpopulations share a common immunophenotypic profile with conventional Tregs and are associated with advanced stage disease. We further provide evidence that the increased number of Tregs contributes indirectly to the proliferation of the CLL clone, by suppressing the proliferation of Teffs which in turn suppress CLL cells. These data are further supported by our observations that CLL derived Tregs appear rather incapable of inducing apoptosis of both normal B cells and CLL cells, in contrast to normal Tregs, suggesting an immunoediting effect of CLL cells on Tregs which negatively affects the functionality of the latter and contributes to the failure of Tregs in CLL to efficiently eliminate the abnormal clone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EPA/NMED/LANL 1998 water quality results: Statistical analysis and comparison to regulatory standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallaher, B.; Mercier, T.; Black, P.; Mullen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Four governmental agencies conducted a round of groundwater, surface water, and spring water sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1998. Samples were split among the four parties and sent to independent analytical laboratories. Results from three of the agencies were available for this study. Comparisons of analytical results that were paired by location and date were made between the various analytical laboratories. The results for over 50 split samples analyzed for inorganic chemicals, metals, and radionuclides were compared. Statistical analyses included non-parametric (sign test and signed-ranks test) and parametric (paired t-test and linear regression) methods. The data pairs were tested for statistically significant differences, defined by an observed significance level, or p-value, less than 0.05. The main conclusion is that the laboratories' performances are similar across most of the analytes that were measured. In some 95% of the laboratory measurements there was agreement on whether contaminant levels exceeded regulatory limits. The most significant differences in performance were noted for the radioactive suite, particularly for gross alpha particle activity and Sr-90

  14. Vitrification of underground storage tanks: Technology development, regulatory issues, and cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixier, J.S.; Corathers, L.A.; Anderson, L.D.

    1992-03-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), is a thermal treatment process for the remediation of hazardous, radioactive, or mixed waste sites. The process has been broadly patented both domestically and abroad. Since the inception of ISV in 1980, developmental activities have been focused on applications to contaminated soils, and more recently the potential for application to buried wastes and underground structures (tanks). Research performed to date on the more advanced ISV applications (i.e., application to buried wastes and underground tanks) shows that significant technical and economic potential exists for using ISV to treat buried wastes and underground structures containing radionuclides and/or hazardous constituents. Present ISV applications are directed to the treatment of contaminated soils; the likelihood of using ISV to treat underground tanks depends on the resolution of significant technical and institutional issues related to this advanced application. This paper describes the ISV process and summarizes the technical progress of underground tank vitrification (UTV), discusses pertinent regulatory issues facing the use of UTV, and presents the potential cost of UTV relative to other remedial action alternatives

  15. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements

  16. Identifying cis-regulatory modules by combining comparative and compositional analysis of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierstorff, Nora; Bergman, Casey M; Wiehe, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Predicting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in higher eukaryotes is a challenging computational task. Commonly used methods to predict CRMs based on the signal of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are limited by prior information about transcription factor specificity. More general methods that bypass the reliance on TFBS models are needed for comprehensive CRM prediction. We have developed a method to predict CRMs called CisPlusFinder that identifies high density regions of perfect local ungapped sequences (PLUSs) based on multiple species conservation. By assuming that PLUSs contain core TFBS motifs that are locally overrepresented, the method attempts to capture the expected features of CRM structure and evolution. Applied to a benchmark dataset of CRMs involved in early Drosophila development, CisPlusFinder predicts more annotated CRMs than all other methods tested. Using the REDfly database, we find that some 'false positive' predictions in the benchmark dataset correspond to recently annotated CRMs. Our work demonstrates that CRM prediction methods that combine comparative genomic data with statistical properties of DNA may achieve reasonable performance when applied genome-wide in the absence of an a priori set of known TFBS motifs. The program CisPlusFinder can be downloaded at http://jakob.genetik.uni-koeln.de/bioinformatik/people/nora/nora.html. All software is licensed under the Lesser GNU Public License (LGPL).

  17. Evolutionary analysis reveals regulatory and functional landscape of coding and non-coding RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Deng, Patricia; Jacobson, Dionna; Li, Jin Billy

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing diversifies the transcriptome and promotes functional diversity, particularly in the brain. A plethora of editing sites has been recently identified; however, how they are selected and regulated and which are functionally important are largely unknown. Here we show the cis-regulation and stepwise selection of RNA editing during Drosophila evolution and pinpoint a large number of functional editing sites. We found that the establishment of editing and variation in editing levels across Drosophila species are largely explained and predicted by cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, editing events that arose early in the species tree tend to be more highly edited in clusters and enriched in slowly-evolved neuronal genes, thus suggesting that the main role of RNA editing is for fine-tuning neurological functions. While nonsynonymous editing events have been long recognized as playing a functional role, in addition to nonsynonymous editing sites, a large fraction of 3'UTR editing sites is evolutionarily constrained, highly edited, and thus likely functional. We find that these 3'UTR editing events can alter mRNA stability and affect miRNA binding and thus highlight the functional roles of noncoding RNA editing. Our work, through evolutionary analyses of RNA editing in Drosophila, uncovers novel insights of RNA editing regulation as well as its functions in both coding and non-coding regions.

  18. Structural model of the hUbA1-UbcH10 quaternary complex: in silico and experimental analysis of the protein-protein interactions between E1, E2 and ubiquitin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Correale

    Full Text Available UbcH10 is a component of the Ubiquitin Conjugation Enzymes (Ubc; E2 involved in the ubiquitination cascade controlling the cell cycle progression, whereby ubiquitin, activated by E1, is transferred through E2 to the target protein with the involvement of E3 enzymes. In this work we propose the first three dimensional model of the tetrameric complex formed by the human UbA1 (E1, two ubiquitin molecules and UbcH10 (E2, leading to the transthiolation reaction. The 3D model was built up by using an experimentally guided incremental docking strategy that combined homology modeling, protein-protein docking and refinement by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The structural features of the in silico model allowed us to identify the regions that mediate the recognition between the interacting proteins, revealing the active role of the ubiquitin crosslinked to E1 in the complex formation. Finally, the role of these regions involved in the E1-E2 binding was validated by designing short peptides that specifically interfere with the binding of UbcH10, thus supporting the reliability of the proposed model and representing valuable scaffolds for the design of peptidomimetic compounds that can bind selectively to Ubcs and inhibit the ubiquitylation process in pathological disorders.

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors derived from a mangrove flora Rhizophora mucronata: An in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Gurudeeban

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV is responsible for conversion of glucose tolerance (GLP-1, into inactive form. The inhibition of DPP IV would be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to isolate and evaluate cystine, phenyl acetic acid, acrylamide, caprylone and oleic acid from Rhizophora mucronata inhibitory action on DPP IV inhibitors using in silico approach. In silico analysis of cystine, phenyl acetic acid, acrylamide, caprylone and oleic acid on human apo DPP IV protein was done by using Autodoc 4.0. Among the five compounds cysteine acts as an inhibitor with binding energy -5.89 kcal/mol, seven hydrogen bond interactions at residues VAL459, VAL 459, GLU408, GLU206, ARG358, GLU205 and SER209 to suppresses the action of DPP IV protein.

  20. Yak milk casein as potential precursor of angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides based on in silico proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Zhang, Lan-Wei; Han, Xue; Xin, Liang; Meng, Zhao-Xu; Gong, Pi-Min; Cheng, Da-You

    2018-07-15

    Yak milk casein was selected as a potential precursor of bioactive peptides based on in silico analysis. Most notable among these are the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides. First, yak milk casein has high homology with cow milk casein by homologous analysis. The potential of yak milk casein for the releasing bioactive peptides was evaluated by determining the frequency of occurrence of fragments with a given activity. Through the BIOPEP database analysis, there are many bioactive peptides in yak milk casein sequences. Then, an in silico proteolysis using single or combined enzymes to obtained ACE inhibitory peptides was investigated. Cytotoxicity analysis using the online toxic prediction tool ToxinPred revealed that all in silico proteolysis derived ACE inhibitory peptides are non-cytotoxic. Overall, the present study highlights a in silico proteolysis approach to assist the yak milk casein releasing ACE inhibitory peptides and provides a guidance for the actual hydrolysis of proteins for the production of bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-10-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

  2. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 130: Essential service water system failures at multi-unit sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, V.; Basdekas, D.; Mazetis, G.

    1991-06-01

    The essential service water system (ESWS) is required to provide cooling in nuclear power plants during normal operation and accident conditions. The ESWS typically supports component cooling water heat exchangers, containment spray heat exchangers, high-pressure injection pump oil coolers, emergency diesel generators, and auxiliary building ventilation coolers. Failure of the ESWS function could lead to severe consequences. This report presents the regulatory analysis for GI-130, ''Essential Service Water System Failures at Multi-Unit Sites.'' The risk reduction estimates, cost/benefit analyses, and other insights gained during this effort have shown that implementation of the recommendations will significantly reduce risk and that these improvements are warranted in accordance with the backfit rule, 10 CFR 50.109(a)(3). 19 refs., 16 tabs

  3. Technical findings and regulatory analysis for Generic Safety Issue II.E.4.3, ''Containment Integrity Check''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, A.W.

    1988-04-01

    This report contains the technical findings and regulatory analysis for Generic Safety Issue II.E.4.3, ''Containment Integrity Check.'' An evaluation of the containment isolation history from 1965 to 1983 reveals that (except for a small number of events) containment integrity has been maintained and that the majority of reported events have been events related to exceeding Technical Specification limits (or 0.6 of the allowable leakage level). In addition, more recent risk analyses have shown that allowable leakage rates even if increased by a factor of 10 would not significantly increase risk. Potential methods of continuous monitoring are identified and evaluated. Therefore, these technical findings and risk evaluations support closure of Generic Safety Issue II.E.4.3

  4. Integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression reveals regulatory networks in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Tejal; Elias, Daniel; Stenvang, Jan

    2016-01-01

    and 14-3-3 family genes. Integrating the inferred miRNA-target relationships, we investigated the functional importance of 2 central genes, SNAI2 and FYN, which showed increased expression in TamR cells, while their corresponding regulatory miRNA were downregulated. Using specific chemical inhibitors......Tamoxifen is an effective anti-estrogen treatment for patients with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, however, tamoxifen resistance is frequently observed. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance, we performed a systematic analysis of miRNA......-mediated gene regulation in three clinically-relevant tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines (TamRs) compared to their parental tamoxifen-sensitive cell line. Alterations in the expression of 131 miRNAs in tamoxifen-resistant vs. parental cell lines were identified, 22 of which were common to all Tam...

  5. Computer simulations of a generic truck cask in a regulatory fire using the Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, H.; Greiner, M.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code is designed to predict accurately convection and radiation heat transfer to a thermally massive object engulfed in a large pool fire. It is well suited for design and risk analyses of spent nuclear fuel transport systems. CAFE employs computational fluid dynamics and several fire and radiation models. These models must be benchmarked using experimental results. In this paper, a set of wind velocity conditions are determined which allow CAFE accurately to reproduce recent heat transfer measurements for a thick walled calorimeter in a ST-1 regulatory pool fire. CAFE is then used to predict the response of an intack (thin walled) generic legal weight truck cask. The maximum temperatures reached by internal components are within safe limits. A simple 800 deg. C, grey-radiation fire model gives maximum component temperatures that are somewhat below those predicted by CAFE. (author)

  6. CoryneRegNet: an ontology-based data warehouse of corynebacterial transcription factors and regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Jan; Brinkrolf, Karina; Czaja, Lisa F; Rahmann, Sven; Tauch, Andreas

    2006-02-14

    The application of DNA microarray technology in post-genomic analysis of bacterial genome sequences has allowed the generation of huge amounts of data related to regulatory networks. This data along with literature-derived knowledge on regulation of gene expression has opened the way for genome-wide reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks. These large-scale reconstructions can be converted into in silico models of bacterial cells that allow a systematic analysis of network behavior in response to changing environmental conditions. CoryneRegNet was designed to facilitate the genome-wide reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks of corynebacteria relevant in biotechnology and human medicine. During the import and integration process of data derived from experimental studies or literature knowledge CoryneRegNet generates links to genome annotations, to identified transcription factors and to the corresponding cis-regulatory elements. CoryneRegNet is based on a multi-layered, hierarchical and modular concept of transcriptional regulation and was implemented by using the relational database management system MySQL and an ontology-based data structure. Reconstructed regulatory networks can be visualized by using the yFiles JAVA graph library. As an application example of CoryneRegNet, we have reconstructed the global transcriptional regulation of a cellular module involved in SOS and stress response of corynebacteria. CoryneRegNet is an ontology-based data warehouse that allows a pertinent data management of regulatory interactions along with the genome-scale reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks. These models can further be combined with metabolic networks to build integrated models of cellular function including both metabolism and its transcriptional regulation.

  7. CoryneRegNet: An ontology-based data warehouse of corynebacterial transcription factors and regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czaja Lisa F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of DNA microarray technology in post-genomic analysis of bacterial genome sequences has allowed the generation of huge amounts of data related to regulatory networks. This data along with literature-derived knowledge on regulation of gene expression has opened the way for genome-wide reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks. These large-scale reconstructions can be converted into in silico models of bacterial cells that allow a systematic analysis of network behavior in response to changing environmental conditions. Description CoryneRegNet was designed to facilitate the genome-wide reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks of corynebacteria relevant in biotechnology and human medicine. During the import and integration process of data derived from experimental studies or literature knowledge CoryneRegNet generates links to genome annotations, to identified transcription factors and to the corresponding cis-regulatory elements. CoryneRegNet is based on a multi-layered, hierarchical and modular concept of transcriptional regulation and was implemented by using the relational database management system MySQL and an ontology-based data structure. Reconstructed regulatory networks can be visualized by using the yFiles JAVA graph library. As an application example of CoryneRegNet, we have reconstructed the global transcriptional regulation of a cellular module involved in SOS and stress response of corynebacteria. Conclusion CoryneRegNet is an ontology-based data warehouse that allows a pertinent data management of regulatory interactions along with the genome-scale reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks. These models can further be combined with metabolic networks to build integrated models of cellular function including both metabolism and its transcriptional regulation.

  8. Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Eric I; Leyn, Semen A; Kazanov, Marat D; Saier, Milton H; Novichkov, Pavel S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-09-02

    In silico comparative genomics approaches have been efficiently used for functional prediction and reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks. Riboswitches are metabolite-sensing structures often found in bacterial mRNA leaders controlling gene expression on transcriptional or translational levels.An increasing number of riboswitches and other cis-regulatory RNAs have been recently classified into numerous RNA families in the Rfam database. High conservation of these RNA motifs provides a unique advantage for their genomic identification and comparative analysis. A comparative genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict tool was used for reconstruction and functional annotation of regulons controlled by RNAs from 43 Rfam families in diverse taxonomic groups of Bacteria. The inferred regulons include ~5200 cis-regulatory RNAs and more than 12000 target genes in 255 microbial genomes. All predicted RNA-regulated genes were classified into specific and overall functional categories. Analysis of taxonomic distribution of these categories allowed us to establish major functional preferences for each analyzed cis-regulatory RNA motif family. Overall, most RNA motif regulons showed predictable functional content in accordance with their experimentally established effector ligands. Our results suggest that some RNA motifs (including thiamin pyrophosphate and cobalamin riboswitches that control the cofactor metabolism) are widespread and likely originated from the last common ancestor of all bacteria. However, many more analyzed RNA motifs are restricted to a narrow taxonomic group of bacteria and likely represent more recent evolutionary innovations. The reconstructed regulatory networks for major known RNA motifs substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in bacteria. The inferred regulons can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and evolutionary analysis. The obtained genome

  9. Pathway-based analysis of genome-wide siRNA screens reveals the regulatory landscape of APP processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Miguel Camargo

    Full Text Available The progressive aggregation of Amyloid-β (Aβ in the brain is a major trait of Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Aβ is produced as a result of proteolytic processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP. Processing of APP is mediated by multiple enzymes, resulting in the production of distinct peptide products: the non-amyloidogenic peptide sAPPα and the amyloidogenic peptides sAPPβ, Aβ40, and Aβ42. Using a pathway-based approach, we analyzed a large-scale siRNA screen that measured the production of different APP proteolytic products. Our analysis identified many of the biological processes/pathways that are known to regulate APP processing and have been implicated in AD pathogenesis, as well as revealing novel regulatory mechanisms. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that some of these processes differentially regulate APP processing, with some mechanisms favouring production of certain peptide species over others. For example, synaptic transmission having a bias towards regulating Aβ40 production over Aβ42 as well as processes involved in insulin and pancreatic biology having a bias for sAPPβ production over sAPPα. In addition, some of the pathways identified as regulators of APP processing contain genes (CLU, BIN1, CR1, PICALM, TREM2, SORL1, MEF2C, DSG2, EPH1A recently implicated with AD through genome wide association studies (GWAS and associated meta-analysis. In addition, we provide supporting evidence and a deeper mechanistic understanding of the role of diabetes in AD. The identification of these processes/pathways, their differential impact on APP processing, and their relationships to each other, provide a comprehensive systems biology view of the "regulatory landscape" of APP.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of an Insecticide Resistant Housefly Strain: Insights about SNPs and Regulatory Elements in Cytochrome P450 Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Højland, Dorte H; Asp, Torben; Kristensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance in the housefly, Musca domestica, has been investigated for more than 60 years. It will enter a new era after the recent publication of the housefly genome and the development of multiple next generation sequencing technologies. The genetic background of the xenobiotic response can now be investigated in greater detail. Here, we investigate the 454-pyrosequencing transcriptome of the spinosad-resistant 791spin strain in relation to the housefly genome with focus on P450 genes. The de novo assembly of clean reads gave 35,834 contigs consisting of 21,780 sequences of the spinosad resistant strain. The 3,648 sequences were annotated with an enzyme code EC number and were mapped to 124 KEGG pathways with metabolic processes as most highly represented pathway. One hundred and twenty contigs were annotated as P450s covering 44 different P450 genes of housefly. Eight differentially expressed P450s genes were identified and investigated for SNPs, CpG islands and common regulatory motifs in promoter and coding regions. Functional annotation clustering of metabolic related genes and motif analysis of P450s revealed their association with epigenetic, transcription and gene expression related functions. The sequence variation analysis resulted in 12 SNPs and eight of them found in cyp6d1. There is variation in location, size and frequency of CpG islands and specific motifs were also identified in these P450s. Moreover, identified motifs were associated to GO terms and transcription factors using bioinformatic tools. Transcriptome data of a spinosad resistant strain provide together with genome data fundamental support for future research to understand evolution of resistance in houseflies. Here, we report for the first time the SNPs, CpG islands and common regulatory motifs in differentially expressed P450s. Taken together our findings will serve as a stepping stone to advance understanding of the mechanism and role of P450s in xenobiotic detoxification.

  11. Eucalyptus microsatellites mined in silico: survey and evaluation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-04-01

    Apr 1, 2008 ... Eucalyptus microsatellites mined in silico: survey and evaluation ... cific regions of the genome of different species (Marques et ..... Received 21 June 2007, in revised form 11 September 2007; accepted 12 September 2007.

  12. In-Silico Integration Approach to Identify a Key miRNA Regulating a Gene Network in Aggressive Prostate Cancer