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Sample records for significant radioprotective effects

  1. Radioprotective effectiveness of some zootoxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernigorova, L.A.; Lebedev, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the effectiveness of a new class of radioprotective agents, polypeptides, obtained from zootoxins of scorpion, tarantula, Lathrodectes tredecimguttatus, and bee under conditions of a short-term and long-term irradiation. The peptide fraction of the sorption venom, butoxin, was most radioprotective: it provided 65% survival after LD 98/30 . Butoxin exerted a stimulatory effect on the hypophysis-adrenal system and haemopoiesis of intact and irradiated animals

  2. Radioprotective effect of bread products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadzhijski, L.; Alyakov, M.; Tsvetkova, E.; Kavrakirova, S.; Chamova, S.; Vasileva, R.

    1993-01-01

    A new technology for preparation of bread for special purposes is developed. The technology includes the use of pectin as an additive with decontaminating properties. Pectin shows well pronounced radioprotective effect on the haemopoiesis when persons are subjected to external irradiation. However, bread with pectin have no decontaminating effect against radiostrontium and radiocesium. (author)

  3. Radioprotective effect of edible herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ying; Huang Meiying; Zhu Genbo; Fang Jixi; Fan Xiudi

    1992-08-01

    The radioprotective effect of the edible herbs was studied in animals. The results showed: (1) The acute death rate of animals was decreased. (2) The peripheral leukocytes were increased. (3) The valine, hydroxyproline, glycine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid in the plasma also were increased. (4) The activity of SOD (superoxide dimutase) was risen. (5) the edible herbs have the function to protect the structure of organs of thymus and testes

  4. Radioprotective effect of the pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ying; Zhu Gengbo; Huang Meiying; Yin Zhiwei; Fang Jixi; Fan Xiudi

    1990-10-01

    The radioprotective injury effect of pollen in animals was studied. Research came to the conclusion that: (1) the acute death rate of animals is decreased by the pollen; (2) the peripheral leukocytes and spleen-B-lymph cells of animals are increased by the pollen; (3) the activity of superoxide dimutase (SOD) in the erythrocytes of animals is increased by the pollen; (4) the pollen has the function of protecting the structure of the organs of thymus and testes and so on; (5) the plasma hydroxyproline of animals is remarkably decreased by the pollen

  5. Radioprotective effect of interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasukhina, G.

    1984-12-18

    A cycle of experiments performed jointly with associations of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute reportedly demonstrated that interferons protect human cells cultivated in a test tube against the action of fast neutrons and gamma radiation. Cells treated in advance with interferon not only survived irradiation but were almost totally protected against harmful effects of fast neutrons on the structure of chromosomes, according to the author. She mentions that the laboratory has also been studying effects produced on cells by compounds of heavy metals and other chemical compounds, including ones which cause breaks in the DNA molecule. Interferon's ability to protect cells against effects of chemical compounds has been studied in this connection. Another direction of the laboratory's work is research on interferon's effects on blood cells of persons suffering from certain hereditary diseases in which restorative processes of cells are impaired. The purpose of this is to develop courses of treatment which will not cause irreversible damages to chromosomes, the author explains. Interferon has been found to stimulate the reparation systems of cells in cases of Marfan's syndrome, for example.

  6. Radioprotective effect of CURCUMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Curcuma longa is the scientific name of turmeric, which can be found on spice racks worldwide. This herb is responsible for the yellow colouring of many curry dishes. In the present study, female albino rats were treated with oral administration of curcumin for 14 days before gamma irradiation. Gamma radiation was applied in 0.1, 0.75 and 2 Gy, 1 hour after the last dose of curcuma administration. Animals were divided into control and 6 treated groups, all were irradiated with gamma rays, only three were injected with curcumin. Blood was collected 1 and 48 hours after irradiation. Serum total protein, albumin, globulins, cholesterol, triglycerides, SGOT and SGPT were determined. Curcuma was found to elevate the protein profile (total protein, albumin and globulin) and ameliorated the hyperlipidaemic effects of gamma radiation. Curcuma also improved the liver functions affected by gamma irradiation. It could be concluded that curcuma can be used as a radioprotector for occupationally exposed individuals to low doses and low dose rates

  7. Glucan: mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patchen, M.L.; D'Alesandro, M.M.; Brook, I.; Blakely, W.F.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    It has generally been accepted that most biologically derived agents that are radioprotective in the hemopoietic-syndrome dose range (eg, endotoxin, Bacillus Calmette Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum, etc) exert their beneficial properties by enhancing hemopoietic recovery and hence, by regenerating the host's ability to resist life-threatening opportunistic infections. However, using glucan as a hemopoietic stimulant/radioprotectant, we have demonstrated that host resistance to opportunistic infection is enhanced in these mice even prior to the detection of significant hemopoietic regeneration. This early enhanced resistance to microbial invasion in glucan-treated irradiated mice could be correlated with enhanced and/or prolonged macrophage (but not granulocyte) function. These results suggest that early after irradiation glucan may mediate its radioprotection by enhancing resistance to microbial invasion via mechanisms not necessarily predicated on hemopoietic recovery. In addition, preliminary evidence suggests that glucan can also function as an effective free-radical scavenger. Because macrophages have been shown to selectively phagocytize and sequester glucan, the possibility that these specific cells may be protected by virtue of glucan's scavenging ability is also suggested

  8. Effects of radioprotective agents on mammal cella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.; Pauly, H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of aminothiols and thiophosphates on cultures of B14 Chinese Hamster cells wee investigated. 30 min before irradiation, the cells were covered with a solution of the radioprotective agent. After irradiation, this solution was removed and substituted by culture medium. The radioprotective effect increases with increasing cystamine concentrations. With a cystamine concentration of 60 mM, a dose reduction factor of 3 was achieved. Further investigations showed that already after 2 min of incubation, the radioprotective effect in the same as after 60 min. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Radioprotective effect of vitamins C and E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nahas, S.M.; Mohamed, A.A.; Mattar, F.E.

    1993-01-01

    Albino rats were treated with aqueous vitamin C solution and vitamin E solution dissolved in olive oil at two concentrations, 100 and 300 mg/kg/day, for 6 months. Some of the animals where then subjected to whole-body irradiation. Chromosomal aberrations and mitotic activity in non-irradiated and irradiated groups were recorded. Both vitamins were found to be non-mutagenic. Vitamin C exerted a radioprotective effect but vitamin E was not radioprotective and it suppressed the radioprotection otherwise produced by olive oil. (author). 31 refs., 2 figs

  10. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, H.

    1991-03-01

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  11. Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rashmi; Tiwari, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    A major feature of all higher eukaryotes is the defined life span of the organism. Radioprotections are substances that protect the cells against Radiation induced damage. Over the past decade interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phytoproducts for use in Cancer preventing strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for controlling the Cancer incidence in many developing countries as well as developed countries. Several experimental evidence has indicated that intake of fruit and vegetables and a number of other dietary items are associated with decreased Cancer incidence. These potential agents either abolish or delay the development of Cancer by interfering with one or more steps in the process of carcinogenesis, such as preventing the activation of carcinogen by increasing detoxification or by blocking the interaction of ultimate carcinogen with cellular macromolecules or suppressing the clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. The potential of using medicinal herbs as Cancer chemo preventive neutraceuticals and functional food is promising. Radioprotective potential of extracts of certain dietary botanicals including Mentha arvensi (field mint), Syzyzium cumini (Jamun), Zingiber officinale (Ginger), Aegle marmelos (Bael), Emblica officianalis (Amla), Aloe vera (Gwar patha), Moringa oleifera (Moringa, Horse Radish Tree), Grewia asiatica (Phalsa), Rosemarinus officinalis (Rosemary), Trigonella foenum-graecum, Ocirnurn sanctum, Phylanthus niruri, Vetiveria zizanioides (vetivergrass), Delbergia sisso oil (Sesame oil) was evaluated. All botanicals tested had shown a very low toxicity. Administration of these botanicals increased the survival of whole body irradiated mice and reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness. (author)

  12. Radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rashmi; Tiwari, Ajay [Department of Zoology, Govt. College, Ajmer (India)

    2012-07-01

    A major feature of all higher eukaryotes is the defined life span of the organism. Radioprotections are substances that protect the cells against Radiation induced damage. Over the past decade interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phytoproducts for use in Cancer preventing strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for controlling the Cancer incidence in many developing countries as well as developed countries. Several experimental evidence has indicated that intake of fruit and vegetables and a number of other dietary items are associated with decreased Cancer incidence. These potential agents either abolish or delay the development of Cancer by interfering with one or more steps in the process of carcinogenesis, such as preventing the activation of carcinogen by increasing detoxification or by blocking the interaction of ultimate carcinogen with cellular macromolecules or suppressing the clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. The potential of using medicinal herbs as Cancer chemo preventive neutraceuticals and functional food is promising. Radioprotective potential of extracts of certain dietary botanicals including Mentha arvensi (field mint), Syzyzium cumini (Jamun), Zingiber officinale (Ginger), Aegle marmelos (Bael), Emblica officianalis (Amla), Aloe vera (Gwar patha), Moringa oleifera (Moringa, Horse Radish Tree), Grewia asiatica (Phalsa), Rosemarinus officinalis (Rosemary), Trigonella foenum-graecum, Ocirnurn sanctum, Phylanthus niruri, Vetiveria zizanioides (vetivergrass), Delbergia sisso oil (Sesame oil) was evaluated. All botanicals tested had shown a very low toxicity. Administration of these botanicals increased the survival of whole body irradiated mice and reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness. (author)

  13. Radioprotective effect of the β-carotene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ying; Huang Meiying; Zhu Gengbo; Yin Zhiwei; Fang Jixi; Fan Xiudi

    1991-09-01

    The radioprotective effect of β-carotene was studied in animals. The results showed: 1) The chronic death rate decreased; 2) The peripheral leukocytes and spleen-B-Lymph cells increased; 3) The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the blood increased; 4) The β-carotene has the function of protecting the structure of the organs of thymus and testes; 5) The free asparagine (Asn) in the plasma increased and proline decreased

  14. Radioprotective effects of flurbiprofen and its nitroderivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juchelkova, L.; Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Pipalova, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, flurbiprofen (FBP) and its novel nitroderivative flurbiprofen 4-nitroxy butylester (NO-FBP), which exhibits decreased gastrointestinal toxicity, were compared in mice. The drugs were administered in equimolar single doses, 2 hours before whole-body gamma irradiation of the animals. After a sublethal radiation dose of 6.5 Gy, significantly increased numbers of endogenous haemopoietic spleen colonies and enhanced granulopoiesis were found in mice given either FBP or NO-FBP, when compared to vehicle-treated controls. There were no differences in the effectiveness of either drug to enhance postirradiation haemopoietic recovery. Survival of FBP- or NO-FBP-treated mice subjected to a lethal dose of 9.5 Gy was slightly but insignificantly enhanced, both drugs showing the same effect. These results clearly indicate the ability of both drugs to enhance haemopoietic recovery after sublethal radiation exposure and the absence of unfavourable effects under higher radiation doses. Because of its lower potential for gastrointestinal damage, NO-FBP seems to be a promising drug which can find a use in the protection of postirradiation myelosuppression. (author)

  15. Cytotoxic and radioprotective effects of Podophyllum hexandrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Afrin, Farhat; Puri, Satish Chandra; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-07-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a herb thriving in Himalayas has already been reported to exhibit antitumor and radioprotective properties. Present study was undertaken to unravel the possible mechanism responsible for the cytotoxic and radioprotective properties of REC-2001, a fraction isolated from the rhizome of P. hexandrum using murine peritoneal macrophages and plasmid DNA as model systems. Cell death, levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis were studied employing trypan blue exclusion assay, dichlorofluorescein diacetate and DNA fragmentation assay, respectively. Superoxide anions, hydroxyl radicals and DNA damage were estimated following nitroblue tetrazolium, 2-deoxyribose degradation and plasmid DNA relaxation assays, respectively. Pre-irradiation administration of REC-2001 to peritoneal macrophages in the concentration range of 25-200μg/ml significantly reduced radiation induced ROS generation, DNA damage, apoptosis and cell killing in comparison to radiation control group indicating radioprotective potential. Studies with plasmid DNA indicated the ability of REC-2001 to inhibit 20Gy induced single and double strand breaks further supporting the antioxidative potential. However, REC-2001 in a dose-dependent fashion induced cell death, ROS and DNA fragmentation indicating the cytotoxic nature. REC-2001, in presence of 100μM copper sulfate, generated significant amount of hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anions indicating ability to act as a pro-oxidant in presence of metal ions. The superoxide anion generation was found to be sensitive to metal chelators like EDTA and deferoxamine mesylate (DFR). These results suggest that the ability of REC-2001 to act as a pro-oxidant in presence of metal ions and antioxidant in presence of free radicals might be responsible for cytotoxic and radioprotective properties.

  16. Study of radioprotective effect of the resveratrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Carolina dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4,5 trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is present at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. This high capacity to scavenge the free radicals generated by several biologic processes by resveratrol can provide a prevention of human cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancer. The main objective of this study was to determine the in vitro radioprotective effect of resveratrol in cell culture with the aid of the tests of cytotoxicity of resveratrol (IC50%) and lethal dose 50% of gamma radiation (LD50). Studies of the level of resveratrol toxicity, found by cytotoxicity test performed by neutral red uptake assay, and lethal dose 50% (LD50) of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60 (Co-60) was performed in cell culture NCTC Clone 929 from ATCC. The IC50% of resveratrol was about 50 M/L. The DL50 of gamma radiation showed a value of about 354 Gy. On the basis of these biological results, it was performed studies of radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the same experimental conditions, verifying that the resveratrol in concentrations between 12.5 M/L and 25 M/L showed a more pronounced radioprotective effect. (author)

  17. Radioprotective effectiveness of Adeturone incapsulated in liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantev, T.

    1989-01-01

    The radioprotective properties of the radioprotector Adeturone incapsulated in mono- and tricomponent liposomes were studied. Intraperitoneal administration of the radioprotector by means of monocomponent liposomes from egg lecithin, as well as its applicaton alone immediately (15-30 min) before irradiation of mice with 7,5 Gy gamma-quanta (LD 100/30 ) guaranteed high survival -80% and 75% accordingly. Orally introduced Adeturone, incapsulated in tricomponent liposomes (dipalmitoil lecithin, cholesterol, stearinamine - 7:2:1), protected for 0,5 to 4,5 hours lethally X-irradiated mice (7,8 Gy; LD 90/30 ). Under these conditions, Adeturone applied alone 4,5 hours before irradiation was ineffective. These results show the presence of prolonged radioprotective effect of Adeturone, when orally applied in the form of liposomal suspension. 2 tabs., 17 refs

  18. Radioprotective effectiveness of Adeturone, incapsulated in liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantev, T.

    1990-01-01

    The radioprotective properties of Adeturone (S,2-aminoethyl isothiuronic adenosine-5-triphosphate), incapsulated in mono- and tricomponent lisosomes was studied. Intraperitoneal adminisration of the radioprotector by means of monocomponent liposomes from egg lecithins, as well as of the radioprotector alone shortly before (15-30 min) gamma irradiation of mice with 7.5 Gy (LD 100/30 ) provided high survival rate - accordingly 80% and 75%. Orally administered Adeturone incapsulated in tricomponent liposomes (dipalmitoil-DL-3-lecithin:cholesterine:stearilamine - 7:2:1) protected mice exposed to lethal X-irradiation (7.8 Gy, LD 90/30 ) for 0.5 to 4.5 hours. Adeturone, applied alone under these conditions 4.5 hours before irradiation, was ineffective. The results clearly demonstrated a prolonged radioprotective effect of Adeturone, administered per os as liposome suspension. 2 tabs., 17 refs

  19. Investigations with beagles about toxicity and radioprotective effect of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Sedlmeier, H.; Wustrow, T.; Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl-thiophosphate) was examined in 25 beagles. The study showed that the toxicity of the substance increases as the dose gets higher. Between the doses 200 and 250 mg/kg of body weight, the increase of toxicity was significantly greater than could be expected on the basis of the dose difference. Until a dose of 200 mg/kg, the authors found no side effects which would have disturbed vital functions, but higher doses led to marked symptoms of intoxication. (orig.) [de

  20. Radioprotective effect of catecholamines on the cultured Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkov, Yu.Yu.; Malatsidze, M.A.; Sobolev, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    On cultivated in vitro Chinese hamster fibroblasts radioprotective properties of adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoproterenol in different concentrations are studied. Isoproterenol radiopreventive effect is clearly manifested with its concentration being 1x10 -8 M; adrenaline and noradrenaline are efficient in higher concentrations. Propranolol, blocking β-adrenergic receptors, completely presents radioprotective effect of catecholamines on the cells. β-adrenergic mechanism of catecholamine radioprotective effect on Mammalia cells is discussed

  1. Radioprotective effects of dextran sulphate in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Bartonickova, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Palyga, G.F.; Zhukova, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Influence of a single i.p. injection of dextran sulphate on radiosensitivity of mice was investigated. The administration of dextran sulphate 24, 48 and 72 hours prior to irradiation increased formation of endogenous colonies of the hemopoietic tissue on the surface of the spleen. DRF calculated from an equieffective exposure for 5 colonies was 1.96 when dextran sulphate was administered 24 hours before irradiation, and 2.25 when dextran sulphate was administered 72 hours before irradiation. The radioprotective effects of dextran sulphate were manifested also in the survival of animals exposed to lethal doses of short-termed as well as long-termed gamma radiation. (orig.) [de

  2. Radioprotective effect of fish products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadzhijski, L.; Alyakov, M.; Tsvetkova, E.; Kavrakirova, S.; Chamova, S.; Chaneva, M.

    1993-01-01

    New fish cans were prepared in the Institute of Fish Industry, Burgas (BG), containing pectin and additives. A biological experimental study was conducted to investigate the decontaminating effect of the new products. The results demonstrated no decontaminating effect in relation to radiocesium and radiostrontium. A pronounced prophylactic effect was observed in case of external irradiation, judged by endogenous spleen colonies. (author)

  3. Radioprotective effect of antioxidants on human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingsuo; Gu Xuandi; Zhu Genbo; Feng Jixing; Su Liaoyuan

    1991-09-01

    By using an improved fluorometric method with 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as fluorometric agent, the antiradiation effects of four kinds of antioxidants on 60 Co γ-ray irradiation inducing final products of lipid peroxides (LPO), i.e. malodialdehyde (MDA) content changes in human blood lymphocytes, were investigated with LPO value as an indicator. The results of the experiment were as following: (1)The radioprotective effect of exogenous antioxidants added to human blood lymphocytes on radiation-induced LPO damage of cellular membrane were remarkable; (2)The radioprotective beneficial sequences of four kinds of antioxidants were arranged like this: SOD > VE >VC, Se 4+ ; (3)Radioprotective effects of antioxidants on radiation-induced damage varied especially with the property of antioxidants, drug concentration, and pretreatment and monitoring time, etc., as well as irradiated dosage and various kinds of incubated cells. In addition, the mechanism of these antioxidants as radioprotectants on human blood lymphocytes is discussed in connection with LPO damage and radioprotection

  4. Researches on radioprotective effects of dendrobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongdao; Qiang Yizhong; Cui Fengmei

    2004-01-01

    Effects of Dendrobium on the LPO content in the mouse tissues, the white blood cells and platelets in the mouse peripheral blood after whole-body γ-ray irradiation exposure were studied. Besides, the 30-day survival rates of irradiated mice treated with three different doses of Dendrobium were observed. The results show that Dendrobium was effective in reducing the LPO contents in the tissues (p<0.01); and could increase the platelets in the peripheral blood of irradiated mice; and white blood cells had a tendency toward rising; different doses of Dendrobium could raise the survival rates of irradiated mice and prolong the survival duration. The above-mentioned findings suggest that Dendrobium has the radioprotective effect and its mechanism probably relates to scavenging of free radicals and restoration of haematopoiesis. (authors)

  5. Radioprotective effectiveness of adeturone in monkey experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, I.; Pantev, T.; Rogozkin, P.; Chertkov, K.; Dikovenko, E.; Kosarenkov, V.

    1976-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of adeturone (adenosine triphsophate salt of AET) was tested on 28 monkeys (Macaca mulata). The animals were gamma-irradiated (cobalt 60) with a dose of 680 R (17,6 R/min, LDsub(100/18)). Adeturone was administered intravenously for 5 minutes, from 6 to 15 minutes before irradiation in a dose of 150 mg/kg (1/2 of thr maximal tolerable dose). It was found that adeturone administration before the absolute lethal irradiation will ensure survival of 50 % of the monkeys. Radiation sickness in protected animals runs a milder course as shown by the duration of the latency period, the manifestation of the hemorrhagic syndrome, the leukopenia and erythrocytes in the peripheral blood. Some symptoms do not appear at all (diarrhoea) or develop later(hyperthermia, hypodynamia). (A.B.)

  6. Chemical radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.

    1979-01-01

    A reivew of the problems and progress in the field of chemical radioprotection is given. After defining the field of research, the practical significance of radioprotective substances and the requirements for a utilizable radioprotective preparation are presented. Trends of development of this field of research, the state of the art, and resulting conclusions for the future development of radioprotective substances of practical value are discussed. (author)

  7. Radioprotective effects of bacterial superoxide dismutase on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Tianxi

    1992-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of bacterial superoxide dismutase (b-SOD) on the mice irradiated by 8 Gy γ-ray were investigated. The results showed that when b-SOD was injected before and after irradiation, the survival fraction of mice is increased 50% and 30% respectively. The former treatment could increase the DNA synthesis of the myeloid cells and spleen's lymphocytes, decrease the LPO of tissue homogenates and the hemolysis of erythrocytes significantly. The mechanism that b-SOD can drop the radiation injury of the mice was discussed

  8. Radioprotective Effects of Gallic Acid in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopakumar Gopinathan

    2013-01-01

    Radioprotecting ability of the natural polyphenol, gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA), was investigated in Swiss albino mice. Oral administration of GA (100 mg/kg body weight), one hour prior to whole body gamma radiation exposure (2–8 Gy; 6 animals/group), reduced the radiation-induced cellular DNA damage in mouse peripheral blood leukocytes, bone marrow cells, and spleenocytes as revealed by comet assay. The GA administration also prevented the radiation-induced decrease in the levels of the antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidise (GPx), and nonprotein thiol glutathione (GSH) and inhibited the peroxidation of membrane lipids in these animals. Exposure of mice to whole body gamma radiation also caused the formation of micronuclei in blood reticulocytes and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells, and the administration of GA resulted in the inhibition of micronucleus formation and chromosomal aberrations. In irradiated animals, administration of GA elicited an enhancement in the rate of DNA repair process and a significant increase in endogenous spleen colony formation. The administration of GA also prevented the radiation-induced weight loss and mortality in animals (10 animals/group) exposed to lethal dose (10 Gy) of gamma radiation. (For every experiment unirradiated animals without GA administration were taken as normal control; specific dose (Gy) irradiated animals without GA administration serve as radiation control; and unirradiated GA treated animals were taken as drug alone control). PMID:24069607

  9. Radioprotective Effects of Hairy Roots of Ginseng

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Young; Yang, Deok Cho [Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Panax ginseng is an important medicinal plant in Korea, which has broad efficacious effects against hypertension, diabetes, nociception and cancer. And it improves weakness. The native ginseng is a slow growing plant taking 5-7 years from seed planting to mature root harvesting, during which time much care is needed since its growth is susceptible to many environmental factors such as soil, shade, climate, pathogens and pests. Nowadays, a wild ginseng has become extremely scarce and the ginseng supply depends almost exclusively on field cultivation, which is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. To meet the demand for the plant in the international market, a bioreactor technology is a useful tool for production of root biomass on a large scale. Therefore, suspension culture of ginseng roots in bioreactors is viewed as a primary alternative method for large-scale production and recently our laboratory has developed a protocol for the in vitro culture of P. ginseng. About 60-70% of cellular DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation is caused by OH, formed from the radiolysis of water. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an excessive free radical production and/or low antioxidant defense, and results in the chemical alterations of biomolecules causing structural and functional modifications. The generation of the reactive oxygen metabolites plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the irradiation-induced tissue injury. An extensive literature review implicates cellular DNA as the primary target for the biological and lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Besides DNA, lipids and proteins are also attacked by free radicals. The purpose of this study, aimed at investigating the possible radioprotective effect of the hairy roots of P. ginseng on irradiation-induced damage by the comet assay.

  10. Radioprotective Effects of Hairy Roots of Ginseng

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Eun Young; Yang, Deok Cho

    2005-01-01

    Panax ginseng is an important medicinal plant in Korea, which has broad efficacious effects against hypertension, diabetes, nociception and cancer. And it improves weakness. The native ginseng is a slow growing plant taking 5-7 years from seed planting to mature root harvesting, during which time much care is needed since its growth is susceptible to many environmental factors such as soil, shade, climate, pathogens and pests. Nowadays, a wild ginseng has become extremely scarce and the ginseng supply depends almost exclusively on field cultivation, which is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. To meet the demand for the plant in the international market, a bioreactor technology is a useful tool for production of root biomass on a large scale. Therefore, suspension culture of ginseng roots in bioreactors is viewed as a primary alternative method for large-scale production and recently our laboratory has developed a protocol for the in vitro culture of P. ginseng. About 60-70% of cellular DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation is caused by OH, formed from the radiolysis of water. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an excessive free radical production and/or low antioxidant defense, and results in the chemical alterations of biomolecules causing structural and functional modifications. The generation of the reactive oxygen metabolites plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the irradiation-induced tissue injury. An extensive literature review implicates cellular DNA as the primary target for the biological and lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Besides DNA, lipids and proteins are also attacked by free radicals. The purpose of this study, aimed at investigating the possible radioprotective effect of the hairy roots of P. ginseng on irradiation-induced damage by the comet assay

  11. Study in vitro of origin radioprotective food the radioprotective effect in vitro of food borne; Estudio in vitro de radioprotectores de origen alimentario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soraino, J. M.; Sebastia, N.; Almonacid, M.; Alonso, O.; Cervera, J.; Such, E.; Silla, M. A.; Villaescusa, J. I.; Montoro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Study in vitro of origin radioprotective food the radioprotective effect in vitro of food borne substances studied is a first step in developing effective radioprotectors that can prevent radiation damage to healthy tissue., cannot forget that these studies must be accompanied by in vitro studies of toxicity and bioavailability to profile designing radioprotective substance.

  12. Radioprotective effects of aronia on radiation irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Hwan Sik; Lee, Jun Haeng [Dept. of Radiology, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The present study was intended to orally administer aronia to rats, irradiate radiation once to the whole bodies of the rats, and conduct blood tests to observe, compare, and analyze changes in blood cells, such as leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets, in order to examine the radioprotective effects of aronia. As experimental animals, 15 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats aged six weeks weighing 200∼250 g were taken and divided into the normal group (A) of five rats, the 5 Gy control group (B) of five rats, and the 5 Gy experimental group (C) of five rats. The normal group (A) was not irradiated at all, the control group (B) was administered with general diets and irradiated, and the experimental group(C) was orally administered with 50 mg/kg/day of aronia two times per day to achieve a distilled water oral dose of 100 mg/kg/day and irradiated thereafter (5 Gy at 500 cGy/min) for 14 days. After the experiment, differences in leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets among the normal group (A), the control group (B), and the experimental group (C) were examined by comparing the counts of the blood cells and the results showed no statistically significant differences. However, on a detailed review, the normal group (A) showed statistically higher mean values for all of lymphocytes, hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin as compared to the control group (B) and the experimental group (C). Statistically significant differences in the counts of lymphocytes were shown between the normal group (A) and the control group (B), and between the normal group (A) and the experimental group (C); furthermore, statistically significant differences in mean corpuscular hemoglobin were shown between the normal group (A) and the experimental group (C). Given the results of the present study, in irradiated rats, aronia was generally considered as having no radioprotective effect on leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet while having statistically significant radioprotective effects on

  13. On the radioprotective effect of biotin (vitamin H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perepelkin, S.R.; Egorova, N.D.; Katsitadze, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown on rats exposed to a whole-body X-irradiation with 600 R that food rich in vitamin H (biotin) causes a radioprotective effect. Most effective were the vitamin doses of 4.0 and 8.0 μg/rat

  14. Radioprotective effects of sodium arginate on radiation induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsugawa, Shigekazu; Yukawa, Yutaka; Abe, Mitsuyuki.

    1988-05-01

    Effects of sodium arginate were examined on radiation-induced intestinal death of mice and on the pathological changes of the ileum after whole or partial abdominal X-irradiation. BALB/c male mice (SPF, 7 approx. 8 week old, 21 approx. 28 g body weight) were irradiated with various doses of 10 MV of X-rays under general anesthesia (dose rate : 4 Gy/min). A radiation field covers either 2.5 or 5.0 cm width of abdomen from the anus. Sterilized water or 5 % sodium arginate solution (0.2 ml/body) was daily given per os through a stomach tube until the death of mice or 15 approx. 21 days after X-ray exposure. Intestinal death was examined daily. In another experiment, mice were daily sacrificed and pathological specimens were made. In order to study the effects of sodium arginate on peripheral blood circulation in the ileum after X-ray exposure, the microangiograms with Ba contrast media were also taken. Sodium arginate showed statistically significant radioprotective effects on intestinal death after 14.5 approx. 15.0 Gy of X-ray irradiation to the abdomen through a radiation field of 5.0 cm width or after 18.0 Gy of X-irradiation to the abdomen through a field of 2.5 cm width. The pathological studies suggest that the drug may protect the surface of the intestine against infection and potentiate the recovery processes of the mucosal membrane. This may elucidate the possible mechanisms of radioprotective effects of sodium arginate on esophagitis or on rectal ulcer induced by radiotherapy.

  15. Modification of the radioprotective effect of hypoxic hypoxia by the artificial hibernation of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovakimov, V.G.; Yarmonenko, S.P.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental'noj i Klinicheskoj Onkologii)

    1975-01-01

    A significant weakening of the radioprotective effect of hypoxic hypoxia has been noted in the hibernated mice the resistance of which to acute oxygen deficiency is artificially hibernated (hypothermia under conditions of neuroplegia). The dose decrease factor is about 1.27 and 2.5 for hibernated and nonhibernated animals, respectively

  16. The radioprotective effect of a new aminothiol (20-PRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolabela, M.F.; Lopes, M.T.P.; Pereira, M.T.; Steffani, G.M.; Pilo-Veloso, D.; Salas, C.E.; Nelson, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the radioprotective effect of aminothiol 2-N-propylamine-cyclohexane thiol (20-PRA) on a human leukemic cell line (K562) following various radiation doses (5,7.5 and 20 Gy) using a source of 60 Co γ-rays. At 5 Gy and 1nM 20-PRA, a substantial protective effect (58%) was seen 24 h after irradiation, followed by a decrease at 48 h (11%). At the high radiation dose (20 Gy) a low protective effect was also seen (35%). In addition, the anti tumorigenic potential of 10 nM 20-PRA was shown by the inhibition of crown gall formation induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The radioprotective potency of 20-PRA is 10 5- 10 6 times higher than that of the aminothiol WR-1065 (N(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diamino propane) whose protective effect is in the 0.1 to 1.0 nM range. (author)

  17. The radioprotective effect of a new aminothiol (20-PRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Dolabela

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the radioprotective effect of aminothiol 2-N-propylamine-cyclo-hexanethiol (20-PRA on a human leukemic cell line (K562 following various radiation doses (5, 7.5 and 20 Gy using a source of 60Co g-rays. At 5 Gy and 1 nM 20-PRA, a substantial protective effect (58% was seen 24 h after irradiation, followed by a decrease at 48 h (11%. At the high radiation dose (20 Gy a low protective effect was also seen (35%. In addition, the antitumorigenic potential of 10 nM 20-PRA was shown by the inhibition of crown gall formation induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The radioprotective potency of 20-PRA is 105-106 times higher than that of the aminothiol WR-1065 (N-(2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane whose protective effect is in the 0.1 to 1.0 mM range.

  18. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Samer George, E-mail: samer.hakim@mkg-chir.mu-luebeck.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Benedek, Geza Attila [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Su Yuxiong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guanghua (China); Jacobsen, Hans Christian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Klinger, Matthias [Institute of Anatomy, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Dendorfer, Andreas [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Hemmelmann, Claudia [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Meller, Birgit [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Sieg, Peter [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  19. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, Samer George; Benedek, Gèza Attila; Su Yuxiong; Jacobsen, Hans Christian; Klinger, Matthias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Meller, Birgit; Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk; Sieg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  20. The radioprotective effects of carboxy fullerene C3 on AHH-1 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Husheng; Cai, Jianming; Huang, Yuecheng; Cui, Jianguo; Liu, Hanchen; Sun, Ding; Zhao, Fang; Dong, Junru; Li, Bailong

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radioprotective effects of carboxy fullerene C 3 on AHH-1 cell and it's prospective as a novel radioprotectant. Materials and Methods: Carboxy fullerene C 3 was prepared by chemical synthesis and trypan blue rejection test was performed to detect its cytotoxicity to AHH-1 cell. Then different concentration of C 3 was used to treat AHH-1 cells after radiated with 60 Coγ ray. Annexin-V/PI staining and flow cytometry assay were applied to assess the cell proliferation and apoptosis after irradiation. Results: C 3 showed little toxicity to AHH-1 cells with little change of trypan blue rejection rate during the drug concentration range 0-400 mg/L (P>0.05). We found in this study C 3 had good radioprotective effects to AHH-1 cell radiated with 1-8 Gy γ-ray. When the concentration was 10 mg/L, C 3 showed protection effects to AHH-1 cell irradiated with 4 Gy γ -ray, which was enhanced with increase of C 3 concentration. When the final concentration reached 200-400 mg/L, the cell survival rate after irradiation was similar to that of non-irradiated control cells(P >0.05). And the irradiation induced apoptosis and death rate were significantly lower than that of single radiation group cells(P 3 were time-dependant, and the best protection effects were observed when the C 3 was administered before irradiation (0-24 h). Conclusion: Carboxy fullerene C 3 has good radioprotective effects to AHH-1 cell, which is dose-dependent, and the higher concentration of C 3 is, the better protective effects it shows. In the effective drug concentration range of this study, C 3 do little harm on the survival rate of AHH-1 cell, which suggest that C 3 as a novel promising radioprotectant deserve to be further investigated. (author)

  1. Radioprotective effects of some commonly used calcium blockers (deltiazem, nifidine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alya, G.

    2002-11-01

    The main aim of this study is looking for other radio protectors less or non-toxic with a favorable therapeutic index and good tolerance in human body. Wistar rats of both sexes were used; control animals were irradiated (total body irradiation) in perforated plexiglas by using the 60 Co source. Dose of irradiation was 9 Gy (lethal dose of 100% of animals-LD 1 00) and dose rate was 80-85 rad/min -1 . Irradiated animals have been monitored for two weeks and percentage of survival has been calculated. Different concentrations of deltiazem and nifidine were used at 15 or 30 minutes before the time of irradiation. Irradiation and treated animals have been monitored for 30 days post-irradiation and the percentage of survival has been calculated. The results showed that the Ca 2+ antagonists in question could be used as radio protectors. moreover, results of this undertaken study revealed that deltiazem is more effective than nifidine, survival rates of deltiazem-treated animals were, significantly, higher than those, which were treated with nifidine. The radio protective effects of these drugs vary according to animals' sex and age. Drugs concentration and time of administration play an important role in their radioprotective effects. These drugs can attenuate radiation injuries and thus they can protect animals from radiation syndromes, especially bone marrow syndrome and gastrointestinal syndrome the matter that causes decreasing in lethality induced by lethal doses of gamma radiation. (author)

  2. Radioprotective effect of flavonoid quercetin on human lymphocytic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Melo, Larissa S.A.; Lima, Maíra V.; Luna Filho, Ricardo L.C.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Silva, Edvane B.

    2017-01-01

    Several substances of synthetic and natural origin have been studied in relation to their ability to protect the body from damage caused by ionizing radiation. Among these substances, quercetin has been shown to be a molecule of natural origin with high radioprotective potential due to its antioxidant properties. The objective of this study was to determine, in vitro, the radioprotective effect of quercetin on human lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation. Blood was irradiated at the 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 Gy doses and then lymphocyte culture with quercetin at preselected concentrations of 37.5 and 75 μM. Subsequently, slides were prepared for analysis and quantification of the metaphases present in lymphocyte cells. The results demonstrated that irradiated lymphocytes and later exposed to quercetin presented a lower number of chromosomal alterations compared to the control group which was irradiated and not exposed to quercetin. Therefore, the results suggest a radioprotective effect of flavonoid quercetin on human lymphocytes exposed, in vitro, to ionizing radiation

  3. Study on radioprotective effects of GANRA-like medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Zhu; Hailong, Pei; Wenling, Ye [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); others, and

    2012-03-15

    After three days of medicine administrated, Kunming mice were exposed to 8 Gy of 100 kVp X-rays. Hemogram, viscere, survival, MDA yields and SOD activity were examined. Results showed that, (1) Survival of medicine-administrated mice were similar to the control group. After irradiation, survival dropped significantly. It took 20 days for the control group to reach to 50% survival, while 9 days for DMSO group 29 days for drug group 1, and 24 days for drug group 5. (2) The medicine per se had no obvious impacts on visceral indexes. Liver index and spleen index of the control group and DMSO group were elevated after irradiated, while those of medicine-administrated group did not change much. (3) The groups treated by DMSO and drug group 1 had high yield of MDA, but low activity of SOD. Compared with DMSO group, drug group 5 had high SOD activity while low MDA level. Irradiation increased MDA level but decreased SOD activity of every group, However, group drug 5 still showed higher SOD activity and lower MDA level than DMSO group. (4) The medicine did not show distinctive contributions to variation of hemogram. In summary, our results demonstrated that GANRA-like group drug 1 and group drug 5 medicine had radioprotective effects and their mechanisms might be related to the scavenging ability of free radicals. (authors)

  4. Study on radioprotective effects of GANRA-like medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingyue; Pei Hailong; Ye Wenling

    2012-01-01

    After three days of medicine administrated, Kunming mice were exposed to 8 Gy of 100 kVp X-rays. Hemogram, viscere, survival, MDA yields and SOD activity were examined. Results showed that, (1) Survival of medicine-administrated mice were similar to the control group. After irradiation, survival dropped significantly. It took 20 days for the control group to reach to 50% survival, while 9 days for DMSO group 29 days for drug group 1, and 24 days for drug group 5. (2) The medicine per se had no obvious impacts on visceral indexes. Liver index and spleen index of the control group and DMSO group were elevated after irradiated, while those of medicine-administrated group did not change much. (3) The groups treated by DMSO and drug group 1 had high yield of MDA, but low activity of SOD. Compared with DMSO group, drug group 5 had high SOD activity while low MDA level. Irradiation increased MDA level but decreased SOD activity of every group, However, group drug 5 still showed higher SOD activity and lower MDA level than DMSO group. (4) The medicine did not show distinctive contributions to variation of hemogram. In summary, our results demonstrated that GANRA-like group drug 1 and group drug 5 medicine had radioprotective effects and their mechanisms might be related to the scavenging ability of free radicals. (authors)

  5. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  6. Radioprotective effects of antioxidative plant flavonoids in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoi, Kayoko; Masuda, Shuichi; Shen, Bingrong; Furugori, Michiyo; Kinae, Naohide

    1996-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of tea infusions and plant flavonoids were investigated by using the micronucleus test for anticlastogenic activity and the thiobarbituric acid assay for antioxidative activity. A single gastric intubation of rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis) infusion at 1 ml per mouse 2 h prior to γ-ray irradiation (1.5 Gy) reduced the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes (MNRETs). After the fractionation of rooibos tea infusion, the flavonoid fraction was found to be most anticlastogenic and antioxidative. From this fraction, luteolin was isolated as an effective component. Then, anticlastogenic effects of 12 flavonoids containing luteolin and their antioxidative activities against lipid peroxidation by Fenton's reagent were examined. A good correlation (r=0.717) was observed between both activities. Luteolin showed the most effective potency. A gastric intubation of luteolin (10 μmol/kg) 2 h prior to γ-ray irradiation (6 Gy) suppressed lipid peroxidation in mouse bone marrow and spleen and a trend of protective effect of luteolin against the decrease of endogenous ascorbic acid in mouse bone marrow after γ-ray irradiation (3 Gy) was observed. These results suggest that plant flavonoids, which show antioxidative potency in vitro, work as antioxidants in vivo and their radioprotective effects may be attributed to their scavenging potency towards free radicals such as hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, the flavonoids contained in tea, vegetables and fruits seem to be important as antioxidants in the human diet

  7. Potentiation of the protective effect of S-containing radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, V.G.; Zajtseva, T.G.; Smirnova, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the radioprotective efficiency and toxicity of mixtures containing cystamine or aminopropyl aminoethylthiophosphoric acid and one of the thiourea derivatives (gutimine or ethyrone). It was shown that these preparations delivered in a combination enhance the radioprotective effect while the toxicity was decreased [ru

  8. Radioprotective effect of Geranium Sanguineum concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velev, G.; Marinov, V.P.

    1993-01-01

    An extract of Geranium Sanguineum had been subjected to sublimation drying following a 24-hour soaking in ethyl alcohol (96 o ) or distilled water. The lyophilized mixture obtained was tested upon non-thoroughbred white male mice to establish its prophylactic and therapeutic effect. The effect proved to be dependent on the dose of the dry substance. The correlation was manifested in a moderate prophylactic effect as concerns the survival rate of the experimental animals in contrast to the control group as well as in statistically reliable increase in the endogenic spleen colonies. (author)

  9. Radioprotection by murine and human tumor-necrosis factor; Dose-dependent effects on hematopoiesis in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloerdal, L; Muench, M O; Warren, D J; Moore, M A.S. [James Ewing Laboratory of Developmental Hematopoiesis, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (USA)

    1989-01-01

    Tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) has been shown to confer significant radioprotection in murine models. Herein, we demonstrate a dose-dependent enhancement of hematological recovery when single doses of either murine or human recombinant TNF are administered prior to irradiation. In addition to its action upon leukocytes and erythocytes, TNF also alleviates radiation-induced thrombocytopenia in the mouse. These effects on circulating blood constituents are further reflected in increased numbers of both primitive (CFU-S) and more differentiated (CFU-GM, CFU-Mega) hematopoietic progenitors in TNF-treated animals. This suggests that TNF exerts it radioprotective effects on a pool of primitive multi-potential hematopoietic cells. (author).

  10. Radioprotective effects of ascorbic acid in barley seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, B V

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the radioprotective effects of a naturally occurring reducing agent, ascorbic acid, on seeds (caryopses) of barley, Hordeum vulgare L. emend Lam. Seeds were soaked either before or after ..gamma.. or fission neutron irradiation in distilled water or ascorbic acid solutions ranging in concentration from 0.01 to 1.00 M. Results are reported as percentage germination, seedling height, seedling growth reduction, and (in one experiment) percent of cells with chromosome aberrations. As evidenced by both reduced germination and seedling growth, ascorbic acid was toxic when seeds were soaked for 1 hr at ambient temperature prior to irradiation and then planted immediately. When seeds were soaked in ascorbic acid before irradiation and soaked after irradiation in air-bubbled water at 0/sup 0/C for 18 hr, the toxicity disappeared, and a protective effect (which increased with increasing ascorbic acid concentration) was observed for ..gamma.. and, to a lesser extent, for neutron irradiation. Additional studies suggested that the protective effect was related to reduced hydration of the embryos of seeds soaked in ascorbic acid. Also, no radioprotective effect was observed when seeds were presoaked for 2 or 16 hr in 0.01 M ascorbic acid solutions buffered at pH 3 or pH 7. A protective effect was observed for seeds of 1.5 percent water content soaked after irradiation in an oxygen-bubbled ascorbic acid solution of 0.5 M but was not observed for seeds soaked in nitrogen-bubbled ascorbic acid. The protective effect against oxygen-dependent damage may be a result of interaction of ascorbic acid with radiation-induced free radicals.

  11. Actual knowledge about some plants with radioprotective effect and about the research of possibilities their use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalka, J.

    2004-01-01

    Study was undertaken to refer to me importance of radiological protection of human and animal species, especially. After the crash of nuclear power station in Chernobyl, Ukraine, an enormous natural catastrophe. The world wide research programs are dedicated to vearch for plants with radioprotective effect. Apparently representing sea vegetation, brown algae, were considered to have a radioprotective effect just as a large amount of plants representing terrestrial flora. The direction of research programs in the world continues in identification of other unknown plants having radioprotective effect. We would like to direct our research interests in this direction and use enormous possibilities of our rich and various vegetation. (author)

  12. Radioprotective Effect of Moderate Wine Consumption in Patients With Breast Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Digesu, Cinzia; Panunzi, Simona; De Gaetano, Andrea; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cece, M. Grazia; Cirocco, Massimo; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Iacoviello, Licia; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Gaetano, Giovanni de

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Given the high cost and side effects of radioprotective agents such as amifostine, attention has been focused on potentially equally effective but less expensive and toxic natural substances. We evaluated the potential radioprotective effects of wine in preventing skin toxicity in patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Before treatment, the medical history and habits of patients were assessed and the information recorded in their clinical folders. Patients were divided into three groups based on the dose/fractionation scheme used: control group, 60.4 Gy (standard technique); Modulated Accelerated Radiotherapy in Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer (MARA)-1 protocol group, 44 Gy (concomitant boost to tumoral bed); and MARA-2 protocol group, 60 Gy (concomitant boost to tumoral bed). The impact of the following variables on acute skin toxicity was evaluated by chart review: radiotherapy protocol, planning target volume (PTV), comorbidity (e.g., hypertension and diabetes), hemoglobin level before therapy, adjuvant hormone therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and drinking habits. Results: The study population consisted of 348 patients. More severe skin toxicity was significantly associated with the radiotherapy protocol (p < 0.001) and median PTV (p = 0.005). In addition, the incidence of acute toxicity of Grade 2 or greater was higher in patients without alcohol intake (38.4% vs. 22.3%, p = 0.021). The daily amount of alcohol intake also influenced the incidence of skin toxicity, with an incidence of 38.4% in patients with no wine intake, 31.8% in patients drinking half a glass per day, 13.6% in patients drinking one glass per day, and 35.0% in patients drinking two glasses per day. Multivariate analysis showed that wine intake, PTV, and radiotherapy protocol were all significantly correlated with acute toxicity. Conclusions: Our results indicate that wine may have a radioprotective effect; however, prospective studies are needed to

  13. Peculiarities of the radioprotective effect of antioxidants during gamma irradiation of wheat seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, U.Sh.

    1988-01-01

    Bioantioxidant radioprotective action mechanism was studied using wheat seeds. Cobalt-60 was used as radiation source, phenosane potassium salt in aqueous solution in 0.1 and 0.25% concentrations possessing the maximum radioprotective effect - as an antioxidant. Dry seeds irradiated with 100 Gy dose were treated with fresh antioxidant solutions during 20 hours with 0.2, 4.6 an 8 hour interval at room temperature. The number of cells with aberrations at the anaphase stage in the main root apical meristem were counted in germinated seeds. A high radioprotective effect of phenosane antioxidant which represents space-complicated phenols is ascertained. Radioprotective effect is dependent on time interval between seed irradaition and germination and is maximal when this time makes up 4-8 hours

  14. The cytogenetic estimate of the radioprotective effect of antioxydant on normal and defected human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvereva, S.V.; Mutovina, G.R.; Khandogina, E.K.; Marchenko, L.F.; Neudakhin, E.V.; Artamonov, R.G.; Akif'ev, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    In studying the radioprotective action of natural and synthesised antioxydants a decreased yield of chromosome aberrations with respect to those in untreated cells was noted in normal cells irradiated in phase G 1 whereas no radioprotective effect was found in cells irradiated in G 0 . The addition of antioxydants into the cell cultures from patients with Turner's syndrome did not change their radiosensitivity. No adaptive response was induced in lymphocytes from patients with Down's syndrome cultivated with vitamine E

  15. A comparative study of radioprotective effect of several antioxidants on human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingsuo; Zhu Gengbai; Gu Xuandi

    1992-01-01

    By means of improved fluorometric method with 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as the fluorometric agent, radioprotective effects of four kinds of antioxidants on 60 Co γ-ray induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) level, i.e. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content changes in human blood lymphocytes were in human blood lymphocytes were compared by using relative protective efficiency (RPE) as an indicator. The LPO level in human lymphocytes which had been treated with an antioxidant at an concentration of 5 x 10 -3 g/L for 1 hr was measured 2 hr after exposure to 4 Gy of γ-rays, and the RPE values of antioxidants were calculated under these conditions: SOD, 38.23; VE, 23.75:VC, 19.32 and Se +4 , 18.27, thus the anticipation that the compounds, superoxide dismutase (SOD), 2-tocopherols (VE), ascorbic acid (VC) and Na 2 SeO 3 (Se +4 ) had radioprotective effects was confirmed. It was found that the radioprotective beneficial sequences of four kinds of antioxidants were arranged as SOD>VE>VC,Se +4 . The results show that radioprotective effects of exogenous antioxidants on radiation induced LPO damage are dependent not only on irradiation dosage, but also especially on property of antioxidants, drug concentration, pretreatment and monitoring time, etc. The mechanism of these antioxidants effecting as radioprotectants on human lymphocytes is discussed in connection with LPO damage and radioprotection

  16. Radioprotective effect of c-ski on rat skin fibroblast in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xia; Li Ping; Zhang En; Liu Ping; Zhou Ping; Zhou Yuanguo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine radioprotective effect of c-ski on rat skin fibroblast in vitro and explore its possible mechanism. Methods: The effect of soft X-ray irradiation at dose varied from 2 to 8 Gy on cell apoptosis in rat skin fibroblast were determined by flow cytometry with Annexin-V-FITC-PI labelling. The effect of c-ski gene transfection on cell apoptosis was evaluated after soft X-ray irradiation of 4 Gy. The protein expressions of Bax and Bcl-2 after c-ski gene transfection were measured with the Western blot method. Results: Soft X-ray irradiation increases cell apoptosis, and the increase is proportional to the irradiation dose. Apoptosis ratio increases with time since the irradiation, and reaches its peak at 36h after the irradiation, c-ski gene was observed to markedly decrease apoptosis index at 24 h after soft X-ray irradiation of 4 Gy compared to the control group, significant increase of the protein expression of Bcl-2 was observed. C-ski gene was found no significant effect on the protein expression of Bax. Conclusion: c-ski gene can decrease radiation sensitivity of skin fibroblast, promoting Bcl-2 protein expression is one of its possible mechanism for this radioprotective effects. (authors)

  17. Radioprotective effect of cysteamine in glutathione synthetase-deficient cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.; Midander, J.; Revesz, L.

    1986-01-01

    The radioprotective role of endogenous and exogenous thiols was investigated, with survival as the end-point, after radiation exposure of cells under oxic and hypoxic conditions. Human cell strains originating from a 5-oxoprolinuria patient and from a related control were used. Due to a genetic deficiency in glutathione synthetase, the level of free SH groups, and in particular that of glutathione, is decreased in 5-oxoprolinuria cells. The glutathione synthetase deficient cells have a reduced oxygen enhancement ratio (1.5) compared to control cells (2.7). The radiosensitivity was assessed for both cell strains in the presence of different concentrations of an exogenous radioprotector:cysteamine. At concentrations varying between 0.1 and 20 mM, cysteamine protected the two cell strains to the same extent when irradiated under oxic and hypoxic conditions. The protective effect of cysteamine was lower under hypoxia than under oxic conditions for both cell strains. Consequently, the oxygen enhancement ratio decreased for both cell strains when cysteamine concentration increased. These results suggest that cysteamine cannot replace endogenous thiols as far as they are implicated in the radiobiological oxygen effect. (author)

  18. Radioprotective effect of vitamin E in parotid glands: a morphometric analysis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Carolina Cintra; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria de; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz; Novaes, Pedro Duarte

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of vitamin E on rat parotid glands by morphometric analysis. Sixty male rats were divided into 5 groups (n=6): control, in which animals received olive oil solution; olive oil/irradiated, in which animals received olive oil and were irradiated with a dose of 15 Gy of gamma radiation; irradiated, in which animals were irradiated with a dose of 15 Gy gamma radiation; vitamin E, which received α-tocopherol acetate solution; vitamin E/irradiated, which received α-tocopherol acetate solution before irradiation with a dose of 15 Gy gamma rays. Half of the animals were euthanized at 8 h, and the remaining at 30 days after irradiation. Both parotid glands were surgically removed and morphometric analysis of acinar cells was performed. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Morphometric analysis showed a significant reduction in the number of parotid acinar cells at 30 days in olive oil/irradiated and irradiated groups. In groups evaluated over time a significant reduction was shown at 30 days in olive oil/irradiated and irradiated groups, indicating that ionizing radiation caused tissue damage. The vitamin E/irradiated group presented more acinar cells than the irradiated group, but no statistically significant difference was observed (p>0.05). In conclusion, vitamin E seems to have failed as a radioprotective agent on acinar cells in rat parotid glands. (author)

  19. Radioprotective effect of vitamin E in parotid glands: a morphometric analysis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Carolina Cintra; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico Oral; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz, E-mail: flavia.ramosperez@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Novaes, Pedro Duarte [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola de Odontologia. Dept. de Morfologia

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of vitamin E on rat parotid glands by morphometric analysis. Sixty male rats were divided into 5 groups (n=6): control, in which animals received olive oil solution; olive oil/irradiated, in which animals received olive oil and were irradiated with a dose of 15 Gy of gamma radiation; irradiated, in which animals were irradiated with a dose of 15 Gy gamma radiation; vitamin E, which received {alpha}-tocopherol acetate solution; vitamin E/irradiated, which received {alpha}-tocopherol acetate solution before irradiation with a dose of 15 Gy gamma rays. Half of the animals were euthanized at 8 h, and the remaining at 30 days after irradiation. Both parotid glands were surgically removed and morphometric analysis of acinar cells was performed. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test ({alpha}=0.05). Morphometric analysis showed a significant reduction in the number of parotid acinar cells at 30 days in olive oil/irradiated and irradiated groups. In groups evaluated over time a significant reduction was shown at 30 days in olive oil/irradiated and irradiated groups, indicating that ionizing radiation caused tissue damage. The vitamin E/irradiated group presented more acinar cells than the irradiated group, but no statistically significant difference was observed (p>0.05). In conclusion, vitamin E seems to have failed as a radioprotective agent on acinar cells in rat parotid glands. (author)

  20. Radioprotective effect of sulphydryl group containing triazole derivative to modulate the radiation-induced clastogenic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchetha Kumari, N.; Madhu, L.N.

    2012-01-01

    Protection of biological systems against radiation damage is of paramount importance during accidental and unavoidable exposure to radiation. Several physico-chemical and biological factors collectively contribute to the damage caused by radiation and are, therefore, targets for developing radioprotectors. Chemicals capable of scavenging free radicals, relieving oxidative stress, promoting antioxidant activity and modulating immune response have been some of the radioprotectors extensively investigated with limited success. It has long been known that some of the most effective radioprotective agents are those which contain sulphydryl groups. The present study reports an evaluation of radical scavenging property and radioprotective property of sulphydryl group containing triazole derivative. The lethal dose of Electron beam radiation (EBR) was studied by survival assay. The dose reduction factor (DRF) of 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl-1,2,4-triazole (TR1) was calculated by taking the ratio between LD 50 of EBR with and without TR1 treatment. Radical scavenging property of TR1 was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging assay. The clastogenic effects of EBR were recorded by Micronucleus test in bone marrow cells and DNA fragmentation assay in hepatic cells of mice. The survival assay results showed that 10Gy was the LD 50 of EBR. The calculated DRF for TR1 was found to be 1.2. DPPH radical scavenging assay showed a positive result when it compared with the standard glutathione. Treatment of mice with 100 mg of TR1 for 15 days before irradiation significantly (P<0.05) reduced the frequency of micronucleus formation in bone marrow cells and also reduced the DNA fragmentation in hepatic cells. The result obtained in the present study concludes that TR1 has a protective effect against the EBR-induced mortality and clastogenicity. (author)

  1. Influence of previous administration of trans-phenylcyclopropylamine on radioprotective and hypothermic effects of serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misustova, J.; Hosek, B.; Novak, L.; Kautska, J.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of a previous administration of trans-phenylcyclopropylamine (t-PCPA) on radioprotective and hypothermic effects of serotonin was studied in male mice of the H strain, which were given t-PCPA in the dose of 4 mg/kg intraperitoneally 2 or 7 hours before application of serotonin (40 mg/kg, i.p.). The time course of protection was studied for exposures to 800 and 900 R. The results have shown that a previous administration of t-PCPA does not alter the short-time protective effect of serotonin, but that it significantly prolongs the time course of protection. The administration of t-PCPA also affects the starting speed and the duration of the serotonin-induced hypothermic reaction. The established correlation between prolongation of the radioprotective and hypothermic effects of serotonin induced by previous application of t-PCPA supplements the results with the existence of mutual relationship between changes of the energetic exchange and radioresistance of the organism. (author)

  2. A radioprotective effect of imatinib (Gleevec registered) in human squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartkowiak, D.; Hipp, P.R.; Roettinger, E.M.; Mendonca, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiation response-modifying effect of imatinib (Gleevec registered ) in a squamous cell carcinoma line, PECA. Patients and Methods: Cytotoxicity was determined by colony forming and multiplying capacity. Drug stability was shown by HPLC. Multidrug resistance phenotype was studied by rhodamine-123 efflux. Cell-cycle responses were measured by flow cytometry. Homologous recombination repair was determined by Rad51 immunohistochemistry. Results: Inactivating 50% of the PECA cells required approximately 7 μM imatinib. The drug did not decay nor was it degraded during test periods. Drug efflux occurred only to a minor extent. Multiplying capacity but not survival fractions revealed a radioprotective effect of imatinib. There were only minor cell-cycle alterations in the presence of imatinib but the rate of Rad51-positive repair foci was significantly increased. Conclusion: PECA cells apparently lack a highly specific target for imatinib. In cells surviving at high drug concentrations, imatinib may exert a radioprotective effect on multiplying capacity by inducing DNA repair. Under prolonged exposure, drug-resistant cells may show an accelerated recovery from acute or delayed radiation damage. (orig.)

  3. Investigation of radioprotective effects of aqueous extract of sauseurea obyallata on immune system of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guoliang; Li Wenhui; Guo Na; Hou Yu; Wang Chenghong; Li Tianqian; Yu Shuhui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radioprotective effects of test compound on immune system of mice from radiation injury. Methods: Immunologic function and general state of mice were shown by swimming experiment with the weighing of spleen, thymus and computing their indexs, hemolysin mensurate experiment and PHA stimulated lymphocyte transformation experiment. All mice were irradiated with 6 Gy and received the test compound by gavage for 14 days, 7 days before irradiation and 7 days after irradiation. All the indicators were measured according to established methods. The data went through Statistical analysis by spss11.5. Results: Irradiation has obvious influence on the immune function and systemic state of mice. In swimming experiment, mice in the treatment group swim longer than the model group, but is of no significant difference. The thymus indexes are higher in treatment groups than in model group, especially the HD group, compared with model group, the differences are obvious (P<0.05). There is no obvious difference between treatment groups and model group with OD value in hemolysin mensurate experiment. Conclusions: Aqueous Extract of Sauseurea Obyallata may have radioprotective effects on immune system of mice, which deserves further exploration in the compound preparing, analysis of Chemical Compositions and the dose and mode and the treatment duration of the compound. (authors)

  4. 7. national congress of radioprotection - SFRP 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.; Lecomte, J.F.; Averbeck, D.; Makovicka, L.; Barescut, J.C.; Maubert, H.; Benderitter, M.; Menechal, Ph.; Biau, A.; Menetrier, F.; Briand-Champlong, J.; Metivier, H.; Cherin, A.; Paquet, F.; Decobert, V.; Radecki, J.J.; Devin, P.; Roy, C.; Fracas, P.; Schneider, Th.; Italia, J.; Souques, M.; Lagroye, I.; Tamponnet, Ch.; Laurent, G.; Vidal, J.P.; Aubert, B.; Piqueras, P.; Cervera, J.; Vial, Th.; Mear, R.; Visseaux, H.; Patrix, N.; Bourguignon, M.; Acker, A.; Sabatier, L.; Abela, G.; Andrieux, J.L.; Bernard, H.; Vicaud, A.; De Bruyne, T.; Valero, M.; Godet, J.L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Renaud, P.; Bordy, J.M.; Leuraud, K.; Arranz, L.; Lochard, J.; Vaillant, L.; Droesch, P.; Coenen, S.; Michiels, J.; Pepin, S.; Poffijn, A.; Wertelaers, A.; Schrauben, M.; Pires, N.; Matouk, F.; Wall, B.; Hart, D.; Mol, H.; Lecluyse, A.; Aroua, A.; Trueb, P.; Griebel, J.; Nekolla, E.; Gron, P.; Waltenburg, H.; Beauvais-March, H.; Scanff, P.; Pirard, P.; Sinno-Tellier, S.; Shannoun, F.; Brugmans, M.; Meeuwsen, E.; Stoop, P.; Olerud, H.; Borretzen, I.; Leitz, W.; Marconato, M.; Magnier, F.; Rehel, J.L.; Etard, C.; Ducou Le Pointe, H.; Bouette, A.; Fourrier, P.; Lisbona, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Metz-Flamant, C.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Giraud, J.M.; Acker, A.; Laurier, D.; Laurent, O.; Rogel, A.; Joly, K.; Hubert, D.; Riedel, A.; Garcier, Y.; Amabile, J.C.; Leuraud, K.; Vacquier, B.; Caer, S.; Griffiths, N.; Van der Meeren, A.; Fritsch, P.; Abram, M.C.; Bernaudin, J.F.; Poncy, J.L.; Chevillard, S.; Cesarini, J.P.; Bertho, J.M.; Louiba, S.; Tourlonias, E.; Faure, M.C.; Stefani, J.; Siffert, B.; Paquet, F.; Dublineau, I.; Adam, C.; Alonzo, F.; Bonzom, J.M.; Gagnaire, B.; Gilbin, R.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Denoziere, M.; Lecerf, N.; Leroy, E.; Daures, J.; Bordy, J.M.; Clairand, I.; Debroas, J.; Denoziere, M.; Donadille, L.; D'Errico, F.; Gouriou, J.; Itie, C.; Struelens, L.; Broggio, D.; Borissov, N.; Janeczko, J.; Lamart, S.; Blanchardon, E.; Molokanov, A.; Yatsenko, V.; Franck, D.; Rannou, A.; Kockerols, P.; Bickel, M.; De Bruyne, G.; Fessler, A.; McCourt, J.; Lefaure, C.; Godet, J.L.; Bouchet, F.; Ecault, A.; Lacoeuille, F.; Cahouet-Vannier, A.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference. Sixty six presentations out of 68 are assembled in the document. The conference is organized in 11 sessions dealing with: 1 - radioprotection regulations and standards; 2 - radioprotection of patients; 3 - radiation effects on man and ecosystems; 4 - advances in dosimetry and metrology; occupational radioprotection (2 sessions); 5 - radioprotection of populations and ecosystems (2 sessions); 6 - radioprotection in incident, accident and post-accident situations; 7 - radioprotection and society

  5. Radioprotective effect of microelements at the territories contaminated by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, I.N.

    2007-01-01

    The most radioactively contaminated region of Ukrainian and Byelorussian Palesse belongs to a biogeochemical province where soils, plants, and, accordingly, forage for animals and food stuffs are poor with biologically important microelements - iodine, zinc, copper, cobalt, fluorine, manganese, lithium, boron. It is a cause of specific diseases of plants, animals and people known as hypomicroelementhoses. Carrying out the radioprotective measures (countermeasures), particularly liming of soils and applying the heightened doses of phosphoric fertilizers, reduces transfer of radionuclides from soil to plants and also elements of mineral nutrition included the microelements. It aggravates the deficiency of microelements following the decrease of productivity and quality of production in plant and animal breeding and exacerbation of the mentioned diseases. It is known, that many microelements have radioprotective properties, and same of them can influence on uptake of other elements in plants. Therefore, considering the situation with microelements, we can expect of their role in radiation protection of living organisms in a zone affected by accident in Chernobyl NPP. It was shown the applying (root injection) of zinc, manganese, cobalt, copper in the sulfates and chlorides (4-6 kg of metal per hectare) on soddy-podsolic soil, reduced the Sr 90 and Cs 137 transfer factor. Zinc was the most effective: the content of both radionuclides in grain of oats and lupine decreased in 1,5-2 times. Lesser efficiency was observed with manganese and cobalt, much less - with copper. Moreover, in some cases the increase of Sr 90 accumulation was observed. Influence of microelements was stronger in variants without fertilizers, than with their heightened doses. It happened because, firstly, fertilizers contain some various microelements. And, secondly, in favorable conditions for growth and development of plants provided by fertilizers, the action of both factors, positive, and

  6. Comparative radioprotective studies of chlorpromazine and cysteamine on rat bone development; Effect on serum and bone proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdeen, A M; Ibrahim, H A; Badawy, M; Elkholy, W M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were planned to study the radioprotective effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and Cysteamine (Cys), when injected separately or combined before irradiation, on some factors affecting the development of rat bone. The results obtained can be summarized as follows: (1) The body weight decreased due to gamma-irradiation. (2) The mortality rate increased after irradiation, but diminished by single or double chemical injection before irradiation. (3) The serum total protein; albumin, globulin contents and A/G ratio were significantly increased, 6 hrs. After irradiation, then declined afterwards. (4) Histochemically, a decrease in bone protein content was demonstrates after irradiation. The above irradiation effects were suppressed by injection of the radioprotective substances. Their effect seems to be cumulative. 4 fig.,3 tab.

  7. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  8. Radioprotective effect of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (2-MPG) on the hematology of Swiss albino mice after radiocalcium internal administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Bhagat, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The drug 2-MPG, when administered before 45 Ca treatment, shows its radioprotective effect on total red blood cells, total white blood cells, hemoglobin balues and hematocrit percentage. However, the radioprotective effects of 2 MPG are limited to early intervals only. (author)

  9. Radioprotection by dipyridamole in the aging mouse. Effects on lipid peroxidation in mouse liver, spleen and brain after whole-body X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Noritaka

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the radioprotective effect of dipyridamole in the aging mouse, the lipid peroxide content in aging mouse liver, spleen and brain irradiated by X-ray were measured both before and after injection of dipyridamole. The lipid peroxide content increased with aging from 2 months old to 16 months old in the mouse liver, spleen and brain. The content of lipid peroxide in the liver and spleen of the aging mouse was significantly increased in 7 days after whole-body irradiation with 8 Gy, but was unchanged in the brain. Dipyridamole, given before irradiation, significantly inhibited the increase of lipid peroxide after irradiation. These results suggest that dipyridamole may have radioprotective effects on aging mouse liver and spleen as well as on young mouse, and that inhibition of lipid peroxidation is a possible factor in the radioprotective effect of dipyridamole. (author)

  10. Assessment of the radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human lymphocytes irradiated with gamma-rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Miocic, S.; Ramic, S.; Milic, M.; Viculin, T.

    2005-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human peripheral blood irradiated with g-rays were investigated using the micronucleus (MN) assay and the analysis of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Duplicate blood samples were pre-treated with amifostine (7.7 mM), melatonin (2 mM) and their combination for 30 minutes. Negative controls were also included. After treatment with radioprotectors, one blood sample from each experimental group was exposed to g-rays from a 6 0C o source. The radiation dose absorbed was 2 Gy. Pre-treated irradiated blood samples showed a decrease in the total number of MN and in the number of cells with more than one MN. Moreover, they also showed significantly lower mean SCE values. Our results indicate that amifostine, melatonin and their combination in vitro have radioprotective effects on g-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no significant genotoxicity. Therefore, it may be reasonable to use them in combination, adjusting the doses of amifostine to achieve the best radioprotective effect with as few side effects as possible. Before employment, this combination should be extensively tested in vitro and in vivo, using the same and other biomarkers for different radiation dose and concentration ranges of both radioprotectors.(author)

  11. Evaluation of the radioprotective effect of turmeric extract and vitamin E in mice exposed to therapeutic dose of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhartiya, Uma S.; Raut, Yogita S.; Joseph, Lebana J.; Hawaldar, Rohini W.; Rao, Badanidiyoor S.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of turmeric extract (40 mg/kg body weight) and vitamin E (α - tocopherol acetate, 400 IU/kg body weight) supplementation on lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and antioxidant defense enzymes in various organs like liver, kidney and salivary glands at 24 h in adult Swiss mice. 131 Iodine exposure significantly increased lipid peroxidation in kidney and salivary glands in comparison to control animals. Pre supplementation with turmeric extract for 15 days showed significant lowering of lipid peroxidation in kidney. On the other hand vitamin E pre supplementation showed marked reduction in lipid peroxidation in salivary glands. Reduced glutathione levels decreased significantly in liver after radiation exposure. However, pre supplementation with turmeric extract and vitamin E did not improve glutathione levels in liver. In conclusion we have observed differential radioprotective effect of turmeric extract and vitamin E in kidney and salivary glands. However, Vitamin E seems to offer better radioprotection for salivary glands which is known to be the major site of cellular destruction after radioiodine therapy in patients. (author)

  12. Radioprotective effects of a preparation (HemoHIM) of a herb mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Jung, U Hee; Jeong, Ill Yun; Byun, Myung Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho [Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yee, Sung Tae [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The proliferation of radioactive materials in industry, medicine, scientific and medical research, the military, and as a source of energy has increased the likelihood of an accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. Synthetic radioprotective agents have been studied for decades but their application was limited due to their toxicity. Thus, the radioprotective agent to protect individuals against severe radiation damage is required. A preparation (HemoHIM) of a mixture of 3 edible herbs was designed to protect the gastrointestine and hematopoietic organs and to promote recovery of the immune system against radiation damage. In this study, we evaluated its radioprotective effects with regards to reduction of DNA damage, immune cell repopulation, intestinal crypt survival, and 30-day survival rate.

  13. Genetic determination of the radioprotective effect of cysteamine on γ-irradiated Bacillus subtilis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, V.L.; Oskolkova, O.B.; Stepanova, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of a lethal effect of 60 Co-γ-rays on Bacillus subtilis cells: a wild type strain and recombination-deficient mutants rec A, rec B, rec D, rec F, rec K, rec L and rec O exposed in the absence and in the presence of cysteamine (H -2 M). It was established that the protective efficiency of cysteamine for repair- and recombination-deficient mutants is significantly lower than that for the wild type (DMF 2.2-3.0). The most deficient in sensitivity to the protective action of cysteamine are rec B mutants (DMF 0.8-1.2). These data suggest that in B. subtilis, like in E. coli, the radioprotective effect of cysteamine is genetically determined and depends on the activity of repair systems

  14. Influence of cesium and lithium ions on radioprotective effectiveness of taurine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhalaya, M.Ya.; Novosel'tseva, S.D.; Kolesnikov, Yu.A.; Bogatyrev, G.P.; Yartsev, E.I.; Kudryashov, Yu.B.

    1976-01-01

    In vitro experiments with irradiated cultures of heart cells from cynomolgus monkeys and mice and in vivo experiments on irradiated mice indicated that CsNO 3 , LiOAc and Li 2 CO 3 potentiated the radioprotective effect of taurine. The maximum effect was observed when equimolar conceptions of taurine and the metal salts were used

  15. [Study of the radioprotective effects of TMG on teratogenic malformations in irradiated mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Hasegawa, T; Kim, H; Suzuki, I; Mori, T; Yamamoto, Y

    2000-12-01

    ICR mice fetuses in the organogenesis stage were used to clarify experimentally the mechanism of the protective effect of vitamin E derivant (TMG: 2-(alpha-D-Glucopyranosyl) methyl-2, -5, -7, -8-Teramethylchorman-6-working woman) on the effects of radiation. The authors paid careful attention to radiation, and the radioprotective effects of TMG on the induction of malformations was examined. Radiation is an important consideration because of its widespread use in the areas of medicine, nuclear energy, and industry. Malformations induced by radiation at the organogenesis stage, skeletal malformations, and the effects at the cellular level of embryos were examined in this research. Further, the mechanism of the protection effect of TMG against radiation-induced malformations was analyzed and observed experimentally. Thus, this study was done to provide fundamental data on the radioprotective agent TMG. It was clear that TMG exerted radioprotective effects against embryonic death and the rate of teratogenesis when administered before exposure. Such effects were also exerted against skeletal malformations and fetal body weight. In summary, radioprotective effects were observed at the whole-body level as well as at the cellular level.

  16. Study of the radioprotective effects of TMG on teratogenic malformations in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Mori, Takehiko; Yamamoto, Youichi; Kim, Hwakon

    2000-01-01

    ICR mice fetuses in the organogenesis stage were used to clarify experimentally the mechanism of the protective effect of vitamin E derivant (TMG: 2- (α-D-Glucopyranosyl) methyl-2, -5, -7, -8-Teramethylchorman-6-working woman) on the effects of radiation. The authors paid careful attention to radiation, and the radioprotective effects of TMG on the induction of malformations was examined. Radiation is an important consideration because of its widespread use in the areas of medicine, nuclear energy, and industry. Malformations induced by radiation at the organogenesis stage, skeletal malformations, and the effects at the cellular level of embryos were examined in this research. Further, the mechanism of the protection effect of TMG against radiation-induced malformations was analyzed and observed experimentally. Thus, this study was done to provide fundamental data on the radioprotective agent TMG. It was clear that TMG exerted radioprotective effects against embryonic death and the rate of teratogenesis when administered before exposure. Such effects were also exerted against skeletal malformations and fetal body weight. In summary, radioprotective effects were observed at the whole-body level as well as at the cellular level. (author)

  17. 7. national congress of radioprotection - SFRP 2009; 7. congres national de radioprotection - SFRP 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurengo, A.; Lecomte, J.F.; Averbeck, D.; Makovicka, L.; Barescut, J.C.; Maubert, H.; Benderitter, M.; Menechal, Ph.; Biau, A.; Menetrier, F.; Briand-Champlong, J.; Metivier, H.; Cherin, A.; Paquet, F.; Decobert, V.; Radecki, J.J.; Devin, P.; Roy, C.; Fracas, P.; Schneider, Th.; Italia, J.; Souques, M.; Lagroye, I.; Tamponnet, Ch.; Laurent, G.; Vidal, J.P.; Aubert, B.; Piqueras, P.; Cervera, J.; Vial, Th.; Mear, R.; Visseaux, H.; Patrix, N.; Bourguignon, M.; Acker, A.; Sabatier, L.; Abela, G.; Andrieux, J.L.; Bernard, H.; Vicaud, A.; De Bruyne, T.; Valero, M.; Godet, J.L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Renaud, P.; Bordy, J.M.; Leuraud, K.; Arranz, L.; Lochard, J.; Vaillant, L.; Droesch, P.; Coenen, S.; Michiels, J.; Pepin, S.; Poffijn, A.; Wertelaers, A.; Schrauben, M.; Pires, N.; Matouk, F.; Wall, B.; Hart, D.; Mol, H.; Lecluyse, A.; Aroua, A.; Trueb, P.; Griebel, J.; Nekolla, E.; Gron, P.; Waltenburg, H.; Beauvais-March, H.; Scanff, P.; Pirard, P.; Sinno-Tellier, S.; Shannoun, F.; Brugmans, M.; Meeuwsen, E.; Stoop, P.; Olerud, H.; Borretzen, I.; Leitz, W.; Marconato, M.; Magnier, F.; Rehel, J.L.; Etard, C.; Ducou Le Pointe, H.; Bouette, A.; Fourrier, P.; Lisbona, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Metz-Flamant, C.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Giraud, J.M.; Acker, A.; Laurier, D.; Laurent, O.; Rogel, A.; Joly, K.; Hubert, D.; Riedel, A.; Garcier, Y.; Amabile, J.C.; Leuraud, K.; Vacquier, B.; Caer, S.; Griffiths, N.; Van der Meeren, A.; Fritsch, P.; Abram, M.C.; Bernaudin, J.F.; Poncy, J.L.; Chevillard, S.; Cesarini, J.P.; Bertho, J.M.; Louiba, S.; Tourlonias, E.; Faure, M.C.; Stefani, J.; Siffert, B.; Paquet, F.; Dublineau, I.; Adam, C.; Alonzo, F.; Bonzom, J.M.; Gagnaire, B.; Gilbin, R.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Denoziere, M.; Lecerf, N.; Leroy, E.; Daures, J.; Bordy, J.M.; Clairand, I.; Debroas, J.; Denoziere, M.; Donadille, L.; D' Errico, F.; Gouriou, J.; Itie, C.; Struelens, L.; Broggio, D.; Borissov, N.; Janeczko, J.; Lamart, S.; Blanchardon, E.; Molokanov, A. [and others

    2009-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference. Sixty six presentations out of 68 are assembled in the document. The conference is organized in 11 sessions dealing with: 1 - radioprotection regulations and standards; 2 - radioprotection of patients; 3 - radiation effects on man and ecosystems; 4 - advances in dosimetry and metrology; occupational radioprotection (2 sessions); 5 - radioprotection of populations and ecosystems (2 sessions); 6 - radioprotection in incident, accident and post-accident situations; 7 - radioprotection and society

  18. Comparison of radioprotective effects of caffeine and ascorbic acid in male mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Ji Hyang; Lee, Byoung Hun [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Dal [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    The oxygen effect in radiation biology is well known. Since oxygen enhances radiation-induced biological damage, antioxidants should be radioprotectors. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) or caffeine is an essential component in the diet of humans and a small range of other mammals. Radioprotective effects of vitamin C have been demonstrated in certain cells and animals, which would result from scavenging free radicals. Caffeine is the main psychoactive ingredient of coffee, tea, even coke with a high frequency of concurrent use in humans. Caffeine has been recently reported as a scavenger of hydroxyl radical in millimolar levels and a potently radioprotector in a chronically exposed rodent. This study investigates functional radioprotection of caffeine and ascorbic acid against gamma irradiation in male mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6N mice were irradiated with 6.5 Gy. A caffeine treated group was administered with 80 mg/kg body weight by i.p injection, a single exposure 1 hour before irradiation. Ascorbic acid was administered 330 mg/liter in drinking water through all the experimental period. The remaining mice were kept as sham controls. After collecting a serum from the experimental mice 6 hr after irradiation, qualitative analysis of testosterone was performed by means of radioimmunoassay (RIA). For histological investigation, testes were removed 1 week after irradiation and fixed in NBF. Fixed testes were processed for paraffin sections and stained by H-E. The circulating testosterone significantly decreased in all irradiated groups. The harmful effect of radiation on the body and organ weight and the appearance of semiferous tubules were significantly improved in the caffeine - or ascorbic acid-treated group. In conclusion, caffeine and ascorbic acid protected spermatogenesis from impairment against gamma radiation, acting as a radioprotector.

  19. Comparison of radioprotective effects of caffeine and ascorbic acid in male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Ji Hyang; Lee, Byoung Hun; Yoon, Yong Dal

    2003-01-01

    The oxygen effect in radiation biology is well known. Since oxygen enhances radiation-induced biological damage, antioxidants should be radioprotectors. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) or caffeine is an essential component in the diet of humans and a small range of other mammals. Radioprotective effects of vitamin C have been demonstrated in certain cells and animals, which would result from scavenging free radicals. Caffeine is the main psychoactive ingredient of coffee, tea, even coke with a high frequency of concurrent use in humans. Caffeine has been recently reported as a scavenger of hydroxyl radical in millimolar levels and a potently radioprotector in a chronically exposed rodent. This study investigates functional radioprotection of caffeine and ascorbic acid against gamma irradiation in male mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6N mice were irradiated with 6.5 Gy. A caffeine treated group was administered with 80 mg/kg body weight by i.p injection, a single exposure 1 hour before irradiation. Ascorbic acid was administered 330 mg/liter in drinking water through all the experimental period. The remaining mice were kept as sham controls. After collecting a serum from the experimental mice 6 hr after irradiation, qualitative analysis of testosterone was performed by means of radioimmunoassay (RIA). For histological investigation, testes were removed 1 week after irradiation and fixed in NBF. Fixed testes were processed for paraffin sections and stained by H-E. The circulating testosterone significantly decreased in all irradiated groups. The harmful effect of radiation on the body and organ weight and the appearance of semiferous tubules were significantly improved in the caffeine - or ascorbic acid-treated group. In conclusion, caffeine and ascorbic acid protected spermatogenesis from impairment against gamma radiation, acting as a radioprotector

  20. Radioprotective effects of CBLB502 on γ-radiated Rhesus monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing SHEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective A Rhesus monkey model was employed to study the radioprotective effects of a Toll-like receptor 5 agonist, CBLB502, against 7.0Gy whole-body irradiation of 60Co gamma-rays. Methods Thirty animals were assigned to a placebo treatment group, a WR-2721 positive control group, and three CBLB502 treatment groups (n=6 animals/group. Each animal was irradiated with 7.0Gy 60Co γ and given CBLB502 at 2.5, 10 and 40μg/kg, respectively in treatment groups, or WR-2721 at 30mg/kg, or physiological saline 0.3ml/kg for the placebo treatment group. The treatment was given once by intramuscular injection 30 min before irradiation. All irradiated animals received symptomatic treatment based on same guidelines. General observation, peripheral blood tests, hemopoietic progenitor cell colony-counting, and histopathological examination were performed. Results We found that 10 or 40μg/kg CBLB502 treatment resulted in 100% survival, while the survival rate was 33% in placebo treatment group. Hematopoietic recovery in the WR-2721 treatment group was marginally superior to the irradiation control group. Nadirs of peripheral white cell and platelet counts of animals treated with 40μg/kg of CBLB502 were significantly higher than those of the placebo treatment group (P<0.05. CBLB502 at 40μg/kg also gave a shortened duration of low platelet count, earlier recovery time, reduced the amount of blood transfusion and damage to the bone marrow and intestine. Conclusion All Rhesus monkeys irradiated with 7.0Gy 60Co γ-rays would suffer from severe acute radiation sickness of hematopoietic system. CBLB502 at 40μg/kg is radioprotective in this model and a single intramuscular injection of CBLB502 in a dose of 40μg/kg 30min before irradiation gives better radioprotective effects than WR-2721. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.04.07

  1. Radioprotective preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, D.; Frattadochi, A.; Gattavecchia, E.; Ferri, E.; Tonnelli, D.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is intended for radiation injuries prophylaxis in mammals. It has an well expressed radioprotective effect against acute gamma irradiation on cellular level as well as a prolonged action when applied up to 48 hours before the acute irradiation. The preparation is a coprecipitate of the natural tripeptide glutathione (reduced form) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (pvp) in ratio 30-60/70-40. It is obtained by incubation method with subsequent lyophilization from water solution of the initial components. The molecular mass of the pvp is 20 till 360.10 3 . 2 claims

  2. In vitro analysis of radioprotective effect of monoterpenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken-ichi Kudo; Tadashi Hanafusa; Toshiro Ono

    2017-01-01

    Monoterpenes are naturally occurring hydrocarbons composed of two units of isoprenes. They exhibit antioxidant activity to scavenge reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radicals. We investigated the potential of monoterpenes such as thymol, linalool, and menthol to act as radioprotectants. The proliferation of EL4 cells, a mouse lymphoma cell line, treated with linalool at a concentration of 500 μM or more was not affected by X-ray irradiation. Plasmid-nicking assay performed using formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase showed that linalool prevented single strand breaks and oxidized purines on pUC19 plasmid DNA. These findings indicate that linalool has the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species and is a potential radioprotector. (author)

  3. Radioprotective effects of natural β-carotene on villi and crypts in abdominally radiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurabe, Teruhisa; Itoh, Youko; Matsumura, Eijin; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ayakawa, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The protective effect of β-carotene against radiation injury to the small intestine of abdominally radiated mice (15 Gy) was examined with administration given pre-radiation, during (pre- and post-) radiation, and post-radiation. In the β-carotene group, the ratio of villus length to crypt was significantly greater in comparison with the radiation only group at 2 days after radiation. At 7 days after radiation, the ratio of necrotic cells in the crypt vs. the total was significantly lower, and the ratio of necrotic cells in the villus vs. the total was significantly greater with β-carotene administration, which indicated that β-carotene accelerated recovery from radiation injury. Each group administered β-carotene showed a significant radioprotective effect, with pre-radiation administration yielding a smaller effect than administration during radiation and post-radiation. It is concluded that pre-, during, and post-radiation administration of β-carotene protected against radiation injury of the small intestine and accelerated recovery from it. (author)

  4. Enhancement of radioprotective effectiveness of adenosine monophosphate by magnesium aspartate in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Netikova, J.; Kozubik, A.; Chertkov, K.S.; Ministry of Health, Moscow

    1988-01-01

    The enhancing effect of magnesium aspartate on the radioprotective effectiveness of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) administered to whole-body gamma-irradiated mice was studied. Male (CBA x C57BL/10)F 1 hybrid mice of a mean body weight of 32 g were used. 5 mg AMP per mouse was injected i.p. 15 min before and 15 min after irradiation; magnesium aspartate (13.3 mg per mouse) was administered s.c. 35 min before irradiation. The benefical effect of the drug combination used was manifested when investigating hematological indices at the recovery phase of sublethally irradiated animals, as well as when observing the survival of lethally irradiated mice. The synergistic radioprotective effects of AMP and magnesium aspartate are explained by the stimulatory action of both these compounds on the cell adenylate cyclase system. (author)

  5. Radioprotective action of serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodop' yanova, L G; Vinogradova, M F [Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Biologicheskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst.

    1975-09-01

    Tests in vitro were performed to study the effect of serotonin on oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria of rat liver. Serotonin (2.10/sup -4/ M) was shown to suppress oxidation of ..cap alpha..-ketoglutaric acid without significantly changing succinic acid consumption. A comparison of the results obtained with those from the literature allowed to assume that the radioprotective effect of serotonin was based not only on its previously known ability to cause tissue hypoxia, but also on its ability to affect oxidation processes in mitochondria.

  6. Radioprotective effect of low doses of 2-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-imidazoline alone or associated with phosphorothioates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, J.D.; Roman, V.; Fatome, M.; Laduranty, J.; Miginiac, L.; Lion, C.; Sentenac-Roumanou, H.

    1993-01-01

    In the mouse, the intraperitoneal injection of 2-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-imidazoline has a radioprotective effect even at low doses. Its association with S-[2-(3-aminopropyl)aminoethyl] phosphorothioate (WR 2721) or S-[3-(3-methylaminopropyl)-aminopropyl]phosphorothioate (WR 151327) at low doses led to an enhancement of their respective radioprotective activities without any apparent side effects. These results strengthen the interest of this non-sulphur compound as a radioprotector

  7. Modification by caffeine of cysteamine radioprotective effect under different postradiation conditions of the yeast cell cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil'yano, N.Ya.; Malinovskij, O.V.

    1981-01-01

    Reversibility kinetics of cysteamine radioprotective effect under different conditions of postradiation incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisial cells, irradiated by 60 Co beams of 530 Gr dose, was studied. Caffeine added just after irradiation into cell suspension, protected before irradiation with cysteamine, reduced protective effect of cysteamine in both variants of experiments - in aqueous suspension and in liquid nutrient medium. Thus, caffeine changes nature only of those radiation damages, which were modified by cysteamine, without affecting survivability and reparation of nonprotected cells

  8. Radioprotective effects of Mentha piperita (LINN) against radiation induced hematological injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samartha, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Present study reports the radioprotective effect of aqueous extract of M. piperita against gamma radiation. Male Swiss albino mice 6-8 weeks old (25±2gm) from inbred colony were selected and divided into two groups. Group-I animals were given equal volume of double distilled water and were exposed to 6, 8 and 10 Gy gamma rays (dose-rate 1.59 Gy/min). Group-II animals were given Mentha extract (ME) 1 gm/kg body wt./day for three consecutive days and then exposed to gamma rays.Regression analysis of survival data yielded LD50/30 as 6.48 ± 0.07 and 11.59 ± 0.21 Gy for control (Irradiation alone) and experimental (ME + Irradiation) animals respectively and produced a dose reduction factor as 1.78. A significant increase in the number of endogenous spleen colonies and spleen weight was observed on day 10 in ME pretreated irradiated animals. Further a significant decrease in hematological values of control animals as compared to normal was observed at all the radiation doses studied. However, at 6 Gy hematological values showed recovery at day 30. The hematological values of ME pretreated irradiated animals showed significant increase over the respective controls at each autopsy interval. Although, initially they had lower values of RBCs, WBCs, Hb and Hct, but later showed gradual recovery and reached to normal at 48 hrs. (6 Gy), and day 5 (8 Gy). A dose-dependent decrease in GSH content was observed in control animals. However, ME pretreated irradiated animals exhibited a significant increase in GSH content and decrease in LPO level but the values remained below the normal. A significant increase in the serum alkaline phosphatase activity was observed in ME pretreated irradiated animals during the entire period of study and normal range was evident at 24 hrs. (6 Gy) and day 5 (8 Gy). However, such level could not be restored even at day 30 in 10 Gy exposed animals. Acid phosphatase activity in ME pretreated irradiated animals was measured significantly

  9. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide in two biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastro, N.L. del; Bernardes, D.M.L.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.

    1991-03-01

    The present study was conducted: a) to confirm data from others describing a radioprotective capacity of DMSO in mice; b) to establish whether this protective behavior could be evidenced in an in vitro chemical system utilizing bovine crystalline protein as target. Heterozigous female albino mice were used for the 30-day-survival studies after 9 Gy sup(60)Co gamma irradiation (dose rate: 4.5 Gy/min) injected 1 h prior with 2000 mg/kg DMSO intraperitoneally. Total body weight curves during the same period were also analysed. For the molecular level studies 1 M DMSO was added to a series of aqueous protein solutions from bovine lens and 10 min later irradiated with 5 different doses from 5,000 to 25,000 Gy sup(60)Co (average dose rate 14 Gy/min). After irradiation, spectrophotometric reading at 600 nm and free thiol group determinations were performed in order to evaluate the radiation-induced modifications. (author)

  10. RADIOPROTECTIVE EFFECT OF LYCOPENE IN GAMMA IRRADIATED ALBINO RATS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOHAMED, M.I.; ALI, S.E.; HAGGAG, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to explore the radioprotective potential of lycopene in gamma irradiated male rats. Four groups, each of sixteen rats, were assigned as follows: the first was untreated (control group), the second fed on chow diet mixed with 300 mg lycopene/kg diet (lycopene group), the third exposed to 6.5 Gy gamma radiation (irradiated group) and the fourth fed on chow mixed with 300 mg lycopene/kg and exposed to 6.5 Gy gamma radiation (irradiated and treated group). Animals exposed to ionizing radiation experienced decline in their body weights, increased ALT and AST enzymes and decreased serum albumin level. The study also showed decline in hemoglobin, total white blood cells count and blood platelets count. Bone marrow examination revealed profound hypoplasis and reduction of the cellular elements. Histological examination of liver, spleen, testis and intestine showed disruption of normal architecture of these organs. Irradiated and treated animals maintained a more or less steady body weight, and improved serum ALT, AST and albumin in comparison with those irradiated. The results also showed increased hemoglobin, total white blood cells, platelets count and partial improvement of bone marrow cellularity. Lycopene was also capable of partial preservation of normal architecture of liver, spleen, intestine and testis in gamma irradiated group.In conclusion, lycopene seems to be a useful radioprotector probably because of its potent antioxidant property

  11. Radioprotective effects of Cordyceps sinensis extracts on {gamma}-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wongwang Health Science College, Iri (Korea, Republic of); Kim, On Joong; Kim, Jae Young [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Effect of single intraperitoneal administration of Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) extract at 24 hour before whole-body {gamma} - irradiation on the survival ratio, body weight, organ weight changes and serum metabolites in the irradiated mice were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cs extract increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 66.7 percent to 83.4 percent. The administration of Cs extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by {gamma} - irradiation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cs treated mice. The administration of Cs inhibited the serum hyperglycemia produced by irradiation on the day 7th(P < 0.01). However, it did not influence the serum cholesterol and protein levels on the days examined. The present study is the first report regarding Cs which was tested and found to be radioprotective. (Author)

  12. Radioprotective effects of Cordyceps sinensis extracts on γ-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu; Kim, On Joong; Kim, Jae Young

    1999-01-01

    Effect of single intraperitoneal administration of Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) extract at 24 hour before whole-body γ - irradiation on the survival ratio, body weight, organ weight changes and serum metabolites in the irradiated mice were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cs extract increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 66.7 percent to 83.4 percent. The administration of Cs extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by γ - irradiation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cs treated mice. The administration of Cs inhibited the serum hyperglycemia produced by irradiation on the day 7th(P < 0.01). However, it did not influence the serum cholesterol and protein levels on the days examined. The present study is the first report regarding Cs which was tested and found to be radioprotective. (Author)

  13. Radioprotective effect of dextran sulphate and aerogenic hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Bartonickova, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Konoplyanikova, O.A.; Konoplyanikov, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of dextran sulfate given 6 h before irradiation produced higher numbers of microcolonies of intestinal crypt stem cells in whole-body irradiated mice than an injection of saline in control mice. If dextran sulfate and hypoxia are combined, the radioprotective effect of hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells depends on the time interval between irradiation and administration of dextran sulfate. (author). 2 figs., 12 refs

  14. Radioprotection to the Gonads in Pediatric Pelvic Radiography: Effectiveness of Developed Bismuth Shield

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Karami; Mansour Zabihzadeh; Nasim Shams; Mehrdad Golami

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use and effectiveness of traditional lead gonad shields in pediatric pelvic radiography has been challenged by several literatures over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to develop a new radioprotective gonad shields to be use in pediatric pelvic radiography. Materials and Methods: The commercially available 0.06 mm lead equivalent bismuth garment has cropped squarely and used as ovarian shield to cover the entire region of pelvis. In order to prevent deteriorati...

  15. Radioprotective effect of cysteamine entrapped in liposomes oraly administered to the Mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Vincent; Bocquier, Francois; Leterrier, Francois; Fatome, Marc

    1982-01-01

    Cysteamine entrapped in liposomes was oraly delivered to Mice and its radioprotective effect observed as a function of the time elapsed between its administration and 60 Co gamma irradiation. A protection is manifest up to 3 hrs after administration. This result contrasts with the absence of protection afforded by cysteamine when oraly given as an aqueous solutions, and with the short lasting activity of its parenteral administration [fr

  16. Radioprotective effect of sesamol on γ-radiation induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants levels in cultured human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, N. Rajendra; Menon, Venugopal P.; Vasudev, V.; Pugalendi, K.V.

    2005-01-01

    Sesamol pretreated (1, 5 and 10 μg/ml) lymphocytes were exposed to different doses of γ-radiation, i.e., 1, 2 and 4 Gray (Gy) and the cellular changes were estimated by using cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (MN), dicentric aberration (DC), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Radiation significantly increased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and decreased GSH and antioxidant enzyme levels in a dose dependent manner. The highest damage to lymphocytes was observed at 4 Gy irradiation. On the other hand, sesamol pretreatment significantly decreased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and increased GSH levels and SOD, CAT and GPx activities in a concentration dependent manner. At 1 Gy irradiation all concentrations of sesamol (1, 5 and 10 μg/ml) significantly protects the lymphocytes from radiation damage. At 2 Gy irradiation 5 and 10 μg/ml of sesamol shows significant radioprotection. Since the highest damage was observed at 4 Gy irradiation both 1 and 5 μg/ml of sesamol pretreatment were not sufficient to protect the lymphocytes from radiation damage but 10 μg/ml of sesamol significantly (p < 0.05) protects the lymphocytes from radiation effect. Thus, sesamol pretreatment gives significant protection to cultured human lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced cellular damage. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective influence of sesamol is discussed

  17. Study of radioprotective effect of the resveratrol;Estudo do efeito radioprotetor do resveratrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina dos Santos

    2009-07-01

    Resveratrol (3,4,5 trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is present at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. This high capacity to scavenge the free radicals generated by several biologic processes by resveratrol can provide a prevention of human cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancer. The main objective of this study was to determine the in vitro radioprotective effect of resveratrol in cell culture with the aid of the tests of cytotoxicity of resveratrol (IC50%) and lethal dose 50% of gamma radiation (LD50). Studies of the level of resveratrol toxicity, found by cytotoxicity test performed by neutral red uptake assay, and lethal dose 50% (LD50) of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60 (Co-60) was performed in cell culture NCTC Clone 929 from ATCC. The IC50% of resveratrol was about 50 M/L. The DL50 of gamma radiation showed a value of about 354 Gy. On the basis of these biological results, it was performed studies of radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the same experimental conditions, verifying that the resveratrol in concentrations between 12.5 M/L and 25 M/L showed a more pronounced radioprotective effect. (author)

  18. Radioprotective effect of Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. ex. Fr. ) Karst after X-ray irradiation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, H.Y.; Lian, S.L.; Lin, C.C. (Kaohsiung Medical College (Taiwan))

    1990-01-01

    Six to seven week old male mice of ICR strain were exposed to 500 or 650 cGy of X-ray during experiments to determine if Ganoderma lucidum could be a factor in modification of radiation damage. Continuous intraperitoneal injection of the extract from Ganoderma lucidum before or after irradiation of 500 and 650 cGy of X-ray was found to improve the 30-day survival fractions of ICR mice, but wasn't significant by statistical analysis. The administration also enhanced the recoveries of the body weights and increased the recovery of hemograms of irradiated mice from radiation damage by injecting before or after radiation exposure, especially for the treatment of 500 cGy irradiation. The 10-day CFUs was significantly higher for Ganoderma lucidum treated groups than for untreated groups. However, the differences of radioprotective effect between the X-ray irradiated groups with Ganoderma lucidum pretreated and post-treated were not significant (p greater than 0.05).

  19. Radioprotective effect of Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. ex. Fr.) Karst after X-ray irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H.Y.; Lian, S.L.; Lin, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Six to seven week old male mice of ICR strain were exposed to 500 or 650 cGy of X-ray during experiments to determine if Ganoderma lucidum could be a factor in modification of radiation damage. Continuous intraperitoneal injection of the extract from Ganoderma lucidum before or after irradiation of 500 and 650 cGy of X-ray was found to improve the 30-day survival fractions of ICR mice, but wasn't significant by statistical analysis. The administration also enhanced the recoveries of the body weights and increased the recovery of hemograms of irradiated mice from radiation damage by injecting before or after radiation exposure, especially for the treatment of 500 cGy irradiation. The 10-day CFUs was significantly higher for Ganoderma lucidum treated groups than for untreated groups. However, the differences of radioprotective effect between the X-ray irradiated groups with Ganoderma lucidum pretreated and post-treated were not significant (p greater than 0.05)

  20. Micro-CT evaluation of the radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the mandibular incisors of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende Barbosa, Gabriella Lopes de; Almeida, Solange Maria de

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a micro computerized tomographic evaluation of the radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the volume of mandibular incisors of irradiated rats. A second aim was to make a quantitative assessment of the effect of x-ray exposure on these dental tissues. Twenty adult male rats were divided into four groups: control, irradiated control, resveratrol, and irradiated resveratrol. The resveratrol groups received 100 mg/kg of resveratrol, whereas the irradiated groups were exposed to 15 Gy of irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 30 days after the irradiation procedure, and their mandibles were removed and scanned in a micro computerized tomography unit. The images were loaded into Mimics software to allow segmentation of the mandibular incisor and assessment of its volume. The results were compared by One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test, considering a 5% significance level. The irradiated groups showed significantly diminished volumes of the evaluated teeth, as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). The resveratrol group presented higher values than those of the irradiated groups, and volumes similar to those of the control group. High radiation doses significantly affected tooth formation, resulting in alterations in the dental structure, and thus lower volumes. Moreover, resveratrol showed no effective radioprotective impact on dental tissues. Future studies are needed to evaluate different concentrations of this substance, in an endeavor to verify its potential as a radioprotector for these dental tissues. (author)

  1. Micro-CT evaluation of the radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the mandibular incisors of irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende Barbosa, Gabriella Lopes de; Almeida, Solange Maria de, E-mail: gabriellalopes@live.com [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola de Odontologia. Departmento de Diagnostico Oral; Pimenta, Luiz Andre [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Department of Dental Ecology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a micro computerized tomographic evaluation of the radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the volume of mandibular incisors of irradiated rats. A second aim was to make a quantitative assessment of the effect of x-ray exposure on these dental tissues. Twenty adult male rats were divided into four groups: control, irradiated control, resveratrol, and irradiated resveratrol. The resveratrol groups received 100 mg/kg of resveratrol, whereas the irradiated groups were exposed to 15 Gy of irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 30 days after the irradiation procedure, and their mandibles were removed and scanned in a micro computerized tomography unit. The images were loaded into Mimics software to allow segmentation of the mandibular incisor and assessment of its volume. The results were compared by One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test, considering a 5% significance level. The irradiated groups showed significantly diminished volumes of the evaluated teeth, as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). The resveratrol group presented higher values than those of the irradiated groups, and volumes similar to those of the control group. High radiation doses significantly affected tooth formation, resulting in alterations in the dental structure, and thus lower volumes. Moreover, resveratrol showed no effective radioprotective impact on dental tissues. Future studies are needed to evaluate different concentrations of this substance, in an endeavor to verify its potential as a radioprotector for these dental tissues. (author)

  2. Study of radio-protective effects of ascorbic acid in rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, A.M.; Mohammad, A.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential radio-protective effects of different ascorbic acid concentrations (vitamin C) in rats before whole body irradiation with total dose of 7 Gy ( 60 Co source) using two different dose rates of 1 and 0.55 Gy.min -1 by increasing percent of surviving. In the first group (1 Gy/m); rats were administered four different concentrations of ascorbic acid (7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg b wt ) in drinking water for 30 days before irradiation starting from the ablactation which considered as day 0. Whereas, in the second group (0.55 Gy/m); rats were administered six different concentrations of ascorbic acid (1, 5, 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg b wt) before irradiation with total dose 7 Gy ( 60 Co source). The results have showed that the ascorbic acid enhance the 30-day survival of irradiated rats in 1 and 0.55 Gy/m groups, compared to the control group. The mean cumulated probability of survival of rats (1 Gy/m group) was 66%± 6 (Mean± S.E), 69%± 5, 52%± 9 and 51%± 9 in groups of rats which administered 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg, respectively, versus 41%± 9 in control group for 14 days. While, it was 90%± 2, 90%± 2, 88%± 2, 94%± 1, 84%± 3 and 78%± 3 in groups of rats which administered 1, 5, 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg respectively, versus 52%± 6 in control group for 30 days. Our data, also, indicated that all ascorbic acid concentrations in both groups had significant reduction in mortality and increasing percent of surviving compared to the control groups. We conclude that all ascorbic acid concentrations which used in both groups (1 and 0.55 Gy/m), had radioprotective effects in rats when administrated before irradiations, and this role was more effective against lower dose rate of radiation exposure. (author)

  3. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Radiation Emergency Medicine Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Fujita, Mayumi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Meineke, Viktor [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  4. Modalities of declaration and codification of criteria related to significant events in the field of radioprotection besides base nuclear installations and transports of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document specifies provisions which must be applied by those in charge of a nuclear activity when declaring significant events regarding radioprotection. It describes the general principles, evokes the declaration criteria (they are more precisely presented in appendix), the declaration delay, and the declaration modalities (the informant, the documents, the addressee). It also evokes obligations regarding population information. A declaration form and a model of event report are provided in appendix

  5. Radioprotective effects of Silymarin on the sperm parameters of NMRI mice irradiated with γ-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Daryoush; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Shekarchi, Babak; Shabani, Arash; Seify, Mohammad; Rostamzadeh, Ayoob

    2018-01-01

    Free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated using various endogenous systems or from external sources such as exposure to different physiochemicals. Ionizing radiation damage to the cell can be caused by the direct or indirect effects of radiotherapy processes. Silymarin (SM), a flavanolignan compound, has been identified as a natural potent antioxidant with cytoprotection activities due to scavenging free radicals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of SM on sperm parameters of mice induced by γ-rays. A total number of 40 adult, male NMRI mice were randomly divided into four equal groups. The control group was neither treated with SM nor irradiated by γ-rays. The second group was only irradiated with 2Gy of γ-rays. The third group was firstly treated with 50mg/kg of SM for 7 consecutive days, and one day later, last injections were irradiated by 2Gy of γ-rays. The fourth groups received only 50mg/kg of SM for 7 consecutive days. All the animals were treated intraperitoneally. Histopathological and morphometrical examinations were performed. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. A value of pradiation-only group when compared with those treated with SM and irradiated, a significant different was observed in testicular parameters and DNA damage (peffects of γ-radiation-induced cellular damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Radioprotective effects of combination broncho-vaxom, a macrophage activator, and indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin production. Relationship to myelopoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorocko, P.; Mackova, N.O. [Safarik Univ., Faculty ofSciences, Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Kosice (Slovakia)

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the bacterial extract broncho-vaxom (BV; radioprotective immunomodulator; 500 {mu}g/mouse i.p., -24 h) and indomethacin (INDO; inhibitor of prostaglandin production; 2x40 {mu}g/mouse i.m., - 24 h and - 3 h) on the post-irradiation recovery of hemopoietic functions in mice were investigated. Both agents were administered either alone or in combination. Endogenous spleen colony formation was increased in all treatment groups, with combination-treated mice exhibiting the greatest effects. Similarly, 24 h after combined administration of BV and INDO (i.e. at the time of presumed irradiation) to the non-irradiated mice granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) numbers were greater in the bone marrow and spleen. Also, as determined by hydroxyurea injection, there was an increase in the number of GM-CFC in the S-phase of the cell cycle in the bone marrow. However, GM-CFC in the spleen of combination pretreated mice was not stimulated to significant proliferation as compared to GM-CFC in the spleen of mice injected with BV alone. Combined modality treatment was also more effective than single agent treatments in accelerating bone marrow cellularity and GM-CFC regeneration, but not in accelerating GM-CFC regeneration in the spleen. Combined administration of BV and INDO to mice prior to lethal irradiation exerted and additional radioprotective effect and protected 95% of the C57B1/6 mice. (au) 42 refs.

  7. Radioprotective effect of Tamarindus indica pod extract in Swiss albino mice exposed to whole body electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandini, S.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Ganesh Sanjeev; D'sa, Prima

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of Tamarindus indica pod extract against radiation induced damage.The effect of 100 mg of hydroalcoholic extract of Tamarindus indica pod was studied in Swiss albino mice exposed to 6 Gy whole body electron beam radiation. Treatment of mice with extract for 15 days before irradiation reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness when compared with the untreated irradiated group. The irradiated animals showed an elevation in lipid peroxidation and reduction in glutathione, total antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities. Radiation induced mice has shown micronucleus in the bone marrow cells. Treatment of mice with Tamarindus indica pod extract before irradiation caused a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation followed by significant elevation in reduced glutathione, total antioxidants, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. It also showed a reduction in the micronucleus formation in bone marrow cells. Results indicate that the radioprotective activity of Tamarindus indica pod extract may be due to free radical scavenging attributed as a result of increased antioxidant level in mice. (author)

  8. Radioprotective Effect of Achillea millefolium L Against Genotoxicity Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Human Normal Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Shahani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The radioprotective effect of Achillea millefolium L (ACM extract was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation (IR in human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with the methanolic extract of ACM at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL for 2 hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 2.5 Gy of X-ray and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cell. Antioxidant capacity of the extract was determined using free radical-scavenging method. The treatment of lymphocytes with the extract showed a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei binucleated cells, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei were observed at 200 μg/mL of ACM extract which completely protected genotoxicity induced by IR in human lymphocytes. Achillea millefolium extract exhibited concentration-dependent radical-scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. These data suggest that the methanolic extract of ACM may play an important role in the protection of normal tissues against genetic damage induced by IR.

  9. Research progress in the radioprotective effect of the canonical Wnt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jin-Feng; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Qu; Huang, Guan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation from diverse sources is ubiquitous and closely associated with human activities. Radiation therapy (RT), an important component of multiple radiation origins, is a common therapeutic modality for cancer. More importantly, RT provides significant contribution to oncotherapy by killing tumor cells. However, during the course of therapy, irradiation of normal tissues can result in a wide range of side effects, including self-limited acute toxicities, mild chronic symptoms, or severe organ dysfunction. Although numerous promising radioprotective agents have emerged, only a few have successfully entered the market because of various limitations. At present, the widely accepted hypothesis for protection against radiation-caused injury involves the Wnt canonical pathway. Activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may protect the salivary gland, oral mucosa, and gastrointestinal epithelium from radiation damage. The underlying mechanisms include inhibiting apoptosis and preserving normal tissue functions. However, aberrant Wnt signaling underlies a wide range of pathologies in humans, and its various components contribute to cancer. Moreover, studies have suggested that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may lead to radioresistance of cancer stem cell. These facts markedly complicate any definition of the exact function of the Wnt pathway

  10. Radioprotective effects of hawthorn fruit extract against gamma irradiation in mouse bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinimehr, S.J.; Azadbakht, M.; Mousavi, S.M.; Mahmoudzadeh, A.; Akhlaghpoor, S.

    2007-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation has been investigated in mouse bone marrow cells. A single intraperitoneal (ip) administration of hawthorn extract at doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg 1 h prior to gamma irradiation (2 Gy) reduced the frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs). All four doses of hawthorn extract significantly reduced the frequencies of MnPCEs and increased the PCE/PCE+NCE ratio (polychromatic erythrocyte/polychromatic erythrocyte+normochromatic erythrocyte) in mice bone marrow compared with the non drug-treated irradiated control (p<0.02-0.00001). The maximum reduction in MnPCEs was observed in mice treated with extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Administration of amifostine at dose 100 mg/kg and hawthorn at dose 200 mg/kg reduced the frequency of MnPCE almost 4.8 and 5.7 fold; respectively, after being exposed to 2 Gy of gamma rays, compare with the irradiated control group. Crataegus extract exhibited concentration-dependent activity on 1, 1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl free radical showing that Crataegus contained high amounts of phenolic compounds and the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis determined that it contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It appeared that hawthorn extract with antioxidant activity reduced the genotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation in bone marrow cells. (author)

  11. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7 adr human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7 adr and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against 60 cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy

  12. Radioprotective effect of chitosan in sub-lethally X-ray irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Ikota, Nobuo; Arima, Hiromi; Watanabe, Yoshito; Yukawa, Masae; Ozawa, Toshihiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kim, Hee-Sun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Radiation Health Research Inst.; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Young-Ho [Chonnam Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    2003-03-01

    The radioprotective effect of chitosan was studied in mice following whole-body X-ray irradiation. C3H/He mice were exposed to 7 Gy, and their survival rates were examined. The survival rates of chitosan-diet mice were about 20% higher than those of mice on a standard diet, and the rates dropped sharply to a plateau at day 10 after X-ray irradiation. The chitosan-diet mice had an increased weight ratio of spleen to body within the experimental period. The leukocyte, thrombocyte, and erythrocyte counts as well as the hematocrit and hemoglobin levels were recovered significantly and more rapidly in the chitosan-diet mice than the standard-diet mice at day 14 after irradiation. The scavenging abilities of chitosan were evaluated by the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method. These observations suggested that chitosan led to hematopoetic activation and leuko-cytogenesis in mice after sub-lethal dose irradiation, and that the biological response might be caused by radical trapping or scavenging. (author)

  13. Synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM). Behavioral effects and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landauer, M.R.; Mcchesney, D.G.; Ledney, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM), an immunomodulator, for its survival enhancing capacity and behavioral toxicity in B6D2F1 female mice. In survival experiments, mice were administered S-TDCM (25-400 μg/mouse i.p.) 20-24 hr before 5.6 Gy mixed-field fission-neutron irradiation (n) and γ-photon irradiation. The 30-day survival rates for mice treated with 100-400 μg/mouse S-TDCM were significantly enhanced compared to controls. Toxicity of S-TDCM was measured in nonirradiated mice by locomotor activity, food intake, water consumption, and alterations in body weight. A dose-dependent decrease was noted in all behavioral measures in mice treated with S-TDCM. Doses of 100 and 200 μg/mouse S-TDCM significantly reduced motor activity beginning 12 hr postinjection with recovery by 24 hr. A dose of 400 μg/mouse significantly decreased activity within the first 4 hr after administration and returned to control levels by 32 hr following injection. Food and water intake were significantly depressed at doses of 200 and 400 μg/mouse on the day following drug administration, and were recovered in 24 hr. Body weight was significantly decreased in the 200 μg/mouse group for 2 days and in the 400 μg/mouse group for 4 days following injection. A dose of 100 μg/mouse effectively enhanced survival after fission-neutron irradiation with no adverse effect on food consumption, water intake, or body weight and a minimal, short-term effect on locomotor activity. (author)

  14. The potential effect of taurine as a radioprotective agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharoud, M.N.M.

    2010-01-01

    People can be exposed to irradiation either external or internal. The potential effects of radiation on health depend in part on the radiation dose delivered and the rate of delivery causing oxidation and free radical formation. The main purpose of the present study was to asses the effect of taurine administration in modulating some biochemical and hematological parameters in female rats exposed to 6 gray γ-irradiation. The data showed in this study that the ionizing γradiation (6 Gy) induced a significant (p<0.05) increment in the levels of serum lipid profile (cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL) and elevation of cardiac enzyme activities (LDH, CK and AST) and elevation in the activities of serum AST , ALT and ALP. on the other hand , the ionizing radiation induced a significant (p < 0.05) decline in the concentrations of serum total protein and albumin . In case of exposing female rat to gamma ray, the level of MDA was significantly elevated compared to their corresponding normal control group. Whereas, the drastic decrease were observed in hematological parameters (Hb, RBCs, WBCs and Hct). A significant correction was occurred in all previous parameters after the irradiated rats were intraperitoneally (i.p) injected with taurine (500 mg/100 g body weigh / day for one month). Leading to the conclusion that taurine is considered as antioxidant and a radio-protector agent.

  15. Radioprotective effect of hematopoietic growth factor gene therapy regulated by Egr-1 promoter on radiation injury of SCID mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Nan; Pei Xuetao; Luo Chengji; Su Yongping; Cheng Tianmin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the radioprotective effect of the expression of hematopoietic growth factors regulated by radio-inducible promoter on radiation injury. Methods: The human FL cDNA and EGFP cDNA were linked together with an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and then inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo with the Egr-1 promoter (Egr-EF), and further transduced into bone marrow stromal cell lines HFCL (HFCL/EF). The HFCL/EF and CD34 + cells from human umbilical cord blood were transplanted i.v. one after the other into sublethally irradiated severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The number of peripheral blood WBC and human cells engrafted in recipient mice were detected by flow cytometry and CFU-GM assay. Results: In contrast to two control groups (HFCL and HFCL/F), HFCL/EF (the Egr-1 regulatory element-driven expression of FL gene therapy) resulted in a proportionally obvious increase in the number of the WBC at early stage after irradiation. Significant differences were found for CD45 + , CD34 + , CFU-GM, and nucleated cells in the bone marrow. Conclusion: Hematopoietic growth factor gene therapy regulated by radio-inducible promoter has radioprotective effect on radiation hematopoietic injury

  16. The radioprotective effects of Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) juice on the bone marrow of irradiated Mus musculus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boquiren, Ryan Albert Leonard N.; Te Tan, Alvin E.

    2000-03-01

    The radioprotective effects of Noni juice on the bone marrow of irradiated Mus musculus L. (7-week old IRC strain) was studied using the micronucleus test. Five mice were used for each of the six groups; negative and positive control, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% treatment. Both negative and positive control groups were not treated with Noni juice. However, the negative control was not irradiated. Four different concentrations, a mixture of distilled water and commercial Noni juice, were administered via oral gavage to mice in their specific groups during the 15-day feeding schedule. A day (24H) after the last treatment, the mice were irradiated (6 Gy of gamma radiation). Two days (48H) after irradiation, the mice were sacrifice and the femur were extracted. The bone marrow cells were collected and slides were prepared. One thousand polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were screened for the presence of micronucleus per mouse. The mean frequency of micronucleated PCE were as follows: negative control, 15; positive control, 45; 25% treatment, 21; 50% treatment, 18; 75% treatment, 11; 100% treatment, 7. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the groups' responses varied (α=0.05). Multiple comparison showed that there were significant differences between: (1) 25% and 100% treatment group; (2) positive control group and 75% treatment group; (3) positive control group and 100% treatment group, thus indicating that Noni juice is effective in inhibiting micronucleus formation at high concentrations. The result also showed that radioprotective potential of Noni juice follows a dose-dependent pattern. (Author)

  17. The radioprotective effects of Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) juice on the bone marrow of irradiated Mus musculus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boquiren, Ryan Albert Leonard N.; Te Tan, Alvin E

    2000-03-01

    The radioprotective effects of Noni juice on the bone marrow of irradiated Mus musculus L. (7-week old IRC strain) was studied using the micronucleus test. Five mice were used for each of the six groups; negative and positive control, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% treatment. Both negative and positive control groups were not treated with Noni juice. However, the negative control was not irradiated. Four different concentrations, a mixture of distilled water and commercial Noni juice, were administered via oral gavage to mice in their specific groups during the 15-day feeding schedule. A day (24H) after the last treatment, the mice were irradiated (6 Gy of gamma radiation). Two days (48H) after irradiation, the mice were sacrifice and the femur were extracted. The bone marrow cells were collected and slides were prepared. One thousand polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were screened for the presence of micronucleus per mouse. The mean frequency of micronucleated PCE were as follows: negative control, 15; positive control, 45; 25% treatment, 21; 50% treatment, 18; 75% treatment, 11; 100% treatment, 7. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the groups' responses varied ({alpha}=0.05). Multiple comparison showed that there were significant differences between: (1) 25% and 100% treatment group; (2) positive control group and 75% treatment group; (3) positive control group and 100% treatment group, thus indicating that Noni juice is effective in inhibiting micronucleus formation at high concentrations. The result also showed that radioprotective potential of Noni juice follows a dose-dependent pattern. (Author)

  18. Effect of extraction method and orientin content on radio-protective effect of tulsi extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Mrinalini; Dwarakanath, B. S.; Agrawala, Paban K., E-mail: pkagrawal@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India); Murugan, R.; Parimelazhagan, T. [Department of Botany, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India); Uma Devi, P. [ARA-B-3SA, Plavilakonam,Trivandrum (India); Gota, V.; Sarin, R. K. [Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer, Navi Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Extract of tulsi leaves (Ocimum sanctum) has been reported for its radioprotective efficacy. In our initial studies we observed significant variation in the survival of irradiated mice with different batches of tulsi extracts and therefore we employed different extraction methods on leaves collected during various seasons from different localities to study any variation in the radioprotective efficacy. Orientin, a component of tulsi extract, was considered a marker. Mice whole body survival (at 10 Gy lethal whole body irradiation) study and day 11 endo-CFU-s assay (at 5 Gy WBI) were performed employing 3 treatment schedules, 50 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg b.w (single injection, 30 min irradiation), and 10 mg/kgb.w (one injection per day for 5 day, last injection being 30 min before irradiation). Single dose of 25 mg/kg b.w (both aqueous and alcoholic) did not provide any significant survival benefit. The orientin concentrations in the extracts tested varied from 3.3 to 9.91 mg/g extract as studied by HPLC method. With a single administration (i.p) of 50 mg/kg, the aqueous extract from leaves of monsoon season had an orientin content of 9.91 mg/g extract and gave a survival of 60% with a CFU-s count of 37, while extract of leaf summer leaves had an orientin content of 4.15 mg/g extract and gave a survival of 50% with a CFU-s count of 11.6. At the same dose (50 mg/kg), the aqueous extract from the winter season had an orientin content of 3.30 mg/g extract and gave 25% survival with a CFU-s count of 19, while the ethanolic extract had an orientin content of 7.70 mg/g extract and gave a survival of 50% with a CFU-s count of 13. These observations suggest that different climatic factors, orientin content and the doses of administration are important factors regulating radioprotection afforded by different extracts of tulsi. (author)

  19. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karslioglu, Ie.; Ertekin, M.V.; Taysi, S.; Kocer, Ie.; Sezen, O.; Koc, M.; Bakan, N.; Gepdiremen, A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the mechanisms proposed to explain lens opacification is the oxidation of crystallins, either by radiation or reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been shown that melatonin has both an anti-peroxidative effect on several tissues and a scavenger effect on ROS. The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidant role of melatonin (5 mg/kg/day) against radiation-induced cataract in the lens after total-cranium irradiation of rats with a single dose of 5 Gy. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Control group received neither melatonin nor irradiation. Irradiated rats (IR) and melatonin+irradiated rats (IR+Mel) groups were exposed to total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose by using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. IR+Mel and melatonin (Mel) groups were administered 5 mg/kg melatonin daily by intraperitoneal injections during ten days. Chylack's cataract classification was used in this study. At the end of the 10 th day, the rats were killed and their eyes were enucleated to measure the antioxidant enzymes i.e. the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde (MDA)). Irradiation significantly increased the MDA level, as an end product of lipid peroxidation, and also significantly decreased SOD and GSH-Px activity, emphasizing the generation of increased oxidative stress. Rats injected with melatonin only did not cause cataract formation. Melatonin supplementation with irradiation significantly increased the activity of SOD and GSH-Px enzymes and significantly decreased the MDA level. Total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose enhanced cataract formation, and melatonin supplementation protected the lenses from radiation-induced cataract formation. Our results suggest that supplementing cancer patients with adjuvant therapy of melatonin may reduce patients suffering from toxic therapeutic regimens such as chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and may provide

  20. Radioprotective effects of shark cartilage mucopolysaccharide preparation on immune nad reproductive organs in male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Jie; Shen Xianrong; Jiang Dingwen; Chen Wei; Lu Min

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the protective effects of shark cartilage mucopolysaccharide preparation (SCMP) on immune and reproductive organs in male mice with irradiation damage induced by γ-rays. Methods: 50 mice were randomly divided into normal control group,model control group, the 0.5g/kg. d SCMP group, the 1.0g/kg. d SCMP group, and the 2.0g/kg. d SCMP group. SCMP was administrated by intragastric infusion with the volume of 0.4ml per 20g. Normal control group and model control group were given the same volume of water. 2 weeks later, all of the mice were irradiated by γ-ray of 60 Co(0.83Gy/h) with the dose of 5 Gy. Peripheral blood WBC, the spleen index(SI), thymus index(TI), the gMNC, testicle index, germ cells were detected. Results: Compared with the modal control group, peripheral blood WBC became significantly higher in the treated groups with 1.0g/kg. d and 2.0g/kg. d SCMP after 3 days by irradiation (P<0.05). TI, BMNC and germ cells were significantly higher in the treated groups with 1.0g/kg. d and 2.0g/kg. d SCMP comparing with the control model group (P<0.05) and SI, and Testicle index was significantly compared with the model group (P<0.05) only in 2.0g/ kg. d SCMP treated group. The germ abnormality rate became lower in SCMP treated groups (P<0.01) in 1.0 and 2.0g/kg. d SCMP group. Conclusion: SCMP has radioprotective effects on immune and reproductive organs in male mice. (authors)

  1. Radioprotective effect of garlic extract on some bacterial strains with different radiation sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, Z.S.; Abushady, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of garlic on four bacterial strains with different degrees of radiation sensitivities was investigated. The presence of garlic led to an increase in d-10 value of Ps. Aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. typhimurium by 160%, 50%, and 30% respectively. The protective efficiency of garlic against radiation was noticed to be proportional to its concentration in a given inoculum size. Garlic extract up to 180 micro liter per 10 8 inoculum size of B. cereus showed no protective effect. This fact was attributed to the existence of sulphur compounds in the given strain. Higher garlic concentrations appeared to affect the cloning efficiency of a given strain. 4fig., 2tab

  2. Radioprotective effect of a metalloporphyrin compound in rat eye model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, X W; Crapo, J D; Mekonnen, T; Lindsey, N; Martinez, P; Gridley, D S; Slater, J M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the antioxidant Mn (III) tetrakis (N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl) porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP) in protecting ocular tissue and retinal microvasculature from radiation damage. 75 rats were treated with Mn TE-2-PyP at 2.5 micro g/injection into one eye an hour before proton irradiation. The radiation was delivered in a single fraction to total doses of 8 Gray (Gy) or 28 Gy; Rats were sacrificed 3 days and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months thereafter for histology and quantification of photoreceptor cell populations and retinal capillary changes. By 6 months following radiation, there was significant loss of retinal outer and inner nuclear layers in eyes receiving radiation only (8 and 28 Gy) (p eyes of rats treated with radiation plus metalloporphyrin. Retinal microvessel length density decreased significantly 6 months following 28 Gy (p eyes showed extensive damage to the photoreceptor layer, whereas the eyes of animals receiving radiation plus MnTE-2-PyP showed almost no morphological damage. MnTE-2-PyP treatment also suppressed radiation-induced apoptosis in our study. These results demonstrated that MnTE-2-PyP protected both photoreceptors and retinal capillaries from radiation damage, suggesting that this metalloporphyrin antioxidant is effective in regulating the damage induced by proton radiation.

  3. Dependence of radioprotective effect of chemical modifying agents on their intracellular concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidus, L.K.; Korystov, Y.N.; Kublik, L.N.; Vexler, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Regularities of the radioprotective effect of chemical modifying agents cysteamine, caffeine benzoate, thioglycolic acid, and caffeine, all weak electrolytes, have been studied in cultured Chinese hamster cells. Efficiency of protection is shown to be dependent on pH and concentrations of the drug inside the cells and in the medium. Based on the theory of the dissociation of weak electrolytes and their distribution between the cells and the medium a strong correlation between the efficiency of modification of the radiation response and intracellular concentration of a modifying agent is shown. (author)

  4. Radiosensitivity of marrow stromal cells and the effect of some radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuhua

    1992-01-01

    The results showed that marrow stromal cells include fibroblasts, reticular cells, macrophages and adipocytes. The capability of the adherent layer derived from marrow cells of 2 mouse femurs to support hematopoietic stem cells was stronger than those of layers derived from 0.5 or 1 mouse femurs. The radiosensitivity of bone marrow stromal cells was lower than that of hematopoietic stem cells. The radioprotective effect of AET and PLP (polysaccharide of Lobaria Pulmonaria Hoffm) on the bone marrow stromal cells and their capability to support hematopoietic stem cells was clearly demonstrated

  5. Investigation of radioprotective effect of indraline of hematopoietic system in different species of animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, M.V.; Antipov, V.V.; Chernov, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The experiments were made on mice, guinea pigs and dogs. Radioprotector indraline increased radioresistant state of hematopoietic stem cells in vivo and in vitro, decreased the amount of post-radiation chromosome aberrations in marrow, induced more early and intensive post-radiation proliferative repair of marrow and spleen, faster regeneration of the initial amount of leukocytes thrombocytes and erytrocytes in blood of mice, guinea pigs and dogs. Antiradiation efficiency of indraline in hematopoietic system is equal to 1.5-2 by FMD. Radioprotective mechanism of indraline effect on hematopoietic system is discussed. 22 refs.; 8 figs.; 4 tabs

  6. Antioxidant and radioprotective effect of the active fraction of Pilea microphylla (L.) ethanolic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, K R; Veerapur, V P; Bansal, Punit; Parihar, Vipan Kumar; Reddy Kandadi, Machendar; Bhagath Kumar, P; Priyadarsini, K I; Unnikrishnan, M K

    2007-01-05

    The ethanolic extract of Pilea microphylla (L.) was defatted, successively fractionated with acetone and the residue so obtained was found to be most potent when subjected to detailed free radical scavenging and in vivo radioprotection studies. The most active fraction reacts with free radicals, such as DPPH (50 microM), ABTS(.)(-) (100 microM) and (.)OH (generated by Fenton reaction) with IC(50) value of 23.15 microg/ml, 3.0 microg/ml and 310 microg/ml, respectively. The most active fraction inhibited iron-induced lipid peroxidation in phosphatidyl choline liposomes with an IC(50) of 13.74 microg/ml. The kinetics of scavenging of DPPH and ABTS(.)(-) radicals were followed at different concentrations of the fraction by employing stopped-flow studies. The observed first order decay rate constants at 200 microg/ml and 50 microg/ml of fraction with DPPH (50 microM) and ABTS(.)(-) (50 microM) were found to be 0.4s(-1) and 2.1s(-1), respectively. The fraction when screened for in vivo radioprotection in Swiss albino mice showed 80% protection at a dose of 900 mg/kg and with a DRF of about 1.12. The fraction was also found to protect livers of irradiated mice from depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes like glutathione, GST, SOD, catalase and thiols. The fraction also protected the villi height, increased the number of crypt cells while offering general protection to the intestine from acute radiation effects. The fraction also protected the hematopoietic system as assessed by endogenous spleen colony assay, contributing to the overall radioprotective ability.

  7. Radioprotective effects of Grewia asiatica in vivo: studies in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, K.V.; Ahaskar, Muktika; Singh, Smita; Sisodia, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Increasing use of nuclear radiation for human welfare necessitates a new, safe and cost effective radio protector not only for personnel's charged with responsibility of testing or with radiations in laboratories, but also for the general public. Keeping this view, this study has been undertaken to find out the possible radio protective potential of the Grewia asiatica fruit pulp extract (GAE), Grewia asiatica has a high content of antioxidants like Vitamin C, anthocyanin and folate that may play a possible role in radioprotection. For experimental study, healthy Swiss Albino mice were selected from an inbred colony and divided into four groups. Group I (normal) did not receive any treatment. Group II was orally supplemented (GAE) once daily at the dose of 700 mg/Kg. b.wt/day for fifteen consecutive days. Group III (control) received distilled water orally equivalent to GAE for fifteen days than exposed to 5 Gy of gamma radiation. Group IV (experimental) was administered orally (GAE) for 15 consecutive days once daily after exposure to single dose of 5Gy of gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed at different autopsy intervals viz. 1, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days and liver was removed for various biochemical estimations viz. glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO). Irradiation resulted an elevation in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and a decline in glutathione (GSH) level in liver. On the other hand, treatment of animals with GAE extract after irradiation caused a significant decrease in LPO and a marked elevation in GSH. This finding showed that post treatment of GAE is more effective than its pretreatment

  8. Study of the radioprotective effect of flavonoid quercetin on human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Williams Nascimento de

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been used in various fields of study, as medicine, industry, energy production, surgical materials sterilization, preservation and sterilization of foods, among others. These radiations may be responsible for adverse effects at molecular level in living organisms, where most important damage occurs in deoxyribonucleic acid molecule, DNA. These harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about radioprotector substances because they can act as protector of living tissue of those effects. In this research was investigated the possible radioprotective effect 'in vitro' of the flavonoid quercetin in human lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation. At first, test was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of quercetin by capturing DPPH free radical molecules. Then, it was collected peripheral blood of volunteers donors. Then the samples were irradiated from linear accelerator (Siemens Primus - energy of 6 MeV and dose rate of 200 cGy/min from IMIP-PE). After samples irradiation, lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and then the culture was carried out to obtain lymphocyte in metaphases and subsequent, analysis of chromosomal abnormalities were done at optical microscope. Statistical analysis was used Student 't' test. The results showed that quercetin at a concentration of 37.5 μM presented radioprotective against damage from gamma radiation on human lymphocytes in vitro. Have been also observed that the irradiated lymphocytes showed morphologically unchanged after undergoing the presence of the flavonoid quercetin. (author)

  9. Radioprotective effect of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin in gamma induced acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindekov, Ivan; Vassilieva, Vladimir; Aljakova, Mitko; Mileva, Milka; Krastev, Dimo; Raynova, Yuliana; Idakieva, Krassimira; Doumanov, Lyuba

    2014-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin (RtH) against radiation-induced injuries (stomach ulcers, survival time and endogenous haemopoiesis) and post-radiation recovery was investigated in male albino mice (C3H strain). Radiation course was in a dose of 7.5 Gy (LD 100/30 - dose that kills 100% of the mice at 30 days) from "1"3"7Cs with a dose of 2.05 Gy/ min. Radiation injuries were manifested by inducing 2 hematopoietic form of acute radiation syndrome. RtH was administered intraperitoneally in a single dose of 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b. w.) once a day for five consecutive days before irradiation. The results obtained showed that radiation exposure led to (1) 100% mortality rate, (2) ulceration in the stomach mucosa and (3) decrease formation of spleen colonies as a marker of endogenous haemopoiesis. Administration of RtH at a dose of 200 mg/kg provided better protection against radiation-induced stomach ulceration, mitigated the lethal effects of radiation exposure and recovered endogenous haemopoiesis versus irradiated but not supplemented mice. It could be expected that RtH will find a use in mitigating radiation induced injury and enhanced radiorecovery. Keywords: Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin; acute radiation syndrome; radioprotective effect; spleen colony assay; stomach ulcerations

  10. Mechanisms of the radioprotective effect of cysteamine in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korystov, Yu.N.; Vexler, F.B.

    1988-01-01

    The values of the oxygen effect (m) and the maximal protective effect of cysteamine (DMF*) were estimated for four Escherichia coli strains: AB1157 (wild type), AB1886 (uvrA), AB2463 (recA), and p3478 (polA). A correlation made between DMF* and m as well as the kinetics of the increase of DMF with oxygen depletion showed that the protective effect of cysteamine is realized by three mechanisms: (i) anoxia achieved by oxygen reduction, with the DMF varying from 2.2 to 4.2 for different E. coli strains (this protection is the major contribution to the entire mechanism); (ii) lowering of the indirect radiation effect; i.e., for 50 mM cysteamine DMF does not exceed 1.1; and (iii) increase of the efficiency of enzymatic repair. The latter effect of cysteamine is registered only with the wild-type E. coli, the DMF being not less than 1.4

  11. Quantification of the antioxidant 3, 4, 5,-Trihydroxybenzoic acid in radioprotective drug SBL-1 and its modifying effects on radiation induced changes in renal oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Manu; Madhu Bala

    2013-01-01

    Development of radioprotective drug is international challenge and till date no radioprotective agent has been approved for human use. Leaf extract of Hippophae rhamnoides, code name SBL-1, was demonstrated to have significant radioprotective properties. Antioxidant properties have contributed significantly to radiation protection potential of many herbs. In this study we have developed simple, sensitive, reliable, rapid and validated HPTLC protocol, for quantification of a major antioxidant 3, 4, 5,-Trihydroxybenzoic acid (Gallic acid ethyl ester) in SBL-1 and also studied the effect of treatment of mice with SBL-1 before total body irradiation (10 Gy, lethal dose) on renal anti-oxidant enzymes. Separation was carried out on silica gel 60F 254 pre-coated TLC aluminum plates, while allowing linear ascending development in twin trough glass chamber, saturated with suitably designed mobile phase. Densitometric detection of Gallic acid was at 280 nm. The protocol produced a discrete band where retention factor was 0.58; correlation coefficient for linear relationship between concentrations and peak areas was 0.9999; detection limits was 25 ng; limits of quantification was 50 ng and percentage recovery was 98.76. Administration of SBL-1 to mice before total body irradiation with lethal dose of low LET 60 Co-gamma rays (10 Gy), resulted in significant countering of the radiation induced disturbances in the levels of Glutathione S-Transferase (GST), Catalase and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) in kidney. This study elucidated an important mechanism of protection to kidney in total body lethally irradiated mice. (author)

  12. Radioprotective effect of exogenic hypoxia in fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazymbetov, P.; Yarmonenko, S.P.; Vajnson, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the experiments with mice it is established, that exogenic hypoxia protective effect (8%O 2 ), evaluated according to survival rate, decreases at the change from single to fractionated irradiation. Dose change factor (DCF) is equal to 1.55 and 1.22-1.31, respectively. Skin protection using exogenic hypoxia at the local fractionated irradiation is expressed more, than at the fractionated one. DCF is equal to 1.56 and 1.28, respectively. Exogenic hypoxia protection effect in the tumor is expressed rather weakly. DCF at single and fractionated irradiation constitutes 1.03 and 1.07-1.13, respectively. Due to skin preferential protection the therapeutic gain factor at irradiation under the exogenic hypoxia conditions constitutes 1.24 and 1.38-1.46, respectively, at single and fractionated irradiation

  13. Radioprotection effects of TMG to radical scavenger effect of the mice in radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo; Oshima, Masami

    2002-01-01

    Now there is many it, and the radiotherapy that is one of cancer therapy is used by single or anticancer drug and combination. A chemical material has been used as radioprotector, but the use is limited conventionally by a serious side effect. Vitamin E derivative[TMG 2- (α - D-Glucopyranosyl) Methyl-2,5,7,8-Teramethyl -chorman-6-OL] which we are water-soluble, And is the nature material as well for the fetal teratogenicity that I use ICR mouse used for a malformed experiment frequently in this study, and sensibility for radiation is the highest, we studied radiation protection effect of TMG. As a result, as for the fetal malformed incidence, it was admitted that it fell in shifts and changes by administering TMG before radiation exposure. Decrease depression of degradation of a skeletal malformation rate in particular and fetal weight was recognized, and an individual level made radiation protection indication of TMG clear. In addition, that there was radioprotection effect for embryonic death by radiation was made clear by premedication doing TMG equally, and that there was protection effect for radiation exposure in a cell level same as an individual level was proved, and TMG showed the potency that it was it in radioprotector promising in the future. Furthermore, by what we reviewed about congenital defect for radiation, effect for skeletal malformation incidence and sensibility of embryonic cell level in organogenesis, we analyzed mechanism of protection effect of TMG for fetal teratogenicity by radiation experimentally

  14. Radioprotection effects of TMG to radical scavenger effect of the mice in radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo; Oshima, Masami [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Suzuka (Japan)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    Now there is many it, and the radiotherapy that is one of cancer therapy is used by single or anticancer drug and combination. A chemical material has been used as radioprotector, but the use is limited conventionally by a serious side effect. Vitamin E derivative[TMG 2- ({alpha} - D-Glucopyranosyl) Methyl-2,5,7,8-Teramethyl -chorman-6-OL] which we are water-soluble, And is the nature material as well for the fetal teratogenicity that I use ICR mouse used for a malformed experiment frequently in this study, and sensibility for radiation is the highest, we studied radiation protection effect of TMG. As a result, as for the fetal malformed incidence, it was admitted that it fell in shifts and changes by administering TMG before radiation exposure. Decrease depression of degradation of a skeletal malformation rate in particular and fetal weight was recognized, and an individual level made radiation protection indication of TMG clear. In addition, that there was radioprotection effect for embryonic death by radiation was made clear by premedication doing TMG equally, and that there was protection effect for radiation exposure in a cell level same as an individual level was proved, and TMG showed the potency that it was it in radioprotector promising in the future. Furthermore, by what we reviewed about congenital defect for radiation, effect for skeletal malformation incidence and sensibility of embryonic cell level in organogenesis, we analyzed mechanism of protection effect of TMG for fetal teratogenicity by radiation experimentally.

  15. A New Orally Active, Aminothiol Radioprotector-Free of Nausea and Hypotension Side Effects at Its Highest Radioprotective Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soref, Cheryl M. [ProCertus BioPharm, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Hacker, Timothy A. [Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Physiology Core, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Fahl, William E., E-mail: fahl@oncology.wisc.edu [ProCertus BioPharm, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: A new aminothiol, PrC-210, was tested for orally conferred radioprotection (rats, mice; 9.0 Gy whole-body, which was otherwise lethal to 100% of the animals) and presence of the debilitating side effects (nausea/vomiting, hypotension/fainting) that restrict use of the current aminothiol, amifostine (Ethyol, WR-2721). Methods and Materials: PrC-210 in water was administered to rats and mice at times before irradiation, and percent-survival was recorded for 60 days. Subcutaneous (SC) amifostine (positive control) or SC PrC-210 was administered to ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) and retching/emesis responses were recorded. Intraperitoneal amifostine (positive control) or PrC-210 was administered to arterial cannulated rats to score drug-induced hypotension. Results: Oral PrC-210 conferred 100% survival in rat and mouse models against an otherwise 100% lethal whole-body radiation dose (9.0 Gy). Oral PrC-210, administered by gavage 30-90 min before irradiation, conferred a broad window of radioprotection. The comparison of PrC-210 and amifostine side effects was striking because there was no retching or emesis in 10 ferrets treated with PrC-210 and no induced hypotension in arterial cannulated rats treated with PrC-210. The tested PrC-210 doses were the ferret and rat equivalent doses of the 0.5 maximum tolerated dose (MTD) PrC-210 dose in mice. The human equivalent of this mouse 0.5 MTD PrC-210 dose would likely be the highest PrC-210 dose used in humans. By comparison, the mouse 0.5 MTD amifostine dose, 400 {mu}g/g body weight (equivalent to the human amifostine dose of 910 mg/m{sup 2}), when tested at equivalent ferret and rat doses in the above models produced 100% retching/vomiting in ferrets and 100% incidence of significant, progressive hypotension in rats. Conclusions: The PrC-210 aminothiol, with no detectable nausea/vomiting or hypotension side effects in these preclinical models, is a logical candidate for human drug development to use in healthy

  16. Radioprotective effect of cimitidine on acutely irradiated mice survival and hematopoietic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-rong WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the radioprotective effect of cimetidine on survival rate and hematopoietic system in acutely irradiated mice. Methods The total body irradiation doses were 6.0Gy and 8.0Gy respectively at 1.01Gy/min rate. Sixty healthy male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into control group, model group, positive-drug (523 group and cimetidine groups (33.3mg/kg, 100mg/kg and 300mg/kg. Each group had ten mice. The mice were given intragastric administration of cimetidine for 6d before the irradiation in cimetidine groups, and 523 was administered before irradiation once a day for one day in 523 group, and at 5h after irradiation, was given again. The 30d survival rate after 8.0Gy irradiation was recorded. The peripheral blood cells, bone marrow DNA content and frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (fMNPCE were determined 30d after 6.0Gy irradiation. Results After 8.0Gy irradiation, all the mice died on 21th day in model control group. The survival rates in cimetidine groups were 50%, 20% and 30%, respectively. After 6.0Gy irradiation on 30th day, compared with control group, the peripheral white blood cells (WBC and bone marrow DNA content were decreased significantly (P<0.01, P<0.05 in model group, and fMNPCE was increased significantly (P<0.05. Compared with model group, WBC was significantly increased in 300mg/kg cimetidine group (P<0.01. In cimetidine groups, the bone marrow DNA content was increased significantly after irradiation (P<0.01 or P<0.05, and the fMNPCE was decreased significantly (P<0.01 or P<0.05and tended towards normal. Conclusion Cimetidine could improve 30d survival rate of acutely irradiated mice and has good protective effect on hematopoietic system. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.12

  17. Radioprotection: mechanism and radioprotective agents including honeybee venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varanda, E.A.; Tavares, D.C. [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas

    1998-07-01

    Since 1949, a great deal of research has been carried on the radioprotective action of chemical substances. These substances have shown to reduce mortality when administered to animals prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. This fact is of considerable importance since it permits reduction of radiation-induced damage and provides prophylactic treatment for the damaging effects produced by radiotherapy. The following radioprotection mechanisms were proposed: free radical scavenger, repair by hydrogen donation to target molecules formation of mixed disulfides, delay of cellular division and induction of hypoxia in the tissues. Radioprotective agents have been divided into four major groups: the thiol compounds, other sulfur compounds, pharmacological agents (anesthetic drugs, analgesics, tranquilizers, etc.) and other radioprotective agents (WR-1065, WR-2721, vitamins C and E, glutathione, etc.). Several studies revealed the radioprotective action of Apis mellifera honeybee venom as well as that of its components mellitin and histamine. Radioprotective activity of bee venom involves mainly the stimulation of the hematopoietic system. In addition, release of histamine and reduction in oxygen tension also contribute to the radioprotective action of bee venom. (author)

  18. Radioprotection: mechanism and radioprotective agents including honeybee venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanda, E.A.; Tavares, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1949, a great deal of research has been carried on the radioprotective action of chemical substances. These substances have shown to reduce mortality when administered to animals prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. This fact is of considerable importance since it permits reduction of radiation-induced damage and provides prophylactic treatment for the damaging effects produced by radiotherapy. The following radioprotection mechanisms were proposed: free radical scavenger, repair by hydrogen donation to target molecules formation of mixed disulfides, delay of cellular division and induction of hypoxia in the tissues. Radioprotective agents have been divided into four major groups: the thiol compounds, other sulfur compounds, pharmacological agents (anesthetic drugs, analgesics, tranquilizers, etc.) and other radioprotective agents (WR-1065, WR-2721, vitamins C and E, glutathione, etc.). Several studies revealed the radioprotective action of Apis mellifera honeybee venom as well as that of its components mellitin and histamine. Radioprotective activity of bee venom involves mainly the stimulation of the hematopoietic system. In addition, release of histamine and reduction in oxygen tension also contribute to the radioprotective action of bee venom. (author)

  19. Radioprotective effect of calorie restriction in Hela cells and SD rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yang; Chong Yu; Jiao Yang; Xu Jiaying; Fan Saijun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of low calorie metabolism on the survival of HeLa cells exposed to X-rays, and the influence of starvation on the antioxidative factors in the blood of rats after irradiation. Methods: MTT method was used to evaluate the impact of different concentration glucose on the proliferation of HeLa cells. Colony formation assay was employed to detect the influence of glucose (1, 5, 10 and 25 mmol/L) on radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. Flow cytometry assay was used to analyze distribution of cell cycle and apoptosis. 60 male SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups with 10 rats each. Rats in every two groups were fed ad libitum, fasted for 24 h and fasted for 48 h, respectively. Rats in one group of each approach were respectively exposed to whole-body X-rays at 11 Gy. At 2 h after irradiation,all of rats were sacrificed and their venous blood was collected. Elisa kits were used to detect superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC). Results: An increased viability was observed in HeLa cells treated with the glucose at low concentration (<25 mmol/L), while HeLa cell growth was inhibited by glucose at doses of >25 mmol/L. Relevant to cells treated with 1 mmoL/L glucose, SERs (sensitive enhancement ratio) in cells exposed to 5, 10 and 25 mmol/L glucose were 1.07, 1.10 and 1.23,respectively. A reduction of G 2 /M and S arrests and apoptosis caused by 6 Gy X-ray irradiation were observed [(49.68 ±1.88)% and (35.54±1.45)% at G 2 /M phase, (16.88 ±1.22)% and (10.23 ±1.65)% at S phase, t=10.42, 5.61, P<0.05] and in the cells treated with 1 mmol/L glucose compared with cells treated with 25 mmol/L glucose [(25.50 ± 0.95)% and (7.56 ± 1.07)%, t=21.72, P<0.05].Without irradiation, calorie restriction exhibited a negligible influence on SOD and T-AOC in rats. However, after 11 Gy irradiation, compared with rats fed ad libitum, the levels of SOD and T-AOC were significantly increased in rats with calorie restriction (t=40

  20. Enzymeaticial analysis and soluble proteins assays on radioprotective effects of cordyceps militaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wonkwang Health Science College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joon Chul [Ansan 1 College, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    Effect of single pre-administration of Cordyceps militaries (Cm) extract on the survival ratio, body weight and organ weight changes and blood cell counts after whole-body {gamma}-irradiation were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cm extract at 24 hrs before {gamma}-irradiation increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 60.1% to 71/4%. The administration of Cm extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by {gamma}-irradiation (P<0.01, P<0.05). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cm treated mice. The administration of Cm extract retarded the reduction of both leukocyte and lymphocyte counts occured during the first 7 days and accelerated the recovery of the counts thereafter. The extract also accelerated the recovery of the erythrocyte counts occurred after the day 21th. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the soluble proteins extracted from various organs did not reveal differences to any extent in all groups except in the levers of the irradiated and extract treated groups, in which some proteins were missing or less present. Also, the result of general intra and extra mycelial enzyme assays with Cm, extramycelial enzyme activity was relatively higher than the intramycelial enzyme. Cm appeared to indicate that {alpha}-amylase was the highest among the enzymes and gluosidase and chitinase were followed. Since the spleen, thymus and testis have been well known as radiosensitive organs, the protective action of Cm extract on irradiated mice may be responsible for its enhancing recovery of these organs. Although the exact mechanism in protective effect of Cm extract on irradiated mice is not clear yet, the present study is the first report regarding the Cm which was tested and found to be a potential radioprotective agent.

  1. Enzymeaticial analysis and soluble proteins assays on radioprotective effects of cordyceps militaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu; Park, Joon Chul

    2001-01-01

    Effect of single pre-administration of Cordyceps militaries (Cm) extract on the survival ratio, body weight and organ weight changes and blood cell counts after whole-body γ-irradiation were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cm extract at 24 hrs before γ-irradiation increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 60.1% to 71/4%. The administration of Cm extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by γ-irradiation (P<0.01, P<0.05). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cm treated mice. The administration of Cm extract retarded the reduction of both leukocyte and lymphocyte counts occured during the first 7 days and accelerated the recovery of the counts thereafter. The extract also accelerated the recovery of the erythrocyte counts occurred after the day 21th. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the soluble proteins extracted from various organs did not reveal differences to any extent in all groups except in the levers of the irradiated and extract treated groups, in which some proteins were missing or less present. Also, the result of general intra and extra mycelial enzyme assays with Cm, extramycelial enzyme activity was relatively higher than the intramycelial enzyme. Cm appeared to indicate that α-amylase was the highest among the enzymes and gluosidase and chitinase were followed. Since the spleen, thymus and testis have been well known as radiosensitive organs, the protective action of Cm extract on irradiated mice may be responsible for its enhancing recovery of these organs. Although the exact mechanism in protective effect of Cm extract on irradiated mice is not clear yet, the present study is the first report regarding the Cm which was tested and found to be a potential radioprotective agent

  2. Radio-protective effect of sodium meclofenamate. A prospective clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahafzah, M.; Halpern, J.; Nava, H.R.; Huben, R.P.; Sayyid, S.; Bryson, W.; Ambrus, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Twentyfour patients treated with irradiation to either their pelvis or their chest for neoplastic disease were included in a randomized study of radioprotection with sodium meclofenamate (Meclomen) (SM). Seventeen patients received SM 100 mg, p.os, t.i.d., and seven received placebo. The long-range radiation related chronic gastrointestinal and urinary tract toxicity was diminished by SM. At 12 months post irradiation, SM treated patients experienced less gastrointestinal and urinary symptoms, as well as less measured bladder contraction, than the controls. Acute gastrointestinal signs of radiotoxicity, however, seemed to have been enhanced by SM. The treated patients suffered from nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. These acute toxic effects were temporary and reversible

  3. Combined effect of hormones and radioprotective substances in case of animal exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benke, D.; Bodo-Sekejchidinch, K.; Ehanta, A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of anabolic and other relative preparations used in the national therapy in combination with radioprotective compounds tested earlier in experiments with animals was studied. The investigations were carried out on albino male mice of CFLP line. X-ray exposure was carried out with the help of a TNH-250 type unit for deep irradiation (630 R and 800 R doses). For gamma irradiation, a 60 Co facility was utilized. AET radioprotective compounds (S 2 -beta-aminoethylisothiouronium-bromide-hydrobromide) and ixeprin (bis-alfa-propinyl-glycyl-sodium disulfide) were used. Nerobolyl (norandrostenolon-phenylpropionate) and retabolyl (norandrostenolon-decanoat) were studied among anabolic hormones. Experiments were also conducted using retandrolom (testosteron-phenylpropionate) which did not belong to anabolics but was used in oncology as a supporting agent. Three days prior to the irradiation, intraperitoneal injections of nerobolyl (10 mg/kg) dissolved in oil for injections, ratabolyl (50 mg/kg) and retandrol (25 mg/kg) began to be made to groups of animals, 15 mice in each. Control groups received intraperitoneally only 0.5 ml of oil. In another series of experiments hormones were used even after the irradiation. Radioprotectors were introduced, as a rule, 20 min. prior to the radiation exposure. Ixeprin, as an effective radioprotector, was introduced 3 hours after the irradiation. When evaluating the results of the experiments, the number of animals which survived during 30 days after the irradiation and the rate of mortality were taken into consideration, gain in weig was also taken into accout. A single introduction of an anabolic in combination with a radioprotector (AET or ixeprin) usually did not contribute to an increase of the survival rate of irradiated animals

  4. Radioprotection and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolibe, D [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN), Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Zackova, H

    1994-12-31

    In a country where 75% of its electric power production is nuclear-based and where the health industry is making more and more use of ionizing radiation, Radioprotection education in France is necessarily characterized by a wide diversity in the trainings delivered and a significant increase in the number of actors providing these training programs. From the isolated worker using an industrial gammagraphy device to the thousands of persons working in major nuclear installations, it is estimated that more than 100,000 workers are exposed to ionizing radiation. Due to the seriousness of the pathological consequences resulting from overexposure to ionizing radiation, the volume of population concerned ant the media impact generated by the problem, one of the basic requirements formulated at the very early stages of the legislation is the obligation of informing workers of the hazards of exposure and the preventive measures to be taken. Employers are legally required to inform their personnel of the risks taken when handling equipment generating ionizing radiation of when using radio-nuclides. This obligation translates concretely by the need for the employer to name a qualified Radioprotection Department. The Qualified Officer or the Radioprotection Department are responsible for, among other tasks, ensuring training of workers. Two training orientations can be distinguished, each having different goals: - the first consists in training a body of highly-skilled Radioprotection professionals or managers (Qualified Officers), - the second consists in training all workers having any contact with ionizing radiation; each person should be capable of ensuring his own Radioprotection regardless of the presence of Qualified Officers. (authors).

  5. Radioprotection and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, D.; Zackova, H.

    1994-01-01

    In a country where 75% of its electric power production is nuclear-based and where the health industry is making more and more use of ionizing radiation, Radioprotection education in France is necessarily characterized by a wide diversity in the trainings delivered and a significant increase in the number of actors providing these training programs. From the isolated worker using an industrial gammagraphy device to the thousands of persons working in major nuclear installations, it is estimated that more than 100,000 workers are exposed to ionizing radiation. Due to the seriousness of the pathological consequences resulting from overexposure to ionizing radiation, the volume of population concerned ant the media impact generated by the problem, one of the basic requirements formulated at the very early stages of the legislation is the obligation of informing workers of the hazards of exposure and the preventive measures to be taken. Employers are legally required to inform their personnel of the risks taken when handling equipment generating ionizing radiation of when using radio-nuclides. This obligation translates concretely by the need for the employer to name a qualified Radioprotection Department. The Qualified Officer or the Radioprotection Department are responsible for, among other tasks, ensuring training of workers. Two training orientations can be distinguished, each having different goals: - the first consists in training a body of highly-skilled Radioprotection professionals or managers (Qualified Officers), - the second consists in training all workers having any contact with ionizing radiation; each person should be capable of ensuring his own Radioprotection regardless of the presence of Qualified Officers. (authors)

  6. On the correlation between the radioprotective effectiveness of serotonin and its derivatives and their ability to modify the local blood flow in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, M.M.; Vasin, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    Radioprotective effectiveness of serotonin and its alkoxy derivatives and their ability to modify a local blood flow in hemopoietic tissues have been comparatively studied in albino mice and rats. The correlation between these two parameters is nonlinear and may be approximated by a hyperbola equation. The correlation coefficient is - 0.88. A high radioprotective effect of serotonin and its derivatives is observed in the case of a three-fold decrease of the blood flow in the spleen

  7. Radioprotective effects saffron and its combination with green tea against γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, Apurva; Abraham, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Protective effects of aqueous extract of saffron (dried stigmas of Crocus sativus L.) alone and its combination with green tea against γ-radiation-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress were investigated in Swiss albino mice. Saffron (40 mg/kg bw) alone and in combination with green tea (40 mg/kg bw) were orally administered to mice for six consecutive days, followed by exposure to γ-radiation (2.25 Gy) on 6 th day after final feeding. Antigenotoxic effect of saffron was assayed using micronucleus test in bone marrow cells which showed a significant decrease in the number of micronucleated PCEs in saffron alone and its combination with green tea pre-treated animals when compared with the radiation alone treated animals. Saffron alone and its combination with green tea pre-treated animals showed a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation levels with a significant increase in the activity of antioxidant defense system enzymes, viz. acetylcholine esterase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and non-enzymatic antioxidant (GSH), when compared with the radiation alone treated animals. Our results suggested that saffron in combination with green tea exhibits radioprotective effects against γ-radiation induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice. (author)

  8. Radioprotective effect of RSP-CM on mice irradiated with different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xia; Yang Rujun; Zhang Xin; Yang Yunfang; Jin Zhijun; Xiang Yingsong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radioprotective effects of cytokines on hematopoietic impairment of irradiated mice. Methods: Using RSP-CM and LP3-CM respectively originated GM-CSF and G-CSF to treat ICR mice irradiated with different doses of 60 Co γ-rays. The 30-day survival rate of mice, the mean survival days of dead mice were determined and the numbers of peripheral white blood cells and BMC of part of the mice were counted. At the same time, GM clonogenic activity of BM was assayed. Results:RSP-CM could effectively raise 30-day survival rate of mice irradiated with 7.5 Gy. However, LP3-CM had no obvious effect. Judging from the comparative survival ratio, only the RSP-CM treated group showed protective effect on the 8.0 Gy -irradiated mice. The 8.5 Gy-irradiated mice all died within 30 days, indicating that GM-CSF had weak effect on higher dose-irradiated mice. Conclusion: GM-CSF can stimulate the hematopoietic system of irradiated mice, and has dose-effect and time-effect relations. M-CSF used singly has no obvious effect

  9. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Silva, Ronaldo C.; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of 60 Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and χ 2 . Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  10. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of {sup 60}Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and {chi}{sup 2}. Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  11. The radioprotective effects of methylprednisolone and Sho-Saikoto on mouse lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kure, Fumio [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1992-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of methylprednisolone and Sho-Saikoto (a herbal medicine) on radiation damage to lung tissue were evaluated in four main groups of female Slc-ICR mice, one control group and three groups irradiated with single doses (6 Gy, 12 Gy, 18 Gy) of {sup 60}Co gamma rays. Subgroups were established with administration of methylprednisolone and Sho-Saikoto, alone and together. Direct quantitative measurements of collagen accumulation in lung (lung fibrosis) were made by analysis of digitally processed microscopic images of Azan-Mallory stained sections 24 weeks after irradiation. Administration of methylprednisolone supressed the expected development of fibrotic lung tissue in each of the irradiated groups. In a further study, peplomycin, a lung fibrosis enhancing agent, was administered to all four groups in addition to methylprednisolone and Sho-Saikoto, alone and together. Methylprednisolone was demonstrated to be effective only in 12 Gy group. Overall, Sho-Saikoto showed a lesser degree of effect in the prevention of the fibrosis than methylprednisolone, but the administration of both was demonstrated to be more effective than either alone. (author).

  12. Possible radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Gisel; Ponzinibbio, María Virginia; Seoane, Analia I

    2016-08-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA damage through production of single and double-strand breaks and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Folic acid (FA) prevents radiation-induced DNA damage by modification of DNA synthesis and/or repair and as a radical scavenger. We hypothesized that in vitro supplementation with FA will decrease the sensitivity of cells to genetic damage induced by low dose of ionizing radiation. Annexin V, comet and micronucleus assays were performed in cultured CHO cells. After 7 days of pre-treatment with 0, 100, 200 or 300 nM FA, cultures were exposed to radiation (100 mSv). Two un-irradiated controls were executed (0 and 100 nM FA). Data were statistically analyzed with X2-test and linear regression analysis (P 0.05). We observed a significantly decreased frequency of apoptotic cells with the increasing FA concentration (P <0.05). The same trend was observed when analyzing DNA damage and chromosomal instability (P <0.05 for 300 nM). Only micronuclei frequencies showed significant differences for linear regression analysis (R2=94.04; P <0.01). Our results have demonstrated the radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro; folate status should be taken into account when studying the effect of low dose radiation in environmental or occupational exposure.

  13. Genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing effect of curcumin and trans-resveratrol in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, V.A.; Tirsa Muñoz, B.; Sebastià, N.; Gómez-Cabrero, L.; La Parra, V.; Hervás, D.; Rodrigo, R.; Villaescusa, J.I.; Soriano, J.M.; Montoro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are natural polyphenol compounds. Curcumin is obtained from the rhizomes of the Curcumin plant (Curcuma longa), while trans-resveratrol is found in grapes, blackberries and other types of berry. These compounds have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anticarcinogenic properties among others. In addition, they are also known for their radiomodulating properties since they are capable of providing radioprotection or radiosensitization for normal or tumours cells depending on different factors. This dual action may be the result of their properties, such as free radicals scavenging, as well as their influence on cell cycle checkpoints or control mechanisms. These are activated in response to the genetic damage induced by radiation. Despite the many beneficial properties attributed to these polyphenol compounds, some studies suggest that they are able to be genotoxic agents for some cellular lines. The results obtained indicate that both compounds possess a radioprotective effect on the lymphocytes of peripheral blood in the quiescent phase of the cellular cycle (G0). Nevertheless, they are capable of induce radiosensitivity on these type of cells in the growth phase (G2), and in addition, a different genotoxic effect can be seen according to the concentration of each compound. This study suggests, therefore, that curcumin and trans-resveratrol are able to exert a triple effect, genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing on in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes depending on the study parameters. [es

  14. Do carbamazepine, gabapentin, or other anticonvulsants exert sufficient radioprotective effects to alter responses from trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, John C; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C

    2012-07-15

    Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age ≤70 years, and Type 1 typical

  15. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, John C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); College of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kano, Hideyuki [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Niranjan, Ajay [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Flickinger, John C., E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up {>=}6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age

  16. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6–153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with

  17. Morphological study of the radioprotective effect of vitamin E (dl-alpha-tocopheryl) in tissue reparation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzi, Flavio Ricardo; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria de; Tuji, Fabricio Mesquita

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the action of the vitamin E as a radioprotective agent in the process of tissue reparation in rats submitted to a surgical procedure, which consisted of a wound done in the fore dorsal area. The animals were divided into five groups: group C (controls) - wound; group VE - previous treatment with vitamin E (90 UI); group IR - wound and irradiation of the borders three days after surgery; group VEIR - previous treatment with 90 UI of the vitamin E and irradiation of the borders three days after the surgery; group OIR - previous treatment with olive oil and irradiation of the borders three days after surgery. The radioprotective effect of the vitamin E was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin stained specimens in order to identify granulation tissue, at 4, 7, 14 and 21 days after the surgical procedures. The results showed that 6 Gy of electron irradiation with a beam of 6 MeV caused retardation of the tissue repairing process and that vitamin E was effective as a radioprotective agent. (author)

  18. An experimental study of radioprotective effect of ginseng alkaloid fraction on cellular damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Kim, Seong Ho; Kim, Tae Hwan [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    This paper is to assess the effect of Adaptagen as a radioprotector in which main component is alkaloid fraction of ginseng. Evaluation was made in vitro and in vivo study with NIGP(S) mouse by the measurement of regeneration of jejunal crypt cell and micronucleus assay to analyze radioprotective effect of ginseng alkaloid fraction in comparison with that of water fraction after whole body irradiation. The results were as follows, 1. The degree of radiation damage of mouse jejunal crypt cell was diminished in both of alkaloid and water fraction groups compared to control group but more in alkaloid fraction group than water fraction group. 2. Regeneration of mouse jejunal crypt cell was higher both in alkaloid and water fraction groups than control group. 3. In vitro study, frequency of micronucleus was diminished in tendency for the treated groups than control group but statistically insignificant. 4. In vitro study, frequency of micronucleus was diminished in both alkaloid and water fraction groups compared to control group but more in alkaloid fraction group than water fraction group.

  19. Fullerene C60 hydroxylated with peracetic acid and its radioprotective effects tested in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemanova, Eva; Klouda, Karel

    2011-01-01

    A water-soluble C60 derivative (DF) was obtained by reacting C60 fullerene with peracetic acid followed by hydrolysis. The highest DF concentration achieved at room temperature and neutral pH was 443.2 mg/L. TEM and SEM observations and FTIR spectra were interpreted The possibility of DF application as a substance improving resistance to ionizing radiation (6X, linear accelerator, 10-70 Gry) was investigated in vivo using juvenile (2.5 months) Danio rerio without sex selection. A prolonged toxicity test gave evidence that an aqueous DF solution 147 mg/L is not toxic to this fish species in the long run. A radioprotective effect was demonstrated for a five-day exposure to this solution prior to irradiation. The survival times after irradiation with 10 to 70 Gy doses were up to 70% longer. The LD50 values for various times of survival roughly doubled. The effect is preventive rather than curative and is associated with the capability of fullerenes to eliminate free radicals and oxidants formed by radiolysis of water. (orig.)

  20. Radioprotective effects of flavonoids against to chromosomal damage: relation between the structure and activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Acevedo, C.; Benavente-Garcia, O.; Castillo, J.; Vicente, V.; Canteras, M.

    2004-01-01

    The polyphenolic distribution of Vitis vinifera seeds (GSE), Citrus spp, frutis (CE) and Olea europaea L. leaves (OL) extracts were characterized and quantified by HPLC methods. Radioprotective effects of these extracts and the reference flavonoids diosmin and rutin, widely used as pharmaceuticals, were determined by using the micronucleus test for anticlastogenic activity, evaluating the reduction of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs) in bone marrow of mouse exposed to X-rays. The most effective compounds were, in order GSE>CE>rutin>dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO)>OL>diosmin. Thes results show that the free radicals scavenging capacity, mainly vs hydroxyl radical, and consequently, the anticlastogenic activity of these polyphenolic compounds are based, structurally, on the presence of specific functional groups in their structures, aminly the B-ring catechol, the 3-hydroxyl group and the 2,3-double bond conjugated with 4-oxo function and, in addition by the stability of the aroxyl radical generated in the processes. (Author) 80 refs

  1. Radioprotective effects of Aloe vera leaf extract on skin of Swiss mice after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlot, Prashasnika; Saini, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Biological effects of radiation are detrimental to life. Skin being a cell-renewal system is one of the best organ for studying radiation induced effects and their modulation by antioxidants. An attempt has been made to evaluate radioprotective efficacy of Aloe vera leaf extract on skin in Swiss mice (1g/kg body wt/day). The mice selected from inbreed colony were divided into two groups. The first group was given Aloe vera extract orally for 15th consecutive days and served as experimental group while the other group received DDW (vol. equal to Aloe extract) to serve as control group. On the 15th day, after 30 min of above treatment animals of both the groups were exposed to 2 Gy gamma irradiation and autopsied on 6h 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. DNA as well as total protein decreases in control group as compared to the normal value. Surprisingly, in experimental group, DNA and protein increases in comparison to the control group. Thus, Aloe vera were found to have positive influence against radiation induced alterations on skin of Swiss albino mice

  2. Radioprotective effect of septilin on radiation- induced histological and biochemical changes of rat eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, N.I.; Abd El Maguid, A.; Fahmy, N.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of an herbal formulation septilin as a radioprotector on the histopathological changes of the eye and some biochemical changes of blood in irradiated rats. Male albino rats (120-140 g) were subjected to whole body gamma irradiation (4 Gy or 6 Gy) with or without septilin treatment (100 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for one week before exposure to gamma irradiation. Samples of eye and blood were taken 1, 5 and 10 days post-irradiation. The data showed that radiation exposure caused histopathological changes in the eye manifested by marked degeneration, necrosis and atrophy of inner and outer nuclear cell layers and vacuolation of segments of rods and cones in the retina, lens coagulation and on the other hand, the cornea showed edema in the lamina propria. Radiation exposure also caused blood biochemical alterations exerted by increased levels of lipid peroxides accompanied by decreased levels of protein content and catalase activity. Pre-treatment of rats with septilin exerted a noticeable protection against these radiation effects. The present study demonstrated septilin as a good radioprotective agent and it could be concluded that septilin may be considered as a promising radioprotector drug

  3. Radioprotective effects of chlorogenic acid against mortality induced by gamma irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyed Jalal Hosseinimehr; Amirhossein Ahmadi; Shahram Akhlaghpoor; Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The radioprotective effects of the naturally occurring compound chlorogenic acid has been investigated against mortality induced by gamma irradiation in mice. Chlorogenic acid administrated at single doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg 1 and 24 h prior to lethal dose of gamma irradiation (8.5 Gy). At 30 days after treatment, the percentage of animal survival in each group was: control, 20%; 100 mg/kg, 20% and 15%; 200 mg/kg, 45% and 15%; 400 mg/kg, 25% and 35% for 1 h and 24 h treatment prior gamma irradiation, respectively. Percentage of survival increased in animal treated with this agent at 200 mg/kg at 1 h statistically compared with irradiated alone group. Other doses of chlorogenic acid have not showed any enhanced survival at 1 and 24 h before irradiation. Chlorogenic acid exhibited concentration-dependent activity on 1, 1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl free radical to show strong antioxidant activity. It appeared that chlorogenic acid with antioxidant activity reduced mortality induced by gamma irradiation.

  4. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on carbon-ion and X ray irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masayoshi; Kawata, Tetsuya; Liu, C.; Sakurai, Akiko; Ito, Hisao; Ando, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The radioprotective ability of melatonin was investigated in C3H mice irradiated to a whole-body X-ray (150 Kv, 20 mA) and carbon-ion (290 MeV/u). Mice exposed to X-ray, 13 KeV/μm and 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion dose of 7.0-7.5 Gy, 6.5-7.25 Gy and 6.0-6.5 Gy, respectively. One hour before the irradiation, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of 0.2 ml of either solvent (soybean oil) or melatonin (250 mg/kg, uniform suspension in soybean oil). Mice were observed for mortality over a period of 30 days following irradiation. Results obtained the first year are as follows. The toxicity of melatonin (at a dose 250 mg/kg) intraperitoneal administered to mice could not be observed. A pretreatment of melatonin is effective in protecting mice from lethal damage of low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation (X-ray and 13 KeV/μm carbon-ion). In the high-LET irradiated mice with 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion, melatonin exhibited a slight increase in their survival. (author)

  5. Radioprotection to the Gonads in Pediatric Pelvic Radiography: Effectiveness of Developed Bismuth Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use and effectiveness of traditional lead gonad shields in pediatric pelvic radiography has been challenged by several literatures over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to develop a new radioprotective gonad shields to be use in pediatric pelvic radiography. Materials and Methods: The commercially available 0.06 mm lead equivalent bismuth garment has cropped squarely and used as ovarian shield to cover the entire region of pelvis. In order to prevent deterioration of image quality due to beam hardening artifacts, a 1-cm foam as spacer was located between the shield and patients pelvis. Moreover, we added a lead piece at the cranial position of the bismuth garment to absorb the scatter radiations to the radiosensitive organs. In girls, 49 radiographs with shield and 46 radiographs without shield was taken. The radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs. Image quality assessments were performed using the European guidelines. For boys, the lead testicular shields was developed using 2 cm bismuth garment, added to the sides. The prevalence and efficacy of testicular shields was assessed in clinical practice fromFebruary 2016 to June 2016. Results: Without increasing the dose to the breast, thyroid and the lens of the eyes, the use of bismuth shield has reduced the entrance skin dose(ESD of the pelvis and radiation dose to the ovaries by 62.2% and 61.7%, respectively (P

  6. Radioprotective effect of sodium selenite on bone repair in the tibia of ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Deborah Queiroz de; Neves, Ellen Gaby; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria de [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Department of Oral Diagnosis. Oral Radiology Area; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes [Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Department of Clinical and Preventive Dentistry; Marques, Marcelo Rocha [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Division of Histology. Department of Morphology

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated protection by selenium (Se) in the bone repair process in ovariectomized rats after irradiation. For such purpose, 80 ovariectomized female Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups: ovariectomized (Ov), Ov/Se, Ov/irradiated (Irr) and Ov/ Se/Irr. A bone defect was created on the tibia of all animals 40 days after ovariectomy. Two days after surgery, only the Ov/Se and Ov/Se/Irr rats received 0.8 mg Se/kg. Three days after surgery, only the Ov/Irr and Ov/Se/Irr rats received 10 Gy of x-rays on the lower limb region. The animals were euthanized at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after surgery to assess the repair process, which was evaluated by analysis of trabecular bone number (Masson Trichrome) and birefringence analysis (Picrosirius). It was possible to observe a delay in the bone repair process in the ovariectomized/irradiated group and similarity between the ovariectomized, Ov/Se and Ov/Se/Irr groups. In conclusion, sodium selenite exerted a radioprotective effect in the bone repair of tibia of ovariectomized rats without toxicity. (author)

  7. Effect of some drugs on radioprotective effectiveness, toxicity and distribution of 35S-Aminopropyl-aminoethyl-thiophosphate orally administered to mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechka, I.I.; Belavina, L.P.; Kalistpatov, G.V.; Zherebchenko, P.G.

    1979-01-01

    Studied was the influence of adreno- adn cholinolytics and cholinomimetic substances on radioprotective effectiveness and toxicity of aminopropyl-aminoehtyl-thiophosphate (APAETP) and distribution thereof among organs after oral and intraperitoneal administration. Atropine and INPEA decrease the toxicity and radioprotectiVe efficiency of APAETP when administered orally and do not influence these properties after intraperitoneal in ection. Deposition of the labelled radioprotector within the organs after oral administration is also indicative that atropine and INPEA can delay the transfer of APAETP from the stomach to the intenstine

  8. Bystander effects of the ionizing radiation and his implications in radiotherapy and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Ayala, Irene Maria; Sanchez Luthard, Maria de los Angeles; Martins Schmitz; Gomez, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    According to the classical paradigm, biological effects of ionizing radiation are attributed to DNA damage induced in each irradiated cell. Demonstration of ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) has generated a deep change in current understanding of radiobiology. RIBE are radiation-induced effects produced in cells that have not been actually irradiated. Several technical advances, particularly the use of microbeams, allowed in vitro study of RIBE. There are two known ways by which irradiated cells can communicate with non-irradiated cells, namely: through gap junctions connecting the cytoplasms of adjacent cells, and through the secretion of soluble factors to the extracellular medium. These factors include several cytokines and reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. In the affected cells, signalling pathways mostly involve activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), NF-kB transcription factor and of the enzymes cyclooxygenase 2, nitric oxide synthase 2 and NAD (P)H oxidase. RIBE induce point mutations and epigenetic changes. Effects on cellular signalling pathways can persist indefinitely and even be transmitted to the progeny of affected cells. Paradoxically, under certain conditions RIBE may be adaptive, which means that they turn affected cells more resistant to ionizing radiation. Adaptation demands protein synthesis. It enhances DNA repair mechanisms and resistance to oxidative stress. RIBE have also been demonstrated in vivo. Thus, they may have important implications for radiotherapy, both to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce the incidence of adverse effects. Furthermore, a better understanding of RIBE may have an influence on international radioprotection standards. (authors) [es

  9. Proceedings of the Fourth Session of Radioprotection of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Radiology Argentine Society and the Radioprotection Argentine Society have organized the 4. Session of the Protection to the Patient, in order to inform to the technical and scientific community about the scopes of the radioprotection to the patient. The principal treated topics were the following: effects of the radiation in radiodiagnostic; radioprotection of the fetus and the pregnancy woman; radioprotection in dental radiology; radiological protection in TAC; radiation doses in radiodiagnostic; treatment of radiation injuries; fatal accidents in radiotherapy. [es

  10. Radioprotective effects of flavonoids against to chromosomal damage: relation between the structure and activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, M.; Acevedo, C.; Benavente-Garcia, O.; Castillo, J.; Vicente, V.; Canteras, M.

    2004-07-01

    Protective effects of grape (Vitis vinifera) seed (GSE), Citrus spp. fruits (CE) and olive Olea europaea L) leaf (OL) extracts, the flavonoids diosmin and rutin, widely used as pharmaceuticals, and diemthyl sulphoxide (DMSO) against chromosomal damage induced by X-rays and g radiation were determined by using two different micronucleus test for anti genotoxic activity. The quantitative distribution of several flavones-3-ols was determined using HPLC in a grape (Vitis vinifera), seed extract (GSE) and Olea european (OL) of four cultivars grown in the region of Murcia. Polymer>C4 units made up the largest group of procyanidins in the GSE (90,92%, expressed as HPLC% area). The antioxidant activity of GSE and other reference compounds was investigated by measuring theirs ability to scavenge the ABTS+ radical cation (TEAC). The most effective compounds were in order: GSE >rutin>(+)-catechin>OL>diosmina>ascorbic acid. The radioprotective effects of GSE and other reference compounds were determined by using the micronucleus test for anticlastogenic activity, any reduction of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mnOCEs) being evaluated in the bone marrow of mouse exposed to X rays; and evaluating the reduction in the frequency of micronuclei in citokinesis-blocked cells of human lymphocytes exposed to g-rays. The most effective compounds were, in order: GSE>rutin>dimetylsufoxide (DMSO)>ascorbic acid>OL>6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-6c (PTU)>disomin. The higher ABTS scavenging capacity and antigenotoxic activity of GSE can be explained, structurally, by the high number of conjugated structures between the catechol groups in the B-rings ant the 3-OH free groups of the polymeric polyphenolic skeleton and, in addition, by the stability of the aroxyl flavonoide radical generated in the above processes. (Author)

  11. Radioprotective effects of flavonoids against to chromosomal damage: relation between the structure and activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Acevedo, C.; Benavente-Garcia, O.; Castillo, J.; Vicente, V.; Canteras, M.

    2004-01-01

    Protective effects of grape (Vitis vinifera) seed (GSE), Citrus spp. fruits (CE) and olive Olea europaea L) leaf (OL) extracts, the flavonoids diosmin and rutin, widely used as pharmaceuticals, and diemthyl sulphoxide (DMSO) against chromosomal damage induced by X-rays and g radiation were determined by using two different micronucleus test for anti genotoxic activity. The quantitative distribution of several flavones-3-ols was determined using HPLC in a grape (Vitis vinifera), seed extract (GSE) and Olea european (OL) of four cultivars grown in the region of Murcia. Polymer>C4 units made up the largest group of procyanidins in the GSE (90,92%, expressed as HPLC% area). The antioxidant activity of GSE and other reference compounds was investigated by measuring theirs ability to scavenge the ABTS+ radical cation (TEAC). The most effective compounds were in order: GSE >rutin>(+)-catechin>OL>diosmina>ascorbic acid. The radioprotective effects of GSE and other reference compounds were determined by using the micronucleus test for anticlastogenic activity, any reduction of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mnOCEs) being evaluated in the bone marrow of mouse exposed to X rays; and evaluating the reduction in the frequency of micronuclei in citokinesis-blocked cells of human lymphocytes exposed to g-rays. The most effective compounds were, in order: GSE>rutin>dimetylsufoxide (DMSO)>ascorbic acid>OL>6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-6c (PTU)>disomin. The higher ABTS scavenging capacity and antigenotoxic activity of GSE can be explained, structurally, by the high number of conjugated structures between the catechol groups in the B-rings ant the 3-OH free groups of the polymeric polyphenolic skeleton and, in addition, by the stability of the aroxyl flavonoide radical generated in the above processes. (Author)

  12. Modulation of radioprotective effects of respiratory hypoxia by changing the duration of hypoxia before irradiation and by combining hypoxia and administration of hemopoiesis-stimulating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Hofer, M.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of radioprotective effect of respiratory hypoxia on hemopoietic tissue and enhancement of this effect by hemopoietic activation. Material and methods: In mice breathing hypoxic gas mixture during total body gamma irradiation the recovery of pluripotent and committed granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells and animal lethality were determined. Results: In mice forced to breathe 10% O 2 and 8% O 2 during irradiation, the oxygen tension in the spleen decreased to 40% and 20%, respectively, of control values. Hypoxia mitigated the lethal effect of gamma-rays and improved the recovery of hemopoiesis in compartments of pluripotent and committed progenitor cells. Enhancement of the proliferative activity in hemopoietic tissue by a cytokine (rmGM-CSF) or an immunomodulator (dextran sulfate) increased the effect of hypoxic radioprotection, while elimination of proliferative cells by hydroxyurea decreased the radioprotective effect. Adaptation of experimental animals to hypoxic conditions was found to reduce the radioprotective effect without influencing tissue partial oxygen pressure lowered by hypoxic conditions. Conclusion: The data presented confirm the radioprotective effect of 10% and 8% O 2 respiratory hypoxia on hemopoiesis. These findings may represent a way out for further experimental and clinical research aimed at considering differential protection of various tissues by hypoxia. (orig.) [de

  13. Study of the radioprotective effects of the aqueous extract of S.obval-lata DC. Edgew on mice from radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jinyan; Li Wenhui; Liu Jianbo; Wang Shuguang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To preliminarily explore the radioprotective effects of the aqueous extract of S. obval-lata DC. Edgew on mice from radiation injury. Methods: mice from radiation injury, as target of the research, are been intragastricly administrating and receive different doses of aqueous extract of S. obval-lata DC. Edgew in IR + medication groups, and corresponding amount of normal and saline for IR group. After 5 days, mice are been receive a total body irradiation at a does of 6Gy X -ray. Then repeated intragastric administrating was given for 5 days and observed. On the 18th day, measure the body weights, RBC, WBC, PLT, Hb of venous blood, the bone DNA contents (A value) and marrow nucleated cell population, the spleen weights. Results: In IR + medication groups the body weights, WBC, PLT, the bone marrow DNA contents (A value) and nucleated cell population of mice rise obviously comparing with IR group, there were significant statistical differences among them, P 0.05. Conclusions: The active components of the aqueous extract of S. obval-lata DC. Edgew express out the obvious radioprotective effects for hemopoietic system of mice and can stimulate proliferation of the spleen cell, improve immune function of mice. No obvious difference to the contents of RBC, Hb of peripheral blood in all irradiation groups is possibly related with the long metabolism cycle of RBC, Hb and the delay of hematopoietic tissue delivery RBC and Hb synthesis. (authors)

  14. Radio-Protective Effects of Melatonin on Subventricular Zone in Irradiated Rat: Decrease in Apoptosis and Upregulation of Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Shafigheh; Moghahi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein Noori; Mokhtari, Tahmineh; Roghani, Mehrdad; Shirazi, Ali Reza; Malek, Fatemeh; Rastegar, Tayebeh

    2017-10-01

    Neural stem cells are self-renewing, multipotent cells that can be found in subventricular (SVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones of the brain. These zones are susceptible to irradiation-induced apoptosis and oxidative stress. Melatonin (MLT) is a natural protector of neural cells against toxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of MLT as a radio-protective material effective in reducing tissue lesions in the SVZ of the brain and changing local apoptotic potential in rats. Twenty-five Gray irradiation was applied on adult rat brain for this study. One hour before irradiation, 100 mg/kg/IP MLT was injected, and 6 h later, the animals were sacrificed. The antioxidant enzymes and MDA activity levels were measured post-sacrifice. Also, the expression level of Nestin and caspase 3 were studied by immunohistochemistry. Spectrophotometric analysis showed significant increases in the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the irradiation-exposed (RAD) group compared to that of the control (Co) group (P < 0.05). Pre-treatment with MLT (100 mg/kg) ameliorates the harmful effects of the aforementioned 25 Gy irradiation by increasing antioxidant enzyme activity and decreasing MDA levels. A significant reduction in apoptotic cells was observed in rats treated with MLT 1 h before exposure (P < 0.001). Nestin-positive cells were also reduced in the RAD group (P < 0.001). Our results confirm the anti-apoptotic and antioxidant role of MLT. The MLT concentration used may serve as a threshold for significant protection against 25 Gy gamma irradiations on neural stem cells in SVZ.

  15. Role of an external cell membrane and its thiols in realization of the radioprotective effect of anoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinova, M.M.; Dontsova, G.V.; Panaeva, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    In experiments with Ehrlich ascites tumor cells using a specific thiol blocker 6.6-dithiodinicitinic acid that does not penetrate the cell and therefore only binds SH-groups of peripheral areas of an external cell membrane it was demonstrated that (1) the external cell membrane is the site where the radioprotective effect of anoxia (the oxygen effect) is realized (2) thiols of the esternal cell membrane contribute markedly to the oxygen effect and (3) they are needed at both stages of its realization

  16. Survey on radioprotective attention in the nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayamori, Ryo; Satoh, Shizuma; Sakai, Kunio; Kitabatake, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Yoki

    1978-01-01

    Questionnaires were sent to 2965 nurses and practical nurses in 37 institutions in Niigata prefecture in April, 1977, and the degree of radioprotective knowledge and attention in the nurses were investigated. Answers in 2205 cases were effective. The mean rate of those who answered that they knew International Committee of Radiation Protection and the permissible dose in the abdomen of female who had a possibility to be pregnant and hereditary (significant) dose was 22.2%. Out of the nurses working in the institutions dealing with radiation, the rate of those who wore film-badge was 15.7%, and that of those who received special health examinations was 1.39%. 654 nurses answered that it was better to fix the nurses in the institutions dealing with radiation. An actual condition of radioprotective education in nurse education was analysed, and private opinions on its future direction were described. (Tsunoda, M.)

  17. Survey on radioprotective attention in the nurses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayamori, R; Satoh, S; Sakai, K; Kitabatake, T; Yoshizawa, Y [Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    1978-05-01

    Questionnaires were sent to 2965 nurses and practical nurses in 37 institutions in Niigata prefecture in April, 1977, and the degree of radioprotective knowledge and attention in the nurses were investigated. Answers in 2205 cases were effective. The mean rate of those who answered that they knew International Committee of Radiation Protection and the permissible dose in the abdomen of female who had a possibility to be pregnant and hereditary (significant) dose was 22.2%. Out of the nurses working in the institutions dealing with radiation, the rate of those who wore film-badge was 15.7%, and that of those who received special health examinations was 1.39%. 654 nurses answered that it was better to fix the nurses in the institutions dealing with radiation. An actual condition of radioprotective education in nurse education was analysed, and private opinions on its future direction were described.

  18. Significant events in the field of radioprotection (aside from base nuclear installations and transports of radioactive substances): criteria declaration and codification. Guide No. 11, Index 2, Version from 07.10.2009, updated July 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    This document specifies provisions which must be applied by those in charge of a nuclear activity when declaring significant events regarding radioprotection. It describes the general principles, evokes the declaration criteria (they are more precisely presented in appendix), the declaration delay, and the declaration modalities (the informant, the documents, the addressee). It also evokes obligations regarding population information. A declaration form and a model of event report are provided in appendix

  19. Protective effect of a mixture of radioprotective substances (AET and mexamine) on the haemopoietic stem cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Sikulova, J.; Dikovenko, E.A.; Barkaja, V.S.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Sukhumi. Inst. Ehksperimental'noj Patologii i Terapii)

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a combined application of radioprotective substances (AET-i.p., mexamine-s.c.) was studied in mice. The duration of the protective effect on the haematopoietic stem cells and on the survival of mice after a lethal exposure to X-ray irradiation lasted for 5 hours p.i.. The DRF calculated from a change of LD 50/30 reached its maximum (1.53) within 30 min p.i., and was equal to 1.17 within an interval of 5 hrs. The protection of haematopoiesis, as expressed by the DRF calculated from an equieffiective exposure for 2 ESC, reached the maximum within 60 min p.i. (DRF = 3.4). The D 0 calculated from the CFU survival curves of endogenous haemapoietic tissue colonies (ESC) was, within a 120 min interval, almost three times higher (310 R) than in the control group (110 R). After the injection of radioprotective substances a greater number of haemopoietic CFU survives after an exposure to 100-400 R than after mere irradiation. The postirradiation decrease in the weight of small intestine was smaller in protected animals than in the controls. The role of a decrease of the radiation damage to the haemopoietic stem cells in the total protective effect of the radioprotectors used is discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Radioprotective effects of hesperidin on oxidative damages and histopathological changes induced by X-irradiation in rats heart tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhasan Rezaeyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate radioprotective effects of hesperidin (HES administration before the irradiation on the cardiac oxidative stress and histopathological changes in an experimental rat model. The cardiovascular complications of radiation exposure cause morbidity and mortality in patients who received radiotherapy. HES, an antioxidant flavonoid found in citrus fruits, suggests the protection against the tissue damage. Fifty-eight rats were divided into four groups: Group 1 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS and sham radiation; Group 2, HES and sham radiation; Group 3, PBS and radiation; and Group 4, HES and radiation. The rats were exposed to single dose of 18 Gy of 6 MV X-ray. One hundred milligrams per kilogram doses of HES was administered for 7 days before irradiation. The estimation of superoxide dismutase (SOD, malondialdehyde (MDA, and histopathological analyses was performed at 24 h and 8 weeks after radiation exposure. The irradiation of chest area resulted in an elevated MDA level and decreased SOD activity. Moreover, long-term pathological lesions of radiation were inflammation, fibrosis, the increased number of mast cells and macrophages, and development of plaque, vascular leakage, myocardial degeneration, and myocyte necrosis. Although the administration of HES decreases inflammation, fibrosis, mast cell and macrophage numbers, and myocyte necrosis, it did not result in reduced thrombus, myocardium degeneration, and vascular leakage. In conclusion, these results suggest that HES can perform a radioprotection action. The protective effect of HES may be attributable to its immunomodulatory effects and free radical-scavenging properties.

  1. Effects of gamma rays on rat testis tissue according to the morphological parameters and immunohistochemistry: radioprotective role of silymarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Mohsen; Anjamshoa, Maryam; Jafari, Parnia; Masoumi, Hossien; Ahadi, Reza; Fatehi, Daryoush

    2017-06-01

    To determine the radioprotective effects of Silymarin in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats irradiated with γ-rays. The present experimental study was performed in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran from December 2009 to March 2010. The study was performed on 40 rats, which were randomly and equally divided into four groups: 1) control group: neither received Silymarin nor irradiated with γ-rays; 2) γ-irradiation group: testis region exposed to 2Gy of γ-rays; 3) Silymarin & γ-irradiation: rats received 100 mg/kg of Silymarin 24hrs before exposure to 2Gy of γ-rays; 4) Silymarin & γ-irradiation: rats received 200 mg/kg of Silymarin 24hrs before exposure to 2Gy of γ-rays. After animal experiments and preparing the tissue sections, different histological and histomorphological parameters of seminiferous tubules and the biological characteristics of Leydig cells were evaluated applying quantitative assessment, Johnson scoring, and Leydig cell apoptosis assay by TUNEL method. The data were analyzed applying ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test, using SPSS software (V.19). Irradiation of 2 Gy γ-rays to the testis of the rats significantly affected the frequency of spermatogonia, primary spermatocyte, round spermatid, spermatozoa, seminiferous tube and lumen diameters, thickness of the epithelium, Leydig cell nuclear diameter and volume, epithelium height, and apoptotic cells (p<0.05). However, administration of Silymarin improved the mentioned parameters specifically in 200 mg/kg of dosage. Silymarin could act as a potent radioprotector and it can be used in modulation as well as improvement to radiation therapy to prevent male reproductive function, specifically seminiferous tubules in an animal model; however, its molecular mechanism is still not clear and needs more molecular researches.

  2. Radioprotection of the patient in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Maria del R.

    2004-01-01

    The following topics are developed: concepts on radioprotection; stochastic and deterministic effects; the prenatal irradiation; different types of radiation exposition (medical, occupational and public irradiation); and the justification of the levels of radiation

  3. Radioprotective effect of methanolic root extract of Loeseneriella arnottiana on radiation induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajna, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Intense exposure to ionization radiation by accidental, occupational or therapeutical purpose causes cellular damage mainly by formation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) or by free radicals. Humans are intentionally exposed to ionising radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. The use of ionising radiation in cancer therapy may lead to transient and/or permanent injury to normal tissues within the treatment field. To increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy, various modes of radioprotection have been developed that selectively reduce cytotoxic effects to normal tissues. Because radiation-induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to the harmful effects of free radicals, molecules with radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radioprotectors. Loeseneriella arnottiana, a member of family Hippocrateaceae, is a climbing shrub used by traditional medicine practitioners. To study the antioxidant activity and radioprotective effect of methanolic root extract of Loeseneriella arnottiana against electron beam radiation induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Loeseneriella arnottiana roots were dried and extracted using methanol by solvent extraction method. Antioxidant activity was measured by DPPH method. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay parameters. The lymphocytes were incubated for one hour with two different concentrations 10 μg and 50 μg of root extract before exposure to 2 Gy electron beam radiation. 30 μg of methanolic root extract of Loeseneriella arnottiana exhibited 96% radical scavenging activity comparable to 15 μg of ascorbic acid. In reducing power assay it showed dose dependent increase in absorbance indicating that extract is capable of donating hydrogen atoms. Pretreatment of lymphocytes with 10 μg and 50 μg of root extract before irradiation resulted in reduction in the Comet length, Olive tail moment, percentage of DNA in tail when compared to the radiation control group. Results of this

  4. Actual knowledge about some plants with radioprotective effect and about the research of possibilities their use; Aktualne poznatky o niektorych rastlinach s radioprotektivnym ucinkom a o vyskume moznosti ich vyuzitia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalka, J [I. Interna klinika, Univerzita veterinarsneho lekarstva, Kosice (Slovakia)

    2004-06-15

    Study was undertaken to refer to me importance of radiological protection of human and animal species, especially. After the crash of nuclear power station in Chernobyl, Ukraine, an enormous natural catastrophe. The world wide research programs are dedicated to vearch for plants with radioprotective effect. Apparently representing sea vegetation, brown algae, were considered to have a radioprotective effect just as a large amount of plants representing terrestrial flora. The direction of research programs in the world continues in identification of other unknown plants having radioprotective effect. We would like to direct our research interests in this direction and use enormous possibilities of our rich and various vegetation. (author)

  5. Radioprotection in Brazilian universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, K.C.; Borges, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a broad knowledge of the circumstances under which activities involving ionizing radiations are held at brazilian academic institutions. Around 90 institutions (universities and isolated schools of both public and private sectors) were invited, by mail, to answer an inquiry with questions from technical to legal aspects of their activities with radiations. Information received from 2/3 of institutions contacted, permitted conclusions as: there is a wide ignorance about radioprotection procedures and legislation, although few universities maintain some efficient radioprotection staff; there is a need for the establishment of a standard radioprotection text dedicated to those specific activities of the sector. (author)

  6. Prospective of clinical drugs for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alok, Amit; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Arun; Chaudhury, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    We are living in an era of nuclear power where power derived from nuclear reaction is used for power generation as well as for nuclear weapons. The terrorism and the threat of dirty bombs looms around the civilized population. Therefore, there is a need to develop radioprotector which could prevent against the harmful effect of radiation. The research on radioprotector started more than fifty years ago but still there is no approved radioprotector in the drug market. Hundreds of lead molecule have been screened and have shown varying amount of radioprotection either in vitro or in vivo or in both. Only one drug amifostine was approved by FDA but due to its toxicity in head and neck cancer, this drug is no more in use. Antioxidants too have proven to be a potential radioprotector but the dose required for radioprotection is too high for maintenance of homeostasis in physiological system. We have taken an alternative approach of using clinical drugs like diclofenac and tetracycline for development of approach for radioprotection and reported the radioprotective role of diclofenac. The advantage of using clinical drug is its wide availability in the market and the ease with which it could be channelized for radioprotection. Antiradical assays have demonstrated possible use of tetracycline for radioprotection. Tetracycline has also ability to reduce oxidative damages ex vivo. Studies related to comet assay as well as antioxidant assays in different organs are in progress for designing further work for efficacy and elucidation of mechanisms. (author)

  7. Radioprotective effects in mice by a single dose of subcutaneous administration of cobaltous chloride post γ-rays irradiation with a sublethal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumo, Yoshiro; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    1993-01-01

    Radioprotective effects were investigated in mice which received subcutaneously a single dose of each inorganic metal: Co, Cu, Rb, Sr, Mo and W 24 hours post irradiation of 60 Co γ-rays with a sublethal dose. The effects were observed in mice injected with Co at an optimum dosage of 20 mg/kg·body weight. Then to elucidate mechanisms of the effects, mice were injected with Co containing the radioactive tracer ( 60 Co) following the radiation exposure, measured elimination of the radioactivity for 7 days, then sacrificed and divided to some tissues and organs. The radioactivity in whole body during this period resulted in a markedly higher retention than that for mice injected with [ 60 Co] alone, as well as liver in the organs. These higher retentions appeared to be related to the radioprotective effects. (author)

  8. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastià, N., E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Radiation Protection Service, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hervás, D. [Biostatistics Unit, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pantelias, G.; Hatzi, V.I. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Soriano, J.M. [Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Curcumin and trans-resveratrol can exert radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects. • The mechanisms underlying such dual action were elucidated using the PCC and G2-assay. • Radioprotection occurs in non-cycling cells exposed to curcumin and resveratrol. • Radiosensitization occurs in cycling cells exposed to the chemicals. • G2-checkpoint abrogation by the chemicals underlies the radiosensitizing mechanism. - Abstract: Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140 μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220 μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity

  9. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastià, N.; Montoro, A.; Hervás, D.; Pantelias, G.; Hatzi, V.I.; Soriano, J.M.; Villaescusa, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Curcumin and trans-resveratrol can exert radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects. • The mechanisms underlying such dual action were elucidated using the PCC and G2-assay. • Radioprotection occurs in non-cycling cells exposed to curcumin and resveratrol. • Radiosensitization occurs in cycling cells exposed to the chemicals. • G2-checkpoint abrogation by the chemicals underlies the radiosensitizing mechanism. - Abstract: Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140 μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220 μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity

  10. Interventional techniques in medicine and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Bar, O.; Benderitter, M.; Bourguignon, M.; Chevillard, S.; Gauron, Ch.; Lallemand, J.; Lombard, J.; Maccia, C.; Sapoval, M.; Bernier, M.O.; Pirard, Ph.; Jacob, S.; Donadille, L.; Aubert, B.; Clairand, I.; Mozziconacci, J.G.; Brot, A.M.; Jarrige, V.; Huet, Ch.; Marchal, C.; Martin, M.; Bar, O.; Degrange, J.P.; Livarek, B.; Menechal, Ph.; Sapoval, M.; Pellerin, O.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Nineteen presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - Interventional radiology: why is it developing? (M. Sapoval); 2 - exposure particularities in interventional radiology (O. Bar); 3 - doses received by organs in interventional cardiology (C. Maccia); 4 - Patients exposure: description of cumulated exposure of patients treated in interventional cardiology (M.O. Bernier); 5 - 2004 inquiry to dermatologists about post-interventional radiology radio-dermatitis (P. Pirard); 6 - exposure and risks to operators (S. Jacob); 7 - dosimetric evaluation techniques and results about interventional imaging operators' extremities (L. Donadille and F. Merat); 8 - bibliographic study of doses received by operators with non-protected organs (B. Aubert); 9 - ORAMED European project: optimization of operational dosimeter uses in interventional radiology (I. Clairand); 10 - reference levels and dosimetric evaluation of patients (C. Maccia); 11 - optimization in coronary angioplasty (J.G. Mozziconacci, A.M. Brot and V. Jarrige); 12 - dosimetry in medical over-exposure situation (C. Huet); 13 - significant radioprotection events in interventional radiology declared to the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) - status and experience feedback (C. Marchal); 14 - interventional radiology and unwanted effects (M. Benderitter); 15 - global analyses and new exposure indicators in human epidermis cells (M. Martin); 16 - radioprotection regulations and training (O. Bar); 17 - zoning and workplace analysis in interventional cardiology (J.P. Degrange); 18 - guide of good clinical practices: example of interventional cardiology (B. Livarek); 19 - how to encourage the radioprotection optimization in interventional radiology: the ASN's point of view (P. Menechal). (J.S.)

  11. Effect of radioprotectant WR 2721 on cyclic nucleotides, prostaglandins, and lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocha, P.J.; Catravas, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Within 1 hr after ip injection of the radioprotectant WR 2721 into rats, splenic cGMP levels dropped and remained suppressed for 6 hr before returning to normal. However, if rats were exposed to ionizing radiation 30-40 min after WR 2721 treatment, they had higher cGMP levels at 3 hr postirradiation than the nonirradiUted, drug-treated controls, but the cGMP content was still found to be lower than that of the irradiated nondrug-treated controls. Radiation exposure of animals pretreated with WR 2721 also resulted in higher liver and spleen levels of cAMP and additional elevations in spleen prostaglandin content, compared with irradiated controls at 3-6 hr after radiation treatment. The secondary fluctuations of lysosomal enzyme activities, prostaglandin content, and cyclic nucleotide levels were also altered in irradiated rats pretreated with WR 2721 when compared with irradiated controls. Liver and spleen lysosomal β-glucuronidase activities, spleen cAMP and cGMP levels, and spleen prostaglandin concentrations were closer to physiological levels at 3 days postirradiation in rats given WR 2721 before the radiation treatment

  12. Radioprotective effects of selenium and vitamin-E against 6MV X-rays in human blood lymphocytes by micronucleus assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rostami, Aram; Moosavi, Seyed Akbar; Changizi, Vahid; Abbasian Ardakani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Critical macromolecules of cells such as DNA are in exposure to damage of free radicals that induced from the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological systems. Selenium and vitamin-E are natural compounds that have been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of selenium and vitamin-E separately and synergistically against genotoxicity induced by 6MV x-rays irradiation in blood lymphocytes. Methods: ...

  13. Radioprotection of vitamin D on mice injured by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohui; Zhou Zhengyu; Li Bingyan; Nie Jihua; Tong Jian; Zhang Zengli

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the radioprotective effect of vitamin D against irradiation injury, the mice exposed to 60 Co γ-rays at 6 Gy was treated with preparation of vitamin D(Alfacalcidol Soft Capsules). Cell cycle and apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) following staining of cells with propidium iodide (PI). Peripheral blood cell counts were analyzed by autoanalyzer. It has been found that vitamin D significantly increases white blood cell (WBC) counts, decreases bone marrow PEC micronucleus rate. FCM analysis shows that compared with damaged group, G2 and S phases of bone marrow cells in vitamin D protection group increases significantly at 24 h after whole body irradiation, whereas G1 phase cells decrease at the same times. So vitamin D might be a new radioprotection agent and it should be deserved further study. (authors)

  14. Mankind, radiations and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, Henri

    2015-10-01

    After a brief recall of the historic knowledge on natural radioactivity, of the first developments of nuclear medicine and of the emergence of a necessary regulation of the use of these radiations, the author first proposes an overview of the relationship between radioactivity and exposure: sources of natural irradiation, sources of natural origin but modified by technology (medical exposure, professional exposure). Then, the author recalls the origin of radioprotection rules: the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). He addresses the notion of dose with its different types: absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, specific case of internal exposure with the notion of engaged dose. He gives an overview of the effects of ionizing radiations: deterministic effects, global external irradiation, partial irradiations, and stochastic effects. The next part addresses the radiological protection system: scope of application, the three principles (justification, optimisation, and limitation), and dose limitations. Some matters of debate are reviewed: consequences of accidents of reactors, of Chernobyl and Fukushima (mortality by acute radiation syndrome, thyroid cancers, other cancers, leukaemia, non cancerous diseases, projections and conclusions after the Chernobyl accident), the notions of collective dose and of radio-toxicity, radio-induced cancers and genetic predisposition

  15. Radioprotective effect of flavonoid quercetin on human lymphocytic cells; Efeito radioprotetor do flavonóide quercetina sobre células linfocitárias humanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Melo, Larissa S.A.; Lima, Maíra V.; Luna Filho, Ricardo L.C.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Silva, Edvane B., E-mail: williams.wns@gmail.com, E-mail: larissamelo.pe@gmail.com, E-mail: mairavasconceloslima@gmail.com, E-mail: ricardolclf@hotmail.com, E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: edvborges@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Several substances of synthetic and natural origin have been studied in relation to their ability to protect the body from damage caused by ionizing radiation. Among these substances, quercetin has been shown to be a molecule of natural origin with high radioprotective potential due to its antioxidant properties. The objective of this study was to determine, in vitro, the radioprotective effect of quercetin on human lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation. Blood was irradiated at the 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 Gy doses and then lymphocyte culture with quercetin at preselected concentrations of 37.5 and 75 μM. Subsequently, slides were prepared for analysis and quantification of the metaphases present in lymphocyte cells. The results demonstrated that irradiated lymphocytes and later exposed to quercetin presented a lower number of chromosomal alterations compared to the control group which was irradiated and not exposed to quercetin. Therefore, the results suggest a radioprotective effect of flavonoid quercetin on human lymphocytes exposed, in vitro, to ionizing radiation.

  16. Modulation of radioprotective effects of respiratory hypoxia by changing the duration of hypoxia before irradiation and by combining hypoxia and administration of hemopoiesis-stimulating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacek, A.; Hofer, M. [Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Brno (Czech Republic). Inst. of Biophysics; Tacev, T. [Masaryk Memorial Cancer Inst., Brno (Czechoslovakia)

    2001-09-01

    Aim: Analysis of radioprotective effect of respiratory hypoxia on hemopoietic tissue and enhancement of this effect by hemopoietic activation. Material and methods: In mice breathing hypoxic gas mixture during total body gamma irradiation the recovery of pluripotent and committed granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells and animal lethality were determined. Results: In mice forced to breathe 10% O{sub 2} and 8% O{sub 2} during irradiation, the oxygen tension in the spleen decreased to 40% and 20%, respectively, of control values. Hypoxia mitigated the lethal effect of gamma-rays and improved the recovery of hemopoiesis in compartments of pluripotent and committed progenitor cells. Enhancement of the proliferative activity in hemopoietic tissue by a cytokine (rmGM-CSF) or an immunomodulator (dextran sulfate) increased the effect of hypoxic radioprotection, while elimination of proliferative cells by hydroxyurea decreased the radioprotective effect. Adaptation of experimental animals to hypoxic conditions was found to reduce the radioprotective effect without influencing tissue partial oxygen pressure lowered by hypoxic conditions. Conclusion: The data presented confirm the radioprotective effect of 10% and 8% O{sub 2} respiratory hypoxia on hemopoiesis. These findings may represent a way out for further experimental and clinical research aimed at considering differential protection of various tissues by hypoxia. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Analyse von radioprotektiver Wirkung der respiratorischen Hypoxie auf das haematopoetische Gewebe und Verstaerkung dieses Effekts durch Aktivierung der Haematopoese. Material und Methode: Es wurden bei Maeusen, die 10%igen und 8%igen Sauerstoff waehrend der Bestrahlung geatmet haben, die Erholung von pluripotenten und unipotenten Progenitorzellen und das Ueberleben nach einer letalen Strahlendosis untersucht. Ergebnisse: Bei Maeusen, die 10% und 8% Sauerstoff waehrend der Strahlentherapie geatmet haben, sank der Sauerstoffpartialdruck

  17. Radioprotective effect of Hatakeshimeji(lyophyllum decastes) on the organogenesis stage of fetus and haemopoietic cells in ICR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Ukawa, Yuuichi; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Park, Sangrea; Tanaka, Masashi; Matsumori, Masaki; Oshima, Masami; Hayashi, Ikuo; Hasegawa, Takeo; Rhee, Soo Young

    2002-01-01

    The organogenesis stage of embryos in ICR mice is most sensitive for radiation. We paid attention to the radioprotective effect of a Hatakeshimeji (Lyophyllum decastes) on the radiation-induced malformation at the organogenesis stage, embryonic death and the effects of Hatakeshimeji (Lyophyllum decastes) on the In vivo level of the fetuses. ICR mouse from Japan National Institute of Health was used for the experiment. One or two female mice and one male mouse of shame age range were mated for only three hours from 8:00 to 11:00. The pregnant mice were placed in plastic cages for radiation exposure, and were treated with a single whole-body X -radiation at 1 Gy with a dose rate of 35 cGy/min on 8 days after the conception. 100 mg/kg of Hatakeshimeji (Lyophyllum decastes) (isotonic sodium chloride solution: 0.2 ml) was injected by i.p.route to the pregnant mice. The embryonic death, external malformations, fetal body weight, sex ratio and embryonic death were observed in these experiments

  18. Comparative study of the radioprotective effects of cysteamine, WR-2721, and WR-1065 in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The compounds, 2-mercaptoethylamine (cysteamine), S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721), and N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) were tested for toxicity and radioprotective effect in cultured human cells using viability (reproductive death) as an indicator. WR-2721 and WR-1065 had no harmful effect at concentrations of 4 and 10 mM for periods up to 3 hr whereas cysteamine was toxic if left in contact with the cells for more than 30 min. The response of the cells to radiation was measured after a 30-min treatment with 4 mM of each protective agent. Survival curves were constructed and the following dose reduction factors (DRFs) were calculated: WR-2721, 1.3; cysteamine, 2.3; WR-1065, 2.9. Increasing the concentration of protective agent did not increase the DRF under these conditions except in the case of cysteamine. Extending the period of treatment with drug before irradiation increased the DRF for WR-2721 and WR-1065; values up to 1.8 and 3.4 were obtained with 10 mM WR-2721 and WR-1065, respectively. With these two compounds, the rate of development of protection with time is almost independent of concentration until the maximum is attained; it is probably controlled by the rate of transport across the cell membrane, in the case of WR-1065, and by the rate of hydrolysis of WR-2721

  19. Use of micronucleus test in evaluating radioprotective action of mixed tremella preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jiaben; Huang Yinmei; Zhu Bingchai

    1993-01-01

    The radioprotective action of mixed tremella preparation (Yinshen Yin) on whole body gamma irradiated dogs has been studied. 25 male dogs were divided into five groups: tremella, mercaminum, Yinshen Yin at high dose, Yinshen Yin at low dose and control. All the dogs were given above drugs in 10 successive days before acute exposure of 1 Gy radiation. The results showed that the prophylactic use of Yinshen Yin had good anti-irradiation effect, and the radioprotective effect was similar to the mercaminum, but significantly higher than tremella. Thereby it was considered as a good radioprotective agent. The dose reduction factor in different groups were: Yinshen Yin high dose 2.01, Yinshen Yin low dose group 1.72, mercaminum group 1.55 and tremella group 1.11

  20. Radioprotective effect of Haberlea rhodopensis (Friv.) leaf extract on gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant levels in rabbit blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Svetlana; Popov, Borislav; Bonev, Georgi

    2013-01-01

    Different concentrations of H. rhodopensis total extract (HRE; 0.03, 0.06 and 0.12 g/kg body weight) were injected im, into rabbits 2 h before collecting the blood samples. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to 2.0 Gy 60Co gamma-radiation. The radiation-induced changes were estimated by using the chromosome aberration test (CA) and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN) in peripheral lymphocytes, and by determining the malondialdehyde levels (MDA) in blood plasma and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity in erythrocytes. Radiation significantly increased the chromosome aberration and micronuclei frequencies as well as MDA levels and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activity. On the other hand, the HRE pretreatment significantly decreased the CA, MN frequencies and MDA levels and increased the SOD and CAT activity in a concentration dependent manner. The most effective was the highest concentration of HRE (0.12 g/kg body weight). The results suggest that HRE as a natural product with a nantioxidant capacity could play a modulatory role against the cellular damage induced by gamma-irradiation. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective potential of HRE is discussed.

  1. Radioprotective effect of Haberlea rhodopensis (Friv.) leaf extract on γ-radiation-induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant levels in rabbit blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, Svetlana; Bonev, Georgi; Popov, Borislav

    2013-01-01

    Different concentrations of H. rhodopensis total extract (HRE; 0.03, 0.06 and 0.12 g/kg body weight) were injected im, into rabbits 2 h before collecting the blood samples. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to 2.0 Gy 60 Co γ-radiation. The radiation-induced changes were estimated by using the chromosome aberration test (CA) and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN) in peripheral lymphocytes, and by determining the malondialdehyde levels (MDA) in blood plasma and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity in erythrocytes. Radiation significantly increased the chromosome aberration and micronuclei frequencies as well as MDA levels and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activity. On the other hand, the HRE pretreatment significantly decreased the CA, MN frequencies and MDA levels and increased the SOD and CAT activity in a concentration dependent manner. The most effective was the highest concentration of HRE (0.12 g/kg body weight). The results suggest that HRE as a natural product with an antioxidant capacity could play a modulatory role against the cellular damage induced by γ-irradiation. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective potential of HRE is discussed. (author)

  2. Hypoxyradiotherapy: lack of experimental evidence for a preferential radioprotective effect on normal versus tumor tissue as shown by direct oxygenation measurements in experimental sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, Debra K.; Thews, Oliver; Vaupel, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Aim: In order to investigate possible pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the postulated preferential protective effect of hypoxia on normal tissue during radiotherapy, the impact of acute respiratory hypoxia (8.2% O 2 + 91.8% N 2 ) on tissue oxygenation was assessed. Methods: Tumor and normal tissue oxygenation was directly determined using O 2 -sensitive electrodes in two experimental rat tumors (DS and Yoshida sarcomas) and in the normal subcutis of the hind foot dorsum. Results: During respiratory hypoxia, arterial blood O 2 tension (pO 2 ), oxyhemoglobin saturation and mean arterial blood pressure decreased. Changes in the arterial blood gas status were accompanied by a reflex hyperventilation leading to hypocapnia and respiratory alkalosis. In the subcutis, tissue oxygenation worsened during acute hypoxia, with decreases in the mean and median pO 2 . Significant increases in the hypoxic fractions were, however, not seen. In tumor tissues, oxygenation also worsened upon hypoxic hypoxia with significant decreases in the mean and median pO 2 and increases in the size of the hypoxic fractions for both sarcomas. Conclusion: These results suggest that during respiratory hypoxia, radiobiologically relevant reductions in the oxygenation (and a subsequent selective radioprotection) of normal tissue may not be achieved. In addition, in the tumor models studied, a worsening of tumor oxygenation was seen which could result in an increased radioresistance

  3. Investigation of radioprotective properties of synthetic antagonist of glucocorticoids RU 38 486

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejliev, A.A.; Zvonareva, N.B.; Zhivotovskij, B.D.; Khanson, K.P.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Leningrad

    1992-01-01

    Radioprotective properties of synthetic antiglucocorticoid RU 38 486 were investigated. It was demonstrated that this antigonist of glucocorticoids possesses radioprotective effect in vitro and in vivo systems. Radioprotective properties at molecular level exhibited in inhibition of postirradiation endonuclease activation and in prevention of internucleosome chromatin degradation. Involvement of cytosol glucocorticoid receptors in initiation of radiation-induced programmed cell death is discussed

  4. Radioprotective effects of Asparagus racemosus extracts against free radical damage in rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boloor, K.K.; Kamat, J.P.; Devasagayam, T.P.A.; Venkatachalam, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    The possible antioxidant effect of the extracts of Asparagus racemosus against membrane damage induced by free radicals generated during γ-radiation was examined in rat liver/brain mitochondria. These extracts displayed significant antioxidant properties in mitochondria against oxidation of both lipids and proteins as assessed by lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and depletion of thiols. The inhibitory effect of the extracts, rich in polysaccharides like galactose, was more than that of the established antioxidants glutathione and ascorbic acid. (author)

  5. Radioprotective effect of Panax ginseng on the phosphatases and lipid peroxidation level in testes of Swiss albino mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar M.; Sharma M.K.; Saxena P.S.; Kumar A. [Rajasthan Univ., Jaipur (India)

    2003-03-01

    The Panax ginseng has been used as traditional medicine for past several years among oriental people. The present investigation has been made to assess the radioprotective efficacy of ginseng root extract in the testicular enzymes of Swiss albino mice. The Swiss albino mice were divided into different groups. Ginseng treated group: The animals were administered 10 mg/kg body weight ginseng root extract intraperitoneal (i.p.). Radiation treated group: The animals were exposed to 8 Gy gamma radiation at the dose rate of 1.69 Gy/min at the distance of 80 cm. Combination group: Animals were administered ginseng extract continuously for 4 d and on 4th day they were irradiated to 8 Gy gamma radiation after 30 min of extract administration. The animals from above groups were autopsied on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 30. Biochemical estimations of acid and alkaline phosphatases and Lipid peroxidation (LPO) in testes were done. In ginseng treated group acid and alkaline phosphatases activity and LPO level did not show any significant alteration. In irradiated animals there was a significant increase in acid phosphatase activity and LPO level. However, significant decline in alkaline phosphatase activity was observed. The treatment of ginseng before irradiation causes significant decrease in acid phosphatase and LPO level and significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. One of the cause of radiation damage is lipid peroxidation. Due to lipid peroxidation, lysosomal membrane permeability alters and thus results in release of hydrolytic enzymes. So, an increase in acid phosphatase was noticed after radiation treatment. The alkaline phosphatase activity is associated with membrane permeability and different stages of spermatogenesis. Due to membrane damage and depletion of germ cells of testes after irradiation the enzyme activity was decreased. Ginseng markedly inhibits lipid peroxidation. It acts in indirect fashion to protect radical processes by inhibition of initiation of

  6. Radioprotective effect of Panax ginseng on the phosphatases and lipid peroxidation level in testes of Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, M.; Sharma, M.K.; Saxena, P.S.; Kumar, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Panax ginseng has been used as traditional medicine for past several years among oriental people. The present investigation has been made to assess the radioprotective efficacy of ginseng root extract in the testicular enzymes of Swiss albino mice. The Swiss albino mice were divided into different groups. Ginseng treated group: The animals were administered 10 mg/kg body weight ginseng root extract intraperitoneal (i.p.). Radiation treated group: The animals were exposed to 8 Gy gamma radiation at the dose rate of 1.69 Gy/min at the distance of 80 cm. Combination group: Animals were administered ginseng extract continuously for 4 d and on 4th day they were irradiated to 8 Gy gamma radiation after 30 min of extract administration. The animals from above groups were autopsied on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 30. Biochemical estimations of acid and alkaline phosphatases and Lipid peroxidation (LPO) in testes were done. In ginseng treated group acid and alkaline phosphatases activity and LPO level did not show any significant alteration. In irradiated animals there was a significant increase in acid phosphatase activity and LPO level. However, significant decline in alkaline phosphatase activity was observed. The treatment of ginseng before irradiation causes significant decrease in acid phosphatase and LPO level and significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. One of the cause of radiation damage is lipid peroxidation. Due to lipid peroxidation, lysosomal membrane permeability alters and thus results in release of hydrolytic enzymes. So, an increase in acid phosphatase was noticed after radiation treatment. The alkaline phosphatase activity is associated with membrane permeability and different stages of spermatogenesis. Due to membrane damage and depletion of germ cells of testes after irradiation the enzyme activity was decreased. Ginseng markedly inhibits lipid peroxidation. It acts in indirect fashion to protect radical processes by inhibition of initiation of

  7. Radioprotective effects of histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on gamma ray induced chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Histamine H2 receptor antagonist such as Cimetidine, Famotidine and Ranitidine are used in the clinical treatment of peptic ulcer. In vitro metaphase analysis and micronucleus assay were used to test the effects of famotidine and ranitidine on Cobalt 60 γ-ray induced clastogenic effects. Heparinised whole blood was obtained from healthy non-smoker volunteers. Blood samples were irradiated at a dose of 3Gy and incubated at 37 deg C for 1h. Lymphocyte cultures were initiated for metaphase chromosomes and cytochalasin B blocked micronucleus analysis. Aqueous solution of Famotidine (150 g/ml) and Ranitidine (500 g/ml) was added to the whole blood cultures at 0h and 24h. Cultures were harvested and processed at 48h and 72h for chromosome aberrations and micronucleus analysis respectively. Cultures treated with Famotidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 60.90% and 56.52% inhibition in dicentrics, 48.70% and 43.61% inhibition in total aberrations. Ranitidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 52.17% and 43.47% inhibition in dicentrics, 33.60% and 46.15% inhibition in total aberrations, when compared with 3Gy γ-ray irradiation alone. 43-54% inhibition in Binucleated cells with micronuclei and 47.72% inhibition in micronuclei at 0h treatment respectively. In conclusion radioprotective effects of Histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on γ-ray induced chromosome damage is observed and the drugs effectively reduced the frequency of radiation induced chromosome aberrations and micronucleus. Famotidine was found to be more effective. The mechanism in which these drugs reduce clastogenic effect of γ-radiation is not fully understood. It might be due to their antioxidant and free radical-scavenging properties. (author)

  8. hTERT peptide fragment GV1001 demonstrates radioprotective and antifibrotic effects through suppression of TGF‑β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Kim, Sangjae; Shon, Won-Jun; Kim, Reuben H; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K

    2018-06-01

    GV1001 is a 16‑amino acid peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein (616‑626; EARPALLTSRLRFIPK), which lies within the reverse transcriptase domain. Originally developed as an anticancer vaccine, GV1001 demonstrates diverse cellular effects, including anti‑inflammatory, tumor suppressive and antiviral effects. In the present study, the radioprotective and antifibrotic effects of GV1001 were demonstrated through suppressing transforming growth factor‑β (TGF‑β) signaling. Proliferating human keratinocytes underwent premature senescence upon exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), however, treatment of cells with GV1001 allowed the cells to proliferate and showed a reduction in senescent phenotype. GV1001 treatment notably increased the levels of Grainyhead‑like 2 and phosphorylated (p‑)Akt (Ser473), and reduced the activation of p53 and the level of p21/WAF1 in irradiated keratinocytes. It also markedly suppressed the level of TGF‑β signaling molecules, including p‑small mothers against decapentaplegic (Smad)2/3 and Smad4, and TGF‑β target genes, including zinc finger E‑box binding homeobox 1, fibronectin, N‑cadharin and Snail, in irradiated keratinocytes. Furthermore, GV1001 suppressed TGF‑β signaling in primary human fibroblasts and inhibited myofibroblast differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that GV1001 suppressed the binding of Smad2 on the promoter regions of collagen type III α1 chain (Col3a1) and Col1a1. In a dermal fibrosis model in vivo, GV1001 treatment notably reduced the thickness of fibrotic lesions and the synthesis of Col3a1. These data indicated that GV1001 ameliorated the IR‑induced senescence phenotype and tissue fibrosis by inhibiting TGF‑β signaling and may have therapeutic effects on radiation‑induced tissue damage.

  9. Interventional techniques in medicine and radioprotection; Les techniques interventionnelles en medecine et radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B.; Bar, O.; Benderitter, M.; Bourguignon, M.; Chevillard, S.; Gauron, Ch.; Lallemand, J.; Lombard, J.; Maccia, C.; Sapoval, M.; Bernier, M.O.; Pirard, Ph.; Jacob, S.; Donadille, L.; Aubert, B.; Clairand, I.; Mozziconacci, J.G.; Brot, A.M.; Jarrige, V.; Huet, Ch.; Marchal, C.; Martin, M.; Bar, O.; Degrange, J.P.; Livarek, B.; Menechal, Ph.; Sapoval, M.; Pellerin, O.

    2009-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Nineteen presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - Interventional radiology: why is it developing? (M. Sapoval); 2 - exposure particularities in interventional radiology (O. Bar); 3 - doses received by organs in interventional cardiology (C. Maccia); 4 - Patients exposure: description of cumulated exposure of patients treated in interventional cardiology (M.O. Bernier); 5 - 2004 inquiry to dermatologists about post-interventional radiology radio-dermatitis (P. Pirard); 6 - exposure and risks to operators (S. Jacob); 7 - dosimetric evaluation techniques and results about interventional imaging operators' extremities (L. Donadille and F. Merat); 8 - bibliographic study of doses received by operators with non-protected organs (B. Aubert); 9 - ORAMED European project: optimization of operational dosimeter uses in interventional radiology (I. Clairand); 10 - reference levels and dosimetric evaluation of patients (C. Maccia); 11 - optimization in coronary angioplasty (J.G. Mozziconacci, A.M. Brot and V. Jarrige); 12 - dosimetry in medical over-exposure situation (C. Huet); 13 - significant radioprotection events in interventional radiology declared to the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) - status and experience feedback (C. Marchal); 14 - interventional radiology and unwanted effects (M. Benderitter); 15 - global analyses and new exposure indicators in human epidermis cells (M. Martin); 16 - radioprotection regulations and training (O. Bar); 17 - zoning and workplace analysis in interventional cardiology (J.P. Degrange); 18 - guide of good clinical practices: example of interventional cardiology (B. Livarek); 19 - how to encourage the radioprotection optimization in interventional radiology: the ASN's point of view (P. Menechal). (J.S.)

  10. Radioprotective effects of ginsan through the stimulation hematopoiesis and antioxidant enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jie Young; Son, Soo Jung; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Shim, Ji Young; Han, Young Soo; Yun, Yeon Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    An immunomodulator ginsan which was isolated from Panax ginseng showed the mitogenic activity, generation of LAK cells, and secretion of several cytokines. In the extended effort to search other immunostimulatory effects, we evaluated protective effects of in vivo injected Ginsan against irradiation, by measuring the recovery of CFU-S, and the functioning of bone marrow (BM) and spleen cells. Ginsan was found to significantly increase the number of BM cells, spleen cells, granulocytes macrophage-colony forming cells (GM-CFC), and the number of circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets in irradiated mice. In addition, it induced endogenous production of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IFN-g and IL-12, which are required for hematopoietic recovery, and was able to enhance Th1 function while interfering with the Th2 response in irradiated mice. We demonstrated that the pretreatment with Ginsan protected mice from lethal effects of ionizing radiation more effectively than given immediately or after the irradiation. A significant increase of the survival of Ginsan-treated group (100mg/kg) from LD50/30 7.54 Gy of PBS-injection to 10.93 Gy was observed. Moreover, the levels of the antioxidant enzymes such as SODs, catalase and gluthathion peroxidase were increased 1.5-2 fold in ginsan treated mice compared to the irradiated mice. These findings indicate that ginsan may be a promising agent to be used in reducing the time needed for reconstituting of hematopoietic cells after irradiation treatment.

  11. An alternative mechanism for radioprotection by dimethyl sulfoxide. Possible facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashino, Genro; Liu, Yong; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Ono, Koji; Tano, Keizo; Watanabe, Masami

    2010-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been known for many years, and the suppression of hydroxyl (OH) radicals induced by ionizing radiation has been thought to be the main cause of this effect. However, the DMSO concentration used was very high, and might be toxic, in earlier studies. In the present study, we administered a lower, non-toxic concentration (0.5%, id est (i.e.), 64 mM) of DMSO before irradiation and examined its radioprotective effects. Colony formation assay and micronucleus assay showed significant radioprotective effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO), but not in xrs5, which is defective in the repair function of DNA double-strand breaks. The levels of phosphorylated H2AX and the formation of 53BP1 foci 15 minutes after irradiation, which might reflect initial DNA double-strand breaks, in DMSO-treated CHO cells were similar to those in non-treated cells, suggesting that the radioprotective effects were not attributable to the suppression of general indirect action in the lower concentration of DMSO. On the other hand, 2 hours after irradiation, the average number of 53BP1 foci, which might reflect residual DNA double-strand breaks, was significantly decreased in DMSO-treated CHO cells compared to non-treated cells. The results indicated that low concentration of DMSO exerts radioprotective effects through the facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair rather than through the suppression of indirect action. (author)

  12. An alternative mechanism for radioprotection by dimethyl sulfoxide; possible facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashino, Genro; Liu, Yong; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Ono, Koji; Tano, Keizo; Watanabe, Masami

    2010-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been known for many years, and the suppression of hydroxyl (OH) radicals induced by ionizing radiation has been thought to be the main cause of this effect. However, the DMSO concentration used was very high, and might be toxic, in earlier studies. In the present study, we administered a lower, non-toxic concentration (0.5%, i.e., 64 mM) of DMSO before irradiation and examined its radioprotective effects. Colony formation assay and micronucleus assay showed significant radioprotective effects in CHO, but not in xrs5, which is defective in the repair function of DNA double-strand breaks. The levels of phosphorylated H2AX and the formation of 53BP1 foci 15 minutes after irradiation, which might reflect initial DNA double-strand breaks, in DMSO-treated CHO cells were similar to those in non-treated cells, suggesting that the radioprotective effects were not attributable to the suppression of general indirect action in the lower concentration of DMSO. On the other hand, 2 hours after irradiation, the average number of 53BP1 foci, which might reflect residual DNA double-strand breaks, was significantly decreased in DMSO-treated CHO cells compared to non-treated cells. The results indicated that low concentration of DMSO exerts radioprotective effects through the facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair rather than through the suppression of indirect action.

  13. Biochemical basis for the action of radioprotective drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romantsev, E.F.; Blokhina, V.D.; Zhulanova, Z.I.; Koshcheenko, N.N.; Filippovich, I.V.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis of complex biochemical mechanism of action of radioprotective drugs is described. Shortly after injection of radioprotective aminothiols into animals the inhibition of radiosensitive biochemical processes: DNA and RNA synthesis, protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation has been observed. The molecular mechanism of these phenomena consists of radioprotectors ability to form adsorption, thioester, amide, and disulphide bonds with appropriate enzymes. The curve reflecting the formation and breakdown of mixed disulphides between radioprotectors and proteins coincides well with that reflecting the radioprotective effect dependence on time. The radiobiological significance of molecular interactions observed may be interpreted as the diminution in ''spoiled'' molecules formation (inhibition of replication) and elevation in repartion rate. The inhibition of biochemical processes has the reversible nature and last for short time. The drugs acting according to so-called oxygen effect protect also by means of biochemical mechanisms. The molecular mechanism is mediated through their ability to bind to receptors, and biologically important molecules and macromolecules. As a result the inhibition of radiosensitive processes occurs, the ''spoiled'' molecules number is diminished and reparation takes place more easily. The idea on the complex biochemical mechanism of action of radioprotectors correlates with the proposal on complex biochemical mechanism responsible for interphase death occured after irradiation

  14. Study on radioprotective effect of occupational healthy-tea No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongjian; Chen Yuli; Zou Xianqing; Dai Liming; Wang Shuzhen; Zhao Xiulan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the radiation protection effect of Occupational Healthy-tea No 4(OHT4) against injury by X-ray in mice. Methods: 45 male mice of Kunming strain were divided randomly into 3 groups: (1) normal control, (2) irradiated model group and (3) the experimental group. Mice of groups (2)(3) were irradiated once with 6.0 GyX-ray (2.0 Gy/min), meanwhile the mice of group (3) were treated with 2 mg/g.bw of OHT4. Then the difference of survival rate and the changes of WBC, PLT, T-cells subgroups between 3 groups were observed. Results: The OHT4 could lessen the radiation injury of X-ray and enhance the survival rate, the number of blood cells and T-cell immune function in mice. Conclusion: OHT4 has the significant protective effect against X-ray radiation

  15. On the problem of radioprotective foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiradzhiev, G.; Paskalev, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The authors claim that purposely created food with anti-radiation effect (radioprotective food) is of no use for the Kozloduy NPP workers. Their reason is that internal radiation doses represent only 14-24% of the total dose while in cases with the highest content of radionuclides the activity is less than 10% of the annual intake limits. Measures to protect the respiratory tract are recommended instead. Radioprotective food can be used not only for protection of the population in case of accidents but also for disease treatment, rehabilitation and prophylactics. 11 refs

  16. On the problem of radioprotective foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiradzhiev, G; Paskalev, Z [National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    The authors claim that purposely created food with anti-radiation effect (radioprotective food) is of no use for the Kozloduy NPP workers. Their reason is that internal radiation doses represent only 14-24% of the total dose while in cases with the highest content of radionuclides the activity is less than 10% of the annual intake limits. Measures to protect the respiratory tract are recommended instead. Radioprotective food can be used not only for protection of the population in case of accidents but also for disease treatment, rehabilitation and prophylactics. 11 refs.

  17. The radioprotective effects of Moringa oleifera against mobile phone electromagnetic radiation-induced infertility in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed; El-kott, Attalla Farag

    2015-01-01

    The present study has investigated the effects of mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on fertility in rats. The purpose of this study was to explore the capability of polyphenolic-rich Moringa oleifera leaf extract in protecting rat testis against EMR-induced impairments based on evaluation of sperm count, viability, motility, sperm cell morphology, anti-oxidants (SOD & CAT), oxidative stress marker, testis tissue histopathology and PCNA immunohistochemistry. The sample consisted of sixty male Wistar rats which were divided into four equal groups. The first group (the control) received only standard diet while the second group was supplemented daily and for eight weeks with 200 mg/kg aqueous extract of Moringa leaves. The third group was exposed to 900 MHz fields for one hour a day and for (7) days a week. As for the fourth group, it was exposed to mobile phone radiation and received the Moringa extract. The results showed that the EMR treated group exhibited a significantly decrease sperm parameters. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to EMR and treated with MOE significantly enhanced the sperm parameters. However, histological results in EMR group showed irregular seminiferous tubules, few spermatogonia, giant multinucleated cells, degenerated spermatozoa and the number of Leydig cells was significantly reduced. PCNA labeling indices were significant in EMR group versus the control group. Also, EMR affects spermatogenesis and causes to apoptosis due to the heat and other stress-related EMR in testis tissue. This study concludes that chronic exposure to EMR marked testicular injury which can be prevented by Moringa oleifera leaf extract. PMID:26550159

  18. Radioprotective shield - an adequate radioprotective device for routine stomatological radiodiagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltschke, F [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ., Greifswald (German Democratic Republic); Taschner, P; Koenig, W; Menzel, B [Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz, Berlin (German Democratic Republic)

    1975-01-01

    Starting from the shortcomings of the radioprotective devices at present used in routine stomatological radiodiagnosis, the authors describe the advantages of a radioprotective shield which has been produced in the Greifswald University Stomatological Clinic. On the basis of dosimetric studies, the National Board for Nuclear Safety and Radiological Protection of the GDR (Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz der DDR) could demonstrate the suitability of this shield as a radioprotective device for routine stomatological radiodiagnosis.

  19. Radioprotective effect of Punica granatum extract in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amulya, T.M.; Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To study protective role of pomegranate extract on radiation induced dermatitis and mucositis in head and neck cancer patients, a prospective, clinical, double blind case control study was carried out. 60 patients (30 active and controls) undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were studied for 12 months. Patients in study group were given whole fruit pomegranate extract. Each capsule contained 300 mg of whole fruit extract, each capsule contains 40% polyphenols and 27% punicalagin. Each patient was given 2 capsules every day for a period of 6 to 7 weeks. The skin and mucosal changes was graded according to the Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring criteria (RTOG) for skin and mucous membrane. Among the 30 patients who received the pomegranate extract, 27 had grade 1, 2 had grade 2 and 1 had grade 3 dermatitis. Whereas those who did not receive the extract, 20 had grade 2 dermatitis, 7 had grade 3 dermatitis and 3 had grade 4 dermatitis. Among the 30 patients who received the pomegranate extract, 10 had grade 0, 17 had grade 1 and 3 had grade 2 mucositis. Whereas of those who did not receive the extract, 21 had grade 2 mucositis, 9 had grade 3 mucositis. The results were statistically significant. Our study is one of the first study in humans to demonstrate the effectiveness of pomegranate extract in preventing radiation dermatitis and mucositis. (author)

  20. Effect of combined radiotherapy, hyperthermia, radioprotective agent and hypoxic cell sensitizer on mice testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Yasuhiko

    1985-08-01

    Application of hyperthermia was executed by immersing pelvis, testes and legs of mice in a thermostatically controlled water bath. Irradiation was carried out using Toshiba KXC-18 type X-ray therapy machine. Mice were killed 30 days after treatment. The testis weights obtained after hypertheramia alone were compared with that of the control and the relative testis weight ratios were calculated. The testis weights of mice treated for 5, 10, 20 and 40 min. in 40 deg C water and for 5 and 10 min. in 43 deg C water were not significantly different from the control. Their weights were reduced when treated for 20 min. in 43 deg C water and for 5 min. in 46 deg C water and their testis weight ratios were 0.81 and 0.46, respectively. The testis weights of irradiated mice decreased to about 45 % of the control at 250 rad. Beyond this dose, reduction of their weights was slowed down and testis weight at 1,000 rad was 28 %. There was not significantly difference between the relative testis weight ratios of the irradiation alone and that of the radiotherapy combined with YM-08310 (S-2-)3-aminopropylamino) ethyl phosphorothioic acid monohydrate). But when hyperthermia was added to their treatment, the effectiveness of the YM-08310 was slightly increased. The relative testis weight ratio on 400 rad X-ray combined with YM-08310 was 0.32 of the control, while its ratio on the radiotherapy and YM-08310 combined with the hyperthermia (43 deg C, 10 min.) was 0.43. (p < 0.01). The misonidazole treatments at 50, 100 and 200 rads were found to be effectuve. Radiation alone gave the relative testis weight ratios of 0.78, 0.71 and 0.49, respectively. In contrast, its ratios on the irradiation combined with the misonidazole were 0.57 (p < 0.01), 0.46 (p < 0.01) and 0.41 (p < 0.001). But, the additional hyperthermia combined with their treatment was found to be ineffective. (J.P.N.).

  1. Tinned fish with radioprotective ingredients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaneva, M.; Minkova, M.; Zajko, G.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of food ingredients with pronounced radioprotective properties is made. The protective effect of fish proteins and some vegetable oils is mentioned. As suitable additives to tinned fish during the manufacturing process the β carotene, anthocyans and apple pectin are pointed out. β-carotene possesses the ability to absorb radiations. It can be added either as a pure crystalline substance or dissolved in the vegetable oil. Anthocyans have an antimutagen effect due to their ability to inhibit free radical reactions. Some vegetable polyphenols can be added with wine. The Bulgarian anthocyan concentrate Enobagrin (made by extraction of marc and wine) is also proposed. A combination of Enobagrin, β-tocopherol and pyracetam decreases the postradiation hypoplasia. Special attention is paid to the importance of the pectin in intoxication with heavy radioactive metals. It is thought that the pectin forms unsoluble complex compounds with Fe, Zn, Cd, Co, Pb, Hg, Mn, Cr. The binding energy depends on the available carboxylic groups. Some experiments showing the interaction of the pectin with 90 Sr are mentioned. In the tinned fish the pectin can be introduced with tomato paste. Vegetables rich in pectin and carotene - carrots and tomato concentrate - can be added as well. Proposed enriched tinned fish can be used as a preventive radioprotective food under conditions of increased radiation risk. 19 refs

  2. Mechanisms of radioprotection - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    Theories of radiation protection can be considered at both the molecular and biochemical-physiological levels. Four molecular level protection hypotheses, radical scavenging, hydrogen transfer reactions, the mixed disulfide hypothesis and the endogenous non-protein sulfhydryl hypothesis, probably describe different aspects of the actual protection mechanism, although each has inconsistencies. At the biochemical-physiological level, hypothermia induction and biochemical shock may be involved in protection of the organism against radiation induced damage and death. It is most likely that no single mechanism can account for the protection offered by a radioprotective drug. Certain compounds may operate primarily by means of physiological effects resulting in hypoxia or hypothermia in critical tissues. Others may operate primarily by influencing the intrinsic radiosensitivity of target molecules by causing localized radical scavenging or by donating a hydrogen atom. Metabolic effects such as biochemical shock, release of endogenous non-protein sulfhydryls, induction of structural changes in target molecules or delay in DNA synthesis and cell division are also possible mechanisms for radioprotection. (author)

  3. Investigation of the mechanism of radioprotective action of adrenoceptor agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinskij, V.I.; Klimova, A.D.; Yashunskij, V.G.; Alpatova, T.V.; 4205700SU)

    1986-01-01

    α-Adrenoceptor agonists of both main groups, i.e. arylalkylamines and imidazolines, have a pronounced radioprotective effect. Their chemical analogs, which fail to stimulate α-adrenoceptors, do not protect mice. The effect of phenylephrine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline comes into play via α 1 -adrenoceptors and that of clonidine, via α 2 -adrenoceptors and also via α 1 -adrenoceptors. Adrenoceptor agonists can probably manifest their radioprotective action via both subtypes of α-adrenoceptors. Possible intracellular mechanisms of the radioprotective action are discussed

  4. Sustained release of radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, J.

    1980-11-01

    New pharmaceutical formulations for the sustained release into the G.I. tract of radioprotective agents have been developed by the authors. The experimental method initially consisted in the production of methylcellulose microcapsules. This method failed apparently because of the premature ''explosion'' of the microcapsules and the consequent premature release of massive amounts of the drug. A new method has been developed which consists in drying and pulverising cysteamine and cysteine preparations, mixing them in various proportions with stearic acid and ethylcellulose as carriers. The mixture is then compressed into cylindrical tablets at several pressure values and the leaching rate of the radioprotective agents is then measured by spectrophotometry. The relation between the concentration of the active drug and its rate of release, and the effect on the release rate of the pressure applied to the tablet during its formation were also investigated. Results indicating that the release rate was linearly related to the square root of ''t'' seem to be in agreement with what is predictable, according to Higuchi's equation, save for the very initial and terminal phases. A clear correlation was also established between the stearic acid/ethylcellulose ratios and the release of 20% cysteine, namely a marked decrease in the rate of cysteine release was observed with increasing concentrations of stearic acid. Finally, it was observed that a higher formation pressure results in quicker release of the drug

  5. Radioprotective Effect of Alk(enyl Thiosulfates Derived from Allium Vegetables against DNA Damage Caused by X-Ray Irradiation in Cultured Cells: Antiradiation Potential of Onions and Garlic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Sook Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate a radioprotective effect of sodium n-propyl thiosulfate (NPTS and sodium 2-propenyl thiosulfate (2PTS derived from onions and garlic, respectively, rat hepatoma H4IIE cells and mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were preincubated with each of these compounds for 48 hours at 37°C before receiving 10 Gy of X-ray irradiation. Cell damage caused by the irradiation was quantified as comet tail moment, which represents the degree of DNA damage. X-ray-induced DNA damage was significantly decreased in both H4IIE and L5178Y cells by micromolar concentrations of NPTS and 2PTS compared with the control without the compounds. The protective effect was more potent with 2PTS than NPTS. Onions and garlic have antiradiation potential.

  6. The radioprotective effect of synthetic immunomodulators on hemopoietic cfu-s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semina, O.V.; Semenets, T.N.; Dejgin, V.I.; Korotkov, A.M.; Poverennyj, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The radiotherapeutic effect of thymogen (Glu-Trp) and thymohexin (Arg-Lys-Asp-Val-Agr) synthetic peptide immunomodulators was investigated. Both thymogen and thymohexin were demonstrated to be able to reduce the damagine effect of ionizing radiation (1 Gy) on CFU-S by half. The treatment by these preparations after irradiation at dose of 4 Gy leads to more intensive restoration of CFU-S population as compared with control

  7. Radioprotective effects of ocimum flavonoids on leukocyte oxidants and antioxidants in oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshma, K [Department of Biochemistry, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore (India); Rao, A V [Fr. Muller' s Medical College, Mangalore (India); Dinesh, M [Department of Oncology, Amritha Institute of Medical Sciences, Cochin (India); Vasudevan, D M [Dept. of Biochemistry, Amritha Institute of Medical Sciences, Cochin (India)

    2008-04-15

    Oxidants (NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase) and antioxidants (GSH, GSH peroxidase, SOD and glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase, that provides NADPH for antioxidants) were assayed in the neutrophils from oral cancer patients, in three stages viz, baseline samples, 15 days after radiation and 30 days following radiation. These samples were obtained from 2 groups of patients. Group A that received radiation alone and Group B that received radiation and ocimum flavonoids, a radioprotector. The results showed a significant fall in the SOD levels in the second follow up of group B. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase showed significant increase only in the first follow up of patients who received Ocimum flavonoids. Except for these findings all other parameters remained statistically nonsignificant. (author)

  8. Radioprotective effects of ocimum flavonoids on leukocyte oxidants and antioxidants in oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshma, K.; Rao, A.V.; Dinesh, M.; Vasudevan, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidants (NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase) and antioxidants (GSH, GSH peroxidase, SOD and glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase, that provides NADPH for antioxidants) were assayed in the neutrophils from oral cancer patients, in three stages viz, baseline samples, 15 days after radiation and 30 days following radiation. These samples were obtained from 2 groups of patients. Group A that received radiation alone and Group B that received radiation and ocimum flavonoids, a radioprotector. The results showed a significant fall in the SOD levels in the second follow up of group B. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase showed significant increase only in the first follow up of patients who received Ocimum flavonoids. Except for these findings all other parameters remained statistically nonsignificant. (author)

  9. Potentiation of the radioprotective effect of hypoxic in mice with experimental hyperthyreosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikulova, Ya.; Vatsek, A.

    1982-01-01

    In mice fed for nine days a diet with the addition of dried thyroid gland, the protective effect of hypoxic hypoxia (12% O 2 ) on hemopoiesis was investigated. The protective effect of hypoxia on endogenous CFUs of the spleen and bone marrow cell populations grew with feeding intervals. In the course of thyroid gland feeding the number of hemopoietic stem cells (CFUs) of the femur increases. In the animals, hypermetabolism is induced which is manifested by an elevation of the total consumption of oxygen and by a decrease of oxygen tension in the tissues during the stay in an environment with 12% O 2 which is more pronounced than in the control group. The intensification of tissue hypoxia in hypermetabolic state suggests one of the possibilities of potentiating the protective effectiveness of drugs that reduce oxygen tension in the tissues [ru

  10. Radioprotective effect of both vitamins E and / or C on some blood components of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, W.A.; El-Daway, H.A.E.; Tawfik, S.S.M.; Soliman, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The protective effects of vitamin C and/or vitamin E on some blood components and serum level of thiobarbituric reactive substances (as indicator to level of lipid peroxidation) of irradiated male mice at dose 3 Gy sacrificed after 15,24 and 46 days of irradiation have been assessed in comparison with control and non-irradiated-treated with vitamin C and/or vitamin E groups. Vit. C, vit. E or in combination decreased the effect of irradiation on blood components and the level of thiobarbituric reactive substances, but average haemoglobin level RBC count, total WBC count, neutrophil count and lymphocyte count did not reach to the original average level even after 36 days of irradiation. Vit. E had a more protective effect than vit. C in case of total white blood cells, while vit. C was more protective in case of lymphocyte count. The combination of vitamins C and E had more protective effect than either of both vitamins alone. The decrease in lipid peroxidation products due to administration of vit. E and vit. C as antioxidants supported the theory that lipid peroxidation increased due to free radicals induced by irradiation

  11. Differential radioprotective effects of misoprostol in DNA repair-proficient and -deficient or radiosensitive cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buul, P. P.; van Duyn-Goedhart, A.; de rooij, D. G.; Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1997-01-01

    The protective effects of misoprostol (MP), an analogue of prostaglandin E1, on X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations, were studied in normal or mutant Chinese hamster cell lines grown as spheroids in vitro and on cell-killing in stem-cell spermatogonia of a mutant (acid) mouse strain or its

  12. Dose selenomethionine have radio-protective effect on cell lines with wild type p53?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, K.; Hagihira, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Selenium compounds are known to have cancer preventive effects. It is reported recently that selenium in the form of selenomethionine (SeMet) can protect cells with wild type p53 from UV-induced cell killing by activating the DNA repair mechanism of p53 tumor suppressor protein via redox factor Ref1 by reducing p53 cysteine residue 275 and 277. In contrast, SeMet has no protective effect on UV-induced cell killing in p53-null cells. If SeMet also has protective effect in cells with wild type p53 on cell killing by photon irradiation, SeMet can be used as normal tissue radio-protector. We examined the effect of SeMet on cell killing by X-ray irradiation in several cell lines with different p53 status at exponentially growing phase. Cell lines used in this experiment were as follows: H1299/neo; human lung cancer cell line of p53 null type tranfected with control vector with no p53, H1299/wp53; wild type p53 transfected counterpart. A172/neo; human glioblastoma cell line with wild type p53, A172/mp53-248; mp53-248 (248-mutant, ARG >TRP) transfected counterpart. SAS/neo; human tongue cancer cell line with wild type p53, and SAS/mp53-248; mp53-248 transfected counterpart. Cells were subcultured at monolayer in D-MEM containing 10% FBS. Survivals of the cells were determined by colony forming ability. Ten-MV linac X-ray was used to irradiate the cells. Exponentially growing cells were incubated with 20μM of SeMet for 15 hours before irradiation. After 24 hours exposure of SeMet, cells were incubated up to two weeks in growth medium for colony formation. Twenty-four hours exposure of 20μM of SeMet had no cytotoxicity on these cell lines. SeMet had no modification effect on cell killing by photon irradiation in H1299/neo, H1299/wp53, SAS/neo, SAS/mp53-248, and A172/mp53-248. On the other hand, SeMet sensitized A172/neo in radiation cell killing. The effects of p53 on interaction of SeMet and photon irradiation differ according to cell lines

  13. Radioprotective effects of soya and garlic oils in irradiated male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Forty male albino rats were divided equally into four groups, the first group acted as control group, the second group was subjected to 5 Gy whole body gamma irradiation, the third group was injected intraperitoneally daily with soya oil (15 mg/kg b.w. for 14 days) before gamma irradiation and the fourth group was injected intraperitoneally daily with garlic oil (150/kg b.w. for 14 days) before gamma irradiation. Mortality percentage and body weight were recorded. Blood samples were collected one week post-gamma irradiation from all animals for biochemical analysis. Serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), total lipids, triglycerides and cholesterol were measured. Total proteins and albumin were measured using photometric methods. Globulin value was calculated by subtraction of albumin from total protein values. The results showed that gamma irradiation with dose level of 5 Gy induced retardation of live body weight and increased the mortality. The data also showed significant increases in TBARS, total lipids, triglycerides and cholesterol levels, whereas the levels of total proteins, albumin and globulin were significantly decreased. The soya oil or garlic oil injected pre-irradiation exerted noticeable amelioration in induced radiation changes on body weight, mortality, TBARS, lipid profiles and protein fractions

  14. Radioprotective effect of misonidazole (Ro-07-0582) on normal canine rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stryker, J.A.; Albert, A.; Abt, A.B.

    1980-10-01

    A single 1500 rad (=15 Gy) dose of 10-MeV X-rays was administered to the pelvis of 20 mongrel dogs. Ten received misonidazole (Ro-07-0582), 100 mg/kg p.o., 4 hours pre-irradiation. Serum misonidazole levels immediately pre-irradiation were 43 +- 10 ..mu..g/ml (mean +- SD). The dogs were euthanized within 3 months post-irradiation. Each rectal specimen was studied for anatomic and histologic pathology and was assigned a Pathologic Alteration Score (PAS) of 1, 2, or 3 in order of increasing severity. The PAS of the rectal specimens from the drug group was 1.6 +- 0.7, and that of the controls 2.3 +- 0.8. The PAS of the drug group was significantly lower than the control group (P = 0.008). The data suggest that misonidazole is a radioprotector for normal tissue.

  15. Evaluation of radio-protective effect of melatonin on whole body irradiation induced liver tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Alireza; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Ghobadi, Ghazale; Mohseni, Mehran; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with biological systems to induce excessive fluxes of free radicals that attack various cellular components. Melatonin has been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger and indirect antioxidant via its stimulatory actions on the antioxidant system.The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant role of melatonin against radiation-induced oxidative injury to the rat liver after whole body irradiation. In this experimental study,thirty-two rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 was the control group, group 2 only received melatonin (30 mg/kg on the first day and 30 mg/kg on the following days), group 3 only received whole body gamma irradiation of 10 Gy, and group 4 received 30 mg/kg melatonin 30 minutes prior to radiation plus whole body irradiation of 10 Gy plus 30 mg/kg melatonin daily through intraperitoneal (IP) injection for three days after irradiation. Three days after irradiation, all rats were sacrificed and their livers were excised to measure the biochemical parameters malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Each data point represents mean ± standard error on the mean (SEM) of at least eight animals per group. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare different groups, followed by Tukey's multiple comparison tests (p<0.05). The results demonstrated that whole body irradiation induced liver tissue damage by increasing MDA levels and decreasing GSH levels. Hepatic MDA levels in irradiated rats that were treated with melatonin (30 mg/kg) were significantly decreased, while GSH levels were significantly increased, when compared to either of the control groups or the melatonin only group. The data suggest that administration of melatonin before and after irradiation may reduce liver damage caused by gamma irradiation.

  16. Radioprotective Effect and Follow-up of Melatonin as Antifertility Drug in Male Adult Mice submitted to Whole-Body γ Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, S.S.; Mansour, H.H.; El-Shamy, E.; Sallam, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Melatonin is universal antioxidant for both man and animals and a substance normally produced in the human body. Radioprotective and follow up of melatonin as anti-fertility drug in whole body γ-irradiated male adult mice were studied. The alterations occurred in reproductive system and biochemical aspects in mice were evaluated. Control group, melatonin treated (received 10 mg/kg body wt for 20 successive days), following up for melatonin treated (2 recovery periods; 60 and 120 days), irradiated (2 Gy-γ-rays), pre-treated (received melatonin before irradiation) and following up for pre-treated (2 recovery periods) groups were designed. Body and testes wt, micronucleus test (MN), chromosomal aberration (CA), seminal plasma melatonin, sperm quality (count, motility and abnormal forms) and hormonal assay in serum (melatonin, testosterone, FSH and prolactin) were recorded for fertility assessment. Oxidative parameters in testis tissue (malonaldehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO)) and biochemical assay (protein and lipid fractions in serum) were investigated for judgment melatonin radioprotective efficacy. Irradiation intensifies the processes of lipo peroxidation and oxidative modification of lipids and proteins with synchronized inhibition of the anti oxidative protection system. Melatonin administration against a background of radiation caused a distinctly expressed antioxidant effect

  17. Radioprotective effect of leaf extract of Indian medical plant Ocimum sanctum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uma Devi, P; Ganasoundari, A [Kasturba Medical College, Manipal (India). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-03-01

    Water or aqueous ethanol extract of O.sanctum was given ip, either as a single dose or multiple doses, before a whole-body exposure to 11 Gy(LD{sub 100/30}) of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in albino mice. The water extract was more effective and less toxic than the aqueous ethanol extract. An optimum ip dose of 50 mg/kg (<1/100 LD{sub 50}) of the water extract, at 10 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, gave the maximum survival. Increasing the dose per treatment or the number of treatments did not increase protection. Intraperitoneal administration gave the best protection (70% survival). Other routes (im, iv and po) were less effective and produced 37-47% survival. The optimum dose (ip) gave a dose modifying factor of 1.28. Since the extract may contain a number of chemical compounds, it is not possible to attribute the observed protection to any particular compound at present. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. In vivo radioprotective effect of curcumin, taurine, apigenin and kampferol on DNA damage in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, S.; Bhilwade, H.N.; Chaubey, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to produce oxidative stress through the generation of ROS leading to a variety of DNA lesions. However, the most dangerous DNA lesions which are responsible for the origin of lethal effects, mutagenesis, genomic instability and carcinogenesis are the DSBs. During recent years efforts are being made to identify phytochemicals or other naturally occurring compounds which can reduce the harmful effect of radiation during accidental exposure or prevent normal tissue injury during radiotherapy. In present study, we have investigated the protective role of curcumin, taurine, apigenin and kaempferol against radiation-induced oxidative damage in mice. Groups of mice were fed 1 % of curcumin in diet for three weeks. Similarly other groups of mice were injected i.p. with 50 mg/kg body weight of taurine for five consecutive days. Other four groups of mice were injected i.p. with apigenin (10.8 mg/kg BW and 21.6 mg/kg BW), kaempferol (14.3 mg/kg BW and 28.6 mg/kg BW). After the completion of the treatment mice pre-treated with curcumin, taurine, apigenin and kaempferol were exposed to 2 or 3 Gy of gamma rays. Immediately after irradiation, alkaline comet assay was performed using standard procedures. Twenty four post radiation exposure mice were sacrificed for micronucleus test

  19. Radioprotection by butylated hydroxytoluene against radiation induced genetic and lethal effects in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjaria, Kshiti B.; Shirsath, Kapil B.; Sreedevi, B.

    2012-01-01

    Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a phenolic antioxidant which is used widely in food industry as a food preservative for fats and oils; in plastics and also in cosmetics and fragrances. Generally it is considered harmless, however BHT has also shown potentiation of radiation effects in some studies. The objective of this study was to test the modifying properties of BHT in a eukaryotic model system comprising of Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7, a diploid yeast strain, against the genotoxic effects induced by 60 Co gamma radiation. Log phase cells were exposed to 100 Gy of radiation in the absence or presence of 0.025-0.25 mM BHT. In another set of experiments, log phase cells were exposed to 400 Gy of radiation in the absence or presence of 0.025 mM BHT. Cells were washed and plated. The results indicated that presence of BHT reduced the frequencies of gene conversion and back mutation as well as cell killing induced by radiation. The results obtained in the present study can be explained on the basis of potent radical scavenging ability of BHT, which is a well known standard antioxidant and whose free radical scavenging ability has been very well established and documented using stable free radical DPPH. (author)

  20. Reduced bone marrow pO2 following treatment with radioprotective drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allalunis-Turner, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The sensitizer adduct technique [(3H]misonidazole binding) was used to assess the extent of murine bone marrow hypoxia following treatment with a variety of radioprotectors. The binding rates previously determined in vivo were compared to those obtained by incubating marrow cells in atmospheres of varying oxygen content. Parallel experiments demonstrated that the oxygen dependence of [3H]misonidazole binding (Km approximately 0.15% oxygen) was similar to the oxygen dependence of marrow radiosensitivity (Km approximately 0.2% oxygen). Maximally radioprotective doses of several drugs have been shown to increase the binding of [3H]misonidazole significantly in vivo. A comparison to the in vitro binding rates suggests that the average oxygen concentration in the marrow at times associated with radioprotection was on the order of 0.5 to 0.8% oxygen. The relative importance of marrow hypoxia to the overall radioprotective effects of different drugs may vary considerably. However, these results have demonstrated that certain radioprotective drugs can induce marrow hypoxia and this reduced pO2 may contribute to the efficacy of these agents

  1. Activity report of the medical section of radioprotection, 1974-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This report supersides the activities of the medical section of the Radioprotection Department of the Orsay Institute of Nuclear Physics: industrial medicine, monitoring of ionizing radiation effects [fr

  2. Proceedings of the 6. conference days on radioprotection optimization in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vial, Eric; Bernier, Marie-Odile; De Vita, Antoine; Pignot, Christine; Bardelay, Chantal; Godet, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Marie-Line; Saad, Nawal; Deboodt, Pascal P.A.; Faure, Sophie; Fusil, Laurence; Alvarez, Manuel; Tourneux, C.; Barbey, Pierre; Pigree, Gilbert; Lemarchand, Maxime; Buchaniec, Remi; Rocourt, Nathalie; Bouden, Helene; Lasselin, Stephanie; Moeneclaey, Ludivine; Rebullida, Delphine; Werquin, Marie Odile; Dubus, Francois; Ponsard, Samuel; Marques, Sophie; K-Zerho, R.; Vacher, F.; Vrammout, D.; Guillot, E.; Fucks, I.; Moukarzel, Marianne; Ryckx, Nick; Verdun, Francis R.; Lefaure, Christian; Balduyck, Sebastien; Cruz Suarez, Rodolfo; ); Bouvy, Christophe; Geets, Jean-Michel; Nactergal, Benoit; Davet, Laurent; Carlier, Pierre; Lereculey, Clement; Livolsi, Paul; PIN, Alain; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Le Faou, Yann; Courageot, Estelle; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Kutschera, Reinald; Le Meur, Gaelle; Lantheaume, Noel; Schiedts, Dominique; Nouveau, Philippe; Walterscheid, Bertrand; Humbert, Edouard; Tranchant, Philippe; Dabat-Blondeau, Charlotte; Renard, Francois; Lucas, Jean-Yves; Fritioff, Karin; Svedberg, Torgny; Carlson, Marie; Hennigor, Staffan; Schieber, Caroline; Andresz, Sylvain; Roch, Patrice; Celier, David; Aubert, Bernard; Etard, Cecile; Bouette, Aurelien; Carette, M.F.; Haddad, S.; Khalil, A.; Foulquier, J.N.; Parrot, A.; Ceyrolle, C.; Bechard, Pascal; Clero, E.; Leuraud, K.; Laurier, D.; Couzinet, M.; LE GUEN, B.; Davesne, Estelle; Blanchardon, Eric; Franck, Didier; Quesne, Benoit; De Vita, Antoine; Chojnacki, Eric; Grandeau, E.; Dumont, N.; Cattelotte, J.; Dine, Pierre Emmanuel; Guersen, Joel; Nwatsock, Joseph Francis; Boyer, Louis; Karmouche, K.; Moyon, J.B.; Cassagnes, L.; Garcier, J.M.; Lortal, B.; Caron, J.; Karst, M.; Rage, Estelle; Caer-Lorho, Sylvaine; Drubay, Damien; Ancelet, Sophie; Laurier, Dominique; Laroche, Pierre; Sans, Philippe; Tournier, Helene; Zvorykin, Sonia

    2014-06-01

    This 6. ALARA conference was jointly organised by the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) and several professional associations (ABR, AFPPE, ARRAD, ATSR, RAMIP, SFPM, SFR). The conference was the occasion to review all aspects relative to the issues of radioprotection optimization and to its implementation to workers, patients and the public in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains. A particular attention must be given to the application of the ALARA principle in all sectors relevant to radioprotection, especially in a context characterized by: big dismantling works under preparation in the French nuclear park, an increased use of X-radiation in the medical domain - involving both patients and medical personnel, new knowledge concerning the health effects of ionizing radiations, and an evolution of European and international radioprotection safety standards. All these aspects were discussed during these conference days. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) together with their corresponding abstracts (in French) and dealing with: 1 - Review of the evolution of workers/patients exposure in France and comparison with international data (E. Vial); 2 - Status of low dose epidemiology (M.O. Bernier); 3 - Radioprotection optimization method at the MELOX plant (A. De Vita); 4 - Elaboration method for the annual dosimetric objective of the French nuclear park (C. Pignot); 5 - Optimisation principle in the new EURATOM Directive (N. Saad); 6 - Integrated management of radiological and non-radiological risks: the inevitable challenge (P. Deboodt); 7 - Radiological and conventional risks: the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) integrated approach (S. Faure); 8 - EVEREST (Evolving towards an entry into controlled areas in street clothes, M. Alvarez); 9 - Example of multi-risk management in the medical domain (C. Tourneux); 10 - Radioprotection optimisation in the research domain (P. Barbey); 11 - Child scanning dosimetry

  3. Radioprotection in the medical applications of the ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication presents information about of the radiological safety in the medical application of the ionizing radiation compiled in 11 chapter and 1 annex. The first four chapters are principally dedicated to technical uses in radioprotection, the external and internal irradiation and the biological radiation effects. The radioprotection principles, the individual monitoring techniques, and the radioprotection systems are developed afterwards in the followings three chapters. The second half of the document is dedicated entirely to the medical practices using ionizing radiations, specially to the radioprotection aspects in radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The final chapter is dedicated to radiological accidents happened worldwide in the field of the medical applications of the ionizing radiations. The annex, about of the regulatory area, established a set of standards, laws, decrees and other force regulations in radiological safety, related in radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy

  4. Analysis of interleukin 1 mediated radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manori, I.; Kushilevsky, A.; Weinstein, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The potential value of interleukin 1(IL-1) containing supernatants as a radioprotective agent was evaluated. It was found that the response of irradiated thymocytes to mitogens was partially restored if IL-1 containing supernatants was included in the culture medium immediately after irradiation. A delay of 24 h in the addition of IL-1 and mitogen abrogated the radioprotection effect. Under the same conditions IL-2 containing supernatants were effective, suggesting that the dose modifying effect of IL-1 acts through induction of IL-2 elaboration. The results of the present study may be important in cases where it is necessary to restore depressed immune response resulting from irradiation accidents or radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Evaluation of radioprotective action of a mutant (E-25) form of Chlorella vulgaris in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, L.; Tiku, A.B.; Kesavan, P.C.; Ogaki, M.

    1993-01-01

    The possible role of orally fed Chlorella vulgaris (E-25) in modulating the gamma-ray induced chromosomal damage in whole-body irradiated mice was evaluated using a micronucleus test. Different doses of E-25 were administered either chronically (once, twice or thrice a day for 28 days) or as single acute doses before/after irradiation. A significant radioprotective effect was observed in both acute and chronic pretreatments, but only at doses above 400 mg/kg body weight. However, in mice that received E-25 (500 mg/kg) three times a day for 28 days, there was no protective effect, and a significant loss in their body weight was observed. Interestingly, E-25 afforded significant radioprotection even when it was administered within 0.4 hr after irradiation. (author)

  6. Perculiarities of the toxicity and radioprotective activity of aminopropyl aminoethyl thiophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terekhov, A.V.; Besedina, L.N.; Zherebchenko, P.G.; Znamenskij, V.V.; Suslikov, V.I.; Titov, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    Toxicity and radioprotective activity of aminopropyl aminoethyl thiophosphate (APAETP) has been compared to those of cystaphos. APAETP has been shown to exceed cystaphos slightly by the value of the radioprotective effect but it is inferior to the latter in the duration of the action after intraperitoneal administration. APAETP, used in toxic doses, does not cause spastic reactions in animals. The range of radioprotective effect of APAETP is almost twice as high as that of cystaphos. Both APAETP and cystaphos have a pronounced radioprotective action not only at high (355 R/min) but also at comparatively low (10.7 R/min) dose-rates of γ-radiation

  7. Radioprotective Properties of Detoxified Lipid A from Salmonella minnesota R595

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    irradiated animals treated with bacterial endotoxins. Am. J. Physiol. 191, 124-130 (1957). 3. M. PARANT, Effect of LPS on nonspecific recistance to...Salmonella minnesota R595. Radiat. Res. 107, 107-114(1986). . in the past, the toxicity of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or its principal bioactive...contained significantly less CSA than those receiving either GLY or LAD. DISCUSSION The radioprotective effect of bacterial endotoxins has been known for over

  8. Radioprotective Effect of Propolis on the Blood Corpuscle of a Mouse by SEM after X-irradiation on the Whole Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Tae Jeong

    2008-01-01

    After x-ray 5 Gy radiation on the whole body of a mouse using a linear accelerator, its leucocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet were observed by SEM. Also, after injecting propolis into the abdominal cavity, the radio-protective effect of blood corpuscles was studied. The observation of micromorphology in blood corpuscles revealed that the number of leukocyte, erythrocyte, and thrombocyte decreased in the experimental group and the lump got together in blood corpuscles after 10 and 20 days. In RBC, crack or break on the surface and poikilosperocytes were observed. In the irradiation group, the size of leucocytes was smaller than that in control group and the number of villus at the verge substantially decreased. The blood corpuscles in the propolis group, however, had the similar results to control group.

  9. Radioprotective Effect of Propolis on the Blood Corpuscle of a Mouse by SEM after X-irradiation on the Whole Body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Tae Jeong [Dept. of Radiological Science, Kaya University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    After x-ray 5 Gy radiation on the whole body of a mouse using a linear accelerator, its leucocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet were observed by SEM. Also, after injecting propolis into the abdominal cavity, the radio-protective effect of blood corpuscles was studied. The observation of micromorphology in blood corpuscles revealed that the number of leukocyte, erythrocyte, and thrombocyte decreased in the experimental group and the lump got together in blood corpuscles after 10 and 20 days. In RBC, crack or break on the surface and poikilosperocytes were observed. In the irradiation group, the size of leucocytes was smaller than that in control group and the number of villus at the verge substantially decreased. The blood corpuscles in the propolis group, however, had the similar results to control group.

  10. Modulation of Radioprotective Effects of Respiratory Hypoxia by Changing the Duration of Hypoxia before Irradiation and by Combining Hypoxia and Administration of Hemopoiesis-Stimulating Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacek, Antonín; Tačev, T.; Hofer, Michal

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 177, č. 9 (2001), s. 474-481 ISSN 0179-7158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : radioprotection * mice * hypoxia Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.005, year: 2001

  11. Protection of the environment. How to position radioprotection in an ecological risk assessment perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, Francois

    2003-01-01

    cancer induction (stochastic) in human individuals, whereas the current approach in radioprotection of biota targets reproductive success (deterministic) and cytogenetic effects, thought to have the highest significance at population and ecosystem levels. The focus on individuals in a bottom-up approach, due to the ease with which it may be quantified, has prompted the development of current ecotoxicological methods as a scientific foundation for environmental protection regulation. However, the most recent ecological theories, which emphasise on complex systems as a key to modern ecological understanding, call for the additional consideration of more holistic, top-down, approaches. Critically, dose-effect relationships of the subsystem components may lose their predictive ability at the system level

  12. Radioprotective effects of miso (fermented soy bean paste) against radiation in B6C3F1 mice. Increased small intestinal crypt survival, crypt lengths and prolongation of average time to death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Masayuki; Lu, Huimei; Shiraki, Katsutomo; Ishimura, Yoshimasa; Uesaka, Toshihiro; Katoh, Osamu; Watanabe, Hiromitsu

    2001-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of miso, a fermentation product from soy bean, was investigated with reference to the survival time, crypt survival and jejunum crypt length in male B6C3F1 mice. Miso at three different fermentation stages (early-, medium- and long-term fermented miso) was mixed in MF diet into biscuits at 10% and was administered from 1 week before irradiation. Animal survival in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly prolonged as compared with the short-term fermented miso and MF cases after 8 Gy of 60 Co-γ-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 2 Gy min -1 . Delay in mortality was evident in all three miso groups, with significantly increased survival. At doses of 10 and 12 Gy X-irradiation at a dose rate of 4 Gy min -1 , the treatment with long-term fermented miso significantly increased crypt survival. Also the protective influence against irradiation in terms of crypt lengths in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly greater than in the short-term or medium-term fermented miso and MF diet groups. Thus, prolonged fermentation appears to be very important for protection against radiation effects. (author)

  13. Radioprotective effects of miso (fermented soy bean paste) against radiation in B6C3F1 mice: increased small intestinal crypt survival, crypt lengths and prolongation of average time to death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, M; Lu, H; Shiraki, K; Ishimura, Y; Uesaka, T; Katoh, O; Watanabe, H

    2001-12-01

    The radioprotective effect of miso, a fermentation product from soy bean, was investigated with reference to the survival time, crypt survival and jejunum crypt length in male B6C3F1 mice. Miso at three different fermentation stages (early-, medium- and long-term fermented miso) was mixed in MF diet into biscuits at 10% and was administered from 1 week before irradiation. Animal survival in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly prolonged as compared with the short-term fermented miso and MF cases after 8 Gy of 60Co-gamma-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 2Gy min(-1). Delay in mortality was evident in all three miso groups, with significantly increased survival. At doses of 10 and 12 Gy X-irradiation at a dose rate of 4 Gy min(-1), the treatment with long-term fermented miso significantly increased crypt survival. Also the protective influence against irradiation in terms of crypt lengths in the long-term fermented miso group was significantly greater than in the short-term or medium-term fermented miso and MF diet groups. Thus, prolonged fermentation appears to be very important for protection against radiation effects.

  14. Radioprotective action of curcumin extracted from Curcuma longa LINN: inhibitory effect on formation of urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, tumorigenesis, but not mortality, induced by γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inano, Hiroshi; Onoda, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the radioprotective action of curcumin [1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione] extracted from Curcuma longa LINN against the acute and chronic effects and the mortality induced by exposure to radiation using female rats. Methods and Materials: For the assay of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in urine, a marker for acute effects, Wistar-MS virgin rats were fed the basal diet with exposure at 0 or 3 Gy to γ-rays from a 60 Co source as the control. Rats in the experimental groups received whole-body irradiation with 3 Gy and were fed a diet containing 1% (wt/wt) curcumin for 3 days before and/or 2 days after irradiation. The urine was collected for a 24-h period between 1 and 2 days after irradiation. Urine samples were used to determine the 8-OHdG level using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the creatinine level by a modified Jaffe reaction. For long-term effects, rats at Day 17 of pregnancy were fed a diet containing curcumin for 3 days before and/or 3 days after irradiation with 1.5 Gy, and received a pellet of diethylstilbestrol as the promoter. The rats were examined for mammary and pituitary tumors for 1 year. To determine survival, virgin rats received whole-body irradiation with 9.6 Gy and were fed a diet containing curcumin for 3 days before and/or 3 days after irradiation. After irradiation, all rats were assessed daily for survival for 30 days. Results: Acutely in virgin rats irradiated with 3 Gy, the creatinine-corrected concentration and total amount of 8-OHdG in the 24-h urine samples were higher (approximately 1.3-fold) than the corresponding values in the nonirradiated controls. Adding curcumin to the diet for 3 days before and/or 2 days after irradiation reduced the elevated 8-OHdG levels by 50-70%. The evaluation of the protective action of curcumin against the long-term effects revealed that curcumin significantly decreased the incidence of mammary and pituitary tumors. However, the

  15. Evaluation of the free radical scavenging activity and radioprotective efficacy of Grewia asiatica fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Krishna V; Sisodia, Rashmi [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan-302055 (India)], E-mail: rashsisodia@yahoo.co.in

    2009-09-01

    The radioprotective effect of Grewia asiatica fruit (GAE) which contains anthocyanin-type cyanidin 3-glucoside, vitamins C and A, minerals, carotenes and dietary fibre was studied. For the study Swiss albino mice were divided into five groups: (1) control (vehicle treated); (2) GAE treated (700 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} for 15 days); (3) irradiated (5 Gy); (4) GAE+irradiated and (5) irradiated+GAE treated. The irradiation of animals resulted in a significant elevation of lipid peroxidation in terms of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content and depletion in glutathione (GSH) and protein levels at all intervals studied, namely 1-30 days, in comparison to the control group. Treatment of mice with GAE before and after irradiation caused a significant depletion in TBARS content followed by a significant elevation in GSH and protein concentration in the intestine and testis of mice at all post-irradiation autopsy intervals in comparison to irradiated mice. Significant protection of DNA and RNA in testis was also noticed. GAE was found to have strong radical scavenging activity in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH{sup *}) and O{sub 2}{sup -} assays and also showed in vitro radioprotective activity in protein carbonyl assay in a dose-dependent manner. The above results prove the radioprotective efficacy of GAE.

  16. Effectiveness of adenoplex forte with or without heparegene as radioprotective and curative agent for controlling radiation induced hepatic metabolic dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, S.H.; EL-Sayed, N.M.; Hussein, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the combined radioprotective and curative capacities of a known drug namely adenoplex forte [combination of adenosine tetraphosphate (ATP), co carboxylase, cyanocobalamin (Bn) and nicotinamide (vitamin P.P)] in dependency or in combination with heparegen [thiazolidine 4 -carboxylic acid] on liver metabolic processes of rats irradiated at 5 Gy. Therefore, the levels of plasma total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were estimated as indicative parameters for lipid metabolism. Estimations of plasma glucose, pyruvate and lactate levels as well as liver glycogen content were employed as a useful means for testing the carbohydrate metabolism. The tested parameters were undertaken on 3, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days post-radiation exposure of rats to 5 Gy. Data of the present study revealed that exposure of rats to gamma irradiation at a dose level of 5 Gy was associated with disturbances in liver metabolic functions as reflected by alterations observed in all the tested parameters of both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism up to 30 days post-irradiation. The data further indicated that appropriate use of the selected drug adenoplex forte either independently or in combination with heparegen can preferentially modify liver metabolic disturbances induced by radiation exposure, which creates a therapeutic advantage in radiation therapy. In conclusion, this study suggest the potential use of adenoplex forte (with dose of 290 mg/kg) in combination with heparegen (with dose of 2 mg/kg) in patients receiving radiotherapy and suffering disturbed liver metabolic function mainly in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

  17. On the radioprotective properties of heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, R.; Bernard, Y.

    1964-01-01

    Continuing their study of the possible radioprotective properties of heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds, the authors study certain derivatives of imidazole and other compounds of similar structure. The results obtained showed: 1 - that the derivatives resulting from the presence in the imidazole ring of the mercapto, methyl, carbonyl, or benzyl groups are inactive: these substitutions appear to destroy the significant radioprotective activity of the imidazole, 2 - that benzimidazole, on the contrary, seems to possess highly interesting properties. The percentage of survivals obtained with mice treated with benzimidazole and exposed to lethal irradiation has encouraged the authors to undertake careful study of this substance, with a view to define optimum activity conditions, and to determine the mechanism responsible for its radioprotective action. Further on and so as to of clarify certain points that might give useful data concerning the mechanisms of action of radioprotective chemicals, in respect of each of the products the authors have studied: a - the action of these bodies on the internal temperature of mice, b - their radioprotective activity in vitro, in a solution of irradiated hemin. (authors) [fr

  18. Synthesis and radioprotective study of novel amino-alkyl dithiocarbamic acid derivatives against γ-irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinimehr, S. J.; Beiki, D.; Kebriaeezadeh, A.; Khalaj, A.; Pirali Hamedani, M.; Akhlaghpoor, S.; Esmaeili, H.; Barazesh, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective capacity of some novel amino alkylated dithiocarbamic acid potassium salts against γ-irradiation in mice. Materials and Methods: Eight compounds containing 2-aminoethyl-, 3-aminopropyl-, 4-aminobutyl-, 5-aminopentyl-, 6-aminohexyl-, 7-amino heptyl-, 8-amino octyl and 9-amino nonyl of dithiocarbamate derivatives were prepared. Male NMRI mice were injected intraperitoneally with a geometric progression of doses (300 -1000 mg/kg), through the dose response range for lethal toxicity. To evaluate the radioprotective activity, one-half of the toxic LD 50 of each compound were injected intraperitoneally to groups of twenty mice, 30 minutes prior to γ-irradiation. The treated animals were kept for 30 days, and the lethality was recorded each day. Results: Among Eight compounds of alkyl dithiocarbamic acid derivatives, 5-aminopentyl, 7-amino heptyl, 8-amino octyl and 9-amino nonyl dithiocarbamic acid mono potassium salts are new compounds. All evaluated compounds showed a concentration dependent effect on the survival in mice. The LD 50 values were found to be more than 599 mg/kg. The percentages of 30-day survival of mice for 2-aminoethyl, 7-amino heptyl and 8-amino octyl dithiocarbamic acid derivatives were 7%, 40% and 13.5%, respectively, when injected 30 minutes before γ-irradiation. Other compounds had no radioprotective effects. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the treated and control groups for the 7-amino heptyl derivative (p<0.05). Conclusion: Among the compounds investigated in this study, 7-amino heptyl dithiocarbamate derivative showed more radioprotective effects in comparison with the others. Although it seems that the radioprotective effects in these derivatives correlate with the size of the alkyl chain, more experiments are required to support this hypothesis.

  19. D-penicillamine exhibits a higher radioprotective effect in suckling mice than in grown-up animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroszlan, Gy.; Lakatos, L.; Dezsi, Z.; Hatvani, I.; Pintye, E.; Karmazsin, L.; Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Debrecen; Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Debrecen

    1982-01-01

    Grown-up and suckling mice were exposed to whole-body 60 Co-irradiation of 6-10 Gy. The survival time was significantly increased in suckling animals by 3000 mg per kg body weight D-penicillamine applied intraperitoneally 60 min before irradiation, whereas the same treatment had no significant effect in grown-up animals. (L.E.)

  20. Representative parameter of immunostimulatory ginseng polysaccharide to predict radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyeog Jin; Shim, Ji Young; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Yun, Yeon Sook; Song, Jie Young [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    According to the increase in the use of radiotherapy to cancer patients, many approaches have been tried to develop new agents for the protection of surrounding normal tissues. However, it is still few applied in the clinic as a radioprotector. We aim to find a representative parameter for radioprotection to easily predict the activity of in vivo experiment from the results of in vitro screening. The polysaccharide extracted from Panax ginseng was used in this study because the immunostimulator has been regarded as one of the radioprotective agent category and was already reported having a promising radioprotective activity through the increase of hematopoietic cells and the production of several cytokines. Mitogenic activity, AK cells activity and nitric oxide production were monitored for the in vitro immunological assay, and endogenous Colony-Forming Unit (e-CFU) was measured as in vivo radioprotective parameter. The immunological activity was increased by the galactose contents of ginseng polysaccharide dependently. The result of this study suggests that mitogenic activity of splenocytes demonstrated a good correlation with in vivo radioprotective effect, and may be used as a representative parameter to screen the candidates for radioprotector.

  1. Morphological study of the radioprotective effect of vitamin E (dl-alpha-tocopheryl) in tissue reparation in rats; Estudo morfologico do efeito radioprotetor da vitamina E (dl-alfa-tocoferil) na reparacao tecidual em ratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzi, Flavio Ricardo [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Raduilogia Odontologica; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Radiologia Odontologica; Tuji, Fabricio Mesquita [Para Univ., Belem, PA (Brazil). Radiologia Odontologica

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the action of the vitamin E as a radioprotective agent in the process of tissue reparation in rats submitted to a surgical procedure, which consisted of a wound done in the fore dorsal area. The animals were divided into five groups: group C (controls) - wound; group VE - previous treatment with vitamin E (90 UI); group IR - wound and irradiation of the borders three days after surgery; group VEIR - previous treatment with 90 UI of the vitamin E and irradiation of the borders three days after the surgery; group OIR - previous treatment with olive oil and irradiation of the borders three days after surgery. The radioprotective effect of the vitamin E was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin stained specimens in order to identify granulation tissue, at 4, 7, 14 and 21 days after the surgical procedures. The results showed that 6 Gy of electron irradiation with a beam of 6 MeV caused retardation of the tissue repairing process and that vitamin E was effective as a radioprotective agent. (author)

  2. Prolonged radioprotective activity of WR-2721 linked to dextran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moenig, H.; Konermann, G.; Oehlert, W.

    1990-01-01

    The radioprotective agent WR-2721 was linked to dextran and poly(glutamic acid) respectively, to obtain a prolonged radioprotective ability. Male mice were administered these water soluble polymer conjugates one to 72 hours prior to a whole body irradiation with X-rays. A prolongation of radioprotective efficiency was achieved with two dextran-(WR-2721)-conjugates. For a period of 24 hours between administration, and irradiation dose reduction factors of 1.14±0.04 and 1.10±0.03 respectively were found. After 72 hours, no protective effect was observed. Histopathological investigations of the liver for formation of tumors 200 to 600 days after irradiation seems to indicate that a protective effect is not produced by the dextran-(WR-2721)-conjugats. (orig.) [de

  3. Formal conditions for the significance-effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thellefsen, Torkild Leo; Sørensen, Bent; Thellefsen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The significance-effect is the right effect of meaning caused upon an interpreting mind. The right effect is understood as the right interpretation of an intended meaning caused by a sign communicated by an utterer. In the article, which is inspired by Charles S. Peirce's doctrine of signs, his s...... semeiotics and his theory of communication, we account for the formal conditions that have to be present for the release of the significance-effect....

  4. Studies of the radioprotective properties of nicotinyl compounds, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itzel-Kietzmann, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    Radioprotective properties of sodium salts of nicotinyl aspartic acid, nicotinyl methionyl aspartic acid and nicotinyl glutamic acid were tested in mice (NMRI). Experimental animals were irradiated by rayage (9,5 Gy). Parameters were: survival rate, peritoneal fluid cell count, weight and DNA concentration of spleen, hepatic DNA polymerase activity and rate of protein synthesis, lactate dehydrogenase activity in serum, maltase, sucrase and leucine aminopeptidase activitiy in duodenum and jejunum. Following results were obtained: 1. There was no significant difference in survival rate of treated and untreated animals. In treated animals only a short prolongation of survival time was observed. 2. After irradiation a quick reduction of splenic weight and DNA concentration was measured. 3. A reduction of DNA polymerase activity in liver was observed in treated and untreated mice. The rate of hepatic protein synthesis was similar in all animals. A final decrease was observed. 4. Variable activities of maltase, sucrase and leucine aminopeptidase activity in duodenum and jejunum indicated no radioprotective effect of tested substances. In conclusion of these results the tested substances show no significant radioprotective properties. (orig.) [de

  5. ESR studies of radiation induced radical products from linoleic acid and linolenic acid and the radioprotective effect by α-tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Younan; Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Zhang Jiashan; Li Nianyun

    1993-01-01

    Primary radicals from the γ-radiolysis of air-saturated linoleic acid and linolenic acid at 77 K, and the subsequent secondary radicals appeared during the course of variable temperature elevation were investigated by ESR. The ESR spectrum from samples irradiated and observed at 77 K shows the presence of the radical anion doublet arise from the electron adducts of the carboxy groups and the poorly resolved broad singlet results from some carbon-centered radicals. Annealing to approximately 125 K which allows for molecular oxygen migration results in the formation of peroxyl radicals. At 247 K, the ESR spectrum is a multi-line pattern which is attributable to structure of the α-carbon radical superimposed on the pentadienyl radicals. The ESR spectra from linoleic acid-α-tocopherol and linolenic acid-α-tocopherol binary systems irradiated at 77 K and recorded at 140 K or 215 K revealed the characteristic similarity to that from α-tocopherol alone, no trace of ESR signal from either peroxyl or the composite pattern from superposition of pentadienyl radical and α-carbon radicals can be found out. Therefore α-tocopherol has exerted radioprotection effect on peroxidation of linoleic acid and linolenic acid

  6. Radioprotection by Rubia cordifolia: studies on mitochondrial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamat, J.P.; Mishra, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative stress is inevitable to living cells and induces several adverse effects in human ill health. Ionizing radiations are the major sources of ROS. Our present study was aimed to examine the radioprotective role of one popular ayurvedic herbal drug, Rubia cordifolia (Rubiaceae) (Rc) against cellular damage. The results showed that aqueous extract of Rc ( ∼50 μg/ml) significantly prevented rat liver mitochondrial damage induced by ionizing radiation. Single strand breaks induced in plasmid pBR322 DNA following ionizing radiations was effectively prevented by Rc extract. Based on several biochemical results as well as radical scavenging ability of the extract, it can be suggested that extract of Rc may have possible therapeutic applications in the prevention of radiation-induced cellular damage. (author)

  7. Radioprotection and radar: practical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepersack, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The author, on basis of his experience in radar-radioprotection, exposes the standard and security norms and recommendations to be applied for the preventive adapation of the work-areas as well as for the follow-up of the exposed workers. (author)

  8. Radioprotective property of the ethanolic extract of Piper betel leaf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Roychowdhury, S.; Bandyopadhyay, S.K.; Subramanian, M.; Bauri, A.K.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Kamat, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The radioprotective activity of Piper betel ethanolic extract (PE) has been studied using rat liver mitochondria and pBR 322 plasmid DNA as two model in vitro systems. The extract effectively prevented γ-ray induced lipid peroxidation as assessed by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates, lipid hydroperoxide and conjugated diene. Likewise, it prevented radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in a concentration dependent manner. The radioprotective activity of PE could be attributed to its hydroxyl and superoxide radicals scavenging property along with its lymphoproliferative activity. The radical scavenging capacity of PE was primarily due to its constituent phenolics, which were isolated and identified as chevibetol and allyl pyrocatechol. (author)

  9. Biophysical basis of hypoxic radioprotection by deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.T.; Hill, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Perfusion with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin provides an effective method for inducing hypoxic radioprotection of normal tissues during radiation treatment of tumors. In this study, the dependence of P50, the half-saturation pressure of oxygen binding to dextran-hemoglobin, was analyzed as a function of solution temperature and pH. The variation of attainable radioprotection with P50, and with the amount of collateral blood entering into the perfused region, was calculated. Upon perfusion of canine gracilis muscle with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin, a rapid onset of extensive venous hypoxia was observed

  10. A prospective view of radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barescut, Jean C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: If we exclude the specific case of medical radioprotection and workers radioprotection, the main challenge of tomorrow radioprotection is the protection of usual people faced to a possible increase of ambient contamination, either as a consequence of usual releases of industry or as a consequence of sporadic accidents. From the view points of regulators and practitioners of radioprotection, we have to optimize today researches and studies, to optimize protection investments and to prepare future rules according to what could be the possible concerns of radioprotection in a near future. Clearly, when dealing with nuclear energy, a perspective of 30 years is not a very far one. A nuclear plant built today will still be in operation 30 years from now. But 30 years is a fairly long time compared to evolutions of science. For example, DNA was discovered in 1953 and gene engineering began seriously in the years 70s. There is no doubt that the evolution speed will not decrease and that the scientific situation will be quite different within 30 years. This could have many practical consequences. One is that the risk associated to radioactive stress could be better estimated, another is that precursors of a disease attributable to radioactivity will certainly be detected earlier and will allow cure to begin earlier. It is quite likely also that our ability to stimulate the natural defenses of organisms will improve. In an even more futuristic approach, the use of nanoengines or the use of highly selective killer processes at the cell level seems quite possible. Radioprotection will not only be influenced by science but also by the level of environmental threats. We have already a pretty good backward knowledge but, if we consider that the real beginning of industrial nuclear age was in the seventies, within 30 years, we will have more than 70 years of retrospective view. That should be enough to determine if our exposure to radioactivity is really increasing

  11. Radioprotection: Gelam Honey And Other Potential Natural Sources As Radioprotectant Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The application of antioxidant compounds has been studied since the early days of nuclear era, due to the high possibility of overexposure among individuals working in radiation facilities. Ionising radiations can trigger the formation of free radicals which induces biological damage even at a very low dose. It can damage DNA molecules via two mechanisms, either directly or indirectly. Therefore, radioprotectant must have the characteristic of a free radical scavenger to prevent those damages. In this study, the effect of gamma irradiation-induced DNA damage and cellular response was determined by DNA damage pathway. Gelam honey was chosen to determine its radioprotective efficacy when normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) were exposed to gamma-rays. HDFs were treated with Gelam Honey at pre-, during- and post-irradiation at 1 Gray dose. Through this study, gamma-irradiation modulated the cell defence system which involved expression of gene/protein of DNA damage detection, subsequently lead to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. Conversely, HDFs pre-treated with Gelam honey maintained the cell proliferation as shown by the decrease in DNA damage and increase in cell survival rate. These mechanisms may be used as one of the guidelines for radioprotection study with other natural resources such as beta-glucan extract from mushrooms. (author)

  12. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger; Prise, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to 137 Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He 2+ microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for 137 Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He 2+ charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He 2+ ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He 2+ ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [de

  13. Radioprotective effects of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide combined with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on radiation-injured mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shuqi; Shen Xianrong; Liu Yuming; He Ying; Jiang Dingwen; Chen Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the radioprotective effect of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide (SNP) in combination with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on irradiated mice. A total of 70 Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice were divided into seven groups: the control group, the model group and five administration groups. All groups, except the control group, were exposed to a 5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray beam. Blood parameters [including white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelet counts and hemoglobin level] were assessed three days before irradiation, and the on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after irradiation. Spleen, thymus and testicular indices, DNA contents of bone marrow cells, bone marrow nucleated cells, sperm counts, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), testosterone and estradiol levels in the serum were assessed on the 14th day after irradiation. The combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF exerted synergistic recovery effects on peripheral blood WBC, RBC and platelet counts and hemoglobin levels in irradiated mice, and synergistic promotion effects on spleen, thymus, testicle, bone marrow nucleated cells and sperm counts in irradiated mice. The synergistic administration increased the serum SOD activities and serum testosterone content of irradiated mice, but synergy decreased the content of serum MDA and estradiol in irradiated mice. These results suggest that the combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF should increase the efficacy of these drugs for acute radiation sickness, protect immunity, hematopoiesis and the reproductive organs of irradiated-damaged mice, and improve oxidation resistance in the body. (author)

  14. Low Doses of Gamma-Irradiation Induce an Early Bystander Effect in Zebrafish Cells Which Is Sufficient to Radioprotect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term “bystander effect” is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01–0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors. PMID:24667817

  15. Natural radioprotection of cells. Radiochemical, biochemical and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent investigations on natural radioprotection are reviewed, carried out with human fibroblast strains and lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from individuals heterozygous or homozygous with regard to an inborn error in glutathione synthetase activity. The cells have a decreased content of non-protein bound sulphydryls and lack specifically glutathione either almost totally, or have a glutathione level about fifty per cent of the normal. Using single-strand DNA breaks as the end-point of the radiation effect, oxygen and misonidazole fail to enhance the radiosensitivity of cells deficient in glutathione, and OER and DMF close to unity are calculated. Substitution of glutathione deficiency by treatment with different radioprotective aminothiols decreases the sensitivity of the cells, and makes them susceptible to the oxygen effect. In glutathione deficient cells, rejoining of the single strand breaks proceeds at a normal rate after anoxic radiation exposure, but is inhibited after oxic exposure. Using clonogenic survival as the end-point for the radiation effect, sensitization of glutathione deficient cells is again greatly decreased, but OER and DMF differ significantly from unity. The data were interpreted to indicate that endogenous glutathione or some exogenous aminothiols repair radiation induced radicals in key target molecules by hydrogen transfer in a competition with oxygen and/or misonidazole which permanent the damage. The outcome of the radical reactions will be modified by further post-irradiation enzymatic repair processes of which at least one is glutathione dependent. For the appropriate clinical application of hypoxic cell sensitizers, the use of a ''vascularization index'', possibly determined by morphometric analysis of histological preparations, is suggested as a diagnostic parameter to characterize neoplasms besides current routine staging and grading of differentiation

  16. Chemical radioprotection: current data and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentenac-Roumanou, H.; Fatome, M.

    1978-01-01

    Since discovery, between 1951 and 1955, of the classical radioprotective agents cysteamine, serotonin and A.E.T., synthesis of more active molecules, long acting polymers and compounds active when orally administered, have been performed, especially during the last decade. On the other hand, extensive investigations on mechanism of action of radioprotective agents and particularly discovery of the essential role displayed by protection of the central nervous system of mammals allowed a marked improvement of concepts in the field of chemical radioprotection [fr

  17. Immunomodulators used in contemporary radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambov, V.

    1993-01-01

    A review is presented of the potentialities of immunomodulation - a new modern alternative trend in the field of radioprotective substances. The main advantages of the drugs assigned as 'biological-response modifying factors', or 'immunomodulators', over the chemically synthesized radioprotectors for prophylaxis of fractionated, prolonged and chronic low-dose irradiations are stressed. The mechanism of the indirect radiation protection of such preparations on hemopoietic level is described, as well as their chemical nature, pharmacokinetics and physiological properties. Special attention is paid to polysaccharides as the most perspective immunomodulators. The mechanism of their radioprotective action on mononuclear-macrophageal cell system is discussed. The most popular immunomodulators as Biostin, Azimexone, Imuthiol, Krestin, Lentinan, etc, are characterized by their origin, biochemical nature, affected cells and optimal doses. 2 tabs., 18 refs. (orig.)

  18. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide in golden hamster embryo cells exposed to gamma rays at 77 K. I. Radical formation as studied by electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Hayakawa, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, M.; Watanabe, M.

    1990-01-01

    Formation of free radicals in golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells in the frozen living state by gamma irradiation has been studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy at 4.2 and 77 K. The relative yields of H atoms, OH radicals, and organic radicals trapped in the irradiated GHE cells are 12, 72, and 16%, respectively, of total radical yields. When dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is added to GHE cells at 77 K, a large quantity of CH2SOCH3 radicals (DMSO radicals) are formed after gamma irradiation. The yields of OH radicals are not affected by the addition of DMSO. When the GHE cell-DMSO mixtures are irradiated with gamma rays at 77 K and then warmed to 111 K, the OH radicals decay, whereas the DMSO radicals do not increase complementarily. Moreover, the decay rates of the OH radicals at 111 K do not depend upon the concentration of DMSO. Thus OH radicals do not react with DMSO during warming of the irradiated sample. When H atoms are produced by gamma irradiation of acid ice at 60 K, the decay rates of the H atoms at 77 K increase with increasing DMSO concentration, indicating that DMSO reacts with H atoms (CH3SOCH3 + H----.CH2SOCH3 + H2) at 77 K by quantum-mechanical tunneling. When the GHE cell-DMSO mixture is irradiated with gamma rays at 77 or 4.2 K in the dark, DMSO ions are produced in addition to DMSO radicals. Therefore it is concluded that DMSO does not scavenge OH radicals, but does capture H atoms, holes and/or electrons in the gamma-irradiated cells, resulting in the remarkable formation of DMSO radicals. This scavenger effect of DMSO may be related to the radioprotection of DMSO against cell killing

  19. Role of peroxide in the radioprotective action of thiols in E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeslund, M.; Fedorcsak, I.; Ehrenberg, L.

    1976-01-01

    The radioprotective action of cysteamine (MEA) and cysteine in E. coli is due partly to autoxidatively generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2 0 2 ). This effect, which predominates at low concentrations of the thiols (1-2 mM in neutral solution), is regularly correlated with a metabolic block, measured as inhibition of RNA synthesis. In experiments with E. coli 15 (autotroph) under exponential growth in complete medium, the role of H 2 0 2 was demonstrated by (a) a decreased radioprotective action if catalase was present in the medium; (b) a radioprotective action if H 2 0 2 added to the medium; (c) a decreased protective action in the absence of catalytically active copper; and (d) oxygen being required for the radioprotective action to develop. At higher concentrations of the thiols, their radioprotective action, and the accompanying metabolic block, are less dependent on H 2 0 2 generation and presumably due to a different mechanism. The radioprotective action of H 2 0 2 is possibly related to the radioprotective action in mammals of catalase inhibitors. (author)

  20. Radioprotection by polyethylene glycol-protein complexes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.H.; Stull, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol of about 5000 D was activated with cyanuric chloride, and the activated compound was complexed to each of three proteins. Polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase and polyethylene glycol-catalase were each radioprotectants when administered prophylactically to female B6CBF1 mice before irradiation. The dose reduction factor for these mice was 1.2 when 5000 units of polyethylene glycol-catalase was administered before 60 Co irradiation. Female B6CBF1 mice administered prophylactic intravenous injections of catalase, polyethylene glycol-albumin, or heat-denatured polyethylene glycol-catalase had survival rates similar to phosphate-buffered saline-injected control mice following 60 Co irradiation. Polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase and polyethylene glycol-catalase have radioprotective activity in B6CBF1 mice, which appears to depend in part on enzymatic activities of the complex. However, no radioprotective effect was observed in male C57BL/6 mice injected with each polyethylene glycol-protein complex at either 3 or 24 hr before irradiation. The mechanism for radioprotection by these complexes may depend in part on other factors

  1. Radioprotection of whole-body gamma irradiation induced alterations in lipid metabolism of liver and plasma by AET (S-2, aminoethyl isothiuronium Br. H. Br.) and serotonin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, R.; Misra, U.K.

    1975-01-01

    Radioprotective effect of AET, serotonin and their mixture has been studied on liver and plasma lipid metabolism 24 hrs and 48 hrs after irradiation in fasted male rats. AET and serotonin both gave significant radioprotection to certain liver and plasma lipid components, but the mixture of the two afforded a better protection. The non-radioprotection of plasma NEFA, phospholipids and phosphatidyl choline levels by serotonin observed in irradiated rats was because serotonin itself raised the levels of these lipids in control rats. Serotonin alone or in mixture effectively protected the radiation-induced increased incorporation of NaH 2 32 PO 4 into liver phospholipids. Mixture of AET and serotonin failed to protect the increased incorporation of aceae-1-14-C into liver total fatty acids and cholesterol, but it prevented this increased incorporation into liver triglycerides and phospholipids. (orig.) [de

  2. Radioprotection of the patient in nuclear medicine; Proteccion radiologica del paciente en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Maria del R [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    The following topics are developed: concepts on radioprotection; stochastic and deterministic effects; the prenatal irradiation; different types of radiation exposition (medical, occupational and public irradiation); and the justification of the levels of radiation.

  3. The ViewPoint radioprotection supervision workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaultier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The author briefly presents the ViewPoint supervision global solution which incorporates audio and video advanced technologies to manage radioprotection operational measurements. Data can be transmitted by-wire or wireless. It can integrate a large number of radioprotection measurement instruments, such as a belt for the monitoring of physiological parameters (body temperature, breathing rhythm, body posture)

  4. Proceedings of the 9. meeting of radioprotection skill persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahaye, Thierry; Vallet, Jeremie; Michel, Nicolas; Saad, Nawal; Benzakri, Adil; Gauron, C.; Prevot, Sylviane; Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Mahu, Marjolaine; Tenailleau, Lionel; Pigree, G.; Lemarchand, M.; Barbey, P.; Hery, Michel; Scanff, Pascale; Reuter, Celine; Hoorelbeke, Agnes; Lefaure, Christian; Entine, F.; Dody, C.; Gagna, G.; Michel, X.; Cazoulat, A.; Amabile, J.C.; Winizuk, E.; Baccialone, J.; Renault, Catherine; Rodde, Sylvie; Rousse, Carole; Delisle, Sophie; Karmouche, Kaouthar; Moyon, Jean-Baptiste; Gabrillargues, Jean; Chabert, Emmanuel; Jean, Betty; Guersen, Joel; Boyer, Louis; Cassagnes, Lucie; Rosec, Maeva; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Celier, David; Etard, Cecile; Bassinet, Celine; Coutin, Frederic; Clauss, Nicolas; Mertz, L.; Gangi, Afshjn; Bing, F.; Garnon, J.; Thenint, M.A.; Enescu, I.; Tsoumakidou, G.; Cortet, Laetitia; Quirins, Charles; Craveiro, Nathalie; Philippe, SANS; Giordan, Denis; Chanal, Sandrine; Cojan, Aurelie; Rigaud, Sylvie; Monsanglant-Louvet, Celine; Osmond, Melanie; Jeanjacques, Caroline; Sevestre, Bernard; Barbette, Frederic; Allenet Le Page, Benedicte

    2014-11-01

    and CoRPAR coordination: recent evolutions and actions in progress (C. Lefaure); 13 - Radioprotection of the new projectable military scanography module (F. Entine); 14 - Experience feedback of the new standard application in the medical, dental and veterinary domain (C. Renault); 15 - Review of significant radiation protection events in the industrial and medical sectors (S. Rodde, C. Rousse); 16 - Activity report of the recognised organisations for radiation protection technical control (OARP) (S. Delisle); 17 - Study of a radioprotection cabin prototype: routine use in vascular neuroradiology? (K. Karmouche); 18 - Radioprotection of personnel performing radioscopy-guided urology actions in operating rooms (D. Celier); 19 - Impact study of a real-time dosimetry system on radioprotection practices (N. Clauss); 20 - Implementation of dosimetric rings in interventional radiology (L. Cortet, N. Craveiro); 21 - Preparation of a dossier of work in radioactive environment for firemen (P. Sans); 22 - Intervention outside nuclear facilities during accidental situation with or without wounded (D. Giordan); 23 - Cooperation actions of the Nuclear Safety Authority in the domain of radiation protection in French Polynesia and New Caledonia (A. Benzakri); 24 - Management and elimination of radioactive wastes in the research sector (S. Chanal); 25 - Experience feedback about a transport of high activity sealed sources (M. Osmond); 26 - Management of used sealed sources, works of the 'source' group of the national plan for the management of radioactive materials and wastes (PNGMDR) (B. Sevestre); 27 - Presentation of the 2015 catalogue of training courses of the National Agency for the Management of Radioactive Wastes (ANDRA) (N. Pommenof); 28 - CAMARI: certificate of fitness for the handling of industrial radiology devices (B. Allenet Le Page)

  5. Evaluation of the radioprotective efficacy of rifaximin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hee Jong [Dept. of Radiation Treatment Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Radiation exposure causes severe intestinal damage, and intestinal injury has been shown to plays a pivotal role in survival. The non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, is used in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea due to bacterial enteropathogens and has an anti-biotic and an anti-inflammatory effect with low gastrointestinal absorption of < 0.4%. Rifaximin also has been used for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, pouchitis. Jahraus et al. reported that rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethalmwhole-body radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of rifaximin on ionizing radiation-induced intestinal injury. Rifaximin showed increased survival rate as well as decreased weight loss between pre treatment and post treatment. Fortunately rifaximin seems to involveincreased number of crypt cells and length of villus. These findings suggest that rifaximin can be a strategy by protecting intestinal injury.

  6. Evaluation of the radioprotective efficacy of rifaximin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hee Jong

    2014-01-01

    Radiation exposure causes severe intestinal damage, and intestinal injury has been shown to plays a pivotal role in survival. The non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, is used in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea due to bacterial enteropathogens and has an anti-biotic and an anti-inflammatory effect with low gastrointestinal absorption of < 0.4%. Rifaximin also has been used for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, pouchitis. Jahraus et al. reported that rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethalmwhole-body radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of rifaximin on ionizing radiation-induced intestinal injury. Rifaximin showed increased survival rate as well as decreased weight loss between pre treatment and post treatment. Fortunately rifaximin seems to involveincreased number of crypt cells and length of villus. These findings suggest that rifaximin can be a strategy by protecting intestinal injury

  7. Impact of radioactivity on the environment: problems, state of current knowledge and approaches for identification of radioprotection criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.

    2001-01-01

    There is currently a revitalized concern about the potential impact of ionizing radiation on the environment that calls for the construction of a system ensuring an adequate radioprotection of the non-human biota and their associated biotopes. This paper first sets the context of the problem both, with respect to the general philosophy of environmental protection as a whole, but also with respect to the consideration of the environment achieved so far in the purpose of human radioprotection. The current accumulated knowledge on the effects of ionizing radiation to biota (fauna and flora) is then briefly reviewed, encompassing effects at individual and community/ecosystem level, situations of acute and chronic exposure to high and low doses, finally leading to the identification of the most critical gaps in scientific knowledge: effects of mixed low dose rates in chronic exposure to communities and ecosystems. The most significant current international efforts towards the identification of environmental radioprotection criteria and standards are finally presented along with some relevant national examples. (author)

  8. Effect of some radioprotective and radiosensitizing substances on the semiconservative and unscheduled DNA biosynthesis of rat thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkle, J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect on the semiconservative and unscheduled insertion of 3 H-methyl-thymidine (TdR- 3 H) into the DNA was tested on rat thymocytes in vitro. The semiconservative incorporation of TdR- 3 H was inhibited by AET, cysteine glutathione, N-ethylmaleimide, cytosine arabinoside, ethidiumbromide, bleomycin and diethyldithiocarbamate. Metronidazole and caffeine had no effect. Aminothiols and bleomycin stimulated, cytosine arabinoside, N-ethylmaleimide, ethidiumbromide and diethyldithiocarbamate decreased the unscheduled TdR- 3 H incorporation. There was no substantial effect of an exposure to UV-rays. The results lead to the following conclusions: The aminothiol-effect on the excision repair suggest that inhibition of the semiconservative DNA-synthesis will amplify regenerative capacity of the cells. The effect of most substances investigated accord with the present views on their mechanisms of action. The present investigations do not allow an explanation of the influence of diethyldithiocarbamate unspecific effects (such as complexing activity) and more specialized reactions (such as inhibition of superoxide dismutase) must be kept in mind. (orig./MG)

  9. Radioprotective effectiveness and toxicity of ATP, AET and serotonin applied individually or simultaneously to mice. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benova, D.K.; Putev, I.K.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions occuring between three drugs - AET, serotonin, and ATP - in simultaneous administration were studied quantitatively. Using isobologram techniques, paired drug combination were examined for synergism in protective action against radiation. For ATP+AET pairs, increase in ATP fraction enhanced protection. For ATP+serotonin pairs, peak effect was observed at 360 mg/kg b.w. of ATP and 12 mg/kg b.w. of serotonin. Higher ATP fractions lowered the effectiveness. The highest degree of synergism was found for AET+serotonin, with peak effect at 17 to 33 mg/kg of AET plus 11 to 7 mg/kg of serotonin. By applying a method specially elaborated to enable prediction of interactions between three drugs administered simultaneously and by making use of three-dimensional diagrams, the parts played by individual components of triple combinations in total effect were estimated and the component dose ratio providing maximum protection identified. The determining components in protection were found to be AET and serotonin, the latter being of greater importance. The rhole of ATP in total effect is small and enhancement may be noted only up to ATP doses of no more than 156 mg/kg. The maximum effectiveness dose ratio of serotonin:AET:ATP was identified as 1:2:7.5-9. (orig.) [de

  10. Industrial irradiators and their radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo (ed.)

    2018-04-01

    In this book you will learn how the gamma irradiators and accelerators for industry and research applications work and all the radioprotection safety items that should be followed when operating them. This book was written mainly for those who intend to become Radiation Safety Officers (RSO) responsible for the operation of gamma irradiators, but it is also useful to business people who plan to embark on this area or for those who are simply curious. This book is only an introduction to the subject and is far from being exhaustive. (author)

  11. Study on induction of radioprotection using antioxidant combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, J. S.; Choe, Y. K.; Lee, H. G.; Kim, K. D. [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Antioxidants are applied in tumor patients during chemo- or radiotherapy due to its cytoprotective effects. Therefore, aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of exposure with a variety of antioxidants on primary bone marrow cells after {gamma}-irradiation. We studied the radiation-induced cell death in comparison to mouse bone marrow cells after single-dose irradiation with 1, 2, 3 or 6 Gy and controls without irradiation. Cells cultured in vitro had been exposed to different concentrations of antioxidants prior to {gamma}-irradiation. The effect was evaluated 6, 8, 17 or 24 h after radiation exposure by propium iodide staining. While sodium selenite and N-acetylcyseine could achieve significant inhibition of radiation-induced cell death, aminoguanidine and alpha-lipoic acid were not shown to inhibit it. Furthermore, the combination of N-acetylcysteine with some mild antioxidants such as BHA, propyl gallate, quercetin or trolox induced the significant inhibition of radiation-induced cell death. However, these effect was different depending on the duration of radiation exposure and the concentration of antioxidants added in culture. Although the radioprotective effect of antioxidants should be compared with the effect on tumor itself, our results indicate that the use of antioxidants in combination can efficiently modulate the radiation-induced cell damage like apoptosis and can be applied in tumor patients during radiotherapy. 26 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  12. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, N.; Garcia, F.; Parrilla, J.J.; Calaf, J.; Martin-Mateo, M.; Caldes, M. Garcia

    2009-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F 0 ) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F 1 ) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  13. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, N. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, F. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, J.J. [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, J. [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin-Mateo, M. [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, M. Garcia, E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-10-02

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F{sub 0}) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F{sub 1}) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  14. Hibernation for space travel: Impact on radioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Matteo; Tinganelli, Walter; Negrini, Matteo; Helm, Alexander; Scifoni, Emanuele; Tommasino, Francesco; Sioli, Maximiliano; Zoccoli, Antonio; Durante, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Hibernation is a state of reduced metabolic activity used by some animals to survive in harsh environmental conditions. The idea of exploiting hibernation for space exploration has been proposed many years ago, but in recent years it is becoming more realistic, thanks to the introduction of specific methods to induce hibernation-like conditions (synthetic torpor) in non-hibernating animals. In addition to the expected advantages in long-term exploratory-class missions in terms of resource consumptions, aging, and psychology, hibernation may provide protection from cosmic radiation damage to the crew. Data from over half century ago in animal models suggest indeed that radiation effects are reduced during hibernation. We will review the mechanisms of increased radioprotection in hibernation, and discuss possible impact on human space exploration.

  15. Synergistic Radioprotection by Gamma-Tocotrienol and Pentoxifylline: Role of cAMP Signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, Shilpa; Chakraborty, Kushal; Kumar, K. Sree; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Ghosh, Sanchita P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study was designed to determine the efficacy and mechanisms of radioprotection by the combination of gamma-tocotrienol (GT3) and pentoxifylline (PTX) against acute radiation injury. Materials and Methods. Post-irradiation survival was monitored to determine the most efficacious dose and time of administration of PTX. Dose reduction factor (DRF) was calculated to compare the radioprotective efficacy of the combination. To determine the mechanism of synergistic radioprotection by the combination, mevalonate or calmodulin were coadministered with the GT3-PTX combination. Mevalonate was used to reverse the inhibitory effect of GT3 on 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), and calmodulin was used to reverse the inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) by PTX. Results. The combination was most effective when 200 mg/kg of PTX was administered 15 min before irradiation along with 200 mg/kg of GT3 (−24 h) and resulted in a DRF of 1.5. White blood cells and neutrophil counts showed accelerated recovery in GT3-PTX-treated groups compared to GT3. Mevalonate had no effect on the radioprotection of GT3-PTX; calmodulin abrogated the synergistic radioprotection by GT3-PTX. Conclusion. The mechanism of radioprotection by GT3-PTX may involve PDE inhibition

  16. Radioprotection of the rat parotid gland by cAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodicoff, M.; Conger, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Most earlier studies showing a radioprotective effect by cAMP show only slight degrees of protection. The present study demonstrates a substantial protective effect (DMF, 1.63) of exogenously administered cAMP on the rat parotid gland and supports the mechanism suggested previously for protection afforded the parotid glands by the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol, which is known to elevate endogenous intracellular cAMP

  17. Radioprotective activity of Gentiana lutea extract and mangiferin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkovic, Nebojsa; Juranic, Zorica; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Raonic-Stevanovic, Tatjana; Savikin, Katarina; Zdunić, Gordana; Borojevic, Nenad

    2010-11-01

    Radioprotective/sensitizing actions of Gentiana lutea aqueous-ethanol extract and mangiferin on radiation-induced effects on different types of cells were investigated. The study focused on the decreasing survival of normal human immunocompetent cells, the survival of the malignant cells in vitro, and the survival of ex vivo irradiated cells before and after consumption of the extract by healthy volunteers. The in vitro experiments showed that mangiferin could inhibit cytotoxic action of ionizing irradiation (doses of 6 and 8 Gy) only on normal resting human PBMC, not stimulated for proliferation. Orally consumed G. lutea extract showed the potential to reduce the cytotoxic effect of x-ray irradiation on normal human immunocompetent cells PBMC of some healthy people, without changing the susceptibility of malignant cells to be destroyed by irradiation. Since the radioprotective effect was individually dependent, further clinical studies are needed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Normal-tissue radioprotection by overexpression of the copper-zinc and manganese superoxide dismutase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldwijk, Marlon R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Mannheim, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Pharmacology of Cancer Treatment (G402), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Herskind, Carsten; Wenz, Frederik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Mannheim, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Sellner, Leopold; Zeller, W. Jens [Pharmacology of Cancer Treatment (G402), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Radujkovic, Aleksandar [Dept. of Internal Medicine V, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Laufs, Stephanie [Dept. of Experimental Surgery, Univ. Medical Center Mannheim, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Molecular Oncology of Solid Tumors (G360), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Fruehauf, Stefan [Center for Tumor Diagnostic and Therapy, Paracelsus-Klinik, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Background and Purpose: Protection of normal tissue against radiation-induced damage may increase the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy. A promising strategy for testing this approach is gene therapy-mediated overexpression of the copper-zinc (CuZnSOD) or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV2) vectors. The purpose of this study was to test the modulating effects of the SOD genes on human primary lung fibroblasts (HPLF) after irradiation. Material and Methods: HPLF were transduced with rAAV2 vectors containing cDNA for the CuZnSOD, MnSOD or a control gene. The cells were irradiated (1-6 Gy), and gene transfer efficiency, apoptosis, protein expression/activity, and radiosensitivity measured by the colony-forming assay determined. Results: After transduction, 90.0% {+-} 6.4% of the cells expressed the transgene. A significant fivefold overexpression of both SOD was confirmed by an SOD activity assay (control: 21.1 {+-} 12.6, CuZnSOD: 95.1 {+-} 17.1, MnSOD: 108.5 {+-} 36.0 U SOD/mg protein) and immunohistochemistry. CuZnSOD and MnSOD overexpression resulted in a significant radioprotection of HPLF compared to controls (surviving fraction [SF] ratio SOD/control > 1): CuZnSOD: 1.18-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.32; p = 0.005), MnSOD: 1.23-fold (95% CI: 1.07-1.43; p = 0.01). Conclusion: Overexpression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD in HPLF mediated an increase in clonogenic survival after irradiation compared to controls. In previous works, a lack of radioprotection in SOD-overexpressing tumor cells was observed. Therefore, the present results suggest that rAAV2 vectors are promising tools for the delivery of radioprotective genes in normal tissue. (orig.)

  19. RADIOPROTECTION CAMPAIGN AND CARD: EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES THAT REDUCE CHILDREN'S EXCESSIVE EXPOSURE TO RADIOLOGICAL EXAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Mônica Oliveira; Almeida, Fernando Antonio de; Morgado, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the results of an initiative aimed at improving the reasonable use of radiological examinations, ensuring their technical quality, implementing a radioprotection campaign that includes training of the professional team, and introducing the radioprotection card for children under 12 years old as a tool for parents and doctors to control children's exposure to radiation. The study was held in a health care insurance system covering 140,000 people. A radioprotection campaign was implemented according to Image Gently • protocols, ensuring the lowest dose of radiation and the quality of examinations, and the radioprotection card was implemented. To assess the effectiveness of these actions, the number of radiological examinations performed at the pediatric emergency room in a period of one year preceding the campaign was compared with the number of radiological examinations performed one year after the campaign. The campaign was well accepted by all professionals, families, and patients involved. In the year following the implementation of radioprotection strategies, there was a 22% reduction of radiological examinations performed at the pediatric emergency room. There was also a 29% reduction in the request of two or more radiological examinations for the same child or examinations with two or more incidences. The campaign and the radioprotection card for children under 12 years old proved to be feasible strategies and correlated with a reduction in radiological examinations requested and performed at the pediatric emergency room.

  20. Radioprotective effect of local hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong-Su; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Higano, Shuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Hoshino, Fumihiko

    1985-01-01

    We attempted local hypothermia to prevent radiation dermatitis and stomatitis. With regard to parasternal skin reactions postoperatively irradiated breast cancer, dry and moist desquamation, which occasionally occurred with conventional irradiation was not observed in combination with local cooling. As for head and neck tumors, patients who complained of stomatitis decreased with the local cooling, and no one wanted a pause in irradiation before 40 Gy. As local hypothermia is free from danger and does not require special equipment, it was considered to be widely applicable. (author)

  1. Radioprotection of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abela, G.; Bonaventure, P.; Jupin, L.; Truchi, F.

    2006-01-01

    The EDF Nuclear Power Division (N.P.D.) conducts a substantial number of industrial g-ray inspections: about 40.000 inspections are conducted annually on the nuclear fleet by contractors as H.O.R.U.S. Company. Point sources of Iridium 192 are generally used. In normal configurations, the activity of these sources can go up to 4.4 T.Bq (120 Ci), inducing - at a range of 1 meter - such a high dose equivalent rate that the value of 20 mSv is reached in a little more than 2 minutes. To date, no exceeding of the regulatory limit has been observed within EDF, but during the observation of events, a practice that has been in effect for many years, 'low-level events', such as unplanned exposures lower than the regulatory limits, were noted. N.P.D. management and contractors thus decided to take particular actions in the field. An analysis of unplanned exposures was carried out. This analysis related to 1: The 'human factor' analysis showed that the activity, which can seem 'simple' due to its seemingly basic constituent parts, taken in isolation, therefore appears easy to accomplish. In fact, completion of each point requires very extensive technical training, a complex planning file has to be compiled as there are many interfaces with other players, is linked to other activities that have to be carried out prior to the g-ray inspection. It requires preparation of the areas, with measures taken to prohibit access, and requires adaptation to physical conditions (temperature, lighting, noise, dose rate) and sometimes very difficult access conditions. The operators 'error' and lack of attention or vigilance cannot thus be considered by a preventer as being a satisfactory cause of incidents or accidents, within the scope of an ongoing improvement initiative: Vigilance means work. 2: Analysis of material causes did not highlight causes related to the equipment used, but camera ergonomics could be improved. Changes to EDF rules focused on: Compulsory and systematic use of

  2. Histological investigations on the effect of zytostatica, ionizing radiation and a radioprotective substance on spleen, lung, lymphatic nodes, bone marrow, skin and muscles on rats under drugs suitable for gynacological cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeueler, R.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of radiation, zytostatica and on radiation protective substance on the organs: spleen, lung, lymphatic nodes, skin and muscles of the rat were examined. High-voltage gamma radiation, zytostatica cyclophosphamide, podophyllinic acid ethyl hydrazide and VM26, as well as N-acetyl homocystein thiol actone were applied as radioprotective substance in several combinations. The doses were adapted to those commonly used in human medicine. The different combinations are compared regarding side effects, as well as advantages and disadvantages of different doses. Podophyllinic acid ethyl hydrazide is found to be well suited as zytostatic substance for combination therapy. The histologically detectable side effects on the organs examined by adding N-acetyl homocystein thiol actone were not greatly reduced compared to the sole or combined application of radiation and cytostatica therapy. (orig.) [de

  3. Improved chemical radioprotection following activation with dextran sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartonickova, A.; Vacek, A.; Rotkovska, D.

    1982-01-01

    The radioresistance was observed of mice after sublethal and lethal gamma irradiation following a combined application of dextran sulphate and the chemical radioprotectors cystamine and mexamine. The mechanism of the radioprotection by mexamine and cystamine is connected with their effect on the oxygen tension in tissues. With the application of dextran sulphate an increase was observed in metabolic activity of tissues and a reduced oxygen tension in the medium will result in a deeper cell hypoxia in the tissue. (M.D.)

  4. The use of radioprotective indicators in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly Junior, Joao G.; Schmidt, Margot F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Radioprotection indicators are proposed as per the World Health Organization guide-lines, in order to establish policies as well as to show the development and identified new operational strategic in radiological protection

  5. The Significance of Effective Leadership in Organisations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽闻

    2017-01-01

    This essay will study leadership by critically analysing several key theories; it will begin with the concept of leadership to facility an understanding of the subject. Initially, the description of leadership in organisations will be explored to present the development of leadership, and simultaneously identify the purpose of effective leadership. Subse-quently, the demand for good leaders in current business environment will be discussed in order to identify the importance of effective lead-ership. Finally, an empirical case will be discussed to reveal how well the key theories help leaders to address various issues in organisations.

  6. Modelling vocal anatomy's significant effect on speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of larynx position on the articulatory abilities of a humanlike vocal tract. Previous work has investigated models that were built to resemble the anatomy of existing species or fossil ancestors. This has led to conflicting conclusions about the relation between

  7. Contribution to the study of the radioprotective effect of serotonin on brain spontaneous and evoked electrical activities in the adult rabbit following whole-body lethal $gamma$-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatome, M; Court, L

    1973-11-01

    Thesis. Submitted to Paris Univ., (France). A 1 to 12 mg/kg serotonin- creatine-sulfate intravenous injection seems to act only slightly on the chronic implanted rabbit CNS except for an increase in latencies and delays of the fast components of evoked potentials and a generalized decrease in the total energy of the signal occurring 20 to 60 min after the injection. The CNS is given a real protection by a 10 mg/kg serotonin injec, tion 20 min before a 650 R whole-body exposure, the spontaneous or induced electrical activity being slightly disturbed. In the hours following irradiation the total energy increase is less important than in the unprotected animal, and there is no clear variation towards the low frequencies. Serotonin could act on the brain structures and the total energy of the signal through its depressing effect. Its radioprotective effect could act, at least partly, through the CNS. (auth)

  8. Timing in administration of a heat-killed Lactobacillus casei preparation for radioprotection in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuneoka, Kazuko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Dimchev, A.B.; Shikita, Mikio; Nomoto, Koji; Yokokura, Teruo.

    1994-01-01

    A single subcutaneous injection of a preparation of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei (LC 9018), given before or after irradiation, significantly increased the survival rate of mice that had received 8.5-Gy 137 Cs whole-body γ-irradiation. A similar radioprotective effect was observed when LC 9018 was administered within the period from 2 days before irradiation to 9 h after irradiation, the pre-irradiation treatment being slightly better than the post-irradiation treatment. Increases in the weight of the spleen and in the number of endogenous spleen colonies on days 8 and 12 after irradiation suggested that the radioprotective effect was based on enhanced recovery of hematopoietic tissues. The activity of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in serum was rapidly increased by the treatment and was maintained at the elevated level for 13 days. At the same time, an increased level of M-CSF mRNA was detected in the livers of the treated mice. However, LC 9018 failed to save the lives of mice when administered 3 days after irradiation, although it increased serum M-CSF as effectively as noted above. The small advantage of the pre-irradiation over the post-irradiation treatment was not explained by the increases of metallothionein in the hematopoietic tissues of the treated mice. (author)

  9. The ViewPoint radioprotection supervision workstation; Poste de supervision radioprotection viewpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaultier, E. [APVL Ingenierie- 6, bd Nobel - Equatop La Rabelais - 37540 Saint Cyr sur Loire (France)

    2009-07-01

    The author briefly presents the ViewPoint supervision global solution which incorporates audio and video advanced technologies to manage radioprotection operational measurements. Data can be transmitted by-wire or wireless. It can integrate a large number of radioprotection measurement instruments, such as a belt for the monitoring of physiological parameters (body temperature, breathing rhythm, body posture)

  10. The importance of radioprotection controls in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahyun, A.; Sanches, M.P.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    In nuclear medicine the main objective of radioprotection controls is to protect three people groups from external and internal radiation. To obtain this goal, the dose limitation system has to be followed firmly and for that, basic procedures have to be introduced. These basic procedures are the result of several activities which have to be balanced, one against the other to be effective. The aims of radioprotection are to ensure that people are not exposed to doses enough to cause radiation symptoms and to limit the doses of radiation. This is achieved by the use of shielding, containment, careful design and operating and administrative procedures. This paper presents a small list of general radioprotection problems found in nuclear medicine and establishes some rules to the job schedule and control measures to be followed in favor of safety. By considering the general radioprotection problems, a number of factors of substantial relevance in the control of external and internal doses can be deduced and emphasis properly placed. Work with radioactive material should be concentrated on a limited number of work rooms. Good radioactive materials inventory are essential because of the potentially large diversity of material and users. Storage of radioactive materials ensure that the public is not unnecessarily exposed. Appropriate monitoring equipment should be available within each working site. Line management commitment to safety has led to a heightened awareness for those control measures which encourages individuals to review and improve their own work rules. Investment in training programs, plant modifications and written procedures provide the necessary resource to support the dose reduction initiatives

  11. Radioprotection of mouse intestine by inhibitors of cyclic amp phosphodiesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.

    1979-01-01

    The survival of colony-forming units of the jejunal crypt was used to assay the radioprotective capacity of various inhibitors of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. DL-152, RO-20-1724 and the methyl xanthines, caffeine, theophylline, and methyl isbutyl xanthine (MIX) were all found to have some radioprotective effect. The degree of radioprotecton depended on the route of administration of the drug and on the timing of administration with respect to irradiation. Optimum survival of crypt stem cells was found following intraperitoneal administration of DL-152 (60 min before irradiation) or MIX (30 min before irradiaton), and following intravenous administration of caffeine (60 to 120 min before irradiaton) or theophylline (60 min before irradiation). When these protocols were used, crypt stem cell survival could be enhanced by a factor of from 6 to 7. All the compounds investigated produced some elevation of cyclic AMP content of the whole jejunum; this was found to be simultaneous with or to precede the period of maximum radioprotection. Cyclic AMP was localized with immunofluorescent staining; following injection of DL-152 it was found to be elevated in all parts of the jejunum but to the greatest extent in the lower part of the crypt. Survival curves for crypt stem cells from MIX and DL-152 treated mice were found to have almost the same exponential slope as the saline-injected control, suggesting that the mechanism of protection does not depend on induction of hypoxia

  12. Evaluation of radioprotective properties of chlorophyllin against the gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Gutierrez, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Several decades ago it had been demonstrated that chlorophyllin, and its water soluble derivates, such as chlorophyllin, have therapeutic values. recently an antimutagenic activity has been observed in several tests. The aim of this work is to investigate if chlorophyllin has some radioprotective effect when the organisms are exposed to gamma-rays. The somatic mutation and recombination test in drosophila was used. This test allows us to detect simultaneously both genetic mutation, chromosomal aberration and mitotic recombination. The conduction of the experiment involved four treatments: 1) 5% sucrose, 2) 5% chlorophyllin, 3) 5% sucrose +20Gyγrays 4) 5% chlorophyllin +20Gyγrays. All the treatments lasted 24 hours and three replicas were performed. The data obtained showed a significant decrease in spot frequency found in the treatment with chlorophyllin and γ rays. From the results we are to conclude that the chlorophyllin has a radioprotective effect, when the drosophila larvae are irradiated with 20 Gy OF γrays. Mitotic recombination was affected in the same way and it is important because genetic recombination process are related to cancer induction. (Author)

  13. Vasoactive and radioprotective properties of isothiourea derivatives having NOS-inhibitory activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filimonova, Marina V.; Shevchenko, Ludmila I.; Ulyanenko, Stepan E.; Makarchuk, Victorya M.; Kuznetsova, Mary N.; Shevchuk, Aza S.; Lushnikova, Galina A.; Chesnakova, Ekaterina A. [Medical Radiological Research Center Health Ministry of Russia, 4, Korolev street, Obninsk, 249036, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    We studied vasoactive and radioprotective properties of new original N-acyl, S-alkyl isothiourea derivatives which are potent inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases (preferably eNOS and iNOS). These compounds have a moderate toxicity (LD50 - 400-550 mg/kg), and are stable in aqueous solutions. In hemodynamic studies, these compounds exhibited high vasotropic activity. The use of these compounds in doses of 5-15 mg/kg (0,01-0,03 LD{sub 50}) in the experimental animals in a state of the severe hemorrhagic or endo-toxic shock causes a potent vasopressor effect, accompanied by a significant and continuous rise in blood pressure. The increasing of vascular tone developed over 2-5 min after injection and persisted for at least 60-90 minutes, excelling at least 3-5 times the duration of α1-adreno-mimetic vasopressor action. The rapid increase in vascular tone under the influence of these compounds in normo-tonic animals caused protective baroreflex to prevent high blood pressure. At doses of 10-15 mg/kg the reflex reaction was mild, but at higher doses (30-40 mg/kg) the reaction was fierce and prolonged, and was accompanied by severe bradycardia, decreasing of the cardiac output and a significant weakening of the peripheral blood flow. In all cases, the hemodynamic response was reflexive and easily eliminated by atropine. The ability of these compounds to induce circulatory hypoxia was the basis for the study of their radioprotective properties. The study of radioprotective effect on the survival of animals exposed to lethal doses of γ-radiation (10 Gy) and on the survival of hematopoietic clonogenic cells showed that these compounds in doses of 80-150 mg/kg (0,2-0,3 LD50) have considerable radioprotective action, which is comparable with the protective effect of the maximum tolerated dose of cystamine. The factor of change in dose for γ-radiation, estimated by the LD{sub 50}, was 1,42-1,58. We also investigated the ability of the test compounds, due to their hypoxic

  14. Preventive effect of two-component chemical radioprotector and variability in its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambov, V.; Metodiev, S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the radioprotective efficiency of two-component radioprotective schema consisting of the chemically synthesized radioprotector WR-2721 (OK-79) and a new glycoside pigment obtained from melanoidine CL. The application of melanoidine 7-21 days before WR-2721 significantly increases the radioprotective efficiency of the chemically obtained product and enhances the 30-day survival of hybrid mice treated with 15 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. The effect of potentiated radioprotection is not observed when the interval between the application of the two agents is reduced to 24 h. It is suggested that the observed enhancement of the radioprotective efficiency in the two-component schema is due to the antioxidant and immuno modulating properties of the pigment product, observed and described in our previous investigations. (author)

  15. Assessment in vitro of radioprotective efficacy of curcumin and resveratrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastia, Natividad, E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Montoro, Alegria [Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, Amparo [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Almonacid, Miguel; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio [Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Silla, Ma Angeles [Servicio de Hematologia, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Soriano, Jose Miguel [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Many natural substances have been studied in recent past to be used as radioprotectors to mitigate ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems due to its effectiveness given both pre- and post-irradiation and for long time with out drug-related toxicity. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are both natural occurring polyphenols, obtained from the root of Curcuma longa and from grapes and other berries, respectively. These compounds have shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anti-carcinogenic properties. Our aim was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy, in vitro, of curcumin and trans-resveratrol separately against radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The study was carried out by the pre-treatment of human blood lymphocytes at concentrations from 0 to 500 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and from 0 to 50 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for curcumin and trans-resveratrol, respectively. The results showed that all concentrations tested reduced radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Maximum damage protection was observed at the concentration of 5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for curcumin and 0.5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for trans-resveratrol. Thus, our results show that curcumin and trans-resveratrol pre-treatment significantly protect normal lymphocytes against {gamma}-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  16. Assessment in vitro of radioprotective efficacy of curcumin and resveratrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastia, Natividad; Montoro, Alegria; Montoro, Amparo; Almonacid, Miguel; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio; Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Silla, Ma Angeles; Soriano, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Many natural substances have been studied in recent past to be used as radioprotectors to mitigate ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems due to its effectiveness given both pre- and post-irradiation and for long time with out drug-related toxicity. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are both natural occurring polyphenols, obtained from the root of Curcuma longa and from grapes and other berries, respectively. These compounds have shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anti-carcinogenic properties. Our aim was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy, in vitro, of curcumin and trans-resveratrol separately against radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The study was carried out by the pre-treatment of human blood lymphocytes at concentrations from 0 to 500 μg mL -1 and from 0 to 50 μg mL -1 for curcumin and trans-resveratrol, respectively. The results showed that all concentrations tested reduced radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Maximum damage protection was observed at the concentration of 5 μg mL -1 for curcumin and 0.5 μg mL -1 for trans-resveratrol. Thus, our results show that curcumin and trans-resveratrol pre-treatment significantly protect normal lymphocytes against γ-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  17. Radioprotection of patients and workers in interventional and operating block radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menechal, P.; Valero, M.; Megnigbeto, C.; Marchal, C.; Godet, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last ten years or so, extensive development in radiological and implantable equipment has generated significant growth in radio-guided procedures. The real benefit of these practices to patients explains their development. These procedures can be undertaken using not only dedicated, specific fixed installations and computed tomography scanners, but also mobile installations in facilities not designed for radiography, such as operating blocks. The complexity of these procedures and the times spent implementing the required radiation can lead to major detrimental effects on personnel and patients, if they are not fully controlled. Many specialist medical disciplines now perform invasive procedures guided by images. Optimisation of patient doses mainly depends on the training level of medical teams, the intrinsic performance characteristics of the equipment used, adjustment of the technical parameters and the presence or absence of qualified personnel. Optimisation of professional personnel exposure is complex and depends on the performance conditions of procedures, which can expose workers extensively and non-uniformly. Designation of personnel competent in radioprotection, assessment of risks and definition of controlled areas, analysis of workstations and dosimetric monitoring of operators (especially of body extremities) are difficult to implement. Use of collective and personal protective equipment must be improved. The general manager of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) has referred the matter to the permanent group of radioprotection experts (GPMED) to ensure that recommendations are drawn up in the short term. (authors)

  18. Gamma irradiation of radioprotectant drugs. 1. Levamisole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, C R; Elhardt, C E; May, L [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1980-09-01

    Levamisole ((S)-(-)-2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-6-phenyl-imidazo-(2, 1-b) thiazole), an immunomodulating drug and veterinary antihelminthic, is converted by tissues to a sulfhydryl derivative. The drug and its metabolite have mediating effects on lipid peroxidation in microsomal preparations. Because levamisole, as an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, is a radioprotectant drug, it was of interest to study the response of the drug itself to ionizing radiation. Experiments were directed toward an examination of the effects of gamma radiation on aqueous solutions of levamisole. Chromatographic analysis (TLC) revealed two distinct groups of radiation products. Further separation and analysis of these groups by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) demonstrated that each group of radiation products consists of several components, indicating that the gamma irradiation of non-deaerated solutions of levamisole gives rise to varying amounts of a multiproduct mixture, no constituent of which corresponds to the natural metabolite. Dose effect curves for the levamisole irradiation indicate that the drug is markedly resistant to molecular alteration under the experimental radiation conditions.

  19. Assay for the antioxidant and radioprotectant activity of extracts form endemic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Ji Hyang; Woo, Hyun Jung; Plewa, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Since radiation damage and oxygen poisoning occur through the formation of reactive oxygen species, it is a challenging task to develop agents with high antioxidant and radioprotectant activities from plant species. In this study, several species of Korean endemic plants were chosen as experimental candidates. Water-and ethanol extracts were made from the candidates and tested for their antioxidant and radioprotectant activities. In vitro antioxidant assay of the aqueous-organic extracts was carried out using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl scavenging method. Radioprotective effects were tested by means of experimental on irradiated cell cultures and animals. Among others, the water-extract of Ixeris dentata leaves showed a marked effect on the viability of B16 melanoma cells and provided a radioprotective effect on the number of the leukocytes in the irradiated rodents. DNA damage in the lymphocytes after γ-irradiation decreased in the extract administered animals. Many of the extracts tested in this study showed a slightly lower activity in free radical scavenging than the well-known chemical antiozidants such as ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxytuluene, and glutathione. However, some extracts showed an antioxidant activity similar to that of α-tocopherol acetate and caffeine. These results support the optimistic view for developing radioprotective agents from the Korean endemic plants that showed a strong antioxidant activity

  20. Assay for the antioxidant and radioprotectant activity of extracts form endemic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Ji Hyang; Woo, Hyun Jung [KAERI, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Plewa, Michael J. [University of Illinois, Illinosi (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Since radiation damage and oxygen poisoning occur through the formation of reactive oxygen species, it is a challenging task to develop agents with high antioxidant and radioprotectant activities from plant species. In this study, several species of Korean endemic plants were chosen as experimental candidates. Water-and ethanol extracts were made from the candidates and tested for their antioxidant and radioprotectant activities. In vitro antioxidant assay of the aqueous-organic extracts was carried out using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl scavenging method. Radioprotective effects were tested by means of experimental on irradiated cell cultures and animals. Among others, the water-extract of Ixeris dentata leaves showed a marked effect on the viability of B16 melanoma cells and provided a radioprotective effect on the number of the leukocytes in the irradiated rodents. DNA damage in the lymphocytes after {gamma}-irradiation decreased in the extract administered animals. Many of the extracts tested in this study showed a slightly lower activity in free radical scavenging than the well-known chemical antiozidants such as ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxytuluene, and glutathione. However, some extracts showed an antioxidant activity similar to that of {alpha}-tocopherol acetate and caffeine. These results support the optimistic view for developing radioprotective agents from the Korean endemic plants that showed a strong antioxidant activity.

  1. Radioprotection of whole-body γ-irradiation-induced alteration in some haematological parameters by cysteine, vitamin E and their combination in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, A.A.; Hassan, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Radioprotective effect of cysteine, vitamin E and their combination on γ-irradiation-induced alteration in some haematological parameters in male rats has been studied 24 and 48 hrs after whole-body γ-irradiation at a dose level of 7.5 Gy. The results of this study reveal that γ-irradiation caused a significant decrease in red blood cells (RBCs) count with insignificant change in hemoglobin level, 24 and 48 hrs postirradiation, γ-irradiated rats showed as well a progressive decrease in their blood ATP, and serum-SH levels with a significant increase in blood glutathione (GSH) level. Administration of cysteine or vitamin E preceeding γ-radiation exposure gave a significant radioprotection to the above haematological parameters. However, combination of both agents afforded a better protection, so that most of the measured parameters were restored to the pre-irradiated values. Finally, the data demonstrate that the radioprotection provided by combined adminsistration of vitamin E and cysteine is feasible and perhaps, even more efficient against radiation injury to RBCs. This will appreciate the usage of such combination in protecting the patient during radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  2. Gamma radiation induced enhancement in the antioxidant and radioprotective activities of flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arul Anantha Kumar, A.; Sonwani, Swetha; Bakkiam, D.

    2018-01-01

    Recently γ-radiation has been used as a tool to induce structural changes in natural biomolecules to enhance their biological and physiological properties. Flavonoids are a family of plant derived polyphenolic compounds having considerable scientific and therapeutic importance. Structurally they are the benzo-γ-pyrone derivatives containing phenolic and pyrane rings. Flavonoid radioprotection is an intense area of research thanks to features like natural origin, effectiveness at non-toxic dose levels and lack of side effects. But till date no report is available on the effect of γ-radiation mediated enhancement in radioprotection activity of flavonoids. In view of this the present study was carried out to determine the γ-radiation induced structural changes in selected flavonoids i.e. apigenin, naringenin and genistein and also to explore the possibility of enhancement in their antioxidant and radioprotective activities

  3. Radioprotection program to attend of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Costa Silva, L.H. da; Rosa, R.

    1989-04-01

    The aspects of a radioprotection program to be implanted in hospitals to cases of medical treatment to external and internal contamined people are presented. It is based in the experience acquired in the coordination of radioprotection of the Marcilio Dias Naval Medical Center, Rio de Janeiro, due to accident happened in Goiania in 1987. The infra-structure necessary of a ward and the procedures of radioprotection to acess control, entrance and way out of material area and patients monitoring, decontamination and the activities in the support area such as the control and maintenance of detection equipments and radioactive waste management are described. The radiologic protection materials necessaries and the quantity of radioactive waste generated by patient for day are estimated. (V.R.B.)

  4. Computerized techniques for collecting the radioprotection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenusa, V.; Valeca, S.; Guta, C.; Talpalariu, C.; Stoica, V.

    2016-01-01

    An important component of a computerized radioprotection system is the module for the collection of the radioprotection data. The data collection can be made automatically from the measurement equipment or manually by the operators after they read the values measured by the mobile devices. Database systems are used for storing the data, they offer higher performances, more efficient data organization, ensure data integrity and controlled access to the data into a multiuser environment. The experimental program for the automatic collection of the remote data transfers periodically, at programmable time intervals, data files from the fixed radiation monitoring stations to a centralized system for radioprotection data. For this is used the File Transfer Protocol (FTP). A Radiation Monitoring Equipment designed and assembled in the Electronics Department of ICN Pitesti was used as a data source for the testing of the experimental programs. (authors)

  5. Radioprotective and radiotherapeutic properties of biotechnological agent MD2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobol, C.V.; Komar, V.E.; Sobol, Y.T.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years as the result of nuclear testing and accidents at nuclear power plants such as Chernobyl, etc. radiation exposure has become a major issue in various parts of the world. Experience of recent nuclear accidents has shown there is no effective treatment for patients expose to doses of radiation that result in fatal hematopoietic failure and /or secondary infections. Therefore, agents that are effective when administered after irradiation, are of great interest. In this study, the possibility of using biotechnological agent MD2 after lethal total body irradiation (TBI) and radiotherapy has been demonstrated. In addition, the considerable radioprotection without toxic effect can be obtained. (author)

  6. Human Keratinocytes Radioprotection with Mentha Longifolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Berselli, P.; Zava, S.; Negroni, M.; Corsetto, P.; Montorfano, G.; Bertolotti, A.; Ranza, E.; Ottolenghi, A.; Berra, B.

    Antioxidants are suggested to act as radioprotectors, and dietary supplements based on antiox-idants have been proposed for astronauts involved in long-term space missions. Plant extracts with antioxidant properties may be used in dietetic supplements for astronauts; in fact recent nutritional guidelines suggest that "fruits and vegetables may become as important on space-going vessels as limes were on the sea-going vessels of old". Mint presents a large variety of biological properties, such as antiallergenic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, an-tiviral, gastrointestinal protective, hepatoprotective, chemopreventive activities, most of which are attributable to its antioxidant activity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antioxidant properties and protective bio-efficacy of a phenol enriched Mentha longifolia ex-tract on gamma rays stressed human keratinocytes (NCTC2544). We assessed first the in vitro antioxidant activity (ABTS and DPPH), and then evaluated different stress markers in order to investigate various oxidative stress targets: cell viability (MTT); retained proliferating ca-pability (CA); DNA damage (histone H2AX) and protein damage (HSP70 induction). Results indicate that this Mint extract has a higher antioxidant activity respect to fresh extracts, that could be responsible of its really interesting radio-protective effects.

  7. Radiobiological study of the radioprotective activity of a natural Iranian compound, ''Shir-Khecht''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhanizadeh, N.

    1967-01-01

    After reviewing the primary mechanisms of the action of ionizing radiation, the possible mechanisms of the action of radioprotective substances, the various chemical structures having a protective effect and the methods for studying chemical radioprotection, the author presents the results he has obtained with natural Iranian product: ''Shir-Khecht''. Tests with this product at lethal and sublethal doses have been carried out on the rat using various means of introduction. The effect of radiation, both with and without protection, has been studied using histological and biochemical methods. The product examined has, in effect, a protective action; it is, furthermore, non-toxic and active when taken orally. (author) [fr

  8. Murine P-glycoprotein deficiency alters intestinal injury repair and blunts lipopolysaccharide-induced radioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Elizabeth M; Yarbrough, Vanisha R; Schoeb, Trenton R; Daft, Joseph G; Tanner, Scott M; Steverson, Dennis; Lorenz, Robin G

    2012-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been reported to increase stem cell proliferation and regulate apoptosis. Absence of P-gp results in decreased repair of intestinal epithelial cells after chemical injury. To further explore the mechanisms involved in the effects of P-gp on intestinal injury and repair, we used the well-characterized radiation injury model. In this model, injury repair is mediated by production of prostaglandins (PGE(2)) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to confer radioprotection. B6.mdr1a(-/-) mice and wild-type controls were subjected to 12 Gy total body X-ray irradiation and surviving crypts in the proximal jejunum and distal colon were evaluated 3.5 days after irradiation. B6.mdr1a(-/-) mice exhibited normal baseline stem cell proliferation and COX dependent crypt regeneration after irradiation. However, radiation induced apoptosis was increased and LPS-induced radioprotection was blunted in the C57BL6.mdr1a(-/-) distal colon, compared to B6 wild-type controls. The LPS treatment induced gene expression of the radioprotective cytokine IL-1α, in B6 wild-type controls but not in B6.mdr1a(-/-) animals. Lipopolysaccharid-induced radioprotection was absent in IL-1R1(-/-) animals, indicating a role for IL-1α in radioprotection, and demonstrating that P-gp deficiency interferes with IL-1α gene expression in response to systemic exposure to LPS.

  9. Biochemical and molecular genetic approaches on the radioprotective mechanism of natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Sung, Woo Kyung; Piao, Wen Hua [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    We reported the radio-protective effect of DTT. The treatment of DTT increased cell survival after gamma-irradiation, decreased in the frequencies of micronucleus, and reduction in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis after UV-C irradiation was revealed by the changes in the relative cell death, increase in the relative amount of apoptotic cells, and the induction of DNA fragmentation. About 100 medicinal plants were purchased and methanol extract samples were prepared. Radio-protective and radio-sensitizing activities of these samples were screened. Seven samples showed above 20% radio-protective activities: Salvia miltiorrhiza, Areca catechu, Cornus officinalis, Alpiniae officinari rhizoma, Meliae fructus, Alpiniae katsumadaii semen, Betulae cortex. Acanthopanax sessiliflous showed the highest radio-sensitizing effect and 10 other samples revealed moderate activities: Melia japonica, Agastache rugosa, Platycodon gradiflorum, Broussonetia bazinoki, Angelica gigas, Inula helenium, Chelidonium majus, Pulsatilla koreana, Oldenlandia diffusa, Dioscorea batatas. (author). 49 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Use of methods of mathemitical theory of experiment in deVeloping many-component radioprotective preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, V.G.; Zajtseva, T.G.; Kamenko, I.P.; Poddubskij, G.A.; Razorenov, G.S.; Smirnova, S.M.; Tarnopol'skaya, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the possibility of using a mathematical theory of experiment in developing effective many-component radioprotective preparations. The preparations composed of cystamine or S-(ω-aminopropyl)-β-aminoethyl thiophosphate, as the basis, and mexamine, ethyron and gutimine were used as an example to prove the adequacy of such an approach in solving the problems of optimization of composing the radioprotective complexes according to their efficiency and toxicity

  11. Cardiovascular effects. Chapter 3.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, J.

    1975-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of various radioprotective substances are reviewed. Reports of the cardiovascular reactions of different species have been analysed to show that there is no relationship between the principal cardiovascular activities and the specific effects of the radioprotective agents; sometimes radioprotection develops simultaneously with a general lowering of arterial pressure, sometimes it occurs with a rise in blood pressure. In contrast, lowered arterial pressure in the chicken is not sufficient to raise the resistance to X-rays. No common characteristics were revealed by a comparative study of the effects of radioprotective agents on blood pressure, histamine liberation and concentration of catecholamines in blood. The effect on tissue perfusion, at the level of the microcirculation, may be of more significance, but techniques are not yet available for investigating the mechanism of action at this level. (U.K.)

  12. In vivo radioprotection by alpha-TMG: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyamitra, M; Devi, P U; Murase, H; Kagiya, V T

    2001-08-08

    alpha-TMG is a novel water-soluble derivative of Vitamin E that has shown excellent antioxidant activity. The parent compound has demonstrated protection against radiation induced chromosomal damage in vivo. Hence, the preliminary experiments to determine the radioprotective activity of alpha-TMG were carried out in adult Swiss albino mice. Acute toxicity of the drug was studied taking 24h, 72 h and 30 day mortality after a single intraperitoneal injection of 500-2000 mg/kg body weight of the drug. The drug LD(50) for 24h and 72 h/30 day survival were found to be 1120 and 1000 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The optimum time of drug administration and drug dose-dependent effect on in vivo radiation protection of bone marrow chromosomes was studied in mice. Injection of 600 mg/kg of the drug 15 min before or within 5, 15 or 30min after 3Gy whole body gamma radiation resulted in a significant decrease in the aberrant metaphases percent at 24h post-irradiation; the maximum effect was seen when the drug was given immediately after irradiation. Injection of 200-800 mg/kg TMG within 5 min of irradiation with 3 Gy produced a significant dose-dependent reduction in the radiation induced percent aberrant metaphases and in the frequency of micronucleated erythrocytes at 24h after exposure, with a corresponding decrease in the different types of aberrations. The optimum dose for protection without drug toxicity was 600 mg/kg body weight. At this dose, TMG produced 70 and >60% reduction in the radiation induced percent aberrant metaphases and micronucleated erythrocytes, respectively. The high water solubility and effectiveness when administered post-irradiation favor TMG as a likely candidate for protection in case of accidental exposures.

  13. Proceedings of the Fourth Session of Radioprotection of the patient; Actas de la 4. Jornada de Proteccion Radiologica al Paciente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The Radiology Argentine Society and the Radioprotection Argentine Society have organized the 4. Session of the Protection to the Patient, in order to inform to the technical and scientific community about the scopes of the radioprotection to the patient. The principal treated topics were the following: effects of the radiation in radiodiagnostic; radioprotection of the fetus and the pregnancy woman; radioprotection in dental radiology; radiological protection in TAC; radiation doses in radiodiagnostic; treatment of radiation injuries; fatal accidents in radiotherapy. [Spanish] La Sociedad Argentina de Radiologia, y la Sociedad Argentina de Radioproteccion, han organizado la 4ta. Jornada de Proteccion al Paciente, con el objeto de informar a la comunidad cientifico y tecnica sobre los alcances de la radioproteccion al paciente. Los principales temas tratados fueron los siguientes: efectos de la radiacion en radiodiagnostico; radioproteccion del feto y la mujer gestante; radioproteccion en radiologia odontologica; proteccion radioogica en TAC; dosis de radiacion en radiodiagnostico; tratamiento de lesiones por radiacion; accidentes fatales en radioterapia.

  14. S-omega carboxamidinoalkyl isothiurea compounds. VI. Radioprotective testing on E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkova, M; Pantev, T [Nauchno-Izsledovatelski Inst. po Radiologiya i Radiatsionna Khigiena, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1975-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of eight newly synthesized potential radioprotectors from the group of the S-omega carboxamidinoalkyl isothiourea compounds is studied. The protective activity of these compounds is evaluated according to the ability of E. coli B to form colonies. Exponential culture of this strain were exposed to 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 kR of gamma rays (Cobalt 60) in the presence of the tested compounds administered in experimentally established nontoxic concentrations 15 minutes before irradiation. Five of the eight compounds tested showed radioprotective effect which was more prominent at the higher doses. As a result of this, cell survival was increased by one order.

  15. Rich radioprotective profiles of two indigenous medicinal plants Andrographis paniculata (Ap) and Swertia chirata (Sc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Rakshamani [V.B.S. Purvanchal University, Jaunpur (India); Mohan, H [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Kamat, J P [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2005-01-01

    The extracts of two indigenous medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata (Ap) and Swertia chirata (Sc) were selected to study if they could prevent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during radiation exposure. Rat liver mitochondria exposed to {gamma}-radiation (450Gy) resulted significant oxidative damage as exemplified by enhanced formation in various lipid peroxidation products, conjugated dienes (CD), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), TBARS as well as hydroxylnonenals. Simultaneous addition of Ap or Sc (50 mg/ml) extracts during radiation could significantly reverse such damage. Extracts showed high reducing equivalents, phenolic contents and displayed high scavenging activity with superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. The pulse radiolysis studies exhibited high reactivity with ABTS. Based on these observation, the plant extracts, Andrographis paniculata and Swertia chirata may emerge as effective radioprotective agents, protecting cells from radiation-induced injury. (author)

  16. Rich radioprotective profiles of two indigenous medicinal plants Andrographis paniculata (Ap) and Swertia chirata (Sc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Rakshamani; Mohan, H.; Kamat, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The extracts of two indigenous medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata (Ap) and Swertia chirata (Sc) were selected to study if they could prevent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during radiation exposure. Rat liver mitochondria exposed to γ-radiation (450Gy) resulted significant oxidative damage as exemplified by enhanced formation in various lipid peroxidation products, conjugated dienes (CD), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), TBARS as well as hydroxylnonenals. Simultaneous addition of Ap or Sc (50 mg/ml) extracts during radiation could significantly reverse such damage. Extracts showed high reducing equivalents, phenolic contents and displayed high scavenging activity with superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. The pulse radiolysis studies exhibited high reactivity with ABTS. Based on these observation, the plant extracts, Andrographis paniculata and Swertia chirata may emerge as effective radioprotective agents, protecting cells from radiation-induced injury. (author)

  17. Genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing effect of curcumin and trans-resveratrol in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes; Efecto genotóxico, radioprotector y radiosensibilizante de la curcumina y el trans-resveratrol en cultivos in vitro de linfocitos humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, V.A.; Tirsa Muñoz, B.; Sebastià, N.; Gómez-Cabrero, L.; La Parra, V.; Hervás, D.; Rodrigo, R.; Villaescusa, J.I.; Soriano, J.M.; Montoro, A.

    2015-07-01

    Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are natural polyphenol compounds. Curcumin is obtained from the rhizomes of the Curcumin plant (Curcuma longa), while trans-resveratrol is found in grapes, blackberries and other types of berry. These compounds have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anticarcinogenic properties among others. In addition, they are also known for their radiomodulating properties since they are capable of providing radioprotection or radiosensitization for normal or tumours cells depending on different factors. This dual action may be the result of their properties, such as free radicals scavenging, as well as their influence on cell cycle checkpoints or control mechanisms. These are activated in response to the genetic damage induced by radiation. Despite the many beneficial properties attributed to these polyphenol compounds, some studies suggest that they are able to be genotoxic agents for some cellular lines. The results obtained indicate that both compounds possess a radioprotective effect on the lymphocytes of peripheral blood in the quiescent phase of the cellular cycle (G0). Nevertheless, they are capable of induce radiosensitivity on these type of cells in the growth phase (G2), and in addition, a different genotoxic effect can be seen according to the concentration of each compound. This study suggests, therefore, that curcumin and trans-resveratrol are able to exert a triple effect, genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing on in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes depending on the study parameters. [Spanish] La curcumina y el trans-resveratrol son compuestos polifenólicos de origen natural. La curcumina es obtenida a partir de los rizomas de la planta de la cúrcuma (Curcuma longa), mientras que el trans-resveratrol se encuentra en uvas, moras y otras bayas. Estos compuestos presentan propiedades antioxidantes, antiinflamatorias, inmunoestimulantes y anticancerígenas, entre otras. Además, también se les conoce por

  18. Radioprotective properties of detoxified lipid A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.L.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Patchen, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has long been known to possess radioprotective properties. Nevertheless, the toxicity of LPS, or its principal bioactive component, Lipid A, has detracted from its potential use as a radioprotectant. Recently, a relatively non-toxic monophosphoryl Lipid A that retains many of the immunobiological properties of native LPS has been prepared from a polyaccharide-deficient and heptoseless Re mutant strain of S. minnesota. The authors conducted experiments that evaluated and compared the radioprotective efficiency of native endotoxin, as well as the mono (detoxified) and diphosphoryl (toxic) forms of Lipid A, in both responder (CD2F1 and C3H/HeN) and non-responder (C3H/HeJ) mice. It has been found that the optimal dose for the mono- and diphosphoryl Lipid A are approximately the same (800 μg/kg in CD2F1 mice), and that both compounds provide maximum protection when administered 24 h before exposure to an LD100 dose of cobalt - 60 gamma radiation. Possible mechanisms for the radioprotective action of detoxified Lipid A are suggested

  19. Use of herbal medicine for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    There are primarily three ways to achieve radio-protection in biological systems that have been exposed to ionizing radiation. The first is by changing the environment by physical or chemical means, or physical protection. The second is by chemical alternation of the site of radiation injury, or chemical protection. The third is by biological alternation to decrease the extent of the radiation injury

  20. Melatonin as a radioprotective agent: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, Russel J.; Tan, D.-X.; Herman, Terence S.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief secretory product of the pineal gland in the brain, is well known for its functional versatility. In hundreds of investigations, melatonin has been documented as a direct free radical scavenger and an indirect antioxidant, as well as an important immunomodulatory agent. The radical scavenging ability of melatonin is believed to work via electron donation to detoxify a variety of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including the highly toxic hydroxyl radical. It has long been recognized that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation are brought about by both direct and indirect mechanisms. The direct action produces disruption of sensitive molecules in the cells, whereas the indirect effects (∼70%) result from its interaction with water molecules, which results in the production of highly reactive free radicals such as · OH, · H, and e aq - and their subsequent action on subcellular structures. The hydroxyl radical scavenging ability of melatonin was used as a rationale to determine its radioprotective efficiency. Indeed, the results from many in vitro and in vivo investigations have confirmed that melatonin protects mammalian cells from the toxic effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, several clinical reports indicate that melatonin administration, either alone or in combination with traditional radiotherapy, results in a favorable efficacy:toxicity ratio during the treatment of human cancers. This article reviews the literature from laboratory investigations that document the ability of melatonin to scavenge a variety of free radicals (including the hydroxyl radical induced by ionizing radiation) and summarizes the evidence that should be used to design larger translational research-based clinical trials using melatonin as a radioprotector and also in cancer radiotherapy. The potential use of melatonin for protecting individuals from radiation terrorism is also considered

  1. Current knowledge from experimental works with radioprotective drugs from the viewpoint of latest scientific research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalka, J.

    2008-01-01

    The protection of both human and animal population against a radiation impairment proves to be an impulse for continuous intensive searching for plants with radioprotective properties, identification of their radioprotective components and examination of their effects both in vivo an in vitro. I am presenting the results as well as knowledge of a latest scientific research in this field with testing the following plants: Vigna radiata, Mentha piperita, Citrus aurantium var. amara, Syzygium cumini, Tinospora cordifolia, Aegle marmelos, Phyllanthus amarus, Aloe vera, Angelica sinensis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Panax ginseng, Hippophae rhamnoides, Ocimum sanctum, Crataegus microphylla. (authors)

  2. Aminoacids used as radioprotective substances against Cs137 and Sr90 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danetskaya, E.V.; Ramzaev, P.V.; Troitskaya, M.N.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study on white rats into the radioprotective action of ten essential amino acids has that valine, arginine, and histidine all effect appreciably the life span and absorbed doses of the principal radionuclides, 137 Cs and 90 Sr. When these amino acids are fed to rats, the survival rate increases and hemopoiesis tends to return to normal more rapidly; the reproductive function is unaffected. The mechanism of radioprotective action of these amino acids has been studied inadequately, but they seem to have a role to play in the metabolism of sulfur-containing compounds. The remaining amino acids have no protective action

  3. Radioprotection conferred by dextran sulfate given before irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.; Peeke, J.

    1986-01-01

    Dextran sulfate (DS) has been observed to cause mobilization (fivefold) of hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) and leukocytes, primarily lymphocytes, into the peripheral blood of mice within 2-3 h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. This effect was dose dependent and was prolonged for several hours when the high-molecular-weight version DS500 (500,000 daltons) was used. When DS500 was given 1-3 days before irradiation, hemopoietic recovery was markedly enhanced. Postirradiation injection was ineffective. By ten days after irradiation (7.0 Gy), the number of endogenous spleen colonies (CFUs) and the splenic mass were much larger if DS pretreatment had been given. This effect was dependent on the dose of DS500 and on the time administered, 60 mg/kg producing a maximal effect when given three days before irradiation. DS500 caused a transient anaphylactoid shock, however, in most mice--mild at low doses but potentially lethal at doses above 40 mg/kg (10% mortality within 1-3 days after 60 mg/kg). The following results were obtained with 50 mg/kg, a compromise dose causing minimal mortality (3%) given three days before irradiation. Reticulocyte reappearance was earlier in irradiated mice given DS500, indicating earlier erythropoietic recovery. Some of these reticulocytes were resistant to lysing agents, so their appearance could be detected using the Coulter electronic cell counter, as well as in stained blood smears. The 30-day mortality due to bone marrow failure after irradiation was significantly decreased in DS-treated mice below 9.5 Gy, and the LD50/30 was increased by 0.5 Gy. This study shows that dextran sulfate exerts a radioprotective influence on the hemopoietic system and hence survival when administered prophylactically

  4. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Environmental Effects § 971.602 Significant adverse environmental effects. (a) Determination of significant adverse environmental effects. The Administrator will determine the potential for or the occurrence of any significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106...

  5. Examination of the effect of ovarian radiation injury induced by hysterosalpingography on ovarian proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the radioprotective effect of amifostine: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can B

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Behzat Can,1 Remzi Atilgan,1 Sehmus Pala,1 Tuncay Kuloğlu,2 Sule Kiray,3 Nevin Ilhan4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Firat University School of Medicine, Elazig, Turkey; 2Department of Histology and Embryology, Firat University School of Medicine, Elazig, Turkey; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maltepe University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; 4Department of Biochemistry, Firat University School of Medicine, Elazig, Turkey Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of amifostine on cellular injury in the ovarian tissue induced by hysterosalpingography (HSG.Methods: In total, forty 4-month old female Wistar Albino rats were assigned into 8 groups. Each group contained 5 rats. Group 1 (G1: rats were decapitated without any procedure. Group 2 (G2: rats were decapitated after 3 hours of total body irradiation. Group 3 (G3: rats were decapitated 3 hours after HSG procedure. Group 4 (G4: rats were decapitated 3 hours after HSG procedure performed 30 min after receiving amifostine 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally. Group 5 (G5: rats were decapitated after 1 month without any procedure. Group 6 (G6: rats were decapitated after 1 month of total body irradiation. Group 7 (G7: rats were decapitated 1 month after HSG procedure. Group 8 (G8: rats were decapitated 1 month after HSG procedure performed 30 min after receiving amifostine 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally. After rats were decapitated under general anesthesia in all groups, blood samples were obtained and bilateral ovaries were removed. One of the ovaries was placed in 10% formaldehyde solution for histological germinal epithelial degeneration, apoptosis and proliferating cell nuclear antigen scoring. The other ovary and blood sera were stored at –80°C. TNF-α, total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, and malondialdehyde levels were studied in tissue samples and anti-mullerian hormone levels in blood samples.Results: At the end of the first month, there was

  6. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Oxford University Hospitals, Cellular Pathology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Prise, Kevin M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-23

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to {sup 137}Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for {sup 137}Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He{sup 2+} charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He{sup 2+} ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [German] Radioprotektive Agenzien sind sowohl in der Strahlentherapie von Krebserkrankungen als auch im Strahlenschutz im Zusammenhang mit akzidenteller Exposition von Bedeutung. Methylproamine ist die Leitsubstanz einer Klasse von

  7. The rat acute-phase protein {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin plays a central role in amifostine-mediated radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirjana, Mihailovic; Goran, Poznanovic; Nevena, Grdovic; Melita, Vidakovic; Svetlana, Dinic; Ilijana, Grigorov; Desanka, Bogojevic, E-mail: mista@ibiss.bg.ac.r [Department of Molecular Biology, Institute for Biological Research ' Sinisa Stankovic' , University of Belgrade, Bulevar despota Stefana 142, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-09-15

    Previously we reported that elevated circulating concentrations of the acute-phase (AP) protein {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin ({alpha}{sub 2}M), either as typically occurring in pregnant female rats or after administration to male rats, provides radioprotection, displayed as 100% survival of experimental animals exposed to total-body irradiation with 6.7 Gy (LD{sub 50/30}) x-rays, that is as effective as that afforded by the synthetic radioprotector amifostine. The finding that amifostine administration induces a 45-fold increase in {alpha}{sub 2}M in the circulation led us to hypothesise that {alpha}{sub 2}M assumes an essential role in both natural and amifostine-mediated radioprotection in the rat. In the present work we examined the activation of cytoprotective mechanisms in rat hepatocytes after the exogenous administration of {alpha}{sub 2}M and amifostine. Our results showed that the IL6/JAK/STAT3 hepatoprotective signal pathway, described in a variety of liver-injury models, upregulated the {alpha}{sub 2}M gene in amifostine-pretreated animals. In both {alpha}{sub 2}M- and amifostine-pretreated rats we observed the activation of the Akt signalling pathways that mediate cellular survival. At the cellular level this was reflected as a significant reduction of irradiation-induced DNA damage that allowed for the rapid and complete restoration of liver mass and ultimately at the level of the whole organism the complete restoration of body weight. We conclude that the selective upregulation of {alpha}{sub 2}M plays a central role in amifostine-provided radioprotection.

  8. Evaluation of radioprotective activities Rhodiola imbricata Edgew--a high altitude plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Sagar, Ravinder; Prasad, Jagdish; Singh, Surendar; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok; Singh, Shikha; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2005-05-01

    The present study reports the radioprotective properties of a hydro-alcoholic rhizome extract of Rhodiola imbricata (code named REC-7004), a plant native to the high-altitude Himalayas. The radioprotective effect, along with its relevant superoxide ion scavenging, metal chelation, antioxidant, anti-lipid peroxidation and anti-hemolytic activities was evaluated under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Chemical analysis showed the presence of high content of polyphenolics (0.971 +/- 0.01 mg% of quercetin). Absorption spectra analysis revealed constituents that absorb in the range of 220-290 nm, while high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed the presence of four major peaks with retention times of 4.780, 5.767, 6.397 and 7.577 min. REC-7004 was found to lower lipid oxidation significantly (p degradation within first 24 h. The metal chelation activity of REC-7004 was found to increase concomitantly from 1 to 50 microg/ml. REC-7004 (10-50 microg/ml) exhibited significant metal chelation activity (p < 0.05), as compared to control, and maximum percentage inhibition (30%) of formation of iron-2,2'-bi-pyridyl complex was observed at 50 microg/ml, which correlated well with quercetin (34.9%), taken as standard. The reducing power of REC-7004 increased in a dose-dependent manner. The absorption unit value of REC-7004 was significantly lower (0.0183 +/- 0.0033) as compared to butylated hydroxy toluene, a standard antioxidant (0.230 +/- 0.091), confirming its high reducing ability. Superoxide ion scavenging ability of REC-7004 exhibited a dose-dependent increase (1-100 microg/ml) and was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of quercetin at lower concentrations (1-10 microg/ml), while at 100 microg/ml, both quercetin and REC-7004 scavenged over 90% superoxide anions. MTT assay in U87 cell line revealed an increase in percent survival of cells at doses between 25 and 125 microg/ml in case of drug + radiation group. In vivo evaluation of radio-protective

  9. Antimutagenic and radioprotective properties of products from Lactobacterium Bulgaricum strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, I.; Benova, D.; Yagova, A.; Topalova, S.

    1993-01-01

    The antimutagenic properties of the strains LBL-4 and LBL-144 have been studied by the incidence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PE) and endogenous spleen colony forming units (E-CFU) in C57BL mice. The lyophilized lactic acid products have been administered orally in the course of 3 weeks on 5 consecutive days. After the last treatment the mice have been gamma irradiated with 0.5, 3.0, 7.0 and 8.0 Gy. The prophylactic pretreatment of mice with LBL-4 in the schedule 3 x 5 days has shown a reduction of the induced micronuclei in PE after gamma irradiation with 3.0 Gy (37% compared to 50.5%; p < 0.001). The radiation effects caused by a lower dose of 0.5 Gy has not been modified by LBL-4 (36.7% compared to 33.8%). The application of LBL-144 does not reduce the mutagenic activity of both 0.5 and 3.0 Gy gamma rays. Applied independently, both LBL-4 and LBL-144 have shown the same frequency of micro-nucleated PE as the male and female mice controls. The radioprotective properties of LBL-4 have been assessed according to E-CFU and the changes in spleen weights after irradiation with 7.0 and 8.0 Gy gamma rays. The amount of E-CFU have been counted on day 9 after irradiation. A significant increase of spleen colony formation units has been established in mice pretreated with LBL-4. The spleen weights of the protected mice have been increased compared to unprotected animals. The results obtained show a good protection of haemopoietic stem cells by the product LBL-4. (author)

  10. Hydrogen as a New Class of Radioprotective Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liren; Shen, Jianliang; Chuai, Yunhai; Cai, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that most of the ionizing radiation-induced damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals (·OH) follows radiolysis of H2O. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has antioxidant activities by selectively reducing ·OH and peroxynitrite(ONOO-). We firstly hypothesized and demonstrated the radioprotective effect of H2 in vitro and in vivo, which was also repeated on different experimental animal models by different departments. A randomized, placebo-controlled study showed that consumption of hydrogen-rich water reduces the biological reaction to radiation-induced oxidative stress without compromising anti-tumor effects. These encouraging results suggested that H2 represents a potentially novel preventative strategy for radiation-induced oxidative injuries. H2 is explosive. Therefore, administration of hydrogen-rich solution (physiological saline/pure water/other solutions saturated with H2) may be more practical in daily life and more suitable for daily consumption. This review focuses on major scientific and clinical advances of hydrogen-rich solution/H2 as a new class of radioprotective agent. PMID:24155664

  11. Antagonism of ascorbate against the radioprotective action of cysteamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeslund, M; Ehrenberg, L; Djalali-Behzad, G [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Radiobiologiska Institutionen

    1976-07-01

    An investigation has been carried out into the interaction of cysteamine (MEA) and ascorbate on the radiosensitivity of E.coli, with painstaking removal of autoxidation products from glassware. Trace amounts of copper could be effectively removed, and the influence of small amounts of iron contaminating the analytical grade phosphate was assessed. The bacteria were exposed to MEA and/or ascorbate for 1 hour at 37/sup 0/C, irradiation with 42 or 58 krad of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..rays taking place 30 to 40 minutes after the additions. Survival studies demonstrated the reversion of a major fraction of the radioprotective action of MEA (2 or 6 mM) by ascorbate (5 mM) simultaneously present in the medium. Net RNA synthesis, determined by the incorporation of /sup 3/H-uridine, was suppressed by MEA and this was partly reversed by ascorbate. The irradiation of bacterium suspensions containing MEA and ascorbate was found to provoke a conspicuous stimulation of RNA synthesis above the level of unirradiated parallel samples. The effects of some oxidizing treatments (dehydroascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 3.6 ..mu..M FeSO/sub 4/ or 1 ..mu..M CuSO/sub 4/) together with MEA were also studied. Possible mechanisms for the ability of ascorbate to counteract the radioprotective action of MEA are discussed, and the implication of monodehydroascorbate formed during irradiation is suggested.

  12. Incoherences of Brazilian labour laws face to present radioprotection concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Brazilian labour legislation establishes, since 1950, some privileges for people working in activities which imply exposure to ionizing radiations. Comparing the present legal framework with technical radioprotection knowledge, one can detect several incoherences covering: classification of such activities; additional payments; reduced labour journey; more vacations; medical surveillance; early retirements; special norms for women. An analysis of these incoherences lead us to propose a new frame of labour rights and radioprotection norms, coupling Brazilian juridical principles and modern radioprotection knowledge. (author)

  13. Current topics and perspectives in the field of radioprotective compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentenac-Roumanou, H.; Fatome, M.

    1978-01-01

    Since discovery, between 1951 and 1955, of the classical radioprotective agents cysteamine, serotonin and A.E.T., synthesis of more active molecules, long acting polymers and compounds active when orally administered, have been performed, especially during the last decade. On the other hand, extensive investigations on mechanism of action of radioprotective agents and particularly discovery of the essential role displayed by protection of the central nervous system of mammals allowed a marked improvement of concepts in the field of chemical radioprotection [fr

  14. From fundamental limits to radioprotection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, P.; Chassany, J.

    1980-01-01

    The individual dose limits fixed by present French legislation for different categories of people refer to dose equivalents received by or delivered to the whole body or to certain tissues or organs over given periods of time. The values concerning personnel engaged directly in work under radiations are summed up in a table. These are the limits which radioprotection authorities must impose, while ensuring that exposure levels are kept as low as possible. With the means available in practical radioprotection it is not possible to measure dose equivalents directly, but information may be obtained on dose rates, absorbed doses, particle fluxes, activities per unit volume and per surface area. An interpretation of these measurements is necessary if an efficient supervision of worker exposure is to be achieved [fr

  15. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time

  16. Radioprotection of normal tissues of the mouse by hypoxic breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.N.; Joiner, B.; Denekamp, J.

    1989-01-01

    Hypoxic breathing during irradiation has been advocated as a therapeutic modality, to increase the efficacy of radiotherapy. In this form of treatment, the total and daily X-ray dose is increased by a factor of 1.25, on the assumption that all normal tissues in the beam will be protected to a similar extent by breathing gas containing a reduced oxygen concentration (usually 10%). To test this concept, we have determined the effect of varying the inspired oxygen tension on the radiosensitivity of 3 normal tissues in the mouse (kidney, jejunum and skin), and have compared these results with data from the literature for mouse lung. Reduction of the inspired oxygen tension from 21% (air) to 7-8% led to much greater radioprotection of skin (protection factor 1.37) than of lung (1.09). Protection factors for jejunum and kidney were 1.16 and 1.36 respectively. The results show that the extent of radioprotection afforded by hypoxic breathing is tissue dependent, and that great care must be taken clinically in choosing the increased radiation dose to be used in conjunction with hypoxic breathing

  17. Radioprotection rayonnements, dosimétrie, protection

    CERN Document Server

    Marey, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Pour tous les travailleurs du nucléaire comme pour les étudiants des licences professionnelles et des BTS Environnement nucléaire et BTS radioprotection, l'ouvrage rassemble de façon progressive, claire et précise toutes les informations scientifiques et pratiques qui leur sont indispensables. Une première partie résume les données de base relatives à la structure de la matière, la stabilité des noyaux, les différents rayonnements, leur énergie et la décroissance radioactive. La deuxième partie constitue une approche progressive de la radioprotection s'appuyant sur l'influence des rayonnement sur la matière pour définir les notions de dose et aborder le dimensionnement des protections biologiques et des éléments de ventilation. Enfin, la dernière partie traite de la mise en oeuvre pratique de la radioprotection sur le terrain et de la gestion des déchets nucléaires en application de la technologie actuelle, de la réglementation et des directives imposées par l'exploitant qu'est EDF. De...

  18. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, Christian [University Clinics, Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    retinoblastoma who did not have a genetic predisposition. Mainly osteoblastoma and soft tissue sarcoma were observed in the former radiation field. From these date it must be concluded that such effects also occur in the low dose range. Individuals with the extreme radiosensitivity (dose modifying factor, DMG, of around 5) are rare, but there are individuals with a DMF of around 1.5 to 2 who are more frequent. Therefore it has to be discussed whether the individual variability of radiosensitivity must also be considered for radioprotection by special dose limits or other regulations. (author)

  19. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    2000-01-01

    retinoblastoma who did not have a genetic predisposition. Mainly osteoblastoma and soft tissue sarcoma were observed in the former radiation field. From these date it must be concluded that such effects also occur in the low dose range. Individuals with the extreme radiosensitivity (dose modifying factor, DMG, of around 5) are rare, but there are individuals with a DMF of around 1.5 to 2 who are more frequent. Therefore it has to be discussed whether the individual variability of radiosensitivity must also be considered for radioprotection by special dose limits or other regulations. (author)

  20. Radioprotection of Swiss albino mice by Adhatoda vesica leaf extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The radioprotective role of aqueous extract of Adhatoda vesica leaf extract against radiation induced hematological alterations in peripheral blood of Swiss albino mice was studied at various post-irradiation intervals between 6 hrs to 30 days. Oral administration of Adhatoda vesica leaf extract (800 mg / kg body weight) prior to whole-body irradiation showed a significant protection in terms of survival percentage and hematological parameters. Mice exposed to radiation (8 Gy) without Adhatoda vesica leaf extract pre-treatment exhibited signs of radiation sickness like anorexia, lethargicity, ruffled hairs and diarrhoea and such animals died within 26 days post-irradiation. The dose reduction factor (DRF=1.6) for Adhatoda vesica leaf extract was calculated from LD50/30 values. A significant decline in hematological constituents (RBCs, WBCs, Hb and Hct) was evident till day 15, at later period of observation (day 15 onwards), no animals could survive from control group whereas, in Adhatoda vesica leaf extract pre-treated irradiated group, a gradual recovery was noted in the hematological values. However, these hematological values remained significantly below the normal even till day 30. A significant decrease in GSH was recorded in control animals. Experimental animals showed a significant increase in GSH content (blood as well as liver) with respect to control, but such values remained below normal. A significant increase in TBARS level in liver and serum was evident in control animals. Although, no significant difference was noticed in such levels in normal and Adhatoda vesica leaf extract treated animals. But, a significant decrease was registered in Adhatoda vesica leaf extract pretreated irradiated animals. The results from the present study suggest that Adhatoda vesica leaf extract has radioprotective role in stimulating/protecting the hematopoietic system thereby enhancing the survival and increasing the hematological constituents in peripheral

  1. In vivo radioprotection of mice by 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (edaravone; Radicut), a clinical drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Kazunori; Furuse, Masako; Yoshida, Akira; Matsuyama, Azusa; Moritake, Takashi; Ikota, Nobuo; Tsuboi, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one; Radicut) is a brain-protecting agent used clinically to treat acute ischemic stroke with a reaction mechanism of free radical scavenging. Since the initial stage of radiation damage involves the formation of free radicals, edaravone is expected to be effective in preventing lethal damage from ionizing radiation. In the present study, we used mice to examine in vivo the radioprotective effect of edaravone on whole body X-ray irradiation. A solution of edaravone was administered intraperitoneally to C3H mice (male, 10 weeks old), and they were irradiated with a total dose of 8.0 Gy. Edaravone exhibited dose-dependent and injection time-dependent radioprotection. When injected 30 min before the X-ray irradiation, it had the greatest radioprotective effect, whereas an injection after the irradiation showed no protective effect. The LD 50/30 was about 8.8 Gy for edaravone-injected mice and 6.6 Gy for control mice, yielding a DRF for edaravone (450 mg/kg body weight) of 1.3. Edaravone decreased the body temperature transiently about 3-6deg C, but this did not seem to be responsible for the radioprotection. Since the radioprotection was observed only when the reagent was administered before the irradiation, the primary action of edaravone might be the quenching of free radicals with a short lifetime generated by the irradiation. (author)

  2. In vivo radioprotection of mice by 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (edaravone; Radicut), a clinical drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzai, Kazunori; Furuse, Masako; Yoshida, Akira; Matsuyama, Azusa; Moritake, Takashi; Ikota, Nobuo [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Research Center for Radiation Safety; Tsuboi, Koji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2004-06-01

    Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one; Radicut) is a brain-protecting agent used clinically to treat acute ischemic stroke with a reaction mechanism of free radical scavenging. Since the initial stage of radiation damage involves the formation of free radicals, edaravone is expected to be effective in preventing lethal damage from ionizing radiation. In the present study, we used mice to examine in vivo the radioprotective effect of edaravone on whole body X-ray irradiation. A solution of edaravone was administered intraperitoneally to C3H mice (male, 10 weeks old), and they were irradiated with a total dose of 8.0 Gy. Edaravone exhibited dose-dependent and injection time-dependent radioprotection. When injected 30 min before the X-ray irradiation, it had the greatest radioprotective effect, whereas an injection after the irradiation showed no protective effect. The LD{sub 50/30} was about 8.8 Gy for edaravone-injected mice and 6.6 Gy for control mice, yielding a DRF for edaravone (450 mg/kg body weight) of 1.3. Edaravone decreased the body temperature transiently about 3-6deg C, but this did not seem to be responsible for the radioprotection. Since the radioprotection was observed only when the reagent was administered before the irradiation, the primary action of edaravone might be the quenching of free radicals with a short lifetime generated by the irradiation. (author)

  3. Iodine kinetics and effectiveness of stable iodine prophylaxis after intake of radioiodine: a review; Pharmacocinetique de l'iode: revue des connaissances utiles en radioprotection accidentelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffroy, B.; Verger, P.; Le Guen, B. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPSN, 92 (France)

    2000-06-01

    Ingestion of stable iodine (potassium iodide) offers an efficient protection against the irradiation of the thyroid when an accidental exposure to radioiodine occurs. This prophylaxis aims at obtaining a rapid and maximum thyroid protection without antithyroid effects. This article reviews studies on iodine kinetics in the human and on stable iodine effectiveness to protect the thyroid. In adults with a normal thyroid function, ingestion of 100 mg of iodide just before exposure to radioiodine allows a percentage of thyroid averted dose equal or greater than 95%. If the exposure persists after iodide ingestion (100 mg), the percentage of averted dose may decrease significantly. Repeated ingestion of daily amounts of 15 mg of stable iodine would then allow to maintain a 90% effectiveness. Iodide effectiveness and antithyroid effects also depend on external and individual factors such as iodine amounts in the diet, thyroid function and age. It is recommended to adapt the amount of ingested stable iodine according to age at the time of exposure. (author)

  4. The influence of the known radioprotective compounds on the metabolism of red blood cells. Pt. 1. Effect of crysteamine on the cellular level of the intermediates and coenzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmiel, J.; Kopczynski, Z.; Rybczynska, M.

    1976-01-01

    Cysteamine added to the human blood smples in the final concentration of 6.5 x 10 -3 M, 1,9 x 10 -2 M and 3,8 x 10 -2 M exerts a significant effect on the metabolism of erythrocytes. The chromatographic determination of carbohydrate intermediates and coenzymes in red blood cells indicates that in lower concentration of the drug the rate of anaerobic metabolism of glucose is increased. Higher concentration of cysteamine (3.8 x 10 -3 M) enhances aerobic catabolism of glucose in pentose shunt. (author)

  5. Radioprotective effect of ascorbic acid on cytological changes induced by exposing fertile eggs to different doses of gamma rays in chicken embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-wardany, A.E.M.; Hassanien, M.M.; El-fiky, A.

    2003-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome that develops after exposure to ionizing radiation is mainly caused by the impairment of cell division which is of vital importance for all biological systems. DNA is susceptible to damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are produced via exposure to ionizing radiation and expressed by cellular alterations and chromosomal damage. The present study showed that the irradiated group of chick embryo revealed linearity of damaging effect with increasing dose level from 50 rad to 150 rad. The antioxidant ascorbic acid (vitamin C) could acts as a first defense against DNA oxidative stress. The present work clarified the extent to which the natural compound ascorbic acid could antagonist the incorporated radionuclide impact induced by radiation and effect genomic stability of embryonic cells. The obtained data revealed that injection of ascorbic acid(100 mug/ egg) prior to radiation exposure induced significant reduction (P<0.05) in the frequency of total aberrant

  6. Evaluation of the radioprotective Effect of the co-oral Administration of Vitamin B12 with Vitamin c on some Haematological and Biochemical Alterations in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Magied, N.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of co-oral administration of vitamin B 12 with vitamin C against radiation induced haematological and biochemical alterations in male albino rats. Male albino rats were divided into six groups (n=8). Group 1: rats were kept as control, Group 2; rats received orally vita-min B 12 (2000μgkg -1 ). Group 3; rats received Vitamin B 12 with Vitamin C (500mgkg -1 ). Group 4; rats whole body exposed to 7Gy of gamma rays. Group 5; rats received vitamin B 12 for 21 successive days before irradiation. Group 6; rats received Vitamin B 12 with Vitamin C for 21 successive days before irradiation. Animals were sacrificed the third day post irradiation. The oral administration of Vitamin B 12 with or with-out Vitamin C enhanced the recovery from radiation-induced haemopoietic injury and some biochemical changes demonstrated by a significant increase (p0.05>) of WBCs, RBCs and Platelets count, Hb content, Hct%, serum erythropoietin and iron levels and a significant reduction (p0.05>) of serum homocysteine level (Hcy), creatine kinase (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities compared to their respective values in irradiated rats. Improvement of oxidative stress in heart and spleen tissues denoted by a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation (MDA) and a significant increase in glutathione (GSH) content was recorded also. The co-oral administration of vitamin B 12 with vitamin C has no effect on the prophylactic efficacy of vitamin B 12

  7. Advances in radioprotection through the use of combined agent regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J F; Kumar, K S; Walden, T L; Neta, R; Landauer, M R; Clark, E P [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1990-04-01

    Improved radioprotection and reduced lethal toxicity of the phosphorothioate WR 2721 was observed after administration with metals (selenium, zinc or copper). A number of receptor-mediated protectors and other biological compounds, including endotoxin, eicosanoids and cytokines, have at least an additive effect when administered with thiol protectors. Eicosanoids and other bioactive lipids must be administered before exposure, whereas some immunomodulators have activity when administered either before or after exposure, e.g. interleukin administered simultaneously with WR 2721 before or after irradiation enhances the efficacy of WR 2721. The most effective single or combinations of protectors result in a decrement in locomotor activity (index of behavioural toxicity). Recent evidence indicates that caffeine mitigates toxicity of an effective dose of phosphorothioate WR 3689 without altering its efficacy. (UK).

  8. Radioprotective action of beta-carotin and vitamin A, C and E complexes at reproductive system and indices of antioxidant system in male rat blood and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereshchako, G.G.; Konoplya, E.F.; Khodosovskaya, A.M.; Rutkovskaya, Zh.A.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of total irradiation in low dose at the state of rat mail reproductive system, lipid peroxidation processes and antioxidant system in rat blood and liver tissues as well as radioprotective capacity of beta-carotin with vitamin A, C and E complexes were investigated. It was established that injection of this substances to rat's organism one day before irradiation in 1.0 Gy dose led to normalization of spermatogenic cells number, increase of nucleic acids content in testes and significant improvement of antioxidant status of blood and liver tissue. (authors)

  9. Natural products as radioprotective agents; past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2013-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation, which is the cornerstone of cancer treatment, is compromised by the radiosensitivity of normal tissues. A chemical that can give selective benefit to the normal cells against the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation has been a long sought goal. However, most of the compounds studied have shown inadequate clinical application owing to their inherent toxicity, undesirable side effects, and high cost. Plants commonly used as dietary and or therapeutic agents have recently been the focus of attention since in most cases they are non-toxic and are easily accepted for human use. The proposed talk will mainly deal on the radioprotective potential of some important plant and herbal extracts. (author)

  10. Role of endogenous serotonin in the mechanism of action of radioprotective substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinova, M.M.; Nekrasova, I.V.; Gusareva, Eh.V.; Dontsova, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of a correlation between radiomodifying activity of noradrenaline (NA), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and a combination of these agents and their effect on the content of endogenous serotonin in cells of Ehrlich's ascites tumor and E. coli B. There is no uniformity in the response of different cells and uniform direction of the changes in their radioresistance and endogenous serotonin content both under the effect of the substances (NA and NEM) given separately and under a combined effect of the protector and the agent, which removes the protective effect or prevents realization of the latter (NEM). This enables us to arrive at a conclusion that endogenous serotonin is not the only factor responsible for the radioprotective effect of the protective substances. At the same time, it is not excluded that endogenous serotonin is involved in the chain of reactions which are necessary for the radioprotective effect to come into play

  11. Computerized examination system on radioprotection knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, Gabriel; Rosca Fartat, Gabriela; Ghilea, Simion

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the recognition system of the education and training in the field of radioprotection based on the examination system and the software solutions adopted by the regulatory authority in Romania. The Romanian Radiation Protection system is in place since 1950, when the first nuclear research reactor was built and activities involving radioactive sources started to be developed, and several developing phases were passed through. Linked to the Romanian Radiation Protection system an Education, Training and Recognition system was developed. The recognition of the competencies achieved by the personnel in the framework of the education and training system consists in obtaining a work permit. It is mandatory at least for the radiological safety officers to posses a work permit granted by the Romanian Regulatory Body (CNCAN) based on an examination of the radioprotection knowledge. The examination consists in solving a questionnaire on radioprotection and legislation issues. Each participant receives a questionnaire with 60 questions and has to solve it in a time limit of one hour. In 2007 the examination system has been improved by authors who designed a software and a database which contains all the questions and answers with related explanations. For each examination session the software generates randomly for each participant the examination questionnaire. More than 2000 questions and answers from the database are published on the web site of CNCAN for different fields of ionizing radiation applications. Moreover the generated questions and participant's answers are registered in order to perform the further analysis and review. The result is an objective and transparent examination system which encourages the continuous training and retraining. (author)

  12. Radioprotection plan at the Abadia interim repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.G.; Rabello, P.N.P.; Tranjan Filho, A.

    1993-01-01

    The wastes from Goiania radiological accident are temporarily stored at a site near the village of Abadia de Goias, 23 km for far from downtown Goiania. Foreseeing operations inside the storage yard, a Radioprotection Plan was organize primarily with the aim of establishing procedures to reduce radiation exposure of workers to as-low-as reasonably achievable (ALARA principles and to be at the adopted regulatory exposure radiation limits. The adequacy of the storage containers and their reconditioning are the operations involved. (B.C.A.). 09 refs, 02 tabs

  13. Note from the radioprotection group's shipping service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Le service SHIPPING du groupe de radioprotection souhaite vous rappeler qu'avant toute expédition de matériel susceptible d'être radioactif, une demande de transport doit être établie par EDH en cochant la case appropriée (danger radioactif). Merci de bien vouloir prendre note des informations figurant dans le site Web: http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Toute demande non conforme ne sera pas prise en compte. Radioactive Shipping Service http://cern.ch/service-rp-shippingTél: 73171Fax: 69200

  14. Relationship between electronic structure and radioprotective activity of some indazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    The quantum-chemical study of electronic structure of 29 indasoles with complete optimization of geometry and search of quantitative link between the established characteristics and radioprotective activity (RPA) was carried out through the MNDO method with application of multiple linear and nonlinear regression analysis and the basic component method. The equations of correlation relationship between the RPA and electronic characteristics are presented. 10 indasole structures, the forecasted RPA values whereof (survival rate, %) equal 50% and above, are selected. The statistic significance of the obtained correlation equations and their regression coefficients make it possible to conclude, that the established relationships are not accidental and are prospective for forecasting RPA of other close compounds of the indasole series [ru

  15. On the role played by direct protection of the haemopoietic system cells in radioprotective action of some biogenous amines on the animal organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, I.B.; Dontsova, G.V.; Yanushevskaya, M.I.; Graevskij, E.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    It has been found in mice, by a method of splenic exocolonies, that: (1) serotonin, adrenaline and noradrenaline can protect both isolated bone marrow cells and cells in situ (2) a considerable contribution to a radioprotective action of the amines under study on the animal organism is made by their direct protective effect on cells, (3) with serotonin and adrenaline, ''cell'' protection in the organism is added by a radioprotective action of tissue hypoxia caused by these amines

  16. Computed tomography and radioprotection: Knowing and acting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducou Le Pointe, H.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the population to ionizing radiation for medical purposes is increasing throughout the world. In the United States of America, this exposure (3 mSv) has reached, even exceeded, exposure from natural sources. In France, the report of the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) on exposure of the French population to ionizing radiation in 2007, based on the 74.6 million medical diagnostic procedures, estimates the mean individual effective dose to be 1.3 mSv. This value is much lower than the value in the United States but has progressed in 5 years by 62.5%. Computed tomography accounts for 10.1% of the procedures and 58% of the collective effective dose. This is why computed tomography is receiving very special attention from all those involved in radioprotection. It must be remembered, nevertheless, that we are well within the low dose range (effective dose less than 100 mSv), and indeed, in the large majority of CT examinations exposure values are lower than 15 mSv. The biological effects of low doses are still a matter of debate. First of all, it has not been possible to demonstrate the risk of cancer due to this level of exposure, neither on the survivors of the atomic bombs in Japan nor on workers in the nuclear industry in the United Kingdom. The year 2012 marked a change; for the first time, epidemiology took over from statistical studies. Despite the low risk demonstrated, reserves concerning methodology, and waiting for further European epidemiological studies underway, we must continue to act to encourage radiological protection. Before considering the action to take and without under-estimating the risks, it is important to remember that a computed tomography investigation is conducted in patients, and not in individuals in good health. Acting to provide patients with protection from radiation means involving all those concerned with justifying it, with substituting it, and with optimising it. For some years

  17. Development of Functional Foods and Advanced Technology for Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Byun, Myung Woo; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2003-05-01

    We have previously developed two medicinal herb mixtures that protects immune/hematopoietic system and self-renewal tissues against irradiation and enhances immune/hematopoietic functions. In this study, we have developed two pilot products by adding the effective fractions to the hot water extract of the herb mixtures and investigated their efficacy. In irradiated mice, pilot products protected hematopoietic stem cells, promoted the regeneration and activation of immune cells, normalized the unbalanced immune reaction, and inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Polysaccharide was active fraction and mechanisms were elucidated. The products also protected the stem cells in self-renewal tissues. DNA/membrane damages, apoptotic cell signals, chromosome/DNA alterations, and oxidation of protein/lipid were inhibited by pilot products, and their radical scavenging activities were observed. Five active components were isolated and identified. Pilot products also inhibited the cancer development by 30% in irradiated mice. In clinical investigation, pilot products inhibited the side-effects of cancer therapy including immune/hematopoietic depression. Therefore, the pilot products may be used as functional foods for overcoming of immune/hematopoietic depression and self-renewal tissue damages induced by irradiation, as well as for the immune/hematopoietic enhancement. Also we have screened food materials for inhibition of radiation-induced chronic damage (carcinogenesis), and selected effective 4 materials and elicited two mixture preparations with enhanced activity, and confirmed their inhibitory activities in cancer initiation model systems. To obtain the applicability of radiation technology for the safe sanitation and distribution of functional food materials, we verified the toxicological safety, stability of activity and active components of irradiated medicinal herbs. Also, screening of new radioprotective materials and basic biological research for the enhancement of

  18. Radioprotective action on bone marrow CFU during immobilization of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keizer, H.J.; van Putten, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Anesthesia and restraint without anesthesia during whole-body x-irradiation decrease the mortality from both the bone marrow and the intestinal syndromes (30- and 5-day mortality). The two types of immobilization decrease the radiosensitivity of the hemopoietic stem cells, as shown by an increased survival of hemopoietic stem cells in the marrow of immobilized mice. The hypoxic cell radiosensitizer Ro-07-0582 reversed the radioprotective effect during restraint without anesthesia, but not during pentobarbital anesthesia. This indicates that hypoxia of the femur bone marrow cannot explain the decreased radiosensitivity of the stem cells during pentobarbital anesthesia. Pentobarbital was also shown to inhibit the recruitment of resting femur bone marrow stem cells (G 0 -phase cells) into cycle following a sublethal dose of x rays. The relevance of these observations is discussed

  19. Radioprotection of intestinal crypt cells by cox-inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisnar, Paul O.; Dones, Rosa Angela S.A.; Serna, Paulene-Ver A.; Deocaris, Chester C.; Guttierez, Kalangitan V.; Deocaris, Custer C.

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of tissue homeostasis in the gastrointestinal epithelium after epithelial injury focuses on the prostaglandins(PGs) as its major mediators. The two cyclooxygenase isoforms, cox-1 and cox-2, catalyze synthesis of PGs. Cox-1 is the predominant cyclooxygenase isoform found in the normal intestine. In contrast, cox-2 is present at low levels in normal intestine but is elevated at sites of inflammation, and in adenomas and carcinomas. To study the effects of various commercially-available cox-inhibitors (Ketorolac: cox-1 selective; Celecoxib: cox-2 selective; and Indocid: cox-1/2 non-selective), we determine mouse crypt epithelial cell fate after genotoxic injury with whole-body gamma-ray exposure at 15 Gy. Intestinal tissues of mice treated with cox-2 inhibitors that showed invariable apoptotic event, however, have increased occurrence of regenerating cells. Our results suggest a potential application of cox-2 selective inhibitors as radioprotective agent for normal cells after radiotherapy. (Author)

  20. Radioprotection of the environment: on the context of biodiversity and evolutionary theory. A reference organism has no genetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedervall, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    The recent efforts to define a basis for radioprotection of the environment include some concepts and ideas related to various endpoints which need a clarification. This paper focuses on the biodiversity concept and the context of individuals of a species as well as that of the species as a gene pool. A major problem with the ambition to radioprotect biodiversity is the concept 'reference organism' which has no genetic properties and therefore is in contradiction with a real biological species. Biodiversity and the species (gene pool) concept are, just as any other areas of biology, integral parts of evolutionary theory. With the reference organism as a basis no meaningful reasoning can take place which relates data on radioactivity levels or mutations to potential effects on populations or biodiversity. It is therefore suggested that the national and international bodies involved in radioprotection of the environment take advantage of evolutionary theory as a reference frame. (author)

  1. Statistical Significance and Effect Size: Two Sides of a Coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xitao

    This paper suggests that statistical significance testing and effect size are two sides of the same coin; they complement each other, but do not substitute for one another. Good research practice requires that both should be taken into consideration to make sound quantitative decisions. A Monte Carlo simulation experiment was conducted, and a…

  2. Reporting effect sizes as a supplement to statistical significance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the article is to review the statistical significance reporting practices in reading instruction studies and to provide guidelines for when to calculate and report effect sizes in educational research. A review of six readily accessible (online) and accredited journals publishing research on reading instruction ...

  3. S-omega-carboxyl-amidinoalkyl isothiocarbamides. VI. Radioprotective assay on E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkova, M; Pantev, T [Nauchno-Izsledovatelski Inst. po Radiologiya i Radiatsionna Khigiena, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1975-01-01

    The radioprotective properties of newly synthesized compounds, members of S-omega-carboxamidino-alkyl-isothiourea are studied. Protective activity is evaluated by the colony-forming capacity of Escherichia coli. Exponential cultures of this strain are irradiated with gamma rays within the 20-120 kr span, in the presence of the compounds submitted to the study. The dose reduction factors are estimated by correlating the regression coefficients of the dose-effect curves obtained in the presence or absence of protection. Five of the eight preparations studied showed radioprotective effect, more conspicuous with the use of higher doses. The dose-reduction factors are lower than those of cysteamine. The relation between chemical structure and effectiveness of the compounds is investigated.

  4. Thalidomide has a significant effect in patients with thalassemia intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YunShuan; Ren, Quan; Zhou, Yali; Li, Pingping; Lin, Wanhua; Yin, Xiaolin

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effect of thalidomide in patients with thalassemia intermedia. We observed the effect of thalidomide in seven patients with thalassemia intermedia requiring blood transfusion. Four of the patients were transfusion-independent, and three patients were transfusion-dependent. For the four transfusion-independent patients, hemoglobin concentration increased significantly (≥2 g/dl) in three and moderately (1-2 g/dl) in one. After 3 months of treatment, hemoglobin concentration increased 3.2 ± 1.2 g/dl compared to pretreatment. Among the three transfusion-dependent patients, transfusion was terminated after one month of treatment in one patient and decreased >50% in the other two patients, accompanied by an increase in the average hemoglobin concentration. Thalidomide had a significant effect in patients with thalassemia intermedia. Further studies of a larger scale and more rigorous design are warranted.

  5. Significance of autobiographical episodes and spacing effects in incidental memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Participants were presented with target words on two occasions, and were asked each time to generate a memory of a past episode associated with the targets. Participants were also instructed to rate the importance (significance elaboration) or pleasantness of the pisode (pleasantness elaboration) in an orienting task, followed by an unexpect d recall test. Significance elaboration led to better recall than pleasantness elaboration, but only in the spaced presentation. The spaced presentation led to better tree recall than massed presentation with significance elaboration, but the difference between the two types of presentation was not observed with pleasantness elaboration. These results suggest that the significance of an episode is more critical than the pleasantness of an episode in determining the effectiveness of autobiographical elaboration in facilitating recall.

  6. Radioactivity and radioprotection: the every day life in a nuclear installation. Press tour at CEA/GRENOBLE 18 november 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information, this paper gives a general information on the radioactivity and the radioprotection at the CEA/Cadarache center. A first part is devoted to a presentation of the radioactivity with definitions and radiation effects on the human being and the environment. An other part presents the radioprotection activities and regulations. The last part deals with specific activities of the CEA/Cadarache: the CASCAD installations for spent fuels storage, the LECA Laboratory for the Examination of Active Fuels and a dismantling installation for big irradiated objects. Historical aspects of the CEA/Cadarache are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  7. Radioprotection: smart games with death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, Andrei V; Komarova, Elena A

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of cancer treatment by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs is often limited by severe side effects that primarily affect the hematopoietic system and the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract. Progress in understanding differences in the mechanisms involved in the responses of normal and tumor cells to genotoxic stress has led to the development of new rational approaches to selective protection of normal cells, such as suppression of apoptosis by pharmacological inhibition of p53 or activation of NF-kappaB. Another promising approach presented in this issue by Johnson et al. is based on the idea of using pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) to convert normal cells into a radioresistant state by inducing reversible cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. The evidence indicates that this approach is likely to be specific for protection of normal cells and may, therefore, have clinical potential as an adjuvant in anticancer therapies.

  8. Radioprotection offered by bacterial secondary metabolite RK-IP-006.G to the mice by oral route of administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ashutosh K.; Malhotra, Poonam; Singh, Praveen K.; Chhachhia, Neha; Singh, Shravan K.; Kumar, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause oxidative damage in biological system primarily by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Gastrointestinal system is considered one of the most radiosensitive biological systems. The most radiosensitive cells type found in the intestine are continuously proliferative crypt cells. Damage to intestinal crypt cells lead to gastrointestinal functions impairment that contribute to mortality. In the present study, whole body radioprotective efficacy of bacterial secondary metabolite RK-IP-006.G was evaluated in C57BL/6 male mice. To determine free radical scavenging properties of RK-IP-006.G 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) assay was performed. Radiation induced lipid peroxidation and its inhibition by RK-IP-006.G pretreatment was assessed in intestinal tissue homogenate. To find out cellular antioxidant status of the irradiated and RK-IP- 006.G treated mice, SOD, Catalase, and Glutathion-S-Transferase activity were estimated in intestinal tissue homogenate. Anti-apoptotic and mitochondrial membrane hypopolarization effect of the RK-IP-006.G was also analyzed using fluorescent probes Acridine Orange and Rhodamine123 respectively. Results of the study demonstrated that, RK-IP-006.G pretreatment (∼2h; 150 mg/kg.b.wt. oral administration) to the lethally irradiated (9 Gy) C57BL/6 male mice contributes to >83% whole body radioprotection in mice. Significant (P>0.05%) inhibition in lipid peroxidation was observed in intestinal tissue of irradiated mice pretreated with RK-IP-006.G compared to only irradiated controls. Significant (P>0.05%) increase in antioxidant enzyme i.e. Catalase, SOD and GST activities was reported in irradiated mice pretreated with RK-IP-006.G compared to irradiated control groups. RK-IP-006.G pretreatment also found to be instrumental in inhibiting radiation induced apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. In conclusion, present study revealed that bacterial secondary

  9. On the radioprotective properties of heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds; Etude des proprietes radioprotectrices de composes heterocycliques azotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, R; Bernard, Y [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Continuing their study of the possible radioprotective properties of heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds, the authors study certain derivatives of imidazole and other compounds of similar structure. The results obtained showed: 1 - that the derivatives resulting from the presence in the imidazole ring of the mercapto, methyl, carbonyl, or benzyl groups are inactive: these substitutions appear to destroy the significant radioprotective activity of the imidazole, 2 - that benzimidazole, on the contrary, seems to possess highly interesting properties. The percentage of survivals obtained with mice treated with benzimidazole and exposed to lethal irradiation has encouraged the authors to undertake careful study of this substance, with a view to define optimum activity conditions, and to determine the mechanism responsible for its radioprotective action. Further on and so as to of clarify certain points that might give useful data concerning the mechanisms of action of radioprotective chemicals, in respect of each of the products the authors have studied: a - the action of these bodies on the internal temperature of mice, b - their radioprotective activity in vitro, in a solution of irradiated hemin. (authors) [French] Les proprietes radioprotectrices de l'imidazole ayant ete mises en evidence dans un precedent travail, les auteurs poursuivent leur experimentation sur certains derives de ce noyau ainsi que des composes de structure voisine. Leurs resultats montrent: 1 - que les composes obtenus par substitution d'un groupement mercapto, methyle, carbonyle ou benzyle, a un hydrogene du noyau imidazole sont inactifs, 2 - que le benzimidazole presente par contre des proprietes interessantes. Pour ce dernier compose le pourcentage de survie pouvant atteindre 90 pour cent les auteurs ont determine les conditions optimales de son activite radioprotectrice; de plus, dans le but d'obtenir des renseignements susceptibles de preciser le mecanisme d'action de la radioprotection

  10. Significance assessment of the external control effects of lecturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbatova Margarita, V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The state policy regarding higher education has changed in the last decade. These changes were part of the efficiency programs of the public sector. Governments of different countries ruined previously existing system of higher education state regulation and attempted to build the quasi-market structure in the higher education industry. Such transformations served as timely and progressive reforms in the recent studies of the economics of education. Substitution of bureaucratic management mechanisms and modern competition managerial tools are articulated. Economic and institutional and sociological studies on the effects of the introduction of quasi-markets and managerial tools in higher education governance oppose to orthodox market approach. They drew attention to the fact that evaluation methods and improve the effectiveness of organizations and employees that are typical of the private sector often produce results that differ from those in the public sector. To assess the consequences of the introduction of managerial tools of external control activities of university lecturers used a methodology based on the allocation of the individual structural components (effects and building on their basis of a multi-level hierarchical model in the research. Each component of the model (single effect is characterized by a degree of significance (importance and the degree of severity. The results of the systematization and assessment of the significance of the effects of external control activity of lecturers of Russian universities implemented in conditions of quasi-market mechanisms of the higher education system are highlighted in the paper.

  11. Analysis of Minocycline as a Radioprotectant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Shalini

    Exposure to radiation is increasing in a variety of settings including space exploration, diagnostic medical procedures and radiotherapy. Cells of the hematopoietic system, such as white blood cells (WBC), are especially sensitive to radiation and their decline can result in Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS). Radiotherapy is often used for cancers of the central nervous system (CNS), but includes the risk for normal tissue damage, often leading to cognitive impairment. The literature suggests that tetracyclines can be radioprotectors of the hematopoietic system with potential utility in radiation emergencies and anticancer radiotherapy. Minocycline, a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative, has anti-inflammatory, free radical scavenging, anti-apoptotic and anti-angiogenic properties with exceptional penetration into the CNS. These qualities make it a viable candidate for use in combination with radiotherapy for CNS tumors as a normal tissue radioprotectant and for hematopoietoc recovery following whole-body irradiation. This study was undertaken to determine the potential of minocycline as a radioprotective agent of the hematopoietic system and CNS in response to whole-body irradiation with 1, 2 and 3 Gy (γ-rays). C57BL/6 mice were injected with minocycline, 5 times beginning immediately before irradiation. Spleen, blood and brain were collected on days 4 and 32 post-irradiation. WBC and other cell populations were determined in the blood and spleen while cytokines were quantified in CD3-activated splenocytes and homogenized brain supernatants. We also evaluated the impact of minocycline on DNA synthesis and viability of human glioblastoma cells versus astrocytes and microglia. Minocycline increased counts and percentages of splenic macrophages, granulocytes, natural killer (NK), T and CD8 + T cells on day 4 and B cells on day 32. Minocycline up-regulated interleukin-1α (IL-1α)which is radioprotective, as well as granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM

  12. Evaluating significance in linear mixed-effects models in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Steven G

    2017-08-01

    Mixed-effects models are being used ever more frequently in the analysis of experimental data. However, in the lme4 package in R the standards for evaluating significance of fixed effects in these models (i.e., obtaining p-values) are somewhat vague. There are good reasons for this, but as researchers who are using these models are required in many cases to report p-values, some method for evaluating the significance of the model output is needed. This paper reports the results of simulations showing that the two most common methods for evaluating significance, using likelihood ratio tests and applying the z distribution to the Wald t values from the model output (t-as-z), are somewhat anti-conservative, especially for smaller sample sizes. Other methods for evaluating significance, including parametric bootstrapping and the Kenward-Roger and Satterthwaite approximations for degrees of freedom, were also evaluated. The results of these simulations suggest that Type 1 error rates are closest to .05 when models are fitted using REML and p-values are derived using the Kenward-Roger or Satterthwaite approximations, as these approximations both produced acceptable Type 1 error rates even for smaller samples.

  13. Assessment of the radioprotective effect of propolis in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. New perspective for an old honey bee product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Ebeid

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Supplementation of propolis with radiotherapy treatment offers a quite measurable protection against DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation in BC patients leukocytes and inhibits RRM2 overexpression. Moreover, propolis has beneficial effects on the serum antioxidant capacity and improves the digestive utilization of iron and the regeneration efficiency of hemoglobin. Larger prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  14. Histochemical and ultrastructural investigations on the antioedematous and radioprotective effect of 0-(β-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides in the brain of rats after single dose irradiation. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, H.J.; Sauer, R.; Lierse, W.; Lehmann, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    The disturbances of the carbohydrate metabolism and the activation of acid phosphatases with and without protection by 0-(β-hydroxyethyl)-rutoside (HR) were studied in irradiated rat brains by means of the light microscope. The histochemically demonstrable deposition of glycogen and acid mucopolysaccarides serves as a criterion for a reversible lesion of the irradiated cerebral tissue. The extent of local activation of repair processes following to irradiation can be determined by the quantity of acid phosphatases in the lysosomes. For the dose range of 1 to 5 Gy, HR seems to exert a protective effect on the cellular metasbolism of the irradiated cerebral tissue shown by ba slight decrease of glycogen and mucopolysaccharide deposits compared to the untreated animals. However, when exceeding a threshold dose of 10 Gy, the deposition of carbohydrates in the HR group is strongly increased. A slightly increased activity of acid phosphatases induced by HR can be supposed at best for the dose range of 5 to 7.5 Gy. If the dose is even more increased, the reverse effect found in the carbohydrate metabolism, too, and an increased activation of acid phosphatases in the control group will be observed. This unexpected reversion of the protective effect could be related to the assumed inhibitory effect of HR on the ATPases and thus on the anaerobic part of glycolysis or to a breakdown of the cell interaction system of endothelial cells, glia cells, and neurons. (orig.) [de

  15. Radioprotective efficacy of bisarylidene cyclopentanone on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darshan Raj, C.G.; Sarojini, B.K.; Musthafa Khaleel, V.; Ramesh, S.R.; Ramakrishna, M.K.; Narayana, B.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Present study was carried out for evaluating the radioprotective effect of bischalcone (2E, 5E) - 2,5-bis (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzylidene) cyclopentanone (curcumin analog (CA)), on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster adults. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants included superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The oxidative stress was induced at 1.5 Gy. (author)

  16. Moderating Effects of Trust on Environmentally Significant Behavior in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Gin Moon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To treat environmental problems and to seek sustainable development, voluntary and cooperative efforts, which is really against the traditional mentality with the emphasis on the individual competitive optimization, became the key to maintain the sustainability of complex social and ecological systems. To understand the cooperative and voluntary individual’s environmentally significant behavior (ESB, this paper focuses on the role of trust, and assesses the effect of trust on the relationship between existing factors and ESB. A structural equation model (SEM is constructed to estimate the moderating effects of trust on ESB in Korea. We found that people with a negative view on strict environmental regulations do not exhibit ESB and thus nudge policies could be much more effective than the forceful measure. It is noteworthy that public private partnership, as a kind of optimal trust, should be more promoted in the environmental protection policies.

  17. Radioprotection in the operation of accelerator and plasma units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewen, K.

    1984-01-01

    Relatively great problems of radioprotection can be caused by accelerator units, above all in the field of science, because all kinds of ionizing radiation and radioactive substances can be produced in all stages of aggregation. Furthermore, activities with relatively long half-lifes are induced by high particle streams with energies beyond the thresholds of many nuclear reations, to that the conditions of a control zone, even of a prohibited zone exist at many points after having switched off the accelerator. Not all of these radioprotective problems can be solved by constructive or technical measures. A sufficient skill of the persons responsible for radioprotection is very important in this connection. Efficient radioprotective measures are only possible by a close cooperation between the radiation protection officer, the competent authority, and the expert. (orig.) [de

  18. Radioprotection of the intestinal crypts of mice by recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.G.; Miyamoto, T.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha (rHIL-1 alpha or IL-1) protected the intestinal crypt cells of mice against X-ray-induced damage. The survival of crypt cells measured in terms of their ability to form colonies of regenerating duodenal epithelium in situ was increased when IL-1 was given either before or after irradiation. The maximum degree of radioprotection was seen when the drug was given between 13 and 25 h before irradiation. The IL-1 dose producing maximum protection was about 6.3 micrograms/kg. This is the first report indicating that the cytokine IL-1 has a radioprotective effect in the intestine. The finding suggests that IL-1 may be of potential value in preventing radiation injury to the gut in the clinic

  19. Assessment of the Radioprotection Efficacy of Antioxidant Substances in Foods in regard to Clonogenic Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyosung; Lee, Minho; Kim, Eunhee [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Radiation is perceived as a hazard in spite of its diverse uses. The public are more sensitive than ever to the activities from the nuclear power plant industry since Fukushima accident and the consequential environment contamination. The never-dissolved fear from the public of the nuclear energy costs the nuclear industry too much for safety measures not to mention brings the public uneasy life. Beta carotene, oltipraz and luteolin, which are easily taken from various foods, are substances that may protect cells from damage caused by unstable molecules known as free radicals. The purpose of this study is to inform people of accessible radiation protection measures in everyday lives. Three antioxidant substances were investigated regarding their radioprotection effects counted in terms of clonogenic cell surviving fraction in vitro. The radioprotection efficacy was observed with those substances at concentrations below certain levels. At concentrations beyond those levels, the efficacy was canceled out by their inherent cytotoxicity.

  20. Radioprotective effect against gamma-irradiation of methylene blue in the rat with reference to serum enzymes and pancreatic protein fractions examined by isoelectric focussing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, S O; Nam, S Y [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Biology

    1975-12-01

    The Sprague-Dawley male rats were given 360 rads of single whole-body gamma-irradiation following an intraperitoneal injection of methylene blue (40 mg/kg). Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), serum amylase, serum lipase, and serum lecithinase A activities, and isoelectric focussing pattern of pancreatic juice proteins were determined at various time intervals after exposure. Methylene blue reduced generally the rise of SGOT, sGPT, amylase, and lipase activities. Methylene blue delayed also the serum lecithinase A fall after exposure. Mean number of protein bands as revealed by isoelectric focussing of pancreatic juice were significantly altered in both the control and the methylene blue-treated group after exposure. Especially methylene blue-treated group showed a marked delay in the decrease in number of protein bands after exposure. The possibility of using the SGOT, the SGPT, the serum amylase, the serum lipase, and the serum lecithinase A levels, and the number of protein bands in isoelectric focussing pattern of pancreatic juice as an early index of radiation injury is suggested.

  1. Effect of low-dose irradiation on expression of mRNA and protein. Pt.1. Induction of thioredoxin as radioprotective protein in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Yuko; Tanooka, Hiroshi; Wakasugi, Hiro; Miyasaki, Kunihisa

    1997-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of hormetic effect by low-dose ionizing radiation, we studied the expression of the thioredoxin (TRX) gene in human lymphocytes after irradiation. TRX is a radioprotector and a key protein regulating cellular functions through redox reaction. The major results obtained were as follows; (1) The peaks of TRX mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human lymphocytes appeared 6-8 hr after irradiation with 25cGy. (2) At 6 hr after irradiation, the optimum dose for induction of TRX mRNA and TRX protein in human lymphocytes appeared to be 25-50cGy. (3) Induction of expression TRX mRNA had individual variations about twice. (4) Lymphocytes prepared from fresh venous blood showed the lowest TRX mRNA level in other cells such a Jurkat cells, lymphocytes stimulated for now with IL-2 and CD3 and the immortalized cell line 1G8. (5) The optimal dose and time course of induction of TRX by low-dose radiation suggest that TRX is related to the radio-adaptive response. (author)

  2. Significantly enhanced memory effect in metallic glass by multistep training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. X.; Luo, P.; Sun, Y. T.; Wen, P.; Bai, H. Y.; Liu, Y. H.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-11-01

    The state of metastable equilibrium glass can carry an imprint of the past and exhibit memory effect. As a hallmark of glassy dynamics, memory effect can affect glassy behavior as it evolves further upon time. Even though the physical picture of the memory effect has been well studied, it is unclear whether a glass can recall as many pieces of information as possible, and if so, how the glass will accordingly behave. We report that by fractionizing temperature interval, inserting multistep aging protocols, and optimizing the time of each temperature step, i.e., by imposing a multistep "training" on a prototypical P d40N i10C u30P20 metallic glass, the memory of the trained glass can be significantly strengthened, marked by a pronounced augment in potential energy. These findings provide a new guide for regulating the energy state of glass by enhancing the nonequilibrium behaviors of the memory effect and offer an opportunity to develop a clearer physical picture of glassy dynamics.

  3. Evaluation of an Immunomodulator Drug as a Radioprotectant on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sattarpour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: IMOD™, a selenium enriched extract of the plants Tanacetum vulgare, Urtica dioica, and Rosa canina, has an excellent effect on oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of this immunomodulatory drug on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods: Peripheral blood samples obtained from venipuncture of the brachial vein were treated with IMOD™ (5, 10, 15, 20 μl for 30 min and Cobalt 60 γ-rays (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 Gy as the test groups and cultured with the control. We used the micronuclei assay, cell death detection, and cell toxicity assay to analyze the treatment effects. Results: The frequency of micronuclei were 1.66 (0 Gy, 5.33 (0.25 Gy, 9.67 (0.5 Gy, 17.67 (1 Gy, and 23.67 (2 Gy in the irradiated lymphocytes (P<0.001. The percentage of micronuclei frequency reduced to 20%, 26.83%, 37.68%, 16%, and 20.47% with IMOD™. Apoptosis and necrosis decreased significantly in the IMOD™ treated groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: IMOD™ may protect these cells against ionizing radiation.

  4. Development of enhanced radioprotectors - Biochemical and molecular genetical approaches on the radioprotective mechanism of natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Hong, Jung A [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To identify radio-protective agent candidate among medicinal plants and to elucidate the mechanism of action of the candidate material by using modern biochemical and molecular biological methods, we screened radio-protective activity among 48 medicinal plants. Seven samples showed above 20% protective activities against oxidative cell damage: Euryale ferox, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Eucomia ulmoides, Paeonia suffruticosa, Spirodela polyrrhiza, and Nelumbo nucifera. We also screened for oxidative stress sensitizing activity among other 51 medicinal plants. Among those samples, 11 samples showed good sensitizing effect; Melia azedarach, Agastache rugosa, Catalpa ovata, Prunus persica, Sinomenium acutum, Pulsatilla koreana, Oldenlandia diffusa, Anthriscus sylvestris, Schizandra chinensis, Gleditsia sinensis, and Cridium officinale. We also reported the radio-protective effect of DTT. The treatment of DTT increased cell survival after gamma-irradiation, decreased in the frequencies of micronucleus, and reduction in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis after UV-C irradiation was revealed by the changes in the relative cell death, increase in the relative amount of apoptotic cells, and the induction of DNA fragmentation. 165 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  5. Radioprotection of Wistar Rat Lymphocytes Against Microwave Radiation Mediated by Bee Venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Gajski, G.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave radiation is a type of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation present in the environment, and is a potential threat to human health. Cytogenetic studies of microwave radiation conducted in vitro and in vivo, yielded contradictory and often intriguing experimental results. Some reports suggest that exposure of human cells to radiofrequency radiation does not result in increased cytogenetic damage. On the other hand, there is a range of studies showing that radiofrequency radiation can indeed induce genetic alteration after exposure to electric field. Bee venom is used in traditional medicine to treat variety of conditions, such as arthritis, rheumatism, back pain and skin disease. In recent years it has been reported that bee venom possesses antimutagenic, proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, and anticancer effects. In addition to the wide range of the bee venom's activities, it also possesses a radioprotective capacity that was noted against X-ray and gamma radiation in various test systems. The aim of the present study was assessment of the radioprotective effect of bee venom against 915 MHz microwave radiation-induced DNA damage in the Wistar rat's lymphocytes in vitro. The possible genotoxic effect of bee venom alone was also assessed on non-irradiated lymphocytes. The alkaline comet assay was used as a sensitive tool in The assessment of DNA damage was performed using the alkaline comet assay and the Fpg-modified comet assay that is more specific technique in detection of DNA strand breaks and oxidative stress. Whole blood was collected from adult male Wistar rats (11 weeks old, approximate body weight 350 g)by cardiac puncture under sterile conditions in heparinized vacutainer tubes. After collection, blood was divided into 1 ml aliquots and placed into 24-well culture plates according to the exposure conditions. Bee venom was added to lymphocyte cultures in final concentration of 1 μg/ml, 4 h prior to irradiation and immediately

  6. Immunological Effects of Probiotics and their Significance to Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Harsharn S.; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender K.; Gill, Preet

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit upon the host (FAO/WHO, 2001). Lactic acid bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species are commonly used as probiotics. Other less commonly used probiotics include the yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae and some non-pathogenic Escherichia coli and Bacillus species. Studies over the past 20 years have demonstrated that probiotic intake is able to confer a range of health benefits including modulation of the immune system, protection against gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections, lowering of blood cholesterol levels, attenuation of overt immuno-inflammatory disorders (such as inflammatory bowel disease, allergies) and anti-cancer effects. However, the strongest clinical evidence for probiotics relates to their effectiveness in improving gut health and modulating (via stimulation or regulation) the host immune system. This chapter provides an overview of the current status of our knowledge regarding the immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory effects of probiotics on the immune system and their significance to human health.

  7. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. I. Cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Kang, H.J.; Baumann, F.E.; Blazek, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity limits radiation therapy and could depend on the extent of damage to the vascular endothelium. Aminothiols such as WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] provide radioprotection for normal tissues, but little is known about how the aminothiols specifically affect the endothelium. Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture were exposed to WR-1065 for 2 h before irradiation ( 137 Cs γ rays, 1 Gy/min). Alone, WR-1065 demonstrated an antiproliferative effect that was related to dose (0.5-4 mM) and was evident by lowered counts of adherent cells 48 h after exposure. WR-1065 was clearly radioprotective when assessed by colony formation and incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine. However, when the number of adherent cells was evaluated, radioprotection appeared to be slight and evident only in logarithmically growing cells. WR-1065 at 2 mM suppressed single-strand DNA breaks after 3 Gy by 22% and double-strand breaks after 9 Gy by 47%. Also in the irradiated cells, WR-1065 more than doubled the rate of progression of cells from G 1 to S phase. WR-1065 pretreatment elevated cellular glutathione (GSH) content more than twofold. Although pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine inhibited the elevation of GSH, the radioprotective impact of WR-1065 on total DNA strand breaks and colony formation was unaffected. These results suggest that WR-1065 may enable tissue recovery from irradiation by promoting the replication of endothelial cells, possibly by mechanisms independent of GSH. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Measurements and modeling for examination of magnitudes and thresholds and transitions of cellular radio-protective mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, B.

    2007-01-01

    factor of 10 excess dose to connective tissue and organs. Finally, a method for measuring the changes in endogenic cell capabilities to carry-out increased radio-protective processes i.e. separate decreased direct damage (greater ROS scavenging) and the increased repair rates (increased damage recognition, increased damage site location, increased repair mobilization and finally increased repair of the actual damage). This method shows for low LET IDRE no decreased direct damage occurs and significant increased repair occurs. After the 'triggered' threshold and transition of IDRE protection against cell killing, a larger fraction of cell damage produces viable mutations. This suggests that the cells bio-chemically conclude it is senseless to provide protection against potentially mutations in the low dose rate region if all the cells are being killed. Conclusions: The BE does not cause the underground miners high Radon IDRE. Single Specific Energy nucleus hits at very low dose rates activate adaptive response protection of spontaneous neoplastic transformations from mammography X-rays. A dose and dose-rate coupling is modeled. A correlation between the 'triggering' of the transition of the radio-protection for the Hyper-radiosensitivity and dose induced radio-resistance effect (HRS/IRR) and the low LET 'inverse' dose-rate effect (IDRE) as if they are from same radioprotective mechanisms. Possible excess connective tissue and organs damage occurs from low LET IDRE in LDR Brachytherapy treatments with permanent implants.

  9. Radioprotection against radiation induced bone marrow syndrome by a semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryavanshi, Shweta; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Santosh Kumar, S.; Sainis, Krishna B.

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of biological properties have been attributed to chlorophyllin (CHL), the water soluble derivative of the green plant pigment chlorophyll. Several studies are available describing its ability to modify genotoxic effects. It has been shown that administration CHL to human lymphopenic individuals led to the recovery and restoration of the immune system and also inhibited aflatoxin B1-DNA binding in individuals residing in high risk exposure to this liver carcinogen. The present study is aimed at establishing radioprotective efficacy of CHL against ionizing radiation induced hematopoietic syndrome. CHL offered complete protection against whole body irradiation (WBI, 7 Gy) induced mortality in mice. This observation was supported by increase in the number of macroscopic endogenous colonies enumerated on the surface of the spleens taken from CHL+WBI group as compared to WBI group. Radioprotection by CHL was found to be mediated by increasing the frequency of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as evaluated by side population assay. Administration of CHL induced G1 arrest in bone marrow cells, increased number of granulocytes and neutrophils in the peripheral blood. At the molecular level, activation of ERK was observed in bone marrow cells obtained from CHL administered mice. In conclusion, CHL mediated radioprotection was attributed to increased stem cell numbers, G1 arrest in bone marrow cells, increased neutrophil numbers and ERK activation. (author)

  10. Assessment by survival analysis of the radioprotective properties of propolis and its polyphenolic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsolic, N.; Benkovic, V.; Horvat-Knezevic, A.; Basic, I.; Kopjar, N.; Kosalec, I.; Bakmaz, M.; Mihaljevic, Z.; Bendelja, K.

    2007-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of propolis and polyphenolic compounds from propolis on the radiation-induced mortality of mice exposed to 9 Gy of γ-irradiation were studied. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of mice at doses of 100 mgkg -1 body weight of propolis (water or ethanolic extract; water-soluble derivative of propolis (WSDP) or ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP)) or its polyphenolic compounds (quercetin, naringin caffeic acid, chrysin) consecutively for 3 d before irradiation, delayed the onset of mortality and reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness. All test compounds provided protection against hematopoietic death (death within 30 d after irradiation). The greatest protection was achieved with quercetin; the number of survivors at the termination of the experiment was 63%. According to statistical analyses by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test, a significant difference between test components and control was found (p<0.001). Treatment with test components after lethal irradiation was ineffective. These results suggest that propolis and its polyphenolic compounds given to mice before irradiation protect mice from the lethal effects of whole-body irradiation. (author)

  11. Radioprotection - an example for non-nuclear industrial hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalabreysse, J.

    1977-01-01

    Basing himself on the experience acquired for 14 years with the atomic energy commision in the sphere of radiotoxicological surveyance of the personnel, the author observes that very strict controles are ensured in the nuclear industry. Simultaneously the results of measures that has been taken in respect to diversification for the past six years in many non-nuclear industries spread over the whole of French Territory are described. The different harmful effects that has been involved in controlling: mineral toxics (lead, mercury); organic toxics (vinyl chloride, benzenic solvents, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene); physical harmful effects (noise), are studied. The results obtained, both from the biological and toxicological point of view, on the man at work and on the conditions of his exposure to non radioactive harmful effects, are analyzed. The author compares the knowledge acquired in the two fields: nuclear field in which the biological effects of radiation, the metabolism of radioelements, the standards of exposure and radiotoxicological surveyance are now well known and codified; non-nuclear field in which many unknown elements continue, the standards of exposure not being agreed at International Level and even inexistant at national level. The example of vinyl chloride, whose considerable toxicity has recently been displayed, is analyzed. The author can thus conclude that the technology and design of the A.E.C. installations ensure excellent prevention. Radioprotection is an example of what should be attained in all work environments for all other effects harmful to man at work [fr

  12. Whole Body Hyperthermia in Mice Confers Delayed Radioprotection at Cellular and Tissue Levels: Inducible Heat Shock Proteins as Endogenous Radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malytina, Y. V.; Sements, T. N.; Semina, O. V.; Mosin, A. F.; Kabakov, A.

    2004-01-01

    It was previously shown on heat shock protein (Hsp)-over expressing cell lines that the increased intracellular content of Hsp 70 or Hsp27 is associated with the elevated radioresistance. However, it was so far unknown whether the in vivo Fsp induction by stressful preconditioning can confer radioprotection at the tissue and cellular levels. In the present study, we examined how the in vivo up-regulation of the Hsp expression in response to mild whole body hyperthermia (42 degrees C, 10 min) in mice changes susceptibility of their bone marrow stem cells and thymocytes to subsequent gamma-irradiation. to assess the expectable contribution of stress-inducible Hsp we used injections with Quercetin, a flavonoid inhibiting the stress-responsive Hsp induction. The results demonstrate that the bone marrow stem cells and thymocytes from heat-preconditioned mice were more radioresistant than those from the non-preconditioned animals. the radioprotection was well manifested if mice or their isolated thymocytes were irradiated 18-25 h after the in vivo hyperthermia. This delayed radioprotection resulting from the heat preconditioning was suppressed in Quercetin-injected mice. The revealed correlation between the intracellular Hsp accumulation and the acquired Quercetin-sensitive radioprotection suggests a beneficial role of Hsps as of endogenous radioprotectors. Our finding discovers new ways for artificial modulation of effects of irradiation on target cells via manipulating the Hsp expression. (Author) 17 refs

  13. Radioprotective properties of certain nitrogenous compounds heterocyclic on the serum proteins of irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierotti, T.; Roushdy, H.; Polverelli, M.; Mazza, M.

    1969-01-01

    The results obtained from this study suggest the following: the concentration of total serum proteins in mice is very little changed during all the treatments carried out, while protein fractions showed significant alterations. The concentrations of various serum proteins remain almost constant under normal conditions. Intraperitoneal administration of imidazole or benzimidazole at the mentioned doses induces rapid quantitative changes in the serum which are recovered in about 3 days Whole-body X-irradiation at 750 roentgens creates slow but progressive and persisting serious changes in a concentration of serum protein fractions which end by death of animals at the 8 - 10. day after irradiation. Whole-body X-irradiation of imidazole or benzimidazole protected animals results in quantitative rapid changes in concentration of serum protein fractions, for about four days after which a slow but steady restoration begins. The concentration approaches the normal levels towards the 10. day after irradiation. Imidazole and benzimidazole were proved to be good radio-protectants against the effects of radiation on serum protein fractions. Benzimidazole seems to surpass imidazole. (authors) [fr

  14. Guide for the evaluation of the implementation of radioprotection in an electricity production nuclear centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the approach for the evaluation of the implementation of radioprotection in nuclear power plants. This approach encompasses six main themes: radioprotection customization, radioprotection steering quality, professional and contractor commitment, skill and efficiency of the Risk Prevention Department, radioprotection operational management, robustness of the transport system. Each theme comprises sub-themes which are assessed according to 2, 3 or 4 levels, the sum of which giving a mark out of 20 for the theme

  15. Discussion on posting and labeling for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fabio F.

    2009-01-01

    The radioprotection aims the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation or radioactive substances as well as the safety of radiation sources. As ionizing radiation is not perceived by human senses, the warning signs and labels on radiation sources and the safety posters in controlled and supervised areas have an important role to keep the doses and risks as low as reasonably achievable, to prevent radiological accidents and to mitigate their consequences. In Brazil, several technical regulations require such safety labels and posters, however, despite their importance, there is quite few guidance about their format or contents. In this paper the posting and labeling requirements for radiological control existing in Brazilian technical regulations are discussed, confronting them with national, foreign and international technical standards and by drawing up a parallel with requirements of technical regulations from other countries. Changes are suggested in some parts of the national regulations, to prevent some differences in the current guidance, allowing the optimization of posting and labeling programs of radiological facilities. (author)

  16. OSIRIS reactor radioprotection, radioprotection measurements performed during the power rise and the first 50 megawatt operation; Radioprotection de la pile OSIRIS, mesures de radioprotection effectuees au cours de la montee en puissance et des premiers fonctionnements a 50 megawatts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanton, B.; Lebouleux, P

    1967-12-01

    The authors supply the results of the measurements that have been made near the Osiris reactor during the power increase and during the first functioning at 50 megawatts. The measurements relate to the absorbed dose rates in the premises, the water activation and the atmospheric contamination. The influence of the heat layer of water movements and the water rate in the core chimney on the absorbed dose rate at the footbridge level overhanging the pile core has been studied. The modifications to the protection devices that have been proposed after the measurements and the effect of these modifications on the results of the measures are given then. The regeneration process of a water purification chain has been examined from the radiation protection point of view. It has been possible to make some twenty radionuclides obvious in the produced effluents and to determine the volume activity of these effluents for each radionuclide. The whole of results show that in a general way, the irradiation levels are low during the usual reactor functioning. [French] Les auteurs fournissent les resultats des mesures de radioprotection oui ont ete effectuees aupres de la pile Osiris pendant la montee en puissance et au cours des premiers fonctionnements a 50 megawatts. Les mesures portent sur les debits de dose absorbee dans les locaux, l'activation de l'eau et la contamination atmospherique. L'influence de la couche chaude des mouvements d'eau et du debit d'eau dans la cheminee du coeur sur le debit de dose absorbee au niveau de la passerelle surplombant le coeur de la pile, a ete etudiee. Les modifications aux dispositifs de protection, qui ont ete proposees a la suite des mesures, et l'effet de ces modifications sur les resultats des mesures sont indiques ensuite. Le processus de regeneration d'une chaine d'epuration de l'eau a ete examine sous l'angle de la radioprotection. Il a ete possible de mettre en evidence une vingtaine

  17. OSIRIS reactor radioprotection, radioprotection measurements performed during the power rise and the first 50 megawatt operation; Radioprotection de la pile OSIRIS, mesures de radioprotection effectuees au cours de la montee en puissance et des premiers fonctionnements a 50 megawatts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanton, B; Lebouleux, P

    1967-12-01

    The authors supply the results of the measurements that have been made near the Osiris reactor during the power increase and during the first functioning at 50 megawatts. The measurements relate to the absorbed dose rates in the premises, the water activation and the atmospheric contamination. The influence of the heat layer of water movements and the water rate in the core chimney on the absorbed dose rate at the footbridge level overhanging the pile core has been studied. The modifications to the protection devices that have been proposed after the measurements and the effect of these modifications on the results of the measures are given then. The regeneration process of a water purification chain has been examined from the radiation protection point of view. It has been possible to make some twenty radionuclides obvious in the produced effluents and to determine the volume activity of these effluents for each radionuclide. The whole of results show that in a general way, the irradiation levels are low during the usual reactor functioning. [French] Les auteurs fournissent les resultats des mesures de radioprotection oui ont ete effectuees aupres de la pile Osiris pendant la montee en puissance et au cours des premiers fonctionnements a 50 megawatts. Les mesures portent sur les debits de dose absorbee dans les locaux, l'activation de l'eau et la contamination atmospherique. L'influence de la couche chaude des mouvements d'eau et du debit d'eau dans la cheminee du coeur sur le debit de dose absorbee au niveau de la passerelle surplombant le coeur de la pile, a ete etudiee. Les modifications aux dispositifs de protection, qui ont ete proposees a la suite des mesures, et l'effet de ces modifications sur les resultats des mesures sont indiques ensuite. Le processus de regeneration d'une chaine d'epuration de l'eau a ete examine sous l'angle de la radioprotection. Il a ete possible de mettre en evidence une vingtaine de radionucleides dans les effluents produits et de

  18. Significance of radiation-induced bystander effects in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Since 1994, a Phase I/II clinical study and radiotherapy have carried out using carbon-ion beams produced with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Now we constructed the new treatment facility for the advanced carbon-ion therapy at HIMAC applying a 3D fast spot scanning system with pencil beams. In the field of fundamental biological studies for high-LET heavy ions, there are some reports regarding bystander effects after exposure to alpha particles derived from 238 Pu or He-ion microbeams. However, only limited sets of studies have examined bystander effects after exposure to different ion species heavier than helium, such as carbon ions. We have been investigating bystander cellular responses in both normal human and human tumor cells irradiated with the HIMAC carbon ions. Bystander cell-killing effect was observed in the cells harboring wild-type P53 gene, but not in the P53-mutated cells. Moreover, observed bystander effect was suppressed by treating with a specific inhibitor of gap-junction mediated cell-cell communication. There is clear evidence that the carbon-ion irradiation enables the enhanced cell killing in cells with wild-type P53 gene via gap-junction mediated bystander effect. (author)

  19. Parent socialization effects in different cultures: significance of directive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the controversy of divergent findings in research on parental socialization effects in different cultures is addressed. Three explanations intended to address divergent findings of socialization effects in different cultures, as advanced by researchers who emphasize cultural differences, are discussed. These include cultural differences in socialization values and goals of parents, parental emotional and cognitive characteristics associated with parenting styles, and adolescents' interpretations or evaluations of their parents' parenting styles. The empirical evidence for and against each of these arguments is examined and an alternative paradigm for understanding and empirical study of developmental outcomes associated with parenting styles in different cultures is suggested. Baumrind's directive parenting style is presented as an alternative to the authoritarian parenting style in understanding the positive developmental effects associated with "strict" parenting in cultures said to have a collectivist orientation. Directions for research on the three explanations are mentioned.

  20. Environmental radioprotection: main lessons learnt from the Envirhom programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Adam, C.; Gilbin, R.; Simon, O.; Tran, D.; Massabuau, J.C.; Fortin, C.; Denison, D.; Pradines, C.; Floriani, M.; Henner, P.

    2004-01-01

    Within the field of chronic low-level exposure of ecosystems to radionuclides where data are critically sparse, the ENVIRHOM research programme launched two years ago at the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, proposes to acquire the needed knowledge for Ecological Risk Assessment specific to bioaccumulation of alpha and beta emitters in living organisms. Gaps of knowledge within this field constitute a strong limitation to our capability to make a reasonable risk estimate. Internal doses cannot be accurately calculated and potentially associated biological effects at any organization level remain fairly unknown. As a result, derivation of ecologically relevant and knowledge-based predicted no-effects concentrations becomes a critical issue in ERA. The scope of this presentation is to illustrate the relevance of the development of a greater depth of understanding of radionuclide fate and biological effects at several hierarchical levels to support quantitative risk assessments with defined and acceptable uncertainty bounds. The following crucial issues are discussed and exemplified for uranium and other alpha or beta emitters. First, radionuclide bioavailability is a key knowledge to an accurate assessment of both exposure and effect and media quality criteria are needed. Second, specificities of chronic exposures have to be taken into account to obtain accurate dose estimates and induced effects, as exposure conditions (concentration and duration) strongly modify the radionuclide internal distribution at various biological scales. Lastly, considering different scales for biological effects (from early to delayed, from subcellular to high organisation level) is crucial to evidence ecologically relevant indicators. A global overview of operational data from ENVIRHOM - media criteria to assess exposure, dose-effects relationships at various biological scales that constitute primary data to introduce radionuclides in ERA methods in a consistent manner

  1. Radioprotective potential of Emblica officinalis fruit extract against hematological alterations induced by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Inder; Soyal, Dhanraj; Goyal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of expending nuclear energy program all over the world, the role of radiation biology has acquired greater relevance and significance in addressing the health issues in view of constant human exposure to various types of radiations. Radioprotective drugs hold immense promise for saving precious human lives in from irradiation in various situations. Currently available synthetic radiomudulators is fraught with their inherent toxicity at the optimum dose and hence the need to discover and develop new more effective less toxic radiomudulatory drugs from natural sources. In the present study, the protective effect of Emblica officinalis fruit extract (EOFE) has been assessed by estimating hematological constituents against irradiation. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups. Group I was administered with double distilled water (DDW) volume equal to EOFE (100 mg./kg. body wt./animal/clay) by oral gavages to serve as normal. Group II was administered orally EOFE for 7 days once daily at a does of 100 mg./kg.b. wt./animal/day, Group Ill animals were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma radiations to serve as irradiated control. Group IV mice were treated with EOFE, orally for consecutive days (as in Group II) and were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma rays half an hr. after the last administration of EOFE on day 7th. The above animals were necropsied on 12 hr, 24 hr, 3 days, 5 days, 10 days, 20 days and 30 days post treatment intervals, and their blood was collected for estimation of blood constituents. A significant decline in RBC, hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) contents from normal was observed in irradiated control animals (Group III). All these parameters were found to be significantly higher in EOFE pretreated irradiated animals (Group IV). From these results, it is concluded that Emblica officinalis fruit extract has the ability to protect the individuals from radiation-induced hematological injuries. (author)

  2. Metastatic breast cancer - age has a significant effect on survival ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data on 217 elderly (aged ≥ 65 years) and 209 middleaged postmenopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer treated in the Department of Medical Oncology, University of Pretoria, from 1976 to 1985 were analysed to determine the effect of age on survival. When considered as a group, the elderly have a more ...

  3. Biological Studies On The Radioprotective Role Of Melatonin On The Medfly Ceratitis Capitata (WIED.), Sterile Males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHOMAN, A.A.; MAHMOUD, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) has been used successfully against the medfly. The use of gamma irradiation for sterilizing insects has some adverse effects on their competitiveness which in turn reduces the efficiency of the technique. This study was carried out to evaluate the radioprotective effects of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytyrptamine) on egg hatchability, larval duration, pupal recovery, pupal weight, adult recovery, sex ratio, adult survival, flight ability and mating competitiveness of the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.), sterile males against the oxidative stress induced by gamma radiation. The results showed that the use of melatonin before the application of radiation doses did not affect the percentages of egg hatchability, larval duration and pupal weight while the addition of melatonin to the larval diet led to a significant increase in the percent of the pupal recovery as compared with the control group. The results also showed significant increases in adult recovery, adult survival and flight ability of males reared on larval diet containing melatonin before irradiation as compared to those treated with radiation alone. The competitiveness values were drastically decreased (0.30, 0.17 and 0.19) with the increase of gamma irradiation (90, 100 and 110 Gy, respectively). However, the results showed that the competitiveness values were increased in males previously reared on a larval diet containing 1 g melatonin/kg larval media (0.1%) and the produced full grown pupae were irradiated with 90, 100 and 110 Gy. The highest male mating competitiveness was recorded when melatonin was added to the larval diet then irradiated the produced pupae with the sterilizing dose (90 Gy). The results showed that the competitiveness values were 0.67, 0.47 and 0.46 for the doses 90, 100 and 110 Gy, respectively. The results refer to availability of using melatonin as a simple and effective means to improve the quality and the male mating competitiveness of the

  4. Radioprotective role of H2S/CSE pathway in Chang liver cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yan; Ye Shuang; Yuan Dexiao; Zhang Jianghong; Bai Yang; Shao Chunlin

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver cell damage may be life-threatening. Here, we investigated whether hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S)/cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) pathway could serve the protective role toward radiation in normal human liver cells. Our data showed that pretreatment of cells with H 2 S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) significantly attenuated radiation induced micronuclei formation and improved cell viability. However, the use of DL-propargylglycine (PPG), a potent inhibitor of CSE, markedly enhanced the cell-killing effect induced by radiation. Exposure of cells to 2 Gy γ-radiation led to significant increases of the endogenous H 2 S content. The mRNA and protein expressions of CSE also increased after radiation in a time-dependent manner, while the expression of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), another endogenous H 2 S synthetase, did not change significantly. Notably, radiation induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly reversed by the pretreatment of NaHS, while blockage of CSE activity resulted in an enhanced ROS production in irradiated cells. Moreover, NaHS markedly suppressed radiation-induced phosphorylation of P53, decrease of Bcl-2/Bax, and activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB). In conclusion, our finding demonstrates that H 2 S/CSE pathway plays a radioprotection role by inhibiting radiation-induced ROS production, P53 phosphorylation, NF-κB activation and decrease of Bcl-2/Bax, indicating that modulation of H 2 S may be a novel protection strategy for liver radiation injury in radiotherapy.

  5. On the role of endogenous serotin in the radioprotective action of some aminothiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverdlov, A.G.; Pavlova, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    It has been studied whether there is a correlation of the radioprotective effect of cystamine (50 and 150 mg/kg by base) and its analogue, N',N'-tetramethyl cystamine (130 mg/kg by base), with the ability of these compounds to rise the endogenous serotonin content of radiosensitive organs 20 and 60 minutes after intraperitoneal administration to mice. The ability of sulphur-containing radioprotectors does not necessarily correlate with their preventive properties: an ineffective radioprotector analogue, N',N'-tetramethyl cystamine, has the same effect on the endogeneous serotonin level as the protector itself

  6. Radioprotective efficacy of Carica papaya (L.) leaf extract in electron beam irradiated Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yogish Somayaji, T.; Suchetha Kumari, N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that leaf extract of Carica papaya (Linn.) has antibacterial, antitumor, antioxidant, anti-sickling properties and has shown to increase the platelets in patients with dengue fever. In the present study, the radioprotective effects and radioadaptive response of Carica papaya (L.) was evaluated in mice irradiated with electron beam radiation. Radiation induced hematological suppression was seen at sublethal doses of 6 Gy irradiated groups. There was a decrease in hemoglobin, red blood cell, total white blood cell count and platelet counts in irradiated groups whereas papaya leaf extract enhanced platelet levels indicated thrombopoietic effect

  7. Significance of radiation effects in solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permar, P.H.; McDonell, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Proposed NRC criteria for disposal of high-level nuclear waste require development of waste packages to contain radionuclide for at least 1000 years, and design of repositories to prevent radionuclide release at an annual rate greater than 1 part in 100,000 of the total activity. The high-level wastes that are now temporarily stored as aqueous salts, sludges, and calcines must be converted to high-integrity solid forms that resist deterioration from radiation and other effects of long-term storage. Spent fuel may be encapsulated for similar long-term storage. Candidate waste forms beside the spent fuel elements themselves, include borosilicate and related glasses, mineral-like crystalline ceramics, concrete formulations, and metal-matrix glass or ceramic composites. these waste forms will sustain damage produced by beta-gamma radiation up to 10 12 rads, by alpha radiation up to 10 19 particles/g, by internal helium generation greater than about 0.1 atom percent, and by the atom transmutations accompanying radioactive decay. Current data indicate that under these conditions the glass forms suffer only minor volume changes, stored energy deposition, and leachability effects. The crystalline ceramics appear susceptible to the potentially more severe alterations accompanying metamictization and natural analogs of candidate materials are being examined to establish their suitability as waste forms. Helium concentrations in the waste forms are generally below thresholds for severe damage in either glass or crystalline ceramics at low temperatures, but microstructural effects are not well characterized. Transmutation effects remain to be established

  8. The significance of domino effect in chemical accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmatian, Behrouz; Abdolhamidzadeh, B; Darbra Roman, Rosa Maria; Casal Fàbrega, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    A historical survey was performed on 330 accidents involving domino effect, occurred in process/storage plants and in the transportation of hazardous materials; only accidents occurred after 1st-January-1961 have been considered. The main features – geographical location, type of accident, materials involved, origin and causes, consequences, domino sequences – were analyzed, with special consideration to the situation in the developing countries and compared to those from other previous surve...

  9. Opinion of the IRSN on French electronuclear stock safety and radioprotection in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In its first part, this annual report presents the main trends which emerge after a global examination of nuclear safety and radioprotection of the operated nuclear power plants in France during 2009. The second part reports, comments and discusses events which occurred in 2009 and are considered as important as far as safety is concerned. The third part deals with generic anomalies, i.e. those affecting several nuclear plants. The fourth part discusses significant evolutions implemented or planned by EDF, whether they are modifications or arrangements in plant operation aimed at treating safety issues, but also economic constraints

  10. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  11. Radioprotective action of glycerol and cysteamine on inactivation and mutagenesis in Salmonella tester strains after γ- and heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.G.; Krasavin, E.A.; Kozubek, S.

    1992-01-01

    Inactivation and mutagenesis were studied in Salmonella tester strains after γ-irradiation and after heavy ion irradiation in the presence of glycerol and cysteamine. Ions from deuteron to carbon with residual energies of 2-9 MeV/n were used. Cell sensitivity slightly increased with LET before decreasing. In the presence of glycerol the maximum was shifted to higher values of LET. The radioprotective effect of glycerol for cell killing diminished gradually with increasing LET from 2.0 for γ-radiation to 1.1 for carbon ions. Mutagenic effectiveness increased slightly for deuterium and helium ions. The radioprotective effect of cysteamine on mutagenesis was found to be very small in the case of γ-radiation for the three strains examined. (author). 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. Phytochemicals with radioprotection and radio-sensitizing potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Yamini B., E-mail: yaminiok@yahoo.com [Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2012-07-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA damage and are harmful to mankind. They act through free radical generation, which target the double bonds of all cellular macromolecules. The radiation damage may be classified as probabilistic or deterministic, depending on the dose of radiation exposure. Since radiation affects multiple organs so those drugs which protect many organs, would be more beneficial. In this process herbal extracts, which are cocktail of several phyto-chemicals, would be more promising. Initially sulphur containing bio-molecules were identified as radio-protector, but now many secondary metabolites from plant kingdom, have been reported to be radio-protective. They have different mechanism of action, but most of them either prevent the FR induced DNA damage or accelerate the DNA repair process. Aminofostine, WR-2721, 159243, 2926 are some of the examples. However they have limited use because of associated cytotoxicity. Eicosanoids, topoisornerase inhibitors (e.g. camptothecin, topotecan), and the hypoxia-activated anthraquinone AQ4N have shown radioprotecting potential. Several plant products, derived from Tulsi, Vinca alkaloids, taxans, turmeric, Rubia cordifolia, Semecarpus anacardium and several plants rich in polyphenols and flavones have shown hemotherapeutic potential. Similarly, Hippophae, rhodiola imbricata, Podophyllum hexandrum, Ocimum sancturn, Plumbago zeylanica etc have shown radioprotection. Rubia cordifolia has shown both chemotherapeutic and radioprotective property in rats and A-431 cells. Similarly Semecarpus anacardium extract has shown cell cycle arrest in DU-145 cells. (author)

  13. Phytochemicals with radioprotection and radio-sensitizing potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Yamini B.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA damage and are harmful to mankind. They act through free radical generation, which target the double bonds of all cellular macromolecules. The radiation damage may be classified as probabilistic or deterministic, depending on the dose of radiation exposure. Since radiation affects multiple organs so those drugs which protect many organs, would be more beneficial. In this process herbal extracts, which are cocktail of several phyto-chemicals, would be more promising. Initially sulphur containing bio-molecules were identified as radio-protector, but now many secondary metabolites from plant kingdom, have been reported to be radio-protective. They have different mechanism of action, but most of them either prevent the FR induced DNA damage or accelerate the DNA repair process. Aminofostine, WR-2721, 159243, 2926 are some of the examples. However they have limited use because of associated cytotoxicity. Eicosanoids, topoisornerase inhibitors (e.g. camptothecin, topotecan), and the hypoxia-activated anthraquinone AQ4N have shown radioprotecting potential. Several plant products, derived from Tulsi, Vinca alkaloids, taxans, turmeric, Rubia cordifolia, Semecarpus anacardium and several plants rich in polyphenols and flavones have shown hemotherapeutic potential. Similarly, Hippophae, rhodiola imbricata, Podophyllum hexandrum, Ocimum sancturn, Plumbago zeylanica etc have shown radioprotection. Rubia cordifolia has shown both chemotherapeutic and radioprotective property in rats and A-431 cells. Similarly Semecarpus anacardium extract has shown cell cycle arrest in DU-145 cells. (author)

  14. Radioprotection in the medical sector: a new quality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevot, S.

    2008-01-01

    The author describes how quality assurance is organized in the field of radioprotection in the Georges-Francois-Leclerc medical centre in Dijon. She also recalls how this organization has recently evolved because of legal but also technical and technological evolutions. She indicates the main attributions and missions of the radiation protection expert in this medical centre

  15. Radioprotection et ingénierie nucléaire

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Le développement de l'énergie nucléaire repose sur deux piliers essentiels : la sûreté nucléaire, qui concerne la machine, et la radioprotection, qui se préoccupe des hommes. Construit de manière fiable, un réacteur nucléaire se doit d'irradier le moins possible ses opérateurs et conduire à un impact très faible pour les populations avoisinantes. Tout cela est soumis à des règles strictes, élaborées au niveau international, et qui ne tolèrent aucun écart. Les ingénieurs qui ont à concevoir, construire et conduire ces machines doivent maîtriser les règles de protection : cet ouvrage leur est destiné. La radioprotection, si elle se fonde principalement sur des bases scientifiques, intègre également une dimension sociétale exigeante. Ces activités sont en effet sous le regard critique et permanent de nos concitoyens, qui exigent des acteurs de cette industrie une maîtrise totale de la radioprotection ; un ingénieur qui ne connaîtrait pas la genèse de la radioprotection, ses règle...

  16. Standard 'Principle guides of radioprotection': introduced concepts and future forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagnino, R.

    1989-01-01

    The main topics introduced by the new CNEN standard NE 3.01 - Basic Directrix of Radioprotection directly associated to the field work in industrial radiography are presented. It's showed a practical example which evidences the need of information exchange among the industrial security, radiological safety and quality control staffs for the continuity of works in this area. (author)

  17. Differential radioprotection and free radical scavenging activity of Caesalpinia digyna extracts and the active constituent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Umang; Kunwar, A.; Barik, A.; Priyadarsini, K.I.; Mula, S.; Srinivasan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Differential free radical activity of the fractionated extracts (F1: methanolic fraction, F2: acetone soluble fraction and F3: acetone insoluble fraction) of a medicinal plant Caesalpinia digyna, has been studied employing DPPH, superoxide radical and in vitro radioprotecting activity by following their effect on radiation induced protein carbonylation and DNA damage in pBR322. The activity for these fractions is in the order of F1>F2>F3. HPLC analysis indicated that all fractions contain high amount of bergenin, a polyhydroxy isocoumarin derivative and the fractions are more active than isolated bergenin. (author)

  18. Differential radioprotection and free radical scavenging activity of Caesalpinia digyna extracts and the active constituent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Umang; Kunwar, A; Barik, A; Priyadarsini, K I [Radiation and Photochemistry Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mula, S [Bio-Organic Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Srinivasan, R [JSS College of Pharmacy, Ootacamund (India)

    2008-01-15

    Differential free radical activity of the fractionated extracts (F1: methanolic fraction, F2: acetone soluble fraction and F3: acetone insoluble fraction) of a medicinal plant Caesalpinia digyna, has been studied employing DPPH, superoxide radical and in vitro radioprotecting activity by following their effect on radiation induced protein carbonylation and DNA damage in pBR322. The activity for these fractions is in the order of F1>F2>F3. HPLC analysis indicated that all fractions contain high amount of bergenin, a polyhydroxy isocoumarin derivative and the fractions are more active than isolated bergenin. (author)

  19. Some regularities in the transport and radioprotective efficiency of methylated hematoporphyrin in experiments of cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yartsev, E.I.; Novosel'tseva, S.D.; Shkirman, S.F.; Arabej, S.M.; Solov'ev, K.N.; Ponomarev, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    It was shown on a SOC culture that radioprotective effectiveness (RPE) of a methylated derivative of deuteroporphyrin-9 depends upon the level of accumulation there of in cells. The highest RPE was registered with porphyrin administered to a culture medium 8 h before irradiation of cells. By that time, exogenous porphyrin was accumulated by cells to reach a definite stable level. The content of the preparation in cells decreases depending on radiation dose. It was noted that the radioresistance of cells remained increased with considerable porphyrin excretion from there

  20. Radioprotection on nucleated and anucleated erythrocytes by oxide-reduction coenzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.; Tomicic, I.; Rojo, I.

    1981-01-01

    The protective effects of NAD, FAD and quinone and mixtures of these compounds were studied on gamma irradiated rabbit and chicken erythrocytes. The dose relative factor (DRF 37) was evaluated by visible absorbancy measurements of liberated hemoglobin. The DRF 37 obtained on rabbit erythrocytes were: NAD+FAD+quinone mixture: 11,1; NAD+ quinone mixture: 6,1; FAD+quinone mixture: 6,1; NAD: 1,6; FAD: 5,5; quinone: 5,1. The DRF 37 obtained with the mixture NAD+FAD+quinone on chicken erythrocytes was 3,9. The high efficiency of the radioprotective mixture NAD+FAD+ quinone is discussed. (author)

  1. Investigation on radioprotective efficacy of biogenous amines and some aspects of the mechanism of their action on mammalian cells cultivated in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graevskij, Eh.Ya.; Yanushevskaya, M.I.; Bueverova, Eh.I.; Bragina, E.V.; Konstantinova, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Serotonin and adrenaline do not vary virtually from cysteamine in their radioprotective capacity as was demonstrated on Chinese hamster fibroblasts, cultivated in vitro, by the following criteria: reproductive death and chromosome lesions. In contrast to adrenaline, serotonin-induced decrease of radiation injury is not an actual radioprotective effect for serotonin elicits an equal increase in the survival when delivered before or after irradiation. As to chromosome damages, they also reliably decrease with serotonin administered either before or after irradiation although in the latter case, the decrease is lesser

  2. Pharmacological toxicological studies on certain drugs subjected to radiation or used radioprotective agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, S H.M. [Durng Research Dept., National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The present study represents two main subjects. The first encounters the effect of radiosterilization of certain pharmaceretical preparations such as antihistaminics (cimetidine), anticonvulsants (diazepam), beta and calcium channel blacker (propranolol and verapamil) on their pharmacological activity. Results of this study revealed that the previously mentioned drugs can be effectively and safely sterilized by gamma irradiation without deleterious effect on their pharmacological activity. The other subject presented in this study is essentially a pharmacological subject encountering toxicological problems. Data of this study demonstrated that chemical radiation protection has been successfully reported using single drug administration has been successfully reported using single drug administration such as imidazole, and Sh-bearing compounds. In the present work, the radioprotective effect of imidazole was demonstrated on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Furthermore, combined drug administration was found to exert more protective action with less toxicity and therefore minimize the side effects of the radioprotective drugs. Thus, combination of imidazole and serotonin showed potential protective effect on blood gases was also reported. In addition, combination of cysteine and vitamin E afforded a better protection on adrenocortical function in rats than either agent alone. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Pharmacological toxicological studies on certain drugs subjected to radiation or used radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.H.M.

    1995-01-01

    The present study represents two main subjects. The first encounters the effect of radiosterilization of certain pharmaceretical preparations such as antihistaminics (cimetidine), anticonvulsants (diazepam), beta and calcium channel blacker (propranolol and verapamil) on their pharmacological activity. Results of this study revealed that the previously mentioned drugs can be effectively and safely sterilized by gamma irradiation without deleterious effect on their pharmacological activity. The other subject presented in this study is essentially a pharmacological subject encountering toxicological problems. Data of this study demonstrated that chemical radiation protection has been successfully reported using single drug administration has been successfully reported using single drug administration such as imidazole, and Sh-bearing compounds. In the present work, the radioprotective effect of imidazole was demonstrated on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Furthermore, combined drug administration was found to exert more protective action with less toxicity and therefore minimize the side effects of the radioprotective drugs. Thus, combination of imidazole and serotonin showed potential protective effect on blood gases was also reported. In addition, combination of cysteine and vitamin E afforded a better protection on adrenocortical function in rats than either agent alone. 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Radioprotective action of WR-1065 on radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.; VanAnkeren, S.C.; Milas, L.; Meyn, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the radioprotective effect of WR-1065 on cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. The effects of the drug on the induction and rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were measured using alkaline (pH 12.1) and neutral (pH 7.0) elution, respectively. Molecular protection factors (PFs) calculated from these data allowed us to determine whether the degree of modification of strand breakage accurately predicted the PFs measured using the biological end point of cell survival. The drug did protect against the induction of both SSBs and DSBs, although to an extent that did not appear to fully account for the degree of radioprotection in terms of cell killing measured under identical conditions. It is therefore unlikely that radioprotection by WR-1065 occurs simply as a consequence of a general lowering of all types of gamma-ray-induced DNA lesions, and it is possible that the drug could differentially protect against the induction of subsets of these DNA lesions. The rate of SSB rejoining was retarded following preirradiation treatment of cells with WR-1065, but there was no effect on DSB rejoining. Postirradiation treatment with WR-1065 also appeared to retard SSB rejoining but without an accompanying effect on either DSB rejoining or cell survival; however, this effect was largely reversed by the addition of catalase and was, therefore, probably a result of H 2 O 2 generated by autoxidation of the drug. Based on these observations, it would appear that the molecular actions of aminothiol radioprotective compounds that lead to reduced cell killing are much more complex than previously thought

  5. Radioprotection of mice following garlic pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.; Abraham, S.K.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    Freshly prepared aqueous extract of garlic was tested in mice for its possible in vivo protective effect against gamma-radiation-induced chromosomal damage. In the same animals, the changes in the sulphydryl content and glutathione S-transferase activity were evaluated. Three doses of garlic extract [125, 250 and 500 mg kg-1 body weight (bw)] were administered orally for five consecutive days and the animals were exposed to 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy gamma-radiation 2 h after the final feeding. The results of the bone marrow micronucleus test revealed that pretreatment with garlic extract was effective in reducing gamma-radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Against 0.25 Gy gamma-radiation, a high dose of 500 mg kg-1 bw garlic extract was required to significantly reduce the chromosomal damage. All the three doses of garlic extract were effective in exerting a protective effect against 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy gamma-radiation. However a dose-related effect was observed only against 2.0 Gy. The sulphydryl content and glutathione S-transferase activity registered a significant increase after either pretreatment with garlic with extract or irradiation. In the garlic extract pretreated irradiated animals, a significant reduction was observed in the sulphydryl content and glutathione S-transferase activity

  6. Radioprotection of mouse CNS endothelial cells in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubimova, N.; Coultas, P.; Martin, R.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Radioprotection using the minor groove binding DNA ligand Hoechst 33342 has been demonstrated in vitro, and more recently in vivo, in mouse lung. Intravenous administration was used for the lung studies, and both endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells-showed good up-take. Radiation damage to the endothelial cell population has also been postulated as important in late developing radionecrosis of spinal cord and brain. Endothelial cell density in brain can be readily determined by a fluorescent-histochemical technique. Treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor and subsequent injection with L-DOPA results in an accumulation of dopamine (DA) in CNS endothelial cells. DA is converted to a fluorophore by exposure to paraformaldehyde, and cell numbers assayed by fluorescence microscopy. Earlier studies used this technique to monitor post-irradiation changes in endothelial cell density in rodent brain and showed the loss, within 24 hours, of a sensitive subpopulation comprising about 15% of the endothelial cells. Ten minutes after intravenous injection of Hoechst 33342 (80mg/kg) the ligand is confined by its limited penetration to the endothelial cells in mouse brain. When we irradiated at this time, there was protection against early endothelial cell loss. Ablation of the sensitive subpopulation in unprotected mice takes place over a dose range of 1 to 3 Gy γ-rays, but doses between 12 to 20 Gy are required in the presence of ligand. This protection equates to a very high dose modification factor of about 7 and possibly reflects a suppression of apoptosis in the sensitive endothelial subpopulation. The extent to which there is enhanced survival in the endothelial population as a whole and how the observed protection affects late CNS necrosis development has yet to be determined. However present results clearly show potential for the use of DNA-binding radioprotectors with limited penetration for investigations into the relative significance of

  7. Distinct radioprotective activities of major heat shock proteins in irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabakov, Alexander; Malyutina, Yana; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Several years ago we have suggested that heat shock proteins (Hsps) can be involved in cellular and tissue mechanisms of protection from ionizing radiation. At present, the accumulated experimental data do allow us to characterize three major mammalian Hsps, Hsp70, Hsp27 and Hsp90, as specific endogenous radioprotectors which are able to prevent or minimize cell death resulting from the radiation exposure. It follows from the many findings that the radioprotective effect of these Hsps is particularly manifested in their ability to attenuate apoptosis in various normal and tumor cells irradiated in vivo or in vitro. The obtained data already enable to suggest three main mechanisms of the radioprotection conferred by the excess Hsps: 1) Modulation of the intracellular signaling so that the apoptotic signal transduction is blocked, whereas the 'cell survival' signal transduction is stimulated; 2) Suppression of the radiation-associated free radical generation and apoptosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS); 3) Attenuation of the genotoxic impact of ionizing radiation. The latter suggested mechanism seems particularly intriguing and implies that the excess Hsps can somehow contribute to protection/repair of genomic DNA from radiation-induced damage. According to our recent results, Hsp90 is indeed involved in the post-irradiation repair of nuclear DNA, while excess Hsp70 can beneficially affect the p53-mediated DNA damage response in irradiated cells to ensure their long-term survival and recovery. As for Hsp27, we found that its accumulation in target cells increases their radioresistance by enhancing the irradiation-responsive activation of anti apoptotic pathways. While the Hsp70 and Hsp27 seem to perform different functions in irradiated cells, the synergistic enhancement of radioprotection was clearly observed in the cells enriched by the both the Hsps. In vivo, such radioprotective activities of the major mammalian Hsps may play a role in

  8. Restoration of radiation injury by ginseng, 2. Some properties of the radioprotective substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonezawa, M.; Katoh, N.; Takeda, A. (Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan))

    1981-09-01

    Some properties of the radioprotective substances in a ginseng extract that increased the 30-day survival ratio in irradiated mice were studied. Methanol-soluble fraction of the extract did not protect the irradiated animals. Acid or alkali (0.12 N) inactivated the extract at 60/sup 0/C. But the radioprotective activity was stable after heating the ginseng extract in physiological saline at pH 7 in a boiling-water bath for 15 min. The ginseng extract was separated into two fractions by CM-cellulose column chromatography. One of them (CM-A) was significantly efficacious at 5% level, and the other (CM-B) at 0.1% level with the doses proportional to their yields. CM-B, not containing saponin, was subjected to further purification, UV spectrum and a biuret test suggested the presence of protein in this fraction. The supernatant obtained after heating CM-B solution at pH 7 was separated into three fractions, namely G-I, G-II and G-III, by gel-chromatography with a Sephadex G-75 column. Both G-I (0.44 mg per animal) and G-III (0.84 mg, calculated dose) were significantly efficacious, but G-II (0.47 mg) was not.

  9. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Alexander, W.D.; Glasgow Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 131 I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before 131 I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic 131 I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of 131 I, biological half life of 131 I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics. (orig.)

  10. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Hilditch, T.E.; Robertson, J.; Alexander, W.D.

    1987-10-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine (/sup 131/I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive /sup 131/I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before /sup 131/I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic /sup 131/I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of /sup 131/I, biological half life of /sup 131/I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics.

  11. Interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, L.C.; Rafter, J.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Pre-irradiation intravenous administration of the radioprotective drug S-2-[3-aminopropylamino]ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) has potential value in radiotherapy because it doubles the radiation resistance of normal mouse tissues while affording only minimal protection to tumors. Deficient deposition of WR- 2721 in tumor tissue has recently been demonstrated and this is thought to be a major reason for the preferential protection of normal tissues by the drug. Data originally obtained in studies using the mouse and rat indicated that the tissue distribution of WR-2721 was possibly more closely related to dose per unit surface area than to dose per unit weight. To test this hypothesis an interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of 35 S-labeled WR-2721 was carried out in normal mice, rats, rabbits, and dogs at 15 and 30 minutes after intravenous administration. Results suggest that the surface area and body weight exert equal effects on the tissue concentration of WR-2721. The results further suggest that lower absolute doses of WR-2721 in the human, possibly as low as 20 mg/kg, may provide a radioprotective effect equivalent to that produced from 100 mg/kg in the mouse, i.e., a 50 to 80 percent increase in radiation resistance (CH)

  12. Protective effects of vitamins C and E against γ-ray-induced chromosomal damage in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, L.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of vitamins C and E on bone marrow chromosomes of the mouse exposed to 1 Gy of whole-body γ-irradiation were studied. These vitamins, dissolved in water/peanut oil, were administered orally as acute doses, either 2 h before, immediately after, or 2 h after irradiation. Both vitamins significantly reduced the frequencies of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells; radioprotection by vitamin E was, however, appreciably greater than that afforded by vitamin C. Administration of the vitamins to mice immediately after irradiation was as effective as that 2 h before irradiation. A sequential treatment consisting of both the vitamins did not result in additional radioprotection over that afforded by vitamin E alone. The probable mechanisms of radioprotection are discussed. (author)

  13. Radioactivity and radioprotection: the every day life in a nuclear installation. Press tour at CEA/GRENOBLE 18 november 1999; Radioactivite et radioprotection: la vie quotidienne dans une installation nucleaire. Voyage de presse au Centre CEA/CADARACHE 18 novembre 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information, this paper gives a general information on the radioactivity and the radioprotection at the CEA/Cadarache center. A first part is devoted to a presentation of the radioactivity with definitions and radiation effects on the human being and the environment. An other part presents the radioprotection activities and regulations. The last part deals with specific activities of the CEA/Cadarache: the CASCAD installations for spent fuels storage, the LECA Laboratory for the Examination of Active Fuels and a dismantling installation for big irradiated objects. Historical aspects of the CEA/Cadarache are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  14. Reduced glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity in various rat tissues after the administration of some radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulpanova, J.; Kovarova, H.; Ledvina, M.

    1982-01-01

    The concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and activity of glutathione reductase were investigated in rat liver, kidney and spleen after intraperitoneal administration of cystamine (50 mg/kg), mexamine (10 mg/kg), or a mixture of cystamine with mexamine (20 + 10 mg/kg). The GSH concentration increased after the administration of cystamine in the liver (maximum between the 20th and 30th min), in the kidney and spleen (maximum after 60 min). The cystamine + mexamine mixture also caused a significant increase of the GSH concentration in all the organs investigated; however, the values increased at earlier intervals as after the cystamine administration. No substantial effect was shown in the case of the mexamine administration, only 30 min after the administration the values were higher. The activity of glutathione reductase was significantly lower over the entire period examined. This was found in the liver and kidney as after the administration of cystamine, as after the radioprotective mixture. There was also a less pronounced inhibition of the enzyme activity in the spleen. Mexamine as a single radioprotector had practically no influence on the activity. (author)

  15. Radioprotection in the infirmary praxis in service of hemodynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flor, Rita de Cassia; Gelbcke, Francine Lima

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative study made in a hemodynamic service at Santa Catarina, Brazil, viewing to analyse the attitude of workers in infirmary related to the use of radioprotection measurements in interventionist procedures. A methodology of Labor Psycho dynamics was used through the observations, collective interviews and the document analysis. Totally it was realized 36 encounters, completed a total of 54 observation hours. The results have shown that the workers used defense strategies for justification the not use of some radioprotection measurements. Yet, become evident that the measurements related to the distance from the radiation source and the exposure time have not used sometimes, perhaps due to negligence. Finally, it was concluded that, some attitudes adopted by the workers referred to the lack of a continued educational program

  16. Evaluation of the radioprotective potential of the polyphenol norbadione A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, Antoine; Josset, Elodie; Benzina, Sami; Bischoff, Pierre; Nadal, Brice; Desage-El Murr, Marine; Heurtaux, Benoit; Taran, Frederic; Le Gall, Thierry; Meunier, Stephane; Denis, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    There is an obvious need to develop efficient countermeasure agents for use in emergency situations or as adjuncts to radiotherapy to protect healthy tissues from the consequences of an irradiation. To this end, we have investigated the capacity of norbadione A, a polyphenol extracted from the edible mushroom Bay boletus to reduce the toxicity of ionizing radiation towards cultured cells and whole-body exposed mice. Results indicate that this compound could slightly enhance the resistance of TK6 lymphoid cells to radiation and increase the survival rate in lethally irradiated mice. However, norbadione A was found to be cytotoxic at concentrations over 30 μM in vitro. The acute toxicity of this compound also precluded its use at higher doses for enhanced in vivo radioprotection. Norbadione A may nevertheless serve as lead for development of less toxic analogs with potentially cytoprotective/radioprotective activities. (authors)

  17. Local-regional networks of persons with abilities in radioprotection and other actors in radioprotection. Audit report; Les reseaux loco-regionaux de personnes competentes en radioprotection et autres acteurs de la radioprotection. Rapport d'audit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, Ch.

    2009-03-15

    As the regulation requires the existence of persons with abilities in radioprotection (PCR, personnes competentes en radioprotection) in many industrial, medical or research activities where ionizing radiations are present, in order to improve worker protection, these professionals who are much less acknowledged in these sectors than in the nuclear sector, felt the need to gather in regional and sector-based networks. This report proposes a presentation of three existing networks (the APCRAP, the Grand-Ouest network, and the Aquitaine-Sud-Ouest network). For each of them, the report addresses the following aspects: creation, objectives, statutes, members, activities, human, technical and financial resources, role. Then answers to a survey and to interviews are analyzed with respect to the professional sector and to the region, in terms of expectations towards the networks, and in terms of network operation and services. Interviews of institutional actors and union and management representatives are also analysed

  18. Radioprotection in dentistry: Analysis of the Dentistry Faculties of the Rio de Janeiro State not referring at personnel and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha F, L.G.; Borges, J.C.; Raymundo Junior, R.; Koch, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective was to show the necessity and the importance of the training and formation of the dentist in radioprotection according to the recent proposal for technical regulations 'Radiological protection directrixes in Medical and Dentistry radiodiagnostic' of the Secretaria do Vigilancia Sanitaria of Ministerio da Saude (SVSMS). This regulation establishes basic standards to radioprotection in the medical and dentistry areas, including principles, limits, obligations and basic controls for the man and environment protection, versus possible improper effects caused by the use of ionizing radiation sources. An analysis of the discipline programs of the Dentistry Schools of Rio de Janeiro state indicates that they show a little or none preoccupation by the radiological protection, which was confirmed through a survey applied toward responsible professors by department or radiology service to the dentistry Schools. This work suggests the creation or adaptation of the existing disciplines introducing radioprotection and images quality in radiodiagnostic, to improve, complement and to make uniform the formation of future dentists optimizing the solution of the identified problems. (Author)

  19. Radioprotection in E. coli by an agent from M. radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, L S; Gersten, D M; Bruce, A K [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA). Dept. of Biology

    1978-10-01

    An agent extracted from the radioresistant bacterium M. radiodurans was found to protect several strains of E. coli from X-radiation. Optimal radioprotection was observed when the repair-proficient B/r strain was irradiated in the presence of the agent under hypoxic conditions. It is proposed that this agent acts to modify damage incurred in the presence of reduced oxygen concentrations so that this damage might be subsequently repaired.

  20. Occupational radioprotection in the cyclotron laboratory radioisotope production at IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Teixeira, M.V.; Santos, I.H.T.; Pujol Filho, S.V.

    1990-07-01

    The Cyclotron of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear is operated mainly for radioisotope production, neutron production studies and irradiation damage analysis. The risks associated to the activities developed in these laboratories are exposition to beta, neutron and gama radiation and contamination. The radioprotection program adapted are presented briefly and the results of the air and surface contamination analysis, liquid efluents and dose equivalent of the workers in 1988 are shown. (author) [pt

  1. Isolation and identification of radioprotective compound (s) from radioresistant culture of Fusarium Moniliforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Y.M.; Attaby, H.S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Mat extract and filtrate of the radio-resistant strain Fusarium Moniliforme have been prepared and tested for their radioprotective action on the radiosensitive strain Trichoderma Viride. Both extracts gave T. Viride a protective effect against gamma radiation. Analysis of mat extracts and filtrates of both fungi, the radioresistant F. Moniliforme and the radiosensitive T. Viride revealed a pronounced differences in amino acids quantities in addition to the presence of gibberelic acid (GA 3 ) in the filtrate of F. Moniliforme only. Generally, the radioresistant fungus F. Moniliforme was able to accumulate ten amino acids in large quantity than the radiosensitive one. These amino acids comprised, cystine, glutamic acid, serine, methionine, histidine, proline, arginine, alanine, glycine and therionine. The amino acid pool of both fungi was poor in filtrate than in the mat extract. Analysis of filtration of F. Moniliforme was characterized by high content of gibberellic acid, whereas, only traces were detected in mat extract. No gibberellic acid was detected in both mat extract and filtrate of T. Viride. The results of this investigation, revealed also that both amino acids and gibberellic acid were subjected to pronounced disturbances following irradiation compared with the control. A close correlation between the induced radioresistance of T. Viride and the amounts of amino acids and G A, added to its culture medium was observed, suggesting their participation in radioprotection

  2. Radioprotection during the diagnostic use of X-ray in western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agata, Philip.

    1978-10-01

    The speed-up of technical progress in the field of radiodiagnosis has led to a huge expansion of this technique. The number of acts per year per inhabitant is rising constantly in industrialised countries. The average population dose has already doubled natural irradiation in certain cases. Considering the established effects on carcinogenesis and heredity the need for restrictive measures can no longer be ignored. Exposed staff are safeguarded by international recommendations, largely incorporated into national legislations. The protection of patients against superfluous irradiations, while nevertheless essential, is still neglected. The means are not lacking and must certainly be developed, but above all employed properly. Medical irradiation can be limited to a considerable extent by checking the competence of X-ray source users, systematically using the possibities of the equipment in such a way as to reduce the doses delivered and keeping an irradiation book for patients. Everyone agrees that a 90% reduction of medical irradiation would in no way impair the quality of the examinations. The following points are developed particularly: institutional organisation of radioprotection; aims of radioprotection in the context of the diagnostic use of X-rays; present reference norms in radiodiagnosis; doses delivered during conventional radiodiagnostic examinations [fr

  3. Local-regional networks of persons with abilities in radioprotection and other actors in radioprotection. Audit report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    As the regulation requires the existence of persons with abilities in radioprotection (PCR, personnes competentes en radioprotection) in many industrial, medical or research activities where ionizing radiations are present, in order to improve worker protection, these professionals who are much less acknowledged in these sectors than in the nuclear sector, felt the need to gather in regional and sector-based networks. This report proposes a presentation of three existing networks (the APCRAP, the Grand-Ouest network, and the Aquitaine-Sud-Ouest network). For each of them, the report addresses the following aspects: creation, objectives, statutes, members, activities, human, technical and financial resources, role. Then answers to a survey and to interviews are analyzed with respect to the professional sector and to the region, in terms of expectations towards the networks, and in terms of network operation and services. Interviews of institutional actors and union and management representatives are also analysed

  4. Effect of superoxide dismutase and catalase on radiation-induced inhibition of human lymphocyte blastogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, S.; Misra, H.P.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Shifrine, M.

    1980-01-01

    Mitogen-induced lymphocyte blastogenesis was measured following x-irradiation (0 to 400 R) in the presence or absence of SOD, under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. No significant differences were observed between radiation survival curves under these different conditions. SOD had no radioprotective effect, and an o.e.r. of 1.11 was obtained, demonstrating the lack of oxygen dependence of radiation-induced inhibition of lymphocyte blastogenesis. Following x-irradiation at 200 R, neither SOD nor catalase, alone or together, added before or after irradiation, was radioprotective

  5. Evaluation of qualification and radioprotection knowledge of dentists in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha Filho, L.G.; Borges, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The status and implications of the actual radioprotection knowledge of people studying dentistry is evaluated. A brief research of the current situation in Brazil is presented. The inclusion of a discipline - or the remaking of existing ones - in the curricula of Brazilian dentistry schools, covering subjects from radioprotection to images quality control is suggested

  6. Occupational radioprotection program at Nuclear Engineering Institute -IEN: results obtained in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Pastura, V.F.S.; Soares, M.L.; LeRoy, C.L.; Teixeira, M.V.; Santos, I.H.T.; Pujol Filho, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    The results of occupational radioprotection program at Nuclear Engineering Institute-IEN- in 1991 are presented. The personnel monitoring, the routine monitoring of limited areas, the operational monitoring during the operation and the cyclotron CV-28 maintenance, the radioisotope processing and Argonauta Reactor operation, the control of radioprotection equipment and the control of radiation sources are included. (C.G.C.)

  7. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    Introduction: This experimental study of biological effects of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants which were used for prophylaxis and treatment of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by high doses of the low-LET radiation. An important role of Reactive Oxyden Species (Singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and bio-radicals)in development of the Acute Radiation Syndromes could be defined as a "central dogma" of radiobiology. Oxida-tion and damages of lipids, proteins, DNA, and RNA are playing active role in development of postradiation apoptosis. However, the therapeutic role of antioxidants in modification of a postradiation injury caused by high doses of radiation remains controversial.Previous stud-ies had revealed that antioxidants did not increase a survival rate of mammals with severe forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by High Doses of the low-LET radiation. The Antiradiation Vaccine(ARV) contains toxoid forms of the Radiation Toxins(RT) from the Specific Radiation Determinants Group (SRD). The RT SRD has toxic and antigenic prop-erties at the same time and stimulates a specific antibody elaboration and humoral response form activated acquired immune system. The blocking antiradiation antibodies induce an im-munologically specific effect and have inhibiting effects on radiation induced neuro-toxicity, vascular-toxicity, gastrointestinal toxcity, hematopoietic toxicity, and radiation induced cytol-ysis of selected groups of cells that are sensitive to radiation. Methods and materials: Scheme of experiments: 1. Irradiated animals with development of Cerebrovascular ARS (Cv-ARS), Cardiovascular ARS (Cr-ARS) Gastrointestinal ARS(GI-ARS), Hematopoietic ARS (H-ARS) -control -were treated with placebo administration. 2. Irradiated animals were treated with antioxidants prophylaxisis and treatment of Cv-ARS, Cr-SRS, GI-ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 3. irradiated animals were treated with radioprotection by Antiradiation Vaccine

  8. Radioprotection of salivary glands by S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosphorothioic (amifostine) obtained in a rabbit animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohuslavizki, Karl H.; Klutmann, Susanne; Jenicke, Lars; Brenner, Winfried; Feyerabend, Bernd; Henze, Eberhard; Clausen, Malte

    1999-01-01

    Background: Impairment of salivary gland function following high-dose radioiodine treatment (HDRIT) is a well-recognized side effect of the treatment. Because differentiated thyroid cancer has an excellent prognosis, reduction of long-term side-effects is mandatory. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of amifostine in a rabbit animal model. Methods: Salivary gland scintigraphy was performed in a total of 16 New Zealand White rabbits. Uptake of 99m Tc-pertechnetate was calculated in percentage of injected activity as a quantitative measure of both salivary gland and thyroid function. Reproducibility of salivary gland scintigraphy was evaluated in one rabbit without any intervention. Fifteen rabbits were studied prior to and up to 6 months after high-dose radioiodine treatment applying 2 GBq 131 I. Ten animals received 200 mg/kg amifostine prior to high-dose radioiodine therapy, and 5 served as controls. Salivary glands were examined histopathologically. Results: Variation coefficient of parenchymal function was less than 3.8% in salivary glands. Prior to HDRIT, thyroid uptake was 0.417 ± 0.373% and 0.421 ± 0.241% in control and amifostine-treated rabbits, respectively. Four weeks after HDRIT, complete ablation of the thyroid was achieved in both groups. Prior to HDRIT, uptake of 99m Tc-pertechnetate in salivary glands of five control rabbits was not significantly different from ten amifostine-treated rabbits. In control rabbits 6 months after HDRIT, parenchymal function was reduced significantly (p 0.05) in parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. Histopathologically, marked lipomatosis was observed in control animals but was negligible in amifostine-treated animals. Conclusion: Parenchymal damage in salivary glands induced by high-dose radioiodine treatment can be significantly reduced by amifostine in this rabbit animal model. This corresponds to data obtained in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

  9. Radioprotection optimization in the electronuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Abela, G.; Ammerich, M.; Balduyck, S.; Batalla, A.; Drouet, F.; Fracas, P.; Gauron, Ch.; Le Guen, B.; Lombard, J.; Mougnard, Ph.; Murith, Ch.; Rannou, A.; Rodde, S.; Selva, M.; Tranchant, Ph.; Schieber, C.; Solaire, T.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Jolivet, P.; Chauveau, D.; Mathevet, L.; Juhel, T.; Mertz, L.; Bochud, F.O.; Desmaris, G.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Roy, C.; Delacroix, S.; Sevilla, A.; Rehel, J.L.; Bernhard, S.; Palut-Laurent, O.; Lochard, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Wack, G.; Barange, K.; Delabre, H.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty one presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - implementation of the ALARA principle in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains: status and challenges (C. Schieber); 2 - image quality and scanner irradiation: what ingredients to chose? (T. Solaire); 3 - radioprotection stakes and implementation of the ALARA approach during the IFMIF design (Y. Le Tonqueze); 4 - ALARA at the design stage of the EPR (P. Jolivet); 5 - alternative techniques to iridium 192 gamma-graphy for welds control: results and recommendations from the ALTER-X project (D. Chauveau); 6 - alternative techniques to ionizing radiations use in the medical domain: implementation of navigation strategies (L. Mathevet); 7 - justification of ionizing radiations use in non-medical imaging: overview of the French situation and perspectives status (S. Rodde); 8 - ISOE: task scheduling for radioprotection optimization in nuclear power plants (G. Abela); 9 - Practices and ALARA prospects among big nuclear operators (T. Juhel); 10 - experience feedback on the use of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in diagnostic imaging optimization (L. Mertz); 11 - DRLs: Swiss strategy and concept limits (F.O. Bochud); 12 - external dosimetry tools: the existing, the developing and the remaining problems (A. Rannou); 13 - is the optimization principle applicable to the aircraft personnel's exposure to cosmic radiation? (G. Desmaris); 14-15 - experience feedback of the ALARA approach concerning an operation with strong dosimetric stakes (P. Mougnard and N. Fontaine); 16 - optimization of reactor pool decontaminations ((P. Tranchant); 17 - radiopharmaceuticals transport - ALARA principle related stakes (G. Turquet de Beauregard); 18 - ALARA in vet radio-diagnosis activity: good practices guide (C. Roy); 19 - implementation of the ALARA approach at the Proton-therapy centre of Orsay's Curie Institute

  10. Radioprotection of mouse skin by WR-2721: the critical influence of oxygen tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.; Michael, B.D.; Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    The epidermal clone assay has been used to study the radioprotective effect of WR-2721 on mouse skin under different conditions of oxygenation and under anoxia. The skin has shown a progressive decrease in sensitivity as the inspired gas has changed from 100% oxygen towards 0% oxygen. Compared with mice breathning 100% oxygen, those breathing air are partially protected. The inspired oxygen concentration to give half the full oxygen effect is 10-12%. The radioprotecton observed with 400 mg/kg WR-2721 is markedly dependent on the ambient oxygen concentration. The protection factor is 1.1 or less in mice breathing 5%, 1% or 0% oxygen. Protection is maximal (1.95) in air and in 50% oxygen and diminishes to 1.6 at higher oxygen tensions

  11. The radioprotection of the patient in the Italian regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A. A.; Delia, R.; Moccaldi, A.; Campanella, F.

    2002-01-01

    The regulation in order to the radioprotection of the patient was firstly issued in Italy in the 1995. This regulation was a specific part of a more general law on the radiation protection of the workers, public and environment. After, in the year 2000, a specific law regulates the use of ionizing radiation in the medical field, in relation to patient's protection and safety. This law is based on the main principles of the justification and of the optimization of the exposure. The application of the law involves many different professional roles, which all together provide to ensure the respect of the previous principles and the radioprotection of the patients. The above professional figures are: the manager of the medical laboratory, the person in charge of the section, the specialist medical doctor (responsible of the radiological practice), the health physicist and the radiological technician. In the present paper, the Authors show the basic rules of the radioprotection regulation, focusing the attention on the different roles of all involved people, in the all kinds of the radiological practices. The proper application of the law allows the respect of the principle of the dose limitation, through either technical, or physical or medical methodologies. The examination of the Italian experience in this field could be an useful contribution to the improvement of the problem of the patient's radiation protection, taken also into account that the absorbed doses from the patients, for medical purposes, are those ones, which mainly contribute to the computation of the mean level of the dose in every Country

  12. Radioprotective action of 3-(imidazoline-2-alkyl)-5-methoxyindoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitny-Szlachto, S.; Kwiek, S.; Piotrowska, H.; Serafin, B.; Wejroch-Matacz, K.

    1977-01-01

    Radioprotective action in mice of four 3-(imidazoline-2'-alkyl)-5-methoxyindoles was examined and compared with that of 3-(2'-aminoethyl)-5-hydroxyindole (serotonine). The imidazoline-2-methyl derivatives (S 3 , S 4 ), applied in doses of 50 μmole/kg 10 min prior to irrdiation were found to reduce mortality of mice with LD 50 DRF of 1.14-1.15, while serotonine displayed DRF of 1.45. The imidazoline-2-ethyl derivatives (S 7 , S 8 ) have turned out to be ineffective. (author)

  13. Radioprotection optimization in the electronuclear, industrial and medical domains; Optimisation de la radioprotection dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, C.; Abela, G.; Ammerich, M.; Balduyck, S.; Batalla, A.; Drouet, F.; Fracas, P.; Gauron, Ch.; Le Guen, B.; Lombard, J.; Mougnard, Ph.; Murith, Ch.; Rannou, A.; Rodde, S.; Selva, M.; Tranchant, Ph.; Schieber, C.; Solaire, T.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Jolivet, P.; Chauveau, D.; Mathevet, L.; Juhel, T.; Mertz, L.; Bochud, F.O.; Desmaris, G.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Roy, C.; Delacroix, S.; Sevilla, A.; Rehel, J.L.; Bernhard, S.; Palut-Laurent, O.; Lochard, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Wack, G.; Barange, K.; Delabre, H.

    2011-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty one presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - implementation of the ALARA principle in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains: status and challenges (C. Schieber); 2 - image quality and scanner irradiation: what ingredients to chose? (T. Solaire); 3 - radioprotection stakes and implementation of the ALARA approach during the IFMIF design (Y. Le Tonqueze); 4 - ALARA at the design stage of the EPR (P. Jolivet); 5 - alternative techniques to iridium 192 gamma-graphy for welds control: results and recommendations from the ALTER-X project (D. Chauveau); 6 - alternative techniques to ionizing radiations use in the medical domain: implementation of navigation strategies (L. Mathevet); 7 - justification of ionizing radiations use in non-medical imaging: overview of the French situation and perspectives status (S. Rodde); 8 - ISOE: task scheduling for radioprotection optimization in nuclear power plants (G. Abela); 9 - Practices and ALARA prospects among big nuclear operators (T. Juhel); 10 - experience feedback on the use of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in diagnostic imaging optimization (L. Mertz); 11 - DRLs: Swiss strategy and concept limits (F.O. Bochud); 12 - external dosimetry tools: the existing, the developing and the remaining problems (A. Rannou); 13 - is the optimization principle applicable to the aircraft personnel's exposure to cosmic radiation? (G. Desmaris); 14-15 - experience feedback of the ALARA approach concerning an operation with strong dosimetric stakes (P. Mougnard and N. Fontaine); 16 - optimization of reactor pool decontaminations ((P. Tranchant); 17 - radiopharmaceuticals transport - ALARA principle related stakes (G. Turquet de Beauregard); 18 - ALARA in vet radio-diagnosis activity: good practices guide (C. Roy); 19 - implementation of the ALARA approach at the Proton-therapy centre of Orsay's Curie

  14. Feedback on the significant events of radiation protection declared to Asn in external radiotherapy, from necessity of a quality management to the service of risk management; Retour d'experience sur les evenements significatifs de radioprotection declares a l'asn en radiotherapie externe, de la necessite d'un management de la qualite au service de la gestion des risques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchal, C. [ASN, 75 - Paris (France); Garandel, S.; Godet, J.L. [Angers Univ., 49 (France)

    2009-10-15

    The declaration of events in the perspective of a experience feedback towards the professionals contributes to improve the treatments safety. The stakes in term of treatments safety is in the capitalization of these experience feedbacks from declarations. Well, the publication of regulatory obligations in matter of quality assurance and their appropriation by the whole of medical teams should improve the treatment safety and and increase their quality. To the end, without being unaware of the current difficulties encountered y some centers because of the lack of radio physicists, the approach of significant events declaration and risk analysis should allow to the french radiotherapy to become an international reference. (N.C.)

  15. Stabilization of glucocorticoid receptors in isolated rat hepatocytes by radioprotectants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karle, J.M.; Ridder, W.E.; Wright, N.; Olmeda, R.; Nielsen, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work has shown that glucocorticoid receptors in rat liver homogenate can be stabilized by the addition of MoO 4 plus the sulfhydryl-containing compounds dithiothreitol and WR 1065. The latter is the dephosphorylated, principal metabolite of the radioprotectant WR 2721 (or S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanesphosphorothioic acid). The current work results from applying this knowledge to intact rat hepatocytes. Cells were isolated by collagenase perfusion and incubated in supplemented minimum essential medium at 37 0 C with various concentrations of WR 2721, WR 1065, or vehicle. Samples of these cell suspensions were analyzed at various times for steroid binding capacity by incubating homogenates (27,000 x g supernates) with 50 nM 3 H-triamcinolone acetonide in the presence or absence of excess unlabelled dexamethasone. Concentrations of 10 mM WR 2721 provided marked preservation of the binding capacity (>85% of the initial value at 5 hours) compared to control at 60% of the binding capacity. WR 1065 at 10 mM provided no such protection. This is consistent with the observation that WR 1065 does not pass cell membranes. The authors propose that supplying reducing equivalents to intracellular components such as the glucocorticoid receptor may be one mechanism of the radioprotection afforded by WR 2721

  16. The radioprotective potential of 3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, Mary Judith Q.; Gomez, Marlyn O.

    1999-03-01

    The radioprotective potential of 3,5,4'trihydroxystilbene or resveratrol, a compound abundant in grapes, was investigated using the micronucleus test. Gamma radiation (6 Gy) was used to induce micronucleus formation in 12-week old Swiss-Webster mice. Five groups with five mice each were used. Three groups were given corresponding treatments (low, normal, high doses of reservatrol) via oral gavage for one week. The negative control group was not given any radiation nor any compound while the positive control group was exposed to radiation but was not given any compound. The mean micronucleus frequencies arranged from highest to lowest are as follows: low dose, positive control, normal dose, high dose and negative control. Using the analysis of variance-complete random design followed by the Duncan multiple range test, it was proven that resveratrol was able to inhibit micronucleus formation in polychromatic erythrocytes of 12-week old Swiss-Webster mice at the normal (60 micrograms) and high (120 micrograms) concentrations assigned. This suggests that its radioprotective potential may follow a dose-dependent pattern. (Author)

  17. The evolution of radioprotection measuring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, D.

    1995-01-01

    We have reviewed the main issues that must now be faced in radiological protection. Many of them are linked to the ICRP recommendations in the report number 60. The impact of microelectronics in this field is significant and is leading to rapidly improved techniques and increasing sensitivity. A particularly important advance is the ''credit card'' dosemeter for X and gamma rays. (author). 2 refs., 4 figs., 2 tab

  18. Randomized phase III trial of postoperative radiochemotherapy ± amifostine in head and neck cancer. Is there evidence for radioprotection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacha, P.; Fehlauer, F.; Mahlmann, B.; Marx, M.; Richter, E.; Hinke, A.; Sommer, K.; Feyerabend, T.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clincial data suggest a reduction of radiation-induced acute toxicity by amifostine (A). We investigated this issue in a randomized trial comparing radiochemotherapy (RT + CT) versus radiochemotherapy plus amifostine (RC + CT + A) in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: 56 patients with oro-/hypopharynx or larynx cancer (T1-2 N1-2 G3, T3-4 N0-2 G1-3) were randomized to received RC + CT alone or RC + CT + A. Patients were irradiated up to 60 Gy (R0) or 70 Gy (R1/2) and received chemotherapy (70 mg/m 2 carboplatin, day 1-5 week 1 and 5 of radiotherapy). 250 mg amifostine were applied daily before each radiotherapy session. Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC). As for acute xerostomia, patients with laryngeal cancer were excluded from evaluation. Results: 50 patients were evaluable (25 patients in the RC + CT, 25 patients in the RC + CT + A group). Clinical characteristics were well balanced in both treatment groups. Amifostine provided reduction in acute xerostomia and mucositis but had no obvious influence on Karnofsky performance status, body weight, cutaneous side effects, and alopecia. The differences between both groups were statistically significant for acute xerostomia and nonsignificant, but with a trend for mucositis. Conclusions: According to our results, there is a radioprotective effect on salivary glands and a potential effect on oral mucosa by amifostine in postoperative radiotherapy combined with carboplatin. To improve the radio- and chemoprotective effects of amifostine in clinical practice, the application of a higher dose (> 250 mg) seems to be necessary. (orig.)

  19. Randomized phase III trial of postoperative radiochemotherapy {+-} amifostine in head and neck cancer. Is there evidence for radioprotection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacha, P; Fehlauer, F; Mahlmann, B; Marx, M; Richter, E [Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Hinke, A [WiSP Research Inst., Langenfeld (Germany); Sommer, K [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Feyerabend, T [Practice for Radiation Therapy Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Bonn (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clincial data suggest a reduction of radiation-induced acute toxicity by amifostine (A). We investigated this issue in a randomized trial comparing radiochemotherapy (RT + CT) versus radiochemotherapy plus amifostine (RC + CT + A) in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: 56 patients with oro-/hypopharynx or larynx cancer (T1-2 N1-2 G3, T3-4 N0-2 G1-3) were randomized to received RC + CT alone or RC + CT + A. Patients were irradiated up to 60 Gy (R0) or 70 Gy (R1/2) and received chemotherapy (70 mg/m{sup 2} carboplatin, day 1-5 week 1 and 5 of radiotherapy). 250 mg amifostine were applied daily before each radiotherapy session. Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC). As for acute xerostomia, patients with laryngeal cancer were excluded from evaluation. Results: 50 patients were evaluable (25 patients in the RC + CT, 25 patients in the RC + CT + A group). Clinical characteristics were well balanced in both treatment groups. Amifostine provided reduction in acute xerostomia and mucositis but had no obvious influence on Karnofsky performance status, body weight, cutaneous side effects, and alopecia. The differences between both groups were statistically significant for acute xerostomia and nonsignificant, but with a trend for mucositis. Conclusions: According to our results, there is a radioprotective effect on salivary glands and a potential effect on oral mucosa by amifostine in postoperative radiotherapy combined with carboplatin. To improve the radio- and chemoprotective effects of amifostine in clinical practice, the application of a higher dose (> 250 mg) seems to be necessary. (orig.)

  20. Avaliação do efeito radioprotetor do selenito de sódio no processo de reparação tecidual em ratos Evaluation of the radioprotective effect of sodium selenite in the tissue repair process in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício M. Tuji

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a ação radioprotetora do selenito de sódio no processo de reparação tecidual. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar foram submetidos a procedimento cirúrgico para a realização de ferida na região dorsal. Os animais foram divididos em quatro grupos experimentais: controle, selênio, irradiado e selênio-irradiado. Os grupos selênio e selênio-irradiado receberam 2,0 mg/kg de selenito de sódio, 48 horas após a cirurgia. Os grupos irradiado e selênio-irradiado foram submetidos à irradiação em dose única de 6 Gy, administrada somente nas bordas das feridas. Após 4, 7, 13 e 21 dias do procedimento cirúrgico, os animais foram sacrificados e avaliados por meio de análise morfológica, histoquímica e birrefringência do tecido. RESULTADOS: O aspecto estrutural e morfológico, assim como a qualidade do tecido e sua maturação através da quantidade e disposição dos feixes de fibras colágenas, juntamente com o seu grau de orientação macromolecular, permitiu observar a presença de intenso retardo provocado pela irradiação, bem como o efeito radioprotetor do selenito de sódio no processo de reparação. CONCLUSÃO: Dentro das condições experimentais utilizadas, o selenito de sódio apresentou-se como radioprotetor eficaz, visto que o processo de reparação no grupo selênio-irradiado comportou-se, histologicamente, semelhante ao grupo controle.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the radioprotective effect of sodium selenite in the tissue repair process. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar rats submitted to a surgical procedure to produce a wound in the dorsal region. These animals were then divided in four experimental groups: control, selenium, irradiated and selenium-irradiated. The selenium and selenium-irradiated groups received sodium selenite (2.0 mg/kg, 48 hours after surgery. The irradiated and selenium-irradiated groups received a single dose of 6 Gy, administered only in the borders of the wound. The animals were

  1. Evaluation of radioprotective effect of carnosine (beta- alanyl-1- histidine on the wound healing in rats Avaliação do efeito radioprotetor da carnosina (beta-alanil-1- histidina no processo de cicatrização em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aramaki Tanaka

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of carnosine (beta- alanyl-1-histidine on the wound healing in rats. Therefore, 48 male rats were submitted to a surgical procedure to perform a rectangular wound in the anterior-dorsal region. The animals were divided into 4 experimental groups randomly chosen: control; irradiated; carnosine irradiated and carnosine group. The irradiated and carnosine irradiated group were exposed to a dose (6Gy of gamma irradiation, in the whole body, 72 hours after surgery. The carnosine and carnosine irradiated groups, in addition to the surgical procedure and the irradiation, received two doses of carnosine aqueous solution, the first one being injected 48 hours after surgery, and the second one 1 hour and 30 minutes before irradiation. The tissue repair of the 4 groups was evaluated at 4, 7, 14, and 21 days after inflicting the wound, by morphological, histochemical and histophysical methods. At all examined periods, it could be observed that the animals from the carnosine irradiated group presented a better developed granulation tissue than the irradiated group and closely similar to that of the control group. Thus, under the experimental conditions used, it was possible to conclude that carnosine is an effective radioprotective substance.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito radioprotetor da carnosina (beta-alanil-1-histidina no processo de cicatrização em ratos. Para isto, 48 ratos machos foram submetidos a um procedimento cirúrgico para realização de uma ferida retangular na região dorsal anterior. Os animais foram divididos aleatoriamente em 4 grupos experimentais: controle, irradiado, carnosina irradiado e carnosina. Os grupos carnosina e carnosina irradiado foram exposto a uma dose de corpo todo de 6 Gy de radiação gama, 72 horas após a cirurgia para confecção da ferida. O grupo carnosina e carnosina irradiado, adicionalmente, ao procedimento cirúrgico e a

  2. Potent radio-protective effects of vitamins E and C on radiation induced DNA damage in gametes leading to lower frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in subsequent embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein Mozdarani

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: To compare the effects of parental and maternal exposure of NMRI mice with γ-rays on gametes in the absence or presence of vitamins E and C and subsequent cytogenetic damage in pre-implantation embryos generated from irradiated gametes. Materials and Methods: Male and female NMRI mice were whole body irradiated in the presence of 200 IU/Kg vitamin E and 100 μg/ml vitamin C. Various mating schemes were designed for mating of irradiated mice, e.g. mating irradiated male with non-irradiated female, irradiated female with non irradiated male or both male and female irradiated. About 68 h post coitus, 4-8-cell embryos were flushed out from oviducts and fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for chromosome abnormalities and micronuclei. Results: In control embryos, frequencies of abnormal metaphase and embryos with micronuclei was low and there was no significant difference between vitamins treated samples and controls. However there was an increase in both abnormal metaphases and micronuclei frequency in embryos generated after parental or maternal irradiation or both. Vitamin E effectively reduced the frequency of aneuploidy in all irradiated groups and vitamin C was very effective in reducing the frequencies of micronuclei. DRF calculated for both vitamins indicate that vitamin C is more potent than vitamin E in reducing clastogenic effects of gamma-rays in pre-implantation embryos. Conclusion: Data indicate that γ-irradiation affects spermatogenesis and preovulatory stage oocytes in male and female mice respectively. These effects might be due to DNA alterations in sperms and oocytes affecting meiotic segregations that may lead to chromosome abnormalities in subsequent embryos expressed as numerical chromosome abnormalities or micronuclei. Administration of vitamins E and C before irradiation effectively reduced the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities. The way these vitamins reduces genotoxic

  3. Transport Limits for Non-Fixed Contamination: A Hazard to Optimization in Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, S.; Lorenz, B.; Schwarz, W.

    2004-01-01

    from regulatory bodies, expert groups, research and industry. Considering a nuclide specific approach and even reduced dose constraints, as a result higher contamination values could be acceptable for nearly all radionuclides. Although the new exposure model and the calculation of derived personal exposure have been formulated in consensus of the working group, it is still unclear, if and how these results will influence the IAEA revision process and the regulatory practice in the individual countries. A proposal is given, how the results of the new modeling can be implemented in the IAEA TS-R-1. Many working hours of nuclear personnel could be devoted to topics with a significantly higher benefit for radioprotection. (Author)

  4. Transport Limits for Non-Fixed Contamination: A Hazard to Optimization in Radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theis, S.; Lorenz, B.; Schwarz, W.

    2004-07-01

    members from regulatory bodies, expert groups, research and industry. Considering a nuclide specific approach and even reduced dose constraints, as a result higher contamination values could be acceptable for nearly all radionuclides. Although the new exposure model and the calculation of derived personal exposure have been formulated in consensus of the working group, it is still unclear, if and how these results will influence the IAEA revision process and the regulatory practice in the individual countries. A proposal is given, how the results of the new modeling can be implemented in the IAEA TS-R-1. Many working hours of nuclear personnel could be devoted to topics with a significantly higher benefit for radioprotection. (Author)

  5. Antitumor and radiation protection effects of β-1,3-D-glucan extracted from yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Akinobu; Hasegawa, Takeo; Monzen, Hajime; Takahashi, Tohru

    2003-01-01

    Various natural extracts are manufactured and on sale as health food products, which are raising popular consciousness of being fit, because they are considered effective or suppressible for cancer. In the current experiment, we measured the immunological activity, antitumor effects, and radioprotective</