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Sample records for shoulder mr-gezielte mr-arthrographie

  1. MR arthrography of the shoulder: possible indications for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Grebe, P.; Kersjes, W.; Runkel, M.; Kirschner, P.; Schild, H.H.

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective study possible indications for MR arthrography of the shoulder were evaluated. 37 patients were examined before and after intraarticular administration of a 2-mmolar solution of Gd-DTPA. MR arthrography was performed if there was no joint effusion and/or an uncertain finding concerning the rotator cuff or the capsulolabral complex on plain MR images. MR arthrography leads to a better demonstration of labrum pathology in 11/22 patients and to a superior delineation of the capsuloligamentous apparatus in 20/22 cases. In 9/15 patients with impingement lesions MR arthrography allowed a differentiation of severe tendinitis from partial and small full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. MR arthrography of the shoulder joint enhances the accuracy of MR in case of an uncertain finding on plain MR images. (orig.) [de

  2. MR arthrography of the shoulder: possible indications for clinical use; Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der MR-Arthrographie bei Erkrankungen des Schultergelenkes

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    Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Grebe, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Kersjes, W. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie; Kirschner, P. [Elisabeth-Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Abt. fuer Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie St. Vincenz; Schild, H.H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie

    1994-02-01

    In a prospective study possible indications for MR arthrography of the shoulder were evaluated. 37 patients were examined before and after intraarticular administration of a 2-mmolar solution of Gd-DTPA. MR arthrography was performed if there was no joint effusion and/or an uncertain finding concerning the rotator cuff or the capsulolabral complex on plain MR images. MR arthrography leads to a better demonstration of labrum pathology in 11/22 patients and to a superior delineation of the capsuloligamentous apparatus in 20/22 cases. In 9/15 patients with impingement lesions MR arthrography allowed a differentiation of severe tendinitis from partial and small full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. MR arthrography of the shoulder joint enhances the accuracy of MR in case of an uncertain finding on plain MR images. (orig.) [Deutsch] In einer prospektiven Studie sollten Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der MR-Arthrographie bei Erkrankungen des Schultergelenkes herausgearbeitet werden. 37 Patienten wurden sowohl nativ als auch nach intraartikulaerer Gabe einer 2mmolaren Gd-DTPA-Loesung untersucht. Voraussetzungen fuer die KM-Gabe waren ein fehlender Gelenkerguss und/oder ein unklarer Befund des Labrum-Kapsel-Komplexes oder der Rotatorenmanschette in der Nativuntersuchung. Durch die MR-Arthrographie wurde bei 11/22 Patienten eine verbesserte Darstellung der Labrumpathologie erzielt; in 20/22 Faellen ergabe sich eine zuverlaessige Beurteilung der Gelenkkapsel. Bei 9/15 Patienten mit Erkrankungen der Rotatorenmanschette konnten Tendinitiden von partiellen und kleinen kompletten Rotatorenmanschettenrupturen sicher differenziert werden. Die MR-Arthrographie des Schultergelenkes fuehrt bei nicht eindeutigen Befunden in der Nativuntersuchung zu einer verbesserten Treffsicherheit der MR-Diagnostik. (orig.)

  3. CT-guided puncture for direct MR-arthrography of the shoulder: Description of possible techniques

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    Hauth E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The following report describes the possible techniques of CT-guided puncture for direct magnetic resonance (MR arthrography of the shoulder. CT-guided puncture can be regarded as an alternative technique to fluoroscopic- or ultrasound-guided puncture for MR-arthrography of the shoulder with high efficiency, low dose and extremely low complication rate.

  4. MR and MR arthrography to identify degenerative and posttraumatic diseases in the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Lang, Philipp

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of a wide spectrum of both intraarticular and extraarticular pathology of the shoulder. MR imaging enables the detection or exclusion of degenerative and posttraumatic diseases of the shoulder with a reasonable accuracy. MR arthrography is useful in the visualization of subtle anatomic details and further improves the differentiation. In this article, findings of MR imaging and MR arthrography of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder diseases (impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and glenohumeral instability) has been reviewed

  5. MR-guided MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tratting, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Pretterklieber, M.; Kontaxis, G.; Rand, T.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR-guided technique for joint puncture in MR arthrography of the shoulder and to confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip by visualization of the flow of contrast media into the joint. Materials and methods: Three unfixed human shoulder joint specimens were examined on a 1.0 T unit. The optimal point of entrance and depth for joint puncture were estimated by means of MR-compatible markers on the skin. Needle orientation and localization of the needle tip (MR-compatible 22-gauge needle) in the shoulder joint were monitored by rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences in two orthogonal planes. To confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip, diluted gadolinium-DTPA was administered via a long connecting tube and the flow of contrast media into the joint was viewed directly on an LCD screen using real-time MR imaging (local look technique). Results: The MR-compatible markers on the skin allowed determination of the optimal point of entrance and estimation of the depth for joint puncture. Passive visualization of the MR-compatible needle due to spin dephasing and signal loss provided adequate localization of the intra-articular needle tip position in all specimens, although significant artefacts were present on rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences with an increase in width of the apparent needle shaft. Real-time MR imaging of the flow of contrast media was possible using the local look technique and the LCD screen of the MR unit and allowed confirmation of the intracapsular position. Conclusion: MR-guided joint puncture and real-time MR-assisted contrast media application results in improved MR arthrography and may replace conventional fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.) [de

  6. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: evaluation with MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Kim, Yang-Soo; Chung, Yang Guk; Kim, Jung-Man

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography for diagnosing adhesive capsulitis. Shoulder MR images of 28 patients with (n=14) and without (n=14) adhesive capsulitis were retrospectively analyzed. MR images were assessed for capsule and synovium thickness as well as the width of the axillary recess on oblique coronal fat-suppressed T1-weighted images and T2-weighted images, respectively. On oblique sagittal fat-suppressed T1-weighted images, the width of the rotator interval and the presence of abnormal tissue in the interval were evaluated. Significant differences were found between the two groups in capsule and synovium thickness on both sides of the recess on oblique coronal T2-weighted images (P=0.000), whereas thickness on the humeral aspect showed no significant difference on oblique coronal fat-suppressed T1-weighted images (P=0.109). On oblique coronal T2-weighted images, a cut-off value of 3-mm thickness gave the highest diagnostic accuracy for adhesive capsulitis with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 79% (11/14), 100% (14/14), and 89% (25/28) at the humeral side and 93% (13/14), 86% (12/14), and 89% (25/28) at the glenoid side, respectively. There were significant differences in rotator interval width, presence of abnormal tissue in the rotator interval, and axillary recess width between the two groups (P<0.05). Thickness of capsule and synovium of the axillary recess greater than 3 mm is a practical MR criterion for diagnosing adhesive capsulitis when measured on oblique coronal T2-weighted MR arthrography images without fat suppression. The presence of abnormal tissue in the rotator interval showed high sensitivity but rather low specificity. (orig.)

  7. Efficacy of ultrasonography-guided shoulder MR arthrography using a posterior approach

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    Gokalp, Gokhan; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Yazici, Zeynep [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Goeruekle Kampusu, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-06-15

    Shoulder MR arthrography has an important role in the assessment of rotator cuff lesions, labral tears, glenohumeral ligaments, rotator interval lesions, and postoperative shoulder status. Injection in direct MR arthrography can be performed with palpation, fluoroscopy, ultrasonography (US), or MRI. Recently, the posterior approach is the preferred method due to the presence of fewer stabilizers, absence of important articular structures and less extravasation, has been advocated. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of US-guided MR arthrography via a posterior approach on the glenohumeral joint. Thirty MR arthrographies were performed on 29 patients. Ultrasonography (Xario, Toshiba) examinations were conducted by a wide-band 5-12 Mhz linear array transducer set to muscle-skeleton. Diluted contrast medium (1 ml gadolinium chelate and 100 ml saline, approximately 15 ml) was delivered into the glenohumeral joint space from between the humeral head and posterior labrum with a 20-gauge spinal needle. MRI examination was conducted by a 1.5 T scanner. Fat-saturated T1-weighted spin echo was applied on coronal, axial, and sagittal planes within the first 30 min after contrast material injection. One (3.3%) arthrography was not successful due to technical reasons associated with obesity. Contrast extravasation around the infraspinatus and teres minoer muscles was depicted in twelve examinations. One (3.3%) patient developed vasovagal collapse. Ultrasonography-guided posterior approach is an easy, reliable, fast, and comfortable method in experienced hands. It may be an alternative for fluoroscopy-guided shoulder MR arthrography. (orig.)

  8. Efficacy of ultrasonography-guided shoulder MR arthrography using a posterior approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Yazici, Zeynep

    2010-01-01

    Shoulder MR arthrography has an important role in the assessment of rotator cuff lesions, labral tears, glenohumeral ligaments, rotator interval lesions, and postoperative shoulder status. Injection in direct MR arthrography can be performed with palpation, fluoroscopy, ultrasonography (US), or MRI. Recently, the posterior approach is the preferred method due to the presence of fewer stabilizers, absence of important articular structures and less extravasation, has been advocated. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of US-guided MR arthrography via a posterior approach on the glenohumeral joint. Thirty MR arthrographies were performed on 29 patients. Ultrasonography (Xario, Toshiba) examinations were conducted by a wide-band 5-12 Mhz linear array transducer set to muscle-skeleton. Diluted contrast medium (1 ml gadolinium chelate and 100 ml saline, approximately 15 ml) was delivered into the glenohumeral joint space from between the humeral head and posterior labrum with a 20-gauge spinal needle. MRI examination was conducted by a 1.5 T scanner. Fat-saturated T1-weighted spin echo was applied on coronal, axial, and sagittal planes within the first 30 min after contrast material injection. One (3.3%) arthrography was not successful due to technical reasons associated with obesity. Contrast extravasation around the infraspinatus and teres minoer muscles was depicted in twelve examinations. One (3.3%) patient developed vasovagal collapse. Ultrasonography-guided posterior approach is an easy, reliable, fast, and comfortable method in experienced hands. It may be an alternative for fluoroscopy-guided shoulder MR arthrography. (orig.)

  9. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Do we need local anesthesia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spick, Claudio; Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Reittner, Pia; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    lower a patient's pain intensity when applying intra-articular contrast media for MR arthrography of the shoulder. This could result in reduced costs and a reduced risk of adverse reactions, without an impact on patient comfort

  10. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Do we need local anesthesia?

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    Spick, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.spick@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Waehringer-Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Reittner, Pia; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred [Diagnostikum Graz-Südwest, Weblinger Guertel 25, 8054 Graz (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    lower a patient's pain intensity when applying intra-articular contrast media for MR arthrography of the shoulder. This could result in reduced costs and a reduced risk of adverse reactions, without an impact on patient comfort.

  11. Labral-Ligamentous Complex of the Shoulder. Evaluation with double oblique axial MR arthrography. Technical Note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Taisuke; Saito, Y.; Yodono, H.; Prado, G.L.M.; Miura, H.; Itabashi, Y.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of double oblique axial (DOA) MR arthrography in evaluating labral-ligamentous complex compared with conventional axial (CA) MR arthrography. Material and Methods: MR arthrography of 51 shoulders, subsequently examined with arthroscopy, were retrospectively reviewed. DOA imaging was performed in all 51 shoulders and both DOA and CA imaging in 37 using a 1.5 T unit with gradient recalled-echo T2*-weighted sequences. DOA imaging was performed using perpendicular planes to the long axis of the glenoid fossa obtained by an oblique sagittal scout image. We compared the ability of DOA with that of CA MR arthrography to assess labral injuries and to demonstrate the whole length of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL), which were shown to be intact by arthroscopy. Results: For anterior labral injuries, sensitivity and specificity were 87% and 93% with CA, and 94% and 100% with DOA imaging, respectively. For posterior labral injuries, sensitivity and specificity were 47% and 100% with CA, and 79% and 96% with DOA imaging, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between CA and DOA images, except for the ability to diagnose posterior labral injuries, where DOA imaging had a significant superior sensitivity (p = 0.0327). DOA images also demonstrated the whole length of the intact AIGHL in 10 of 11 shoulders, while CA imaging showed this in only 3 of 11. Conclusion: DOA imaging was equal or better than CA imaging for evaluating the labral-ligamentous complex

  12. Comparison study of indirect MR arthrography and direct MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Yi, Sang-Kyu; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2009-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography (I-MRA) with that of direct MR arthrography (D-MRA) for labral tears, rotator cuff tears, and long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) tears using a 3-T MR unit. Institutional review board approval was given; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. From November 2005 to June 2006, 19 patients (eight men and 11 women; mean age, 51 years) who had undergone both I-MRA and D-MRA underwent arthroscopic surgery. Both methods were performed in fat-saturated axial, coronal oblique, and sagittal oblique T1-weighted sequences, as well as axial and coronal oblique T2-weighted sequences. Two radiologists independently and retrospectively evaluated two sets of MRA for the diagnosis of superior and anterior labral tears, subscapularis tendon (SSC), and supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon (SSP-ISP) tears, and LHBT tears. With the arthroscopic finding as a gold standard, we analyzed statistical differences of sensitivities and specificities between two sets of MRA and inter-observer agreement was evaluated using the kappa value. The sensitivity and specificity of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 1 were 79/80% and 71/80%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/100% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/75% and 64/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 100/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 67/100% and 78/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. Those of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 2 were 86/80% and 71/100%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/83% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/88% and 82/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 92/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 78/90% and 89/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. No significant differences were found between the methods. Inter-observer agreements were higher than moderate (κ > 0.41) with both methods. Based on a relatively small number of patients, no significant

  13. Comparison study of indirect MR arthrography and direct MR arthrography of the shoulder

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    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yi, Sang-Kyu [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Sekye Radiologic Clinic, Daejeon (Korea); Yoo, Jaechul [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Choe, Bong-Keun [Kyung Hee University, Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-07-15

    To compare the diagnostic value of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography (I-MRA) with that of direct MR arthrography (D-MRA) for labral tears, rotator cuff tears, and long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) tears using a 3-T MR unit. Institutional review board approval was given; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. From November 2005 to June 2006, 19 patients (eight men and 11 women; mean age, 51 years) who had undergone both I-MRA and D-MRA underwent arthroscopic surgery. Both methods were performed in fat-saturated axial, coronal oblique, and sagittal oblique T1-weighted sequences, as well as axial and coronal oblique T2-weighted sequences. Two radiologists independently and retrospectively evaluated two sets of MRA for the diagnosis of superior and anterior labral tears, subscapularis tendon (SSC), and supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon (SSP-ISP) tears, and LHBT tears. With the arthroscopic finding as a gold standard, we analyzed statistical differences of sensitivities and specificities between two sets of MRA and inter-observer agreement was evaluated using the kappa value. The sensitivity and specificity of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 1 were 79/80% and 71/80%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/100% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/75% and 64/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 100/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 67/100% and 78/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. Those of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 2 were 86/80% and 71/100%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/83% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/88% and 82/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 92/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 78/90% and 89/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. No significant differences were found between the methods. Inter-observer agreements were higher than moderate ({kappa} > 0.41) with both methods. Based on a relatively small number of patients, no significant

  14. Low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder joint: technique, indications, and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.-F.; Thelen, M.; Loew, R.; Runkel, M.; Zoellner, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the age of cost containment and urgent reductions in health care expenditures, new options have to be explored to satisfy both diagnostic requirements and economic limitations. The introduction of low-field MR systems for assessment of joint disorders seemed to be an option for lower costs. The purpose of this article is to summarize available experiences with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with respect to image quality and diagnostic accuracy in detecting labral and rotator cuff lesions. Up to now, there has been only a limited number of studies available dealing with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint. They reveal that, despite a minor image quality in comparison with high-field imaging, low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder allows for sufficient evaluation of intra- and extra-articular structures in the detection of major abnormalities such as glenohumeral instability or rotator cuff disease. Furthermore, open-configured MR scanners enable kinematic studies: Besides the analysis of normal motion, pathological findings in patients with instabilities and impingement syndrome can be delineated. They further offer the possibility for performing MR imaging-guided arthrography of the shoulder. This was first described using an open C-arm scanner with a vertically oriented magnetic field so that MR arthrography may be performed in one setting. (orig.)

  15. Anterior labral tear: diagnostic value of MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Yoon, Yeong Cheol; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2001-01-01

    To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance(MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of anterior labral tear of the shoulder Between september 1996 and February 2000, MR arthrography of the shoulder was performed in 281 patients with a history of shoulder pain or instability. Among this total, only 157 shoulders in 154 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery 0 to 230 (average, 20.9) days after MR arthrography were included in this study; the subjects comprised of 150 males and 4 females with an average age of 23.3 years. MR arthrographs of these 154 patients were analyzed for the presence of anterior labral tears, and the findings were correlated with the arthroscopic and surgical findings. Anterior labral tear was classified as A to D according to its location, as determined by arthroscopy and surgery. (A=4 to 6 o'clock direction, anteroinferior; B=2 to 4 o'clock direction, central; C=12 to 2 o'clock direction, anterosuperior; D= SLAP lesion). The retrospective analysis of MR arthrographs showing false-positive and negative findings was also underthken.. In the diagnosis of anterior labral tear, MR arthrography showed a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 90% and an accuracy of 91%. Anterior labral tears were confirmed by arthroscopy or surgery in 62 of the 157 shoulders (39%). Among 62 lesion, two (3%) were observed in area A, 32(52%) in area A+B, nine (15%) in area A+B+C, one(2%) in area A+B+D,13(21%) in area A+B+C+D, two (3%) in area B+C, one(2%) in area B+D, and two(3%) in area C. Among ten false-positive cases, seven were focal lessions (two, three and two lesions in area A, B and C, respectively), and in the remaining three cases, lacated in area A+B, MR arthrography revealed thickening and deformation. All four false negatives were focal lesions (two in area A and two in area C). Other than in focal lesions, in which accuracy was relatively low, MR arthrography showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of anterior labral tear

  16. Abduction and external rotation (ABER) MR arthrography of the shoulder. Benefits and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, A.; Gokan, Takehiko; Munechika, Hirotsugu; Ogawa, Takashi; El-Feky, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the benefits and limitations of using abduction and external rotation (ABER) positions of the arm during MR arthrography of the shoulder in the evaluation of the rotator-cuff tendon, the capsulolabral complex and the shoulder joint after surgery. Forty-seven patients complaining of either shoulder instability, chronic shoulder pain, pain of unknown cause or pain following shoulder surgery were studied using the direct MR arthrography technique in both the standard neutral position with the arm adducted as well as with the arm in the ABER position. A correlation was obtained between the MR arthrography findings and the surgical findings in 10 reports and clinical presentations of the examined patients. Three patients [6%] were unable to perform ABER positioning. ABER oblique axial images were better than standard oblique coronal images in revealing undersurface tears of the rotator cuff particularly of the grade I type. Four tears were missed in standard images. Oblique axial images were better than standard axial images in demonstrating non-displaced anterior labral tears. One tear was missed and two tears were suspected in the standard images. Oblique axial images were less sensitive than oblique coronal images in the diagnosis of superior labral tears. Two tears were missed in ABER images. The ABER oblique axial MR arthrogram is a useful adjunct to the standard axial and oblique coronal MR arthrograms for assessment of capsulolabral abnormalities and rotator-cuff tendon tears despite some limitations. (author)

  17. MR arthrography in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: diagnostic performance and pitfalls

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    Zubler, Christoph; Mengiardi, Bernard; Schmid, Marius R.; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, Bernhard [University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography to diagnose calcific tendinitis of the shoulder and to assess the reasons for diagnostic errors. Standard MR arthrograms of 22 patients with calcific tendinitis and 61 controls were retrospectively analyzed by two independent and blinded radiologists. All cases were consecutively collected from a database. Conventional radiographs were available in all cases serving as gold standard. The supraspinatus was involved in 16, the infraspinatus in four and the subscapularis in two patients. All diagnostic errors were analyzed by two additional readers. Reader 1 correctly detected 12 of the 22 shoulders with and 42 of the 61 shoulders without calcific tendinitis (sensitivity 0.55, specificity 0.66). The corresponding values for reader 2 were 13 of 22 and 40 of 61 cases (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.69). Inter-rater agreement (kappa-value) was 0.42. Small size of the calcific deposits and isointensity compared to the surrounding tissue were the most important reasons for false negative results. Normal hypointense areas within the supraspinatus tendon substance and attachment were the main reason for false positive results. In conclusion, MR arthrography is insufficient in the diagnosis of calcific tendinitis. Normal hypointense parts of the rotator cuff may mimic calcific deposits and calcifications may not be detected when they are isointense compared to the rotator cuff. Therefore, MR imaging should not be interpreted without corresponding radiographs. (orig.)

  18. MR arthrography in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: diagnostic performance and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubler, Christoph; Mengiardi, Bernard; Schmid, Marius R.; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Jost, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography to diagnose calcific tendinitis of the shoulder and to assess the reasons for diagnostic errors. Standard MR arthrograms of 22 patients with calcific tendinitis and 61 controls were retrospectively analyzed by two independent and blinded radiologists. All cases were consecutively collected from a database. Conventional radiographs were available in all cases serving as gold standard. The supraspinatus was involved in 16, the infraspinatus in four and the subscapularis in two patients. All diagnostic errors were analyzed by two additional readers. Reader 1 correctly detected 12 of the 22 shoulders with and 42 of the 61 shoulders without calcific tendinitis (sensitivity 0.55, specificity 0.66). The corresponding values for reader 2 were 13 of 22 and 40 of 61 cases (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.69). Inter-rater agreement (kappa-value) was 0.42. Small size of the calcific deposits and isointensity compared to the surrounding tissue were the most important reasons for false negative results. Normal hypointense areas within the supraspinatus tendon substance and attachment were the main reason for false positive results. In conclusion, MR arthrography is insufficient in the diagnosis of calcific tendinitis. Normal hypointense parts of the rotator cuff may mimic calcific deposits and calcifications may not be detected when they are isointense compared to the rotator cuff. Therefore, MR imaging should not be interpreted without corresponding radiographs. (orig.)

  19. Shoulder instability: the role of MR arthrography in diagnosing anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions our experience at king hussein medical center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiari, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the reliability and accuracy of magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder for the diagnosis of anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions in patients with gleno-humeral joint instability. This retrospective study was performed at King Hussein Medical Center in Jordan. Twenty eight patients who underwent shoulder MR arthrogram and arthroscopy during a 22-month period were reviewed. All the twenty eight patients had history of previous shoulder dislocation and clinical suspicion of anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions and glenohumeral joint instability. The series included 24 males and 4 females. The mean average age of the patients was 29 years. All patients underwent shoulder MR arthrogram and the results of MR arthrogram were compared with the arthroscopic findings which were used as the reference standard. MR arthrograms were analyzed for the presence and type of labroligamentous injuries which include (Bankart, anterior labral periosteal sleeve avulsion (ALPSA), Perthes, glenolabral articular disruption (GLAD), or nonclassifiable lesion). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the detection and classification of anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions with MR arthrography were calculated. At arthroscopy, 21 anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions were diagnosed, including 15 Bankart lesions, three ALPSA lesions, two Perthes lesions and one GLAD lesion. Seven labral lesions were nonclassifiable at arthroscopy, all of which occurred after a history of chronic instability. When compared with arthroscopic findings, Shoulder MR Arthrography had two false-negative results (sensitivity, 92.8%) and no false-positive results. The sensitivity of shoulder MR Arthrography in detecting anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions was 92.8% (26/28) and specificity was (100%). The overall accuracy of Shoulder MR Arthrography in detecting labroligamentous lesions in this study was 90.5% (19/21). MR arthrography of the shoulder is reliable and accurate in

  20. Gradient-recalled echo sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating the labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Marc J.; Motamedi, Kambiz; Chow, Kira; Seeger, Leanne L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of fat-suppressed gradient-recalled echo (GRE) compared with conventional spin echo T1-weighted (T1W) sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating labral tears. Three musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed MR arthrograms performed over a 12-month period for which surgical correlation was available. Of 180 serial arthrograms, 31 patients had surgery with a mean of 48 days following imaging. Paired coronal oblique and axial T1W or GRE sequences were analyzed by consensus for labral tear (coronal oblique two-dimensional multi-echo data image combination, 2D MEDIC; and axial three-dimensional double-echo steady-state, 3D DESS; Siemens MAGNETOM Sonata 1.5-T MR system). Interpretations were correlated with operative reports. Of 31 shoulders, 25 had labral tears at surgery. The GRE sequences depicted labral tears in 22, while T1W images depicted tears in 16 (sensitivity 88% versus 64%; p 0.7). Specificities were somewhat lower for GRE. Thin section GRE sequences are more sensitive than T1W for the detection of anterior and posterior labral tears. As the specificity of GRE was lower, it should be considered as an adjunctive imaging sequence that may improve depiction of labral tears, particularly smaller tears, in routine MR arthrography protocols. (orig.)

  1. Usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Woong; Hong, Suk Ju; Suh, San Il; Yong, Hwan Suk; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Park, Cheol Min; Suh, Won Hyuck; Kim, Myung Gyu

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder to locate the path of access and to control the correct placement of the needle into the shoulder. Fifteen patients with suspicion of shoulder pathology were included in this study. Patients were laid in supine positions with the arm extended and slightly abducted, the palm of the hand facing upward. A sonographic unit with a high resolution transducer with 7.5 MHz linear array was used. Axial images in the anterior aspect of the shoulder were obtained to localize the coracoid process and the anteromedical portion of the humerus. Using an aseptic technique, a 21-guage needle was advanced into the shoulder joint under ultrasonographic guidance. When the needle made contract with the articular cartilage of the humeral head, the needle was tiled to position is point in the articular cavity. Solution of 0.1 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine in 25 ml of normal saline was prepared and 12-16 ml was injected into the joint cavity. The intra-articular position of the needle and the compete distension of the shoulder joint were again confirmed by sonography. The needle was accurately placed in 14 out of 15 patients without damage to neighboring structures. It took 10 to 15 minutes to complete the procedure in 14 patients. No side effects attributable to gadopentetate dimeglumine were found. Sono-guided needle puncture for the shoulder MR arthrography can be a substitutable method for fluoroscopic guidance, with easy access, advantages of lacking radiation hazard and eliminating the need for iodized contrast agents.

  2. Direct MR-arthrography of the shoulder with maximum capsular distension for surgical planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, R.; Rothenburg, T. von; Koester, O.; Schmid, G.; Ludwig, J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of direct MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with maximum distension of the joint capsule in patients with glenohumeral instability for preoperative diagnosis and for determining the method of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: MR arthrography of the shoulder joint was performed on a 1.5 T system in 38 patients. All patients suffered from anterior or bidirectional instability. Using a fluoroscopically guided posterior approach, a 1% dilution of dimeglumine gadopentetate (5 mmol Gd-DTPA/l) was injected until full capsular stretching was achieved. MR imaging protocol included fat-saturated transversal, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo, T1-weighted 3-D and transversal T2-weighted Flash-2D. Results: MR imaging revealed significant capsule distention in 22 patients and ventral capsule defects in 9 patients. Labral lesions were depicted in 25 patients, bicipital tendon lesions in 4 patients and partial ruptures of the rotator cuff in 3 patients. 15 of the 38 patients underwent surgery. Areas of pathologic laxity of the glenohumeral capsule were correctly described in all cases. In 12 of 15 patients, the best method of intervention could be determined prospectively. In 3 of 15 patients, the necessary operation was overestimated. Regarding labral ruptures, MRI had a sensitivity of 88%, a specificity of 86%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 87%. (orig.)

  3. Gradient-recalled echo sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating the labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Marc J.; Motamedi, Kambiz; Chow, Kira; Seeger, Leanne L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, 200 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 165-59, Box 956952, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of fat-suppressed gradient-recalled echo (GRE) compared with conventional spin echo T1-weighted (T1W) sequences in direct shoulder MR arthrography for evaluating labral tears. Three musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed MR arthrograms performed over a 12-month period for which surgical correlation was available. Of 180 serial arthrograms, 31 patients had surgery with a mean of 48 days following imaging. Paired coronal oblique and axial T1W or GRE sequences were analyzed by consensus for labral tear (coronal oblique two-dimensional multi-echo data image combination, 2D MEDIC; and axial three-dimensional double-echo steady-state, 3D DESS; Siemens MAGNETOM Sonata 1.5-T MR system). Interpretations were correlated with operative reports. Of 31 shoulders, 25 had labral tears at surgery. The GRE sequences depicted labral tears in 22, while T1W images depicted tears in 16 (sensitivity 88% versus 64%; p < 0.05). Subdividing the labrum, GRE was significantly more sensitive for the posterior labrum (75% versus 25%; p < 0.05) with a trend toward greater sensitivity at the anterior labrum (78% versus 56%; p = 0.157) but not significantly different for the superior labrum (50% versus 57%; p > 0.7). Specificities were somewhat lower for GRE. Thin section GRE sequences are more sensitive than T1W for the detection of anterior and posterior labral tears. As the specificity of GRE was lower, it should be considered as an adjunctive imaging sequence that may improve depiction of labral tears, particularly smaller tears, in routine MR arthrography protocols. (orig.)

  4. Humeral avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizing structures after anterior shoulder dislocation: demonstration by MRI and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirman, P.F.J.; Steinbach, L.S.; Feller, J.F.; Stauffer, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MRI findings of an anterior shoulder capsular avulsion from the humerus, with or without subscapularis rupture, after anterior dislocation or severe abduction external rotation injury. Design and patients. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI and MR arthrographic examinations of seven patients who were identified at surgery with avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizers from the humerus. MRI was correlated with clinical history and surgical results. Results. MRI findings included: inhomogeneity or frank disruption of the anterior capsule at the humeral insertion (all), fluid intensity anterior to the shoulder (six patients), tear of the subscapularis tendon (six patients), dislocation of the biceps tendon (four patients), and a Hill-Sachs deformity (four patients). MR arthrography additionally found extravasation of contrast through the capsular defect (two patients). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that MRI is helpful for diagnosing humeral avulsion of the anterior glenohumeral capsule, especially when a tear of the subscapularis tendon insertion is present. MR arthrography may be of benefit for diagnosing capsular avulsion without associated subscapularis tendon abnormality. (orig.). With 4 figs

  5. Diagnosis of superior labral lesions: comparison of noncontrast MRI with indirect MR arthrography in unexercised shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinauer, Philip A.; Flemming, Donald J.; Murphy, Kevin P.; Doukas, William C.

    2007-01-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with indirect MR arthrography (I-MRa) of unexercised shoulders for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. Institutional Review Board approval and patient informed consent were obtained for this prospective study. Superior labral findings on shoulder MRI and unexercised I-MRa studies of 104 patients were correlated with findings at arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed the two sets of MR images while blinded to arthroscopic results. For each radiologist, the McNemar test was used to detect statistically significant differences between techniques. The superior labrum was intact in 24 and abnormal in 80 subjects. For detection of superior labral lesions by each radiologist, I-MRa was more sensitive (84-91%) than MRI (66-85%), with statistically significant improvement in sensitivity for one reader (p = 0.003). However, I-MRa was less specific (58-71%) than MRI (75-83%). Overall, accuracy was slightly improved on I-MRa (78-86%) compared with MRI (70-83%), but this difference was not statistically significant for either reader. Compared with noncontrast MRI, I-MRa was more sensitive for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. However, the diagnostic value of I-MRa in shoulders remaining at rest is potentially limited by decreased specificity of the technique. (orig.)

  6. Ultrasound-guided intraarticular injection for MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Bruegel, M.; Waldt, S.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate ultrasound guidance for intraarticular contrast injection via an anterolateral approach in comparison with fluoroscopic guidance. Materials and Methods: Contrast agent injection was performed in 40 consecutive patients, 20 under sonographic guidance and 20 under fluoroscopic guidance. None of the patients had previous shoulder surgery. The procedure time was measured and the efficiency of joint distension, incidence of extravasation and intraarticular air on the consecutive MR arthrograms were assessed by three blinded radiologists with musculoskeletal radiology experience. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Intraarticular contrast injection was successfully accomplished in all 40 patients. Subsequent MR arthrograms did not show any significant difference between sonographic and fluoroscopic guidance with respect to diagnostic quality, joint distension (p = 0.6665), intraarticular air bubbles (p = 0.1567) and occurrence of contrast extravasation (p = 0.8565). The mean duration of ultrasound-guided injection was 7:30 min compared to a shorter procedure time of 4:15 min for fluoroscopic guidance. In both groups, no procedural complications were observed. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided injection for MR arthrography of the shoulder via an anterolateral approach represents a simple, safe, and effective technique which yields comparable results to those of injection under fluoroscopic guidance, but is slightly more time-consuming. (orig.)

  7. Indirect MR arthrography of the shoulder in detection of rotator cuff ruptures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagci, B.; Manisali, M.; Yilmaz, E.; Oezaksoy, D.; Kovanlikaya, I.; Oezkan, M.; Ekin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of indirect MR arthrography images obtained following intravenous contrast injection and conventional MR imaging in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Twenty-four patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease were examined. Conventional MR images and post-contrast indirect MR arthrography images were obtained. All images were evaluated in a blinded fashion by two musculoskeletal radiologist. Results were than analyzed depending on surgical output. The correlation coefficient (Spearman rank correlation test) and the kappa values for agreement between surgery and imaging techniques were calculated. The correlation coefficients between indirect MR arthrography and surgery for reader 1 and reader 2 were 0.9137 and 0.9773, respectively. Whereas the agreement between conventional MR imaging and surgery was moderate (κ=0.383-0.571), the agreement between indirect MR arthrography and surgery was excellent (κ=0.873-0.936). We suggest the use of indirect MR arthrography technique when conventional MR images are equivocal in diagnosis of rotator cuff disease. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of shoulder positions at MR arthrography: change of labroligamentous complex shape and diagnosis of labral tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Jin Young; Ha, Doo Hoe; Kim, Jeung Sook; Lee, Young Soo

    2001-01-01

    To compare the neutral, internal, and external rotation positions of the glenohumeral joint during magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography performed to assess changes in the shape of the labroligamentous complex (LLC) and in the labral tear. MR arthrography of the shoulder was retrospectively evaluated in 36 patients aged 14-66 (mean, 40) years. Fourteen cases were confirmed by arthroscopic surgery (7 SLAP lesions, 2 Bankart lesions, 1 both SLAP and Bankart lesions). Axial fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin-echo images were acquired with each shoulder in the neutral position, and with internal and external rotations. In each position, we measured the angle of rotation between the perpendicular line on the glenoid fossa and the long axis of the humeral head, analyzing the relationship between the rotational angle and changes in the shape of the LLC at each internal and external rotation, relative to the neutral position. In addition, labral tears in 14 arthroscopically confirmed joints were evaluated in each position. Mean angles of rotation relative to the neutral position were 44.1 and 45.3 degrees in internal and external rotation, respectively. Changes in the anterior LLC occurred in 25 and 24 cases of internal and external rotation, respectively. There was a significantly meaningful relationship between rotational angle and changes in the shape of the anterior LLC during external rotation, and when this changes was noticed, the rotational angle was wider (p<0.05). The posterior LLC changed in shape in 13 and 16 cases of internal and external rotation, respectively, but changes according to the angle of rotation were not statistically significant. In arthroscopically confirmed joints, diagnosis of the eight SLAP lesions at external rotation tended to become more accurate, but no statistically significant differences were noted (p=0.07). Two Bankart lesions were interpreted as a tear in all three positions, and one other such lesion was interpreted as a tear in the

  9. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Guermazi@aspetar.com [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Jomaah, Nabil [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Hayashi, Daichi [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Jarraya, Mohamed [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Silva, Jose Roberto [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, Jingbo [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); and others

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions.

  10. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Jomaah, Nabil; Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Silva, Jose Roberto; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions

  11. MR arthrography including abduction and external rotation images in the assessment of atraumatic multidirectional instability of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Chur (Switzerland); Waldt, Simone; Bauer, Jan S.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Schroeder, Michael [Center for Sports Orthopedics and Medicine, Orthosportiv, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, Andreas B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate diagnostic signs and measurements in the assessment of capsular redundancy in atraumatic multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder on MR arthrography (MR-A) including abduction/external rotation (ABER) images. Twenty-one MR-A including ABER position of 20 patients with clinically diagnosed MDI and 17 patients without instability were assessed by three radiologists. On ABER images, presence of a layer of contrast between the humeral head (HH) and the anteroinferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) (crescent sign) and a triangular-shaped space between the HH, AIGHL and glenoid (triangle sign) were evaluated; centring of the HH was measured. Anterosuperior herniation of the rotator interval (RI) capsule and glenoid version were determined on standard imaging planes. The crescent sign had a sensitivity of 57 %/62 %/48 % (observers 1/2/3) and specificity of 100 %/100 %/94 % in the diagnosis of MDI. The triangle sign had a sensitivity of 48 %/57 %/48 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/100 %. The combination of both signs had a sensitivity of 86 %/90 %/81 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/94 %. A positive triangle sign was significantly associated with decentring of the HH. Measurements of RI herniation, RI width and glenoid were not significantly different between both groups. Combined assessment of redundancy signs on ABER position MR-A allows for accurate differentiation between patients with atraumatic MDI and patients with clinically stable shoulders; measurements on standard imaging planes appear inappropriate. (orig.)

  12. MR arthrography: how I do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankaoglu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging has to rely on improving new various sequences and techniques and to get the best imaging quality so magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is one of the most important technique in the assessment of selected musculoskeletal disorders. It is now widely utilized and considered by most musculoskeletal radiologists and some orthopedists to be an integral part of their clinical practice. The technique include: desired degree of joint distension with contrast medium; markedly improved imaging quality of intra-articular structures with the direct delineation so improved detection of pathology with MRI. As appliance and technique of MR arthrography is completely based on traditional arthrography of X ray. In MR arthrography additional very little amount of Gadolinium based contrast agent is added to the desired mixture of contrast material injected to the joint. As in conventional radiography MR arthrography is used to get extra information for conventional MRI . Practically any joint that can be accessed by a needle can be imaged using MR arthrography but it has been applied to limited number of joints to compare with the traditional arthrography so shoulder, knee, wrist, elbow, ankle, and hip are mostly subjects to do in MR arthrography. The procedure is also less invasive and expensive rather than diagnostic arthroscopy and should carefully indicated because it is not completely noninvasive technique so previous imaging modalities and MRI of the patients should be completed and evaluated well. During or after the procedure there has been no major complication reported by so far but more than two third of patients are known to complain some degree of pain right after or several times later than the procedure. As it is more than twenty years now it has been widely accepted helpful for diagnosis and adds some extra sensitivity to conventional MRI . Up to this time MR arthrography has proven to increase sensitivity of conventional MRI in

  13. SLAP tears: diagnosis using 3-T shoulder MR arthrography with the 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo space sequence versus conventional 2D sequences

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    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Michael Yong [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Yeon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang-Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with three-dimensional (3D) isotropic intermediate-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) in the diagnosis of superior labrum anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) lesions compared with two-dimensional (2D) TSE at 3.0 T. MR arthrograms, including 2D TSE and 3D TSE-SPACE, in 87 patients who underwent arthroscopy were retrospectively analysed by two reviewers for the presence and type of SLAP lesions. Sensitivity and specificity were compared using McNemar's test, and inter-observer agreement was calculated using Cohen's kappa. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. The mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 90%, 85% and 86% for 2D TSE, and 81%, 86% and 85% for 3D TSE-SPACE respectively, with no statistically significant differences. Inter-observer agreements were substantial in 2D TSE ({kappa} = 0.76) and 3D TSE-SPACE ({kappa} = 0.68). The areas under the ROC curves were 0.92 for 2D TSE and 0.90 for 3D TSE-SPACE, which were not significantly different. MR arthrography with 3D TSE-SPACE showed comparable accuracy and substantial inter-observer agreement for the diagnosis of SLAP lesions circle MR arthrography is regarded as the definitive method of shoulder imaging circle Different MR sequences are evolving for SLAP lesions circle 3D TSE-SPACE demonstrated comparable overall accuracy to 2D TSE for SLAP lesions. (orig.)

  14. Supraspinatus tendon tears at 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography: diagnosis with 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo SPACE sequence versus 2D conventional sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Michael Y.; Lee, So-Yeon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang-Soo [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To assess the diagnostic performance of shoulder MR arthrography with 3D isotropic fat-suppressed (FS) turbo spin-echo sequence (TSE-SPACE) for supraspinatus tendon tears in comparison with 2D conventional sequences at 3.0 T. The study was HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board with a waiver of informed consent. Eighty-seven arthroscopically confirmed patients who underwent 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography with 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE were included in a consecutive fashion from March 2009 to February 2010. Two reviewers independently analyzed 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement ({kappa}) were compared between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE for full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together and for partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone. There were 33 full-thickness tears and 28 partial-thickness tears of supraspinatus tendons. For full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of both readers were 96, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 91, 84, and 89% on 3D TSE-SPACE. For partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 84, 85, and 84% on 3D TSE-SPACE. There was no statistical difference between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Interobserver agreements were almost perfect on 2D conventional sequences and substantial on 3D TSE-SPACE. Compared with 2D conventional sequences, MR arthrography using 3D TSE-SPACE was comparable for diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears despite limitations in detecting small partial-thickness tears and in discriminating between full-thickness and deep partial-thickness tears. (orig.)

  15. Supraspinatus tendon tears at 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography: diagnosis with 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo SPACE sequence versus 2D conventional sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Michael Y.; Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of shoulder MR arthrography with 3D isotropic fat-suppressed (FS) turbo spin-echo sequence (TSE-SPACE) for supraspinatus tendon tears in comparison with 2D conventional sequences at 3.0 T. The study was HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board with a waiver of informed consent. Eighty-seven arthroscopically confirmed patients who underwent 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography with 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE were included in a consecutive fashion from March 2009 to February 2010. Two reviewers independently analyzed 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement (κ) were compared between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE for full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together and for partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone. There were 33 full-thickness tears and 28 partial-thickness tears of supraspinatus tendons. For full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of both readers were 96, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 91, 84, and 89% on 3D TSE-SPACE. For partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 84, 85, and 84% on 3D TSE-SPACE. There was no statistical difference between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Interobserver agreements were almost perfect on 2D conventional sequences and substantial on 3D TSE-SPACE. Compared with 2D conventional sequences, MR arthrography using 3D TSE-SPACE was comparable for diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears despite limitations in detecting small partial-thickness tears and in discriminating between full-thickness and deep partial-thickness tears. (orig.)

  16. Frequency of glenoid chondral lesions on MR arthrography in patients with anterior shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Brien, J.; Grebenyuk, J.; Leith, J.; Forster, B.B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of glenoid chondral abnormalities in relation to Hill Sachs (HS) lesions in MR arthrograms of patients with anterior shoulder instability versus controls. Such glenoid lesions can directly impact surgical decision-making and approach, and potentially negatively impact outcome if missed. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of direct MR shoulder arthrograms in 165 subjects, (101 with anterior instability/64 controls) was performed independently by 2 blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Outcome measures were the presence of a HS, anterior labral pathology and glenoid chondral injury. Kappa statistic, Pearson Chi-square and Mann–Whitney analysis were employed for analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for the presence of HS, labral and chondral lesions was 0.964, 0.965 and 0.858 respectively, with intra-observer variability of 1.0, 0.985 and 0.861 for the principle reader. 58% of patients and 8% of controls had HS (p < 0.001). 72% of patients and 25% of controls had anterior labral injury (p < 0.001). 36% of instability patients and 10% controls had glenoid chondral lesions (p < 0.001). 46% of anterior instability patients with HS defects had chondral injury as opposed to 21% of patients without HS defects (p = 0.009). Depth of the HS lesion did not increase the likelihood of a glenoid chondral lesion (p = 0.7335). Conclusion: In the clinical anterior instability cohort, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher number of HS and glenoid chondral lesions than in controls. In anterior instability patients, the presence of a HS lesion confers a statistically significant greater likelihood of having a glenoid chondral lesion when compared to patients with instability and no HS.

  17. Frequency of glenoid chondral lesions on MR arthrography in patients with anterior shoulder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J., E-mail: juliemobrien@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada); Grebenyuk, J., E-mail: julia.grebenyuk@utoronto.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada); Leith, J., E-mail: jleith@shaw.ca [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada); Forster, B.B., E-mail: Bruce.Forster@vch.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2B5 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of glenoid chondral abnormalities in relation to Hill Sachs (HS) lesions in MR arthrograms of patients with anterior shoulder instability versus controls. Such glenoid lesions can directly impact surgical decision-making and approach, and potentially negatively impact outcome if missed. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of direct MR shoulder arthrograms in 165 subjects, (101 with anterior instability/64 controls) was performed independently by 2 blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Outcome measures were the presence of a HS, anterior labral pathology and glenoid chondral injury. Kappa statistic, Pearson Chi-square and Mann-Whitney analysis were employed for analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for the presence of HS, labral and chondral lesions was 0.964, 0.965 and 0.858 respectively, with intra-observer variability of 1.0, 0.985 and 0.861 for the principle reader. 58% of patients and 8% of controls had HS (p < 0.001). 72% of patients and 25% of controls had anterior labral injury (p < 0.001). 36% of instability patients and 10% controls had glenoid chondral lesions (p < 0.001). 46% of anterior instability patients with HS defects had chondral injury as opposed to 21% of patients without HS defects (p = 0.009). Depth of the HS lesion did not increase the likelihood of a glenoid chondral lesion (p = 0.7335). Conclusion: In the clinical anterior instability cohort, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher number of HS and glenoid chondral lesions than in controls. In anterior instability patients, the presence of a HS lesion confers a statistically significant greater likelihood of having a glenoid chondral lesion when compared to patients with instability and no HS.

  18. Ultrasound-guided intraarticular injection for MR arthrography of the shoulder; Ultraschallgesteuerte intraartikulaere Kontrastmittelapplikation fuer die MR-Arthrografie der Schulter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Bruegel, M.; Waldt, S.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ultrasound guidance for intraarticular contrast injection via an anterolateral approach in comparison with fluoroscopic guidance. Materials and Methods: Contrast agent injection was performed in 40 consecutive patients, 20 under sonographic guidance and 20 under fluoroscopic guidance. None of the patients had previous shoulder surgery. The procedure time was measured and the efficiency of joint distension, incidence of extravasation and intraarticular air on the consecutive MR arthrograms were assessed by three blinded radiologists with musculoskeletal radiology experience. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Intraarticular contrast injection was successfully accomplished in all 40 patients. Subsequent MR arthrograms did not show any significant difference between sonographic and fluoroscopic guidance with respect to diagnostic quality, joint distension (p = 0.6665), intraarticular air bubbles (p = 0.1567) and occurrence of contrast extravasation (p = 0.8565). The mean duration of ultrasound-guided injection was 7:30 min compared to a shorter procedure time of 4:15 min for fluoroscopic guidance. In both groups, no procedural complications were observed. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided injection for MR arthrography of the shoulder via an anterolateral approach represents a simple, safe, and effective technique which yields comparable results to those of injection under fluoroscopic guidance, but is slightly more time-consuming. (orig.)

  19. Shoulder MR arthrography of the posterior labrocapsular complex in overhead throwers with pathologic internal impingement and internal rotation deficit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, Michael J; Petersen, Brian D; Wise, Steven M [University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Fine, Jason P [University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Department of Biostatistics, Madison, WI (United States); Kaplan, Lee D; Orwin, John F [University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Madison, WI (United States)

    2007-06-15

    To determine if overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit have thickening of the posterior inferior labrocapsular complex on MR arthrogram images. This study was approved and a waiver of consent granted by our institutional review board. Twenty-six overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit, and 26 controls who had undergone MR arthrograms, were retrospectively examined. The MR studies were combined and read in a blind fashion. On an axial image through the posteroinferior glenoid rim, the readers measured the labral length, capsule-labrum length, and the posterior recess angle. A t-test was used to determine statistical significance. The mean labral length was 4.9 mm [standard deviation (SD) 1.4 mm] for the controls, and 6.4 mm (SD 1.6 mm) for the athletes (P = 0.001). The mean capsule-labrum length was 5.4 mm (SD 2.1 mm) for the controls, and 8.8 mm (SD 2.9 mm) for the athletes (P < 0.001). The mean posterior recess angle measured 65 (SD 27 ) for the controls and 94 (SD 38 ) for the athletes (P = 0.002). Overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit tend to have a thicker labrum and a shallower capsular recess in the posterior inferior shoulder joint than do non-overhead-throwing athletes. In many, the posteroinferior capsule is also thickened. These MR findings should alert the radiologist to closely inspect the posterior cuff and posterosuperior labrum for the tears associated with internal impingement. (orig.)

  20. Shoulder MR arthrography of the posterior labrocapsular complex in overhead throwers with pathologic internal impingement and internal rotation deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, Michael J.; Petersen, Brian D.; Wise, Steven M.; Fine, Jason P.; Kaplan, Lee D.; Orwin, John F.

    2007-01-01

    To determine if overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit have thickening of the posterior inferior labrocapsular complex on MR arthrogram images. This study was approved and a waiver of consent granted by our institutional review board. Twenty-six overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit, and 26 controls who had undergone MR arthrograms, were retrospectively examined. The MR studies were combined and read in a blind fashion. On an axial image through the posteroinferior glenoid rim, the readers measured the labral length, capsule-labrum length, and the posterior recess angle. A t-test was used to determine statistical significance. The mean labral length was 4.9 mm [standard deviation (SD) 1.4 mm] for the controls, and 6.4 mm (SD 1.6 mm) for the athletes (P = 0.001). The mean capsule-labrum length was 5.4 mm (SD 2.1 mm) for the controls, and 8.8 mm (SD 2.9 mm) for the athletes (P < 0.001). The mean posterior recess angle measured 65 (SD 27 ) for the controls and 94 (SD 38 ) for the athletes (P = 0.002). Overhead-throwing athletes with internal impingement pain and internal rotation deficit tend to have a thicker labrum and a shallower capsular recess in the posterior inferior shoulder joint than do non-overhead-throwing athletes. In many, the posteroinferior capsule is also thickened. These MR findings should alert the radiologist to closely inspect the posterior cuff and posterosuperior labrum for the tears associated with internal impingement. (orig.)

  1. Feasibility of ultrasonography and MR arthrography during evaluation of rotator cuff injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jin Guang; Lee, Jong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of MR arthrography and ultrasonography in evaluating shoulder pain. The subject group consisted of all patients who visited our institute complaining of shoulder pain or instability form June 2002 to December 2004. There were a total of 92 patients with an mean age of 48. On the basis of arthroscopic results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ultrasonography and MR arthrography were evaluated by comparing them with each other. In the diagnosis of separateness tendon tears, ultrasonography had sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 64%, respectively, whereas MR arthrography had sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 94%, respectively. Ultrasonography also had high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of subscapularis tendon tears (100% and 90%). MR arthrography was appropriate for identifying glenoid labral abnormalities (sensitivity, 95% and specificity, 61%). Similar results from ultrasonography and MR arthrography were obtained in the diagnosis of subscapular tendon tears or full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendons (kappa value, 0.644 and 0.911). While evaluating rotator cuff abnormalities, ultrasonography was appropriate for screening, whereas MR arthrography was useful to confirm the results of the ultrasonography

  2. MR arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.; Engel, A. Jr.; Stiglbauer, R. Jr.; Prayer, L. Jr.; Hajek, P. Jr.; Imhof, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the diagnostic value of MR arthrography in the assessment of cartilaginous lesions, including osteochondritis dissecans. One hundred thirty-two knees of 125 patients were examined with MR arthrography performed on a 1.5-T magnet with a knee resonator. T1-weighted spin-echo and T2*-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequences were obtained after intraarticular administration of 40 mL of 2-mmol GD-DTPA solution. Seventy-five patients were also imaged without contrast agent. The description of the articular surface was classified into four types: I, normal cartilage surface and thickness; II, surface normal or slightly irregular; III, severe surface irregularities and cartilage defects; and IV, extensive cartilage defects, scar formation. MR findings were correlated with those of arthroscopy/arthrotomy (n = 75)

  3. MR arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J. Jr.; Engel, A. Jr.; Stiglbauer, R.; Prayer, L. Jr.; Hajek, P. Jr.; Imhof, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on MR imaging which has gained increasing importance as a diagnostic instrument in orthopedics. The key to joint diagnostics - the evaluation of hyaline articular cartilage - however, has not been touched sufficiently by this development. Fundamental studies were done and 140 patients were examined with MR imaging after intraarticular administration of contrast agent. Hyaline cartilage, cruciate ligaments, and menisci were assessed before and after injection of a 2-mmol/L Gd-DTPA solution, and the results were compared with those of arthroscopy/arthrotomy. MR arthrography provided superior image quality compared with plain MR imaging. This resulted in an improved delineation of intraarticular structures, especially of cartilage defects

  4. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Guelden; Demirtas, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established

  5. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Guelden [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: gsahin@medicine.ankara.edu.tr; Demirtas, Mehmet [Department of Hand Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established.

  6. Technical errors in MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, Juerg

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses potential technical problems of MR arthrography. It starts with contraindications, followed by problems relating to injection technique, contrast material and MR imaging technique. For some of the aspects discussed, there is only little published evidence. Therefore, the article is based on the personal experience of the author and on local standards of procedures. Such standards, as well as medico-legal considerations, may vary from country to country. Contraindications for MR arthrography include pre-existing infection, reflex sympathetic dystrophy and possibly bleeding disorders, avascular necrosis and known allergy to contrast media. Errors in injection technique may lead to extra-articular collection of contrast agent or to contrast agent leaking from the joint space, which may cause diagnostic difficulties. Incorrect concentrations of contrast material influence image quality and may also lead to non-diagnostic examinations. Errors relating to MR imaging include delays between injection and imaging and inadequate choice of sequences. Potential solutions to the various possible errors are presented. (orig.)

  7. Technical errors in MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, Juerg [Orthopaedic University Hospital of Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-01-15

    This article discusses potential technical problems of MR arthrography. It starts with contraindications, followed by problems relating to injection technique, contrast material and MR imaging technique. For some of the aspects discussed, there is only little published evidence. Therefore, the article is based on the personal experience of the author and on local standards of procedures. Such standards, as well as medico-legal considerations, may vary from country to country. Contraindications for MR arthrography include pre-existing infection, reflex sympathetic dystrophy and possibly bleeding disorders, avascular necrosis and known allergy to contrast media. Errors in injection technique may lead to extra-articular collection of contrast agent or to contrast agent leaking from the joint space, which may cause diagnostic difficulties. Incorrect concentrations of contrast material influence image quality and may also lead to non-diagnostic examinations. Errors relating to MR imaging include delays between injection and imaging and inadequate choice of sequences. Potential solutions to the various possible errors are presented. (orig.)

  8. MR arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Rand, T.; Breitenseher, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Schick, S.; Imhof, H.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  9. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Francesco S.; Governi, Simone; Burresi, Francesca; Vigni, Francesco; Stefani, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears. Surgical findings were used as the gold standard in detecting tears. A total of 44 patients were assessed with transverse and longitudinal US scans with respect to the long axis of the rotator cuff tendons and then examined with MR arthrography. This technique involved free-hand injection of contrast medium into the shoulder joint. At surgery 20 incomplete and 24 complete tears were observed. Ultrasound offered good results for the large tears, but its sensitivity decreased proportionally with the size of the tears. Magnetic resonance arthrography correctly diagnosed 43 tears, whereas only one false-negative diagnosis of tendinosis was made for a partial tear on the bursal side. Since it improves the diagnosis of small tears, MR arthrography must be performed on all patients for whom surgical repair is necessary in order to restore normal functions. (orig.)

  10. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Francesco S.; Governi, Simone; Burresi, Francesca; Vigni, Francesco; Stefani, Paolo [Department of Radiologic and Orthopaedic-Rehabilitative Sciences, University Hospital Siena (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears. Surgical findings were used as the gold standard in detecting tears. A total of 44 patients were assessed with transverse and longitudinal US scans with respect to the long axis of the rotator cuff tendons and then examined with MR arthrography. This technique involved free-hand injection of contrast medium into the shoulder joint. At surgery 20 incomplete and 24 complete tears were observed. Ultrasound offered good results for the large tears, but its sensitivity decreased proportionally with the size of the tears. Magnetic resonance arthrography correctly diagnosed 43 tears, whereas only one false-negative diagnosis of tendinosis was made for a partial tear on the bursal side. Since it improves the diagnosis of small tears, MR arthrography must be performed on all patients for whom surgical repair is necessary in order to restore normal functions. (orig.)

  11. Comparison between 3D isotropic and 2D conventional MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tear and labral lesions: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Yun, Seong Jong; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2018-03-30

    Although 3D-isotropic MR arthrography has been characterized as a substitute imaging tool for rotator cuff tear (RCT) and labral lesions, it has not been commonly used in clinical practice because of controversy related to image blurring and indistinctness of structural edges. To perform a comparison of the diagnostic performance of 3D-isotropic MR arthrography and 2D-conventional MR arthrography for diagnosis of RCT (solely RCT, full/partial-thickness supraspinatus [SST]-infraspinatus [IST] tear, or subscapularis [SSc] tear) and labral lesions. Meta-analysis. Patients with shoulder pain. 3D-isotropic and 2D-conventional MR arthrography at 3.0T or 1.5T. PubMed and EMBASE were searched following the PRISMA guidelines. Bivariate modeling and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic modeling were performed to compare the overall diagnostic performance of 3D-isotropic and 2D-conventional MR arthrography. Multiple-subgroup analyses were performed for diagnosing RCT, full/partial-thickness SST-IST tear, SSc tear, and labral lesions. Meta-regression analyses were performed according to subject, study, and MR arthrography characteristics including 3D-isotropic sequences (turbo spine echo [TSE] vs. gradient echo [GRE]). Eleven studies (825 patients) were included. Overall, 3D-isotropic MR arthrography had similar pooled sensitivity (0.90 [95% CI, 0.87-0.93]) (P = 0.95) and specificity (0.92 [95% CI, 0.87-0.95]) (P = 0.99), relative to 2D-conventional MR arthrography (sensitivity, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.86-0.94]); specificity, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.87-0.95]). Multiple-subgroup analyses showed that sensitivities (P = 0.13-0.91) and specificities (P = 0.26-0.99) on 3D-isotropic MR arthrography for diagnosing RCT, full/partial-thickness SST-IST tear, SSC tear, and labral lesions were not significantly different from 2D-conventional MR arthrography. On meta-regression analysis, 3D-TSE sequence demonstrated higher sensitivity (P 3D-GRE for RCT and labral

  12. Indirect MR arthrography in the evaluation of tears of the glenoid labrum; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie in der Diagnostik von Laesionen des Labrum glenoidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Vahlensieck, M.; Lutterbey, G.; Pauleit, D.; Kreft, B.; Keller, E.; Schild, H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Wallny, T. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Steuer, K.; Golombek, V. [Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that intravenous administration of contrast media produces an MR arthrographic effect without the need for intraarticular injection. This is the first study evaluating this new technique of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of glenoid labrum tears. Methods: 28 patients with clinically suspected labral injuries were prospectively investigated (1.5 Tesla, flexible surface coil). A plain MR examination of the shoulder (transverse and oblique-coronal orientation, T{sub 1}-weighted spin- [T{sub E}/T{sub R} 15/675], proton density- and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient echo [T{sub E}/T{sub R}/Flip 14,32/600/30 ] sequences) and indirect MR arthrography (transverse and oblique-coronal orientation, fat-suppressed T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo sequences [T{sub E}/T{sub R} 15/675], intravenous injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine [0.1 mmol/kg], followed by 10-15 min of joint movement) were performed. Results were confirmed by arthroscopy and/or open surgery. Results: Indirect MR arthrography significantly improved delineation of the glenoid labrum and hyaline cartilage (p<0.05). Sensitivity and specificity of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of labral injuries were 90% and 89%, compared to 79% and 67% of the native MR examination. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is a promising non-invasive technique in the evaluation of the glenoid labrum. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: In frueheren Studien wurde gezeigt, dass die intravenoese Injektion gadoliniumhaltiger Kontrastmittel zur Signalintensitaetssteigerung im Gelenkkavum fuehrt. In dieser Studie wurde erstmals diese Technik der indirekten MR-Arthrographie am Schultergelenk in der Diagnostik von Labrumlaesionen evaluiert. Methode: 28 Patienten mit klinischem Verdacht auf eine Verletzung des Labrum glenoidale und/oder der Rotatorenmanschette wurden prospektiv nach folgendem Protokoll an einem 1,5-Tesla-System mit einer Oberflaechen-Ringspule untersucht: 1. Native MR-Standard-Untersuchung mit

  13. MR arthrography: Basics, technique, and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, P.C.; Engel, A.; Kramer, J.; Imhof, H.

    1988-01-01

    Following evidence that intraarticular Gd-DTPA does not induce synovitis and is not stored in normal or chondropathic joint cartilage, the authors injected various concentrations of Gd-DTPA into 40 cadaveric and 40 in vivo knees. All in vivo knees underwent total prosthetic knee replacement, followed by a histologic workup. Results showed that MR arthrography greatly enhances the visibility of normal and pathologic structures and is a safe procedure. Moreover, MR arthrography seems to allow correct assessment and staging of various types of chondropathies

  14. Fast MR arthrography using VIBE sequences to evaluate the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, Jan E. [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Mahachie John, Jestinah M. [University of Hasselt, Centre for Statistics, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Gelin, Geert [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if short volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences can be used as a substitute for T1-weighted with fat saturation (T1-FS) sequences when performing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. Eighty-two patients underwent direct MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE (acquisition time of 13 s) and T1-FS (acquisition time of 5 min) sequences in the axial and paracoronal plane on a 1.0-T MR unit. Two radiologists scored rotator cuff tendons on VIBE and T1-FS images separately as normal, small/large partial thickness and full thickness tears with or without geyser sign. T1-FS sequences were considered the gold standard. Surgical correlation was available in a small sample. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of VIBE were greater than 92% for large articular-sided partial thickness and full thickness tears. For detecting fraying and articular-sided small partial thickness tears, these parameters were 55%, 94%, 94%, and 57%, respectively. The simple kappa value was 0.76, and the weighted kappa value was 0.86 for agreement between T1-FS and VIBE scores. All large partial and full thickness tears at surgery were correctly diagnosed using VIBE or T1-FS MR images. Fast MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE sequences showed good concordance with the classically used T1-FS sequences for the appearance of the rotator cuff, in particular for large articular-sided partial thickness tears and for full thickness tears. Due to its very short acquisition time, VIBE may be especially useful when performing MR arthrography in claustrophobic patients or patients with a painful shoulder. (orig.)

  15. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Han, Tae Il; Lee, Kwang Won; Choi, Youn Seon; Kim, Dae Hong; Han, Hyun Young; Song, Mun Kab; Kwon, Soon Tae

    2001-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a clinical syndrome involving pain and decreased joint motion caused by thickening and contraction of the joint capsule. The purpose of this study is to describe the MR arthrographic findings of this syndrome. Twenty-nine sets of MR arthrographic images were included in the study. Fourteen patients had adhesive capsulitis diagnosed by physical examination and arthrography, and their MR arthrographic findings were compared with those of 15 subjects in the control group. The images were retrospectively reviewed with specific attention to the thickness of the joint capsule, volume of the axillary pouch (length, width, height(depth)), thinkness of the coracohumeral ligament, presence of extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrst filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Mean capsular thickness measured at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch was 4.1 mm in patients with adhesive capsulitis and 1.5 mm in the control group. The mean width of the axillary pouch was 2.5 mm in patients and 9.5 mm in controls. In patients, the capsule was significantly thicker and the axillary pouch significantly narrower than in controls (p<0.05). Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch (sensitivity 93%, specificity 80%) and a pouch narrower than 3.5 mm (sensitivity 93%, specificity 100%) were useful criteria for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. In patients with this condition, extra-articular contrast extravasation was noted in six patients (43%) and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa in three (21%). The MR arthrographic findings of adhesive capsulitis are capsular thickening, a low-volume axillary pouch, extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch and a pouch width of less than 3.5 mm are useful diagnostic imaging characteristics

  16. Diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jee, Sukkyung

    2015-06-01

    Indirect magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is a non-invasive method for shoulder imaging. However, there are no studies that have examined the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears in a large patient population. To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect fast spin-echo (FSE) MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears at 3.0 T. A total of 149 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery were enrolled in this retrospective study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated images from each patient for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) or subscapularis (SSC) tendon tears. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the overall diagnostic performance and detection rates for SSP-ISP and SSC tendon tears were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of readers I and II for the diagnosis of SSP-ISP tendon tears were 94% and 95%, 89% and 85%, and 93% and 93%, respectively. The sensitivity of imaging for detection of SSP-ISP tendon tears by readers I and II were 100% and 100% for full-thickness tears and 84% and 86% for partial-thickness tears, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of readers I and II for the diagnosis of SSC tendon tears were 80% and 76%, 89% and 93%, and 85% and 85%, respectively. Indirect MR arthrography is useful for the detection of SSP-ISP and SSC tendon tears. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Comparison of three dimensional isotropic and two dimensional conventional indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoo, Jae Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jee, Suk Kyoung [Joeun Madi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears.

  18. Comparison of three dimensional isotropic and two dimensional conventional indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoo, Jae Chul; Cha, Jang Kyu; Jee, Suk Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears.

  19. [Technique and value of direct MR arthrography applying articular distraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becce, Fabio; Wettstein, Michael; Guntern, Daniel; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Palhais, Nuno; Theumann, Nicolas

    2010-02-24

    Direct MR arthrography has a better diagnostic accuracy than MR imaging alone. However, contrast material is not always homogeneously distributed in the articular space. Lesions of cartilage surfaces or intra-articular soft tissues can thus be misdiagnosed. Concomitant application of axial traction during MR arthrography leads to articular distraction. This enables better distribution of contrast material in the joint and better delineation of intra-articular structures. Therefore, this technique improves detection of cartilage lesions. Moreover, the axial stress applied on articular structures may reveal lesions invisible on MR images without traction. Based on our clinical experience, we believe that this relatively unknown technique is promising and should be further developed.

  20. Inter- and intraobserver variability of MR arthrography in the detection and classification of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions: evaluation in 78 cases with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, Konstantin; Waldt, Simone; Bruegel, Melanie; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Paul, Jochen; Imhoff, Andreas B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Sports Orthopedics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Heinrich, Petra [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine inter- and intraobserver variability of MR arthrography of the shoulder in the detection and classification of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions. MR arthrograms of 78 patients who underwent MR arthrography before arthroscopy were retrospectively analysed by three blinded readers for the presence and type of SLAP lesions. MR arthrograms were reviewed twice by each reader with a time interval of 4 months between the two readings. Inter- and intraobserver agreement for detection and classification of SLAP lesions were calculated using {kappa} coefficients. Arthroscopy confirmed 48 SLAP lesions: type I (n = 4), type II (n = 37), type III (n = 3), type IV (n = 4). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting SLAP lesions with MR arthrography for each reader were 88.6%/93.3%, 90.9%/80.0% and 86.4%/76.7%. MR arthrographic and arthroscopic grading were concurrent for 72.7%, 68.2% and 70.5% of SLAP lesions for readers 1-3, respectively. Interobserver agreement was excellent ({kappa} = 0.82) for detection and substantial ({kappa} = 0.63) for classification of SLAP lesions. For each reader intraobserver agreement was excellent for detection ({kappa} = 0.93, {kappa} = 0.97, {kappa} = 0.97) and classification ({kappa} = 0.94, {kappa} = 0.84, {kappa} = 0.93) of SLAP lesions. MR arthrography allows reliable and accurate detection of SLAP lesions. In addition, SLAP lesions can be diagnosed and classified with substantial to excellent inter- and intraobserver agreement. (orig.)

  1. Inter- and intraobserver variability of MR arthrography in the detection and classification of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions: evaluation in 78 cases with arthroscopic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzapfel, Konstantin; Waldt, Simone; Bruegel, Melanie; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Paul, Jochen; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Heinrich, Petra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine inter- and intraobserver variability of MR arthrography of the shoulder in the detection and classification of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions. MR arthrograms of 78 patients who underwent MR arthrography before arthroscopy were retrospectively analysed by three blinded readers for the presence and type of SLAP lesions. MR arthrograms were reviewed twice by each reader with a time interval of 4 months between the two readings. Inter- and intraobserver agreement for detection and classification of SLAP lesions were calculated using κ coefficients. Arthroscopy confirmed 48 SLAP lesions: type I (n = 4), type II (n = 37), type III (n = 3), type IV (n = 4). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting SLAP lesions with MR arthrography for each reader were 88.6%/93.3%, 90.9%/80.0% and 86.4%/76.7%. MR arthrographic and arthroscopic grading were concurrent for 72.7%, 68.2% and 70.5% of SLAP lesions for readers 1-3, respectively. Interobserver agreement was excellent (κ = 0.82) for detection and substantial (κ = 0.63) for classification of SLAP lesions. For each reader intraobserver agreement was excellent for detection (κ = 0.93, κ = 0.97, κ = 0.97) and classification (κ = 0.94, κ = 0.84, κ = 0.93) of SLAP lesions. MR arthrography allows reliable and accurate detection of SLAP lesions. In addition, SLAP lesions can be diagnosed and classified with substantial to excellent inter- and intraobserver agreement. (orig.)

  2. MR arthrography: pharmacology, efficacy and safety in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Gebhard, M.; Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Fischer, W.; Zentner, J.; Bohndorf, K.; Wegener, R.; Balzer, T.

    2003-01-01

    A meta-analysis was carried out of clinical trials published between 1987 and 2001 in respect of the clinical pharmacology and safety as well as the diagnostic efficacy of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) for direct intra-articular injection before MRI examination.Design. Scientific papers (clinical, postmortem and experimental studies) and information from the manufacturer regarding intra-articular injection of Gd-DTPA that addressed questions of mode of action, optimal concentration and dose, elimination and safety were reviewed. Clinical studies were classified according to their study design. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR arthrography (MRA) were compared with a ''gold standard'' (arthroscopy, arthrotomy) and other radiological evidence for different joints.Results. Fifty-two clinical studies of the overall 112 studies addressed aspects of diagnostic efficacy of MRA in patients or in healthy volunteers. The shoulder was the most assessed joint (29 of 52 studies). Good (>80%) or even excellent (90-100%) sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were found for MRA in most indications, especially for the shoulder and knee joints and induced extension of rotator cuff lesions, labrum abnormalities and postoperative meniscal tears. Two millimoles per liter has proven to be the best concentration for intra-articular administration of Gd-DTPA. After passive complete diffusion from the joint within 6-24 h, complete and rapid renal elimination takes place after intra-articular injection. Local safety proved to be excellent after intra-articular administration of Gd-DTPA. Regarding systemic tolerance almost no side effects have been reported, but the same safety considerations apply for intra-articular administration of Gd-DTPA as for intravenous injection.Conclusions. The diagnostic efficacy of intra-articular MRA in most clinical conditions affecting major joints is greater than that of plain MRI. In some diagnostic problems MRA achieves almost the same

  3. Comparison between conventional MR arthrograhphy and abduction and external rotation MR arthrography in revealing tears of the antero-inferior glenoid labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Ah; Suh, Sang Il; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung Gyu; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Chang Hee

    2001-01-01

    To compare, in terms of their demonstration of tears of the anterior glenoid labrum, oblique axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's shoulder in the abduction and external rotation (ABER) position, with conventional axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's arm in the neutral position. MR arthrography of the shoulder, including additional oblique axial sequences with the patient in the ABER position, was performed in 30 patients with a clinical history of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. The degree of anterior glenoid labral tear or defect was evaluated in both the conventional axial and the ABER position by two radiologists. Decisions were reached by consensus, and a three-point scale was used: grade 1=normal; grade 2=probable tear, diagnosed when subtle increased signal intensity in the labrum was apparent; grade 3=definite tear/defect, when a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim or deficient labrum was present. The scores for each imaging sequence were averaged and to compare conventional axial and ABER position scans, Student's t test was performed. In 21 (70%) of 30 patients, the same degree of anterior instability was revealed by both imaging sequences. Eight (27%) had a lower grade in the axial position than in the ABER position, while one (3%) had a higher grade in the axial position. Three whose axial scan was grade 1 showed only equivocal evidence of tearing, but their ABER-position scan, in which a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim was present, was grade 3. The average grade was 2.5 (SD=0.73) for axial scans and 2.8 (SD=0.46) for the ABER position. The difference between axial and ABER-position scans was statistically significant (p<0.05). MR arthrography with the patient's shoulder in the ABER position is more efficient than conventional axial scanning in revealing the degree of tear or defect of the anterior glenoid labrum. When equivocal features are seen at

  4. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A.; Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der; Willems, W.J.; Bipat, Shandra

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  5. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willems, W.J. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Orthopaedic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra [University of Amsterdam (NL). Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  6. Paralabral cysts in the hip joint: findings at MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerkurth, Olaf; Jacobson, Jon A.; Girish, Gandikota; Kalume Brigido, Monica; Fessell, David; Bedi, Asheesh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to retrospectively characterize paralabral cysts of the hip as seen at MR arthrography. After Institutional Review Board approval, 704 patients who had MR arthrography were identified over a 3-year period and 40 patients were identified as having a cyst or fluid collection at the hip by MR report. MR images from these 40 patients were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists where 18 were found to have a paralabral cyst, which were characterized as follows: location, configuration, contrast filling, size of the cyst, extent, direction, and whether associated osseous changes were present. In addition, the acetabular labrum was assessed for tears and, if present, the location and pattern were characterized. Paralabral cysts were located anterosuperiorly in 56%, anteriorly in 22%, posterosuperiorly in 17%, and anteroinferiorly in 6% of cases. The vast majority (94%) were multilocular and filled with intra-articular contrast medium. The average dimensions were 8 x 7 x 11 mm. The paralabral cyst demonstrated extracapsular extension in 72% of cases, with 39% located between the ilium and gluteus minimus, and 22% between the ilium and iliopsoas. Remodeling of the ilium adjacent to the cyst was observed in 50% of these cases. A labral tear was at the base of the labrum adjacent to the cyst in 78% of cases, while the tear was isolated to the body of the labrum in 22%. Tears were most commonly anterosuperior (55%) or anterior (28%) in location. Our results show that paralabral cysts of the hip are most commonly located anterosuperiorly, are multilocular, fill with intra-articular contrast medium, have average dimensions up to 11 mm, and often extend extracapsularly between muscle and bone where they may remodel the adjacent ilium. (orig.)

  7. Comparison between evaluations of the glenoid concavity by double oblique axial MR arthrography and clinical results in arthroscopic bankart repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shugo; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki; Tsuda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Toh, Satoshi; Sasaki, Taisuke

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings obtained in the glenoid concavity by double oblique axial MR arthrography (DOA-MRA) and the clinical outcome after arthroscopic Bankart repair. The results in 57 shoulders of 50 patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair were reviewed. The pre and postoperative lesions in the inferior glenohumeral ligament labrum complex (IGHLLC) were classified into 5 morphological types based on the DOA-MRA findings prominent (P), split (S), flat (F), detached (D), and capsular tear (C). The height and slope of the anterior labrum from the glenoid fossa were measured on the DOA-MRA images. The Japan Shoulder Society Shoulder Instability Score (JSS-SIS) system was used to evaluate the affected shoulder of all of the patients after surgery. There were no significant differences between the JSS-SISs of the shoulders in the P group, F group, and S+D group (recurrent Bankart lesion) 6 months postoperatively. There were significant increases in the slope and height of all of the shoulders as a whole between the preoperative period and 3 months postoperatively, but there were no statistically significant differences in the slope or height between 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. The initial capsulolabral buttress property was maintained at 6 months after arthroscopic Bankart repair, and there was no correlation between the morphology of the IGHLLC and the JSS-SISs. (author)

  8. Articular cartilage and labral lesions of the glenohumeral joint: diagnostic performance of 3D water-excitation true FISP MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Tobias Johannes [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Muensterlingen, Department of Radiology, PO Box 8596, Muensterlingen (Switzerland); Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Hodler, Juerg [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Fucentese, Sandro F. [Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopedic University, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the detection of articular cartilage and labral lesions of the glenohumeral joint using a transverse 3D water-excitation true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence. Seventy-five shoulders were included retrospectively. Shoulder arthroscopy was performed within 6 months of MR arthrography. MR images were evaluated separately by two radiologists. They were blinded to clinical and arthroscopic information. Arthroscopy served as the reference standard. For the detection of humeral cartilage lesions, sensitivities and specificities were 86% (12/14)/89% (50/56) for observer 1 and 93%/86% for observer 2) for the transverse true FISP sequence and 64%/86% (50%/82% for observer 2) for the coronal intermediate-weighted spin-echo images. The corresponding values for the glenoidal cartilage were 60% (6/10)/88% (51/58) (80%/76% for observer 2) and 70%/86% (60%/74% for observer 2) respectively. For the detection of abnormalities of the anterior labrum (only assessed on true FISP images) the values were 94% (15/16)/84% (36/43) (88%/79% for observer 2). The corresponding values for the posterior labrum were 67% (8/12)/77% (36/47) (observer 2: 25%/74%). The kappa values for the grading of the humeral and glenoidal cartilage lesions were 0.81 and 0.55 for true FISP images compared with 0.49 and 0.43 for intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo images. Kappa values for true FISP evaluation of the anterior and posterior part of the labrum were 0.81 and 0.70. Transverse 3D true FISP MR arthrography images are useful for the difficult diagnosis of glenohumeral cartilage lesions and suitable for detecting labral abnormalities. (orig.)

  9. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Sam Soo; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Oh, Yu-Whan; Jeong, Woong-Kyo; Kim, Baek Hyun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small ( 3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  10. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kangwon-do (Korea); Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kangwon-do (Korea); Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Oh, Yu-Whan [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jeong, Woong-Kyo [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Baek Hyun [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan City (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small (<1 cm), medium (1-3 cm), and large (>3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  11. Cartilage lesions in the ankle joint: comparison of MR arthrography and CT arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, M.R.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A.; Hodler, J.; Zanetti, M.; Vienne, P.

    2003-01-01

    To compare MR arthrography and CT arthrography for the evaluation of cartilage lesions in the ankle joint.Design and patients Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinically suspected cartilage lesions were prospectively included in the study. A 1:1 mixture of diluted gadoteridol (4 mmol/l) and iopamidol (300 mg iodine/ml) was injected. The articular cartilages of the talus, tibia, and fibula were analyzed separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists. A review panel consisting of two musculoskeletal radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon represented the standard of reference. For reader 1 accuracy of MR arthrography in the talus/tibia/fibula (88%/88%/94%) was slightly inferior to CT arthrography (90%/94%/92%). For reader 2, the accuracy was 76%/78%/83% for MR arthrography, and 92%/93%/92% for CT arthrography, respectively. Interobserver agreement for MR arthrography was 79%/74%/89% (kappa 0.47/0.34/0.27), while interobserver agreement for CT arthrography was 89%/90%/89% (kappa 0.69/0.54/0.54). CT arthrography appears to be more reliable than MR arthrography for the detection of cartilage lesions in the ankle joint. (orig.)

  12. Long head of the biceps brachii tendon: unenhanced MRI versus direct MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, Anthony S.; Huang, Brady K. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Wymore, Lucas; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan [Scripps Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, La Jolla, CA (United States); Chang, Eric Y. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI and direct MR arthrography (MRA) for evaluation of the intra-articular long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A retrospective review of patients who underwent shoulder MRI (n = 132) and MRA (n = 67) within 12 months prior to arthroscopy was performed. MR images were independently reviewed by two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Routinely recorded arthroscopic photos/videos were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. The LHBT was graded as normal, tendinosis, partial thickness tear less or greater than 50 %, and complete tear. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for tendinosis and tear detection were calculated. MRI correctly diagnosed fewer normal LHBTs compared to MRA (39-54 % versus 74-84 %, respectively; p < 0.005). MRI and MRA did not differ significantly in the diagnosis of tendinosis (18-36 % and 15-38 %, respectively; p > 0.05) and tears (75-83 % and 64-73 %, respectively; p > 0.05). For tendinosis, MRI versus MRA showed 18-36 % and 15-38 % sensitivity, 69-79 % and 83-91 % specificity, 22-28 % and 18-50 % PPV, 74-76 % and 80-86 % NPV, and 61-64 % and 70-81 % accuracy; respectively. For tears, MRI versus MRA showed 75-83 % and 64-73 % sensitivity, 73-75 % and 82-91 % specificity, 66-69 % and 41-62 % PPV, 82-87 % and 92-94 % NPV, and 74-78 % and 79-88 % accuracy; respectively. No significant difference was found between unenhanced MRI and direct MRA for the detection of tendinosis and tears of LHBTs. (orig.)

  13. Long head of the biceps brachii tendon: unenhanced MRI versus direct MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadros, Anthony S.; Huang, Brady K.; Wymore, Lucas; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan; Chang, Eric Y.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI and direct MR arthrography (MRA) for evaluation of the intra-articular long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A retrospective review of patients who underwent shoulder MRI (n = 132) and MRA (n = 67) within 12 months prior to arthroscopy was performed. MR images were independently reviewed by two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Routinely recorded arthroscopic photos/videos were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. The LHBT was graded as normal, tendinosis, partial thickness tear less or greater than 50 %, and complete tear. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for tendinosis and tear detection were calculated. MRI correctly diagnosed fewer normal LHBTs compared to MRA (39-54 % versus 74-84 %, respectively; p < 0.005). MRI and MRA did not differ significantly in the diagnosis of tendinosis (18-36 % and 15-38 %, respectively; p > 0.05) and tears (75-83 % and 64-73 %, respectively; p > 0.05). For tendinosis, MRI versus MRA showed 18-36 % and 15-38 % sensitivity, 69-79 % and 83-91 % specificity, 22-28 % and 18-50 % PPV, 74-76 % and 80-86 % NPV, and 61-64 % and 70-81 % accuracy; respectively. For tears, MRI versus MRA showed 75-83 % and 64-73 % sensitivity, 73-75 % and 82-91 % specificity, 66-69 % and 41-62 % PPV, 82-87 % and 92-94 % NPV, and 74-78 % and 79-88 % accuracy; respectively. No significant difference was found between unenhanced MRI and direct MRA for the detection of tendinosis and tears of LHBTs. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Shivani; Srivastava, Deep N; Sharma, Raju; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Kotwal, Prakash P; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS) proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2), 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL) and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL) tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard). Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears. PMID:25114389

  15. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Pahwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and direct magnetic resonance (MR arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2, 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard. Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears.

  16. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection for MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Soo Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Kang, Duck Sick

    2005-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography. Between June 2002 and October 2004, 132 patients (29 female, 103 male: mean age, 33.6 years) underwent ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast media injection (40 ml saline + 10 ml 2% lidocaine + 0.2 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine + 0.4 ml epinephrine) for MR arthrography. The patients were classified into four groups, viz. the no leakage group, the minor leakage with successful intraarticular injection group, the major leakage with unsuccessful intraarticular injection group, and the injection failure group. The 'no leakage' and 'minor leakage' groups were considered to be technical successes, while the 'major leakage' and 'injection failure' groups were regarded as technical failures. The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR Arthrography was 99.2% (131/132 patients) and one patients 0.7% (1/132 patients) was included in the 'major leakage' group. Ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography was feasible with a high success rate

  17. MR arthrography of elbow: evaluation of the ulnar collateral ligament of elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Katsunuki; Masatomi, Takashi; Ochi, Takahiro; Ishida, Takeshi; Hori, Shinichi; Ikezoe, Junpei; Nakamura, Hironobu

    1996-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury of the elbow in throwing athletes by MRI and MR arthrography. Design. Ten elbows of throwing athletes were examined on both plain MRI and MR saline arthrography and the injuries subsequently surgically proven. Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted and fast SE T2-weighted coronal images were obtained. Results. The UCL was unclear in all ten cases on T1-weighted MRI. In five cases an avulsion fracture was also found on T1-weighted MRI. On T2-weighted MRI, abnormal high-intensity areas were identified in or around the UCL. On T2-weighted MR arthrography images, extracapsular high-intensity areas, which represent extracapsular leakage, were found in four of five cases with avulsion fracture. At surgery, all these four cases showed avulsion fractures with instability; the other case had a fracture but it was stable and adherent to the humerus. On T2-weighted MR arthrography images, an extracapsular high-intensity area was found in one of the five cases without avulsion fracture. At surgery this patient had a complete tear of the UCL itself. Conclusion. MR arthrography provided additional information for evaluating the degree of UCL injury. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. Ankle ligamints : comparison of MR arthrography with conventional MR imaging in amputated feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Sung; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Chung, Kyung Ho; Kim, CHong Soo

    2001-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with conventional MR imaging in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Eight freshly amputated human feet underwent conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography. For the former, 1.5-T magnets in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were used, and T1-weighted sequences were obtained. Following the injection of 6-10 ml of diluted contrast media (Gd-DTPA 1:250), T1-weighted images were obtained in the same positions as conventional MR images. Paired conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography of each ankle ligament were rated on a five-point scale, and to reflect inter-group differences a Wilcoxon singed-rank test was used to compare the different measurements (p<0.05). In two ankles, MR images of the ligaments were correlated with ankle dissection. Anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments were more clearly revealed by MR arthrography than by conventional MR imaging, while calcaneofibular ligaments showed no difference between these two modalities. With regard to deltoid ligaments, visualization of the anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament was much improved when contrast material was used to outline the ligament's articular aspect. Visualization of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament and inferior transverse ligament were also improved when the use of contrast material provided delineation of the articular side of the ligaments and separated them from adjacent bone. In addition, MR arthography was very useful for indentification of the posterior intermalleolar ligament, though its use did not enhance visualization of the calcaneofibular, tibiocalcaneal, spring or tibiospring ligaments. MR arthrography accurately revealed the anatomic details of ankle ligaments, and may therefore be more useful than conventional Mr imaging for evaluation of these structures

  19. Evaluation of lesions of the internal ligaments of the wrist; conventional magnetic resonance imaging versus MR arthrography (MRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Ahmed Kamal

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: MR arthrography is a potent additional tool facilitating the diagnosis of different pathologic entities affecting the major internal ligaments of the wrist joint and helps to reduce arthroscopic interventions.

  20. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  1. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2008-01-01

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  2. 3.0 T conventional hip MR and hip MR arthrography for the acetabular labral tears confirmed by arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Chun-Yan [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Jian-Quan [Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191,PR China (China); Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao, E-mail: zzhuozhao@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Ren, A.-Hong [Department of Radiology, Beijing Daxing Hospital, 26 West Huangcun Road, Daxing District, Beijing 102600 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • MR is the preferred imaging modality for diagnosing acetabular labral tears. • The diagnostic performance of MR arthrography are superior than conventional hip MR. • The hip MR arthrography is recommended for diagnosing acetabular labral lesions. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the value of hip MR for diagnosing acetabular labrum tears, and to further compare the diagnostic performances of conventional MR with MR arthrography in acetabular labrum tears. Methods: 90 patients undergoing both hip MR examination and subsequent hip arthroscopy were retrospectively evaluated. Of these patients, 34 accepted both conventional MR and MR arthrography; while the other 56 only underwent conventional MR examination. All hip MR images were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and further compared with the results of hip arthroscopy. Results: 59 of 90 patients were confirmed with acetabular labral tears by hip arthroscopy and 31 without tears. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of conventional MR for evaluating the acetabular labral tears were 61.0%, 77.4%, 83.7% and 51.1% (radiologist A), and 66.1%, 74.2%, 82.9% and 53.4% (radiologist B), respectively, with good consistency between the two observers (K = 0.645). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of MR arthrography for assessing the acetabular labral tears were 90.5%, 84.6%, 90.5% and 84.6% (radiologist A), and 95.2%, 84.6%, 90.9% and 91.7% (radiologist B), respectively, with excellent good consistency between the two observers (K = 0.810). The sensitivity and NPV of MR arthrography for diagnosing the acetabular labral tears were significantly higher than those of conventional MR (both P < 0.05). Conclusion: Hip MR arthrography is a reliable evaluation modality for diagnosing the acetabular labral tears, and its diagnostic performance is superior to that of conventional MR at 3.0 T.

  3. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S.; Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an

  4. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Kramer, J.; Stiglbauer, R.; Hajek, P.C.; Imhof, H.

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  5. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, A. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kramer, J. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Stiglbauer, R. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hajek, P.C. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    1993-04-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  6. Comparisons of the Various Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears on MR Arthrography and Arthroscopic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Young Joo

    2010-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of the various types of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by comparing the MR imaging findings with the arthroscopic findings. The series of MR arthrography studies included 202 patients consisting of 100 patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 102 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, which were reviewed in random order. At arthroscopy, 54 articularsided, 26 bursal-sided, 20 both articular- and bursal-sided partial-thickness tears were diagnosed. The MR arthrographies were analyzed by two radiologists for articular-sided tears, bursal-sided tears, and both articular- and bursal-sided tears of the rotator cuff. The sensitivity and specificity of each type of partial-thickness tears were determined. Kappa statistics was calculated to determine the interand intra-observer agreement of the diagnosis of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The sensitivity and specificity of the various types of rotator cuff tears were 85% and 90%, respectively for articular-sided tears, 62% and 95% for bursal- sided tears, as well as 45% and 99% for both articular- and bursal-sided tears. False-negative assessments were primarily observed in the diagnosis of bursal-sided tears. Conversely, both articular- and bursal-sided tears were overestimated as full-thickness tears. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the diagnosis of articular-sided tears (k = 0.70), moderate (k = 0.59) for bursal-sided tears, and fair (k = 0.34) for both articular- and bursal-sided tears, respectively. Intra-observer agreement for the interpretation of articular- and bursal-sided tears was excellent and good, respectively, whereas intra-observer agreement for both articular- and bursal-sided tears was moderate. MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, but has limitations in that it has low sensitivity in bursal- and

  7. Comparisons of the Various Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears on MR Arthrography and Arthroscopic Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Young Joo [Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St.Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of the various types of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by comparing the MR imaging findings with the arthroscopic findings. The series of MR arthrography studies included 202 patients consisting of 100 patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 102 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, which were reviewed in random order. At arthroscopy, 54 articularsided, 26 bursal-sided, 20 both articular- and bursal-sided partial-thickness tears were diagnosed. The MR arthrographies were analyzed by two radiologists for articular-sided tears, bursal-sided tears, and both articular- and bursal-sided tears of the rotator cuff. The sensitivity and specificity of each type of partial-thickness tears were determined. Kappa statistics was calculated to determine the interand intra-observer agreement of the diagnosis of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The sensitivity and specificity of the various types of rotator cuff tears were 85% and 90%, respectively for articular-sided tears, 62% and 95% for bursal- sided tears, as well as 45% and 99% for both articular- and bursal-sided tears. False-negative assessments were primarily observed in the diagnosis of bursal-sided tears. Conversely, both articular- and bursal-sided tears were overestimated as full-thickness tears. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the diagnosis of articular-sided tears (k = 0.70), moderate (k = 0.59) for bursal-sided tears, and fair (k = 0.34) for both articular- and bursal-sided tears, respectively. Intra-observer agreement for the interpretation of articular- and bursal-sided tears was excellent and good, respectively, whereas intra-observer agreement for both articular- and bursal-sided tears was moderate. MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, but has limitations in that it has low sensitivity in bursal- and

  8. Comparison of Plain MRI and MR Arthrography in the Evaluation of Lateral Ligamentous Injury of the Ankle Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chun Chou

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: For evaluating ankle disability, using plain MRI alone is not adequate for correctly detecting lateral collateral ligamentous injury of the ankle joint. MR arthrography improves the sensitivity and the accuracy for ATaF and CF ligament injuries. It also helps in assessing coexisting pathologic lesions of ankle joints, especially impingement syndromes and osteochondral lesions, and provides more information for therapeutic decision making.

  9. Accuracy of 3-Tesla MR and MR arthrography in diagnosis of meniscal retear in the post-operative knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas [NSI, Merritt Island, FL (United States); University of Central Florida School of Medicine, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-08-15

    This study assesses the accuracy of 3-Tesla (3-T) conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The study also assess whether there are false-negative cases in which injected contrast does not extend into the meniscus despite a meniscal retear being seen on arthroscopy. One hundred consecutive knee MR arthrograms performed on patients with previous knee surgery were reviewed retrospectively. 3-T conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography were assessed for meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The criterion used to diagnose a meniscal retear on MR arthrogram was injected contrast tracking into the meniscus. All patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Seventy-four patients had conventional MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear. In 83 of the 100 patients, intraarticular contrast helped in demonstrating a retear. In ten patients, there were MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear despite intra-articular contrast not tracking into the meniscus. Ninety-four of the 100 patients had meniscal retears on second-look arthroscopy. Three-Tesla conventional MR examination was 78 % sensitive and 75 % specific, MR arthrogram examination was 88 % sensitive and 100 % specific, and the combined use of MR and MR arthrogram imaging was 98 % sensitive and 75 % specific in the diagnosis of a meniscal retear. The combined use of 3-T MR and MR arthrography allows for high sensitivity and specificity in meniscal retear detection. In some patients, intraarticular contrast will not track into a meniscal retear. When MR findings are consistent with a meniscal retear but contrast does not extend into the meniscus, a meniscal retear is likely. (orig.)

  10. Usefulness of MR arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezal, Luis; Fernandez-Hernando, Moises [Department of Radiology, Diagnostico Medico Cantabria, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Perez Carro, Luis [Learnig Trauma Med. Centro de Consultas Medicas CCM, Orthopedic Surgery department, Santander (Spain); Llorca, Javier [University of Cantabria - IDIVAL, Santander (Spain); CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health, Santander (Spain); Llopis, Eva [Alzira Hospital, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Montero, Juan Antonio [Cantabria University, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Santander (Spain); Canga, Ana [Cantabria University, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Santander (Spain); Department of Radiology Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres lesions and to evaluate whether there is increased articular distraction, possibly indicating secondary instability, in hips with ligamentum teres injuries. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained for this retrospective study. MR arthrograms of the hip with leg traction of 184 consecutive patients, including 108 men (mean age, 32.6 years; range, 19-53 years) and 76 women (mean age, 38.5 years; range, 18-56 years), who underwent hip arthroscopy were assessed for the presence of ligamentum teres lesions. The MR arthrographic findings were independently assessed by two radiologists who were blinded to the arthroscopic results. The inclusion criteria stipulated no previous surgery, arthroscopy within 1 month after MR arthrography, and availability of a detailed surgical report with ligamentum teres findings. The arthroscopy findings served as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and K statistics for interobserver and intraobserver agreement were calculated. At arthroscopy, 32 ligamentum teres injuries were found. The ligamentum teres was normal in 152 (82.6 %) patients and had suffered low-grade partial tears in 15 (8.1 %) patients, high-grade partial tears in 10 (5.4 %) patients, and complete ruptures in 7 (3.8 %) patients. MR arthrography with axial traction demonstrated moderate sensitivity and high specificity for both low-grade (62/93 %) and high-grade (66/96 %) partial tears. Grouping low- and high-grade partial tears increased the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography, yielding a sensitivity of 87 % and a specificity of 95 %. For complete ligamentum teres tears, MR arthrography with leg traction demonstrated high sensitivity (92 %) and specificity (98 %). Articular distraction was significantly increased in patients with complete ruptures of the

  11. Usefulness of MR arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezal, Luis; Fernandez-Hernando, Moises; Perez Carro, Luis; Llorca, Javier; Llopis, Eva; Montero, Juan Antonio; Canga, Ana

    2015-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the hip with leg traction in the evaluation of ligamentum teres lesions and to evaluate whether there is increased articular distraction, possibly indicating secondary instability, in hips with ligamentum teres injuries. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained for this retrospective study. MR arthrograms of the hip with leg traction of 184 consecutive patients, including 108 men (mean age, 32.6 years; range, 19-53 years) and 76 women (mean age, 38.5 years; range, 18-56 years), who underwent hip arthroscopy were assessed for the presence of ligamentum teres lesions. The MR arthrographic findings were independently assessed by two radiologists who were blinded to the arthroscopic results. The inclusion criteria stipulated no previous surgery, arthroscopy within 1 month after MR arthrography, and availability of a detailed surgical report with ligamentum teres findings. The arthroscopy findings served as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and K statistics for interobserver and intraobserver agreement were calculated. At arthroscopy, 32 ligamentum teres injuries were found. The ligamentum teres was normal in 152 (82.6 %) patients and had suffered low-grade partial tears in 15 (8.1 %) patients, high-grade partial tears in 10 (5.4 %) patients, and complete ruptures in 7 (3.8 %) patients. MR arthrography with axial traction demonstrated moderate sensitivity and high specificity for both low-grade (62/93 %) and high-grade (66/96 %) partial tears. Grouping low- and high-grade partial tears increased the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography, yielding a sensitivity of 87 % and a specificity of 95 %. For complete ligamentum teres tears, MR arthrography with leg traction demonstrated high sensitivity (92 %) and specificity (98 %). Articular distraction was significantly increased in patients with complete ruptures of the

  12. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K.; Imhoff, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  13. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, A.B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Sports Orthopedics, Munich (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic performance of MR arthrography with anterior trans-subscapularis versus posterior injection approach for subscapularis tendon tears at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Chang-Woo [Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Uijeongbu-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang-Soo [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) with the anterior trans-subscapularis versus posterior injection approach to diagnose subscapularis tendon (SCT) tears. One hundred and sixty-seven arthroscopically confirmed patients (84 anterior and 83 posterior approaches) were included. Two readers retrospectively scored SCT tears. Proportions of correctly graded tears between MR arthrography and arthroscopy were calculated. Retrospective error analysis was performed. The sensitivity and specificity were 80 % (24/30) and 72 % (39/54) by reader 1, 73 % (22/30) and 76 % (41/54) by reader 2 in the anterior approach, and 86 % (30/35) and 79 % (38/48) by reader 1, 80 % (28/35) and 88 % (42/48) by reader 2 in the posterior approach, respectively. There were no significant differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two groups. Proportions of correctly graded tears of both readers were 48 % and 36 % in the anterior approach, and 70 % and 68 % in the posterior approach, respectively. The intratendinous collection of contrast material was not statistically significantly different between anterior (n = 8) and posterior (n = 3) approach group. For the MRA diagnosis of SCT tears, there was no significant difference between the anterior trans-subscapularis and the posterior approach. (orig.)

  15. Diagnostic performance of CT-arthrography and 1.5T MR-arthrography for the assessment of glenohumeral joint cartilage: a comparative study with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omoumi, Patrick [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Rubini, Alexandra; Berg, Bruno C. vande; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Cliniques Universitaires St Luc - Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of multi-detector CT arthrography (CTA) and 1.5-T MR arthrography (MRA) in detecting hyaline cartilage lesions of the shoulder, with arthroscopic correlation. CTA and MRA prospectively obtained in 56 consecutive patients following the same arthrographic procedure were independently evaluated for glenohumeral cartilage lesions (modified Outerbridge grade ≥2 and grade 4) by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The cartilage surface was divided in 18 anatomical areas. Arthroscopy was taken as the reference standard. Diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA was compared using ROC analysis. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement was determined by κ statistics. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA varied from 46.4 to 82.4 % and from 89.0 to 95.9 % respectively; sensitivity and specificity of MRA varied from 31.9 to 66.2 % and from 91.1 to 97.5 % respectively. Diagnostic performance of CTA was statistically significantly better than MRA for both readers (all p ≤ 0.04). Interobserver agreement for the evaluation of cartilage lesions was substantial with CTA (κ = 0.63) and moderate with MRA (κ = 0.54). Intraobserver agreement was almost perfect with both CTA (κ = 0.94-0.95) and MRA (κ = 0.83-0.87). The diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA for the detection of glenohumeral cartilage lesions is moderate, although statistically significantly better with CTA. (orig.)

  16. Diagnostic performance of MR arthrography with anterior trans-subscapularis versus posterior injection approach for subscapularis tendon tears at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Chang-Woo; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2017-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) with the anterior trans-subscapularis versus posterior injection approach to diagnose subscapularis tendon (SCT) tears. One hundred and sixty-seven arthroscopically confirmed patients (84 anterior and 83 posterior approaches) were included. Two readers retrospectively scored SCT tears. Proportions of correctly graded tears between MR arthrography and arthroscopy were calculated. Retrospective error analysis was performed. The sensitivity and specificity were 80 % (24/30) and 72 % (39/54) by reader 1, 73 % (22/30) and 76 % (41/54) by reader 2 in the anterior approach, and 86 % (30/35) and 79 % (38/48) by reader 1, 80 % (28/35) and 88 % (42/48) by reader 2 in the posterior approach, respectively. There were no significant differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two groups. Proportions of correctly graded tears of both readers were 48 % and 36 % in the anterior approach, and 70 % and 68 % in the posterior approach, respectively. The intratendinous collection of contrast material was not statistically significantly different between anterior (n = 8) and posterior (n = 3) approach group. For the MRA diagnosis of SCT tears, there was no significant difference between the anterior trans-subscapularis and the posterior approach. (orig.)

  17. Wrist Traction During MR Arthrography Improves Detection of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex and Intrinsic Ligament Tears and Visibility of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ryan K L; Griffith, James F; Ng, Alex W H; Nung, Ryan C H; Yeung, David K W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of traction during MR arthrography of the wrist on joint space widening, cartilage visibility, and detection of tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and intrinsic ligaments. A prospective study included 40 wrists in 39 patients (25 men, 14 women; mean age, 35 years). MR arthrography was performed with a 3-T MRI system with and without axial traction. Two radiologists independently measured wrist and carpal joint space widths and semiquantitatively graded articular cartilage visibility. Using conventional arthrography as the reference standard and working in consensus, they assessed for the presence of tears of the TFCC, lunotriquetral ligament (LTL), and scapholunate ligament (SLL). Visibility of a tear before traction was compared with visibility after traction. With traction, all joint spaces in the wrist and carpus were significantly widened (change, 0.15-1.01 mm; all p < 0.006). Subjective cartilage visibility of all joint spaces improved after traction (all p ≤ 0.048) except for that of the radioscaphoid space, which was well visualized even before traction. Conventional arthrography depicted 24 TFCC tears, seven LTL tears, and three SLL tears. The accuracy of tear detection improved after traction for the TFCC (98% after traction vs 83% before traction), the LTL (100% vs 88%), and the SLL (100% vs 95%). Tear visibility improved after traction for 54% of TFCC tears, 71% of LTL tears, and 66% of SLL tears. Wrist MR arthrography with axial traction significantly improved the visibility of articular cartilage and the detection and visibility of tears of the TFCC and intrinsic ligaments. The results favor more widespread use of traction during MR arthrography of the wrist.

  18. Is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate in detecting anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions as conventional MR arthography?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A.; Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jaap Willems, W. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Orthopaedic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively compare accuracy of single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in Abduction External Rotation (ABER) with conventional MR arthrography for detection and characterisation of anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions, with arthroscopy as reference standard. Inter-observer variability of both protocols was determined. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms, including oblique axial fat suppressed T1-weighted images in ABER position and conventional imaging directions of 250 patients (170 men, 80 women; mean age, 36 years), were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three reviewers. Reviewers were blinded to clinical information and arthroscopic results. Labroligamentous lesions were registered in both ABER and MRa. The lesions were sub-classified (Bankart, Perthes, anterior labrum periosteal sleeve avulsion (ALPSA) or lesions not otherwise specified). Inter-observer agreement was assessed by Kappa statistics for all 250 patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ABER versus conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Kappa values of the ABER and conventional MR arthrography ranged from 0.44 to 0.56 and 0.44 to 0.62, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 45 of 92 patients had an intact anteroinferior labrum, and in 44 patients, a labroligamentous lesion (eight Bankart, seven Perthes, 29 ALPSA and three lesions not otherwise specified) was diagnosed. There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (85-89%, 89-96%), specificity (82-91%, 84-89%) and overall accuracy (50-62%, 53-63%). The results of a single MR arthrography series in ABER position are comparable with those of conventional MR arthrography for detecting anteroinferior labroligamentous lesions. (orig.)

  19. Postoperative MR arthography of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Trattnig, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Freilinger, W.; Cochole, M.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    Indications of MR arthrography were analyzed in this prospective study. The aim was to evaluate possible advantages over conventional MRI, establish diagnostic criteria and to analyze its meaning further for the therapeutic management of postoperative patients. MR arthrography was performed in eight patients who had undergone surgical repair of rotator cuff lesions (modified Neer acromioplasty) and in six patients who had undergone arthroscopic therapy of recurrent unidirectional dislocation of the shoulder by combined arthroscopic intra- and extracapsular repair. MR investigations were performed before and after application of a contrast solution (2 mmol Gd-DTPA). All patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, a partial tear could be verified in one patient and excluded in all others. In patients after arthroscopic therapy by combined intra- and extracapsular repair, a radiologically patulous-appearing capsule correlated with clinically recurrent dislocations. In all other patients diagnostic criteria, such as distribution of the intra-articular contrast solution, proliferation of scar tissue, nodular appearance of the glenohumeral ligaments and capsule thickness, correlated with a regular postoperative status. MR arthrography of the shoulder represents a promising method in the evaluation of the postoperative shoulder. It might further improve the evaluation of reactive capsule alterations, scar tissue proliferation, and the labroligamentous complex, as well as the ability to differentiate partial and complete rerupture from degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  20. Use of MR arthrography in detecting tears of the ligamentum teres with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Gill, Corey M.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Simeone, Frank J.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, Joseph C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To demonstrate the normal appearance of the ligamentum teres on MR arthrography (MRA) and evaluate the accuracy of MRA in detecting ligamentum teres tears with arthroscopic correlation. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained with a waiver for informed consent because of the retrospective study design. A total of 165 cases in 159 patients (111 females, 48 males; mean age 41 ± 12 years) who underwent both MRA and hip arthroscopy were evaluated for appearance of the ligamentum teres, including the size, number of bundles, and ligamentum teres tears. Marrow edema of the fovea capitis adjacent to the ligamentum teres insertion and the presence of hip plicae were also recorded. The mean thickness and length of the ligamentum teres were 3.5 ± 1.5 mm and 25.2 ± 3.8 mm, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and accuracy of MRA for the detection of ligamentum teres tears were 78, 97, 74, 97, and 95 %, respectively. MRA is an accurate method to evaluate the normal morphology and to detect tears of the ligamentum teres. (orig.)

  1. Indirect wrist MR arthrography: the effects of passive motion versus active exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.E.; Natale, P.; Winalski, C.S.; Culp, R. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. In the wrist, to determine whether passive motion or active exercise yields a better indirect MR arthrographic effect following intravenous gadolinium administration.Design and patients. Twenty-six consecutive patients were studied by indirect wrist MR arthrography. In half active exercise and in half passive motion was performed. Four regions of interest were studied including the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, the midcarpal joint, and the triangular fibrocartilage. Ranges and means of signal intensity were calculated. Surgical follow-up was performed in 22 patients.Results. The joint fluid intensity was greatest in the distal radioulnar joint. Fluid signal intensity was greater and more consistent in the passive motion group although the results did not achieve statistical significance. Imaging accuracy appeared similar in the two groups and was excellent for the triangular fibrocartilage (100%) and scapholunate ligaments (96%).Conclusion. Active exercise and passive motion yield similar degrees of wrist arthrographic effect, but the effect of passive motion is somewhat more consistent. Preliminary data show good accuracy for internal derangements. (orig.)

  2. Indirect MR-arthrography in osteochondral autograft and crushed bone graft with a collagen membrane-Correlation with histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, F. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Schoettle, P.; Schell, H. [Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Lehmkuhl, L.; Madej, T.; Wieners, G. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Duda, G.N. [Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Schroeder, R.J. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Objective: To analyze the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following osteochondral autograft transfer system (OATS) and crushed bone graft using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring and grading system in relation to histology as the standard of reference. Materials and methods: Iatrogenic lesions were set at ovine condylar facets (n = 6/group), treated with OATS or crushed bone graft. 1.5 T MRI was performed 6 months after surgery using PD-weighted (w fat saturated (fs) fast spin echo (FSE), T1-w 2D, and 3D fs gradient echo (GE) sequences 30 min. after i.v. Gd-DTPA administration and passive joint exercise. The repair tissue was evaluated by two independent radiologists. The MR findings were compared to histology. Results: In all cases, MRI and histologic grading correlated well and showed significant superior repair in OATS at 6 months (p < 0.05), reproducing the original articular contour and a good subchondral restoration. FsT1-w3DGE proved most appropriate identifying characteristic post-operative findings: the OATS group demonstrated bone marrow edema at the donor site and the graft/host interface showed significant enhancement in indirect MR-arthrography, indicating fibrocartilage. After crushed bone graft, we found an irregular structure and significant contrast uptake, consistent with remnants of bone grafts surrounded by inflammatory tissue. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is an accurate, non-invasive monitoring tool following OATS and crushed bone graft as the MRI scoring and grading system allows a reliable evaluation of normal and pathological osteochondral repair with a high histologic correlation.

  3. Indirect MR-arthography in the fellow up of autologous osteochondral transplantation; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie zur Verlaufskontrolle nach autologer osteochondraler Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herber, S.; Pitton, M.B.; Kalden, P.; Thelen, M.; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie

    2003-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following autologous osteochondral transplantation. Patients and Methods: 10 patients with autogenous osteochondral homografts underwent indirect MR-arthrography at three, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The MR protocol at 1.5T comprised unenhanced imagings with PD- and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequences with and without fat-suppression as well as T{sub 1}-weighted fat-suppressed SE-sequences before and after iv. contrast administration and after active joint exercise. Image analysis was done by two radiologists in conference and comprised the evaluation of signal intensity (SI) and integrity of the osseous plug and the cartilage surface, as well as the presence of joint effusion or bone marrow edema. Results: At three months, all cases demonstrated a significant bone marrow edema at the recipient and donor site that corresponded to a significant enhancement after iv. contrast administration. The interface between the transplant and the normal bone showed an increased SI at three and 6 months in T{sub 2}-weighted images as well as in indirect MR-arthrography. The marrow signal normalized in most cases after 6 to 12 months, indicating vitality and healing of the transplanted osteochondral graft. The SI of the interface decreased in the same period, demonstrating the stability of the homograft at the recipient site. The osteochondral plugs were well-seated in 9/10 cases. Indirect MR-arthrography was superior to unenhanced imaging in the assessment of the cartilage surface. Cartilage coverage was complete in every case. The transplanted hyaline cartilage as well as the original cartilage showed a significant increase of the SI in indirect MR-arthrography, that did not change in follow up studies. There were no pathological alterations of signal and thickness alterations of the transplanted cartilage in follow up investigations. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool

  4. All-in-One Magnetic Resonance Arthrography of the Shoulder in a Vertically Open Magnetic Resonance Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, J.E.; Vanhoenacker, F.; Beaulieu, C.F.; Bergman, A.; Butts Pauly, K.; Dillingham, M.F.; Lang, P.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem-Antwerp (Belgium))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography frequently involves joint injection under imaging guidance followed by MR imaging in static positions. Purpose: To evaluate if MR arthrography of the shoulder joint can be performed in a comprehensive fashion combining the MR-guided injection procedure, static MR imaging, and dynamic motion MR imaging in a single test. Material and Methods: Twenty-three shoulder joints were injected with Gd-DTPA2- under MR guidance. Static MR imaging was performed and included a three-point Dixon method to achieve water-selective images. Dynamic motion MR imaging with and without applying pressure to the upper arm was used to evaluate glenohumeral joint instability. In 10 cases, surgical correlation was available. Results: The all-in-one MR arthrography technique was successful in all patients, and took an average time of 65 min. All but one glenohumeral injection procedure were performed with a single needle pass, and no complications were observed. Out of eight labrum tears seen with static MR imaging, seven were confirmed at surgery. In 10 cases, dynamic motion MR imaging correlated well with the surgeon's intraoperative evaluation for presence and direction of instability. Conclusion: MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using a vertically open magnet can be performed as a single comprehensive test, including the injection and the static and dynamic motion MR imaging. Good diagnostic accuracy for intraarticular lesions and glenohumeral instability was found in a small sample.

  5. Indirect MR arthrography of the wrist in the diagnosis of TFCC-lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, T.; Lenhart, M.; Held, P.; Feuerbach, S.; Link, J.; Babel, M.; Ruf, S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this prospective study was to assess the value of the indirect MR arthrography (MR-AR) of the wrist in the detection of lesions of the TFCC. Material and methods: Indirect MR-AR was performed in 45 patients (23 f/22 m) with unclear ulnar wrist pain. After i.v. injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA and after a motion-phase of the wrist (15 minutes) MRI was performed in a coronal plane. We used a STIR-, a fatsaturated (fs) T1-SE and a 3D-DESS sequence. The images were evaluated by two radiologists using a consensus score. The lesions were assigned to the system of Palmer and correlated with arthroscopy. Results: Indirect MR-AR showed in 35 of 45 patients a lesion of the TFCC, but arthroscopy only revealed a defect in 32 cases. This means three false positive but no false negative assessments by MRI. Using this MRI protocol sensitivity and specificity in the detection of TFCC lesions were calculated as 100% and 77%. The accuracy was 93%. Small degenerative changes of the fibres were most common (Palmer type IIA). In trauma patients the ligaments usually showed tears near the insertion at the ulna (Palmer type IB). The sensitivity and specificity was 88% and 95% for evaluation of the scapho-lunate (SL) ligament, the accuracy was 93%. Arthroscopy and MRI did not diagnose any rupture of the lunate-triquetral (LT) ligament. Conclusion: Indirect MR-AR is a non-invasive method with a high sensitivity in the evaluation of the TFCC and associated injuries. Therefore, it is an excellent screening procedure to assess the indication for therapeutic arthroscopy. (orig.) [de

  6. Synovial plicae of the hip: evaluation using MR arthrography in patients with hip pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencardino, Jenny T.; La Rocca Vieira, Renata; Kassarjian, Ara; Schwartz, Richard; Mellado, Jose M.; Kocher, Mininder

    2011-01-01

    The appearance and distribution of the intra-articular plicae of the hip have been addressed in few reports in the anatomic and radiological literature. This study aims to determine the prevalence of visible synovial hip plicae using MR arthrography and to measure the association of visible synovial hip plicae with MR arthrographic diagnosis of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. Following institutional review board approval, 63 direct MR arthrographic examinations of the hip in 61 patients with a clinical history of hip pain were retrospectively reviewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. The following variables were measured using a binary system (0 = absent; 1 = present): labral plica, neck plica, ligamental plica, labral tear, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. The surgical reports and arthroscopic images of 10 patients were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test. In all 63 cases at least one plica was visualized on MR-arthrographic images. Labral, neck, and ligamental plicae were found with a prevalence of 76, 97, and 78%, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis among patients with visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. The prevalence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis in our patient population was 79, 28, and 28%, respectively. The presence of intra-articular plicae was the only MR-arthrographic finding in 5 of our 63 symptomatic cases. Visible labral, neck, and/or ligamental plicae are highly prevalent on MR-arthrographic images of the hip performed in the setting of hip pain. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis and visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Henninger, Benjamin; Kogler, Michael; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried; Forstner, Thomas; Reichkendler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Henninger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Kogler, Michael; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Radiology, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria); Forstner, Thomas [Johannes Keppler University, Department for Applied Systems Research and Statistics, Linz (Austria); Reichkendler, Markus [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria)

    2015-06-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. (orig.)

  9. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients; Direkte MR-Arthrographie des Handgelenks im Vergleich zur Arthroskopie: Eine prospektive Studie an 125 Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H. [Klinik fuer Handchirurgie GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an

  10. MR arthrography in chondromalacia patellae diagnosis on a low-field open magnet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Mustafa; Ipeksoy, Umit; Dogan, Ali; Arslan, Halil; Etlik, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy conventional MRI and MR arthrography (MRA) in the diagnosis of chondromalacia patella (CP) on a low-field open magnet system (LFOMS), correlated with arthroscopy. Forty-two patients (50 knees) with pain in the anterior part of the knee were prospectively examined with LFOMS, including T1-weighted, proton density-weighted and T2-weighted sequences. All were also examined T1-weighted MRI after intraarticular injection of dilue gadopentetate dimeglumine. Two observers, who reached a consensus interpretation, evaluated each imaging technique independently. Thirty-six of the 50 facets examined had chondromalacia shown by arthroscopy, which was used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of each imaging technique in the diagnosis of each stage of CP were determined and compared by using the McNemar two-tailed analysis. Arthroscopy showed that 16 facets were normal. Four (30%) of 13 grade 1 lesions were detected with T1. Four lesions (30%) with T2 and three lesions (23%) with proton-weighted images were detected. Seven (53%) of 13 grade 1 lesions were detected with MRA. Grade 2 abnormalities were diagnosed in two (33%) of six facets with proton density-weighted pulse sequences, two (33%) of six facets with T1-weighted pulse sequences, in three (50%) of six facets with T2-weighted pulse sequences, in five (83%) of six facets with MRA sequences. Grade 3 abnormalities were diagnosed in three (71%) of seven facets with proton density- and T1-weighted images, five (71%) of seven facets with T2-weighted pulse sequences, six (85%) of seven facets with MRA sequences. Grade 4 CP was detected with equal sensitivity with T1-, proton density- and T2-weighted pulse sequences, all showing seven (87%) of the eight lesions. MRA again showed these findings in all eight patients. All imaging techniques were insensitive to grade 1 lesions and highly sensitive to grade 4 lesion, so that no

  11. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.

    2010-01-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [de

  12. [Shoulder injuries in overhead sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörtler, K

    2010-05-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence.This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes.

  13. Fluoroscopically-Guided Posterior Approach for Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: Comparison with Conventional Anterior Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Koun J.; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min

    2011-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of the fluoroscopically-guided posterior approach compared with the anterior approach for shoulder magnetic resonance(MR) arthrography. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Among 60 shoulder MR arthrographies performed on 59 patients with symptomatic shoulders, an intra-articular injection was performed (30 cases using the anterior approach and 30 using the posterior approach). Procedure-related pain was assessed by using a 5 score visual analogue scale (VAS). Depth of the puncture and standardized depth of puncture by body mass index (BMI) were recorded. The contrast leakage along the course of the puncture was evaluated by reviewing the MR. The statistical analyses included the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis test. There was no significant difference in VAS scores between the anterior and posterior groups (1.77 ± 1.10 vs. 1.80 ± 0.96). Depth of puncture and standardized depth of puncture by BMI were significantly shorter in the posterior group than those in the anterior group (4.4 ± 0.8 cm and 1.8 ± 0.3 cm vs. 6.6 ± 0.9 cm and 2.8 ± 0.4 cm, p < 0.001), respectively. The incidence of contrast leakage was more frequent in the posterior group (p = 0.003). The posterior approach will be useful in shoulder MR arthrography with a suspected anterior pathology, a postoperative follow-up study or obese patient.

  14. A New Promising Technique of 3D Isovoxel Imaging Using 3T MRI in the Wrist: Comparison with 3T MR Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 3D isovoxel MR imaging using 3T MRI in the wrist joint, as compared with 3T MR arthrography. A total of 33 patients underwent both MR arthrography and 3D isovoxel imaging of the wrist joints using 3T MR, including 11 patients with arthroscopic confirmation. 3D isovoxel MR imaging was performed using an intermediateweighted fast spin echo coronal scan with a 0.4-mm slice thickness and the axial images were reconstructed with a 1-mm slice thickness. One radiologist evaluated for the presence of scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligament tear and she determined the grade of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tear and chondromalacia with its location. We compared the two examinations using kappa values. The rates of detecting wrist injury were similar for both exams with substantial to almost perfect inter-examination agreement (kappa value = 0.864 for scapholunate ligament tear, 0.835 for lunotriquetral ligament tear, 0.799 for TFCC tear and 0.940 for chondromalacia). For the eleven cases that underwent arthroscopy, their results of 3D isovoxel MRI were also similar to that of MR arthrography. 3D isovoxel MR imaging is useful for the evaluation of the wrist joint

  15. The clinical and radiological importance of extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle MR arthrography in patients with OCD and anterolateral impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogul, Hayri, E-mail: drhogul@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Guzel, Yunus [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Medical Faculty, Ordu University, Ordu (Turkey); Pirimoglu, Berhan [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Tuncer, Kutsi [Department of Orthopedic, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Polat, Gokhan; Ergun, Fatih; Sade, Recep; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Yuce, Ihsan; Kantarci, Mecit [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tibiotalar joint capacity and the localisation, frequency and amount of extravasation in patients with extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. Materials and methods: Sites of extravasation were determined in the ankle MR arthrograms of 69 patients. Thirty-four patients without extraarticular contrast material leakage into locations unrelated to the injection path were included as a control group. Volumetric measurements of extraarticular contrast material leakage and the tibiotalar joint capacity were performed on a three dimensional (3D) volume measurement workstation. Results: Extravasation of contrast material occurred through the anterior, posterior, and anterolateral recesses of the tibiotalar joint. The most common site of extravasation was along the flexor hallucis longus tendon synovium (24.6%). The amount of extravasation was significantly higher in patients with ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) than in patients with a different diagnosis (p = 0.039). Loose bodies were detected in all OCD’s patients with insufficient tibiotalar joint distention. Conclusions: Connections between the ankle joint and neighboring synovial compartments can decrease the diagnostic value of ankle MR arthrography examinations due to inadequate joint distention. Large injection volumes should be used for ankle MR arthrography of patients with OCD (especially OCD’s patients with loose body) and impingement syndrome.

  16. A New Promising Technique of 3D Isovoxel Imaging Using 3T MRI in the Wrist: Comparison with 3T MR Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 3D isovoxel MR imaging using 3T MRI in the wrist joint, as compared with 3T MR arthrography. A total of 33 patients underwent both MR arthrography and 3D isovoxel imaging of the wrist joints using 3T MR, including 11 patients with arthroscopic confirmation. 3D isovoxel MR imaging was performed using an intermediateweighted fast spin echo coronal scan with a 0.4-mm slice thickness and the axial images were reconstructed with a 1-mm slice thickness. One radiologist evaluated for the presence of scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligament tear and she determined the grade of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tear and chondromalacia with its location. We compared the two examinations using kappa values. The rates of detecting wrist injury were similar for both exams with substantial to almost perfect inter-examination agreement (kappa value = 0.864 for scapholunate ligament tear, 0.835 for lunotriquetral ligament tear, 0.799 for TFCC tear and 0.940 for chondromalacia). For the eleven cases that underwent arthroscopy, their results of 3D isovoxel MRI were also similar to that of MR arthrography. 3D isovoxel MR imaging is useful for the evaluation of the wrist joint

  17. The clinical and radiological importance of extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle MR arthrography in patients with OCD and anterolateral impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogul, Hayri; Guzel, Yunus; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Polat, Gokhan; Ergun, Fatih; Sade, Recep; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Yuce, Ihsan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tibiotalar joint capacity and the localisation, frequency and amount of extravasation in patients with extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. Materials and methods: Sites of extravasation were determined in the ankle MR arthrograms of 69 patients. Thirty-four patients without extraarticular contrast material leakage into locations unrelated to the injection path were included as a control group. Volumetric measurements of extraarticular contrast material leakage and the tibiotalar joint capacity were performed on a three dimensional (3D) volume measurement workstation. Results: Extravasation of contrast material occurred through the anterior, posterior, and anterolateral recesses of the tibiotalar joint. The most common site of extravasation was along the flexor hallucis longus tendon synovium (24.6%). The amount of extravasation was significantly higher in patients with ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) than in patients with a different diagnosis (p = 0.039). Loose bodies were detected in all OCD’s patients with insufficient tibiotalar joint distention. Conclusions: Connections between the ankle joint and neighboring synovial compartments can decrease the diagnostic value of ankle MR arthrography examinations due to inadequate joint distention. Large injection volumes should be used for ankle MR arthrography of patients with OCD (especially OCD’s patients with loose body) and impingement syndrome.

  18. Postoperative MR arthography of the shoulder joint; MR-Arthographie des Schultergelenks im postoperativen Patientenkollektiv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, T. [Einrichtung fuer Magnetresonanz, Ludwig Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Univ. Wien (Austria); Trattnig, S. [Einrichtung fuer Magnetresonanz, Ludwig Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Univ. Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M. [Einrichtung fuer Magnetresonanz, Ludwig Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Univ. Wien (Austria); Freilinger, W. [Orthopaedisches Krankenhaus Speising (Austria); Cochole, M. [Orthopaedische Abt., Allgemein Oeffentliches Krankenhaus Amstetten (Austria); Imhof, H. [Einrichtung fuer Magnetresonanz, Ludwig Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Univ. Wien (Austria)

    1996-12-01

    Indications of MR arthrography were analyzed in this prospective study. The aim was to evaluate possible advantages over conventional MRI, establish diagnostic criteria and to analyze its meaning further for the therapeutic management of postoperative patients. MR arthrography was performed in eight patients who had undergone surgical repair of rotator cuff lesions (modified Neer acromioplasty) and in six patients who had undergone arthroscopic therapy of recurrent unidirectional dislocation of the shoulder by combined arthroscopic intra- and extracapsular repair. MR investigations were performed before and after application of a contrast solution (2 mmol Gd-DTPA). All patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, a partial tear could be verified in one patient and excluded in all others. In patients after arthroscopic therapy by combined intra- and extracapsular repair, a radiologically patulous-appearing capsule correlated with clinically recurrent dislocations. In all other patients diagnostic criteria, such as distribution of the intra-articular contrast solution, proliferation of scar tissue, nodular appearance of the glenohumeral ligaments and capsule thickness, correlated with a regular postoperative status. MR arthrography of the shoulder represents a promising method in the evaluation of the postoperative shoulder. It might further improve the evaluation of reactive capsule alterations, scar tissue proliferation, and the labroligamentous complex, as well as the ability to differentiate partial and complete rerupture from degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [Deutsch] In einer prospektiven Studie sollten die Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der MR-Arthrographie am operierten Schultergelenk erfasst werden. Ziel der Studie war einerseits eine gegenueber der konventionellen MR-Untersuchung verbesserten Diagnosestellung und andererseits die Erstellung von fuer die Rezidivdiagnostik relevanten Diagnosekriterien

  19. Feasibility and preliminary results of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Roentgeninstitut/Nuklearmedizin, Luzern (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Huellner, Martin W.; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Tornquist, Katharina [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Silva, Angela J. da [Advanced Molecular Imaging, Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Bodmer, Elvira; Wartburg, Urs von; Hug, Urs [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Division of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction. This prospective study included 28 wrists of 27 patients evaluated with SPECT/CT arthrography and MR arthrography. Iodine contrast medium and gadolinium were injected into the distal radioulnar and midcarpal joints. Late-phase SPECT/CT was performed 3.5 h after intravenous injection of approximately 650 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DPD. MR and SPECT/CT images were separately reviewed in relation to bone marrow oedema, radionuclide uptake, and tears in the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and an overall diagnosis of ulnar impaction. MR, CT and SPECT/CT imaging findings were compared with each other, with the surgical findings in 12 patients and with clinical follow-up. The quality of MR arthrography and SPECT/CT arthrography images was fully diagnostic in 23 of 28 wrists (82 %) and 25 of 28 wrists (89 %), respectively. SPECT/CT arthrography was not diagnostic for ligament lesions due to insufficient intraarticular contrast in one wrist. MR and SPECT/CT images showed concordant findings regarding TFCC lesions in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %), SL ligament in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %) and LT ligament in 23 of 27 wrists (85 %). Bone marrow oedema on MR images and scintigraphic uptake were concordant in 21 of 28 wrists (75 %). MR images showed partial TFCC defects in four patients with normal SPECT/CT images. MR images showed bone marrow oedema in 4 of 28 wrists (14 %) without scintigraphic uptake, and scintigraphic uptake was present without MR bone marrow oedema in three wrists (11 %). Regarding diagnosis of ulnar impaction the concordance rate between CT and SPECT/CT was 100 % and reached 96 % (27 of 28) between MR and SPECT/CT arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR, CT and SPECT/CT arthrography were 93 %, 100 % and 100 %, and 93 %, 93 % and 93

  20. Detection and staging of chondromalacia patellae: relative efficacies of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, J A; Chung, E M; Chandnani, V P; Kesling, K L; Christensen, K P; Null, R N; Radvany, M G; Hansen, M F

    1994-09-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a condition characterized by softening, fraying, and ulceration of patellar articular cartilage. We compare the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography in detecting and staging this abnormality. Twenty-seven patients with pain in the anterior part of the knee were prospectively examined with MR imaging, including T1-weighted (650/16), proton density-weighted (2000/20), T2-weighted (2000/80), and spoiled two-dimensional gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR/)/35 degrees (51/10) with fat saturation pulse sequences. All were also examined with T1-weighted MR imaging after intraarticular injection of dilute gadopentetate dimeglumine and with double-contrast CT arthrography. Each imaging technique was evaluated independently by two observers, who reached a consensus interpretation. The signal characteristics of cartilage on MR images and contour abnormalities noted with all imaging techniques were evaluated and graded according to a modification of the classification of Shahriaree. Twenty-six of the 54 facets examined had chondromalacia shown by arthroscopy, which was used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each imaging technique in the diagnosis of each stage of chondromalacia patellae were determined and compared by using the McNemar two-tailed analysis. Arthroscopy showed that 28 facets were normal. Grade 1 chondromalacia patellae was diagnosed only with MR and CT arthrography in two (29%) of seven facets. Intermediate (grade 2 or 3) chondromalacia patellae was detected in two (13%) of 15 facets with T1-weighted and SPGR MR imaging, in three (20%) of 15 facets with proton density-weighted MR imaging, in seven (47%) of 15 facets with T2-weighted MR imaging, in 11 (73%) of 15 facets with CT arthrography, and in 12 (80%) of 15 facets with MR arthrography. Grade 4 was detected in three (75%) of four facets with T1-, proton

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: a review of potential sources of diagnostic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.W.; Helms, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR arthrography are frequently utilized in the evaluation of shoulder pain and instability. The clinical scenario and imaging findings may be confusing to clinicians and radiologists and may present diagnostic challenges for those involved in evaluating and treating shoulder pathology. Often rotator cuff and labral abnormalities may be coexistent, clinical manifestations of denervation syndromes may be confusing to clinicians, and normal anatomic variations, imaging pitfalls, and various artifacts may cause dilemmas for the radiologist. This article will review the most frequently encountered mimickers and pitfalls of MR imaging of the shoulder. (orig.)

  2. Prevalence of the acetabular sublabral sulcus at MR arthrography in patients under 17 years of age: does it exist?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerkurth, Olaf [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hospital Baden, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Jacobson, Jon A.; Morag, Yoav; Fessell, David [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bedi, Asheesh; Sekiya, Jon K. [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-04-18

    To retrospectively determine characteristics of contrast-filled acetabular labral clefts in patients under the age of 17 years at MR arthrography (Mra) correlated with arthroscopy, which may impact the thinking regarding the existence of a sublabral sulcus. After IRB approval, 41 patients under the age of 17 who had MRa were identified. The following observations of contrast-filled clefts were assessed: (1) presence/absence, (2) location, (3) depth, (4) abnormal signal within the labrum and (5) shape (linear, gaping, complex). Fisher's exact and the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test were performed. Interreader agreement was calculated with Cohen's k. Reader 1 found clefts in 41 %. Depth was less than half in 6 %, more than half in 65 % and full thickness in 29 %. Shape was linear in 53 %, gaping in 18 % and complex in 29 %. Signal changes occurred in 88 %. Reader 2 found clefts in 29 %. Depth was less than half in 17 %, more than half in 58 % and full thickness in 25 %. Shape was linear in 50 %, gaping in 42 % and complex in 17 %. Signal changes occurred in 50 %. None of the clefts fulfilled the criteria for a sublabral sulcus at MRa and arthroscopy. None of the clefts found in our subjects under the age of 17 years met the MRa and arthroscopy criteria for a sublabral sulcus, which supports the theory that such clefts represent labral tears. (orig.)

  3. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain; Theumann, Nicolas; Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent; Richarme, Delphine; Meuli, Reto; Becce, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥ 0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: Value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Theumann, Nicolas [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent [Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Clinique Longeraie and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Avenue de la Gare 9, 1003 Lausanne (Switzerland); Richarme, Delphine [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Becce, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.becce@chuv.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. Results: With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0 mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). Conclusion: The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces.

  5. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

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    Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Osteology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Bernt, Reinhard [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: reinhard.bernt@wgkk.sozvers.at; Seeger, Thomas [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Weissenbaeck, Alexander [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Tuechler, Heinrich [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Hematology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Resnick, Donald [Department of Radiology, VA Medical Center, UCSD, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr, San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome.

  6. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Joerg; Bernt, Reinhard; Seeger, Thomas; Weissenbaeck, Alexander; Tuechler, Heinrich; Resnick, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome

  7. MR-arthrography of the acetabular labrum - radiologic-pathologic correlation in 20 cadaveric hip joints; MR-Arthrographie des Labrum acetabulare - Radiologisch-anatomische Korrelation an 20 Leichenhueften

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    Brossmann, J.; Steffens, J.C.; Heller, M. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Ploetz, G.M.J.; Hassenpflug, J. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Orthopadie

    1999-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate frequency of acetabular labral lesions in elderly hip joints, and to determine sensitivity and specificity of MR arthrography (MRa) for the detection of these abnormalities. Materials and Methods: Twenty cadaveric hip joints were examined by MRa. For MRa, 15 ml of a solution of iodinated contrast solution (Solutrast 300) and Gd-DTPA (100:1) were injected under fluoroscopic guidance. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5 TM scanner (Vision, Siemens; FOV 16 cm, matrix 256x256, fat-suppressed 3D-FLASH). Multiplanar image reconstructions were done perpendicular to the acetabulum in the oblique-coronal, oblique-axial, and radial planes. The labral specimens were examined macroscopically. Results: In 12/20 hips (60%), a labral lesion was found on pathologic examination. In 7 specimens, the labrum was partially or completely detached in the weight-bearing superior region. One flap-like variant of the labrum was seen; in 4 hip joints, the labrum was degenerated (one cystic degeneration). Pathologic findings were confirmed by MRa in 8/12 specimens (sensitivity 67%). All degenerated labra were correctly diagnosed on MRa. Three small labral detachments and the flap-like variant were misinterpreted as being normal. There were no false positive findings (specificity 100%). The accuracy was 80%. Labral lesions were seen in 6/8 and in 6/12 of hips with and without osteoarthritis, respectively. Conclusion: MRa is well suited to delineate the acetabular labrum and to diagnose labral abnormalities. Detection of small labral detachments and anatomic variants is difficult and requires some experience. Labral lesions are correlated to osteoarthritis of the hip, but may be frequently seen in the elderly without underlying osteoarthritis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Feststellung der Haeufigkeit von Laesionen des Labrum acetabulare bei aelteren Hueftgelenkspraeparaten und Untersuchung der Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet der MR-Arthrographie (MRa) fuer die Darstellung dieser

  8. Indications for CT and MR arthrography. Recommendations of the Musculoskeletal Workgroup of the DRG; Indikationen der MR- und CT-Arthrografie. Empfehlungen der AG Muskuloskelettale Radiologie der DRG

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    Fischer, W. [Hessingpark Clinic, Radiologengemeinschaft Augsburg (Germany); Bohndorf, K.; Zentner, J. [Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Kreitner, K.F. [Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Schmitt, R. [Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Woertler, K. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2009-05-15

    The ongoing discussion about CT and MR arthrography is at least in part due to the lack of definite guidelines. The intention of the musculoskeletal workgroup of the DRG (Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft) was the establishment of recommendations for general guidance. After review of the recent literature, the indications for arthrographic examinations were discussed during a consensus meeting. Since the published data are insufficient and partially contradictory, no precise statements could be extracted from the literature. Therefore, the proposed recommendations are mainly based on expert opinions. In this review the main statements of the published literature are summarized and the recommendations of the musculoskeletal workgroup of the DRG are presented. (orig.)

  9. Intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears of the wrist: comparison of MDCT arthrography, conventional 3-T MRI, and MR arthrography

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    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Ng, Alex W.H.; Tong, Cina S.L.; Griffith, James F. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Tse, W.L.; Wong, C.; Ho, P.C. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China)

    2013-09-15

    This study compares the diagnostic performance of multidetector CT arthrography (CTA), conventional 3-T MR and MR arthrography (MRA) in detecting intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears of the wrist. Ten cadaveric wrists of five male subjects with an average age 49.6 years (range 26-59 years) were evaluated using CTA, conventional 3-T MR and MRA. We assessed the presence of scapholunate ligament (SLL), lunotriquetral ligament (LTL), and TFCC tears using a combination of conventional arthrography and arthroscopy as a gold standard. All images were evaluated in consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy being calculated. Sensitivities/specificity/accuracy of CTA, conventional MRI, and MRA were 100 %/100 %/100 %, 66 %/86 %/80 %, 100 %/86 %/90 % for the detection of SLL tear, 100 %/80 %/90 %, 60 %/80 %/70 %, 100 %/80 %/90 % for the detection of LTL tear, and 100 %/100 %/100 %, 100 %/86 %/90 %, 100 %/100 %/100 % for the detection of TFCC tear. Overall CTA had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy among the three investigations while MRA performed better than conventional MR. CTA also had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying which component of the SLL and LTL was torn. Membranous tears of both SLL and LTL were better visualized than dorsal or volar tears on all three imaging modalities. Both CT and MR arthrography have a very high degree of accuracy for diagnosing tears of the SLL, LTL, and TFCC with both being more accurate than conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  10. Cam-type femoral-acetabular impingement: is the alpha angle the best MR arthrography has to offer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohan, Derek G.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Motamedi, Kambiz; Sayre, James; Hame, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    In our institutional experience, determination of the alpha (α) angle at MR arthrography as an indicator of the likelihood of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is fraught with inconsistency. The aims of this study were to quantify the degree of variability in and calculate the diagnostic accuracy of the α angle in suggesting a diagnosis of cam impingement, to determine the accuracy of a positive clinical impingement test, and to suggest alternative MR arthrographic measures of femoral head-neck overgrowth and determine their diagnostic utilities. We carried out a retrospective analysis of MR arthrographic studies performed during a 4-year period, combined with chart analysis, which allowed identification of 78 patients in whom surgical correlation was also available. The status of a preoperative clinical impingement test was also noted. Patients were designated as having cam-type FAI (Group A, n = 39) if intra-operative femoral head-neck junction bony osteochondroplasty/arthoscopic femoral debridement was performed. Group B (n = 39) acted as controls. Three radiologists independently and blindly performed a series of measurements (α angle and two newly proposed measurements) in each patient on two separate occasions. An α angle of greater than 55 was considered indicative of the presence of cam-type FAI. Performance values for α angle measurement were poor for each observer. There was considerable (up to 30% of the mean value) intra-observer variability between the first and second α angle measurements for each subject. Binary logistic regression analysis confirmed that the α angle is of no value in predicting the presence or absence of cam-FAI. A statistically significant difference existed between Groups A and B with regard to the newly proposed anterior femoral distance (AFD; p = 0.004). Using an AFD value of 3.60 mm or greater as being indicative of the presence of cam-FAI yields a 0.67 performance measure (95% confidence interval 0

  11. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

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    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  12. Systematics of shoulder instability; Systematik der Schulterinstabilitaet

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    Kreitner, K.F.; Maehringer-Kunz, A. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.) [German] Unter einer Schulterinstabilitaet versteht man jede zu Beschwerden fuehrende Translation des Humeruskopfs in Relation zur Gelenkpfanne waehrend einer aktiven Bewegung der Schulter. Glenohumerale Instabilitaeten werden heute nach ihrer Aetiologie eingeteilt, da bei der Wahl der Therapie der Entstehungsmechanismus der Instabilitaet eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Danach unterscheidet man primaer traumatisch von atraumatisch entstandenen Instabilitaeten sowie Mikroinstabilitaeten. Bei der Diagnostik dienen konventionelle Roentgenuebersichtsaufnahmen nur noch zur Dokumentation einer Luxation und zur Beurteilung der Reposition. Die durch eine Instabilitaet hervorgerufenen Verletzungsfolgen am labroligamentaeren Komplex und den knoechernen Strukturen werden heute bevorzugt mit der direkten MR-Arthrographie dargestellt. Hierbei koennen unterschiedliche Verletzungsmuster dargestellt werden. Nach

  13. What happens to the triangular fibrocartilage complex during pronation and supination of the forearm? Analysis of its morphology and diagnostic assessment with MR arthrography

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    Pfirrmann, C.W.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Theumann, N.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Service de Radiologie, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chung, C.B.; Trudell, D.J.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Botte, M.J. [Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic morphologic changes of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) during pronation and supination of the forearm using high-resolution MR arthrography in cadavers and to evaluate the impact of these changes on the diagnostic assessment of the normal and abnormal TFCC. Design and specimens: High-resolution MR arthrography of 10 wrists of cadaveric specimens was obtained in maximum pronation, in the neutral position, and in maximum supination of the forearm. The structures of the TFCC were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and correlated with anatomic sections. The position of the forearm that allowed the best visualization of normal structures and lesions of the TFCC was determined. Results: The shape and extent of the articular disc as well as the radial portions of the radioulnar ligaments did not change with pronation and supination. The articular disc was horizontal in the neutral position and tilted more distally to align with the proximal carpal row in pronation and supination. The fibers of the ulnar part of the radioulnar ligaments (ulnar attachment of the articular disc) revealed the most significant changes: their orientation was coronal in the neutral position and sagittal in positions of pronation and supination. The ulnomeniscal homologue was largest in the neutral position and was reduced in size during pronation and supination. The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon was centered in its groove in the neutral position and pronation. In supination this tendon revealed subluxation from this groove. The dorsal capsule of the distal radioulnar joint was taut in pronation, and the palmar capsule was taut in supination. The preferred forearm position for analysis of most of the structures of the TFCC was the neutral position, followed by the pronated position. The neutral position was rated best for the detection of ulnar and radial detachments of the TFCC, followed by the pronated position, except for two central

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive imaging tool that can complement the physical examination in the evaluation of traumatic and non-traumatic injuries of the shoulder. The superb soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capabilities of MRI make it a preferred modality to provide a global assessment of the soft tissue and osseous structures of the shoulder. Learning objectives: to review briefly the anatomy of the shoulder and the specificity of sequences and planes for MRI; to demonstrate the characteristic MR findings of some of the most common shoulder disorders; to indicate how MR arthrography (MRA) of the shoulder can add extra value to the diagnostic process; to outline a systematic approach to the interpretation of the shoulder MR examination. Choosing the most suitable sequences and planes as well as the thorough knowledge of the anatomic structures assist the correct diagnosis of the pathologic disorders of the shoulder which is of great importance for the precise treatment management, surgical versus conservative, as well as for the appropriate surgical approach, open versus arthroscopic

  15. High origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: MR arthrography with anatomic and histologic correlation in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Ruiz, Francisco Alejandro; Baranski Kaniak, Beatriz Cristina; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald L.; Haghighi, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    The anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament has been described to arise from the anteroinferior labrum, but we have observed that in some persons its origin is from the anterior or anterosuperior labrum, creating diagnostic difficulties. Ten fresh unembalmed cadaveric shoulders underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using a posterior approach with a 1.5 T GE magnet, with the following sequences: T1-weighted fast spin-echo in axial, coronal and sagittal planes, and T1 fat-suppressed spin-echo in the axial plane (TR/TE 600/20, section thickness 2.5 mm, 0.5 mm interslice space, number of signals acquired, two, field of view 12 x 12 cm, and matrix 512 x 256 pixels). Following imaging, the shoulders were frozen and later sectioned using a band saw into 3-mm sections corresponding to the axial imaging plane. Histological analysis was also performed to determine the origin of the anterior band. Four of the ten shoulders had an origin of the anterior band above or at the 3 o'clock position: one at the 1 o'clock position, two at the 2 o'clock position, and one at the 3 o'clock position. In another shoulder, the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament originated from the middle glenohumeral ligament, and in five other shoulders, the anterior band originated from the anteroinferior labrum as has been described in the literature. This finding is of clinical significance as a high origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament leads to MR arthrographic finding that can simulate those of labral tears or detachments. (orig.)

  16. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports; Schultergelenkverletzungen bei Ueberkopfsportarten

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    Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2010-05-15

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [German] Ueberkopfsportarten stellen grosse Anforderungen an das Schultergelenk. Schulterbeschwerden bei Ueberkopf- und Wurfsportlern koennen in der Mehrzahl der Faelle auf eine chronische Ueberlastung von Sehnen und Kapsel-Band-Strukturen oder auf die Folgen einer Mikroinstabilitaet und sekundaerer Impingementsyndrome zurueckgefuehrt werden. Wegen ihres grossen Einflusses auf die Therapieentscheidung stellt die Bildgebung bei Athleten mit unklaren Schulterbeschwerden eine Herausforderung dar. Die MR-Arthrographie ist in diesem Zusammenhang als Schnittbildverfahren der ersten Wahl anzusehen, da sie den Nachweis bzw. Ausschluss pathologischer Veraenderungen aller relevanten Gelenkstrukturen mit ausreichender Sicherheit ermoeglicht. Dieser Artikel gibt eine Uebersicht ueber biomechanische und klinische Aspekte sowie MR-arthrographische Befunde der haeufigsten Schultergelenkpathologien bei Ueberkopfsportlern, wie Bizepstendinopathie, Superior-labral-anterior-posterior- (SLAP-)Laesionen, Laesionen der

  17. MR arthrographic findings in tenosynovitis of the long bicipital tendon of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueckel, C.; Nidecker, A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MR arthrographic findings of bicipital tenosynovitis in correlation with arthroscopy. Design and patients. The shoulder MR arthrographies of 500 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed for signs of bicipital tenosynovitis and associated pathologies. Forty patients (8%) had MR evidence of bicipital tenosynovitis, but only 17 (3%) with arthroscopic confirmation were included in the study. The MR findings in these patients were compared with those of 10 patients with rotator cuff lesions but arthroscopically normal long biceps tendons. MR arthrography was performed with 10-15 ml of a 250 mmol/l gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) solution injected under fluoroscopic guidance, and transaxial, oblique coronal and sagittal MR sequences were obtained. Results. All 17 patients showed one or more abnormal findings: signal increase in the tendon with or without fusiform distension was seen in 12, surface irregularities in six, adhesions in 11 and noncommunicating effusions of the tendon sheath in six. Associated abnormalities of the rotator cuff were present in 16 while the seventeenth patient had glenohumeral synovitis without rotator cuff pathology. MR arthrograms correlated with arthroscopic findings in the joint but comparison was not possible in the intertubercular groove portion of the biceps tendon. None of the 10 patients with an arthroscopically normal biceps tendon showed any of the MR findings of bicipital tenosynovitis. Conclusion. Bicipital tenosynovitis is detectable by MR arthrography. In most cases it is an associated finding of rotator cuff abnormalities and likely to have a similar etiology. When lesions of the anterior rotator cuff are recognized, the biceps tendon should be scrutinized for inflammatory changes. (orig.)

  18. MR arthrographic findings in tenosynovitis of the long bicipital tendon of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueckel, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Basel, Petersgraben 4, CH-4031 Basel (Switzerland); Nidecker, A. [MRI Institut Rebgasse, Untere Rebgasse 18, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MR arthrographic findings of bicipital tenosynovitis in correlation with arthroscopy. Design and patients. The shoulder MR arthrographies of 500 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed for signs of bicipital tenosynovitis and associated pathologies. Forty patients (8%) had MR evidence of bicipital tenosynovitis, but only 17 (3%) with arthroscopic confirmation were included in the study. The MR findings in these patients were compared with those of 10 patients with rotator cuff lesions but arthroscopically normal long biceps tendons. MR arthrography was performed with 10-15 ml of a 250 mmol/l gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) solution injected under fluoroscopic guidance, and transaxial, oblique coronal and sagittal MR sequences were obtained. Results. All 17 patients showed one or more abnormal findings: signal increase in the tendon with or without fusiform distension was seen in 12, surface irregularities in six, adhesions in 11 and noncommunicating effusions of the tendon sheath in six. Associated abnormalities of the rotator cuff were present in 16 while the seventeenth patient had glenohumeral synovitis without rotator cuff pathology. MR arthrograms correlated with arthroscopic findings in the joint but comparison was not possible in the intertubercular groove portion of the biceps tendon. None of the 10 patients with an arthroscopically normal biceps tendon showed any of the MR findings of bicipital tenosynovitis. Conclusion. Bicipital tenosynovitis is detectable by MR arthrography. In most cases it is an associated finding of rotator cuff abnormalities and likely to have a similar etiology. When lesions of the anterior rotator cuff are recognized, the biceps tendon should be scrutinized for inflammatory changes. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 22 refs.

  19. Acromioclavicular joint cyst: nine cases of a pseudotumor of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshering Vogel, Dechen W.; Anderson, Suzanne E. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, California (United States); Hertel, Ralph [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Orthopedics, Plastic and Hand Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Bernhard, Juerg [Burgerspital, Department of Rheumatology, Solothurn (Switzerland); Stauffer, Edouard [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-05-01

    (1) To analyse the imaging appearances of nine patients with acromioclavicular joint cysts presenting as shoulder masses for tumor staging with operative, histopathological and joint aspiration findings. Retrospective review of imaging and correlation with clinical, operative and surgical notes. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Nine patients who presented clinically with a shoulder mass were evaluated by radiographs (n=9), ultrasound (n=1), conventional arthrography (n=3), MRI (n=6; with direct MR arthrography n=2, indirect MR arthrography n=4). All patients had a focal mass superior to the AC joint, with a size ranging from 1.5 cm to 6 cm and a mean of 3.27 cm. Correlation was available with surgery (n=7), histopathology (n=2) and cyst aspiration (n=2). Two patients were managed conservatively. Geyser sign was positive in all three arthrograms. All MRIs revealed extensive rotator cuff tears with a column of fluid extending from the glenohumeral joint through the rotator cuff tear into the acromioclavicular joint and acromioclavicular cyst. Chondrocalcinosis was seen in the acromioclavicular joint cyst (n=2) and in the glenohumeral joint (n=1). Aspirate in two patients contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. (orig.)

  20. Acromioclavicular joint cyst: nine cases of a pseudotumor of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tshering Vogel, Dechen W.; Anderson, Suzanne E.; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Hertel, Ralph; Bernhard, Juerg; Stauffer, Edouard

    2005-01-01

    (1) To analyse the imaging appearances of nine patients with acromioclavicular joint cysts presenting as shoulder masses for tumor staging with operative, histopathological and joint aspiration findings. Retrospective review of imaging and correlation with clinical, operative and surgical notes. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Nine patients who presented clinically with a shoulder mass were evaluated by radiographs (n=9), ultrasound (n=1), conventional arthrography (n=3), MRI (n=6; with direct MR arthrography n=2, indirect MR arthrography n=4). All patients had a focal mass superior to the AC joint, with a size ranging from 1.5 cm to 6 cm and a mean of 3.27 cm. Correlation was available with surgery (n=7), histopathology (n=2) and cyst aspiration (n=2). Two patients were managed conservatively. Geyser sign was positive in all three arthrograms. All MRIs revealed extensive rotator cuff tears with a column of fluid extending from the glenohumeral joint through the rotator cuff tear into the acromioclavicular joint and acromioclavicular cyst. Chondrocalcinosis was seen in the acromioclavicular joint cyst (n=2) and in the glenohumeral joint (n=1). Aspirate in two patients contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of Labral Pathology and Hip Articular Cartilage in Patients with Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI): Comparison of Multidetector CT Arthrography and MR Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Murat; Calisir, Cuneyt; Omeroglu, Hakan; Inan, Ulukan; Mutlu, Fezan; Kaya, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    To compare the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) arthrography (CTa) and magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography (MRa) findings with surgical findings in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of these methods. Labral pathology and articular cartilage were prospectively evaluated with MRa and CTa in 14 hips of 14 patients. The findings were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists with 10 and 20 years of experience, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value were determined using surgical findings as the standard of reference. While the disagreement between observers was recorded in two cases of labral tearing with MRa, there was a complete consensus with CTa. Disagreement between observers was found in four cases of femoral cartilage loss with both MRa and CTa. Disagreement was also recorded in only one case of acetabular cartilage loss with both methods. The percent sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for correctly assessing the labral tearing were as follows for MRa/CTa, respectively: 100/100, 50/100, 86/100 (p<0.05). The same values for acetabular cartilage assessment were 89/56, 40/60, 71/71 (p>0.05) and for femoral cartilage assessment were 100/75, 90/70, 86/71 (p>0.05). Inter-observer reliability value showed excellent agreement for labral tearing with CTa (κ=1.0). Inter-observer agreement was substantial to excellent with regard to acetabular cartilage assessment with MRa and CTa (κ=0.76 for MRa and κ=0.86 for CTa) Inter-observer reliability with CTa is excellent for labral tearing assessment. CTa seems to have an equal sensitivity and a higher specificity than MRa for the detection of labral pathology. MRa is better, but not statistically significantly, in demonstrating acetabular and femoral cartilage pathology

  2. Ultrasonographic evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint: Correlation of findings with gross anatomy and MR arthrography in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M., E-mail: florian.buck@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Nico, Marcelo A.C., E-mail: nico.marcelo@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Gheno, Ramon, E-mail: ramon.gheno@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Trudell, Debra J., E-mail: debtrudell@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Resnick, Donald, E-mail: dresnick@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in the evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Methods and materials: Ten cadaveric specimens were obtained. US evaluation of cartilage degeneration and thickness was performed by two independent and blinded readers (R1 and R2). Gross anatomy and MR arthrography evaluated by two readers in consensus served as the reference standard. The joint surface not accessible to US was measured. Results: US interreader agreement was non-existent for cartilage thickness measurements and moderate for cartilage degeneration grading (weighted kappa = 0.41). Comparing US and MR imaging evaluation, there was no correlation between US R1 and MR imaging (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC] = 0.352) and a moderate correlation between US R2 and MR imaging (PCC = 0.570) concerning cartilage thickness measurements. Concerning cartilage degeneration grading, there was a moderate to strong (R1 Spearman correlation coefficient [SCC] = 0.729)/R2 SCC = 0.767) correlation concerning cartilage degeneration grading. Comparing US and gross anatomic evaluation, there was no correlation for US R1 (PCC = 0.220) and a strong correlation for US R2 (PCC = 0.922) concerning cartilage thickness measurements, and a strong to moderate correlation (R1 SCC = 0.808/R2 SCC = 0.597) concerning cartilage degeneration grading. The mean sector of the articular surface of the ulna head not accessible to US was 13{sup o}. Conclusion: In conclusion the DRUJ is accessible to US except in the central 13{sup o} sector of the joint surface. US was approved to be sufficient in demonstrating advanced stages of cartilage degeneration. Thus, US of the DRUJ is recommended in patients suffering from ulnar-sided wrist pain.

  3. Ultrasonographic evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint: Correlation of findings with gross anatomy and MR arthrography in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Florian M.; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Gheno, Ramon; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in the evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Methods and materials: Ten cadaveric specimens were obtained. US evaluation of cartilage degeneration and thickness was performed by two independent and blinded readers (R1 and R2). Gross anatomy and MR arthrography evaluated by two readers in consensus served as the reference standard. The joint surface not accessible to US was measured. Results: US interreader agreement was non-existent for cartilage thickness measurements and moderate for cartilage degeneration grading (weighted kappa = 0.41). Comparing US and MR imaging evaluation, there was no correlation between US R1 and MR imaging (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC] = 0.352) and a moderate correlation between US R2 and MR imaging (PCC = 0.570) concerning cartilage thickness measurements. Concerning cartilage degeneration grading, there was a moderate to strong (R1 Spearman correlation coefficient [SCC] = 0.729)/R2 SCC = 0.767) correlation concerning cartilage degeneration grading. Comparing US and gross anatomic evaluation, there was no correlation for US R1 (PCC = 0.220) and a strong correlation for US R2 (PCC = 0.922) concerning cartilage thickness measurements, and a strong to moderate correlation (R1 SCC = 0.808/R2 SCC = 0.597) concerning cartilage degeneration grading. The mean sector of the articular surface of the ulna head not accessible to US was 13 o . Conclusion: In conclusion the DRUJ is accessible to US except in the central 13 o sector of the joint surface. US was approved to be sufficient in demonstrating advanced stages of cartilage degeneration. Thus, US of the DRUJ is recommended in patients suffering from ulnar-sided wrist pain.

  4. Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesion type II with accompanied findings: assessment of shoulder MR arthrographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Young; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kwon, Oh Soo; Kim, Ki Tae

    2006-01-01

    To describe the pattern of various shoulder abnormalities with an associated superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion type II using magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography, and to assess the clinical significance of the associated abnormalities. A retrospective review of the MR arthrographic findings of 92 cases of a shoulder with an arthroscopically confirmed SLAP lesion type II was performed. The MR arthrography images were reviewed and analyzed. MR arthrographic analysis noted the presence of a rotator cuff abnormality, acromioclavicular arthritis, adhesive capsulitis, glenohumeral arthritis, a labral abnormality besides the SLAP lesion, and a paralabral cyst. The patients with SLAP lesions were divided into two age groups: those over 40 years of age and those forty years old or younger. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of age on the various shoulder abnormalities with associated SLAP lesion. Of the 92 SLAP lesions type II, there were 7 cases (8%) of isolated SLAP lesions without any associated any shoulder abnormality. Eighty-five (92%) SLAP lesions were associated with various shoulder abnormalities including rotator cuff tendinosis (30/92, 33%), partial-thickness tear (36/92, 39%), full-thickness tear (2/92, 2%), acromioclavicular arthritis (46/92, 50%), adhesive capsulitis (7/92, 8%), glenohumeral arthritis (15/92, 16%), labral abnormality (26/92, 28%) and paralabral cyst (7/92, 8%). The SLAP lesions (60/92, 65%) in patients over forty years of age were accompanied by a significantly high number of rotator cuff abnormalities (ρ < 0.001), glenohumeral osteoarthritis (ρ = 0.001), and acromioclavicular osteoarthritis (ρ < 0.001). In contrast, the SLAP lesions (32/92, 35%) in patients forty years old or younger had a significantly high number of anterior or posterior labral lesions (ρ < 0.001). Isolated SLAP lesions type II without other associated shoulder abnormalities are uncommon, and the age of the patient influences

  5. Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesion type II with accompanied findings: assessment of shoulder MR arthrographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kwon, Oh Soo; Kim, Ki Tae [The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    To describe the pattern of various shoulder abnormalities with an associated superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion type II using magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography, and to assess the clinical significance of the associated abnormalities. A retrospective review of the MR arthrographic findings of 92 cases of a shoulder with an arthroscopically confirmed SLAP lesion type II was performed. The MR arthrography images were reviewed and analyzed. MR arthrographic analysis noted the presence of a rotator cuff abnormality, acromioclavicular arthritis, adhesive capsulitis, glenohumeral arthritis, a labral abnormality besides the SLAP lesion, and a paralabral cyst. The patients with SLAP lesions were divided into two age groups: those over 40 years of age and those forty years old or younger. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of age on the various shoulder abnormalities with associated SLAP lesion. Of the 92 SLAP lesions type II, there were 7 cases (8%) of isolated SLAP lesions without any associated any shoulder abnormality. Eighty-five (92%) SLAP lesions were associated with various shoulder abnormalities including rotator cuff tendinosis (30/92, 33%), partial-thickness tear (36/92, 39%), full-thickness tear (2/92, 2%), acromioclavicular arthritis (46/92, 50%), adhesive capsulitis (7/92, 8%), glenohumeral arthritis (15/92, 16%), labral abnormality (26/92, 28%) and paralabral cyst (7/92, 8%). The SLAP lesions (60/92, 65%) in patients over forty years of age were accompanied by a significantly high number of rotator cuff abnormalities ({rho} < 0.001), glenohumeral osteoarthritis ({rho} = 0.001), and acromioclavicular osteoarthritis ({rho} < 0.001). In contrast, the SLAP lesions (32/92, 35%) in patients forty years old or younger had a significantly high number of anterior or posterior labral lesions ({rho} < 0.001). Isolated SLAP lesions type II without other associated shoulder abnormalities are uncommon, and the age of the patient

  6. A new method for measurement of subcoracoid outlet and its relationship to rotator cuff pathology at MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, N.A.; Singh, J.; Tins, B.J.; Lalam, R.K.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Orthopaedic surgical studies have shown that variations in the vertical distance between the tip of the coracoid process and the supra-glenoid tubercle alter the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. Our objective was to measure the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supra-glenoid tubercle (CTGT) on MR and to assess whether this showed better correlation with rotator cuff pathology compared with the axial coraco-humeral distance. A retrospective review was performed of 100 consecutive shoulder MR arthrograms. Vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle was measured in the sagittal oblique plane. Separate assessment was then made of tendon pathology of the subscapularis, supraspinatus and long head of biceps tendons. Axial coraco-humeral distance was then measured. Correlation between tendon abnormalities and the two measurements was then made. Of the 100 cases, 42 had subscapularis tendon lesions, 21 had lesions of the long head of biceps and 53 had supraspinatus tendon lesions. Mean vertical distance from the coracoid tip to supraglenoid tubercle was greater in those with lesions of any of these tendons and was statistically significant for the supraspinatus group (P = 0.005). Reduced axial coraco-humeral distance was also seen in patients with tendinopathy, although with less statistically significant difference (p = 0.059). Our results support orthopaedic studies that have shown that the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle increases the incidence and risk of rotator cuff disease by altering the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. (orig.)

  7. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  8. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no

  9. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudisco Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA, showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant

  10. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  11. The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder in detection and grading of SLAP lesions: Comparison with arthroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mohammed Farghally; Youssef, Ahmed Omar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) in diagnosis and grading of superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions of the Glenoid Labrum Compared with surgery Material and methods: This was a prospective study including fifty nine clinically diagnosed SLAP patients. The study was done during the period from January 2008 to June 2010. All patients were submitted to history taking, clinical examination and conventional MRI examination of the shoulder, MRA was done in patients with negative conventional MRI, all of these patients underwent arthroscopy for diagnosis wither open or arthroscopy for diagnosis and treatment and results were compared with MRA findings. Main outcome measures: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and overall accuracy of MR arthrography in detection and grading of SLAP lesions of the gelnoid labrum. Results: Out of fifty nine patients, 25 patients had positive MR findings in conventional MRI, and 34 patients had negative MR findings, who underwent MR arthrography; 10 out of them had normal arthrogram (only 6 of them underwent arthroscopy), 22 had SLAP (superior labrum anterior to posterior) lesions, one had Bankart's lesion and one had internal impingement syndrome. These results were compared with arthroscopy results. The overall sensitivity of MRA in detection of SLAP lesions was 90% while the specificity was 50%, negative predictive value (NPV) was 66.6% and positive predicative value (PPV) was 81.8%. MRA and arthroscopy results were concurrent in 79.3% patients. Conclusion: MR arthrography is a sensitive minimally invasive technique for detection and grading of SLAP lesions, it can help in avoiding patients unnecessary diagnostic arthroscopy

  12. The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder in detection and grading of SLAP lesions: Comparison with arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Mohammed Farghally, E-mail: Mohammed_amin37@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis ElMinya University, ElMinya High Road, ElMinya (Egypt); Youssef, Ahmed Omar [Department of Orthropedic Surgery El Minya University, ElMinya (Egypt)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) in diagnosis and grading of superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions of the Glenoid Labrum Compared with surgery Material and methods: This was a prospective study including fifty nine clinically diagnosed SLAP patients. The study was done during the period from January 2008 to June 2010. All patients were submitted to history taking, clinical examination and conventional MRI examination of the shoulder, MRA was done in patients with negative conventional MRI, all of these patients underwent arthroscopy for diagnosis wither open or arthroscopy for diagnosis and treatment and results were compared with MRA findings. Main outcome measures: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and overall accuracy of MR arthrography in detection and grading of SLAP lesions of the gelnoid labrum. Results: Out of fifty nine patients, 25 patients had positive MR findings in conventional MRI, and 34 patients had negative MR findings, who underwent MR arthrography; 10 out of them had normal arthrogram (only 6 of them underwent arthroscopy), 22 had SLAP (superior labrum anterior to posterior) lesions, one had Bankart's lesion and one had internal impingement syndrome. These results were compared with arthroscopy results. The overall sensitivity of MRA in detection of SLAP lesions was 90% while the specificity was 50%, negative predictive value (NPV) was 66.6% and positive predicative value (PPV) was 81.8%. MRA and arthroscopy results were concurrent in 79.3% patients. Conclusion: MR arthrography is a sensitive minimally invasive technique for detection and grading of SLAP lesions, it can help in avoiding patients unnecessary diagnostic arthroscopy.

  13. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20

  14. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyunghee Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20.

  15. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome; Diagnostik des Schulterimpingementsyndroms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [Deutsch] Grundlage des Impingementsyndroms ist eine Kompression des Supraspinatus am akromioklavikularen Bogen vor allem bei Flexion

  16. Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: A Prospective Randomized Study of Anterior and Posterior Ultrasonography-Guided Contrast Injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, M.P.; Mustonen, A.O.T. (Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is an accurate imaging method for internal shoulder derangements and rotator cuff pathologies. Both anterior and posterior contrast injection techniques, under palpatory, fluoroscopic, or ultrasonographic guidance have been described in the literature. However, clinical comparisons of the injection techniques remain few. Purpose: To compare the performance of anterior and posterior ultrasonography (US)-guided arthrography injections of the shoulder regarding patient discomfort and influence on diagnostic MR reading, and to illustrate the typical artifacts resulting from contrast leakage in the respective techniques. Material and Methods: 43 MR arthrographies were prospectively randomized into anterior and posterior US-guided contrast injections and performed by two radiologists, with the study of artifacts from contrast leakage. Pain from the injections was assessed by a survey utilizing a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Of the 23 anterior injections, nine caused contrast artifacts in the subscapular tendon, and in three the leakage extended further anteriorly. Of the 20 posterior injections, 12 showed injection artifacts of the rotator cuff, extending outside the cuff in seven. Two of the anterior and none of the posterior artifacts compromised diagnostic quality. In posterior injections, the leakage regularly occurred at the caudal edge of the infraspinatus muscle and was easily distinguishable from rotator cuff tears. All patients completed the pain survey. Mean VAS scores were 25.0 (median 18, SD 22) for anterior, and 25.4 (median 16, SD 25) for posterior injections. The two radiologists achieved different mean VAS scores but closely agreed as to anterior and posterior VAS scores. Conclusion: Arthrography injections were fairly simple to perform under US guidance. Patient discomfort for anterior and posterior injections was equally minor. A tailored approach utilizing anterior or posterior injections

  17. Virtual MR arthroscopy of the shoulder: image gallery with arthroscopic correlation of major pathologies in shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, A; Volpe, D; Volpe, N; Fornara, P; Castagna, A; Carriero, A

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare virtual MR arthroscopic reconstructions with arthroscopic images in patients affected by shoulder joint instability. MR arthrography (MR-AR) of the shoulder is now a well-assessed technique, based on the injection of a contrast medium solution, which fills the articular space and finds its way between the rotator cuff (RC) and the glenohumeral ligaments. In patients with glenolabral pathology, we used an additional sequence that provided virtual arthroscopy (VA) post-processed views, which completed the MR evaluation of shoulder pathology. We enrolled 36 patients, from whom MR arthrographic sequence data (SE T1w and GRE T1 FAT SAT) were obtained using a GE 0.5 T Signa--before any surgical or arthroscopic planned treatment; the protocol included a supplemental 3D, spoiled GE T1w positioned in the coronal plane. Dedicated software loaded on a work-station was used to elaborate VAs. Two radiologists evaluated, on a semiquantitative scale, the visibility of the principal anatomic structures, and then, in consensus, the pathology emerging from the VA images. These images were reconstructed in all patients, except one. The visualization of all anatomical structures was acceptable. VA and MR arthrographic images were fairly concordant with intraoperative findings. Although in our pilot study the VA findings did not change the surgical planning, the results showed concordance with the surgical or arthroscopic images.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: dependence on the level of training of the performing radiologist for diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, John S. [University of Toronto, Division of Orthopaedics, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Andreisek, Gustav [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Hospital Zuerich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Harvey, Edward J. [McGill University, Division of Orthopaedics, MUHC - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolin, Preston [Center for Athletic Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Discrepancies were identified between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical findings in patients who had MR imaging examinations evaluated by community-based general radiologists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR imaging examinations of the shoulder with regard to the training level of the performing radiologist. A review of patient charts identified 238 patients (male/female, 175/63; mean age, 40.4 years) in whom 250 arthroscopies were performed and who underwent MR imaging or direct MR arthrography in either a community-based or hospital-based institution prior to surgery. All MR imaging and surgical reports were reviewed and the diagnostic performance for the detection of labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions was determined. Kappa and Student's t test analyses were performed in a subset of cases in which initial community-based MR images were re-evaluated by hospital-based musculoskeletal radiologists, to determine the interobserver agreement and any differences in image interpretation. The diagnostic performance of community-based general radiologists was lower than that of hospital-based sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists. A sub-analysis of re-evaluated cases showed that musculoskeletal radiologists performed better. {kappa} values were 0.208, 0.396, 0.376, and 0.788 for labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions (t test statistics: p =<0.001, 0.004, 0.019, and 0.235). Our results indicate that the diagnostic performance of MR imaging and MR arthrography of the shoulder depends on the training level of the performing radiologist, with sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists having a better diagnostic performance than general radiologists. (orig.)

  19. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery Using your shoulder after surgery Images Impingement syndrome Rotator cuff muscles Heart attack ...

  20. Frozen shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your hormones, such as during menopause Shoulder injury Shoulder surgery Open heart surgery Cervical disk disease of the ... Instructions Rotator cuff exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder surgery - discharge Images Shoulder joint inflammation References Finnoff JT. ...

  1. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; Arthroplasty - shoulder - discharge

  2. Postprocedural pain in shoulder arthrography: differences between using preservative-free normal saline and normal saline with benzyl alcohol as an intraarticular contrast diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Troy F; Gilbride, George; Clifford, Kelly

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the effect of benzyl alcohol, a common preservative in normal saline, on postprocedural pain after intraarticular injection for direct shoulder MR arthrography. From April 2011 through January 2013, 138 patients underwent direct shoulder MR arthrography. Using the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scale, patients were asked to report their shoulder pain level immediately before and immediately after the procedure and then were contacted by telephone 6, 24, and 48 hours after the procedure. Fourteen patients did not receive the prescribed amount of contrast agent for diagnostic reasons or did not complete follow-up. Sixty-two patients received an intraarticular solution including preservative-free normal saline (control group) and 62 patients received an intraarticular solution including normal saline with 0.9% benzyl alcohol as a contrast diluent (test group). Patients were randomized as to which intraarticular diluent they received. Fluoroscopic and MR images were reviewed for extracapsular contrast agent administration or extravasation, full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and adhesive capsulitis. The effect of preservative versus control on pain level was estimated with multiple regression, which included time after procedure as the covariate and accounted for repeated measures over patients. Pain scale scores were significantly (p = 0.0382) higher (0.79 units; 95% CI, 0.034-1.154) with benzyl alcohol preservative compared with control (saline). In both study arms, the pain scale scores decreased slightly after the procedure, increased by roughly 1 unit over baseline for the test group and 0.3 unit over baseline for the control group by 6 hours after the procedure, were 0.50 unit over baseline for the test group and 0.12 unit over baseline for the control group at 24 hours, then fell to be slightly greater than baseline at 48 hours with benzyl alcohol and slightly less than baseline without benzyl alcohol. These trends

  3. Optimization of T2-weighted imaging for shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography by synthetic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Hahn, Seok; Yang, Jaemoon; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-01-01

    Background Synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows reformatting of various synthetic images by adjustment of scanning parameters such as repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE). Optimized MR images can be reformatted from T1, T2, and proton density (PD) values to achieve maximum tissue contrast between joint fluid and adjacent soft tissue. Purpose To demonstrate the method for optimization of TR and TE by synthetic MRI and to validate the optimized images by comparison with conventional shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) images. Material and Methods Thirty-seven shoulder MRA images acquired by synthetic MRI were retrospectively evaluated for PD, T1, and T2 values at the joint fluid and glenoid labrum. Differences in signal intensity between the fluid and labrum were observed between TR of 500-6000 ms and TE of 80-300 ms in T2-weighted (T2W) images. Conventional T2W and synthetic images were analyzed for diagnostic agreement of supraspinatus tendon abnormalities (kappa statistics) and image quality scores (one-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis). Results Optimized mean values of TR and TE were 2724.7 ± 1634.7 and 80.1 ± 0.4, respectively. Diagnostic agreement for supraspinatus tendon abnormalities between conventional and synthetic MR images was excellent (κ = 0.882). The mean image quality score of the joint space in optimized synthetic images was significantly higher compared with those in conventional and synthetic images (2.861 ± 0.351 vs. 2.556 ± 0.607 vs. 2.750 ± 0.439; P optimized TR and TE for shoulder MRA enables optimization of soft-tissue contrast.

  4. Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hit hard with your shoulder in a football game or serve a volleyball really hard. Diagnosis How ... editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, WomenTags: laxity, out of place, shakiness, shoulder, subluxation ...

  5. Shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007206.htm Shoulder arthroscopy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Shoulder arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera called ...

  6. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Wolf, Petra

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  7. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Wolf, Petra [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  8. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.; Krogsgaard, M.; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    long latency (300 ms) excitatory reflex has been found when nerves in the capsule were stimulated electrically during shoulder surgery. In addition, when the anterior-inferior capsule was excited in conscious humans with modest amplitude electrical stimuli during muscle activity, a strong inhibition...... activity around the shoulder. This has implications for rehabilitation and shoulder surgery.......Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  9. Efficacy of labral repair, biceps tenodesis, and diagnostic arthroscopy for SLAP Lesions of the shoulder: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mowinckel Petter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery for type II SLAP (superior labral anterior posterior lesions of the shoulder is a promising but unproven treatment. The procedures include labral repair or biceps tenodesis. Retrospective cohort studies have suggested that the benefits of tenodesis include pain relief and improved function, and higher patient satisfaction, which was reported in a prospective non-randomised study. There have been no completed randomised controlled trials of surgery for type II SLAP lesions. The aims of this participant and observer blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial are to compare the short-term (6 months and long-term (2 years efficacy of labral repair, biceps tenodesis, and placebo (diagnostic arthroscopy for alleviating pain and improving function for type II SLAP lesions. Methods/Design A double-blind randomised controlled trial are performed using 120 patients, aged 18 to 60 years, with a history for type II SLAP lesions and clinical signs suggesting type II SLAP lesion, which were documented by MR arthrography and arthroscopy. Exclusion criteria include patients who have previously undergone operations for SLAP lesions or recurrent shoulder dislocations, and ruptures of the rotator cuff or biceps tendon. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, three, six, 12, and 24 months. Primary outcome measures will be the clinical Rowe Score (1988-version and the Western Ontario Instability Index (WOSI at six and 24 months. Secondary outcome measures will include the Shoulder Instability Questionnaire (SIQ, the generic EuroQol (EQ-5 D and EQ-VAS, return to work and previous sports activity, complications, and the number of reoperations. Discussion The results of this trial will be of international importance and the results will be translatable into clinical practice. Trial Registration [ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00586742

  10. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  11. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  12. Shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, William

    2013-03-01

    The frequency of shoulder dystocia in different reports has varied, ranging 0.2-3% of all vaginal deliveries. Once a shoulder dystocia occurs, even if all actions are appropriately taken, there is an increased frequency of complications, including third- or fourth-degree perineal lacerations, postpartum hemorrhage, and neonatal brachial plexus palsies. Health care providers have a poor ability to predict shoulder dystocia for most patients and there remains no commonly accepted model to accurately predict this obstetric emergency. Consequently, optimal management of shoulder dystocia requires appropriate management at the time it occurs. Multiple investigators have attempted to enhance care of shoulder dystocia by utilizing protocols and simulation training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging of the coracoglenoid ligament: a third ligament in the rotator interval of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappia, Marcello [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Varelli Institute, Naples (Italy); Castagna, Alessandro [Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Barile, Antonio [University of L' Aquila, Applied Clinical Science and Biotechnology, L' Aquila (Italy); Chianca, Vito [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Brunese, Luca [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Pouliart, Nicole [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Basic Biomedical Sciences - Human Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology - Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-08-15

    The coracoglenoid ligament (CGL) forms part of the anterosuperior capsuloligamentous complex of the shoulder. Although it has received attention in the anatomical literature, it has not been investigated on imaging. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage value and the interobserver agreement of identification and classification of the CGL on MR and MR arthrography (MRA) imaging. Retrospectively, 280 MR and 150 MRA examinations were evaluated for detection of the CGL by two musculoskeletal radiologists. On the MRA examinations the CGL configuration in relation to the superior glenohumeral (SGHL) and coracohumeral ligament (CHL) was classified into five types. Additionally, the percentage of intra-articular appearance of the CGL and its mean thickness value were calculated. Finally, a possible correlation between pathological condition and anatomical type was evaluated on MRA. The CGL could be identified in 56%/54% of MRI and in 76%/77% of MRA examinations. On MRA, the CGL was detected as distinct structures in 37%/35% of cases and it appeared fused (partially or totally) with the SGHL and/or CHL in 39%/42%; it was absent in 12%/12% and it appears undistinguishable in the remaining cases. The interobserver agreement was excellent (κ = 0.98 for detection on MRI; p = 0.927 for classification of anterosuperior anatomy on MRA; κ = 0.873 and 0.978 for identification on sagittal and axial external rotation MRA respectively; κ = 0.943 for classification as intra- or extra-articular on MRA). The CGL can be reliably identified on MRI and MRA. (orig.)

  14. Shoulder replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem. Many people are able to return to sports such as golf, swimming, gardening, bowling, and others. Your new shoulder joint will last longer if less stress is placed on it. With normal use, a ...

  15. Shoulder MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery References Hanypsiak B, DeLong JM, Lowe WR. Scapulothoracic ...

  16. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  17. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  18. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Chungang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Chul [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  19. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jee Young; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  20. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Shoulder dystocia Shoulder dystocia Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... women more likely than others to have shoulder dystocia? A pregnant woman may be at risk for ...

  1. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder surgery - after ... rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you need to be careful with your shoulder. Ask the surgeon what arm movements are safe ...

  2. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000179.htm Shoulder surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had shoulder surgery to repair the tissues inside or around your ...

  3. Shoulder Problems in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, William G., Jr.

    A description is given of typical sport-related injuries to the shoulder area. These include: (1) brachial plexus injuries; (2) peripheral nerve injuries about the shoulder; (3) acromioclavicular injuries; (4) sternoclavicular injuries; (5) shoulder dislocations; (6) recurrent traumatic subluxation/dislocations; and (7) overuse injuries.…

  4. The painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past. (orig.) [de

  5. MRI of symptomatic shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Segata, Tateki; Kunitake, Katsuhiko; Morisawa, Keizo; Harada, Masataka; Hirano, Mako

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cuff tear and acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) osteoarthrosis by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation in symptomatic shoulders. MRI was performed on 124 shoulders in 115 patients whose age ranged from 16 to 83 years (average: 58.0 years). There were 74 men (79 shoulders) and 41 women (45 shoulders). The patients were divided into three groups according to age; A group (10 shoulders: 16-29 years), B group (43 shoulders: 30-59 years), and C group (71 shoulders: 60-83 years). Rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis were graded on scales 0 to 3 (normal, increased signal intensity, incomplete, complete), and 1 to 4 (none, mild, moderate, severe), respectively. There was a significant difference in the severity of the cuff tears and the ACJ osteoarthrosis with respect to age. Twenty percent of the shoulders were graded incomplete or complete cuff tears in group A, 88% in group B, and 93% in group C. No shoulders were graded moderate or severe ACJ changes in group A, 63% in group B, and 93% in group C. There was a definite correlation between the cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. MRI of the symptomatic shoulders indicated well correlation between the rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. (author)

  6. Tears of the Supraspinatus Tendon: Assessment with Indirect Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in 67 Patients with Arthroscopic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, P. van; Gielen, J.L.; Parizel, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is generally regarded as the gold standard for shoulder imaging. As an alternative to direct MR arthrography, the less invasive indirect MR arthrography technique was proposed, offering logistic advantages because fluoroscopic or ultrasonographic guidance for joint injection is not required. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness supraspinatus tears in a symptomatic population. Material and Methods: Two radiologists with different levels of experience independently and retrospectively interpreted indirect MR (1.5T) arthrograms of the shoulder obtained in 67 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopy. On MR, the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated for full- or partial-thickness tear. With arthroscopy as the standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography in the detection of full- and partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon was calculated. Kappa (κ) statistics were used for the assessment of the agreement between arthroscopic and imaging findings and for the assessment of interobserver agreement. Results: For full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon, sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies exceeded 90% for both observers, with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 0.910). For partial-thickness tears, sensitivities (38-50%) and accuracies (76-78%) were poor for both reviewers, and interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.491). Discrepancies between MR diagnosis and arthroscopy were predominantly observed with small partial-thickness tears. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears with indirect MR arthrography remains faulty, because exact demarcation of degenerative change and partial rupture is difficult. On the basis of

  7. Tears of the Supraspinatus Tendon: Assessment with Indirect Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in 67 Patients with Arthroscopic Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, P. van; Gielen, J.L.; Parizel, P.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium)) (and others)

    2009-11-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is generally regarded as the gold standard for shoulder imaging. As an alternative to direct MR arthrography, the less invasive indirect MR arthrography technique was proposed, offering logistic advantages because fluoroscopic or ultrasonographic guidance for joint injection is not required. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness supraspinatus tears in a symptomatic population. Material and Methods: Two radiologists with different levels of experience independently and retrospectively interpreted indirect MR (1.5T) arthrograms of the shoulder obtained in 67 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopy. On MR, the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated for full- or partial-thickness tear. With arthroscopy as the standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography in the detection of full- and partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon was calculated. Kappa (kappa) statistics were used for the assessment of the agreement between arthroscopic and imaging findings and for the assessment of interobserver agreement. Results: For full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon, sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies exceeded 90% for both observers, with excellent interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.910). For partial-thickness tears, sensitivities (38-50%) and accuracies (76-78%) were poor for both reviewers, and interobserver agreement was moderate (kappa = 0.491). Discrepancies between MR diagnosis and arthroscopy were predominantly observed with small partial-thickness tears. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears with indirect MR arthrography remains faulty, because exact demarcation of degenerative change and partial rupture is difficult. On the

  8. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. US of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardellin, G.; Perin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty five healty people and 25 patients with shoulder pain underwent US control over a 12-month period: 24 patients with shoulder pain had rotator cuff and/or biceps tendon lesions. The US findings on rotator cuff and biceps tendon lesions are compared with those of arthrography and/or surgery (96% sensitivity). US is rapid, safe, non invasive, inexpensive and often more accurate, and its use is recommended for the routine examination of the shoulder joint insteat of arthrography

  10. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Wilgen, Cornelis P.; de Boer, Erlijn M.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; Koolstra, Muriel; van Opzeeland, Anita; Venema, Piet; Sterken, Margriet W.; Vincent, Andrew; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder

  11. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, M.M.; van Wilgen, C.P.; de Boer, E.M.J.; de Goede, C.J.T.; Koolstra, M.; van Opzeeland, A.; Venema, P.; Sterken, M.W.; Vincent, A.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. Study Design: Prospective. Patients and Methods: Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder

  12. Shoulder pain in hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L T

    1985-01-01

    Development of a painful shoulder in the hemiplegic patient is a significant and serious problem, because it can limit the patient's ability to reach his or her maximum functional potential. Several etiologies of shoulder pain have been identified, such as immobilization of the upper extremity, trauma to the joint structures, including brachial plexus injuries, and subluxation of the gleno-humeral joint. A review of the literature explains the basic anatomy and kinesiology of the shoulder complex, the various etiologies of hemiplegic shoulder pain, and the pros and cons of specific treatment techniques. This knowledge is essential for the occupational therapist to evaluate effectively techniques used to treat the patient with hemiplegic shoulder pain. More effective management of this problem will facilitate the patient's ability to reach his or her maximum functional potential.

  13. [Shoulder injuries in golf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, D; Gosheger, G; Schmidt, C

    2014-03-01

    Due to its growing popularity golf has now come into the focus of orthopedic sports medicine. With a wide range of age groups and playing levels, orthopedic surgeons will encounter a wide range of musculoskeletal problems which are usually the result of overuse rather than trauma. The shoulder joint plays an important role in the golf swing whereby not only the muscles around the glenohumeral joint but also the scapula stabilizing muscles are extremely important for an effective golf swing. Golf is strictly not considered to be an overhead sport; however, the extreme peak positions of the golf swing involve placing the shoulder joint in maximum abduction and adduction positions which can provoke impingement, lesions of the pulley system or even a special form of posterior shoulder instability. Even after complex shoulder operations, such as rotator cuff repair or shoulder arthroplasty, a return to the golf course at nearly the same level of play can be expected.

  14. Simulation and Shoulder Dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaddeau, Angela K; Deering, Shad

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an unpredictable obstetric emergency that requires prompt interventions to ensure optimal outcomes. Proper technique is important but difficult to train given the urgent and critical clinical situation. Simulation training for shoulder dystocia allows providers at all levels to practice technical and teamwork skills in a no-risk environment. Programs utilizing simulation training for this emergency have consistently demonstrated improved performance both during practice drills and in actual patients with significantly decreased risks of fetal injury. Given the evidence, simulation training for shoulder dystocia should be conducted at all institutions that provide delivery services.

  15. Shoulder Impingement Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trunk is crucial for maximizing arm strength and power with throwing or tennis. This part of rehabilitation can usually take place while shoulder pain is subsiding. IV Restore function Resume overhead motion ...

  16. Cross-Sectional Area of the Rotator Cuff Muscles in MRI - Is there Evidence for a Biomechanical Balanced Shoulder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Bouaicha

    correlation of the craniocaudal force couple (supraspinatus/deltoid that ranged from r = 0.565-0.698 (p<0.0001. Inter-reader agreement (ranged from 0.841 to 0.997, p = 0.0007 and intra-reader agreement were excellent (ranged from 0.863 to 0.999, p = 0.0006.The significant correlation of the CSA of the RCM that form the transverse (subscapularis/infraspinatus-teres minor and craniocaudal (supraspinatus/deltoid force couple measured by MR-arthrography supports the biomechanical concept of a dynamically balanced shoulder in patients with an intact rotator cuff.

  17. Shoulder arthroscopy: the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin W; Wright, Thomas W

    2015-04-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy is a commonly performed and accepted procedure for a wide variety of pathologies. Surgeon experience, patient positioning, knowledge of surgical anatomy, proper portal placement, and proper use of instrumentation can improve technical success and minimize complication risks. This article details the surgical anatomy, indications, patient positioning, portal placement, instrumentation, and complications for basic shoulder arthroscopy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complications of shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Todd C; Rudolph, Glen H; Caswell, Kyle; Espinoza, Christopher; Burkhead, Wayne Z; Krishnan, Sumant G

    2014-07-01

    Over the past 20 to 30 years, arthroscopic shoulder techniques have become increasingly popular. Although these techniques have several advantages over open surgery, surgical complications are no less prevalent or devastating than those associated with open techniques. Some of the complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder surgery include recurrent instability, soft-tissue injury, and neurapraxia. These complications can be minimized with thoughtful consideration of the surgical indications, careful patient selection and positioning, and a thorough knowledge of the shoulder anatomy. Deep infection following arthroscopic shoulder surgery is rare; however, the shoulder is particularly susceptible to Propionibacterium acnes infection, which is mildly virulent and has a benign presentation. The surgeon must maintain a high index of suspicion for this infection. Thromboemoblic complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder techniques are also rare, and studies have shown that pharmacologic prophylaxis has minimal efficacy in preventing these complications. Because high-quality studies on the subject are lacking, minimal evidence is available to suggest strategies for prevention. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  19. Scapulohumeral rhythm in shoulders with reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David; Matsuki, Keisuke; Struk, Aimee M; Wright, Thomas W; Banks, Scott A

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about kinematic function of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). Scapulohumeral rhythm (SHR) is a common metric for assessing muscle function and shoulder joint motion. The purpose of this study was to compare SHR in shoulders with RTSA to normal shoulders. Twenty-eight subjects, more than 12 months after unilateral RTSA, were recruited for an Institutional Review Board-approved study. Subjects performed arm abduction in the coronal plane with and without a 1.4-kg hand-held weight. Three-dimensional model-image registration techniques were used to measure orientation and position for the humerus and scapula from fluoroscopic images. Analysis of variance and Tukey tests were used to assess groupwise and pairwise differences. SHR in RTSA shoulders (1.3:1) was significantly lower than in normal shoulders (3:1). Below 30° abduction, RTSA and normal shoulders show a wide range of SHR (1.3:1 to 17:1). Above 30° abduction, SHR in RTSA shoulders was 1.3:1 for unweighted abduction and 1.3:1 for weighted abduction. Maximum RTSA shoulder abduction in weighted trials was lower than in unweighted trials. SHR variability in RTSA shoulders decreased with increasing arm elevation. RTSA shoulders show kinematics that are significantly different from normal shoulders. SHR in RTSA shoulders was significantly lower than in normal shoulders, indicating that RTSA shoulders use more scapulothoracic motion and less glenohumeral motion to elevate the arm. With these observations, it may be possible to improve rehabilitation protocols, with particular attention to the periscapular muscles, and implant design or placement to optimize functional outcomes in shoulders with RTSA. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy and Inter-Observer Agreement of Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in the Detection of Labral Lesion and Assessment of Lesion Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji Young; Song, Sook Yun; Choi, Jin Ha; Shin, Sang Jin [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and inter-observer agreement of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the detection of labral lesions by location and to describe useful MR imaging findings of labral tears. Sixty-eight patients who underwent both pre-operative MR arthrography and arthroscopy were included. The location of the labrum was classified into anterior (2-6 o'clock), superior (12-2 o'clock), and posterior (6-12 o'clock). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and inter-observer agreement of MR arthrography for the diagnosis of labral lesions by location were calculated. Frequency of MR imaging findings such as detachment, high signal intensity cleft, contour change, absence, and signal change of the labrum by location were analyzed. 35 anterior, 44 superior and 15 posterior labral lesions were detected by arthroscopy. The corresponding sensitivities were 91.4%, 79.5%, and 40.0%, specificities were 90.9%, 20.8%, and 86.8%, accuracies were 91.2%, 58.8%, and 76.5%, and kappa values were 0.823, 0.252, and 0.394, for anterior, superior, posterior lesions, respectively. The most common MR imaging findings were detachment in 60.0% of anterior labrums, high signal intensity cleft in 52.3% of superior labrums, and normal in 60.0% of posterior labrums. Diagnostic accuracy and inter-observer agreement of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of labral lesions are high in anterior labrums and low in superior or posterior labrums. The useful MR imaging findings of labral tears were different according to labral location.

  1. [Management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ray, C; Oury, J-F

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this review is to propose recommendations on the management of shoulder dystocia. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. In case of shoulder dystocia, if the obstetrician is not present at delivery, he should be systematically informed as quickly as possible (professional consensus). A third person should also be called for help in order to realize McRoberts maneuver (professional consensus). The patient has to be properly installed in gynecological position (professional consensus). It is recommended not to pull excessively on the fetal head (grade C), do not perform uterine expression (grade C) and do not realize inverse rotation of the fetal head (professional consensus). McRoberts maneuver, with or without a suprapubic pressure, is simple to perform, effective and associated with low morbidity, thus, it is recommended in the first line (grade C). Regarding the maneuvers of the second line, the available data do not suggest the superiority of one maneuver in relation to another (grade C). We proposed an algorithm; however, management should be adapted to the experience of the operator. If the posterior shoulder is engaged, Wood's maneuver should be performed preferentially; if the posterior shoulder is not engaged, delivery of the posterior arm should be performed preferentially (professional consensus). Routine episiotomy is not recommended in shoulder dystocia (professional consensus). Other second intention maneuvers are described. It seems necessary to know at least two maneuvers to perform in case of shoulder dystocia unresolved by the maneuver McRoberts (professional consensus). All physicians and midwives should know and perform obstetric maneuvers if needed quickly but without precipitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Paraplegia and the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Jennifer; Goldstein, Barry

    2004-08-01

    Among consumers, families, therapists, physicians, and other rehabilitation professionals, there has been an increasing interest in shoulder pain associated with spinal cord injury. These disorders primarily affect the soft tissues, including the tendons (eg, rotator cuff tendonitis and bicipital tendinitis), muscles (eg, myalgias and myofascial pain syndromes), and bursae. Disorders of bone and joints also have been of interest (eg, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints). This article addresses the historical context, epidemiology, pathophysiology,diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of shoulder pain as it relates to patients with spinal cord injury.

  3. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The study...... included 5853 primary operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry between 2006 and 2012. Information about deaths was obtained from the Danish Cause of Death Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age- and sex-adjusted control groups were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...

  4. Shoulder arthroscopy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a type of surgery to examine or repair the tissues inside or around your shoulder joint. The procedure ... small incision. If the surgeon is going to repair the joint, small surgical instruments are also used, such as a shaver to remove unwanted tissue.

  5. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Wilgen, Cornelis P.; de Boer, Erlijn M.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; Koolstra, Muriel; van Opzeeland, Anita; Venema, Piet; Sterken, Margriet W.; Vincent, Andrew; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2008-01-01

    To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. Prospective. Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder droop, as well as scores on shoulder disability

  6. Work related shoulder disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mathiassen, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    and symptoms. Data were analysed by generalised estimating equation and multiple logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: For current upper arm elevation above 90°, a duration increment of 1% of the daily working hours was associated with odds ratios of 1.23 (95% CI 1.10 to 1......Aims: To determine quantitative exposure-response relations between work with highly elevated arms and supraspinatus tendinitis, shoulder pain with disability, and shoulder pain without disability. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in a historical cohort of 1886 males from three...... occupational groups. Exposure measurements were performed for four consecutive working days in a random sample of 72 currently employed subjects. Individual work histories were obtained by questionnaire and register data. Health status was ascertained by physical examination blinded towards exposure...

  7. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...... shoulder pain. On postoperative day 4, 19 patients (32%) still suffered shoulder pain, but only 4 patients (7%) had clinically relevant pain. Four patients (8%) still suffered shoulder pain 12 months after surgery. In 26 patients (55%), the shoulder pain was classified as referred versus 21 patients (45...

  8. Shoulder Dystocia: Prediction and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  9. Shoulder dystocia: prediction and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  10. Thermal Shrinkage for Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Alison P.; Warren, Russell F.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Doward, David A.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Altchek, David W.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent...

  11. Shoulder dystocia: management and documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitely, Michael L; Gherman, Robert B

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that occurs when the fetal shoulders become impacted at the pelvic inlet. Management is based on performing maneuvers to alleviate this impaction. A number of protocols and training mnemonics have been developed to assist in managing shoulder dystocia when it occurs. This article reviews the evidence regarding the performance, timing, and sequence of these maneuvers; reviews the mechanism of fetal injury in relation to shoulder dystocia; and discusses issues concerning documentation of the care provided during this obstetric emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Epidemiology of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneux-Tharaux, C; Delorme, P

    2015-12-01

    To synthetize the available evidence regarding the incidence and risk factors of shoulder dystocia (SD). Consultation of the Medline database, and of national guidelines. Shoulder dystocia is defined as a vaginal delivery that requires additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed. With this definition, the incidence of SD in population-based studies is about 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Many risk factors have been described but most associations are not independent, or have not been constantly found. The 2 characteristics consistently found as independent risk factors for SD in the literature are previous SD (incidence of SD of about 10% in parturients with previous SD) and foetal macrosomia. Maternal diabetes and obesity also are associated with a higher risk of SD (2 to 4 folds) but these associations may be completely explained by foetal macrosomia. However, even factors independently and constantly associated with SD do not allow a valid prediction of SD because they are not discriminant; 50 to 70% of SD cases occur in their absence, and the great majority of deliveries when they are present is not associated with SD. Shoulder dystocia is defined by the need for additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed, and complicates 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Its main risk factors are previous SD and macrosomia, but they are poorly predictive. SD remains a non-predictable obstetrics emergency. Knowledge of SD risk factors should increase the vigilance of clinicians in at-risk contexts. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Can we predict shoulder dystocia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revicky, Vladimir; Mukhopadhyay, Sambit; Morris, Edward P; Nieto, Jose J

    2012-02-01

    To analyse the significance of risk factors and the possibility of prediction of shoulder dystocia. This was a retrospective cohort study. There were 9,767 vaginal deliveries at 37 and more weeks of gestation analysed during 2005-2007. Studied population included 234 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. Shoulder dystocia was defined as a delivery that required additional obstetric manoeuvres to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. First, a univariate analysis was done to identify the factors that had a significant association with shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia, birth weight, duration of second stage of labour and mode of delivery were studied factors. All factors were then combined in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (Adj. OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The incidence of shoulder dystocia was 2.4% (234/9,767). Only mode of delivery and birth weight were independent risk factors for shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia and duration of second stage of labour were not independent risk factors. Ventouse delivery increases the risk of shoulder dystocia almost 3 times, forceps delivery comparing to the ventouse delivery increases risk almost 3.4 times. Risk of shoulder dystocia is minimal with the birth weight of 3,000 g or less. It is difficult to foretell the exact birth weight and the mode of delivery, therefore occurrence of shoulder dystocia is highly unpredictable. Regular drills for shoulder dystocia and awareness of increased incidence with instrumental deliveries are important to reduce fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality.

  14. [Symphysiotomy to relieve shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.M.; Nieuwenhof, H.P. van de; Biert, J.; Heidema, W.M.; Bekker, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Symphysiotomy to manage shoulder dystocia is seldom used in the western world. For this reason, in well-resourced countries knowledge of its recuperation rate and the management of physical discomfort in the post-partum period is scarce. We describe two cases of symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia.

  15. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part I. Normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, Mahvash

    2004-01-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  16. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part II. Glenohumeral instability and labrum tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, Mahvash

    2004-01-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  17. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part I. Normal anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, Mahvash [NYU School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2004-10-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  18. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part II. Glenohumeral instability and labrum tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, Mahvash [NYU School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  19. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  20. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  1. MR arthrography gadolinium versus standard MR imaging in rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.; Brahme, S.K.; Karzel, R.; Cervilla, V.; Snyder, S.; Schweitzer, M.; Flannigan, B.; Resnick, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of MR imaging with and without intraarticular gadolinium in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology, using arthroscopy as the gold standard. The authors examined 36 patients, first with T2-weighted sequences and then with T1-weighted sequences after the injection of 15-20 mL of diluted gadolinium. The images were read blindly by three radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal MR imaging. The results were compared with those of arthroscopy. In 16 of 19 arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, both sequences demonstrated no evidence of rotator cuff tear. The remaining three cases were interpreted as partial or full-thickness tears. Of 12 partial tears, T1-weighted images with intraarticular gadolinium demonstrated a partial tear in five, degeneration in four, a full thickness tear in two, and a normal rotator cuff in one

  2. Glenohumeral joint injection: a comparative study of ultrasound and fluoroscopically guided techniques before MR arthrography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.; Collins, J.M.; Maresch, B.J.; Smeets, J.H.R.; Janssen, C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Jager, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the variability in accuracy of contrast media introduction, leakage, required time and patient discomfort in four different centres, each using a different image-guided glenohumeral injection technique. Each centre included 25 consecutive patients. The ultrasound-guided anterior (USa) and

  3. Shoulder dystocia: definitions and incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexandra; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2014-06-01

    Though subjective in nature, both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists practice bulletin and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists green guideline are in agreement on the descriptor of shoulder dystocia: requirement of additional obstetric maneuvers when gentle downward traction has failed to affect the delivery of the shoulders. The rate of shoulder dystocia is about 1.4% of all deliveries and 0.7% for vaginal births. Compared to non-diabetics (0.6%), among diabetics, the rate of impacted shoulders is 201% higher (1.9%); newborns delivered by vacuum or forceps have 254% higher likelihood of shoulder dystocia than those born spontaneously (2.0% vs. 0.6%, respectively). When the birthweight is categorized as 4500 g, the likelihood of shoulder dystocia in the US vs. other countries varies significantly. Future studies should focus on lowering the rate of shoulder dystocia and its associated morbidities, without concomitantly increasing the rate of cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Appel, M.; Kaiser, E.; Luttke, G.; Lukas, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the occurrence, frequency, and significance of increased signal intensity (SI) in the rotator cuff (RC) of normal volunteers suggestive of pathologic findings such as partial tears and tendinitis. Shoulders of 30 volunteers without evidence of prior shoulder disease or trauma were studied. MR imaging at 1.5 T included T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences in axial, oblique coronal, and sagittal planes. Shoulders of 30 cadavers were dissected and studied for correlation with MR findings, five of them after MR examination

  5. Ultrasonography of the painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terriza, M.D.; Manzanares, R.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy was applied in the study of 132 patients with painful shoulder to establish the ultrasonographic findings that indicate the diagnosis of lesions of the rotator cuff of the shoulder (tendentious, tendons degeneration and the different types of fracture) as well as bursitis, lesions of the tendon of the long head of the biceps, joint effusions, lesions of the humeral head, etc. As an initial method of studying painful shoulder using standard plain radiography, this techniques is considered a reliable diagnostic procedure. (Author)

  6. Postoperative imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primery impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications. (orig.) [de

  7. Shoulder Stiffness : Current Concepts and Concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoi, Eiji; Arce, Guillermo; Bain, Gregory I.; Diercks, Ronald L.; Guttmann, Dan; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    Shoulder stiffness can be caused by various etiologies such as immobilization, trauma, or surgical interventions. The Upper Extremity Committee of ISAKOS defined the term "frozen shoulder" as idiopathic stiff shoulder, that is, without a known cause. Secondary stiff shoulder is a term that should be

  8. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 22-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of right shoulder pain after a motocross accident. He was traveling at approximately 10 mph around a turn when he lost control and was thrown over the handlebars, landing directly on his right shoulder. On arrival, he was holding his arm in adduction and internal rotation. An area of swelling was noted over his anterior shoulder. He was unable to abduct his shoulder. No humeral gapping was noted. He had normal neuro-vascular status distal to the injury. Significant findings: Radiographs demonstrated posterior displacement of the humeral head on the “Y” view (see white arrow and widening of the glenohumeral joint space on anterior-posterior view (see red arrow. The findings were consistent with posterior dislocation and a Hill-Sachs type deformity. Sedation was performed and reduction was attempted using external rotation, traction counter-traction. An immediate “pop” was felt during the procedure. Post-procedure radiographs revealed a persistent posterior subluxation with interlocking at posterior glenoid. CT revealed posterior dislocation with acute depressed impaction deformity medial to the biceps groove with the humeral head perched on the posterior glenoid, interlocked at reverse Hill-Sachs deformity (see blue arrow. Discussion: Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare and represent only 2% of all shoulder dislocations. Posterior shoulder dislocations are missed on initial diagnosis in more than 60% of cases.1 Posterior shoulder dislocations result from axial loading of the adducted and internally rotated shoulder, violent muscle contractions (resulting from seizures or electrocution, a direct posterior force applied to the anterior shoulder.1 Physical findings include decreased anterior prominence of the humeral head, increased palpable posterior prominence of the humeral head below the acromion, increased palpable prominence of the

  9. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, R Sean

    2014-09-01

    Since the original Neer humeral replacement in the 1950s, the standard primary anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty design has slowly evolved. Most recently, the humeral stem has become progressively shorter to help combat stem-related complications. Currently, there are several companies who have developed and marketed a stemless humeral arthroplasty component. Manufacturers' data for 5 stemless shoulder arthroplasty components currently on the market were analyzed and reviewed. A literature review of short-term results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty was completed. Of the stemless shoulder arthroplasty systems available on the market, 3 are currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States. The Tornier Simpliciti (Tornier, Edina, MN, USA) clinical trial began in 2011. The study with 2-year minimum follow-up results is scheduled for completion in November 2014. The Arthrex Eclipse (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) clinical trial was started in January 2013. The tentative study completion date is 2017. The Biomet Nano (Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) clinical trial began in October 2013 and also has a tentative completion date of 2017. No other clinical trial is currently under way in the United States. Early results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty indicate clinical results similar to standard stemmed shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic analysis indicates implant stability without migration or subsidence at 2- to 3-year minimum follow-up.. Several stemless shoulder arthroplasty implants are available outside the United States. Early clinical and radiographic results are promising, but well-designed clinical studies and midterm results are lacking. Three clinical trials are currently under way in the United States with initial availability for use anticipated in 2015. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-02-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Jan van Breemen Inst., Amsterdam; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-01-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages. (orig.) [de

  12. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, H.M.; Craig, E.; Kyle, R.; Strefling, M.; Miller, D.; Heithoff, K.; Schellhas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  13. Thermal shrinkage for shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Alison P; Warren, Russell F; Petrigliano, Frank A; Doward, David A; Cordasco, Frank A; Altchek, David W; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent shoulder stabilization surgery with thermal capsular shrinkage using a monopolar radiofrequency device. Follow-up included a subjective outcome questionnaire, discussion of pain, instability, and activity level. Mean follow-up was 3.3 years (range 2.0-4.7 years). The thermal capsular shrinkage procedure failed due to instability and/or pain in 31% of shoulders at a mean time of 39 months. In patients with unidirectional anterior instability and those with concomitant labral repair, the procedure proved effective. Patients with multidirectional instability had moderate success. In contrast, four of five patients with isolated posterior instability failed. Thermal capsular shrinkage has been advocated for the treatment of shoulder instability, particularly mild to moderate capsular laxity. The ease of the procedure makes it attractive. However, our retrospective review revealed an overall failure rate of 31% in 80 patients with 2-year minimum follow-up. This mid- to long-term cohort study adds to the literature lacking support for thermal capsulorrhaphy in general, particularly posterior instability. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11420-010-9187-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  14. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  15. MRI of the postoperative shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatkin, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Performing and interpreting MRI of the shoulder in patients after surgery is a difficult task. The normal anatomic features are distorted by the surgical alterations as well as the artifacts that result from metal and other materials used in the surgical procedures. This article reviews the common surgical procedures undertaken in patients with rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability, and how they affect the appearance of the relevant anatomic structures on MRI examination. It also reviews the more common causes for residual and recurrent abnormalities seen in such patients and how MRI can be used to diagnose such lesions, thus aiding the orthopedic surgeon in treating these difficult clinical problems. (orig.)

  16. Painful Shoulder in Swimmers: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, William C.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder in swimmers, including: regional problems that can cause shoulder pain; physical, clinical, and laboratory tests for diagnostic use; and approaches to management of the problem. (Author/CB)

  17. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  18. Use of soil stabilizers on highway shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated soil additives as stabilizers for aggregate and topsoil shoulders. Its purpose was to determine (1) the effect soil stabilizers have on the strength and stability of soil shoulders, and (2) the costs and benefits of using stabili...

  19. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Sjøbjerg, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and location of heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty were evaluated in 58 Neer Mark-II total shoulder replacements. One year after surgery, 45% had developed some ectopic ossification. In six shoulders (10%) the ossifications roentgenographically bridged...... the glenohumeral and/or the glenoacromial space. There was no correlation between shoulder pain and the development of ossification. Shoulders with grade III heterotopic bone formation had a limited range of active elevation compared with shoulders without or with only a milder lesion. Men and patients...... with osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint were significantly disposed to the development of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty is frequent, but disabling heterotopic ossifications seem to be rare....

  20. Kinematics of the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulder: A possible relationship with post-stroke shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Post-stroke shoulder pain is a common phenomenon in hemiplegia and impedes rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between post-stroke shoulder pain, scapula resting position and shoulder motion. Methods: Shoulder kinematics of 27 patients after

  1. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthros...

  2. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  3. Frozen shoulder and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma B; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frozen shoulder might be a complication or a presenting symptom of cancer. We examined the risk of a cancer diagnosis after an incident diagnosis of frozen shoulder. METHODS: We used prospectively collected data from Danish registries to identify patients with frozen shoulder during 1...

  4. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  5. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro

    1997-01-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  6. Questions and Answers About Shoulder Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury. Injection of a cortisone medicine into your shoulder joint. Surgery to repair the tear if you don’t ... TENS). Injection of a corticosteroid drug if your shoulder is not better. Surgery if the shoulder does not improve with other ...

  7. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  8. Diagnosis of SLAP lesions with Grashey-view arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H. Edmund; Van Raalte, Vanessa; Malian, Vartan

    2003-01-01

    To examine the accuracy of Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography in the diagnosis of clinically relevant superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. Grashey views obtained during diagnostic arthrography (conventional and MR) were used to examine the superior labrum. Twenty-eight of 118 shoulder arthrograms obtained during a 27-month period fulfilled study criteria and were correlated for accuracy using arthroscopically confirmed grade 2-4 SLAP lesions as the standard of reference. Arthrograms were graded using the consensus method. Prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 21%, 50%, 86%, and 79%. The appearance of the superior labrum on the Grashey view was compared subjectively with MR arthrography. Sources of errors were analyzed. Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography can diagnose clinically relevant SLAP lesions with moderately high specificity, moderate accuracy, and limited sensitivity. Findings on the Grashey view closely resemble those seen on coronal oblique MR arthrography. Grashey views should be considered in patients undergoing shoulder arthrography. (orig.)

  9. Diagnosis of SLAP lesions with Grashey-view arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H. Edmund [Radiological Associates of Sacramento Medical Group, Inc., 1500 Expo Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95815 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Van Raalte, Vanessa; Malian, Vartan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    To examine the accuracy of Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography in the diagnosis of clinically relevant superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. Grashey views obtained during diagnostic arthrography (conventional and MR) were used to examine the superior labrum. Twenty-eight of 118 shoulder arthrograms obtained during a 27-month period fulfilled study criteria and were correlated for accuracy using arthroscopically confirmed grade 2-4 SLAP lesions as the standard of reference. Arthrograms were graded using the consensus method. Prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 21%, 50%, 86%, and 79%. The appearance of the superior labrum on the Grashey view was compared subjectively with MR arthrography. Sources of errors were analyzed. Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography can diagnose clinically relevant SLAP lesions with moderately high specificity, moderate accuracy, and limited sensitivity. Findings on the Grashey view closely resemble those seen on coronal oblique MR arthrography. Grashey views should be considered in patients undergoing shoulder arthrography. (orig.)

  10. Mid-term shoulder functional and quality of life outcomes after shoulder replacement in obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Heather K.; Struk, Aimee M.; Reed, Austin; Wright, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain and loss of function are directly associated with obesity. Questions/purposes We hypothesized that significant interactions would exist between total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and obesity status on functional and quality of life (QOL) outcomes over the long term. Clinical and QOL outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation form, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, University of California at Los Angeles Sho...

  11. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C T; Van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2017-03-01

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery are not known. The purpose of this explorative study was to determine the incidence of postoperative frozen shoulder after various operative shoulder procedures. A second aim was to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery. 505 consecutive patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery were included in this prospective cohort study. Follow-up was 6 months after surgery. A prediction model was developed to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery using the TRIPOD guidelines. We nominated five potential predictors: gender, diabetes mellitus, type of physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score. Frozen shoulder was identified in 11% of the patients after shoulder surgery and was more common in females (15%) than in males (8%). Frozen shoulder was encountered after all types of operative procedures. A prediction model based on four variables (diabetes mellitus, specialized shoulder physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score) discriminated reasonably well with an AUC of 0.712. Postoperative frozen shoulder is a serious complication after shoulder surgery, with an incidence of 11%. Four prognostic factors were identified for postoperative frozen shoulder: diabetes mellitus, arthroscopic surgery, specialized shoulder physiotherapy and DASH score. The combination of these four variables provided a prediction rule for postoperative frozen shoulder with reasonable fit. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  12. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  13. Dislocated Shoulder: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by: Sports injuries. Shoulder dislocation is a common injury in contact sports, such as football and hockey, and in sports that may involve falls, such as downhill skiing, gymnastics and volleyball. ... is a common source of dislocation. Falls. You may dislocate your ...

  14. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  15. Interscalene block for shoulder surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Fracture dislocation of the shoulder is a common musculoskeletal injury following road traffic accident. Peripheral ... Fracture luxation de l'épaule est une commune blessures musculo-squelettiques suite route trafic accident. Périphériques nerf .... vertebral artery injection, pneumothorax, Horner's syndrome ...

  16. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  17. Reflex muscle contraction in anterior shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D A; Beard, D J; Gill, R H; Eng, B; Carr, A J

    1997-01-01

    Reduced proprioception may contribute to recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Twelve patients with unilateral shoulder instability were investigated for evidence of deficient proprioception with an activated pneumatic cylinder and surface electromyography electrodes; the contralateral normal shoulder was used as a control. The latency between onset of movement and the detection of muscle contraction was used as an index of proprioception. No significant difference in muscle contraction latency was detected between the stable and unstable shoulders, suggesting that there was no significant defect in muscular reflex activity. This study does not support the use proprioception-enhancing physiotherapy in the treatment of posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability.

  18. [Anterior shoulder instabilities: about 73 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Louaste; Bousbaa, Hicham; Cherrad, Taoufik; Wahidi, Mohammed; Amhajji, Larbi; Rachid, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2014, 73 patients (77 shoulders) underwent Latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability. This retrospective study aims to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results of this surgical technique. Surgical intervention was performed to treat 69 cases with recurrent dislocation, 5 cases with recurrent painful subluxation and 3 cases with painful shoulder. All patients underwent radiographic evaluation before surgery and during the most recent medical control. According to Rowe score, 73 (94.8%) of 77 shoulders got a good or excellent result. In the longest follow-up, 74 shoulders were free from glenohumeral arthrosis.

  19. Can symptomatic acromioclavicular joints be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Jung Han; Cha, Seong Sook; Park, Young Mi; Park, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Woo; Oh, Minkyung

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether symptomatic acromioclavicular joints can be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging. This study included 146 patients who underwent physical examination of acromioclavicular joints and 3-T MR imaging of the shoulder. Among them, 67 patients showing positive results on physical examination were assigned to the symptomatic group, whereas 79 showing negative results were assigned to the asymptomatic group. The following MR findings were compared between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups: presence of osteophytes, articular surface irregularity, subchondral cysts, acromioclavicular joint fluid, subacromial fluid, subacromial bony spurs, joint capsular distension, bone edema, intraarticular enhancement, periarticular enhancement, superior and inferior joint capsular distension degree, and joint capsular thickness. The patients were subsequently divided into groups based on age (younger, older) and the method of MR arthrography (direct MR arthrography, indirect MR arthrography), and all the MR findings in each subgroup were reanalyzed. The meaningful cutoff value of each significant continuous variable was calculated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The degree of superior capsular distension was the only significant MR finding of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints and its meaningful cutoff value was 2.1mm. After subgroup analyses, this variable was significant in the older age group and indirect MR arthrography group. On 3-T MR imaging, the degree of superior joint capsular distension might be a predictable MR finding in the diagnosis of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...... in repetitive work and 782 referents. Shoulder loads were quantified at task level and measures of exposures were assigned based on task distribution. Symptoms in combination with clinical criteria defined shoulder tendinitis. RESULTS: The prevalence of shoulder tendinitis was higher among exposed workers...

  1. The nerves around the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Alain; Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan

  2. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  3. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Breitenseher, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  4. Recurrent shoulder dystocia: is it predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleitman, Vered; Feldman, Roi; Walfisch, Asnat; Toledano, Ronen; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-11-01

    To examine the course and outcome of deliveries occurring in women who previously experienced shoulder dystocia. In addition, recurrent shoulder dystocia risk factors were assessed. A retrospective cohort analysis comparing all singleton deliveries with and without shoulder dystocia in their preceding delivery was conducted. Independent predictors of recurrent shoulder dystocia were investigated using a multiple logistic regression model. Of the 201,422 deliveries included in the analysis, 307 occurred in women with a previous shoulder dystocia (0.015 %). Women with a history of shoulder dystocia were more likely to be older, experienced higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus, polyhydramnios, prolonged second stage, operative delivery and macrosomia (>4000 g) in the following delivery. Previous shoulder dystocia was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia (OR = 6.1, 95 % CI 3.2-11.8, p value dystocia is an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia. Deliveries in women with a history of shoulder dystocia are characterized by higher rates of operative delivery, prolonged second stage of labor and macrosomia.

  5. [Imaging evaluation on adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Youxing; Tang, Kanglai; Yuan, Chengsong; Tao, Xu; Wang, Huaqing; Chen, Bo; Guo, Yupeng

    2015-03-24

    Modern shoulder prosthesis has evolved through four generations. And the fourth generation technology has a core three-dimensional design of restoring 3D reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy. Thus a new shoulder prosthesis is developed on the basis of the technology of 3D prosthesis. Assessment of whether shoulder prosthesis can restore individualized reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy is based on the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy. To evaluate the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy through measuring the parameters of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis and compare with normal data. The parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were analyzed and evaluated for a total of 12 cases undergoing shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The relevant anatomical parameters included neck-shaft angle (NSA), retroversion angle (RA), humeral head height (HH) and humeral head diameter (HD). And the anatomical parameters were compared with the data from normal side. All underwent shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The postoperative parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were compared with those of normal side. And the difference of NSA was 0.05). Individualized shoulder prosthesis has excellent adaptability to shoulder. All core parameters are freely adjustable and specification models may be optimized. With matching tools, individualized shoulder prosthesis improves the accuracy and reliability in shoulder replacement.

  6. Shoulder arthroplasty for sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthel, Jean-David; Schoch, Bradley; Sperling, John W; Cofield, Robert; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-05-01

    Polio infection can often lead to orthopedic complications such as arthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, skeletal deformation, and chronic instability of the joints. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes and associated complications of arthroplasty in shoulders with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Seven patients (average age, 70 years) were treated between 1976 and 2013 with shoulder arthroplasty for the sequelae of polio. One patient underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty, 2 had a hemiarthroplasty, and 4 had total shoulder arthroplasty. Average follow-up was 87 months. Outcome measures included pain, range of motion, and postoperative modified Neer ratings. Overall pain scores improved from 5 to 1.6 points (on a 5-point scale) after shoulder arthroplasty. Six shoulders had no or mild pain at latest follow-up, and 6 shoulders rated the result as much better or better. Mean shoulder elevation improved from 72° to 129°, and external rotation improved from 11° to 56°. Average strength in elevation decreased from 3.9 to 3.4 postoperatively, and external rotation strength decreased from 3.9 to 3.3. This, however, did not reach significance. Evidence of muscle imbalance with radiographic instability was found in 4 shoulders that demonstrated superior subluxation, anterior subluxation, or both. This remained asymptomatic. No shoulder required revision or reoperation. Shoulder arthroplasty provides significant pain relief and improved motion in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Muscle weakness may be responsible for postoperative instability, and careful selection of the patient with good upper extremity muscles must be made. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Shoulder Injury Incidence Rates in NASA Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Foy, Millennia; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the astronaut shoulder injury rates began with an operational concern at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training. An astronaut suffered a shoulder injury during an NBL training run and commented that it was possibly due to a hardware issue. During the subsequent investigation, questions arose regarding the rate of shoulder injuries in recent years and over the entire history of the astronaut corps.

  8. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    OpenAIRE

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitat...

  9. Isometric shoulder strength in young swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaine, Sally J; Ginn, Karen A; Fell, James W; Bird, Marie-Louise

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of shoulder pain in young swimmers is high. Shoulder rotation strength and the ratio of internal to external rotation strength have been reported as potential modifiable risk factors associated with shoulder pain. However, relative strength measures in elevated positions, which include flexion and extension, have not been established for the young swimmer. The aim of this study was to establish clinically useful, normative shoulder strength measures and ratios for swimmers (14-20 years) without shoulder pain. Cross-sectional, observational study. Swimmers (N=85) without a recent history of shoulder pain underwent strength testing of shoulder flexion and extension (in 140° abduction); and internal and external rotation (in 90° abduction). Strength tests were performed in supine using a hand-held dynamometer and values normalised to body weight. Descriptive statistics were calculated for strength and strength ratios (flexion:extension and internal:external rotation). Differences between groups (based on gender, history of pain, test and arm dominance) were explored using independent and paired t tests. Normative shoulder strength values and ratios were established for young swimmers. There was a significant difference (pdifferences in strength ratios. Relative strength of the dominant and non-dominant shoulders (except for extension); and for swimmers with and without a history of shoulder pain was not significantly different. A normal shoulder strength profile for the young swimmer has been established which provides a valuable reference for the clinician assessing shoulder strength in this population. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Sykhorychko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  11. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Sykhorychko; Т.G. Kovalenko; М.А. Sykhorychko

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  12. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Papalia, R.; Tecame, A.; Torre, G.; Narbona, P.; Maffulli, N.; Denaro, V.

    2014-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and ...

  13. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  14. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can shoulder dystocia be reliably predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jodie M; Catcheside, Britt; Scheil, Wendy

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate factors reported to increase the risk of shoulder dystocia, and to evaluate their predictive value at a population level. The South Australian Pregnancy Outcome Unit's population database from 2005 to 2010 was accessed to determine the occurrence of shoulder dystocia in addition to reported risk factors, including age, parity, self-reported ethnicity, presence of diabetes and infant birth weight. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence interval) of shoulder dystocia was calculated for each risk factor, which were then incorporated into a logistic regression model. Test characteristics for each variable in predicting shoulder dystocia were calculated. As a proportion of all births, the reported rate of shoulder dystocia increased significantly from 0.95% in 2005 to 1.38% in 2010 (P = 0.0002). Using a logistic regression model, induction of labour and infant birth weight greater than both 4000 and 4500 g were identified as significant independent predictors of shoulder dystocia. The value of risk factors alone and when incorporated into the logistic regression model was poorly predictive of the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. While there are a number of factors associated with an increased risk of shoulder dystocia, none are of sufficient sensitivity or positive predictive value to allow their use clinically to reliably and accurately identify the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Shoulder dystocia: risk factors, predictability, and preventability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shobha H; Sokol, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia remains an unpredictable obstetric emergency, striking fear in the hearts of obstetricians both novice and experienced. While outcomes that lead to permanent injury are rare, almost all obstetricians with enough years of practice have participated in a birth with a severe shoulder dystocia and are at least aware of cases that have resulted in significant neurologic injury or even neonatal death. This is despite many years of research trying to understand the risk factors associated with it, all in an attempt primarily to characterize when the risk is high enough to avoid vaginal delivery altogether and prevent a shoulder dystocia, whose attendant morbidities are estimated to be at a rate as high as 16-48%. The study of shoulder dystocia remains challenging due to its generally retrospective nature, as well as dependence on proper identification and documentation. As a result, the prediction of shoulder dystocia remains elusive, and the cost of trying to prevent one by performing a cesarean delivery remains high. While ultimately it is the injury that is the key concern, rather than the shoulder dystocia itself, it is in the presence of an identified shoulder dystocia that occurrence of injury is most common. The majority of shoulder dystocia cases occur without major risk factors. Moreover, even the best antenatal predictors have a low positive predictive value. Shoulder dystocia therefore cannot be reliably predicted, and the only preventative measure is cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Shoulder distention arthrography as a treatment modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Sang Bum

    1987-01-01

    18 patients with painful stiff shoulder joint were underwent shoulder distension arthrography as a treatment modality, followed by physical therapy. Range of motion of shoulder joint was evaluated at 1 week and 4 weeks after arthrography. The results were as follows; 1. Arthrographic findings were decreased volume of joint cavity, obliteration of axillary recess, small subscapularis bursa, serrated capsular margin and non-filling of biceps tendon sheath. In 3 cases, rotator cuff tear was found. 2. Range of motion of shoulder joint was improved after distension arthrography. 3. In 3 patients have rotator cuff tear, range of motion was not improved

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Romanowski, L.

    1994-01-01

    The technique of the own method of shoulder examination was presented. Anatomy and the most common diseases of the shoulder are discussed. The diseases of the shoulder diagnosed on the basis of the MR are: rotator cuff disease, impingement syndrome and instability. MR findings occurred in these entities were demonstrated. The most common MR finding of the rotator cuff disease was higher signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon, while in shoulder instability was labral abnormality. Impingement syndrome is the previous syndrome of the full MR imaging of the rotator cuff disease. (author)

  1. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...

  2. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder

  3. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Six horses with shoulder injuries were presented in this report with emphasis on the use of ultrasonography vs. radiography in diagnosis. The two imaging modalities represented valuable and complementary diagnostic procedures. Two horses had fracture fragments of the lateral humeral tuberosity, the accurate ultrasonographic findings encouraging clearer radiographic identification by oblique projections. In one horseultrasonography enabled more accurate localization of calcification within the supraspinatus muscle. In the remaining three cases ultrasonography visualized distension of the bicipital bursa due to aseptic bursitis, bursal hemorrhage, or associated with injury of the biceps brachii muscle and the underlying intermediate humeral tubercle, the bony involvement more clearly demonstrated radiographically

  4. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location. (orig.)

  5. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.H.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Meskers CG, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, Janssen TW. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke. Objective: To identify a possible relationship among chronic poststroke shoulder pain (PSSP), scapular resting pose, and shoulder proprioception.

  6. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    pathological injuries, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, shoulder instability and shoulder ... and specific postural characteristics, which will be useful in future studies. ... concentric and eccentric IR and ER shoulder muscle strength in 15 club-level ...

  7. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merl, T.; Weinhardt, H.; Oettl, G.; Lenz, M.; Riel, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage [de

  8. Observational study on the pavement performance effects of shoulder rumble strip on shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Coffey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rumble strip implementation has shown a constant increase with its safety benefits. Rumble strips are milled into the roadway shoulder to produce noise and vibrations when driven on. With the milling process, the pavement performance is expected to be negatively impacted by the decreased depth, though not mathematically quantified. Using methods defined by the Long-Term Pavement Performance Program, the severity of the shoulder site’s distresses, with and without shoulder rumble strips, will be quantified. The quantification would permit the design to compensate for the impact. This design compensation allows the implementation of hard shoulder running, the use of shoulder as a travel lane during congestion, and retains the shoulder rumble strip safety instead of removing, as suggested by some proposed projects. While hard shoulder running would not impact specific time periods, the safety benefit of rumble strips could be needed at any time. This study aims to quantify the rumble strip impact to enable the full shoulder strength for hard shoulder running while retaining the safety benefits of rumble strips. Keywords: Rumble strips, Shoulder, Cracking, Pavement performance, Hard shoulder running

  9. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs. Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of immobilization with the shoulder in a position of external rotation, for both anterior and posterior shoulder dislocations.7-11,19 In this study, we present a technique for assembling a low-cost external rotation shoulder brace using materials found in most hospitals: cotton roll, stockinette, and shoulder immobilizers. This brace is particularly suited for the uninsured patient, who lacks the financial resources to pay for a pre-fabricated brace out of pocket. We also performed a cost analysis for our low-cost external rotation shoulder brace, and a cost comparison with pre-fabricated brand name braces. At our institution, the total materials cost for our brace was $19.15. The cost of a pre-fabricated shoulder brace at our institution is $150 with markup, which is reimbursed on average at $50.40 according to our hospital billing data. The low-cost external rotation shoulder brace is therefore a more affordable option for the uninsured patient presenting with acute shoulder dislocation. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:114–120.

  10. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  11. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the canine shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, C D; Nyland, T G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the normal ultrasonographic anatomy of the canine shoulder. Fourteen shoulders from 7 clinically normal mid-sized dogs were radiographed and imaged using high frequency ultrasound. Each shoulder was isolated postmortem, and the ultrasonographic and gross anatomy was studied during dissection. The ultrasonographic appearance of the shoulder specimens was similar to that found in the live dogs. Twenty-four shoulders isolated postmortem from 12 variably sized dogs were also used to characterize the normal ultrasound anatomy over a range of sizes. Important anatomic structures that could be consistently evaluated were the biceps tendon and bursa, the bicipital groove surface, the supraspinatous tendon, the infraspinatous tendon, the teres minor tendon, and the caudal aspect of the humeral head. Results of ultrasonographic examination of 4 dogs with shoulder lameness are described to illustrate some applications of canine shoulder ultrasonography in the evaluation of the canine shoulder. In these dogs, ultrasound was a valuable tool to evaluate effusion and synovial proliferation within the bicipital bursa, supraspinatous and biceps tendinitis, biceps tendon strain, and dystrophic calcification.

  12. Avoiding Shoulder Injury from Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durall, Chris J.; Manske, Robert C.; Davies, George J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies shoulder exercises commonly performed in fitness centers that may contribute to or exacerbate glenohumeral joint (shoulder) injury, describing alternative exercises that may be substituted and a offering rationale for the variations. The article focuses on anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, subacromial impingement (primary…

  13. [Prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-05-20

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most tragic, fatal and unexpected obstetrical events, which is mostly unpredictable and unpreventable. This clinical picture is defined as a delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. Shoulder dystocia occurs when the fetal shoulder impacts on the maternal symphysis or sacral promontory. The incidence of shoulder dystocia is 0.2-0.6%. High perinatal mortality and morbidity is associated with the condition, even when it is managed appropriately. Obstetricians should be aware of the existing risk factors, but should always be alert to the possibility of shoulder dystocia in all labors. Maternal morbidity is also increased, particularly postpartum hemorrhage, rupture of the uterus, injury of the bladder, urethra and the bowels and fourth-degree perineal tears. Complications of the newborn include asphyxia, perinatal mortality, fracture of the clavicula and the humerus. Brachial plexus injuries are one of the most important fetal complications of shoulder dystocia, complicating 4-16% of such deliveries. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence regarding the possible prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia.

  14. Eponymous terms in anterior shoulder stabilization surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, M. P.; van der Linde, J. A.; Wiegerinck, J. I.; Hoornenborg, D.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van Deurzen, D. F. P.

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation and its treatment are probably as old as time. Surgical treatment has gained acceptance recently, especially in recurrent cases. Within roughly the last 100 years, numerous treatment strategies have been developed and questions elucidated regarding the entity of shoulder

  15. Diagnosing patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Krogsgaard, M R; Lorenzen, T

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the interobserver agreement of commonly used clinical tests and diagnoses in patients with shoulder pain, and the accuracy of these tests and ultrasonographic findings in comparison with arthroscopic findings. METHODS: Eighty six patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain...

  16. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of

  17. Shoulder Ultrasonography: Performance and Common Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US of the shoulder is the most commonly requested examination in musculoskeletal US diagnosis. Sports injuries and degenerative and inflammatory processes are the main sources of shoulder pain and functional limitations. Because of its availability, low cost, dynamic examination process, absence of radiation exposure, and ease of patient compliance, US is the preferred mode for shoulder imaging over other, more sophisticated, and expensive methods. Operator dependence is the main disadvantage of US examinations. Use of high range equipment with high resolution transducers, adhering to a strict examination protocol, good knowledge of normal anatomy and pathological processes and an awareness of common pitfalls are essential for the optimal performance and interpretation of shoulder US. This article addresses examination techniques, the normal sonographic appearance of tendons, bursae and joints, and the main pathological conditions found in shoulder ultrasonography.

  18. Physiotherapy in frozen shoulder syndrome - literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Korabiusz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The frozen shoulder syndrome is seen as civilization illness. A significant amount of people suffer from it. The frozen shoulder syndrome is one of the most frequent dysfunctions of pectoral girdle. It is seen as a second frequent reason for visits at General Practicioner. There are three stages of this illness, there are a lot of symptoms, but one that occurs most commonly is pain. This illness can be completely curable. Research goal: Goal of this dissertation is a review of literature about available physiotherapy methods used in frozen shoulder syndrome. Conclusion: Kinesiotherapy, kinesiotaping, criotherapy, LASER, Traebert’s currents, iontophoresis, magnetic fields, ultrasounds, massage, manual therapy and combined therapy   are effective physiotherapy methods used in treating frozen shoulder syndrome. Those methods reduce pain indispositions and increase range of movement in shoulder joint.

  19. MRI of the posttraumatic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Abnormalities of the shoulder are common but still unclear for both GPs and the orthopedic surgeon in our community. Difficult and late these patients are directed to a specialist for diagnosis and treatment. Our goal is to address some of the key and most common problem conditions related to the complaints in this area. Incidence of symptomatic ruptures of the shoulder’s rotator cuff is difficult to be evaluated. But it is by no means rare, concerning the research in the world - historically and today. It is also known that ruptures can be asymptomatic. Despite the large percentage of them, many of them are at risk for progression of the symptoms. While, on the world, the authors explicitly state that dealing with a rotator cuff rupture is one of the top 10 issues that are most important for orthopedic surgeons, in our country the most common diagnosis for shoulder complaints is still periarthritis, without specifying of individual muscles pathology. Another major concern is shoulder instability associated with multiple incidents of luxation started either in adolescence with minor traumatic incident, such as recurrent dislocation, or started after severe trauma in older ages. It has to be specified diagnostic type of instability: front, rear or multidirection. Especially it is important to make the initial stabilization period of unavoidable long series of repeated dislocations in adolescents and young people, whether actively practicing sports or not. This point is often missed, and later for large lesions it leads to more invasive surgery. Not infrequently this condition is characterized by pain and limited movement without true dislocation. Then it is mandatory to assess the diagnostic changes in labrum, ligaments and muscles, not to leave the patient to reach first dislocation. Impingement syndrome (IC) is a common suffering, engaging soft tissues in the subacromial bursitis. IC characterizes by pain during the upper limb removal and the

  20. An entropy-assisted musculoskeletal shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-04-01

    Optimization combined with a musculoskeletal shoulder model has been used to estimate mechanical loading of musculoskeletal elements around the shoulder. Traditionally, the objective function is to minimize the summation of the total activities of the muscles with forces, moments, and stability constraints. Such an objective function, however, tends to neglect the antagonist muscle co-contraction. In this study, an objective function including an entropy term is proposed to address muscle co-contractions. A musculoskeletal shoulder model is developed to apply the proposed objective function. To find the optimal weight for the entropy term, an experiment was conducted. In the experiment, participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments in six shoulder postures. The surface EMG of 8 shoulder muscles was measured and compared with the predicted muscle activities based on the proposed objective function using Bhattacharyya distance and concordance ratio under different weight of the entropy term. The results show that a small weight of the entropy term can improve the predictability of the model in terms of muscle activities. Such a result suggests that the concept of entropy could be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of muscle co-contractions as well as developing a shoulder biomechanical model with greater validity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Shoulder disability questionnaires: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, F; Mace, Y; Lefevre-Colau, M M

    2005-07-01

    To identify all available shoulder disability questionnaires designed to measure physical functioning and to examine those with satisfactory clinimetric quality. We used the Medline database and the "Guide des outils de mesure de l'évaluation en médecine physique et de réadaptation" textbook to search for questionnaires. Analysis took into account the development methodology, clinimetric quality of the instruments and frequency of their utilization. We classified the instruments according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Thirty-eight instruments have been developed to measure disease-, shoulder- or upper extremity-specific outcome. Four scales assess upper-extremity disability and 3 others shoulder disability. We found 6 scales evaluating disability and shoulder pain, 7 scales measuring the quality of life in patients with various conditions of the shoulder, 14 scales combining objective and subjective measures, 2 pain scales and 2 unclassified scales. Older instruments developed before the advent of modern measurement development methodology usually combine objective and subjective measures. Recent instruments were designed with appropriate methodology. Most are self-administered questionnaires. Numerous shoulder outcome measure instruments are available. There is no "gold standard" for assessing shoulder function outcome in the general population.

  2. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal......, range of movement, abduction force, or function. The risk of clinical asymptomatic loosening is a relatively late complication that is eventually followed by pronounced bone destruction related to the loose component. Long-term radiographic control of total shoulders with rheumatoid arthritis...... is recommended. Hemiarthroplasty with a cemented humeral prosthesis may be a better treatment in the end stage of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder....

  3. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, N.J.; Dussault, R.G.; Keats, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs

  4. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  5. CT diagnosis with shoulder joint injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.; Hoerl, M.; Schindler, G.

    1986-01-01

    With recidivistic shoulder luxation the CT examination makes possible the objective comprehension of predisposable anatomical evidence as well as the proof of posttraumatic changes. Changes in the acetabular margin (Bankart lesion) as well as in the humerus head (Hills-Sachs lesion) are depicted with recidivistic shoulder luxation as the morphological substrate of the posttraumatic damage. Individual examinations of 83 patients with recidivistic shoulder luxations showed that the mentioned changes often appear in combinations. With the CT examination the Hills-Sachs lesion can be comprehended and its location, extension and depth can be judged as well. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Navigating the Alphabet Soup of Labroligamentous Pathology of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Darren; Grubin, Jeremy

    2016-02-01

    Because of the widespread use of eponyms and acronyms to describe labroligamentous findings in the shoulder, interpreting shoulder magnetic resonance imaging reports can be challenging. A summary of the appearance of these lesions on shoulder magnetic resonance images can help the orthopedic surgeon to understand these entities as imaging findings and to determine the appropriate treatment for patients with shoulder injuries.

  7. Kinematic analysis of dynamic shoulder motion in patients with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young W; Pinto, Vivek J; Yoon, Jangwhon; Frankle, Mark A; Dunning, Page E; Sheikhzadeh, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) has been used to treat patients with irreparable rotator cuff dysfunction. Despite the proven clinical efficacy, there is minimal information regarding the underlying changes to the shoulder kinematics associated with this construct. Therefore, we sought to examine the kinematics of dynamic shoulder motion in patients with well-functioning rTSA. We tested 12 healthy subjects and 17 patients with rTSA. All rTSA patients were able to elevate their arms to at least 90° and received the implant as the primary arthroplasty at least 6 months before testing. On average, the rTSA patients elevated their arms to 112° ± 12° (mean ± SD) and reported an American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons outcome score of 90.6 ± 6.3. A 3-dimensional electromagnetic motion capture device was used to detect the dynamic motion of the trunk, scapula, and humerus during bilateral active shoulder elevation along the sagittal, scapular, and coronal planes. In both healthy and rTSA shoulders, the majority of the humeral-thoracic motion was provided by the glenohumeral motion. Therefore, the ratio of glenohumeral to scapulothoracic (ST) motion was always greater than 1.62 during elevation along the scapular plane. In comparison to healthy subjects, however, the contribution of ST motion to overall shoulder motion was significantly increased in the rTSA shoulders. This increased contribution was noted in all planes of shoulder elevation and was maintained when weights were attached to the arm. Kinematics of the rTSA shoulders are significantly altered, and more ST motion is used to achieve shoulder elevation. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes of an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty with a contralateral reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ryan M; Padegimas, Eric M; Abboud, Joseph A; Getz, Charles L; Lazarus, Mark D; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R; Horneff, John G

    2018-06-01

    It is common for patients to require staged bilateral shoulder arthroplasties. There is a unique cohort of patients who require an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and a contralateral reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). This study compared the outcomes of patients with a TSA in 1 shoulder and an RSA in the contralateral shoulder. Our institutional database was queried to identify all patients with a TSA and a contralateral RSA. Data collection included patient demographics, preoperative and latest follow-up shoulder range of motion, radiographic analysis, and postoperative complications. Identified patients were assessed at follow-up visits or contacted by phone for functional outcome scores. Nineteen patients met our inclusion/exclusion criteria. There was statistically significant greater internal rotation in the TSA shoulder (P= .044) but no significant difference in forward elevation (P = .573) or external rotation (P= .368). There was no radiographic evidence of humeral or glenoid component loosening of any arthroplasty implants. There were no significant differences between TSA and RSA shoulders for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment (P= .381), Simple Shoulder Test (P = .352), Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation (P = .709), and visual analog scale satisfaction (P= .448) or pain scores (P= .305). Thirteen patients (68.4%) preferred the RSA side, 1 patient (5.3%; z = 4.04, P < .001) patient preferred the TSA side, and 5 patients expressed no preference. Despite known limitations and differences between TSA and RSA designs, patients who have received both implants are highly satisfied with both. The only parameter in which the TSA had superior outcomes was internal rotation. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Handball load and shoulder injury rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, R.O.; Attermann, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge of injury patterns, an essential step towards injury prevention, is lacking in youth handball. Aim To investigate if an increase in handball load is associated with increased shoulder injury rates compared with a minor increase or decrease, and if an association is influenced...... by scapular control, isometric shoulder strength or glenohumeral range of motion (ROM). Methods 679 players (14-18 years) provided weekly reports on shoulder injury and handball load (training and competition hours) over 31 weeks using the SMS, phone and medical examination system. Handball load in a given...... week was categorised into (1) 60% relative to the weekly average amount of handball load the preceding 4 weeks. Assessment of shoulder isometric rotational and abduction strength, ROM and scapular control...

  10. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavora, D.G.F.; Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C.; Nakayama, M.; Silva, C.E.P.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  11. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavora, D.G.F., E-mail: danielgurgel@sarah.b [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C. [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Nakayama, M. [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados (Brazil); Silva, C.E.P. [Department of Statistics, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  12. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, E.A.

    1983-09-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole.

  13. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, E.A.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York

    1983-01-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  15. Pseudotumors of the shoulder invited review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Suzanne E. [Department of Radiology, Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Grattan Street, Parkville 3050, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Diagnostic, Pediatric, and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburg Str. 10, 3005 Bern (Switzerland)], E-mail: andersonsembach@yahoo.com.au; Johnston, James O. [Department of Radiology, Bone Section, University of California, San Francisco (United States); Tumour Oncology, Orthopedic Surgery, Kaiser Health, Bay Area, San Francisco (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiology, Bone Section, University of California, San Francisco (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper discusses the main types of MRI pseudotumors in and around the shoulder region. Some unusual types of pseudotumor will also be mentioned. Suggestions on how to improve awareness and diagnosis are also given.

  16. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Cift

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons.

  17. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients' ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients' reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons. PMID:25883820

  18. Subacromial shoulder disorders among baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of cumulative employment as baggage handler on the risk of incident subacromial shoulder disorders. Baggage handling is characterized by repetitive work primarily consisting of heavy lifting in awkward positions and time pressure. METHODS: This cohort study is based...... increased incidence of subacromial shoulder disorders for workers with longer cumulative years of employment. These results support that long-term lifting in awkward positions and time pressure influences the risk of subacromial shoulder disorders....... System. The primary exposure was cumulative years of employment as a baggage handler, and the primary outcome was diagnoses and surgical treatment of subacromial shoulder disorders. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3396 baggage handlers and 63,909 workers in the reference group. Baggage handlers with longer...

  19. Infrapatellar plica of the knee: Revisited with MR arthrographies undertaken in the knee flexion position mimicking operative arthroscopic posture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Jae [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Arthroscopic Surgery Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jin-Suck, E-mail: jss@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the appearance of the infrapatellar plica (IPP) on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) taken in 70° knee flexion, corresponding to the arthroscopic posture. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients (23 knee joints) who underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion were enrolled. All patients underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion to simulate operative arthroscopy. The images included fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin echo axial, sagittal, and coronal images. The visualization and morphology of the IPP were retrospectively assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Results: The IPP was demonstrated in 78.3% (n = 18/23) and was best visualized on the sagittal section through the intercondylar notch. The IPP manifested as a linear hypointense structure with variable thicknesses. The intercondylar component was delineated clearly, arising from the anterior intercondylar notch in parallel with the ACL and curving gently downward to attach to the infrapatellar fat pad. On the other hand, the Hoffa's fat pad component was not depicted clearly. The morphology of the IPP was either a separate type (60.9%) or a split type (17.4%). Conclusion: The IPPs can be visualized with a high rate of detection and various morphologic appearances must be appreciated under the review of a flexed knee MRA.

  20. Labral and cartilage abnormalities in young patients with hip pain: accuracy of 3-Tesla indirect MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petchprapa, Catherine N.; Rybak, Leon D. [NYU Langone Medical Center-Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Dunham, Kevin S.; Recht, Michael P. [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Lattanzi, Riccardo [NYU Langone Medical Center, The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Assess the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T indirect magnetic resonance arthrography (iMRA) for hip cartilage and labral pathology detection using arthroscopy as the reference standard and compare it to the published performance of direct magnetic resonance arthrography (dMRA). Between 2009 and 2011, 290 patients suspected of having femoroacetabular impingement underwent iMRA. Our study group consisted of 41 of these patients (17 males, mean age 35 years; 24 females, mean age 33 years) who did not have a prior history of hip surgery and who subsequently underwent arthroscopy. Two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists separately evaluated the randomized and anonymized studies for the presence and quadrant location of labral and cartilage pathology. These recorded data were compared to arthroscopic reports. Forty-one patients had labral pathology, 34 patients had acetabular and 5 patients had femoral cartilage pathology at arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative- and positive-predictive values for labral lesion detection were respectively 98, 99, 99, 99 and 98 %; for acetabular cartilage lesion detection they were 69, 98, 89, 87 and 95 %; for femoral cartilage lesion detection they were 69, 95, 93 and 39 %. Sensitivities of iMRA by quadrant (anteroinferior, anterosuperior, posteroinferior, posterosuperior) for the labrum were 100.0, 95.0, NA and 85.7 %, for acetabular cartilage were NA, 58.8, NA and 39.5 % and for femoral cartilage were 50.0, 33.3, 75.0 and 75.0 %. NA indicates results not available because of the absence of findings in those quadrants. Specificities of iMRA by quadrant (anteroinferior, anterosuperior, posteroinferior, posterosuperior) for the labrum (95.0, 100.0, 95.1, 67.5 %), acetabular (100.0, 85.7, 92.6, 79.5 %) and femoral cartilage (100.0, 94.7, 96.2, 85.9 %). iMRA at 3 T is accurate in detecting labral pathology suggesting that it is a viable alternative to dMRA. (orig.)

  1. Initial experience with 3D isotropic high-resolution 3 T MR arthrography of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John K; Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; J Yu, Hon; Rafijah, Gregory; Hitt, David; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-16

    Our study was performed to evaluate the image quality of 3 T MR wrist arthrograms with attention to ulnar wrist structures, comparing image quality of isotropic 3D proton density fat suppressed turbo spin echo (PDFS TSE) sequence versus standard 2D 3 T sequences as well as comparison with 1.5 T MR arthrograms. Eleven consecutive 3 T MR wrist arthrograms were performed and the following sequences evaluated: 3D isotropic PDFS, repetition time/echo time (TR/TE) 1400/28.3 ms, voxel size 0.35x0.35x0.35 mm, acquisition time 5 min; 2D coronal sequences with slice thickness 2 mm: T1 fat suppressed turbo spin echo (T1FS TSE) (TR/TE 600/20 ms); proton density (PD) TSE (TR/TE 3499/27 ms). A 1.5 T group of 18 studies with standard sequences were evaluated for comparison. All MR imaging followed fluoroscopically guided intra-articular injection of dilute gadolinium contrast. Qualitative assessment related to delineation of anatomic structures between 1.5 T and 3 T MR arthrograms was carried out using Mann-Whitney test and the differences in delineation of anatomic structures among each sequence in 3 T group were analyzed with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Quantitative assessment of mean relative signal intensity (SI) and relative contrast measurements was performed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Mean qualitative scores for 3 T sequences were significantly higher than 1.5 T (p < 0.01), with isotropic 3D PDFS sequence having highest mean qualitative scores (p < 0.05). Quantitative analysis demonstrated no significant difference in relative signal intensity among the 3 T sequences. Significant differences were found in relative contrast between fluid-bone and fluid-fat comparing 3D and 2D PDFS (p < 0.01). 3D isotropic PDFS sequence showed promise in both qualitative and quantitative assessment, suggesting this may be useful for MR wrist arthrograms at 3 T. Primary reasons for diagnostic potential include the ability to make reformations in any obliquity to follow the components of ulnar side wrist structures including triangular fibrocartilage complex. Additionally, isotropic imaging provides thinner slice thickness with less partial volume averaging allowing for identification of subtle injuries.

  2. High Fidelity In Situ Shoulder Dystocia Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pelikan, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Resident physicians, emergency department (ED staff Introduction: Precipitous deliveries are high acuity, low occurrence in most emergency departments. Shoulder dystocia is a rare but potentially fatal complication of labor that can be relieved by specific maneuvers that must be implemented in a timely manner. This simulation is designed to educate resident learners on the critical management steps in a shoulder dystocia presenting to the emergency department. A special aspect of this simulation is the unique utilization of the “Noelle” model with an instructing physician at bedside maneuvering the fetus through the stations of labor and providing subtle adjustments to fetal positioning not possible though a mechanized model. A literature search of “shoulder dystocia simulation” consists primarily of obstetrics and mid-wife journals, many of which utilize various mannequin models. None of the reviewed articles utilized a bedside provider maneuvering the fetus with the Noelle model, making this method unique. While the Noelle model is equipped with a remote-controlled motor that automatically rotates and delivers the baby either to the head or to the shoulders and can produce a turtle sign and which will prevent delivery of the baby until signaled to do so by the instructor, using the bedside instructor method allows this simulation to be reproduced with less mechanistically advanced and lower cost models.1-5 Objectives: At the end of this simulation, learners will: 1 Recognize impending delivery and mobilize appropriate resources (ie, both obstetrics [OB] and NICU/pediatrics; 2 Identify risk factors for shoulder dystocia based on history and physical; 3 Recognize shoulder dystocia during delivery; 4 Demonstrate maneuvers to relieve shoulder dystocia; 5 Communicate with team members and nursing staff during resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: High-fidelity simulation. Topics: High fidelity, in situ, Noelle model

  3. Little Leaguer's shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, J.L.; Hollingsworth, C.L.; Bisset, G.S. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Squire, D.L. [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-06-01

    A case of Little Leaguer's shoulder in a skeletally immature patient is described with a review of the English literature. This entity manifests as widening of the proximal humeral physis and is well known to our orthopedic colleagues. To our knowledge, however, there is little in the current radiologic literature describing Little Leaguer's shoulder. We describe such a case. (orig.)

  4. Severe refractory hypertension during shoulder arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R O Abrons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of epinephrine-containing saline irrigating solutions during arthroscopic shoulder surgery gained popularity after it was reported that the addition of epinephrine reduced bleeding and improved visualization without adverse cardiovascular effects. We share a case of a patient undergoing shoulder arthroscopy who received a standard intra-articular infusion of epinephrine-containing normal saline (1 mcg/mL and experienced severe hemodynamic consequences.

  5. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, R; Tecame, A; Torre, G; Narbona, P; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and mechanisms of lesion, risk factors and return to sport were extracted and analyzed. The main reported data were incidence, mechanism of injury and type of lesion. Most of the studies report tackle as the main event responsible for shoulder trauma (between 50% and 85%), while the main lesions reported were Bankart lesions, Superior Labral tear from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP tears), anterior dislocation and rotator cuff tears. Open or arthroscopic repair improve clinical outcomes. Shoulder lesions are common injuries in rugby players. Surgical treatment seems to be effective in for rotator cuff tears and shoulder instability. More and better designed studies are needed for a higher Level of Evidence analysis of this topic.

  6. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of shoulder problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternostro-Sluga, T.; Zoech, C.

    2004-01-01

    The shoulder joint has an important influence on arm- and handfunction. Therefore, activities of daily living, working and leisure time can be negatively influenced by diseases of the shoulder joint. Problems of the shoulder joint can be induced by muscular dysbalance and poor body posture. There is a strong relationship between shoulder function and body posture. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the shoulder joint aims at improving the local dysfunction of the shoulder joint as well as at improving function and social participation. Antiinflammatory and pain medication, exercise, occupational, electro-, ultrasound and shock wave therapy, massage, thermotherapy and pulsed electromagnetic fields are used as conservative treatments. Exercise therapy aims at improving muscular performance, joint mobility and body posture. Occupational therapy aims at improving functional movements for daily living and work. Electrotherapy is primarily used to relieve pain. Shock wave and ultrasound therapy proved to be an effective treatment for patients with calcific tendinitis. The subacromial impingement syndrome can be effectively treated by conservative therapy. (orig.) [de

  7. The critical shoulder angle is associated with osteoarthritis in the shoulder but not rotator cuff tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnison, Arnar O; Sørensen, Thomas J; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2013 Moor et al introduced the concept of the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and suggested that an abnormal CSA was a leading factor in development of rotator cuff tear (RCT) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. This study assessed whether the CSA was associated with RCT and OA...

  8. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Computational reverse shoulder prosthesis model: Experimental data and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, A; Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J; Sarmento, M

    2015-09-18

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis aims to restore the stability and function of pathological shoulders, but the biomechanical aspects of the geometrical changes induced by the implant are yet to be fully understood. Considering a large-scale musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, the aim of this study is to evaluate how the Delta reverse shoulder prosthesis influences the biomechanical behavior of the shoulder joint. In this study, the kinematic data of an unloaded abduction in the frontal plane and an unloaded forward flexion in the sagittal plane were experimentally acquired through video-imaging for a control group, composed of 10 healthy shoulders, and a reverse shoulder group, composed of 3 reverse shoulders. Synchronously, the EMG data of 7 superficial muscles were also collected. The muscle force sharing problem was solved through the minimization of the metabolic energy consumption. The evaluation of the shoulder kinematics shows an increase in the lateral rotation of the scapula in the reverse shoulder group, and an increase in the contribution of the scapulothoracic joint to the shoulder joint. Regarding the muscle force sharing problem, the musculoskeletal model estimates an increased activity of the deltoid, teres minor, clavicular fibers of the pectoralis major, and coracobrachialis muscles in the reverse shoulder group. The comparison between the muscle forces predicted and the EMG data acquired revealed a good correlation, which provides further confidence in the model. Overall, the shoulder joint reaction force was lower in the reverse shoulder group than in the control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, Motoyuki

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic capability of MRI in depicting abnormalities in traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder (TAI) was evaluated with special attention to MR arthrogram enhanced by joint effusion or saline solution. Sixty five shoulders with TAI and 19 control shoulders were scanned using the field gradient echo method (STAGE technique) on axial plane with a 1.0 or 1.5 Tesla system. MR arthrogram was obtained in 36 shoulders with TAI (Group A) and 11 control shoulders (Group C). Conventional MRI was obtained in 29 shoulders with TAI (Group B) and 8 control shoulders (Group D). Abnormalities in Bankart lesion were assessed according to signal intensity and labral shape. Abnormal signal was obtained in 8 shoulders (27.6%) in group B. Changes in shape were seen in 35 shoulders (97.2%) in group A and 18 (62.1%) in group B. Interruption of the anterior capsule was suspected in 3 (8.3%) in group A. Hill-Sachs lesion was suspected in 60 shoulders. Shoulders in the control group showed no abnormal change. Details of Bankart lesion confirmed by subsequent arthroscopy were diagnosed correctly in all of 14 shoulders on MR arthrogram and 8 of 16 shoulders on conventional MRI. These results show that MRI, MR arthrogram in particular, is useful for depicting abnormalities in TAI. (author)

  11. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  12. Cost Analysis in Shoulder Arthroplasty Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Teusink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost in shoulder surgery has taken on a new focus with passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. As part of this law, there is a provision for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs and the bundled payment initiative. In this model, one entity would receive a single payment for an episode of care and distribute funds to all other parties involved. Given its reproducible nature, shoulder arthroplasty is ideally situated to become a model for an episode of care. Currently, there is little research into cost in shoulder arthroplasty surgery. The current analyses do not provide surgeons with a method for determining the cost and outcomes of their interventions, which is necessary to the success of bundled payment. Surgeons are ideally positioned to become leaders in ACOs, but in order for them to do so a methodology must be developed where accurate costs and outcomes can be determined for the episode of care.

  13. Kinetic chain abnormalities in the athletic shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Aaron; Thigpen, Charles; Namdari, Surena; Baldwin, Keith

    2012-03-01

    Overhead activities require the shoulder to be exposed to and sustain repetitive loads. The segmental activation of the body's links, known as the kinetic chain, allows this to occur effectively. Proper muscle activation is achieved through generation of energy from the central segment or core, which then transfers the energy to the terminal links of the shoulder, elbow, and hand. The kinetic chain is best characterized by 3 components: optimized anatomy, reproducible efficient motor patterns, and the sequential generation of forces. However, tissue injury and anatomic deficits such as weakness and/or tightness in the leg, pelvic core, or scapular musculature can lead to overuse shoulder injuries. These injuries can be prevented and maladaptations can be detected with a thorough understanding of biomechanics of the kinetic chain as it relates to overhead activity.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Appel, M.; Lehner, K.; Luttke, G.; Technische Univ. Muenchen; Muenchen Univ.

    1990-01-01

    In order to test the criteria for abnormalities of the shoulder as seen on MR, 30 normal shoulders were examined. The examination included T 1 , proton and T 2 -weighted SE sequences and T 2 * -weighted FE sequences, using transverse, oblique coronary and oblique sagittal planes. In 57% there was increased signal intensity in the tendon of the rotator cuff; this might have been interpreted as a rupture of the cuff or tendinitis. Anatomical examination suggests that the finding is due to a normal layer between the long head of the biceps and the tendon joint complex. The anterior glenoid labrum could not be clearly delineated in 57% and the posterior labrum in 5%. In two cases there was a superior, postero-lateral defect in the head of the humerus. The currently accepted criteria for the MRT diagnosis of shoulder abnormalities need to be critically re-evaluated. (orig.) [de

  15. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua Cy; Bale, R Stephen; Trail, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes.

  16. The Effect of Fatigued External Rotator Muscles of the Shoulder on the Shoulder Position Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Iida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue in shoulder external rotator muscles on position sense of shoulder abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. The study included 10 healthy subjects. Shoulder position sense was measured before and after a fatigue task involving shoulder external rotator muscles. The fatigue task was performed using an isokinetic machine. To confirm the muscle fatigue, electromyography (EMG was recorded, and an integrated EMG and median power frequency (MDF during 3 sec performed target torque were calculated. After the fatigue task, the MDF of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased. This indicates that the infraspinatus muscle was involved in the fatigue task. In addition, the shoulder position sense of internal and external rotation significantly decreased after the fatigue task. These results suggest that the fatigue reduced the accuracy of sensory input from muscle spindles. However, no significant difference was observed in shoulder position sense of abduction before and after the fatigue task. This may be due to the fact that infraspinatus muscle did not act as prime movers in shoulder abduction. These results suggest that muscle fatigue decreased position sense during movements in which the affected muscles acted as prime movers.

  17. Electromyographical Comparison of Four Common Shoulder Exercises in Unstable and Stable Shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sciascia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines if electromyographic (EMG amplitude differences exist between patients with shoulder instability and healthy controls performing scaption, prone horizontal abduction, prone external rotation, and push-up plus shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Thirty nine subjects were categorized by a single orthopedic surgeon as having multidirectional instability (n=10, anterior instability (n=9, generalized laxity (n=10, or a healthy shoulder (n=10. Indwelling and surface electrodes were utilized to measure EMG activity (reported as a % of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC in various shoulder muscles during 4 common shoulder exercises. The exercises studied effectively activated the primary musculature targeted in each exercise equally among all groups. The serratus anterior generated high activity (50–80% MVIC during a push-up plus, while the infraspinatus and teres major generated moderate-to-high activity (30–80% MVIC during both the prone horizontal and prone external rotation exercises. Scaption exercise generated moderate activity (20–50% MVIC in both rotator cuff and scapular musculature. Clinicians should feel confident in prescribing these shoulder-strengthening exercises in patients with shoulder instability as the activation levels are comparable to previous findings regarding EMG amplitudes and should improve the dynamic stabilization capability of both rotator cuff and scapular muscles using exercises designed to address glenohumeral joint instability.

  18. Proposal for SICSeG guidelines for rehabilitation after anatomical shoulder prosthesis in concentric shoulder osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, I; Orsini, S; Stignani, S; Creta, D; Cava, F C; Benedetti, M G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide up-to-date guidelines on rehabilitation after anatomical shoulder prosthesis for concentric shoulder osteoarthritis, as previous guidelines date back to late 1970s and are no longer adequate due to the evolution of prosthesis models and surgical techniques. The physiatric committee of the Italian Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (SICSeG-Società Italiana di Chirurgia della Spalla e del Gomito) performed a search for all the existing literature related to rehabilitation after shoulder replacement. A total of 29 papers concerning shoulder rehabilitation were reviewed. In addition, the main Italian orthopedic surgeons and physiatrists dealing with shoulder surgery and rehabilitation were interviewed to obtain indications when literature was not conclusive. From literature evaluation and expert consultation, we produced guidelines concerning: patient evaluation by means of adequate rating scales, preoperative treatment, early intermediate and advanced postoperative phases, rehabilitation of scapulo-thoracic joint, return to work and sports, length of rehabilitation and follow-up. This proposal for guidelines was presented during the 11th SICSeG Congress on May 2012 and to the main scientific societies concerned in shoulder surgery and rehabilitation. A consensus conference is needed in order to formalize and make them usable from all the professional figures involved in this field.

  19. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejnisman B

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Benno Ejnisman,1 Gisele Barbosa,1 Carlos V Andreoli,1 A de Castro Pochini,1 Thiago Lobo,2 Rodrigo Zogaib,2 Moises Cohen,1 Mario Bizzini,3 Jiri Dvorak3 1Department of Orthopaedics, Federal University of São Paulo, 2Sports Medicine Department, Santos FC, São Paulo, Brazil; 3FIFA-Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. Keywords: goalkeeper, shoulder, injury prevention, prevention program

  20. Shoulder Arthroscopy Simulator Training Improves Shoulder Arthroscopy Performance in a Cadaver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, R. Frank; Shah, Neel; Warner, Jon J.P.; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of shoulder arthroscopy simulator training with a cadaver model of shoulder arthroscopy. Methods Seventeen first year medical students with no prior experience in shoulder arthroscopy were enrolled and completed this study. Each subject completed a baseline proctored arthroscopy on a cadaveric shoulder, which included controlling the camera and completing a standard series of tasks using the probe. The subjects were randomized, and nine of the subjects received training on a virtual reality simulator for shoulder arthroscopy. All subjects then repeated the same cadaveric arthroscopy. The arthroscopic videos were analyzed in a blinded fashion for time to task completion and subjective assessment of technical performance. The two groups were compared with students t-tests, and change over time within groups was analyzed with paired t-tests. Results There were no observed differences between the two groups on the baseline evaluation. The simulator group improved significantly from baseline with respect to time to completion and subjective performance (parthroscopy simulator training resulted in significant benefits in clinical shoulder arthroscopy time to task completion in this cadaver model. This study provides important additional evidence of the benefit of simulators in orthopaedic surgical training. Clinical Relevance There may be a role for simulator training in shoulder arthroscopy education. PMID:23591380

  1. Shoulder arthroscopy simulator training improves shoulder arthroscopy performance in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, R Frank; Shah, Neel; Warner, Jon J P; Gomoll, Andreas H

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of shoulder arthroscopy simulator training with a cadaveric model of shoulder arthroscopy. Seventeen first-year medical students with no prior experience in shoulder arthroscopy were enrolled and completed this study. Each subject completed a baseline proctored arthroscopy on a cadaveric shoulder, which included controlling the camera and completing a standard series of tasks using the probe. The subjects were randomized, and 9 of the subjects received training on a virtual reality simulator for shoulder arthroscopy. All subjects then repeated the same cadaveric arthroscopy. The arthroscopic videos were analyzed in a blinded fashion for time to task completion and subjective assessment of technical performance. The 2 groups were compared by use of Student t tests, and change over time within groups was analyzed with paired t tests. There were no observed differences between the 2 groups on the baseline evaluation. The simulator group improved significantly from baseline with respect to time to completion and subjective performance (P arthroscopy simulator training resulted in significant benefits in clinical shoulder arthroscopy time to task completion in this cadaveric model. This study provides important additional evidence of the benefit of simulators in orthopaedic surgical training. There may be a role for simulator training in shoulder arthroscopy education. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Shoulder impairment before breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Ann Marie; Dwyer, Kathleen

    2014-09-01

    To compare pre- and post-operative shoulder active range of motion (AROM) values from female breast cancer survivors to population norm values for shoulder AROM; and to compare shoulder AROM differences pre- and post-surgery between female African American and White breast cancer survivors (BCA). This pilot study used a convenience sample and longitudinal design measuring participants 2 times (T0 = baseline, after biopsy but within 2 weeks before BCA surgery; T1 = 2 nd postoperative week). The U.S. has the largest BCA survivor population in history and yet the mortality burden remains highest among AA BCA survivors. AAs may also have greater burden of physical and functional side effects compared to whites and the general population. The data were collected from a convenience sample (n = 33; n AA = 9, n W = 24) and included data on shoulder AROM, medical chart review for pre- and co-morbid conditions, and self-reported demographics and medical history. We used t-tests to compare sample AROM means to population norms. We then compared our sample across 2 timepoints (T0 = pre-surgery; T1 = 2 weeks post-surgery) using independent samples t-tests and repeated measures analysis of variance (p shoulder abduction (at T0) and flexion (at T1) than whites. However, 100% had significantly reduced AROM for all movements at T0 (prior to surgery but after biopsy) when compared to population norms. The significant reduction in shoulder AROM after biopsy but before surgery points to a possible unmet need for early physical therapy intervention. Further research using randomized controlled trial design is recommended.

  3. Iatrogenic nerve injuries during shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carofino, Bradley C; Brogan, David M; Kircher, Michelle F; Elhassan, Bassem T; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2013-09-18

    The current literature indicates that neurologic injuries during shoulder surgery occur infrequently and result in little if any morbidity. The purpose of this study was to review one institution's experience treating patients with iatrogenic nerve injuries after shoulder surgery. A retrospective review of the records of patients evaluated in a brachial plexus specialty clinic from 2000 to 2010 identified twenty-six patients with iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to shoulder surgery. The records were reviewed to determine the operative procedure, time to presentation, findings on physical examination, treatment, and outcome. The average age was forty-three years (range, seventeen to seventy-two years), and the average delay prior to referral was 5.4 months (range, one to fifteen months). Seven nerve injuries resulted from open procedures done to treat instability; nine, from arthroscopic surgery; four, from total shoulder arthroplasty; and six, from a combined open and arthroscopic operation. The injury occurred at the level of the brachial plexus in thirteen patients and at a terminal nerve branch in thirteen. Fifteen patients (58%) did not recover nerve function after observation and required surgical management. A structural nerve injury (laceration or suture entrapment) occurred in nine patients (35%), including eight of the thirteen who presented with a terminal nerve branch injury and one of the thirteen who presented with an injury at the level of the brachial plexus. Nerve injuries occurring during shoulder surgery can produce severe morbidity and may require surgical management. Injuries at the level of a peripheral nerve are more likely to be surgically treatable than injuries of the brachial plexus. A high index of suspicion and early referral and evaluation should be considered when evaluating patients with iatrogenic neurologic deficits after shoulder surgery.

  4. Sonographic assessment of the subscapularis after reverse shoulder arthroplasty: impact of tendon integrity on shoulder function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedy, Nicolas J; Gouk, Conor J; Taylor, Fraser J; Thomas, Michael; Tan, S L Ezekiel

    2018-06-01

    The deltopectoral approach for reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) requires subscapularis tenotomy or lesser tuberosity osteotomy. Whether the subscapularis should be repaired at the conclusion of the procedure remains controversial. The present study sonographically assessed the subscapularis after RSA and evaluated the effect of tendon integrity on functional outcome. All patients who had undergone RSA in the Gold Coast University Hospital between 2005 and 2016 were included. Sonography was performed by a blinded examiner. Function was assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, the Constant-Murley, and Oxford Shoulder scores. Internal rotation ability was recorded on a 6-point scale. The study included 43 patients (48 shoulders). Median length of follow-up was 19 months (range, 4-132 months). On sonography, the subscapularis was graded intact in 6 shoulders (13%), intact with mild attenuation in 16 (33%), severely attenuated in 15 (31%), and not intact or absent in 11 (23%). Differences in Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, Constant-Murley, or Oxford Shoulder scores between intact and attenuated or absent subscapularis shoulders were not significant. Internal rotation scores were significantly higher in the intact and mildly attenuated tendon group than in the absent tendon group (U = 1.0, P = .001 and U = 28.5, P = .007, respectively). The present work is the first long-term outcome study of RSA using sonography to assess the subscapularis. Subscapularis integrity did not appear to have a measurable effect on patient outcome as measured by standard scores but was important for internal rotation ability after RSA. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Kinesiotaping and Stretching Exercise on Forward Shoulder Angle in Females with Rounded Shoulder Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Hajibashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rounded shoulder posture is a common abnormal posture in upper quarter. Kinesiotape is a new intervention that recently used in rehabilitation. There are no studies have examined the effect of kinesiotape on rounded shoulder posture. Therefore the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of scapular kinesiotaping and pectoralis minor stretching exercise on forward shoulder angle in female subjects with rounded shoulder posture. Methods: Twenty female students aged between 18 to 25 years old with rounded shoulder posture participated in this study. Then, the subjects were randomly and equally assigned to two groups: the stretch group and the stretch plus kinesiotape group. Both groups were trained for doing home exercise to stretch Pectoralis minor bilaterally for two weeks. Kinesiotape group received kinesiotape on scapular area additionally. Forward shoulder angle was measured in four sessions including pre-intervention (first session, immediately after the first intervention (second session, fourth day (third session and at the end of two weeks (fourth session. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (4×2 was used for data analysis. Results: kinesiotape group showed significant within-group decrease in forward shoulder angle between first session with three other sessions (P≤0.05.There was no significant within-group difference in stretch group and between groups (P=0.20 forward shoulder angle-by-group interaction in measurement sessions was significantly different (P=0.02 Conclusion: scapular kinesiotaping along with pectoralis minor stretching exercise improved rounded shoulder posture in subjects of the present study. kinesiotape is suggested as a complem

  6. Clinical anatomy of the elbow and shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Vargas, Angélica; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Canoso, Juan J; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Kalish, Robert A

    The elbow patients herein discussed feature common soft tissue conditions such as tennis elbow, golfers' elbow and olecranon bursitis. Relevant anatomical structures for these conditions can easily be identified and demonstrated by cross examination by instructors and participants. Patients usually present rotator cuff tendinopathy, frozen shoulder, axillary neuropathy and suprascapular neuropathy. The structures involved in tendinopathy and frozen shoulder can be easily identified and demonstrated under normal conditions. The axillary and the suprascapular nerves have surface landmarks but cannot be palpated. In neuropathy however, physical findings in both neuropathies are pathognomonic and will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Shoulder pain: the role of diagnostic injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H M; O'Connor, F G; Nirschl, R P

    1996-04-01

    Many different shoulder disorders cause similar symptoms and pain patterns. An accurate diagnosis can generally be made by obtaining a detailed history, performing a comprehensive, directed physical examination and obtaining selected radiographs. Occasionally, shoulder injections can be of great assistance in establishing a clear diagnosis and providing relief of symptoms. Subacromial space injection, acromioclavicular joint injection, intra-articular injection and injection of the biceps tendon are helpful in identifying such disorders as subacromial bursitis, acromioclavicular arthritis, injury to the glenohumeral joint and bicipital tendinitis.

  8. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation? | Leijnen | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Sports Medicine ... has similarities with an idiopathic frozen shoulder masking proper diagnosis at the time of injury. ... shoulder pain which demonstrates the importance of correct initial diagnosis and management.

  9. Soft tissue disorders of the shoulder. Frozen shoulder, calcific tendintis, and bicipital tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, W H

    1975-04-01

    The painful periarticular conditions about the shoulder joint-calcific tendinitis, bicipital tendinitis, and frozen shoulder syndrome-are seen commonly in the general practice of medicine or in the practice of orthopedic surgery. Their etiologies are unknown. Their treatment is relatively simple and depends upon a knowledge of the anatomic structures involved and the proper use of rest and exercise. Operative intervention is rarely necessary in any of these conditions. The frozen shoulder syndrome, however, in our experience is best treated in the subacute or chronic stages by infiltration brisement under general anesthesia.

  10. Frozen shoulder and the Big Five personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeer, Philippe; Franssens, Fien; Roosen, Isabelle; Dankaerts, Wim; Claes, Laurence

    2014-02-01

    In the past, several studies have suggested the existence of a "periarthritic personality" in patients with frozen shoulder. We conducted a study to determine differences in personality traits in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. We prospectively evaluated 118 patients (84 women and 34 men; mean age, 53.8 years; SD 7.56) with a frozen shoulder. Of these patients, 48 had an idiopathic frozen shoulder and 70 had a secondary frozen shoulder. Personality traits were determined by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) scale. This questionnaire measures the 5 major personality traits and is based on the norms determined in a neutral test situation for 2415 controls. Compared with healthy controls, no differences in personality traits were found in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder, except for Conscientiousness and Extraversion, for which patients with secondary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher than healthy controls. Patients with primary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher on Openness to Experience than did patients with secondary frozen shoulder; on the other 4 Big Five personality traits, no significant differences were found between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder. More specifically, patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder did not score higher on the trait Neuroticism as would be expected from previous publications. Our study results do not indicate that patients with an idiopathic frozen shoulder have a specific personality compared with healthy controls. Only a few differences were found in personality traits when the entire frozen shoulder group was compared with healthy controls and between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. The results of this study suggest that these differences are not sufficient to speak about a specific "frozen shoulder personality." Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  11. Shoulder disorders in general practice : Prognostic indicators of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Koes, Bart W.; Boeke, A. Joan P; Devillé, Walter; De Jong, Bareld A.; Bouter, Lex M.

    Background. Shoulder pain is common in primary health care. Nevertheless, information on the outcome of shoulder disorders is scarce, especially for patients encountered in general practice. Aim. To study the course of shoulder disorders in general practice and to determine prognostic indicators of

  12. Interobserver reliability of physical examination of shoulder girdle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, Jettie G.; Slagers, Anton J.; Bergman, Geert; Winters, Jan C.; Kropmans, Thomas J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    The object of this study was to assess interobserver reliability in 23 tests concerning physical examination of the shoulder girdle. A physical therapist and a physical therapist/manual therapist independently performed a physical examination of the shoulder girdle in 91 patients with shoulder

  13. Looking over the shoulders of researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Autzen, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    The Galathea 3 Expedition from 2006 to 2007 combined research and online news media, allowing journalists literally to “look over the shoulders of researchers.” The authors analyze 781 news articles published online by three media partners of the expedition, all well-established media companies...

  14. Reading on the Shoulders of Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chaim, Michael; Riendeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Reflecting on his successful scientific career, Isaac Newton highlighted his intellectual debt to his predecessors. "If I have seen further," he wrote, "it was "only" by standing on the shoulders of giants." The authors have chosen the title of their article as a token of recognition of their debt to the teachings of…

  15. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    initial diagnosis and management. ... D Leijnen,1,2 MD, MMed (Sports Med); J T Viljoen,1 BSc (Physio), MPhil (Exercise Sci); J H Kirby,1 MB ChB, MSc (Sports Med); ... diagnosis of posterior shoulder dislocation at the time of injury could.

  16. ultrasound-guided shoulder arthrogram injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Using an aseptic technique and without moving the ultrasound transducer from the desired transverse plane, the needle is advanced into the joint space through the rotator cuff interval, using real-time ultrasound guidance (Fig.2). The needle is inserted into the shoulder approximately midway between the ...

  17. A Simple Technique for Shoulder Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, J.D.; Redondo, M.V.; Martinez, F.; Reus, M.; Alonso, J.; Parrilla, A.; Campos, P.A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca Univ. Hospital, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To present a systematic approach to teaching a technique for arthrography of the shoulder. Using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates, precise sites for puncture can be identified and the need for fluoroscopic guidance obviated. Material and Methods: Forty-six glenohumeral arthrograms were performed in 45 patients; in 1 case involving examination of both shoulders. The stages of the technique are described in detail, as are the fundamental aspects of achieving an effective glenohumeral injection. Pain intensity was measured in all patients using a verbal description scale. Results: Shoulder arthrography was successful in all cases. Average time taken for the procedure was 7 min, with no difference in the respective times required by an experienced radiologist and a resident. The procedure was well tolerated by most patients, with slight discomfort being observed in a very few cases. Conclusion: The arthrographic technique used in this study is simple, safe, rapid, and reproducible, and has the advantage of precise localization of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure described in this study can be of help in teaching residents and can reduce the learning curve for radiologists with no experience in arthrographic methods. It also reduces the time of exposure to fluoroscopy Keywords: Arthrography, joint, shoulder.

  18. Shoulder complaints : the occurence, course and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Luime (Jolanda)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractShoulder complaints are expressed in a variety of symptoms. In many cases, the prominent symptom is pain. In some cases, pain is present most of the day and frequently also at night. In other cases, it is provoked primarily by physical activities. Often it is accompanied

  19. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMenamin, Drew; Koulouris, George; Morrison, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging

  20. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMenamin, Drew [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 354755, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)], E-mail: drewmcm@u.washington.edu; Koulouris, George [Gold Coast Medical Imaging, 123 Nerang Street, Southport, QLD 4215 (Australia); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 South 10th Street, Suite 1079a, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Radiographic analysis of shoulder anatomical arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merolla, Giovanni [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)], E-mail: gmerolla@shouldertech.it; Di Pietto, Francesco; Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, Naples (Italy); Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    Arthroplasty is the standard treatment for advanced shoulder osteoarthritis. Modern prostheses designs have modular features whose size, shaft/head and body morphology can be adjusted. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) provides better results. A complete X-ray follow-up is essential to assess the results and evaluate the survival rates of a shoulder prosthesis. Antero-posterior at 40 deg. in both internal and external rotation (true AP view) and axillary view are recommended to assess the following parameters: orientation and translation of the humeral component, offset, size and height of the humeral head, acromio-humeral distance, distribution and fixation of the cement, stress shielding and cortical resorption, radiolucent lines, subsidence and tilt, glenoid wear and 'bone stock', prostheses instability, glenoid component shift. Shoulder hemiarthroplasty can lead to glenoid wear; the true AP film at 40 deg. of internal rotation provides the best profile of gleno-humeral joint to depict glenoid erosion. Shift of the glenoid component in TSA is identified as tilting or medial migration on true AP and axillary views in the early postoperative period (1-2 months) and at minimum of 2 years. An exhaustive radiographic analysis remains essential to monitor the prosthetic implant and detect early and late complications or risk factors of prosthetic loosening.

  2. Standing on the shoulders of giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, the author explains that the journal Temperature stands on the shoulders of giants-prominent scientists of the past and current members of the Temperature community. Temperature also uses the best tools, such as Google Scholar profiles. The editorial includes a new puzzle: why does warm water freeze faster than cold water?

  3. Biomechanical comparison of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems in soft tissue-constrained shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Heath B; King, Frank K; Tashjian, Robert Z; Burks, Robert T

    2014-05-01

    Numerous studies have examined the biomechanics of isolated variables in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. This study directly compared the composite performance of two reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems; each system was designed around either a medialized or a lateralized glenohumeral center of rotation. Seven pairs of shoulders were tested on a biomechanical simulator. Center of rotation, position of the humerus, passive and active range of motion, and force to abduct the arm were quantified. Native arms were tested, implanted with a Tornier Aequalis or DJO Surgical Reverse Shoulder Prosthesis (RSP), and then retested. Differences from the native state were then documented. Both systems shifted the center of rotation medially and inferiorly relative to native. Medial shifts were greater in the Aequalis implant (P .05). Both reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems exhibited adduction deficits, but the RSP implant deficit was smaller (P = .046 between implants). Both systems reduced forces to abduct the arm compared with native, although the Aequalis required more force to initiate motion from the resting position (P = .022). Given the differences in system designs and configurations, outcome variables were generally comparable. The RSP implant allowed slightly more adduction, had a more lateralized humeral position, and required less force to initiate elevation. These factors may play roles in limiting scapular notching, improving active external rotation by normalizing the residual rotator cuff length, and limiting excessive stress on the deltoid. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neep, M.J.; Aziz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  5. Shoulder Dystocia: Quality, Safety, and Risk Management Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Saila; Lee, Colleen; Goffman, Dena

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a term that evokes terror and fear among many physicians, midwives, and health care providers as they recollect at least 1 episode of shoulder dystocia in their careers. Shoulder dystocia can result in significant maternal and neonatal complications. Because shoulder dystocia is an urgent, unanticipated, and uncommon event with potentially catastrophic consequences, all practitioners and health care teams must be well-trained to manage this obstetric emergency. Preparation for shoulder dystocia in a systematic way, through standardization of process, practicing team-training and communication, along with technical skills, through simulation education and ongoing quality improvement initiatives will result in improved outcomes.

  6. Painful shoulder. Introduction into fundamental facts and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, P W

    1987-10-19

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past.

  7. Optimal Design of a Bio-Inspired Anthropocentric Shoulder Rehabilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a bio-inspired anthropocentric 7-DOF wearable robotic arm for the purpose of stroke rehabilitation. The proposed arm rehabilitator synergistically utilizes the human arm structure with non-invasive kinematically under-deterministic cable-driven mechanisms to form a completely deterministic structure. It offers the advantages of being lightweight and having high dexterity. Adopting an anthropocentric design concept also allows it to conform to the human anatomical structure. The focus of this paper is on the analysis and design of the 3-DOF-shoulder module, called the shoulder rehabilitator. The design methodology is divided into three main steps: (1 performance evaluation of the cable-driven shoulder rehabilitator, (2 performance requirements of the shoulder joint based on its physiological characteristics and (3 design optimization of the shoulder rehabilitator based on shoulder joint physiological limitations. The aim is to determine a suitable configuration for the development of a shoulder rehabilitator prototype.

  8. Risk of subacromial shoulder disorder in airport baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sanne Pagh; Brauer, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2018-01-01

    age,exposure variables showed close to significant associations with subacromial shoulder disorder.Results could not confirm our hypothesis that combined information on work task duration and shoulder load intensity was stronger associated with subacromial shoulder disorder than seniority.......Musculoskeletal shoulder-load among baggage handlers measured by combining duration and intensity based on biomechanical and epidemiological information may be a stronger predictor of subacromial shoulder disordersthanbaggage handler seniority.In 2012, a cohort of baggage handlers employed...... at Copenhagen Airport in 1990-2012, and a cohort of unskilledotherwise employed men answered a survey.Self-reported information on work tasks during employment in the airport in combination with work task specific biomechanically modelled forces in the shoulder joint was used to estimate shoulder-load. Exposure...

  9. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    values decreased with age (P shoulder BMD levels increased significantly with increased body mass index (BMI) (P positive relationship between the increased hip/shoulder BMD differential with BMI supports the conclusion that the shoulder is subject......The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... of osteoporosis compared with hip scans, the latter representing a weight-bearing part of the skeleton. We developed a scanning procedure, including a shoulder fixation device, and determined the most appropriate software in order to establish a reference material with the highest possible precision. Duplicate...

  10. Decreased shoulder function and pain common in recreational badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, M; Söderman, K

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and consequences of painful conditions in the shoulder region in recreational badminton players. A questionnaire study was performed on 99 players, of whom 57 were also assessed with Constant score. Previous or present pain in the dominant shoulder was reported by 52% of the players. Sixteen percent of the players had on-going shoulder pain associated with badminton play. A majority of these players reported that their training habits were affected by the pain. Total Constant score was lower in the painful shoulders. Furthermore, range of active pain-free shoulder abduction was decreased. However, isometric shoulder strength test showed no differences when compared with pain-free shoulders. Even though the pain caused functional problems, the players were still playing with on-going symptoms. The diagnoses were mostly unknown, although history and clinical tests indicate problems resembling subacromial impingement.

  11. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees......Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper...

  12. Strength asymmetry of the shoulders in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzic, Vedran; Sattler, Tine; Veselko, Matjaž; Markovic, Goran; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2014-01-01

    Volleyball players are reported to have shoulder strength imbalances. Previous authors have primarily investigated small samples of male players at a single skill level, without considering playing position, and with inconsistent findings. To evaluate shoulder strength asymmetry and a history of shoulder injury in a large sample of professional volleyball players of both sexes across different playing positions and skill levels. Descriptive laboratory study. A sample of 183 volleyball players (99 men, 84 women). We assessed shoulder internal-rotator and external-rotator concentric strength at 60°/s using an isokinetic dynamometer and dominant-nondominant differences in shoulder strength and strength ratios using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Peak torque was normalized for body mass and external-rotation/internal-rotation concentric strength. Internal-rotation strength was asymmetric in favor of the dominant side in both sexes, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. Male volleyball players had a lower shoulder strength ratio on the dominant side, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. However, this finding was valid only when hand dominance was taken into account. Female volleyball players playing at a higher level (ie, first versus second division) were 3.43 times more likely to have an abnormal strength ratio. Playing position was not associated with an abnormal shoulder strength ratio or strength asymmetry. In male volleyball players, the external-rotation/internal-rotation strength ratio of the dominant shoulder was lower, regardless of playing position, skill level, or a previous shoulder injury. In female players, the ratio was less only in those at a higher skill level. Although speculative, these findings generally suggest that female volleyball players could have a lower risk of developing shoulder-related problems than male volleyball players. Isokinetic shoulder testing may reveal important information about the possible risk

  13. Dominant vs. non-dominant shoulder morphology in volleyball players and associations with shoulder pain and spike speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoumas, Dimitrios; Artemiou, Andreas; Dimitrakakis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    The aims of our study were to compare the dominant (DOM) and non-dominant (NDOM) shoulders of high-level volleyball athletes and identify possible associations of shoulder adaptations with spike speed (SS) and shoulder pathology. A total of 22 male volleyball players from two teams participating in the first division of the Cypriot championship underwent clinical shoulder tests and simple measurements around their shoulder girdle joints bilaterally. SS was measured with the use of a sports speed radar. Compared with the NDOM side, the DOM scapula was more lateralised, the DOM dorsal capsule demonstrated greater laxity, the DOM dorsal muscles stretching ability was compromised, and the DOM pectoralis muscle was more lengthened. Players with present or past DOM shoulder pain demonstrated greater laxity in their DOM dorsal capsule, tightening of their DOM inferior capsule, and lower SS compared with those without shoulder pain. Dorsal capsule measurements bilaterally were significant predictors of SS. None of the shoulder measurements was associated with team roles or infraspinatus atrophy, while scapular lateralisation was more pronounced with increasing years of experience, and scapular antetilting was greater with increasing age. Adaptations of the DOM shoulder may be linked to pathology and performance. We describe simple shoulder measurements that may have the potential to predict chronic shoulder injury and become part of injury prevention programmes. Detailed biomechanical and large prospective studies are warranted to assess the validity of our findings and reach more definitive conclusions.

  14. Effects of Messages Delivered by Mobile Phone on Increasing Compliance With Shoulder Exercises Among Patients With a Frozen Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Pi-Chu; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Chuang, Yeu-Hui

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of reminders, encouragement, and educational messages delivered by mobile phone on shoulder exercise compliance and improvements in shoulder function among patients with a frozen shoulder. A randomized controlled trial design was used. A convenience sample of patients with a frozen shoulder in an orthopedic outpatient clinic was recruited. All participants were instructed on how to do shoulder exercises and were provided with a printed pamphlet about shoulder exercises. Then, the intervention group received reminders, encouragement, and educational messages by mobile phone daily for the next 2 weeks, while the comparison group did not. The intervention group had higher compliance with shoulder exercises than did the comparison group (t = 2.263, p = .03) and had significant improvements in shoulder forward flexion (F = 12.067, p = .001), external rotation (F = 13.61, p = .001), and internal rotation (F = 5.903, p = .018) compared to those in the comparison group after the 2-week intervention. The text messages significantly increased patient compliance with shoulder exercises and thus improved patients' shoulder range of motion. Hospital or clinics can send appropriate messages to patients via text message platforms in order to remind and encourage them to do shoulder exercises. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Lädermann, Alexandre; Kevelham, Bart; Chagué, Sylvain; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Holzer, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Shoulder strength training exercises represent a major component of rehabilitation protocols designed for conservative or postsurgical management of shoulder pathologies. Numerous methods are described for exercising each shoulder muscle or muscle group. Limited information is available to assess potential deleterious effects of individual methods with respect to specific shoulder pathologies. Thus, the goal of this pilot study was to use a patient-specific 3D measurement technique coupling medical imaging and optical motion capture for evaluation of a set of shoulder strength training exercises regarding glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as elongation of the rotator cuff muscles. One volunteer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and motion capture of the shoulder. Motion data from the volunteer were recorded during three passive rehabilitation exercises and twenty-nine strengthening exercises targeting eleven of the most frequently trained shoulder muscles or muscle groups and using four different techniques when available. For each exercise, glenohumeral and labral compression, subacromial space height and rotator cuff muscles elongation were measured on the entire range of motion. Significant differences in glenohumeral, subacromial and labral compressions were observed between sets of exercises targeting individual shoulder muscles. Muscle lengths computed by simulation compared to MRI measurements showed differences of 0-5%. This study represents the first screening of shoulder strengthening exercises to identify potential deleterious effects on the shoulder joint. Motion capture combined with medical imaging allows for reliable assessment of glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as muscle-tendon elongation during shoulder strength training exercises.

  16. Comparative characteristics of shoulder blade (Scapula) and shoulder bone (Humerus) of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and sheep (Ovis aries) in order to determine the animal species

    OpenAIRE

    Blagojević Miloš; Nikolić Zora; Prokić Bogomir Bolka; Ćupić-Miladinović Dejana

    2016-01-01

    In illegal hunting it is often possible only on the basis of morphological characteristics to determine the animal species. By the method of comparison there was performed the forensic analysis of roe deer and sheep osteological features. For the purpose of investigating the shoulder blade (Scapula) and shoulder bone (Humerus) comparative characteristics, there were used 6 shoulder blades and 6 shoulder bones of roe deer and 8 shoulder blades and 8 shoulder...

  17. Multimodal assessment of sensorimotor shoulder function in patients with untreated anterior shoulder instability and asymptomatic handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornieux, Guillaume; Hirschmüller, Anja; Gollhofer, Albert; Südkamp, Norbert P; Maier, Dirk

    2018-04-01

    Functional evaluation of sensorimotor function of the shoulder joint is important for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability. Such assessment should be multimodal and comprise all qualities of sensorimotor shoulder function. This study evaluates feasibility of such multimodal assessment of glenohumeral sensorimotor function in patients with shoulder instability and handball players. Nine patients with untreated anterior instability of their dominant shoulder and 15 asymptomatic recreational handball players performed proprioceptive joint position sense and dynamic stabilization evaluations on an isokinetic device, as well as a functional throwing performance task. Outcome measures were analysed individually and equally weighted in a Shoulder-Specific Sensorimotor Index (S-SMI). Finally, isokinetic strength evaluations were conducted. We observed comparable sensorimotor functions of unstable dominant shoulders compared to healthy, contralateral shoulders (e.g. P=0.59 for S-SMI). Handball players demonstrated superior sensorimotor function of their dominant shoulders exhibiting a significantly higher throwing performance and S-SMI (P0.22). The present study proves feasibility of multimodal assessment of shoulder sensorimotor function in overhead athletes and patients with symptomatic anterior shoulder instability. Untreated shoulder instability led to a loss of dominance-related sensorimotor superiority indicating functional internal rotation deficiency. Dominant shoulders of handball players showed a superior overall sensorimotor function but weakness of dominant internal rotation constituting a risk factor for occurrence of posterior superior impingement syndrome. The S-SMI could serve as a diagnostic tool for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability.

  18. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  19. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  20. Dexamethasone for pain after outpatient shoulder surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholdt, K. T.; Mønsted, P. N.; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has analgesic properties when given intravenously before surgery, but the optimal dose has not been determined. We hypothesised that a dose of 40 mg dexamethasone would improve analgesia after outpatient shoulder surgery compared with 8 mg. Methods A randomised, double...... a dose–response relationship, increasing the dexamethasone dose from 8 to 40 mg did not improve analgesia significantly after outpatient shoulder surgery.......) or placebo (D0) before surgery. The primary outcome was pain intensity 8 h after surgery rated on a numeric rating scale of 0 to 10. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, analgesic consumption and side effects during the first 3 days after surgery. Results Data from 73 patients were available for analysis...

  1. Double contrast arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, D.

    1991-01-01

    From 1980 to 1989 the author performed 481 double-contrast arthrographic examinations of the shoulder (DCSA). A hundred and forty-two complete and 46 partial rotator cuff tears were demonstrated; 68 of them underwent surgical exploration. Results confirmed DCSA capabilities in detecting both their location (100%) and size (95%). Moreover, thickness (89%) and erosions (94%) in tendon edges and surfaces were demonstrated - that is, all the qualitative information needed to depict degenerative processes. Such evidence may also affect treatment planning

  2. Geometrical analysis of stemless shoulder arthroplasty: a radiological study of seventy TESS total shoulder prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadum, Bakir; Hassany, Hamid; Wadsten, Mats; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sjödén, Göran

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a stemless shoulder prosthesis to restore shoulder anatomy in relation to premorbid anatomy. This prospective study was performed between May 2007 and December 2013. The inclusion criteria were patients with primary osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone stemless total anatomic shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic measurements were done on anteroposterior X-ray views of the glenohumeral joint. Sixty-nine patients (70 shoulders) were included in the study. The mean difference between premorbid centre of rotation (COR) and post-operative COR was 1 ± 2 mm (range -3 to 5.8 mm). The mean difference between premorbid humeral head height (HH) and post-operative HH was -1 ± 3 mm (range -9.7 to 8.5 mm). The mean difference between premorbid neck-shaft angle (NSA) and post-operative NSA was -3 ± 12° (range -26 to 20°). Stemless implants could be of help to reconstruct the shoulder anatomy. This study shows that there are some challenges to be addressed when attempting to ensure optimal implant positioning. The critical step is to determine the correct level of bone cut to avoid varus or valgus humeral head inclination and ensure correct head size.

  3. Posterior glenoid rim deficiency in recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, D.; Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J.; Nyffeler, R.W.; Gerber, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To assess the shape of the posterior glenoid rim in patients with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability.Design and patients. CT examinations of 15 shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were reviewed in masked fashion with regard to abnormalities of the glenoid shape, specifically of its posterior rim. The glenoid version was also assessed. The findings were compared with the findings in 15 shoulders with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and 15 shoulders without instability. For all patients, surgical correlation was available.Results. Fourteen of the 15 (93%) shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability had a deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim. In patients with recurrent anterior instability or stable shoulders such deficiencies were less common (60% and 73%, respectively). The craniocaudal length of the deficiencies was largest in patients with posterior instability. When a posteroinferior deficiency with a craniocaudal length of 12 mm or more was defined as abnormal, sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were 86.7% and 83.3%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in glenoid version between shoulders with posterior instability and stable shoulders (P=0.01).Conclusion. Recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability should be considered in patients with a bony deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim with a craniocaudal length of more than 12 mm. (orig.)

  4. Shoulder joint loading and posture during medicine cart pushing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; Boyer, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Excessive physical loads and awkward shoulder postures during pushing and pulling are risk factors for shoulder pain. Pushing a medicine cart is a major component of a work shift for nurses and medical assistants in hospitals and other health care facilities. A laboratory experiment was conducted to examine the effects of common factors (e.g., lane congestion, cart load stability, floor surface friction) on shoulder joint moment and shoulder elevation angle of participants during cart pushing. Participants pushed a medicine cart on straight tracks and turning around right-angle corners. Peak shoulder joint moments reached 25.1 Nm, 20.3 Nm, and 26.8 Nm for initial, transition, and turning phases of the pushing tasks, indicating that shoulder joint loading while pushing a medical cart is comparable to levels previously reported from heavy manual activities encountered in industry (e.g., garbage collection). Also, except for user experience, all other main study factors, including congestion level, cart load stability, location of transition strip, shoulder tendency, surface friction, and handedness, significantly influenced shoulder joint moment and shoulder elevation angle. The findings provide a better understanding of shoulder exposures associated with medicine cart operations and may be helpful in designing and optimizing the physical environment where medicine carts are used.

  5. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using κ coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from κ=0.55 to κ=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from κ=0.79 and 0.53 to κ=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff tendon

  6. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Yang-Soo (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using kappa coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from kappa=0.55 to kappa=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from kappa=0.79 and 0.53 to kappa=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff

  7. The diabetic frozen shoulder: arthroscopic release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie-Harris, D J; Myerthall, S

    1997-02-01

    Seventeen patients who were diabetics developed frozen shoulders which failed to respond to conservative management. They had persistent pain, stiffness, and limited function. An arthroscopic release was performed by progressively releasing the anterior structures from superior to inferior. Starting from the interval area we progressed to the anterior superior glenohumeral ligament, the intra-articular portion of the subscapularis, the anterior capsule, and the inferior capsule. Postoperatively physiotherapy was carried out daily to maintain the range of movement. At a follow up of 1 to 5 years the patients were assessed using the American Shoulder Society scheme. In addition the patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively on four criteria; pain, external rotation, abduction, and function. We found that the patients were statistically significantly improved in all four categories. Thirteen of the 17 patients had no pain, full range of motion compared with the opposite side, and full function. There was one poor result with no improvement. The remaining three patients had improved but still had residual abnormalities. We consider arthroscopic release to be an effective treatment for the resistant diabetic frozen shoulder.

  8. Shoulder dystocia--malpractice or acceptable risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolbekken, J A

    2000-09-01

    In 1988 a new patient insurance system was introduced in Norway. It was initially described as an 'objectified' system, similar to one based on the no-fault principle. Early doubts were raised about the system's status, as it contains rules stating that compensation will not be given if the medical intervention is adequate and the involved risk is acceptable. This study was undertaken to examine the practice of these rules. An archival study was performed on the 41 shoulder dystocia cases that had been closed in the decade from 1988-1997. These cases were selected as shoulder dystocia was found to be the obstetrical event most often leading to a decision on acceptable risk. The most common injury in these cases was Erb's palsy, but fatalities and brain injuries were also observed. Compensation was given in nine cases, whereas it was denied due to an acceptable medical risk in the remaining cases. Indications of inconsistency among the reached decisions were found, and judged to be a result of differences of opinion between expert witnesses on the adequacy of the obstetrical practice. Doubts are raised as to whether similar decisions are reached in similar cases. Shoulder dystocia may be an acceptable risk in the sense that it is hard to predict and prevent. Whether the consequences of such a risk should be compensated, remains a political and economical issue. Present thinking leads to decisions that create a divide between the lucky unlucky and the plainly unlucky.

  9. The epidemiology of shoulder dislocations in Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liavaag, S; Svenningsen, S; Reikerås, O; Enger, M; Fjalestad, T; Pripp, A H; Brox, J I

    2011-12-01

    There are few previous studies on the incidence of shoulder dislocation in the general population. The aim of the study was to report the incidence of acute shoulder dislocations in the capital of Norway (Oslo) in 2009. Patients of all ages living in Oslo, sustaining a dislocation of the glenohumeral joint, were identified using electronic diagnosis registers, patient protocols, radiological registers of the hospitals, and the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR). The overall incidence rate was 56.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 50.2-62.4] per 100,000 person-years, with rates of 82.2 (95% CI 71.7-92.8) and 30.9 (95% CI 24.5-37.3) in men and women, respectively. The incidence of primary dislocations was 26.2 (95% CI 22.1-30.4). The overall incidence of shoulder dislocations in Oslo was higher than previously reported incidences. The incidence of primary dislocations was also higher than that in previously reported studies for the general population but it was close to the incidence reported in Malmø, Sweden. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Arthrography of the equine shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.J.; Spencer, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques and normal radiographic anatomy for positive and double contrast shoulder arthrography in horses were evaluated. General anaesthesia was used for most radiographic projections of the shoulder. The mediolateral projection provided the most information during arthrography, although the supinated mediolateral view occasionally allowed better definition of the cartilage surfaces on the medial aspects of the humeral head. The craniocaudal mediolateral oblique and caudocranial projections provided limited additional information. Water soluble non-ionic contrast agents, such as metrizamide and iohexol, were suitable for shoulder arthrography; iohexol resulted in less synovitis and lameness. Arthrography in cases of osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans allowed better evaluation of cartilage attachment to subchondral bone, better evaluation of the length and depth of cartilage lesions and more accurately defined the site and shape of osteocartilaginous free bodies. Cartilage thickening without detachment from the subchondral bone could only be determined by arthrography. Although these thick cartilage regions may later dissect from the subchondral bone, most cases where the cartilage was firmly adherent were not candidates for surgical debridement and carried a favourable prognosis. The determination of a free flap by arthrography indicated the need for surgery. Extensive humeral and glenoid cavity lesions were better defined by arthrography, allowing a rational decision between surgical debridement or euthanasia. Using arthrography, evaluation of the size and patency of the communicating canal to a subchondral cystic defect better separated cases with long, narrow and poorly patent canals for conservative rather than surgical therapy

  11. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lang, Philipp [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Wagner, Ulli [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Moeller, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Deimling, Urs van [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Genant, H K [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Schild, Hans H [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures.

  12. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, Martin; Lang, Philipp; Wagner, Ulli; Moeller, Frank; Deimling, Urs van; Genant, H.K.; Schild, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T 1 -weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T 2 *-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures

  13. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI (United States); Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W. [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kamuela, HI (United States); Shellock, Frank G. [University of Southern California, Education and Research, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crues, John V. [Radnet Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  14. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura; Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W.; Shellock, Frank G.; Crues, John V.; Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  15. The imaging of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayamizu, Kyoko; Ito, Katsuhide; Naito, Akira

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomographic arthrography (arthro-CT) and rotator cuff sonography (RC-US) are new methods for investigating cases with shoulder disorders. We present details of these techniques and report normal and pathological findings of the shoulder joint composed of the glenoid lablum, glenoid, joint capsule and RC. Twenty nine cases with shoulder instability and RC tears were evaluated by arthro-CT. Arthro-CT findings were correlated with surgical ones in three operated cases. Arthro-CT has provided excellent visualizations of labral tears and capsular lesions and has been successfully utilized for detection of the spilled contrast material with RC tears. We examined RC-US in 9 cases who underwent surgery or arthrography on suspicion of rotator cuff tears, and 12 normal volunteers. RC-US findings indicative of the tears included (1) defect or focal thinning of the RC in 3 cases, (2) discontinuity in the homogenous echogenicity of the RC in 2 cases, (3) presence of the abnormal central echogenic band or echogenic foci in the RC in 6 cases. The defect or thinning of the RC represented full-thickness tears. RC-US is a rapid, noninvasive and reliable method of detecting RC tears. (author)

  16. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars L; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct...... training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training...... with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius.An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university...

  17. The Shoulder Objective Practical Assessment Tool: Evaluation of a New Tool Assessing Residents Learning in Diagnostic Shoulder Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher L; Holt, Edward M; Gooding, Benjamin W T; Tennent, Thomas D; Foden, Philip

    2015-08-01

    To design and validate an objective practical assessment tool for diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy that would provide residents with a method to evaluate their progression in this field of surgery and to identify specific learning needs. We designed and evaluated the shoulder Objective Practical Assessment Tool (OPAT). The shoulder OPAT was designed by us, and scoring domains were created using a Delphi process. The shoulder OPAT was trialed by members of the British Elbow & Shoulder Society Education Committee for internal consistency and ease of use before being offered to other trainers and residents. Inter-rater reliability and intrarater reliability were calculated. One hundred forty orthopaedic residents, of varying seniority, within 5 training regions in the United Kingdom, were questioned regarding the tool. A pilot study of 6 residents was undertaken. Internal consistency was 0.77 (standardized Cronbach α). Inter-rater reliability was 0.60, and intrarater reliability was 0.82. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r) between the global summary score for the shoulder OPAT and the current assessment tool used in postgraduate training for orthopaedic residents undertaking diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy equaled 0.74. Of the residents, 82% agreed or strongly agreed when asked if the shoulder OPAT would be a useful tool in monitoring progression and 72% agreed or strongly agreed with the introduction of the shoulder OPAT within the orthopaedic domain. This study shows that the shoulder OPAT fulfills several aspects of reliability and validity when tested. Despite the inter-rater reliability being 0.60, we believe that the shoulder OPAT has the potential to play a role alongside the current assessment tool in the training of orthopaedic residents. The shoulder OPAT can be used to assess residents during shoulder arthroscopy and has the potential for use in medical education, as well as arthroscopic skills training in the operating theater. Copyright © 2015

  18. Mid-term shoulder functional and quality of life outcomes after shoulder replacement in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Heather K; Struk, Aimee M; Reed, Austin; Wright, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder pain and loss of function are directly associated with obesity. We hypothesized that significant interactions would exist between total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and obesity status on functional and quality of life (QOL) outcomes over the long term. Clinical and QOL outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation form, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating scale, Medical Outcomes Short Form 12 (SF-12), range of motion (ROM), and strength) were longitudinally compared in patients with low and high body mass index (BMI) after a TSA or a RSA. Prospectively collected data of patients with a TSA or RSA were reviewed (N = 310). Preoperative, 2-year, and final follow-up visits were included (range 3-17 years; mean 5.0 ± 2.5 years). Patient data were stratified for analysis using BMI. Morbidly obese patients had worse preoperative functional scores and QOL compared to the other groups. There were no significant interactions of BMI group by surgery type for any of the outcome variables except for active external rotation ROM. Morbidly obese patients attained lower SF-12 scores compared to the remaining groups at each time point. Both TSA and RSA can be expected to impart positive functional outcomes in patients irrespective of BMI. Morbidly obese patients do not attain the same gains in Medical Outcomes SF-12 scores as the non-morbidly obese patients. The lower improvements in active external ROM may be due to morphological limitations of excessive adiposity. This is a level II study.

  19. Association of head circumference and shoulder dystocia in macrosomic neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Austin; Mandelbaum, David E

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether asymmetric macrosomia (disproportionately large body size in comparison to head circumference) could be demonstrated in a population of infants suffering shoulder dystocia during delivery relative to those that did not suffer from shoulder dystocia. A case-control study was conducted as a retrospective chart review over 3 years at a large maternity hospital in an urban setting. Among infants over 4,000 g, those that suffered from shoulder dystocia during delivery had a smaller mean head circumference than infants of a similar size that did not suffer from shoulder dystocia. A statistically significant difference was also present when cases of documented gestational diabetes were excluded. Asymmetric macrosomia is more likely to be present in a population of infants who suffered shoulder dystocia during delivery. This knowledge could be used in designing tools to predict which pregnancies are at highest risk for shoulder dystocia during delivery.

  20. Extravasation of joint fluid into the mediastinum and the deep neck during atthoscopic shoulder surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ki Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Dong-A University Hospital, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Extravasation of shoulder joint fluid into the surrounding muscles during shoulder arthroscopic surgery is common and inevitable. Here, we report a case of massive extravasation of shoulder joint fluid leading to mediastinal and retrotracheal effusion after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We will discuss the anatomical basis of fluid leakage from the shoulder to the mediastinum and to the deep neck on CT.

  1. Extravasation of joint fluid into the mediastinum and the deep neck during atthoscopic shoulder surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ki Nam

    2014-01-01

    Extravasation of shoulder joint fluid into the surrounding muscles during shoulder arthroscopic surgery is common and inevitable. Here, we report a case of massive extravasation of shoulder joint fluid leading to mediastinal and retrotracheal effusion after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We will discuss the anatomical basis of fluid leakage from the shoulder to the mediastinum and to the deep neck on CT.

  2. Clinical Outcomes after Arthroscopic Release for Recalcitrant Frozen Shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Moradi, Ali; Pour, Mostafa Khalili; Moghadam, Mohammad Hallaj; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To explain the role of arthroscopic release in intractable frozen shoulders. We used different questionnaires and measuring tools to understand whether arthroscopic release is the superior modality to treat patients with intractable frozen shoulders. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, in a prospective study, we enrolled 80 patients (52 females and 28 males) with recalcitrant frozen shoulder, who underwent arthroscopic release at Ghaem Hospital, a tertiary referral center, in Mashhad,...

  3. Clinical outcomes after arthroscopic release for recalcitrant frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Moradi, Ali; Pour, Mostafa Khalili; Moghadam, Mohammad Hallaj; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2014-09-01

    To explain the role of arthroscopic release in intractable frozen shoulders. We used different questionnaires and measuring tools to understand whether arthroscopic release is the superior modality to treat patients with intractable frozen shoulders. Between 2007 and 2013, in a prospective study, we enrolled 80 patients (52 females and 28 males) with recalcitrant frozen shoulder, who underwent arthroscopic release at Ghaem Hospital, a tertiary referral center, in Mashhad, Iran. Before operation, all patients filled out the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Constant, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), ROWE and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain questionnaires. We measured the difference in range of motion between both the normal and the frozen shoulders in each patient. The average age of the patients was 50.8±7.1 years. In 49 patients, the right shoulder was affected and in the remaining 31 the left side was affected. Before surgery, the patients were suffering from this disease on average for 11.7±10.3 months. The average time to follow-up was 47.2±6.8 months (14 to 60 months). Diabetes mellitus (38%) and history of shoulder trauma (23%) were the most common comorbidities in our patients. We did not find any significant differences between baseline characteristics of diabetics patients with non-diabetics ones. After surgery, the average time to achieve maximum pain improvement and range of motion were 3.6±2.1 and 3.6±2 months, respectively. The VAS score, constant shoulder score, Rowe score, UCLA shoulder score, and DASH score showed significant improvement in shoulder function after surgery, and shoulder range of motion improved in all directions compared to pre-operation range of motion. According to our results, arthroscopic release of recalcitrant frozen shoulder is a valuable modality in treating this disease. This method could decrease pain and improve both subjective and objective mid-term outcomes.

  4. ANALYSIS OF LEVEL OF BOTH SHOULDERS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazala Noor Nizami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During lectures, usually students sit in an awkward position, for prolonged period of time and that may cause postural instability. For a good posture, bilateral landmarks should be on same level, when viewed from front or behind. Therefore, both shoulders should also be on same level as well. Any alteration in level of shoulders in healthy individual may lead to deformity in spine or extremity. The objective of this study was to analyze the level of both shoulders in the physical therapy students and to find its correlation with the perception of students about their shoulder balance. Methods: An observational (cross – sectional study was conducted on students of Doctor in Physical Therapy (DPT from colleges of Physical Therapy, Karachi. 100 Students were selected by Simple Random Sampling technique. Data from students was collected by administering a questionnaire. It includes close-ended questions. Afterwards, the level of both shoulders of the students, were assessed by using Scoliosis Meter. Results: Response from students showed that 79% of them assumed that both shoulders are in same level. When level of shoulder of students was assessed by scoliosis meter, it showed that 37% students have absolute level shoulder. Spearman’s Correlation coefficient (r = 0.046, p= 0.65 showed a weak, positive correlation between perception of the students about shoulder level and assessment of shoulder tilt. Conclusion: This showed that the perception of students about level of both shoulders was not correlated to the actual levels of the shoulders. Hence, as they were not assuming it uneven, so they may not pay any attention to keep themselves straight.

  5. Video Analysis of Primary Shoulder Dislocations in Rugby Tackles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Nobukazu; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Urayama, Shingo; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    Characteristics of rugby tackles that lead to primary anterior shoulder dislocation remain unclear. To clarify the characteristics of tackling that lead to shoulder dislocation and to assess the correlation between the mechanism of injury and morphological damage of the glenoid. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eleven elite rugby players who sustained primary anterior shoulder dislocation due to one-on-one tackling between 2001 and 2014 were included. Using an assessment system, the tackler's movement, posture, and shoulder and head position were evaluated in each phase of tackling. Based on 3-dimensional computed tomography, the glenoid of the affected shoulder was classified into 3 types: intact, erosion, and bone defect. Orientation of the glenoid defect and presence of Hill-Sachs lesion were also evaluated. Eleven tackles that led to primary shoulder dislocation were divided into hand, arm, and shoulder tackle types based on the site at which the tackler contacted the ball carrier initially. In hand and arm tackles, the tackler's shoulder joint was forcibly moved to horizontal abduction by the impact of his upper limb, which appeared to result from an inappropriate approach to the ball carrier. In shoulder tackles, the tackler's head was lowered and was in front of the ball carrier at impact. There was no significant correlation between tackle types and the characteristics of bony lesions of the shoulder. Although the precise mechanism of primary anterior shoulder dislocation could not be estimated from this single-view analysis, failure of individual tackling leading to injury is not uniform and can be caused by 2 main factors: failure of approach followed by an extended arm position or inappropriate posture of the tackler at impact, such as a lowered head in front of the opponent. These findings indicate that injury mechanisms should be assessed for each type of tackle, as it is unknown whether external force to the glenoid is different in each mechanism

  6. Shoulder injuries in professional rugby: a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Ian G; Fowler, Elizabeth M; Rolf, Christer G

    2013-01-01

    Background In the literature, little is known about the level and pattern of rugby injuries. Of the shoulder injuries reported, 51% of these are caused during a tackle, and 65% of all match injuries affected the shoulder. Objective The study aims to describe a sport-specific unique intra-articular shoulder pathology of professional rugby players, who presented with persistent pain and dysfunction despite physiotherapeutic treatment and rest. Method This study is a retrospective analysis set a...

  7. A little-known cause of painful shoulder: os acromiale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granieri, G.F.; Bacarini, L.

    1998-01-01

    The incidental discovery of an 'os acromiale' might explain some cases of 'painful shoulder': this is what we have observed in three patients. The purpose of our article is to underline the relevance of the axillary roentgenogram of the shoulder for the correct diagnosis of this anomaly. In all patients the radiographic examination was performed using a computed radiography system; moreover we performed a computed tomographic examination of the acromioclavicular portion of the shoulders with three-dimensional reconstructions. (orig.)

  8. Online resources for shoulder instability: what are patients reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Grant H; Taylor, Samuel A; Dy, Christopher J; Christ, Alexander; Patel, Ronak M; Dines, Joshua S

    2014-10-15

    Evaluations of the medical literature suggest that many online sites provide poor-quality information. The purpose of our study was to investigate the value of online resources for patient education about shoulder instability. Three search terms ("shoulder instability," "loose shoulder," and "shoulder dislocation") were entered into three Internet search engines. Three orthopaedic residents independently gauged the quality and accuracy of the information with use of a set of predetermined scoring criteria, in addition to noting whether or not four potential surgery options were mentioned. The readability of the web sites was evaluated with use of the Flesch-Kincaid score. Eighty-two unique web sites were evaluated. Quality and accuracy were significantly higher with use of the term "shoulder instability" compared with the term "loose shoulder" (quality, p reading level was significantly more advanced for the "shoulder instability" web sites (p reading levels above the eighth grade level (p = 0.001) (88% of web sites). Only twenty-three sites (28%) mentioned surgical options for shoulder instability, and of these, only eight mentioned thermal capsulorrhaphy as a primary treatment. Online information regarding shoulder instability is often inaccurate and/or at an inappropriately high reading level. The quality of information is highly dependent on the specific search term used. Clinicians need to be aware of the information that is available online and should help direct patients to proper sites and guide Internet search terms. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  9. The volleyball athlete's shoulder: biomechanical adaptations and injury associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoumas, Dimitrios; Stavrou, Antonio; Dimitrakakis, Georgios

    2017-06-01

    In volleyball, the dominant shoulder of the athlete undergoes biomechanical and morphological adaptations; however, definitive conclusions about their exact nature, aetiology, purpose and associations with shoulder injury have not been reached. We present a systematic review of the existing literature describing biomechanical adaptations in the dominant shoulders of volleyball players and factors that may predispose to shoulder pain/injury. A thorough literature search via Medline, EMBASE and SCOPUS was conducted for original studies of volleyball players and 15 eligible articles were identified. Assessment of study quality was performed using the STROBE statement. The reviewed literature supports the existence of a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) and a possible (and less pronounced) external rotation gain in the dominant vs. the non-dominant shoulder of volleyball athletes. Unlike other overhead sports, the GIRD in volleyball athletes appears to be anatomical as a response to the repetitive overhead movements and not to be associated with shoulder pain/injury. Additionally, the dominant shoulder exhibits muscular imbalance, which appears to be a significant risk factor for shoulder pain. Strengthening of the external rotators should be used alongside shoulder stretching and joint mobilisations, core strengthening and optimisation of spike technique as part of injury management and prevention programmes.

  10. Resurfacing shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorde, Pia C Ten; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is no consensus on which type of shoulder prosthesis should be used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe patients with RA who were treated with shoulder replacement, regarding patient-reported outcome, prosthesis survival, and causes of revision...... with adjustment for age, sex, and previous surgery. RESULTS: During the study period, 167 patients underwent shoulder arthroplasty because of rheumatoid arthritis, 80 (48%) of whom received RHA and 34 (26%) of whom received SHA. 16 patients were treated with total stemmed shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), and 24 were...

  11. Validation of the Danish version of Oxford Shoulder Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Noergaard, Peter Moensted; Brorson, Stig

    2011-01-01

    The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS).......The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS)....

  12. Clinical forms of shoulder instability in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav N. Proshchenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The recurrence rate of adolescent chronic shoulder instability is approximately 56%–68%. However, this pathology is often missed in childhood and adolescence. Aim. To identify the clinical forms of shoulder joint instability in pediatric patients. Materials and methods. The authors present the data from 57 pediatric patients aged 3−17 years with a total of 61 unstable shoulder joints. All patients were divided into groups according to the form of instability. Traumatic chronic shoulder instability was identified in 40 patients (Bankart and Hill–Sachs injuries. Of these, non-traumatic shoulder instability was diagnose in 17, including five with recurrent dislocation, and spontaneous shoulder dislocation due to dysplasia of glenoid and labrum was diagnosed in 12. Of the 57 patients in the study cohort, 53 underwent surgery. Postoperatively, two patients developed recurrent shoulder dislocation (Andreev–Boichev technique due type III shoulder dysplasia in the first patient and multidirectional injury in the second. Conclusions. Shoulder joint instability should be considered as the traumatic or non-traumatic form. Treatment decisions should be based on anatomical characteristics that predispose to recurrent dislocation.

  13. Shoulder range of motion measures as risk factors for shoulder and elbow injuries in high school softball and baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Ellen; Rauh, Mitchell J; Michener, Lori A; Ellenbecker, Todd S; Garrison, J Craig; Thigpen, Charles A

    2011-09-01

    Range of motion deficits in shoulder external rotation (ER), internal rotation (IR), total rotation range of motion (ER + IR), and horizontal adduction (HA) have been retrospectively associated with overhand athletes' arm injuries. The authors expected the incidence of upper extremity injury in high school softball and baseball players with side-to-side shoulder range of motion deficits to be greater than the incidence of upper extremity injury in players with normal shoulder range of motion. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. High school softball and baseball players (N = 246) participated. Before the start of the season, passive shoulder ER, IR, and HA were assessed at 90° of abduction with the scapula stabilized. Relative risk (RR) was calculated to examine range of motion measure, by categorical criteria, and risk of upper extremity injury. Twenty-seven shoulder and elbow injuries (9 softball, 18 baseball) were observed during the season. The dominant shoulder of all injured players and baseball players displayed a significant decrease in HA (P = .05) and IR (P = .04). The dominant shoulder total rotation of injured baseball players displayed a significant decrease (mean difference = 8.0° ± 0.1°; P = .05) as compared with the dominant shoulder of uninjured baseball players. Players who displayed a decrease of ≥25° of IR in the dominant shoulder were at 4 times greater risk of upper extremity injury compared with players with a .05). There are large mean deficits in shoulder IR and HA between injured and noninjured players, but not in ER or total rotation. Passive shoulder IR loss ≥25° as compared bilaterally was predictive of arm injury. Shoulder range of motion deficits differed between sports and appeared more predictive of injury for baseball players.

  14. Propensity for obtaining alcohol through shoulder tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Traci L; Fabian, Lindsey E A; Erickson, Darin J; Lenk, Kathleen M

    2007-07-01

    Underage youth often obtain alcohol from adults who illegally provide the alcohol. One method for obtaining alcohol from adults is shoulder tapping, where youth approach an adult outside an alcohol establishment and ask the adult to purchase alcohol for them. The goal of this study was to assess what percentage of the general and youth-targeted adult population approached outside of a convenience/liquor store will agree to purchase and then provide alcohol to individuals who appear under age 21. We conducted 2 waves of pseudo-underage shoulder tap request attempts, using requesters who were age 21 or older but appeared 18 to 20 years old. In both waves, requests were conducted at randomly selected liquor and convenience stores, requesters explained that the reason they were asking the adult was because they did not have their identification with them, and requesters asked the adults to purchase a 6-pack of beer. During wave 1, we conducted 102 attempts, with the requester approaching the first adult entering the store alone. During wave 2, we conducted 102 attempts where the requester approached the first casually dressed male entering the store alone who appeared to be 21 to 30 years old. During wave 1, 8% of the general sample of approached adults provided alcohol to the pseudo-underage requesters. The odds of adults providing alcohol in urban areas were 9.4 times greater than in suburban areas. During wave 2, 19% of the approached young men provided alcohol to the requesters. No requester, request attempt, establishment, or community characteristics were associated with request attempt outcomes during wave 2. A small percentage of the general population of adults will agree to provide alcohol to underage youth when approached outside an alcohol establishment. The likelihood of underage youth obtaining alcohol through shoulder tapping increases substantially if the youth approach young men.

  15. Physical examination of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle in patients with shoulder complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobel, JS; Winters, JC; Groenier, K; Arendzen, Johan; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Objective: To look for differences in mobility in randomly selected patients without shoulder complaints depending on age, gender and left- or right-handedness; to investigate in the patient group whether specific differences exist, depending on the diagnosis made or the afflicted side; and to

  16. Shoulder-elbow exoskeleton as rehabilitation exerciser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianoşi, A.; Dimitrova, A.; Noveanu, S.; Tătar, O. M.; Mândru, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a 2 degree of freedom exoskeleton designed for the rehabilitation of the shoulder and elbow movement in the sagittal plane; a semi-portable design strategy was chosen, which enables an easy attachment to a standard medical chair as well as the patient upper limb. A dedicated driver enables the control from a graphical user interface, which also provides the option of customized rehabilitation exercises. The potential of future improvements is assessed, and recommendations of research direction are made in order to broaden the usability of the proposed device.

  17. Shoulder instability in professional football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclere, Lance E; Asnis, Peter D; Griffith, Matthew H; Granito, David; Berkson, Eric M; Gill, Thomas J

    2013-09-01

    Shoulder instability is a common problem in American football players entering the National Football League (NFL). Treatment options include nonoperative and surgical stabilization. This study evaluated how the method of treatment of pre-NFL shoulder instability affects the rate of recurrence and the time elapsed until recurrence in players on 1 NFL team. Retrospective cohort. Medical records from 1980 to 2008 for 1 NFL team were reviewed. There were 328 players included in the study who started their career on the team and remained on the team for at least 2 years (mean, 3.9 years; range, 2-14 years). The history of instability prior to entering the NFL and the method of treatment were collected. Data on the occurrence of instability while in the NFL were recorded to determine the rate and timing of recurrence. Thirty-one players (9.5%) had a history of instability prior to entering the NFL. Of the 297 players with no history of instability, 39 (13.1%) had a primary event at a mean of 18.4 ± 22.2 months (range, 0-102 months) after joining the team. In the group of players with prior instability treated with surgical stabilization, there was no statistical difference in the rate of recurrence (10.5%) or the timing to the instability episode (mean, 26 months) compared with players with no history of instability. Twelve players had shoulder instability treated nonoperatively prior to the NFL. Five of these players (41.7%) had recurrent instability at a mean of 4.4 ± 7.0 months (range, 0-16 months). The patients treated nonoperatively had a significantly higher rate of recurrence (P = 0.02) and an earlier time of recurrence (P = 0.04). The rate of contralateral instability was 25.8%, occurring at a mean of 8.6 months. Recurrent shoulder instability is more common in NFL players with a history of nonoperative treatment. Surgical stabilization appears to restore the rate and timing of instability to that of players with no prior history of instability.

  18. [Shoulder surgery using only regional anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbury, Claire; van Kampen, Paulien M; Offenberg, Tom A M M; Hogervorst, Tom; Huijsmans, Pol E

    2011-01-01

    Effective intra-operative anaesthesia and peri-operative analgesia are important aspects of patient care in orthopaedic surgery. The interscalene regional anaesthetic block technique, performed with the patient lying in a lateral decubitus position, is new for arthroscopic shoulder surgery conducted in the Netherlands. The combination of the interscalene block (without general anaesthesia) and the lateral decubitus position results in better peri-operative conditions for the patient. Better analgesia, increased patient satisfaction and fewer complications in comparison to general anaesthesia have been reported for these types of surgery.

  19. Kinematic evaluation of patients with total and reverse shoulder arthroplasty during rehabilitation exercises with different loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Toledo, Joelly Mahnic; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes; Janssen, Thomas W.; van der Scheer, Jan W.; Alta, Tjarco D.; Willems, W. Jaap; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J)

    2012-01-01

    Background: Following shoulder arthroplasty, any well-planned rehabilitation program should include muscle strengthening. However, it is not always clear how different external loads influence shoulder kinematics in patients with shoulder prostheses. The objective of this study was to describe

  20. The active and passive kinematic difference between primary reverse and total shoulder prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alta, T.D.; de Toledo, J.S.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Willems, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) effectively decrease pain and improve clinical outcome. However, indications and biomechanical properties vary greatly. Our aim was to analyze both active and passive shoulder motion (thoracohumeral [TH],

  1. Cadaveric Study of the Articular Branches of the Shoulder Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Maxim S; Bickelhaupt, Brittany; Fehl, Jacob; Benfield, Jonathan A; Curley, Jonathan; Rahimi, Ohmid; Nagpal, Ameet S

    This cadaveric study investigated the anatomic relationships of the articular branches of the suprascapular (SN), axillary (AN), and lateral pectoral nerves (LPN), which are potential targets for shoulder analgesia. Sixteen embalmed cadavers and 1 unembalmed cadaver, including 33 shoulders total, were dissected. Following dissections, fluoroscopic images were taken to propose an anatomical landmark to be used in shoulder articular branch blockade. Thirty-three shoulders from 17 total cadavers were studied. In a series of 16 shoulders, 16 (100%) of 16 had an intact SN branch innervating the posterior head of the humerus and shoulder capsule. Suprascapular sensory branches coursed laterally from the spinoglenoid notch then toward the glenohumeral joint capsule posteriorly. Axillary nerve articular branches innervated the posterolateral head of the humerus and shoulder capsule in the same 16 (100%) of 16 shoulders. The AN gave branches ascending circumferentially from the quadrangular space to the posterolateral humerus, deep to the deltoid, and inserting at the inferior portion of the posterior joint capsule. In 4 previously dissected and 17 distinct shoulders, intact LPNs could be identified in 14 (67%) of 21 specimens. Of these, 12 (86%) of 14 had articular branches innervating the anterior shoulder joint, and 14 (100%) of 14 LPN articular branches were adjacent to acromial branches of the thoracoacromial blood vessels over the superior aspect of the coracoid process. Articular branches from the SN, AN, and LPN were identified. Articular branches of the SN and AN insert into the capsule overlying the glenohumeral joint posteriorly. Articular branches of the LPN exist and innervate a portion of the anterior shoulder joint.

  2. Treating Postlaparoscopic Surgery Shoulder Pain with Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gur Kreindler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupuncture on postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP which is a common side effect in patients undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Methods. Patients with moderate to severe PLSP in spite of analgesic treatment, which were referred by the medical staff to the Complementary-Integrative Surgery Service (CISS at our institution, were provided with acupuncture treatment. The severity of PLSP and of general pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS from 0 to 10. Pain assessment was conducted prior to and two hours following acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture treatment was individualized based on traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis. Results. A total of 25 patients were evaluated during a 14-month period, from March 2011 to May 2012. A significant reduction in PLSP (mean reduction of 6.4±2.3  P<0.0001 and general pain (mean reduction 6.4±2.1  P<0.0001 were observed, and no significant side effects were reported. Conclusion. Individualized acupuncture treatments according to traditional Chinese medicine principles may improve postlaparoscopic shoulder pain and general pain when used in conjunction with conventional therapy. The primary findings of this study warrant verification in controlled studies.

  3. Isolated Pulmonary Embolism following Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole H. Goldhaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE following shoulder arthroscopy is a rare complication. We present a unique case report of a 43-year-old right-hand dominant female who developed a PE 41 days postoperatively with no associated upper or lower extremity DVT. The patient had minimal preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Additionally, she had no thromboembolic symptoms postoperatively until 41 days following surgery when she developed sudden right-hand swelling, labored breathing, and abdominal pain. A stat pulmonary computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest revealed an acute PE in the right lower lobe, and subsequent extremity ultrasounds showed no upper or lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. After a thorough review of the literature, we present the first documented isolated PE following shoulder arthroscopy. Although rare, sudden development of an isolated PE is possible, and symptoms such as sudden hand swelling, trouble breathing, and systemic symptoms should be evaluated aggressively with a pulmonary CT angiogram given the fact that an extremity ultrasound may be negative for deep vein thrombosis.

  4. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  5. Interscalene block for shoulder surgery | Rukewe | Annals of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fracture dislocation of the shoulder is a common musculoskeletal injury following road traffic accident. Peripheral nerve block has become a recognized anesthetic technique due to the rapid onset of prolonged analgesia, sufficient for both pain and surgical management. However, interscalene block for shoulder surgery ...

  6. Association of fetal cranial shape with shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfort, M. A.; White, G. L.; Vermeulen, F. M.

    Objective To evaluate whether fetal cranial shape is related to shoulder dystocia. Methods We compared shoulder dystocia cases (n = 18) with controls (normal vaginal deliveries, n = 18) in a retrospective matched- pairs observational study. Subjects were matched for known maternal and fetal risk

  7. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial ...

  8. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Being overhead athletes, water polo players can present with muscular imbalances of the shoulder, between the internal rotators (IR) and external rotators (ER), leading to changes in posture and an increased risk of injury. Objectives: To assess posture and isokinetic shoulder strength of female club-level ...

  9. Geometry parameters for musculoskeletal modelling of the shoulder system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Helm, F C; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Pronk, G M; Van der Woude, L H; Rozendal, R H

    A dynamical finite-element model of the shoulder mechanism consisting of thorax, clavicula, scapula and humerus is outlined. The parameters needed for the model are obtained in a cadaver experiment consisting of both shoulders of seven cadavers. In this paper, in particular, the derivation of

  10. Safety zone for posterosuperior shoulder access: study on cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pereira Costa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The posterosuperior shoulder access used in surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation was constructed through dissection of 20 shoulders from 10 recently chilled adult cadavers, and the distances from this route to the nearby neurovascular structures were analyzed. METHODS: A Kirschner wire was introduced into the top of the base of the coracoid process through the posterosuperior shoulder access, in the area of the origin of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments, thus reproducing the path for inserting two anchors for anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. The smallest distance from the insertion point of the Kirschner wire to the suprascapular nerve and artery/vein was measured. RESULTS: The mean distance from the suprascapular nerve to the origin of the coracoclavicular ligaments at the top of the base of the coracoid process was 18.10 mm (range: 13.77-22.80 in the right shoulder and 18.19 mm (range: 12.59-23.75 in the left shoulder. The mean distance from the suprascapular artery/vein to the origin of the coracoclavicular ligaments was 13.10 mm (range: 9.28-15.44 in the right shoulder and 14.11 mm (range: 8.83-18.89 in the left shoulder. Comparison between the contralateral sides did not show any statistical difference. CONCLUSION: The posterosuperior shoulder access route for anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments in treating acromioclavicular dislocation should be performed respecting the minimum limit of 8.83 mm medially.

  11. Open capsular shift for multi directional shoulder instability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tankeren, E. van; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Loon, C. van

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the outcome of open antero-inferior capsular shift in 17 patients with multidirectional instability of the shoulder who failed to respond to conservative treatment. Six shoulders presented with secondary impingement syndrome and 11 with involuntary instability. The mean duration of

  12. Can shoulder joint reaction forces be estimated by neural networks?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, W.H.K.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Baten, C.T.M.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate the development of future shoulder endoprostheses, a long term load profile of the shoulder joint is desired. A musculoskeletal model using 3D kinematics and external forces as input can estimate the mechanical load on the glenohumeral joint, in terms of joint reaction forces. For long

  13. Investigation of CT picture in so-called loose shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Shigehito; Sakamaki, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Akira; Moriishi, Takeji; Takada, Keiichi.

    1985-01-01

    CT picture of the shoulder joint was analyzed in 124 shoulders (114 patients). A line perpendicular to a given line between the precornu of acetabular tegmen (A) and the postcornu of acetabular tegmen (B) was drawn and the intersection where the line and the caput humeri meet (C) was obtained. The angle of CAB was defined as the backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen. The angular aperture was 26.2 0 +-1.9 in 16 so-called loose shoulders, 17.3 0 +-1.0 in 28 loose shoulders restricted to the inward rotation, and 12.2 0 +-0.4 in 80 normal shoulders, showing a distinct correlation between the angular aperture and the degree of loose shoulder. An increased backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen was considered greatly attributable to the forward glenohumeral movement resulting from malformation of the acetabular tegmen and flaccidity of the joint. Glenoid osteotomy was thus performed in 9 patients, 6 of whom underwent CT scanning before and after osteotomy. Coronal and transverse CT images of the shoulder joint disclosed a noticeable improvement of the glenohumeral alignment. The angular aperture shown on CT seems to be of major importance not only in the diagnosis of so-called loose shoulder but also in surgical choice. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Shoulder injuries in competitive swimmers in KwaZulu- | Puckree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder injuries in competitive swimmers in KwaZulu-. T Puckree, KJ Thomas ... Conclusion. The incidence of shoulder injuries in competitive swimmers is high. This study shows the need for more research into swimming injuries, and the conditioning and rehabilitation of athletes in South Africa. South African Journal of ...

  15. Shoulder morbidity after non-surgical treatment of the neck.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wouwe, V.; de Bree, R.; Kuik, D.J.; de Goede, C.J.T.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Leemans, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports on shoulder function after non-surgical treatment are not available. In the present study shoulder morbidity after surgical and non-surgical treatment of the neck is determined and compared. Materials and methods: In 100 head and neck cancer patients 174 neck sides

  16. Shoulder dystocia: An update and review of new techniques | Cluver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The definition of shoulder dystocia and the incidence vary. Worldwide, shoulder dystocia may be increasing. In this update we look at the complications for both mother and fetus, and review the risk factors and strategies for possible prevention. Management options include the McRoberts position, techniques to deliver the ...

  17. Grading of shoulder ulcerations in sows by biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Dahl-Pedersen, Kirstin; Barington, Krisitane

    2014-01-01

    legislation, stating that sows with shoulder ulcers grade 3 or 4 must be kept loose and have access to soft bedding. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate if biopsies from the center of a shoulder ulcer can be used to point out animals for which an intervention must be initiated. Postmortem......, a punch biopsy was sampled from the center of the ulceration or from the tissue overlaying the tuber spina scapula. Afterward, the shoulders were cross-sectioned and evaluated grossly and histologically (“gold standard”). In total, 121 shoulders were included in the study, and the diagnostic value...... of a punch biopsy in grading shoulder ulcerations was evaluated. The results showed a sensitivity of 0.78, a specificity of 0.98, a positive likelihood ratio of 38.36, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.22. The agreement between the cross-section evaluation and the punch biopsy was found to be 0...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: Rationale and current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.G.; Helms, C.A.; Steinbach, L.; Neumann, C.; Munk, P.L.; Genant, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    Because it can demonstrate a wide range of tissue contrast with excellent resolution, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized imaging in many areas of the musculoskeletal system and has generated excitement among those interested in the painful shoulder. Shoulder impingement syndrome and glenohumeral instability constitute the two major categories of shoulder derangements. Correct diagnosis requires the use of appropriate pulse sequences and imaging planes, proper patient positioning, and a satisfactory surface coil. In addition the imager must have a thorough understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. We present a summary of the current status of MR imaging of the shoulder including technical, anatomic, and pathologic considerations and a review of the pertinent literature. (orig.)

  19. Difference in clinical outcome between total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty used in hemiarthroplasty revision surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, B.P.; Alta, T.D.; Sewnath, M.E.; Willems, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The increase of shoulder replacements will lead to a higher revision rate of shoulder arthroplasties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical results of revision surgery performed in our hospital, distinguish the differences in clinical outcome according to revision

  20. Simple shoulder test and Oxford Shoulder Score: Persian translation and cross-cultural validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Soofia; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Rustaie, Nilufar; Akbari, Mohammad; Ebadi, Safoora; Senobari, Maryam; Hasson, Scott

    2015-12-01

    To translate, culturally adapt, and validate the simple shoulder test (SST) and Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) into Persian language using a cross-sectional and prospective cohort design. A standard forward and backward translation was followed to culturally adapt the SST and the OSS into Persian language. Psychometric properties of floor and ceiling effects, construct convergent validity, discriminant validity, internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, standard error of the measurement (SEM), smallest detectable change (SDC), and factor structure were determined. One hundred patients with shoulder disorders and 50 healthy subjects participated in the study. The PSST and the POSS showed no missing responses. No floor or ceiling effects were observed. Both the PSST and POSS detected differences between patients and healthy subjects supporting their discriminant validity. Construct convergent validity was confirmed by a very good correlation between the PSST and POSS (r = 0.68). There was high internal consistency for both the PSST (α = 0.73) and the POSS (α = 0.91 and 0.92). Test-retest reliability with 1-week interval was excellent (ICCagreement = 0.94 for PSST and 0.90 for POSS). Factor analyses demonstrated a three-factor solution for the PSST (49.7 % of variance) and a two-factor solution for the POSS (61.6 % of variance). The SEM/SDC was satisfactory for PSST (5.5/15.3) and POSS (6.8/18.8). The PSST and POSS are valid and reliable outcome measures for assessing functional limitations in Persian-speaking patients with shoulder disorders.

  1. Shoulder functionality after manual therapy in subjects with shoulder impingement syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; López-Hervás, Antonia; Herrera-Monge, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Leonard, Ana; Piña-Pozo, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the differences in functionality of the upper limb in subjects suffering from shoulder impingement syndrome after intervention by two manual therapy protocols. Randomized, single-blind study with a sample of 22 subjects (58 ± 10.86 years old) divided into two groups. The conventional-group (n = 11) received mobilizations of the shoulder and the experimental-group (n = 11) was treated with soft tissue techniques in the cervical and upper thoracic regions. These two groups received electrotherapy and postural advices. The treatment lasted three weeks (15 daily sessions of 1 h and 30 min). Both active and passive range of motion (ROM) and self-perceived functionality of the upper limb (DASH questionnaire) were measured. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in the DASH scores and both groups improved mobility in the intra-group comparison pre-intervention versus post-intervention (p .05). Our results suggest that a combined treatment with electrotherapy, postural hygiene and manual therapy, regardless of the protocol, improves shoulder mobility and functionality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The "July effect" in total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Allison J; Bohl, Daniel D; Frank, Rachel M; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Nicholson, Gregory P; Romeo, Anthony A

    2017-03-01

    New medical doctors enter their residency fields in July, a time in the hospital in which patient morbidity and mortality rates are perceived to be higher. It remains controversial whether a "July effect" exists in different areas of medicine and surgery, including in orthopedic surgery. The purpose of this study is to test for the July effect in patients undergoing primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Patients who underwent primary TSA from 2005-2012 were identified using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Cases were categorized as involving residents or fellows and as occurring during the first academic quarter. Rates of composite and any adverse event outcomes were compared between patient groups using multivariate logistic regression. A total of 1591 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these cases, 711 (44.7%) had resident or fellow involvement and 390 (24.5%) were performed in the first academic quarter. There were few demographic and comorbidity differences between cases with and without residents or fellows or between cases performed during the first quarter and during the rest of the year. Overall, the rate of serious adverse events was 1.6% and the rate of any adverse events was 6.5%. Using one of the largest cohorts of primary TSA patients, this study could not provide evidence for a July effect. In the context of the recent growth in the volume of TSA procedures, these findings provide important reassurance to patients that it is safe to schedule their elective procedures at training institutions during the first part of the academic year. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder; Schulterimpingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung Radiodiagnostik fuer chirurgische Faecher, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M.J. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom ist ein klinisches Krankheitsbild multifaktorieller Genese, bei dem es primaer oder sekundaer zu einer schmerzhaften mechanischen Beeintraechtigung der Rotatorenmanschette kommt. Als primaere Faktoren gelten ein gebogener oder hakenfoermiger Vorderrand des Akromions oder von diesem entspringende Osteophyten, was zu Laesionen der Supraspinatussehne fuehren kann. Zu den sekundaeren Faktoren zaehlt man v. a. eine Tendinitis calcarea, eine glenohumerale Instabilitaet, ein Os acromiale sowie degenerative Veraenderungen im Bereich des Akromioklavikulargelenks. Bildgebend steht an erster Stelle ein Nativroentgen, mit dem sich die knoechernen Strukturen gut darstellen lassen. Falls vorhanden, kann in weiterer Folge die Sonographie Auskunft ueber den Zustand der Rotatorenmanschette geben. Mit der MRT schliesslich laesst sich die Beziehung von Akromion und gelenkassoziierten Strukturen zur Rotatorenmanschette

  4. [Shoulder dystocia: Guidelines for clinical practice--Short text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentilhes, L; Sénat, M-V; Boulogne, A-I; Deneux-Tharaux, C; Fuchs, F; Legendre, G; Le Ray, C; Lopez, E; Schmitz, T; Lejeune-Saada, V

    2015-12-01

    To determine the available evidence to prevent and treat shoulder dystocia to attempt to decrease its related neonatal and maternal morbidity. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the French and foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. Shoulder dystocia, defined as a vaginal delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers to deliver the fetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed, complicates 0.5-1 % of vaginal deliveries. Risks of brachial plexus birth injury (LE3), clavicle and humeral fracture (LE3), perinatal asphyxia (LE2), hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (LE3) and perinatal mortality (LE2) are increased after shoulder dystocia. Its main risk factors are previous shoulder dystocia and macrosomia, but they are poorly predictive; 50 % to 70 % of shoulder dystocia cases occur in their absence, and the great majority of deliveries when they are present are not associated with shoulder dystocia. No study has proven that the correction of these risk factors (except gestational diabetes) would reduce the risk of shoulder dystocia (SD). Physical activity is recommended before and during pregnancy to reduce the occurrence of some risk factors for shoulder dystocia (grade C). In obese patients, physical activity should be coupled with dietary measures to reduce fetal macrosomia and weight gain during pregnancy (grade A). In case of gestational diabetes, diabetes care is recommended (diabetic diet, glucose monitoring, insulin if needed) (grade A) as it reduces the risk of macrosomia and shoulder dystocia (LE1). In order to avoid shoulder dystocia and its complications, only two measures are proposed. Induction of labor is recommended in case of impending macrosomia if the cervix is favourable and gestational age greater than 39 weeks of gestation (professional consensus). Cesarean delivery is recommended before labor in case of EFW greater than 4500g if associated with maternal

  5. Humeral retroversion and shoulder rotational mobility in young handball practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Gustavo Aguiar; Döhnert, Marcelo Baptista

    2015-01-01

    : To evaluate the prevalence of humeral retroversion and rotational mobility (RHH) in young handball practitioners and non-practitioners. : This is a cross-sectional study performed with two groups: the handball group, with 14 female students practicing handball and the control group, with 13 young participants non-practicing pitch sports. : The handball group presented full rotational movement (FRM) hi-gher than the control group in both the dominant shoulder (p=0.001) and the non-dominant shoulder (p=0.0001). The mobility of active and passive internal rotation was significantly higher in handball players in both shoulders. The handball group presented lower internal rotation range of motion for the dominant shoulder as compared to the non-dominant shoul-der (p=0.001). : Young handball practitioners, des-pite skeletally immature, showed a higher MRT than the control group. The handball group showed loss of internal rotation (medial) on the dominant shoulder as compared to the non--dominant shoulder. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study.

  6. Risk factors for blood transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padegimas, E M; Clyde, C T; Zmistowski, B M; Restrepo, C; Williams, G R; Namdari, S

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there is little information about the need for peri-operative blood transfusion in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of transfusion and its predisposing factors, and to establish a blood conservation strategy. We identified all patients who had undergone shoulder arthroplasty at our hospital between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. The rate of transfusion was determined from the patient's records. While there were exceptions, patients typically underwent transfusion if they had a level of haemoglobin of transfusion. High- and low-risk cohorts for transfusion were identified from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of 1174 shoulder arthroplasties performed on 1081 patients, 53 cases (4.5%) required transfusion post-operatively. Predictors of blood transfusion were a lower pre-operative haematocrit (p transfusion. In total 48 of the 436 (11%) shoulder arthroplasties with a pre-operative haematocrit transfusion compared with five of the 738 (0.70%) shoulder arthroplasties with a haematocrit above this level. We found that transfusion was needed less frequently than previously described for shoulder arthroplasty. Patients with a pre-operative haematocrit blood transfusion, while those with a haematocrit above this level are unlikely to require transfusion. The rate of transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty is under 5%, and those with a pre-operative haematocrit greater than or equal to 39.6% have a very low likelihood (transfusion. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Hemiplegic shoulder pain: implications for occupational therapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Paula E; Spaulding, Sandi J; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2004-02-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain is common after stroke causing hemiplegia. It adversely affects the recovery of arm function and independence in activities of daily living. Subluxation, abnormal tone and limited range of motion or capsular constrictions have been reported as potential causes. Other factors such as rotator cuff tears, brachial plexus injury, shoulder-hand syndrome and other pre-existing pathological conditions may also be associated with hemiplegic shoulder pain. The etiology remains unclear, but hemiplegic shoulder pain may result from a combination of the above factors. This literature review examines the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain and discusses the implications for occupational therapy treatment. Occupational therapy interventions include proper positioning, facilitation of movement through purposeful therapeutic activities, increasing passive range of motion, implementation of external supports and treatment of shoulder-hand syndrome. Understanding the processes involved will assist with effective assessment, treatment and prevention of hemiplegic shoulder pain. This will facilitate clients' participation in rehabilitation programs and move them towards attainment of optimal function.

  8. Association between Propionibacterium acnes and frozen shoulder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Tim D; Boyd, Matthew; Gallacher, Sian; Auckland, Cressida R; Kitson, Jeff; Smith, Chris D

    2014-10-01

    Frozen shoulder has not previously been shown to be associated with infection. The present study set out to confirm the null hypothesis that there is no relationship between infection and frozen shoulder using two modern scientific methods, extended culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacterial nucleic acids. A prospective cohort of 10 patients undergoing arthroscopic release for stage II idiopathic frozen shoulder had two biopsies of tissue taken from the affected shoulder joint capsule at the time of surgery, along with control biopsies of subdermal fat. The biopsies and controls were examined with extended culture and PCR for microbial nucleic acid. Eight of the 10 patients had positive findings on extended culture in their shoulder capsule and, in six of these, Propionibacterium acnes was present. The findings mean that we must reject the null hypothesis that there is no relationship between infection and frozen shoulder. More studies are urgently needed to confirm or refute these findings. If they are confirmed, this could potentially lead to new and effective treatments for this common, painful and disabling condition. Could P. acnes be the Helicobacter of frozen shoulder?

  9. Rates of surgery for frozen shoulder: an experience in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaees, Tariq A; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-01-01

    the aim of this study was to identify the incidence of surgical treatment for frozen shoulder in a western population. patients included in this study all resided within a well-defined area in the North West of England, all had surgery for frozen shoulder over a 3-year period and were identified from theatre logbooks of two local hospitals. Cases having surgery for shoulder stiffness other than frozen shoulder were excluded. Local and national population size estimates were based on data obtained from the UK Office for National Statistics. 117 patients underwent surgery for frozen shoulder during the period examined; of these 101 had arthroscopic arthrolysis and 16 had manipulation under anaesthesia. The overall incidence of frozen shoulder surgery was calculated at 2.67 procedures per 10,000 general population per year, and at 7.55 for those aged 40-60. surgical intervention for frozen shoulder is common, estimated at over 14,180 cases per year in England. Given the variation in costs associated with arthroscopic arthrolysis and manipulation under anaesthesia, comparative studies of the cost effectiveness of the two procedures would be of great value. 2C (outcome research).

  10. POINT CLOUD ORIENTED SHOULDER LINE EXTRACTION IN LOESS HILLY AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Min

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder line is the significant line in hilly area of Loess Plateau in China, dividing the surface into positive and negative terrain (P-N terrains. Due to the point cloud vegetation removal methods of P-N terrains are different, there is an imperative need for shoulder line extraction. In this paper, we proposed an automatic shoulder line extraction method based on point cloud. The workflow is as below: (i ground points were selected by using a grid filter in order to remove most of noisy points. (ii Based on DEM interpolated by those ground points, slope was mapped and classified into two classes (P-N terrains, using Natural Break Classified method. (iii The common boundary between two slopes is extracted as shoulder line candidate. (iv Adjust the filter gird size and repeat step i-iii until the shoulder line candidate matches its real location. (v Generate shoulder line of the whole area. Test area locates in Madigou, Jingbian County of Shaanxi Province, China. A total of 600 million points are acquired in the test area of 0.23km2, using Riegl VZ400 3D Laser Scanner in August 2014. Due to the limit Granted computing performance, the test area is divided into 60 blocks and 13 of them around the shoulder line were selected for filter grid size optimizing. The experiment result shows that the optimal filter grid size varies in diverse sample area, and a power function relation exists between filter grid size and point density. The optimal grid size was determined by above relation and shoulder lines of 60 blocks were then extracted. Comparing with the manual interpretation results, the accuracy of the whole result reaches 85%. This method can be applied to shoulder line extraction in hilly area, which is crucial for point cloud denoising and high accuracy DEM generation.

  11. Point Cloud Oriented Shoulder Line Extraction in Loess Hilly Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Xin, Yang; Liyang, Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Shoulder line is the significant line in hilly area of Loess Plateau in China, dividing the surface into positive and negative terrain (P-N terrains). Due to the point cloud vegetation removal methods of P-N terrains are different, there is an imperative need for shoulder line extraction. In this paper, we proposed an automatic shoulder line extraction method based on point cloud. The workflow is as below: (i) ground points were selected by using a grid filter in order to remove most of noisy points. (ii) Based on DEM interpolated by those ground points, slope was mapped and classified into two classes (P-N terrains), using Natural Break Classified method. (iii) The common boundary between two slopes is extracted as shoulder line candidate. (iv) Adjust the filter gird size and repeat step i-iii until the shoulder line candidate matches its real location. (v) Generate shoulder line of the whole area. Test area locates in Madigou, Jingbian County of Shaanxi Province, China. A total of 600 million points are acquired in the test area of 0.23km2, using Riegl VZ400 3D Laser Scanner in August 2014. Due to the limit Granted computing performance, the test area is divided into 60 blocks and 13 of them around the shoulder line were selected for filter grid size optimizing. The experiment result shows that the optimal filter grid size varies in diverse sample area, and a power function relation exists between filter grid size and point density. The optimal grid size was determined by above relation and shoulder lines of 60 blocks were then extracted. Comparing with the manual interpretation results, the accuracy of the whole result reaches 85%. This method can be applied to shoulder line extraction in hilly area, which is crucial for point cloud denoising and high accuracy DEM generation.

  12. Clinical Outcomes after Arthroscopic Release for Recalcitrant Frozen Shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To explain the role of arthroscopic release in intractable frozen shoulders. We used different questionnaires and measuring tools to understand whether arthroscopic release is the superior modality to treat patients with intractable frozen shoulders. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, in a prospective study, we enrolled 80 patients (52 females and 28 males with recalcitrant frozen shoulder, who underwent arthroscopic release at Ghaem Hospital, a tertiary referral center, in Mashhad, Iran. Before operation, all patients filled out the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH, Constant, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA, ROWE and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS for pain questionnaires. We measured the difference in range of motion between both the normal and the frozen shoulders in each patient. Results: The average age of the patients was 50.8±7.1 years. In 49 patients, the right shoulder was affected and in the remaining 31 the left side was affected. Before surgery, the patients were suffering from this disease on average for 11.7±10.3 months.  The average time to follow-up was 47.2±6.8 months (14 to 60 months. Diabetes mellitus (38% and history of shoulder trauma (23% were the most common comorbidities in our patients. We did not find any significant differences between baseline characteristics of diabetics patients with non-diabetics ones. After surgery, the average time to achieve maximum pain improvement and range of motion were 3.6±2.1 and 3.6±2 months, respectively. The VAS score, constant shoulder score, Rowe score, UCLA shoulder score, and DASH score showed significant improvement in shoulder function after surgery, and shoulder range of motion improved in all directions compared to pre-operation range of motion. Conclusions: According to our results, arthroscopic release of recalcitrant frozen shoulder is a valuable modality in treating this disease. This method could decrease pain and improve both subjective and

  13. Spectrum of shoulder injuries in the baseball pitcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouellette, Hugue; Bredella, Miriam; Palmer, William E.; Sheah, Kenneth; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Labis, John [Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2008-06-15

    This review describes a range of shoulder injuries experienced by baseball pitchers. It is estimated that more than 57% of pitchers suffer some form of shoulder injury during a playing season. Knowledge of the overhead throwing cycle is crucial for our understanding of these shoulder injuries. Baseball pitchers are prone to rotator cuff tears from tensile overload and impingement. Glenoid labrum degeneration or tears are also common, due to overuse syndrome (micro-instability), internal impingement and microtrauma. An understanding of the lesions involved in overhead throwing is crucial in baseball pitchers, as long-term disability can result from these injuries, sometimes with severe financial consequences to the player. (orig.)

  14. Pattern formation in two-dimensional square-shoulder systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornleitner, Julia; Kahl, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Using a highly efficient and reliable optimization tool that is based on ideas of genetic algorithms, we have systematically studied the pattern formation of the two-dimensional square-shoulder system. An overwhelming wealth of complex ordered equilibrium structures emerge from this investigation as we vary the shoulder width. With increasing pressure three structural archetypes could be identified: cluster lattices, where clusters of particles occupy the sites of distorted hexagonal lattices, lane formation, and compact particle arrangements with high coordination numbers. The internal complexity of these structures increases with increasing shoulder width.

  15. Pattern formation in two-dimensional square-shoulder systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornleitner, Julia [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungsszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kahl, Gerhard, E-mail: fornleitner@cmt.tuwien.ac.a [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik and Centre for Computational Materials Science (CMS), Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Wien (Austria)

    2010-03-17

    Using a highly efficient and reliable optimization tool that is based on ideas of genetic algorithms, we have systematically studied the pattern formation of the two-dimensional square-shoulder system. An overwhelming wealth of complex ordered equilibrium structures emerge from this investigation as we vary the shoulder width. With increasing pressure three structural archetypes could be identified: cluster lattices, where clusters of particles occupy the sites of distorted hexagonal lattices, lane formation, and compact particle arrangements with high coordination numbers. The internal complexity of these structures increases with increasing shoulder width.

  16. MRI findings in little leaguer's shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, James C.; Lazarus, Martin L. [Northwestern University and Evanston Northwestern Healthcare, Department of Radiology, Evanston, IL (United States); Song, Alexandra Pae [Health Department, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Little leaguer's shoulder, a stress injury of the proximal humeral physis, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for an adolescent baseball player with shoulder pain, especially if the player is pitching regularly in a competitive environment. While roentgenographs may or may not be helpful, depending on the duration and severity of the injury, we report the MRI appearance of a case of little leaguer's shoulder. We found MRI helpful in diagnosing injury to the growth plate that was radiographically occult; furthermore, we were able to document the patient's progress with a follow-up MRI examination, which showed improvement with treatment. (orig.)

  17. A little-known cause of painful shoulder: os acromiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granieri, G.F.; Bacarini, L. [Dipartimento di Radiologia Clinica, Ospedale Regionale, Treviso (Italy)

    1998-02-01

    The incidental discovery of an `os acromiale` might explain some cases of `painful shoulder`: this is what we have observed in three patients. The purpose of our article is to underline the relevance of the axillary roentgenogram of the shoulder for the correct diagnosis of this anomaly. In all patients the radiographic examination was performed using a computed radiography system; moreover we performed a computed tomographic examination of the acromioclavicular portion of the shoulders with three-dimensional reconstructions. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  18. Spectrum of shoulder injuries in the baseball pitcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouellette, Hugue; Bredella, Miriam; Palmer, William E.; Sheah, Kenneth; Torriani, Martin; Labis, John

    2008-01-01

    This review describes a range of shoulder injuries experienced by baseball pitchers. It is estimated that more than 57% of pitchers suffer some form of shoulder injury during a playing season. Knowledge of the overhead throwing cycle is crucial for our understanding of these shoulder injuries. Baseball pitchers are prone to rotator cuff tears from tensile overload and impingement. Glenoid labrum degeneration or tears are also common, due to overuse syndrome (micro-instability), internal impingement and microtrauma. An understanding of the lesions involved in overhead throwing is crucial in baseball pitchers, as long-term disability can result from these injuries, sometimes with severe financial consequences to the player. (orig.)

  19. Intra-articular elastofibroma of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang-Jin; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2002-01-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with an elastofibroma in his left shoulder joint. The patient had had limitation of motion in his left arm for 3 years, especially when rotating internally. Radiography of his left shoulder showed bone erosion in the neck of the humerus. On MR imaging, a soft tissue mass was noted in the shoulder joint eroding bone. The mass showed similar signal intensity to that of surrounding muscles on T1- and T2-weighted images. At surgery, a soft, encapsulated mass was found attached to the subscapularis muscle. It was pathologically confirmed as an elastofibroma. This unusual manifestation of an elastofibroma is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Intertester reliability of clinical shoulder instability and laxity tests in subjects with and without self-reported shoulder problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshoj, Henrik; Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Kjaer, Birgitte Hougs; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2018-03-03

    First, to investigate the intertester reliability of clinical shoulder instability and laxity tests, and second, to describe the mutual dependency of each test evaluated by each tester for identifying self-reported shoulder instability and laxity. A standardised protocol for conducting reliability studies was used to test the intertester reliability of the six clinical shoulder instability and laxity tests: apprehension, relocation, surprise, load-and-shift, sulcus sign and Gagey. Cohen's kappa (κ) with 95% CIs besides prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK), accounting for insufficient prevalence and bias, were computed to establish the intertester reliability and mutual dependency. Forty individuals (13 with self-reported shoulder instability and laxity-related shoulder problems and 27 normal shoulder individuals) aged 18-60 were included. Fair (relocation), moderate (load-and-shift, sulcus sign) and substantial (apprehension, surprise, Gagey) intertester reliability were observed across tests (κ 0.39-0.73; 95% CI 0.00 to 1.00). PABAK improved reliability across tests, resulting in substantial to almost perfect intertester reliability for the apprehension, surprise, load-and-shift and Gagey tests (κ 0.65-0.90). Mutual dependencies between each test and self-reported shoulder problem showed apprehension, relocation and surprise to be the most often used tests to characterise self-reported shoulder instability and laxity conditions. Four tests (apprehension, surprise, load-and-shift and Gagey) out of six were considered intertester reliable for clinical use, while relocation and sulcus sign tests need further standardisation before acceptable evidence. Furthermore, the validity of the tests for shoulder instability and laxity needs to be studied. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Effect of Pitching Consecutive Days in Youth Fast-Pitch Softball Tournaments on Objective Shoulder Strength and Subjective Shoulder Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, S Andrew; Brophy, Robert H; Wright, Rick W; Smith, Matthew V

    2017-05-01

    The windmill pitching motion has been associated with risk for shoulder injury. Because there are no pitching limits on youth fast-pitch softball pitchers, these athletes often pitch multiple games across consecutive days. Strength changes, fatigue levels, and shoulder pain that develop among female fast-pitch pitchers over the course of consecutive days of pitching have not been investigated. Over the course of 2- and 3-day fast-pitch softball tournaments, pitchers will develop progressive objective weakness and increased subjective shoulder fatigue and pain without complete recovery between days. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fourteen female fast-pitch softball pitchers between the ages of 14 and 18 years were evaluated for strength and fatigue changes across 2- and 3-day tournaments. At the beginning and end of each day of tournament play, pitchers were asked to quantify shoulder fatigue and shoulder pain levels of their dominant throwing arm using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS). Shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, internal rotation, elbow flexion, and elbow extension strength measurements were gathered using a handheld dynamometer. Over the course of an average single day of tournament participation, pitchers developed significant increases in VAS scores for shoulder fatigue (median, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3-3.0) and pain (median, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.5-2.3) and significant strength loss in all tested motions. Pitchers also developed significant increases in VAS shoulder fatigue (median, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.5-5.5), VAS shoulder pain (median, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.0-4.5), and strength loss in all tested motions over the entire tournament. Shoulder pain, fatigue, and strength do not fully recover between days. The accumulation of subjective shoulder pain and fatigue over the course of tournament play were closely correlated. Among youth female fast-pitch softball pitchers, there is a progressive increase in shoulder fatigue, pain, and weakness over the

  2. Effect of pitching consecutive days in youth softball tournaments on objective shoulder strength and subjective shoulder symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, S. Andrew; Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; Smith, Matthew V.

    2017-01-01

    Background The windmill pitching motion has been associated with risk for shoulder injury. Since there are no pitching limits on youth fast-pitch softball pitchers, these athletes often pitch multiple games across consecutive days. Strength changes, fatigue levels, and shoulder pain that develop among female fast-pitch pitchers over the course of consecutive days of pitching have not been investigated. Hypothesis Over the course of 2 and 3-day fast-pitch softball tournaments, pitchers will develop progressive objective weakness and increased subjective shoulder fatigue and pain without complete recovery between days. Study Design Cross-Sectional Study. Methods Female fast-pitch softball pitchers between the ages of 14 and 18 who were pitching in 2 and 3-day tournaments were recruited for study participation. At the beginning and end of each day of tournament play, pitchers were asked to quantify shoulder fatigue and shoulder pain levels of their dominant throwing arm using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS). Shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, internal rotation, elbow flexion, and elbow extension strength measurements were gathered using a hand-held dynamometer. Results Over the course of an average single day of tournament participation, pitchers developed significant increases in VAS shoulder fatigue (2.0, 95% CI: 1.3 to 3.0), and pain (1.3, 95% CI: 0.5 to 2.3) and significant strength loss in all tested motions. Pitchers also developed significant increases in VAS shoulder fatigue (3.5, 95% CI: 1.5 to 5.5), VAS shoulder pain (2.5, 95% CI: 1.0 to 4.5) and strength loss in all tested motions over the entire tournament. Shoulder pain, fatigue, and strength do not fully recover between days. The accumulation of subjective shoulder pain and fatigue over the course of tournament play were closely correlated. Conclusion Among youth female fast-pitch softball pitchers, there is a progressive increase in shoulder fatigue, pain, and weakness over the course

  3. Shoulder dystocia: simulation and a team-centered protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, William A

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that has been reported to occur in 0.2-3% of all vaginal deliveries. Several characteristics of shoulder dystocia make it a particular challenge to manage effectively. It is relatively infrequent, the diagnosis cannot be made according to a single objective criterion that can be recognized to exist by all members of the care team who are present, it is unpredictable, and there is the need for coordinated actions of all members of the health care team who have come together on the day of the delivery and may not have worked together before or specifically during a shoulder dystocia. In general, there is evidence from different medical disciplines that checklists/protocols and simulation may be used to enhance team performance. There is also some evidence, albeit limited, that such techniques may be used to improve shoulder dystocia outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Shoulder dystocia documentation: an evaluation of a documentation training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeRiche, Tammy; Oppenheimer, Lawrence; Caughey, Sharon; Fell, Deshayne; Walker, Mark

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the quality and content of nurse and physician shoulder dystocia delivery documentation before and after MORE training in shoulder dystocia management skills and documentation. Approximately 384 charts at the Ottawa Hospital General Campus involving a diagnosis of shoulder dystocia between the years of 2000 and 2006 excluding the training year of 2003 were identified. The charts were evaluated for 14 key components derived from a validated instrument. The delivery notes were then scored based on these components by 2 separate investigators who were blinded to delivery note author, date, and patient identification to further quantify delivery record quality. Approximately 346 charts were reviewed for physician and nurse delivery documentation. The average score for physician notes was 6 (maximum possible score of 14) both before and after the training intervention. The nurses' average score was 5 before and after the training intervention. Negligible improvement was observed in the content and quality of shoulder dystocia documentation before and after nurse and physician training.

  5. Regional variation in diets of breeding Red-shouldered hawks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Bradley N.; Boal, Clint W.

    2010-01-01

    We collected data on breeding season diet composition of Red-shouldered Hawks (Buteo lineatus) in south Texas and compared these data, and those reported from studies elsewhere to examine large scale spatial variation in prey use in eastern North America. Red-shouldered Hawk diets aligned into two significantly different groups, which appear to correlate with latitude. The diets of Red-shouldered Hawks in group 1, which are of more northern latitudes, had significantly more mammalian prey and significantly less amphibian prey than those in group 2, which are at more southerly latitudes. Our meta-analysis demonstrated the dietary flexibility of Red-shouldered Hawks, which likely accounts for their broad distribution by exploiting regional variations in taxon-specific prey availability.

  6. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 1: Prosthesis terminology and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, B.D.; Ahearn, N.; Tasker, A.; Wakeley, C.; Sarangi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is the third most common joint replacement procedure in the UK, and there are a number of different implant options available to surgeons to treat a variety of shoulder disorders. With an increasing burden placed on clinical follow-up, more patients are remaining under the care of their general practitioners and musculoskeletal triage assessment services and are not necessarily being seen by specialists. Referrals to orthopaedic specialists are therefore often prompted by radiological reports describing evidence of implant failure. This article is the first of two reviews on shoulder arthroplasty, concentrating on implant features and the indications for their use. The second article will address the modes of failure of shoulder arthroplasty and describe the relevant associated radiological features.

  7. Measurement and Quantification of Gross Human Shoulder Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T. Newkirk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shoulder girdle plays an important role in the large pointing workspace that humans enjoy. The goal of this work was to characterize the human shoulder girdle motion in relation to the arm. The overall motion of the human shoulder girdle was characterized based on motion studies completed on test subjects during voluntary (natural/unforced motion. The collected data from the experiments were used to develop surface fit equations that represent the position and orientation of the glenohumeral joint for a given humeral pointing direction. These equations completely quantify gross human shoulder girdle motion relative to the humerus. The equations are presented along with goodness-of-fit results that indicate the equations well approximate the motion of the human glenohumeral joint. This is the first time the motion has been quantified for the entire workspace, and the equations provide a reference against which to compare future work.

  8. Thoracic posture, shoulder muscle activation patterns and isokinetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder injuries are the most severe injuries in rugby union players, accounting for almost 20% of ... under demanding circumstances such as participation in sport.[6,7] ..... from a biomechanical point of view, especially in the game of rugby.

  9. Shoulder arthroplasty with the Neer Mark-II prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Møller, B.N.; Sneppen, O.

    1988-01-01

    Total shoulder joint replacement was used as primary intervention in 50 shoulders--35 with rheumatoid arthritis, eight with osteoarthritis, and seven with traumatic arthritis. Follow-up time was 27 (12-42) months. The primary indication for the operation was chronic severe pain; improvements...... in motion and function were secondary objectives. Relief of pain was obtained in 46 of 50 shoulders. The best results regarding pain, motion, and function were obtained in the osteoarthritic group. The majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis obtained pain relief and the largest increase in range...... of motion occurred in this group, although full range of motion was never regained. The results in patients with traumatic arthritis seemed unpredictable. Two shoulders were complicated by glenoid loosening, one by humeral subluxation, and one by musculocutaneous nerve palsy....

  10. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 1: Prosthesis terminology and classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, B.D., E-mail: bdsheridan@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Ahearn, N.; Tasker, A.; Wakeley, C.; Sarangi, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Shoulder arthroplasty is the third most common joint replacement procedure in the UK, and there are a number of different implant options available to surgeons to treat a variety of shoulder disorders. With an increasing burden placed on clinical follow-up, more patients are remaining under the care of their general practitioners and musculoskeletal triage assessment services and are not necessarily being seen by specialists. Referrals to orthopaedic specialists are therefore often prompted by radiological reports describing evidence of implant failure. This article is the first of two reviews on shoulder arthroplasty, concentrating on implant features and the indications for their use. The second article will address the modes of failure of shoulder arthroplasty and describe the relevant associated radiological features.

  11. mri evaluation of patients with shoulder pain at three imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: The study was conducted for a period of six months between June 2008 and December. 2008. Seventy ... shoulder due to pain, stiffness or weakness causes substantial ... society in terms of lost man-hours, direct hospital bills.

  12. Shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: current concepts in biomechanics and surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, G; Nastrucci, G; Porcellini, G

    Shoulder arthroplasty is a technically demanding procedure to restore shoulder function in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The modern prosthetic system exploit the benefits of modularity and the availibility of additional sizes of the prosthetic components. In this paper we describe the biomechanics of shoulder arthroplasty and the technique for shoulder replacement including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with all-polyethylene and metal-backed glenoid component, humeral head resurfacing and stemless humeral replacement. PMID:24251240

  13. The anterior glenohumeral joint capsule: macroscopic and MRI anatomy of the fasciculus obliquus or so-called ligamentum glenohumerale spirale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merila, M.; Eller, A.; Haviko, T. [Department of Orthopaedics, Clinic of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, University of Tartu, Puusepa 8, 51014, Tartu (Estonia); Leibecke, T.; Gehl, H.B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Busch, L.C. [Institute of Anatomy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Russlies, M. [Clinic of Orthopaedics, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Kolts, I. [Institute of Anatomy, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, Biomedicum, 50411, Tartu (Estonia)

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the macroscopic and MRI anatomy of the fasciculus obliquus, otherwise known as the ligamentum glenohumerale spirale or spiral GHL of the anterior shoulder joint capsule. Conventional and MR arthrography (1.5-T device Somatom Symphony, Siemens with shoulder coil) images in standard planes were compared with gross anatomic dissection findings in six fresh shoulder specimens from three cadavers. The MR imaging protocol included T1, PD and DESS 3D WI sequences. The macroscopically recognisable band - the spiral GHL - was identified by anatomic dissection and MRI in all the specimens. It was best visualised by MR arthrography on axial and oblique sagittal planes (T1; PD WI) and appeared as a low signal intensity stripe within the superficial layer of the anterior joint capsule. The absence of the variable middle glenohumeral ligament did not influence the anatomic properties and the MR imaging of the spiral GHL. Diagnostic visualisation of the normal anatomic structures is a prerequisite to distinguish between normal and pathologic conditions. Anatomy of the spiral GHL can be used by radiologists for more detailed interpretation of the anterior shoulder joint capsule ligaments on MR images. (orig.)

  14. [Functional rehabilitation of degenerative tendinous injuries of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, J M; Rossi, J D; Cossermelli, W; Ferreira Filho, A A

    1991-01-01

    We studied 60 shoulders in a group of 58 patients, with injuries of shoulder tendons. Thirty-one patients presented impingement syndrome, eighteen patients calcareous tendinitis, five patients rotator cuff rupture, three patients bicipital tendinitis and three patients multiple lesions. All of them were submitted to physical therapy: ultra-sound and kinesio-therapy. Good results were obtained in 55% of the patients. Bad results were recorded in women, young people and in patients with calcareous tendinitis.

  15. Team Training and Institutional Protocols to Prevent Shoulder Dystocia Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetrical emergency that may result in significant neonatal complications. It requires rapid recognition and a coordinated response. Standardization of care, teamwork and communication, and clinical simulation are the key components of patient safety programs in obstetrics. Simulation-based team training and institutional protocols for the management of shoulder dystocia are emerging as integral components of many labor and delivery safety initiatives because of their impact on technical skills and team performance.

  16. New developments for the surgical treatment of shoulder problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, W.

    2004-01-01

    Tremendous advancement has been made in the surgical treatment of the shoulder within the last years. Arthroscopic techniques for treatment of rotator cuff lesions, instability problems and biceps tendon lesions are today established because of significant improvement of instruments, suture materials and anchor techniques. The 4th generation of shoulder prosthesis systems guarantee today anatomical and biomechanical advantages with significant functional improvement for the patient. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiotherapy for shoulder impingement; Bestrahlung beim Impingementsyndrom des Schultergelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamietz, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Sauer, R.; Keilholz, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik

    2008-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Up to now, degenerative shoulder diseases were summarized by the term 'periarthritis humeroscapularis'. Actual shoulder diseases can be differentiated etiopathologically according to a primary and secondary impingement syndrome. Narrowing of the subacromial space, which is caused by an osseous shape variant, leads to primary impingement. Secondary impingement develops, when the subacromial space is reduced by swelling tissue below the osseous shoulder roof. This study aimed for the exact diagnosis to indicate therapy and to classify the results according to the Constant score. Patients and Methods: From August 1999 to September 2002, 102 patients with 115 shoulder joint conditions underwent radiation therapy (RT). All joints received two RT series (6 x 0.5 Gy/series) applied in two to three weekly fractions, totaling a dosage of 6.0 Gy (250 kV, 15 mAs, 1-mm Cu filter). The second RT course started 6 weeks after the end of the first. 115 shoulders were examined before RT, 6 weeks after the second RT course and, finally, during the follow-up from January to May 2003. Results: Pain relief was achieved in 94/115 shoulder joints (82%) after 18-month follow-up (median). A significant difference existed between secondary impingement and primary/non-impingement according to response. Tendinosis calcarea, bursitis subdeltoidea, tendovaginitis of the long biceps tendon, and capsulitis adhaesiva responded well to therapy. Conclusion: Shoulder diseases of secondary impingement demonstrate a good response to RT. Less or no benefit was found in primary impingement syndrome or complete rotator cuff disruption and acute shoulder injuries, respectively. (orig.)

  18. [Measurement of shoulder disability in the athlete: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, F; Mace, Y; Lefevre-Colau, M M; Poiraudeau, S; Rannou, F; Revel, M

    2004-08-01

    To identify all available shoulder disability questionnaires and to examine those that could be used for athlete. We systematically reviewed the literature in Medline using the keywords shoulder, function, scale, index, score, questionnaire, disability, quality of life, assessment, and evaluation. We searched for scales used for athletes with the keywords scale name AND (sport OR athlete). Data were completed by using the "Guide des Outils de Mesure et d'Evaluation en Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation" textbook. Analysis took into account the clinimetric quality of the instruments and the number of items specifically related to sports. A total of 37 instruments have been developed to measure disease-, shoulder-specific or upper extremity specific outcome. Older instruments were developed before the advent of modern measurement methods. They usually combined objective and subjective measures. Recent instruments were designed with use of more advanced methods. Most are self-administered questionnaires. Fourteen scales included items assessing sport activity. Four of these scales have been used to assess shoulder disability in athlete. Six scales have been used to assess such disability but do not have specific items related to sports. There is no gold standard for assessing shoulder outcome in the general population and no validated outcome instruments specifically for athletes. We suggest the use of ASES, WOSI and WORC scales for evaluating shoulder function in the recreational athletes. The DASH scale should be evaluated in this population. The principal criterion in evaluating shoulder function in the high level athlete is a return to the same level of sport performance. Further studies are required to identify measurement tools for shoulder disability that have a high predictive value for return to sport.

  19. Mini-Open Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numa Mercier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior shoulder instability is a common problem. The Latarjet procedure has been advocated as an option for the treatment of anteroinferior shoulder instability. The purpose of this paper is to explain our surgical procedure titled “Mini-open Latarjet Procedure.” We detailed patient positioning, skin incision, subscapularis approach, and coracoid fixation. Then, we reviewed the literature to evaluate the clinical outcomes of this procedure.

  20. Ontogeny, phylogeny and functional morphology of the hominoid shoulder girdle

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    The shoulder is of particular relevance for resolving issues of locomotor ancestry since, as a group, living hominoids can be defined by the set of functional similarities that they share at this anatomical area (such as a scapula located on the back of the ribcage, and a shoulder joint adapted to allow extensive abduction). However, there is ongoing debate over which selective pressures are responsible for these shared morphologies. The current study addresses the question of whether the sim...

  1. Comparative study of total shoulder arthroplasty versus total shoulder surface replacement for glenohumeral osteoarthritis with minimum 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, B.W.; Willems, W.J.H.; Lemmens, E.; Hartel, B.P.; Bekerom, M.P. van den; Deurzen, D.F.P. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared with total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), total shoulder surface replacement (TSSR) may offer the advantage of preservation of bone stock and shorter surgical time, possibly at the expense of glenoid component positioning and increasing lateral glenohumeral offset. We hypothesized

  2. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelein Vitringa, V. M.; van Kooten, E.O.; Jaspers, R.T.; Mullender, M.G.; Loogman, M.H.; van der Sluijs, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study

  3. Cryotherapy does not impair shoulder joint position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, Geoffrey; Powers, Michael E

    2004-08-01

    To determine the effects of a cryotherapy treatment on shoulder proprioception. Crossover design with repeated measures. University athletic training and sports medicine research laboratory. Thirty healthy subjects (15 women, 15 men). A 30-minute cryotherapy treatment. Joint position sense was measured in the dominant shoulder by using an inclinometer before and after receiving 30 minutes of either no ice or a 1-kg ice bag application. Skin temperature was measured below the tip of the acromion process and recorded every 5 minutes for the entire 30 minutes and immediately after testing. Three different types of error scores were calculated for data analyses and used to determine proprioception. Separate analyses of absolute, constant, and variable error failed to identify changes in shoulder joint proprioception as a function of the cryotherapy application. Application of an ice bag to the shoulder does not impair joint position sense. The control of proprioception at the shoulder may be more complex than at other joints in the body. Clinical implications may involve modifying rehabilitation considerations when managing shoulder injuries.

  4. Shoulder injuries attributed to resistance training: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Morey J; Beekhuizen, Kristina S; Cheng, Ming-Shun S; Hellman, Madeleine A

    2010-06-01

    The popularity of resistance training (RT) is evident by the more than 45 million Americans who engage in strength training regularly. Although the health and fitness benefits ascribed to RT are generally agreed upon, participation is not without risk. Acute and chronic injuries attributed to RT have been cited in the epidemiological literature among both competitive and recreational participants. The shoulder complex in particular has been alluded to as one of the most prevalent regions of injury. The purpose of this manuscript is to present an overview of documented shoulder injuries among the RT population and where possible discern mechanisms of injury and risk factors. A literature search was conducted in the PUBMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and OVID databases to identify relevant articles for inclusion using combinations of key words: resistance training, shoulder, bodybuilding, weightlifting, shoulder injury, and shoulder disorder. The results of the review indicated that up to 36% of documented RT-related injuries and disorders occur at the shoulder complex. Trends that increased the likelihood of injury were identified and inclusive of intrinsic risk factors such as joint and muscle imbalances and extrinsic risk factors, namely, that of improper attention to exercise technique. A majority of the available research was retrospective in nature, consisting of surveys and descriptive epidemiological reports. A paucity of research was available to identify predictive variables leading to injury, suggesting the need for future prospective-based investigations.

  5. Psychosocial factors and shoulder symptom development among workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline K; Silverstein, Barbara A; Fan, Z Joyce; Bao, Stephen; Johnson, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Shoulder injuries are a common cause of pain and discomfort. Many work-related factors have been associated with the onset of shoulder symptoms. The psychosocial concepts in the demand-control model have been studied in association with musculoskeletal symptoms but with heterogeneous findings. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between the psychosocial concepts of the demand-control model and the incidence of shoulder symptoms in a working population. After following 424 subjects for approximately 1 year, 85 incident cases were identified from self-reported data. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess the associations between shoulder symptoms and demand-control model quadrants. Cases were more likely to be female and report other upper extremity symptoms at baseline (P determine demand-control quadrants was successful in identifying subjects at risk of developing work-related shoulder symptoms. Research is needed to determine if this relationship holds with clinically diagnosed shoulder and other upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. This may be part of a simple tool for assessing risk of developing these UEMSDs. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Myositis ossificans around shoulder following military training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa C Kir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The myositis ossificans around shoulder in military recruits are not reported yet. Three young male soldiers presented with complaints of palpable mass at the anterior aspect of shoulde