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Sample records for shock compression inertial

  1. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated. (paper)

  2. Electron Shock Ignition of Inertial Fusion Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, W. L.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Woo, K.; Hao, L.

    2017-01-01

    Here, it is shown that inertial fusion targets designed with low implosion velocities can be shock ignited using laser–plasma interaction generated hot electrons (hot-e) to obtain high-energy gains. These designs are robust to multimode asymmetries and are predicted to ignite even for significantly distorted implosions. Electron shock ignition requires tens of kilojoules of hot-e, which can only be produced on a large laser facility like the National Ignition Facility, with the laser to hot-e conversion efficiency greater than 10% at laser intensities ~10 16 W/cm 2 .

  3. Shock-timing experiments for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debras, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ), which should achieve energy gain in an indirect drive inertial confinement fusion configuration, is being built in France by the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives). To achieve thermonuclear ignition, the compression of a spherical target will have to be controlled by a series of accurately timed centripetal shocks, with a finely tuned level. A first experiment, performed in 2010 on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser) facility at CEA, has allowed us to study the coalescence of two planar shocks in an indirectly-driven sample of polystyrene, within the framework of shock timing. The main objectives were to validate the experimental concept and the numerical simulations, as a proof-of-principle for future shock-timing campaigns. The main diagnostics used for this study are VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflection) and an optical shock breakout diagnostic, taking into account optical perturbations caused by X-rays. In another experiment, conducted on the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) laser facility in 2010, we studied the timing of two planar directly-driven shocks using the same diagnostics. This latter study is related to the shock ignition concept, with the long-term perspective of energy production. This thesis presents these two experiments and their results. (author) [fr

  4. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  5. Shock compression of diamond crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Ken-ichi; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    Two shock wave experiments employing inclined mirrors have been carried out to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL), final shock state at 191 and 217 GPa, and the post-shock state of diamond crystal, which is shock-compressed along the intermediate direction between the and crystallographic axes. The HEL wave has a velocity of 19.9 ± 0.3 mm/µsec and an amplitude of 63 ± 28 GPa. An alternate interpretation of the inclined wedge mirror streak record suggests a ramp precursor wave and th...

  6. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H; Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E; Katayama, S; Koyano, M

    2010-01-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO 4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO 2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  7. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  8. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H [Department of Earth Sciences, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Katayama, S; Koyano, M, E-mail: okuno@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.j [JAIST, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1297 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO{sub 2} glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  9. Shock ignition of high gain inertial fusion capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurtz, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Lebel, E.; Casner, A.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Inertial Confinement Fusion relies on the compression of small amounts of an equimolar mix of Deuterium and Tritium (DT) up to volumic masses of several hundreds of g/cm 3 . Such high densities are obtained by means of the implosion of a spherical shell made of cryogenic DT fuel. In the conventional scheme a hot spot is formed in the central part of the pellet at the end of the implosion. If the pressure of this hot spot is large enough (several hundreds of Gbars), thermonuclear heating occurs with a characteristic time shorter than the hydrodynamic confinement time and the target self ignites. Since the central hot spot pressure results from the conversion of the shell kinetic energy into thermal energy, the threshold for the ignition of a given mass of DT is a direct function of the implosion velocity. Typical implosion velocities for central self ignition are of the order of 400 km/s. Such high velocities imply both a strong acceleration of the shell and the use of large aspect ration shells in order to optimize the hydrodynamic efficiency of the implosion, at least in direct drive. These two features strongly enhance the risk of shell beak up at time of acceleration under the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore the formation of the hot spot may itself the unstable, this reducing its effective mass. High compression may be achieved at much lower velocities, thus reducing the energy budget and enhancing the implosion safety, but the corresponding fuel assembly requires an additional heating in order to reach ignition. This heating may be obtained from a 70-100 kJ laser pulse, delivered in 10-15 ps (Fast Ignition). An alternative idea is to boost up the central pressure of a target imploded at a sub-ignition velocity by means of a convergent strong shock launched at the end of the compression phase. This Shock Ignition (SI) concept has been suggested in 1983 by Scherbakov et al. More recently, R. Betti et al. developed

  10. Shock compression of geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, S; Braithwaite, C; Williamson, D; Jardine, A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the shock compression of geological materials is important for many applications, and is particularly important to the mining industry. During blast mining the response to shock loading determines the wave propagation speed and resulting fragmentation of the rock. The present work has studied the Hugoniot of two geological materials; Lake Quarry Granite and Gosford Sandstone. For samples of these materials, the composition was characterised in detail. The Hugoniot of Lake Quarry Granite was predicted from this information as the material is fully dense and was found to be in good agreement with the measured Hugoniot. Gosford Sandstone is porous and undergoes compaction during shock loading. Such behaviour is similar to other granular material and we show how it can be described using a P-a compaction model.

  11. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  12. Compression of magnetized target in the magneto-inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzenov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model, numerical method and results of the computer analysis of the compression process and the energy transfer in the target plasma, used in magneto-inertial fusion. The computer simulation of the compression process of magnetized cylindrical target by high-power laser pulse is presented.

  13. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  14. Study of the shock ignition scheme in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Shock Ignition (SI) scheme is an alternative to classical ignition schemes in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Its singularity relies on the relaxation of constraints during the compression phase and fulfilment of ignition conditions by launching a short and intense laser pulse (∼500 ps, ∼300 TW) on the pre-assembled fuel at the end of the implosion.In this thesis, it has been established that the SI process leads to a non-isobaric fuel configuration at the ignition time thus modifying the ignition criteria of Deuterium-Tritium (DT) against the conventional schemes. A gain model has been developed and gain curves have been inferred and numerically validated. This hydrodynamical modeling has demonstrated that the SI process allows higher gain and lower ignition energy threshold than conventional ignition due to the high hot spot pressure at ignition time resulting from the ignitor shock propagation.The radiative hydrodynamic CHIC code developed at the CELIA laboratory has been used to determine parametric dependences describing the optimal conditions for target design leading to ignition. These numerical studies have enlightened the potential of SI with regards to saving up laser energy, obtain high gains but also to safety margins and ignition robustness.Finally, the results of the first SI experiments performed in spherical geometry on the OMEGA laser facility (NY, USA) are presented. An interpretation of the experimental data is proposed from mono and bidimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Then, different trails are explored to account for the differences observed between experimental and numerical data and alternative solutions to improve performances are suggested. (author) [fr

  15. Interaction between shock wave and single inertial bubbles near an elastic boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, G N; Zhong, P

    2006-10-01

    The interaction of laser-generated single inertial bubbles (collapse time = 121 mus) near a silicon rubber membrane with a shock wave (55 MPa in peak pressure and 1.7 mus in compressive pulse duration) is investigated. The interaction leads to directional, forced asymmetric collapse of the bubble with microjet formation toward the surface. Maximum jet penetration into the membrane is produced during the bubble collapse phase with optimal shock wave arrival time and stand-off distance. Such interaction may provide a unique acoustic means for in vivo microinjection, applicable to targeted delivery of macromolecules and gene vectors to biological tissues.

  16. Shock waves in weakly compressed granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wildenberg, Siet; van Loo, Rogier; van Hecke, Martin

    2013-11-22

    We experimentally probe nonlinear wave propagation in weakly compressed granular media and observe a crossover from quasilinear sound waves at low impact to shock waves at high impact. We show that this crossover impact grows with the confining pressure P0, whereas the shock wave speed is independent of P0-two hallmarks of granular shocks predicted recently. The shocks exhibit surprising power law attenuation, which we model with a logarithmic law implying that shock dissipation is weak and qualitatively different from other granular dissipation mechanisms. We show that elastic and potential energy balance in the leading part of the shocks.

  17. Superfluid compressibility and the inertial mass of a moving singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, J.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of finite compressibility of a Fermi superfluid is used to reconsider the problem of inertial mass of vortex lines in both neutral and charged superfluids at T=0. For the charged case, in contrast to previous works where perfect screening was assumed, we take proper account of electromagnetic screening and solve the bulk charge distribution caused by a moving vortex line. A similar problem for a superconducting thin film is also considered

  18. Fast-shock ignition: a new approach to inertial confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Farahbod

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  A new concept for inertial confinement fusion called fast-shock ignition (FSI is introduced as a credible scheme in order to obtain high target gain. In the proposed model, the separation of fuel ignition into two successive steps, under the suitable conditions, reduces required ignitor energy for the fuel ignition. The main procedure in FSI concept is compressing the fuel up to stagnation. Then, two high intensity short pulse laser spikes with energy and power lower than those required for shock ignition (SI and fast ignition (FI with a proper delay time are launched at the fuel which increases the central hot-spot temperature and completes the ignition of the precompressed fuel. The introduced semi-analytical model indicates that with fast-shock ignition, the total required energy for compressing and igniting the fuel can be slightly reduced in comparison to pure shock ignition. Furthermore, for fuel mass greater than , the target energy gain increases up to 15 percent and the contribution of fast ignitor under the proper conditions could be decreased about 20 percent compared with pure fast ignition. The FSI scheme is beneficial from technological considerations for the construction of short pulse high power laser drivers. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition over pure shock ignition in terms of figure of merit can be more than 1.3.

  19. Shock compression of simulated adobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us =2.26up+0.37) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement.

  20. Loss of shear strength in polycrystalline tungsten under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    A reexamination of existing data on shock compression of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature indicates that tungsten may be an exception to the common belief that metals do not behave like elastic-isotropic solids under shock compression

  1. Progress in the shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theobald, W.; Casner, A.; Nora, R.; Ribeyre, X.; Lafon, M.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu; Gotchev, O. V.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Perkins, L. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Schurtz, G.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.

    2013-01-01

    Shock-ignition experiments with peak laser intensities of ∼8 x 10 15 W/cm 2 were performed. D 2 -filled plastic shells were compressed on a low adiabat by 40 of the 60 OMEGA beams. The remaining 20 beams were delayed and tightly focused onto the imploding shell to generate a strong shock. Up to 35% backscattering of laser energy was measured at the highest intensity. Hard x-ray measurements reveal a relatively low hot-electron temperature of ∼40 keV, independent of intensity and spike onset time. (authors)

  2. Longitudinal beam compression for heavy-ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Brandon, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    A scheme is described for compressing a heavy-ion beam longitudinally in such a way that the compressed pulse has uniform line-charge density and longitudinal momentum. Attaining these conditions will be important in the final focusing of a beam on a small fuel capsule in an inertial confinement fusion reactor. The longitudinal dynamics can be approximately described by a one-dimensional (1-D) fluid model for charged particles. Recognizing the similarity between the 1-D charged particle equations of motion and the 1-D equations for ideal-gas flow permits us to calculate the evolution of the line-charge density and velocity profile using self-similar solutions and the method of characteristics, developed for unsteady supersonic gas dynamics, for different regions along the beam. Simple physical arguments show that although the longitudinal and transverse temperatures vary along the beam following the adiabatic laws, no substantial longitudinal and transverse emittance growth is to be expected. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm all the physical arguments. The compressed beam has negligible longitudinal momentum spread and can therefore avoid chromatic aberrations in final focus. (author) 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. Shock compression and quasielastic release in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Tonks, D.L.; Gray, G.T. III

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of quasielastic release in shock-loaded FCC metals have shown a strong influence of the defect state on the leading edge, or first observable arrival, of the release wave. This is due to the large density of pinned dislocation segments behind the shock front, their relatively large pinning separation, and a very short response time as determined by the drag coefficient in the shock-compressed state. This effect is entirely equivalent to problems associated with elastic moduli determination using ultrasonic methods. This is particularly true for FCC metals, which have an especially low Peierls stress, or inherent lattice resistance, that has little influence in pinning dislocation segments and inhibiting anelastic deformation. BCC metals, on the other hand, have a large Peierls stress that essentially holds dislocation segments in place at low net applied shear stresses and thus allows fully elastic deformation to occur in the complete absence of anelastic behavior. Shock-compression and release experiments have been performed on tantalum (BCC), with the observation that the leading release disturbance is indeed elastic. This conclusion is established by examination of experimental VISAR records taken at the tantalum/sapphire (window) interface in a symmetric-impact experiment which subjects the sample to a peak longitudinal stress of approximately 7.3 GPa, in comparison with characteristic code calculations. copyright 1994 American Institute of Physics

  4. Assessment of high-resolution methods for numerical simulations of compressible turbulence with shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Larsson, Johan; Bhagatwala, Ankit V.; Cabot, William H.; Moin, Parviz; Olson, Britton J.; Rawat, Pradeep S.; Shankar, Santhosh K.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H.C.; Zhong Xiaolin; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2010-01-01

    Flows in which shock waves and turbulence are present and interact dynamically occur in a wide range of applications, including inertial confinement fusion, supernovae explosion, and scramjet propulsion. Accurate simulations of such problems are challenging because of the contradictory requirements of numerical methods used to simulate turbulence, which must minimize any numerical dissipation that would otherwise overwhelm the small scales, and shock-capturing schemes, which introduce numerical dissipation to stabilize the solution. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of several numerical methods capable of simultaneously handling turbulence and shock waves. A comprehensive range of high-resolution methods (WENO, hybrid WENO/central difference, artificial diffusivity, adaptive characteristic-based filter, and shock fitting) and suite of test cases (Taylor-Green vortex, Shu-Osher problem, shock-vorticity/entropy wave interaction, Noh problem, compressible isotropic turbulence) relevant to problems with shocks and turbulence are considered. The results indicate that the WENO methods provide sharp shock profiles, but overwhelm the physical dissipation. The hybrid method is minimally dissipative and leads to sharp shocks and well-resolved broadband turbulence, but relies on an appropriate shock sensor. Artificial diffusivity methods in which the artificial bulk viscosity is based on the magnitude of the strain-rate tensor resolve vortical structures well but damp dilatational modes in compressible turbulence; dilatation-based artificial bulk viscosity methods significantly improve this behavior. For well-defined shocks, the shock fitting approach yields good results.

  5. SBS pulse compression for excimer inertial fusion energy drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

    1994-12-31

    A key requirement for the development of commercial fusion power plants utilizing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as a source of thermonuclear power is the availability of reliable, efficient laser drivers. These laser drivers must be capable of delivering UV optical pulses having energies of the order of 5MJ to cryogenic deuterium-tritium (D/T) ICF targets. The current requirements for laser ICF target irradiation specify the laser wavelength, {lambda} ca. 250 nm, pulse duration, {tau}{sub p} ca. 6 ns, bandwidth, {Delta}{lambda} ca. 0.1 nm, polarization state, etc. Excimer lasers are a leading candidate to fill these demanding ICF driver requirements. However, since excimer lasers are not storage lasers, the excimer laser pulse duration, {tau}{sub pp}, is determined primarily by the length of the excitation pulse delivered to the excimer laser amplifier. Pulsed power associated with efficiently generating excimer laser pulses has a time constant, {tau}{sub pp} which falls in the range, 30 {tau}{sub p}<{tau}{sub pp}<100{tau}{sub p}. As a consequence, pulse compression is needed to convert the long excimer laser pulses to pulses of duration {tau}{sub p}. These main ICF driver pulses require, in addition, longer, lower power precursor pulses delivered to the ICF target before the arrival of the main pulse. Although both linear and non-linear optical (NLO) pulse compression techniques have been developed, computer simulations have shown that a ``chirped,`` self-seeded, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) pulse compressor cell using SF{sub 6} at a density, {rho} ca. 1 amagat can efficiently compress krypton fluoride (KrF) laser pulses at {lambda}=248 nm. In order to avoid the generation of output pulses substantially shorter than {tau}{sub p}, the optical power in the chirped input SBS ``seed`` beams was ramped. Compressed pulse conversion efficiencies of up to 68% were calculated for output pulse durations of {tau}{sub p} ca. ns.

  6. SBS pulse compression for excimer inertial fusion energy drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    A key requirement for the development of commercial fusion power plants utilizing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as a source of thermonuclear power is the availability of reliable, efficient laser drivers. These laser drivers must be capable of delivering UV optical pulses having energies of the order of 5MJ to cryogenic deuterium-tritium (D/T) ICF targets. The current requirements for laser ICF target irradiation specify the laser wavelength, λ ca. 250 nm, pulse duration, τ p ca. 6 ns, bandwidth, Δλ ca. 0.1 nm, polarization state, etc. Excimer lasers are a leading candidate to fill these demanding ICF driver requirements. However, since excimer lasers are not storage lasers, the excimer laser pulse duration, τ pp , is determined primarily by the length of the excitation pulse delivered to the excimer laser amplifier. Pulsed power associated with efficiently generating excimer laser pulses has a time constant, τ pp which falls in the range, 30 τ p pp p . As a consequence, pulse compression is needed to convert the long excimer laser pulses to pulses of duration τ p . These main ICF driver pulses require, in addition, longer, lower power precursor pulses delivered to the ICF target before the arrival of the main pulse. Although both linear and non-linear optical (NLO) pulse compression techniques have been developed, computer simulations have shown that a ''chirped,'' self-seeded, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) pulse compressor cell using SF 6 at a density, ρ ca. 1 amagat can efficiently compress krypton fluoride (KrF) laser pulses at λ=248 nm. In order to avoid the generation of output pulses substantially shorter than τ p , the optical power in the chirped input SBS ''seed'' beams was ramped. Compressed pulse conversion efficiencies of up to 68% were calculated for output pulse durations of τ p ca. ns

  7. Phase transition of KCl under shock compression

    CERN Document Server

    Mashimo, T; Tsumoto, K; Zhang, Y; Ando, S; Tonda, H

    2002-01-01

    It had been reported that for potassium chloride (KCl) the B1-B2 phase transition (PT) occurs under shock and static compressions, but the measured transition points showed large scatter. In this study, Hugoniot measurement experiments were performed on KCl single crystals by the inclined-mirror method combined with use of a powder gun. The anisotropic Hugoniot elastic limits and PT points were observed. The PT points along the (100), (110) and (111) axis directions were determined as 2.5, 2.2 and 2.1 GPa, respectively. The anisotropic transition was reasonably explained in terms of the displacement mechanism along the (111) axis direction.

  8. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  9. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  10. Hugoniot and refractive indices of bromoform under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. C.; Zeng, X. L.; Zhou, X. M.; Luo, S. N.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate physical properties of bromoform (liquid CHBr3) including compressibility and refractive index under dynamic extreme conditions of shock compression. Planar shock experiments are conducted along with high-speed laser interferometry. Our experiments and previous results establish a linear shock velocity-particle velocity relation for particle velocities below 1.77 km/s, as well as the Hugoniot and isentropic compression curves up to ˜21 GPa. Shock-state refractive indices of CHBr3 up to 2.3 GPa or ˜26% compression, as a function of density, can be described with a linear relation and follows the Gladstone-Dale relation. The velocity corrections for laser interferometry measurements at 1550 nm are also obtained.

  11. Hugoniot and refractive indices of bromoform under shock compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. C. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate physical properties of bromoform (liquid CHBr3 including compressibility and refractive index under dynamic extreme conditions of shock compression. Planar shock experiments are conducted along with high-speed laser interferometry. Our experiments and previous results establish a linear shock velocity−particle velocity relation for particle velocities below 1.77 km/s, as well as the Hugoniot and isentropic compression curves up to ∼21 GPa. Shock-state refractive indices of CHBr3 up to 2.3 GPa or ∼26% compression, as a function of density, can be described with a linear relation and follows the Gladstone-Dale relation. The velocity corrections for laser interferometry measurements at 1550 nm are also obtained.

  12. Hydrodynamic modelling of the shock ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The shock ignition concept in inertial confinement fusion uses an intense power spike at the end of an assembly laser pulse. The key features of shock ignition are the generation of a high ablation pressure, the shock pressure amplification by at least a factor of a hundred in the cold fuel shell and the shock coupling to the hot-spot. In this thesis, new semi-analytical hydrodynamic models are developed to describe the ignitor shock from its generation up to the moment of fuel ignition. A model is developed to describe a spherical converging shock wave in a pre-heated hot spot. The self-similar solution developed by Guderley is perturbed over the shock Mach number Ms ≥≥1. The first order correction accounts for the effects of the shock strength. An analytical ignition criterion is defined in terms of the shock strength and the hot-spot areal density. The ignition threshold is higher when the initial Mach number of the shock is lower. A minimal shock pressure of 20 Gbar is needed when it enters the hot-spot. The shock dynamics in the imploding shell is then analyzed. The shock is propagating into a non inertial medium with a high radial pressure gradient and an overall pressure increase with time. The collision with a returning shock coming from the assembly phase enhances further the ignitor shock pressure. The analytical theory allows to describe the shock pressure and strength evolution in a typical shock ignition implosion. It is demonstrated that, in the case of the HiPER target design, a generation shock pressure near the ablation zone on the order of 300-400 Mbar is needed. An analysis of experiments on the strong shock generation performed on the OMEGA laser facility is presented. It is shown that a shock pressure close to 300 Mbar near the ablation zone has been reached with an absorbed laser intensity up to 2 * 10 15 W:cm -2 and a laser wavelength of 351 nm. This value is two times higher than the one expected from collisional laser absorption only

  13. Temperature measurements of shock-compressed deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.; Ross, M.; Nellis, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    The authors measured the temperatures of single and double-shocked D 2 and H 2 up to 85 GPa (0.85 Mbar) and 5,200 K. While single shock temperatures, at pressures to 23 GPa, agree well with previous models, the double shock temperatures are as much as 40% lower than predicted. This is believed to be caused by molecular dissociation, and a new model of the hydrogen EOS at extreme conditions has been developed which correctly predicts their observations. These data and model have important implications for programs which use condensed-phase hydrogen in implosion systems

  14. Shock absorbing properties of toroidal shells under compression, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yuji

    1985-01-01

    The author has previously presented the static load-deflection relations of a toroidal shell subjected to axisymmetric compression between rigid plates and those of its outer half when subjected to lateral compression. In both these cases, the analytical method was based on the incremental Rayleigh-Ritz method. In this paper, the effects of compression angle and strain rate on the load-deflection relations of the toroidal shell are investigated for its use as a shock absorber for the radioactive material shipping cask which must keep its structural integrity even after accidental falls at any angle. Static compression tests have been carried out at four angles of compression, 10 0 , 20 0 , 50 0 , 90 0 and the applications of the preceding analytical method have been discussed. Dynamic compression tests have also been performed using the free-falling drop hammer. The results are compared with those in the static compression tests. (author)

  15. Advances in ferroelectric polymers for shock compression sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, F.; Moulard, H.; Samara, G.

    1997-01-01

    Our studies of the shock compression response of PVDF polymer are continuing in order to understand the physical properties under shock loading and to develop high fidelity, reproducible, time-resolved dynamic stress gauges. New PVDF technology, new electrode configurations and piezoelectric analysis have resulted in enhanced precision gauges. Our new standard gauges have a precision of better than 1% in electric charge release under shock up to 15 GPa. The piezoelectric response of shock compressed PVDF gauges 1 mm 2 in active area has been studied and yielded well-behaved reproducible data up to 20 GPa. Analysis of the response of these gauges in the open-quotes thin mode regimeclose quotes using a Lagrangian hydrocode will be presented. P(VDF-TrFE) copolymers exhibit unique piezoelectric properties over a wide range of temperature depending on the composition. Their properties and phase transitions are being investigated. Emphasis of the presentation will be on key results and implications

  16. Temperature measurement of tin under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereil, Pierre-Louis; Mabire, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The results of pyrometric measurements performed at the interface of a tin target with a LiF window material are presented for stresses ranging from 38 to 55 GPa. The purpose of the study is to analyze the part of the interface in the temperature measurement by a multi-channel pyrometric device. The results show that the glue used at target/window interface remains transparent under shock. The values of temperature measured at the tin/LiF interface are consistent with the behavior of tin under shock

  17. Shock Compression of Liquid Noble Gases to Multi-Mbar Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2011-10-01

    The high pressure - high temperature behavior of noble gases is of considerable interest because of their use in z-pinch liners for fusion studies and for understanding astrophysical and planetary evolution. However, our understanding of the equation of state (EOS) of the noble gases at extreme conditions is limited. A prime example of this is the liquid xenon Hugoniot. Previous EOS models rapidly diverged on the Hugoniot above 1 Mbar because of differences in the treatment of the electronic contribution to the free energy. Similar divergences are observed for krypton EOS. Combining shock compression experiments and density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we can determine the thermo-physical behavior of matter under extreme conditions. The experimental and DFT results have been instrumental to recent developments in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Shock compression experiments are performed using Sandia's Z-Accelerator to determine the Hugoniot of liquid xenon and krypton in the Mbar regime. Under strong pressure, krypton and xenon undergo an insulator to metal transition. In the metallic state, the shock front becomes reflective allowing for a direct measurement of the sample's shock velocity using laser interferometry. The Hugoniot state is determined using a Monte Carlo analysis method that accounts for systematic error in the standards and for correlations. DFT simulations at these extreme conditions show good agreement with the experimental data - demonstrating the attention to detail required for dealing with elements with relativistic core states and d-state electrons. The results from shock compression experiments and DFT simulations are presented for liquid xenon to 840 GPa and for liquid krypton to 800 GPa, decidedly increasing the range of known behavior of both gases. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company

  18. Inertial Confinement Fusion as an Extreme Example of Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E.

    2013-06-01

    Initiating and controlling thermonuclear burn at the national ignition facility (NIF) will require the manipulation of matter to extreme energy densities. We will discuss recent advances in both controlling the dynamic compression of ignition targets and our understanding of the physical states and processes leading to ignition. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Shock tubes: compressions in the low pressure chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schins, H.; Giuliani, S.

    1986-01-01

    The gas shock tube used in these experiments consists of a low pressure chamber and a high pressure chamber, divided by a metal-diaphragm-to-rupture. In contrast to the shock mode of operation, where incident and reflected shocks in the low pressure chamber are studied which occur within 3.5 ms, in this work the compression mode of operation was studied, whose maxima occur (in the low pressure chamber) about 9 ms after rupture. Theoretical analysis was done with the finite element computer code EURDYN-1M, where the computation was carried out to 30 ms

  20. Finsler-Geometric Continuum Dynamics and Shock Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    version of Finsler theory is newly applied to shock compression of this ceramic. An order parameter is linked simultaneously to densification and...set of algebraic equations that may be solved simultaneously (albeit, not in closed form) for the shock stress, order param- eter, entropy, and shock...δxa ⊗ dX A = ∂ϕ a(X, D, t) ∂X A δ δxa ⊗ dX A = ∂x(X, D, t) ∂X , FaA = ∂Aϕa = ∂Axa . (2.28) The inverse tangent mapping from spatial to referential

  1. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, A; Stubley, P G; Comley, A J; Eggert, J H; Foster, J M; Kalantar, D H; McGonegle, D; Patel, S; Peacock, L J; Rothman, S D; Smith, R F; Suggit, M J; Wark, J S

    2016-04-13

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported 'anomalous' elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.

  2. Failure Waves in Shock-Compressed Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, G. I.

    2006-01-01

    The failure wave is a network of cracks that are nucleated on the surface and propagate into the elastically stressed body. It is a mode of catastrophic fracture in an elastically stressed media whose relevance is not limited to impact events. In the paper, main properties of the failure waves are summarized and discussed. It has been shown that the failure wave is really a wave process which is characterized by small increase of the longitudinal stress and corresponding increments of the particle velocity and the density. The propagation velocity of the failure wave is less than the sound speed; it is not directly related to the compressibility but is determined by the crack growth speed. The failure wave is steady if the stress state ahead of it is supported unchanging. In some sense the process is similar to a subsonic combustion wave. Computer simulations based on the phenomenological combustion-like model reproduces well all kinematical aspects of the phenomenon

  3. Experimental Study of Shock Generated Compressible Vortex Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debopam; Arakeri, Jaywant H.; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

    2000-11-01

    Formation of a compressible vortex ring and generation of sound associated with it is studied experimentally. Impulse of a shock wave is used to generate a vortex ring from the open end of a shock-tube. Vortex ring formation process has been studied in details using particle image Velocimetry (PIV). As the shock wave exits the tube it diffracts and expands. A circular vortex sheet forms at the edge and rolls up into a vortex ring. Far field microphone measurement shows that the acoustic pressure consists of a spike due to shock wave followed by a low frequency pressure wave of decaying nature, superimposed with high frequency pressure wave. Acoustic waves consist of waves due to expansion, waves formed in the tube during diaphragm breakage and waves associated with the vortex ring and shear-layer vortices. Unsteady evolution of the vortex ring and shear-layer vortices in the jet behind the ring is studied by measuring the velocity field using PIV. Corresponding vorticity field, circulation around the vortex core and growth rate of the vortex core is calculated from the measured velocity field. The velocity field in a compressible vortex ring differs from that of an incompressible ring due to the contribution from both shock and vortex ring.

  4. The size effects upon shock plastic compression of nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malygin, G. A.; Klyavin, O. V.

    2017-10-01

    For the first time a theoretical analysis of scale effects upon the shock plastic compression of nanocrystals is implemented in the context of a dislocation kinetic approach based on the equations and relationships of dislocation kinetics. The yield point of crystals τy is established as a quantitative function of their cross-section size D and the rate of shock deformation as τy ɛ2/3 D. This dependence is valid in the case of elastic stress relaxation on account of emission of dislocations from single-pole Frank-Read sources near the crystal surface.

  5. Spherical strong-shock generation for shock-ignition inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theobald, W.; Seka, W.; Lafon, M.; Anderson, K. S.; Hohenberger, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Edgell, D. H.; Yaakobi, B.; Shvydky, A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nora, R.; Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Casner, A.; Reverdin, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Ribeyre, X.; Vallet, A. [Université de Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications) UMR 5107 F-33400 Talence (France); Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Recent experiments on the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' OMEGA laser have been carried out to produce strong shocks in solid spherical targets with direct laser illumination. The shocks are launched at pressures of several hundred Mbars and reach Gbar upon convergence. The results are relevant to the validation of the shock-ignition scheme and to the development of an OMEGA experimental platform to study material properties at Gbar pressures. The experiments investigate the strength of the ablation pressure and the hot-electron production at incident laser intensities of ∼2 to 6 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2} and demonstrate ablation pressures exceeding 300 Mbar, which is crucial to developing a shock-ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility. The timing of the x-ray flash from shock convergence in the center of the solid plastic target is used to infer the ablation and shock pressures. Laser–plasma instabilities produce hot-electrons with a moderate temperature (<100 keV). The instantaneous conversion efficiencies of laser power into hot-electron power reached up to ∼15% in the intensity spike. The large amount of hot electrons is correlated with an earlier x-ray flash and a strong increase in its magnitude. This suggests that hot electrons contribute to the augmentation of the shock strength.

  6. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride single crystals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-10-01

    S hock compression exper iments in the few hundred GPa (multi - Mabr) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals . This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17 - 32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between %7E200 - 600 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot - the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves - as well as pressure and density of re - shock states up to %7E900 GPa . The experimental measurements are compared with recent density functional theory calculations as well as a new tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Labs.

  7. Electrical conductivity measurements in shock compressed liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.

    1985-06-01

    The electrical conductivity of shock compressed liquid nitrogen was measured in the pressure range 20 to 50 GPa using a two-stage light-gas gun. The conductivities covered a range 4 x 10 -2 to 1 x 10 2 ohm -1 cm -1 . The data are discussed in terms of a liquid semiconductor model below the onset of the dissociative phase transition at 30 GPa. 15 refs., 1 fig

  8. Behavior of porous tungsten under shock compression at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.; Lamothe, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    This work reports the results of room-temperature shock-compression experiments on porous tungsten. The porous tungsten was fabricated by sintering 1-μm tungsten particles. The initial density of the material was 15290 kg/m 3 . Around 97% of the pores in the material were interconnected. The main features of the results are as follows: (1) porous tungsten behaves as a linear elastic material to 1.43 GPa; (2) the shock wave following the elastic precursor is unstable in the material in the stress range 1.43--2.7 GPa; (3) a stable two-wave structure is established at and above 6.4 GPa; (4) the response of porous tungsten is accurately described by the Mie-Grueneisen equation of state at stresses above 4.9 GPa, the stress at which the voids suffer a complete extinction in the material; (5) the deformations induced in the material due to shock compression are irreversible; (6) the recentered Hugoniot of porous tungsten becomes stiffer with the increasing magnitude of initial compressive stress

  9. Shock compression of nitrobenzene; Nitoro benzen no shogeki asshoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Chemical System Engineering; Yoshida, Masatake [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-08-31

    The Hugoniot (4 - 30 x 10{sup 9}Pa) of nitrobenzene has been obtained by shock compression experiments. Explosive plane-wae generators were used for plane shock wave generation. The obtained Hugoniot consists of two linear lines (U{sub s} (x 10{sup 3}m/s) = 2.52 + 1.23U{sub p} (x 10{sup 3}m/s)(0.8shock compression of nitrobenzene. (author)

  10. Stress relaxation in vanadium under shock and shockless dynamic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutions of elastic-plastic waves have been recorded in three series of plate impact experiments with annealed vanadium samples under conditions of shockless and combined ramp and shock dynamic compression. The shaping of incident wave profiles was realized using intermediate base plates made of different silicate glasses through which the compression waves were entered into the samples. Measurements of the free surface velocity histories revealed an apparent growth of the Hugoniot elastic limit with decreasing average rate of compression. The growth was explained by “freezing” of the elastic precursor decay in the area of interaction of the incident and reflected waves. A set of obtained data show that the current value of the Hugoniot elastic limit and plastic strain rate is rather associated with the rate of the elastic precursor decay than with the local rate of compression. The study has revealed the contributions of dislocation multiplications in elastic waves. It has been shown that independently of the compression history the material arrives at the minimum point between the elastic and plastic waves with the same density of mobile dislocations

  11. Shock Compression Response of Calcium Fluoride (CaF2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2017-06-01

    The fluorite crystal structure is a textbook lattice that is observed for many systems, such as CaF2, Mg2 Si, and CeO2. Specifically, CaF2 is a useful material for studying the fluorite system because it is readily available as a single crystal. Under static compression, CaF2 is known to have at least three solid phases: fluorite, cotunnite, and a Ni2 In phase. Along the Hugoniot CaF2 undergoes a fluorite to cotunnite phase transition, however, at higher shock pressures it is unknown whether CaF2 undergoes another solid phase transition or melts directly from the cotunnite phase. In this work, we conducted planar shock compression experiments on CaF2 using Sandia's Z-machine and a two-stage light gun up to 900 GPa. In addition, we use density functional theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations to provide insight into the CaF2 state along the Hugoniot. In collaboration with: Michael Desjarlais, Ray Lemke, Patricia Kalita, Scott Alexander, Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL850.

  12. Burn characteristics of compressed fuel pellets for D-3He inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Y.; Honda, T.; Honda, Y.; Kudo, K.; Nakashima, H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using D- 3 He fuel in inertial confinement fusion is examined by using a hydrodynamics code that includes neutron and charged-particle transport routines. The use of a small amount of deuterium-tritium (D-T) ignitor is indispensable. Burn simulations are made for quasi-isobaric D-T/D- 3 He pellet models compressed to 5000 times the liquid density. Substantial fuel gains (∼500) are obtained from pellets having parameters ρR D-T = 3 g/cm 2 and ρR total = 14 g/cm 2 and a central spark temperature of 5 keV. The amount of driver energy needed to achieve these gains is estimated to be ∼ 30 MJ when the coupling efficiency is 10%. The driver energy requirement can be reduced by using spin-polarized D-T and D- 3 He fuels

  13. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaughnessy, D. A., E-mail: shaughnessy2@llnl.gov; Moody, K. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Grant, P. M.; Gostic, J. M.; Torretto, P. C.; Wooddy, P. T.; Bandong, B. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Despotopulos, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Radiochemistry Program, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,γ) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of {sup 198m+g}Au and {sup 196g}Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF.

  14. Femtosecond visualization of lattice dynamics in shock-compressed matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milathianaki, D; Boutet, S; Williams, G J; Higginbotham, A; Ratner, D; Gleason, A E; Messerschmidt, M; Seibert, M M; Swift, D C; Hering, P; Robinson, J; White, W E; Wark, J S

    2013-10-11

    The ultrafast evolution of microstructure is key to understanding high-pressure and strain-rate phenomena. However, the visualization of lattice dynamics at scales commensurate with those of atomistic simulations has been challenging. Here, we report femtosecond x-ray diffraction measurements unveiling the response of copper to laser shock-compression at peak normal elastic stresses of ~73 gigapascals (GPa) and strain rates of 10(9) per second. We capture the evolution of the lattice from a one-dimensional (1D) elastic to a 3D plastically relaxed state within a few tens of picoseconds, after reaching shear stresses of 18 GPa. Our in situ high-precision measurement of material strength at spatial (<1 micrometer) and temporal (<50 picoseconds) scales provides a direct comparison with multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of shock compression in porous silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Keith; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2017-06-01

    The shock response of porous amorphous silica is investigated using classical molecular dynamics, over a range of porosity ranging from fully dense (2.21 g/cc) down to 0.14 g/cc. We observe an enhanced densification in the Hugoniot response at initial porosities above 50 %, and the effect increases with increasing porosity. In the lowest initial densities, after an initial compression response, the systems expand with increased pressure. These results show good agreement with experiments. Mechanisms leading to enhanced densification will be explored, which appear to differ from mechanisms observed in similar studies in silicon. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Experimental study of fast electron transport and of the propagation of shock waves generated by laser in the framework of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaki, T.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents 3 experiments carried out within the framework of inertial fusion. The first experiment was devoted to the study of fast electron beam transport in a compressed target. The implosion of the target with a cylindrical geometry was carried out with the GEKKO XII laser facility (ILE Osaka, Japan). The fast electron beam was generated by the LFEX laser (∼10"1"9 W/cm"2) and its propagation through the compressed cylinder was observed with several X-ray diagnostics. This experiment showed the guiding effect of the electron beam resulting from self-generated magnetic fields. Furthermore, the results of this experiment were in good agreement with numerical simulations. Two other experiments were performed to study the propagation of strong shock waves created by lasers in a plasma. They were carried out with different laser systems. In the first experiment with the Gekko XII laser, we observed the creation and the propagation of two successive shock waves in an ablation plasma in CH and Be. The objective of characterizing the amplification of a transmitted shock by the collision of two counter-propagating shocks has been partially realized. The comparison of the experimental results with the hydrodynamic simulations enabled us to confirm an amplification of the shock by a factor 2 in pressure in the condition of this experiment. The shot with a Be target allowed the development and validation of the diagnostic method of X-ray radiography for shock wave propagation. The second experiment was performed with PHELIX GSI laser (Darmstadt, Germany). The purpose of this experiment was to study the generation of strong shocks. They were applied to study the equation of state of carbon in the WDM state. The condition of pressure and density for the carbon were obtained by deducing the pressure and the velocity of the shock wave chronometric diagnostics employed in this experiment. In this experiment, diamond was at the metallic liquid phase with a pressure

  17. Shock compression of glow discharge polymer (GDP): density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments on Sandia's Z machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Kyle R.; Ao, T.; Lemke, R. W.; Hamel, S.; Schoff, M. E.; Blue, B. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-03-01

    Glow discharge polymer (GDP) is used extensively as capsule/ablation material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. Accurate knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) under shock and release is particularly important for high-fidelity design, analysis, and optimization of ICF experiments since the capsule material is subject to several converging shocks as well as release towards the cryogenic fuel. We performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, to gain knowledge of the behavior of GDP - for example regarding the role of chemical dissociation during shock compression, we find that the dissociation regime along the Hugoniot extends from 50 GPa to 250 GPa. The shock pressures calculated from DFT are compared experimental data taken at Sandia's Z-machine. The GDP samples were grown in a planar geometry to improve the sample quality and maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere following manufacturing, thus allowing for a direct comparison to the DFT/QMD simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Expansion and compression shock wave calculation in pipes with the C.V.M. numerical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Caumette, P.; Le Coq, G.; Libmann, M.

    1983-03-01

    The Control Variables Method for fluid transients computations has been used to compute expansion and compression shock waves propagations. In this paper, first analytical solutions for shock wave and rarefaction wave propagation are detailed. Then after a rapid description of the C.V.M. technique and its stability and monotonicity properties, we will present some results about standard shock tube problem, reflection of shock wave, finally a comparison between experimental results obtained on the ELF facility and calculations is given

  19. Shock Compression Response of the Light Noble Gases: Neon and Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Shulenburger, Luke; Cochrane, Kyle; Lopez, Andrew; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Understanding material behavior at extreme conditions is important to a wide range of processes in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Modeling the high pressure - high temperature processes requires robust equations of state (EOS). For many materials, EOS models have been developed using low-pressure Hugoniot data. Assumptions are made to extrapolate the EOS models to Mbar pressure regimes, leading to different model behavior at extreme conditions. In this work, we examine the high pressure response of the light noble gases: neon and helium in the multi-Mbar regime. We perform a series of shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine on cryogenically cooled liquids of Ne (26 K) and He (2.2 K) to measure the Hugoniot and reshock states. In parallel, we use density functional theory methods to calculate the Hugoniot and reshock states. The experiments validated the DFT simulations and the combined experimental and simulation results are used to assess the EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy of shock-compressed fluid N2 and O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaw, M.S.; Johnson, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Single-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used to observe the vibrational spectra of liquid N 2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 41 GPa and 5200 K and liquid O 2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 10 GPa and 1000 K. For N 2 , the experimental spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and estimated vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and Raman line widths. The question of excited state populations in the shock-compressed state is addressed

  1. Anomalous elastic response of silicon to uniaxial shock compression on nanosecond time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveridge-Smith, A; Allen, A; Belak, J; Boehly, T; Hauer, A; Holian, B; Kalantar, D; Kyrala, G; Lee, R W; Lomdahl, P; Meyers, M A; Paisley, D; Pollaine, S; Remington, B; Swift, D C; Weber, S; Wark, J S

    2001-03-12

    We have used x-ray diffraction with subnanosecond temporal resolution to measure the lattice parameters of orthogonal planes in shock compressed single crystals of silicon (Si) and copper (Cu). Despite uniaxial compression along the (400) direction of Si reducing the lattice spacing by nearly 11%, no observable changes occur in planes with normals orthogonal to the shock propagation direction. In contrast, shocked Cu shows prompt hydrostaticlike compression. These results are consistent with simple estimates of plastic strain rates based on dislocation velocity data.

  2. P. W. Bridgman's contributions to the foundations of shock compression of condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellis, W J, E-mail: nellis@physics.harvard.ed [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Based on his 50-year career in static high-pressure research, P. W. Bridgman (PWB) is the father of modern high-pressure physics. What is not generally recognized is that Bridgman was also intimately connected with establishing shock compression as a scientific tool and he predicted major events in shock research that occurred up to 40 years after his death. In 1956 the first phase transition under shock compression was reported in Fe at 13 GPa (130 kbar). PWB said a phase transition could not occur in a {approx}microsec, thus setting off a controversy. The scientific legitimacy of shock compression resulted 5 years later when static high-pressure researchers confirmed with x-ray diffraction the existence of epsilon-Fe. Once PWB accepted the fact that shock waves generated with chemical explosives were a valid scientific tool, he immediately realized that substantially higher pressures would be achieved with nuclear explosives. He included his ideas for achieving higher pressures in articles published a few years after his death. L. V. Altshuler eventually read Bridgman's articles and pursued the idea of using nuclear explosives to generate super high pressures, which subsequently morphed today into giant lasers. PWB also anticipated combining static and shock methods, which today is done with pre-compression of a soft sample in a diamond anvil cell followed by laser-driven shock compression. One variation of that method is the reverberating-shock technique, in which the first shock pre-compresses a soft sample and subsequent reverberations isentropically compress the first-shocked state.

  3. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temporal, M., E-mail: mauro.temporal@hotmail.com [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan and CNRS, 61 Av. du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Canaud, B. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Garbett, W. J. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ramis, R. [ETSI Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  4. Theoretical quantification of shock-timing sensitivities for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D.; Boehly, T. R.; Gregor, M. C.; Polsin, D. N.; Davis, A. K.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.

    2018-05-01

    Using temporally shaped laser pulses, multiple shocks can be launched in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments to set the shell on a desired isentrope or adiabat. The velocity of the first shock and the times at which subsequent shocks catch up to it are measured through the velocity interferometry system for any reflector diagnostic [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 092706 (2011)] on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Simulations reproduce these velocity and shock-merger time measurements when using laser pulses designed for setting mid-adiabat (α ˜ 3) implosions, but agreement degrades for lower-adiabat (α ˜ 1) designs. Simulation results indicate that the shock timing discrepancy is most sensitive to details of the density and temperature profiles in the coronal plasma, which influences the laser energy coupled into the target, and only marginally sensitive to the target offset and beam power imbalance. To aid in verifying the coronal profile's influence, a new technique under development to infer coronal profiles using x-ray self-emission imaging [A. K. Davis et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 61, BAPS.2016.DPP.NO8.7 (2016)] can be applied to the pulse shapes used in shock-timing experiments.

  5. Investigation of shock compressed plasma parameters by interaction with magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudin, S. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Gryaznov, V. K.; Mintsev, V. B.; Shilkin, N. S.; Ushnurtsev, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    The Hall effect parameters in shock compressed air, helium and xenon have been estimated and results of experiments with air and helium plasma are presented. Explosively driven shock tubes were used for the generation of strong shock waves. To obtain magnetic field a solenoid was winded over the shock tube. Calculations of dense shock compressed plasma parameters were carried out to plan the experiments. In the experiments with the magnetic field of ∼5 T it was found, that air plasma slug was significantly heated by the whirlwind electrical field. The reflected shock waves technique was used in the experiments with helium. Results on measurements of electrical conductivity and electron concentration of helium are presented

  6. A comparative study on shock compression of nanocrystalline Al and Cu: Shock profiles and microscopic views of plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Wen; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    Shock compressions of nanocrystalline (nc) metals Al and Cu with the same grain size and texture are studied by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results have revealed that the shock front of both Al and Cu can be divided into three stages: elastic, grain-boundary-mediated, and dislocation-mediated plastic deformation. The transition planes among these three stages are proven to be non-planar by two-dimensional shock response analysis, including local stress, shear, temperature, and atom configuration. The difference between shocked Al and Cu is that the rise rate of the elastic stage of Cu is slightly higher than that of Al, and that the shock-front width of Al is wider than Cu at the same loading conditions. For the plastic stage, the dislocation density of shocked Al is lower than Cu, and the contribution of grain-boundary-mediated plasticity to shock front and strain for nc Al is more pronounced than for nc Cu. These results are explained through intrinsic material properties and atomistic analysis of the plastic process. In the case of the shocked Al sample, partial dislocations, perfect dislocations, and twins are observed, but few evidence of perfect dislocations and twins are observed in the shocked Cu

  7. Temperature dependence of parametric instabilities in the context of the shock-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weber, Stefan A.; Riconda, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, Feb (2015), e6 ISSN 2095-4719 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : inertial confinement fusion * shock ignition * laser- plasma interaction * parametric instabilities Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  8. Compression of interstellar clouds in spiral density-wave shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    A mechanism of triggering star formation by galactic shocks is discussed. The possibilty that shocks may form along spiral arms in the gaseous component of a galactic disk is by now a familiar feature of spiral wave theory. It was suggested by Roberts (1969) that these shocks could trigger star formation in narrow bands forming a coherent spiral pattern over most of the disk of a galaxy. Some results of computer simulations of such a triggering process for star formation are reported. (Auth.)

  9. Heterogeneous free-surface profile of B4C polycrystal under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashimo, T.; Uchino, M.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of the free-surface behavior under shock compression by the gapped-flat mirror method were performed on B 4 C and Si 3 N 4 ceramics to study their shock-yielding properties. Jagged profiles of the moving free-surface in the plastic region, with a special scale of about one mm and a maximum local displacement of a few 10s of μm, were observed for B 4 C polycrystals. Similar profiles for Si 3 N 4 polycrystals were smooth. Such profiles for B 4 C polycrystals were also observed in the elastic region. It is suggested that these observations reflect the heterogeneous nature of shock compression in solids, and further indicate that a macroscopic slip system plays an important role in the elastoplastic transition of B 4 C material under shock compression and decompression. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D 3 He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D 3 He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R cm ) from the downshift of the shock-produced D 3 He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR

  11. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  12. Time-resolved shock compression of porous rutile: Wave dispersion in porous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.U.; Graham, R.A.; Holman, G.T.

    1993-08-01

    Rutile (TiO{sub 2}) samples at 60% of solid density have been shock-loaded from 0.21 to 6.1 GPa with sample thickness of 4 mm and studied with the PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauge. The technique uses a copper capsule to contain the sample which has PVDF gauge packages in direct contact with front and rear surfaces. A precise measure is made of the compressive stress wave velocity through the sample, as well as the input and propagated shock stress. Initial density is known from sample preparation, and the amount of shock-compression is calculated from the measurement of shock velocity and input stress. Shock states and re-shock states are measured. Observed data are consistent with previously published high pressure data. It is observed that rutile has a ``crush strength`` near 6 GPa. Propagated stress-pulse rise times vary from 234 to 916 nsec. Propagated stress-pulse rise times of shock-compressed HMX, 2Al + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3Ni + Al, and 5Ti + 3Si are presented.

  13. History of the APS Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, J W

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wavehigh pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years

  14. A soap film shock tube to study two-dimensional compressible flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, C.Y.; Chen, Y.M.; Chang-Jian, S.K. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Da-Yeh University Chang-Hwa (Taiwan)

    2001-07-01

    A new experimental approach to the study of the two-dimensional compressible flow phenomena is presented. In this technique, a variety of compressible flows were generated by bursting plane vertical soap films. An aureole and a ''shock wave'' preceding the rim of the expanding hole were clearly observed using traditional high-speed flash photography and a fast line-scan charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The moving shock wave images obtained from the line-scan CCD camera were similar to the x-t diagrams in gas dynamics. The moving shock waves cause thickness jumps and induce supersonic flows. Photographs of the supersonic flows over a cylinder and a wedge are presented. The results suggest clearly the feasibility of the ''soap film shock tube''. (orig.)

  15. Bacterial survival following shock compression in the GigaPascal range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazael, Rachael; Fitzmaurice, Brianna C.; Foglia, Fabrizia; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth J.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2017-09-01

    The possibility that life can exist within previously unconsidered habitats is causing us to expand our understanding of potential planetary biospheres. Significant populations of living organisms have been identified at depths extending up to several km below the Earth's surface; whereas laboratory experiments have shown that microbial species can survive following exposure to GigaPascal (GPa) pressures. Understanding the degree to which simple organisms such as microbes survive such extreme pressurization under static compression conditions is being actively investigated. The survival of bacteria under dynamic shock compression is also of interest. Such studies are being partly driven to test the hypothesis of potential transport of biological organisms between planetary systems. Shock compression is also of interest for the potential modification and sterilization of foodstuffs and agricultural products. Here we report the survival of Shewanella oneidensis bacteria exposed to dynamic (shock) compression. The samples examined included: (a) a "wild type" (WT) strain and (b) a "pressure adapted" (PA) population obtained by culturing survivors from static compression experiments to 750 MPa. Following exposure to peak shock pressures of 1.5 and 2.5 GPa the proportion of survivors was established as the number of colony forming units (CFU) present after recovery to ambient conditions. The data were compared with previous results in which the same bacterial samples were exposed to static pressurization to the same pressures, for 15 minutes each. The results indicate that shock compression leads to survival of a significantly greater proportion of both WT and PA organisms. The significantly shorter duration of the pressure pulse during the shock experiments (2-3 μs) likely contributes to the increased survival of the microbial species. One reason for this can involve the crossover from deformable to rigid solid-like mechanical relaxational behavior that occurs for

  16. Shock compression of a recrystallized anorthositic rock from Apollo 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Gibbons, R. V.; O'Keefe, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Hugoniot measurements on 15,418, a recrystallized and brecciated gabbroic anorthosite, yield a value of the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) varying from 45 to 70 kbar as the final shock pressure is varied from 70 to 280 kbar. Above the HEL and to 150 kbar, the pressure-density Hugoniot is closely described by a hydrostatic equation of state constructed from ultrasonic data for single-crystal plagioclase and pyroxene. Above 150 kbar, the Hugoniot states indicate that a series of one or more shock-induced phase changes are occurring in the plagioclase and pyroxene. From Hugoniot data for both the single-crystal minerals and the Frederick diabase, we infer that the shock-induced high-pressure phases in 15,418 probably consists of a 3.71 g/cu cm density, high-pressure structure for plagioclase and a 4.70 g/cu cm perovskite-type structure for pyroxene.

  17. Shock wave compression and metallization of simple molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Radousky, H.B.

    1988-03-01

    In this paper we combine shock wave studies and metallization of simple molecules in a single overview. The unifying features are provided by the high shock temperatures which lead to a metallic-like state in the rare gases and to dissociation of diatomic molecules. In the case of the rare gases, electronic excitation into the conduction band leads to a metallic-like inert gas state at lower than metallic densities and provides information regarding the closing of the band gap. Diatomic dissociation caused by thermal excitation also leads to a final metallic-like or monatomic state. Ina ddition, shock wave data can provide information concerning the short range intermolecular force of the insulator that can be useful for calculating the metallic phase transition as for example in the case of hydrogen. 69 refs., 36 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Laser driven single shock compression of fluid deuterium from 45 to 220 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Moon, S; Meyerhofer, D; Collins, G

    2008-03-23

    The compression {eta} of liquid deuterium between 45 and 220 GPa under laser-driven shock loading has been measured using impedance matching to an aluminum (Al) standard. An Al impedance match model derived from a best fit to absolute Hugoniot data has been used to quantify and minimize the systematic errors caused by uncertainties in the high-pressure Al equation of state. In deuterium below 100 GPa results show that {eta} {approx_equal} 4.2, in agreement with previous impedance match data from magnetically-driven flyer and convergent-explosive shock wave experiments; between 100 and 220 GPa {eta} reaches a maximum of {approx}5.0, less than the 6-fold compression observed on the earliest laser-shock experiments but greater than expected from simple extrapolations of lower pressure data. Previous laser-driven double-shock results are found to be in good agreement with these single-shock measurements over the entire range under study. Both sets of laser-shock data indicate that deuterium undergoes an abrupt increase in compression at around 110 GPa.

  19. Compression and Reswelling of Microgel Particles after an Osmotic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeboom, Jelle J. F.; Voudouris, Panayiotis; Punter, Melle T. J. J. M.; Aangenendt, Frank J.; Florea, Daniel; van der Schoot, Paul; Wyss, Hans M.

    2017-09-01

    We use dedicated microfluidic devices to expose soft hydrogel particles to a rapid change in the externally applied osmotic pressure and observe a surprising, nonmonotonic response: After an initial rapid compression, the particle slowly reswells to approximately its original size. We theoretically account for this behavior, enabling us to extract important material properties from a single microfluidic experiment, including the compressive modulus, the gel permeability, and the diffusivity of the osmolyte inside the gel. We expect our approach to be relevant to applications such as controlled release, chromatography, and responsive materials.

  20. Compression and reswelling of microgel particles after an osmotic shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleeboom, J.F.; Voudouris, P.; Punter, M.T.J.J.M.; Aangenendt, F.J.; Florea, D.; van der Schoot, P.P.A.M.; Wyss, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    We use dedicated microfluidic devices to expose soft hydrogel particles to a rapid change in the externally applied osmotic pressure and observe a non-monotonic response: After an initial rapid compression the particle slowly reswells to approximately its original size. Using a simple

  1. Shock compression and flash-heating of molecular adsorbates on the picosecond time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher Michael

    An ultrafast nonlinear coherent laser spectroscopy termed broadband multiplex vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) with nonresonant suppression was employed to monitor vibrational transitions of molecular adsorbates on metallic substrates during laser-driven shock compression and flash-heating. Adsorbates were in the form of well-ordered self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and included molecular explosive simulants, such as nitroaromatics, and long chain-length alkanethiols. Based on reflectance measurements of the metallic substrates, femtosecond flash-heating pulses were capable of producing large-amplitude temperature jumps with DeltaT = 500 K. Laser-driven shock compression of SAMs produced pressures up to 2 GPa, where 1 GPa ≈ 1 x 104 atm. Shock pressures were estimated via comparison with frequency shifts observed in the monolayer vibrational transitions during hydrostatic pressure measurements in a SiC anvil cell. Molecular dynamics during flash-heating and shock loading were probed with vibrational SFG spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. Flash-heating studies of 4-nitrobenzenethiolate (NBT) on Au provided insight into effects from hot-electron excitation of the molecular adsorbates at early pump-probe delay times. At longer delay times, effects from the excitation of SAM lattice modes and lower-energy NBT vibrations were shown. In addition, flash-heating studies of alkanethiolates demonstrated chain disordering behaviors as well as interface thermal conductances across the Au-SAM junction, which was of specific interest within the context of molecular electronics. Shock compression studies of molecular explosive simulants, such as 4-nitrobenzoate (NBA), demonstrated the proficiency of this technique to observe shock-induced molecular dynamics, in this case orientational dynamics, on the picosecond time scale. Results validated the utilization of these refined shock loading techniques to probe the shock

  2. Drift compression and final focus systems for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Hoon, Michiel Jan Laurens [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal compression of space-charge dominated beams can be achieved by imposing a head-to-tail velocity tilt on the beam. This tilt has to be carefully tailored, such that it is removed by the longitudinal space-charge repulsion by the time the beam reaches the end of the drift compression section. The transverse focusing lattice should be designed such that all parts of the beam stay approximately matched, while the beam smoothly expands transversely to the larger beam radius needed in the final focus system following drift compression. In this thesis, several drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression. The occurrence of mismatches due to a rapidly increasing current was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of drift compression to errors in the initial velocity tilt and current profile was studied. These calculations were done using a new computer code that accurately calculates the longitudinal electric field in the space-charge dominated regime.

  3. Finite Strain Analysis of Shock Compression of Brittle Solids Applied to Titanium Diboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dislocation motion [18,19] may take place at high pressures. Multiple investigations have discovered that tita - nium diboride demonstrates a rather unique...mean stress under shock compression. It has been suggested [5] that pore collapse may be an important source of inelasticity in tita - nium diboride

  4. On the failure of NiAl bicrystals during laser-induced shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, Eric; Swift, Damian; Peralta, Pedro; McClellan, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Thin NiAl bicrystals 5 mm in diameter and 150-350 μm thick were tested under laser-induced shock compression to evaluate the material behavior and the effect of localized strain at the grain boundary on the failure of these specimens. Circular NiAl bicrystal samples with random misorientation were grown using a modified Czochralski technique and samples were prepared for shock compression at moderate pressures (<10 GPa). The observed crack patterns on the drive surface as well as the free surface were examined using optical microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the drive surface as well as in the bulk of one grain was performed on recovered specimens following shock compression. This revealed that a nanocrystalline region with a grain size of 15-20 nm formed on a thin layer at the drive surface following the plasma expansion phase of the laser-induced shock. TEM in the bulk of one grain showed that plastic deformation occurred in a periodic fashion through propagation of dislocation clusters. Cracking on the free surface of the samples revealed a clear grain boundary affected zone (GBAZ) due to scattering of the shock wave and variations in wave speed across the inclined boundary. Damage tended to accumulate in the grain into which the elastic wave refracted. This damage accumulation corresponds well to the regions in which the transmitted waves impinged on the free surface as predicted by elastic scattering models

  5. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    Shock compression experiments in the few hundred GPa (multi-Mbar) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride single crystals. This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17-32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between ˜190 and 570 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot—the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves—as well as pressure and density of reshock states up to ˜920 GPa. The experimental measurements are compared with density functional theory calculations, tabular equation of state models, and legacy nuclear driven results that have been reanalyzed using modern equations of state for the shock wave standards used in the experiments.

  6. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  7. Bright emissive core-shell spherical microparticles for shock compression spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the response to shock compression of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye encapsulated in 1.25 μm diameter silica microspheres. When R6G was encapsulated in microspheres, the emission intensity under steady-state irradiation (the brightness) was 3.4 times greater than the same dye in solution (the free dye). At least part of the brightness improvement was caused by an enhanced radiative rate. When the microspheres were embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate subjected to planar shocks in the 3–8.4 GPa range by laser-driven flyer plates, the dye emission redshifted and lost intensity. The dye emission redshift represents an instantaneous response to changes in the local density. In free dye samples, the shock-induced intensity loss had considerably slower rise times and fall times than the redshift. When dye was encapsulated in microspheres, the time dependence of the intensity loss matched the redshift almost exactly over a range of shock pressures and durations. The faster response to shock of dye in silica microspheres was explained by dye photophysics. The microsphere environment decreased the singlet state lifetime, which decreased the rise time, and it also decreased the triplet state lifetime, which decreased the fall time. Since it is much easier and more convenient to make measurements of intensity rather than spectral shift, these microspheres represent a substantial improvement in optical sensors to monitor shock compression of microstructured materials.

  8. Shock compression of monocrystalline copper: Experiments, characterization, and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Buyang; Lassila, David H.; Huang Chongxiang; Xu Yongbo; Meyers, Marc Andre

    2010-01-01

    Monocrystalline copper samples with [0 0 1] and [2 2 1] orientations were subjected to shock/recovery experiments at 30 and 57 GPa and 90 K. The slip system activity and the microstructural evolution were investigated. Different defect structures, including dislocations, stacking faults, twins, microbands, and recrystallized grains were observed in the specimens. The residual microstructures were dependent on crystalline orientation and pressure. The differences with crystalline orientations are most likely due to different resolved shear stresses on specific crystalline planes. The geometric relationships between the shock propagation direction and crystalline orientation are presented under uniaxial strain. It is shown that the [2 2 1] orientation, by virtue of having fewer highly activated slip systems, exhibits greater concentration of deformation with more intense shear on the primary system. This, in turn leads to greater local temperature rise and full recrystallization, in spite of the thermodynamic residual temperature of ∼500 K and rapid cooling (within 20 s) to ambient temperature. The profuse observation of microbands is interpreted in terms of the mechanism proposed by Huang and Gray [J.C. Huang, G.T. Gray III, Acta Metallurgica 37 (1989) 3335-3347].

  9. Nanosecond formation of diamond and lonsdaleite by shock compression of graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D; Ravasio, A; Gauthier, M; Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Frydrych, S; Helfrich, J; Fletcher, L B; Schaumann, G; Nagler, B; Barbrel, B; Bachmann, B; Gamboa, E J; Göde, S; Granados, E; Gregori, G; Lee, H J; Neumayer, P; Schumaker, W; Döppner, T; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H; Roth, M

    2016-03-14

    The shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond has been of great scientific and technological interest since the discovery of microscopic diamonds in remnants of explosively driven graphite. Furthermore, shock synthesis of diamond and lonsdaleite, a speculative hexagonal carbon polymorph with unique hardness, is expected to happen during violent meteor impacts. Here, we show unprecedented in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of diamond formation on nanosecond timescales by shock compression of pyrolytic as well as polycrystalline graphite to pressures from 19 GPa up to 228 GPa. While we observe the transition to diamond starting at 50 GPa for both pyrolytic and polycrystalline graphite, we also record the direct formation of lonsdaleite above 170 GPa for pyrolytic samples only. Our experiment provides new insights into the processes of the shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond and uniquely resolves the dynamics that explain the main natural occurrence of the lonsdaleite crystal structure being close to meteor impact sites.

  10. Onset of hydrodynamic mix in high-velocity, highly compressed inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Patel, P K; Izumi, N; Springer, P T; Key, M H; Atherton, L J; Benedetti, L R; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Glenn, S; Grim, G; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Hicks, D; Hsing, W W; Jones, O S; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Le Pape, S; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Pak, A; Parham, T; Park, H-S; Ralph, J E; Regan, S P; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Ross, J S; Spears, B K; Smalyuk, V; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Weber, S V; Lindl, J D; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Moses, E I

    2013-08-23

    Deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated yields ranging from 0.8 to 7×10(14), and record fuel areal densities of 0.7 to 1.3 g/cm2. These implosions use hohlraums irradiated with shaped laser pulses of 1.5-1.9 MJ energy. The laser peak power and duration at peak power were varied, as were the capsule ablator dopant concentrations and shell thicknesses. We quantify the level of hydrodynamic instability mix of the ablator into the hot spot from the measured elevated absolute x-ray emission of the hot spot. We observe that DT neutron yield and ion temperature decrease abruptly as the hot spot mix mass increases above several hundred ng. The comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic modeling indicates that low mode asymmetries and increased ablator surface perturbations may be responsible for the current performance.

  11. A new apparatus to induce lysis of planktonic microbial cells by shock compression, cavitation and spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, A.; Gardner, M. N.; Lynn, R. H.; Tagarielli, V. L.

    2017-03-01

    Experiments were conducted on an aqueous growth medium containing cultures of Escherichia coli (E. coli) XL1-Blue, to investigate, in a single experiment, the effect of two types of dynamic mechanical loading on cellular integrity. A bespoke shock tube was used to subject separate portions of a planktonic bacterial culture to two different loading sequences: (i) shock compression followed by cavitation, and (ii) shock compression followed by spray. The apparatus allows the generation of an adjustable loading shock wave of magnitude up to 300 MPa in a sterile laboratory environment. Cultures of E. coli were tested with this apparatus and the spread-plate technique was used to measure the survivability after mechanical loading. The loading sequence (ii) gave higher mortality than (i), suggesting that the bacteria are more vulnerable to shear deformation and cavitation than to hydrostatic compression. We present the results of preliminary experiments and suggestions for further experimental work; we discuss the potential applications of this technique to sterilize large volumes of fluid samples.

  12. Shock wave and flame front induced detonation in a rapid compression machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Qi, Y.; Xiang, S.; Mével, R.; Wang, Z.

    2018-05-01

    The present study focuses on one mode of detonation initiation observed in a rapid compression machine (RCM). This mode is referred to as shock wave and flame front-induced detonation (SWFID). Experimental high-speed imaging and two-dimensional numerical simulations with skeletal chemistry are combined to unravel the dominant steps of detonation initiation under SWFID conditions. It is shown that the interaction between the shock wave generated by the end-gas auto-ignition and the spherical flame creates a region of high pressure and temperature which enables the acceleration of the flame front and the detonation onset. The experimental observation lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution despite good reproducibility of the detonation onset. Based on the numerical results, phenomenological interpretation of the event within the framework of shock wave refraction indicates that the formation of a free-precursor shock wave at the transition between regular and irregular refraction may be responsible for detonation onset. The present results along with previous findings on shock wave reflection-induced detonation in the RCM indicate that super-knock occurs after the interaction of the shock wave generated by end-gas auto-ignition with the RCM walls, preignition flame, or another shock wave.

  13. Thermophysical properties of shock compressed argon and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, V.E.; Gryaznov, V.K.; Mintsev, V.B.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of the nature of thermodynamic properties and the high level electrical conductivity of substances at high pressures and temperatures is one of the most key issues of physics of high energy densities. So called pressure ionization is one of the most impressive demonstrations of the strong coupling effects in plasma under compression. Noble gases are the simplest object of studying of these phenomena because of absence of molecules and spherical symmetry of their atoms. In the present paper we are trying to have a common look from the chemical plasma picture on the whole available massive of the experimental data on Ar and Xe in a wide range of the parameters: from gaseous densities of 0,01 g/cc and pressures of several kilobars up to extremely high densities corresponding to the insulator-metal transition and megabar pressure range. (orig.)

  14. Strength properties and structure of a submicrocrystalline Al-Mg-Mn alloy under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, A. N.; Brodova, I. G.; Razorenov, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    The results of studying the strength of a submicrocrystalline aluminum A5083 alloy (chemical composition was 4.4Mg-0.6Mn-0.11Si-0.23Fe-0.03Cr-0.02Cu-0.06Ti wt % and Al base) under shockwave compression are presented. The submicrocrystalline structure of the alloy was produced in the process of dynamic channel-angular pressing at a strain rate of 104 s-1. The average size of crystallites in the alloy was 180-460 nm. Hugoniot elastic limit σHEL, dynamic yield stress σy, and the spall strength σSP of the submicrocrystalline alloy were determined based on the free-surface velocity profiles of samples during shock compression. It has been established that upon shock compression, the σHEL and σy of the submicrocrystalline alloy are higher than those of the coarse-grained alloy and σsp does not depend on the grain size. The maximum value of σHEL reached for the submicrocrystalline alloy is 0.66 GPa, which is greater than that in the coarse-crystalline alloy by 78%. The dynamic yield stress is σy = 0.31 GPa, which is higher than that of the coarse-crystalline alloy by 63%. The spall strength is σsp = 1.49 GPa. The evolution of the submicrocrystalline structure of the alloy during shock compression was studied. It has been established that a mixed nonequilibrium grain-subgrain structure with a fragment size of about 400 nm is retained after shock compression, and the dislocation density and the hardness of the alloy are increased.

  15. Thermophysical properties of liquid carbon dioxide under shock compressions: quantum molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping

    2010-10-07

    Quantum molecular dynamics were used to calculate the equation of state, electrical, and optical properties of liquid carbon dioxide along the Hugoniot at shock pressures up to 74 GPa. The principal Hugoniot derived from the calculated equation of state is in good agreement with experimental results. Molecular dissociation and recombination are investigated through pair correlation functions and decomposition of carbon dioxide is found to be between 40 and 50 GPa along the Hugoniot, where nonmetal-metal transition is observed. In addition, the optical properties of shock compressed carbon dioxide are also theoretically predicted along the Hugoniot.

  16. Material failure and inertial instabilities in a shocked imploded cylindrical aluminum sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, E.A.; Egan, P.; Stokes, J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have used the LANL Pegasus Z-pinch facility to drive a thin cylindrically-convergent Al liner to ∼3 km/s to launch ∼30 GPa shocks in a 3-mm thick 10-mm-i.d. aluminum cylinder whose interior is filled with 1 atm Xe gas. The subsequent material motion of the metal and gas is diagnosed with both radial and axial flash x-rays and with optical framing cameras. Instabilities are seeded by implanting wires of assorted higher density metal parallel to the cylinder axis. The authors have done two shots, varying the target from Al 1100-O to Al 6061-T6 to explore the effect of changing material strength. The images show the spallation failure of the metal-gas interface on shock release and the effect of the seeded instabilities

  17. Measurements of ionic structure in shock compressed lithium hydride from ultrafast x-ray Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Brown, C R D; Davis, P; Döppner, T; Falcone, R W; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G; Holst, B; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Morse, E C; Pelka, A; Redmer, R; Roth, M; Vorberger, J; Wünsch, K; Glenzer, S H

    2009-12-11

    We present the first ultrafast temporally, spectrally, and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from shock-compressed matter. The experimental spectra yield the absolute elastic and inelastic scattering intensities from the measured density of free electrons. Laser-compressed lithium-hydride samples are well characterized by inelastic Compton and plasmon scattering of a K-alpha x-ray probe providing independent measurements of temperature and density. The data show excellent agreement with the total intensity and structure when using the two-species form factor and accounting for the screening of ion-ion interactions.

  18. Shock-wave compression of lithium niobate from 2.4 to 44 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, P.L.; Graham, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Shock compression of lithium niobate above the Hugoniot elastic limit (about 2.5 GPa) reveals a succession of unusual features. Just above the Hugoniot elastic limit, the shock velocity is observed to be well below the bulk sound speed, indicative of a drastic reduction of shear strength. The shock velocity is observed to increase with particle velocity at an unusually large rate due to the reduction of strength in a very stiff material and an anomalously large pressure derivative of the bulk modulus. This later behavior may be due to the effects of localized shock heating resulting from heterogeneous shear deformation in ferroelectrics like lithium niobate and lithium tantalate in which increases in temperature are shown to have a strong effect on bulk modulus. A shock-induced polymorphic phase transition occurs at 13.9 GPa. Above the transition point the slope of the Hugoniot curve relating shock velocity and particle velocity is unusually low, indicative of a broad mixed phase region of undetermined extent. Limited work is reported on the isomorphous crystal, lithium tantalate, which exhibits features similar to lithium niobate with a Hugoniot elastic limit of 4 GPa and a phase transition in the vicinity of 19 GPa

  19. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  20. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  1. Birefringence and incipient plastic deformation in elastically overdriven [100] CaF2 under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zhou, X. M.; Cai, Y.; Liu, C. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2018-04-01

    [100] CaF2 single crystals are shock-compressed via symmetric planar impact, and the flyer plate-target interface velocity histories are measured with a laser displacement interferometry. The shock loading is slightly above the Hugoniot elastic limit to investigate incipient plasticity and its kinetics, and its effects on optical properties and deformation inhomogeneity. Fringe patterns demonstrate different features in modulation of fringe amplitude, including birefringence and complicated modulations. The birefringence is attributed to local lattice rotation accompanying incipient plasticity. Spatially resolved measurements show inhomogeneity in deformation, birefringence, and fringe pattern evolutions, most likely caused by the inhomogeneity associated with lattice rotation and dislocation slip. Transiently overdriven elastic states are observed, and the incubation time for incipient plasticity decreases inversely with increasing overdrive by the elastic shock.

  2. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Betti, R.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or “exploding pushers,” generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D{sup 3}He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure {sup 3}He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important in the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations.

  3. Analysis of internal stress and anelasticity in the shock-compressed state from unloading wave data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.N.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Wills, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on time resolved shock-wave measurements have often been used to infer microstructural behavior in crystalline solids. The authors apply this approach to an interpretation of the release-wave response of an aluminum alloy (6061-T6) as it is dynamically unloaded from a shock-compressed state of 20.7 GPa. The anelastic behavior in the initial portion of the unloading wave is attributed to the accumulation of internal stresses created by the shock process. Specific internal-stress models which are investigated are the double pile-up, the single pile-up, and single dislocation loops between pinning points. It is found that the essential characteristics of double and single pile-ups can be represented by a single dislocation between two pinned dislocations of like sing. Calculations of anelastic wave speeds at constant unloading strain rate are then compared with experimental data. The results suggest that the residual internal stress is due to pinned loops of density 10 15 M - 2 , and the viscous drag coefficient in the shock-compressed state is on the order of 10 - 7 MPa s (approximately two orders of magnitude greater than expected under ambient conditions)

  4. Propagation of Shock on NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine Airfoil under Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on numeric analysis of compressible flow around National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL phase VI wind turbine blade airfoil S809. Although wind turbine airfoils are low Reynolds number airfoils, a reasonable investigation of compressible flow under extreme condition might be helpful. A subsonic flow (mach no. M=0.8 has been considered for this analysis and the impacts of this flow under seven different angles of attack have been determined. The results show that shock takes place just after the mid span at the top surface and just before the mid span at the bottom surface at zero angle of attack. Slowly the shock waves translate their positions as angle of attack increases. A relative translation of the shock waves in upper and lower face of the airfoil are presented. Variation of Turbulent viscosity ratio and surface Y+ have also been determined. A k-ω SST turbulent model is considered and the commercial CFD code ANSYS FLUENT is used to find the pressure coefficient (Cp as well as the lift (CL and drag coefficients (CD. A graphical comparison of shock propagation has been shown with different angle of attack. Flow separation and stream function are also determined.

  5. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion

  6. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  7. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  8. The density compression ratio of shock fronts associated with coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Ryun-Young

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method to extract the three-dimensional electron density profile and density compression ratio of shock fronts associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs observed in white light coronagraph images. We demonstrate the method with two examples of fast halo CMEs (∼2000 km s−1 observed on 2011 March 7 and 2014 February 25. Our method uses the ellipsoid model to derive the three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of the fronts. The density profiles of the sheaths are modeled with double-Gaussian functions with four free parameters, and the electrons are distributed within thin shells behind the front. The modeled densities are integrated along the lines of sight to be compared with the observed brightness in COR2-A, and a χ2 approach is used to obtain the optimal parameters for the Gaussian profiles. The upstream densities are obtained from both the inversion of the brightness in a pre-event image and an empirical model. Then the density ratio and Alfvénic Mach number are derived. We find that the density compression peaks around the CME nose, and decreases at larger position angles. The behavior is consistent with a driven shock at the nose and a freely propagating shock wave at the CME flanks. Interestingly, we find that the supercritical region extends over a large area of the shock and lasts longer (several tens of minutes than past reports. It follows that CME shocks are capable of accelerating energetic particles in the corona over extended spatial and temporal scales and are likely responsible for the wide longitudinal distribution of these particles in the inner heliosphere. Our results also demonstrate the power of multi-viewpoint coronagraphic observations and forward modeling in remotely deriving key shock properties in an otherwise inaccessible regime.

  9. Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slough, John

    2011-12-10

    The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus on an experimental demonstration of the macron launcher at full power, and the demonstration

  10. Neurofilaments Function as Shock Absorbers: Compression Response Arising from Disordered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornreich, Micha; Malka-Gibor, Eti; Zuker, Ben; Laser-Azogui, Adi; Beck, Roy

    2016-09-01

    What can cells gain by using disordered, rather than folded, proteins in the architecture of their skeleton? Disordered proteins take multiple coexisting conformations, and often contain segments which act as random-walk-shaped polymers. Using x-ray scattering we measure the compression response of disordered protein hydrogels, which are the main stress-responsive component of neuron cells. We find that at high compression their mechanics are dominated by gaslike steric and ionic repulsions. At low compression, specific attractive interactions dominate. This is demonstrated by the considerable hydrogel expansion induced by the truncation of critical short protein segments. Accordingly, the floppy disordered proteins form a weakly cross-bridged hydrogel, and act as shock absorbers that sustain large deformations without failure.

  11. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy S. Baty, F. Farassat, John A. Hargreaves

    2007-05-25

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  12. Measurements of the equations of state and spectrum of nonideal xenon plasma under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chen, Q. F.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental equations of state on generation of nonideal xenon plasma by intense shock wave compression was presented in the ranges of pressure of 2-16 GPa and temperature of 31-50 kK, and the xenon plasma with the nonideal coupling parameter Γ range from 0.6-2.1 was generated. The shock wave was produced using the flyer plate impact and accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light gas gun. Gaseous specimens were shocked from two initial pressures of 0.80 and 4.72 MPa at room temperature. Time-resolved spectral radiation histories were recorded by using a multiwavelength channel pyrometer. The transient spectra with the wavelength range of 460-700 nm were recorded by using a spectrometer to evaluate the shock temperature. Shock velocity was measured and particle velocity was determined by the impedance matching methods. The equations of state of xenon plasma and ionization degree have been discussed in terms of the self-consistent fluid variational theory.

  13. Measurements of the equations of state and spectrum of nonideal xenon plasma under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chen, Q. F.

    2010-08-01

    Experimental equations of state on generation of nonideal xenon plasma by intense shock wave compression was presented in the ranges of pressure of 2-16 GPa and temperature of 31-50 kK, and the xenon plasma with the nonideal coupling parameter Γ range from 0.6-2.1 was generated. The shock wave was produced using the flyer plate impact and accelerated up to ˜6km/s with a two-stage light gas gun. Gaseous specimens were shocked from two initial pressures of 0.80 and 4.72 MPa at room temperature. Time-resolved spectral radiation histories were recorded by using a multiwavelength channel pyrometer. The transient spectra with the wavelength range of 460-700 nm were recorded by using a spectrometer to evaluate the shock temperature. Shock velocity was measured and particle velocity was determined by the impedance matching methods. The equations of state of xenon plasma and ionization degree have been discussed in terms of the self-consistent fluid variational theory.

  14. Thin Foil Acceleration Method for Measuring the Unloading Isentropes of Shock-Compressed Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.R.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Fortov, V.E.; Kanel, G.I.; Khishchenko, K.V.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Mehlhorn, T.; Razorenov, S.V.; Utkin, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    This work has been performed as part of the search for possible ways to utilize the capabilities of laser and particle beams techniques in shock wave and equation of state physics. The peculiarity of these techniques is that we have to deal with micron-thick targets and not well reproducible incident shock wave parameters, so all measurements should be of a high resolution and be done in one shot. Besides the Hugoniots, the experimental basis for creating the equations of state includes isentropes corresponding to unloading of shock-compressed matter. Experimental isentrope data are most important in the region of vaporization. With guns or explosive facilities, the unloading isentrope is recovered from a series of experiments where the shock wave parameters in plates of standard low-impedance materials placed behind the sample are measured [1,2]. The specific internal energy and specific volume are calculated from the measured p(u) release curve which corresponds to the Riemann integral. This way is not quite suitable for experiments with beam techniques where the incident shock waves are not well reproducible. The thick foil method [3] provides a few experimental points on the isentrope in one shot. When a higher shock impedance foil is placed on the surface of the material studied, the release phase occurs by steps, whose durations correspond to that for the shock wave to go back and forth in the foil. The velocity during the different steps, connected with the knowledge of the Hugoniot of the foil, allows us to determine a few points on the isentropic unloading curve. However, the method becomes insensitive when the low pressure range of vaporization is reached in the course of the unloading. The isentrope in this region can be measured by recording the smooth acceleration of a thin witness plate foil. With the mass of the foil known, measurements of the foil acceleration will give us the vapor pressure

  15. The α-γ-ɛ triple point and phase boundaries of iron under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wu, Qiang; Xue, Tao; Geng, Huayun; Yu, Jidong; Jin, Ke; Li, Jiabo; Tan, Ye; Xi, Feng

    2017-07-01

    The phase transition of iron under shock compression has attracted much attention in recent decades because of its importance in fields such as condensed matter physics, geophysics, and metallurgy. At room temperature, the transition of iron from the α-phase (bcc) to the ɛ-phase (hpc) occurs at a stress of 13 GPa. At high temperature, a triple point followed by transformation to the γ-phase (fcc) is expected. However, the details of the high-temperature phase transitions of iron are still under debate. Here, we investigate the phase-transition behavior of polycrystalline iron under compression from room temperature to 820 K. The results show that the shock-induced phase transition is determined unequivocally from the measured three-wave-structure profiles, which clearly consist of an elastic wave, a plastic wave, and a phase-transition wave. The phase transition is temperature-dependent, with an average rate Δσtr/ΔT of -6.91 MPa/K below 700 K and -34.7 MPa/K at higher temperatures. The shock α-ɛ and α-γ phase boundaries intersect at 10.6 ± 0.53 GPa and 763 K, which agrees with the α-ɛ-γ triple point from early shock wave experiments and recent laser-heated diamond-anvil cell resistivity and in situ X-ray diffraction data but disagrees with the shock pressure-temperature phase diagram reported in 2009 by Zaretsky [J. Appl. Phys. 106, 023510 (2009)].

  16. A volume-filtered formulation to capture particle-shock interactions in multiphase compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    Compressible particle-laden flows are common in engineering systems. Applications include but are not limited to water injection in high-speed jet flows for noise suppression, rocket-plume surface interactions during planetary landing, and explosions during coal mining operations. Numerically, it is challenging to capture these interactions due to the wide range of length and time scales. Additionally, there are many forms of the multiphase compressible flow equations with volume fraction effects, some of which are conflicting in nature. The purpose of this presentation is to develop the capability to accurately capture particle-shock interactions in systems with a large number of particles from dense to dilute regimes. A thorough derivation of the volume filtered equations is presented. The volume filtered equations are then implemented in a high-order, energy-stable Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. We show this framework is capable of decoupling the fluid mesh from the particle size, enabling arbitrary particle size distributions in the presence of shocks. The proposed method is then assessed against particle-laden shock tube data. Quantities of interest include fluid-phase pressure profiles and particle spreading rates. The effect of collisions in 2D and 3D are also evaluated.

  17. Transport in aluminized RDX under shock compression explored using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losada, M; Chaudhuri, S

    2014-01-01

    Shock response of energetic materials is controlled by a combination of mechanical response, thermal, transport, and chemical properties. How these properties interplay in condensed-phase energetic materials is of fundamental interest for improving predictive capabilities. Due to unknown nature of chemistry during the evolution and growth of high-temperature regions within the energetic material (so called hot spots), the connection between reactive and unreactive equations of state contain a high degree of empiricism. In particular, chemistry in materials with high degree of heterogeneity such as aluminized HE is of interest. In order to identify shock compression states and transport properties in high-pressure/temperature (HP-HT) conditions, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction with the multi-scale shock technique (MSST). Mean square displacement calculations enabled us to track the diffusivity of stable gas products. Among decomposition products, H 2 O and CO 2 are found to be the dominant diffusing species under compression conditions. Heat transport and diffusion rates in decomposed RDX are compared and the comparison shows that around 2000 K, transport can be a major contribution during propagation of the reaction front.

  18. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J.; Atzeni, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D 3 He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, N K ) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (N K  ∼ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects

  19. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mros@lle.rochester.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D{sup 3}He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, N{sub K}) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (N{sub K} ∼ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  20. Shock compression behavior of a mixture of cubic and hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaojun; Yang, Gang; Zhao, Bin; Li, Peiyun; Yang, Jun; Leng, Chunwei; Liu, Hanyu; Huang, Haijun; Fei, Yingwei

    2018-05-01

    We report Hugoniot measurements on a mixture of cubic boron nitride (cBN) and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN, ˜10% in weight) to investigate the shock compression behavior of BN at Hugoniot stresses up to 110 GPa. We observed a discontinuity at ˜77 GPa along the Hugoniot and interpreted it as the manifestation of the shock-induced phase transition of hBN to cBN. The experimental stress at 77-110 GPa shows significant deviation from the hydrodynamic Hugoniot of cBN calculated using the Mie-Grüneisen model coupled with the reported 300 K-isotherms of cBN. Our investigation reveals that material strength in cBN increases with the experimental stress at least up to 110 GPa. The material strength might be preserved at higher stress if we consider the previously reported high stress data.

  1. Sound velocity of tantalum under shock compression in the 18–142 GPa range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Feng, E-mail: xifeng@caep.cn; Jin, Ke; Cai, Lingcang, E-mail: cai-lingcang@aliyun.com; Geng, Huayun; Tan, Ye; Li, Jun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Waves and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-102 Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2015-05-14

    Dynamic compression experiments of tantalum (Ta) within a shock pressure range from 18–142 GPa were conducted driven by explosive, a two-stage light gas gun, and a powder gun, respectively. The time-resolved Ta/LiF (lithium fluoride) interface velocity profiles were recorded with a displacement interferometer system for any reflector. Sound velocities of Ta were obtained from the peak state time duration measurements with the step-sample technique and the direct-reverse impact technique. The uncertainty of measured sound velocities were analyzed carefully, which suggests that the symmetrical impact method with step-samples is more accurate for sound velocity measurement, and the most important parameter in this type experiment is the accurate sample/window particle velocity profile, especially the accurate peak state time duration. From these carefully analyzed sound velocity data, no evidence of a phase transition was found up to the shock melting pressure of Ta.

  2. An efficient shock-capturing scheme for simulating compressible homogeneous mixture flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Son Tung; Ha, Cong Tu; Park, Warn Gyu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chul Min [Advanced Naval Technology CenterNSRDI, ADD, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This work is devoted to the development of a procedure for the numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations for cavitating flows with and without ventilation based on a compressible, multiphase, homogeneous mixture model. The governing equations are discretized on a general structured grid using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme in conjunction with appropriate limiters to prevent the generation of spurious solutions near shock waves or discontinuities. Two well-known limiters are examined, and a new limiter is proposed to enhance the accuracy and stability of the numerical scheme. A sensitivity analysis is first conducted to determine the relative influences of various model parameters on the solution. These parameters are adopted for the computation of water flows over a hemispherical body, conical body and a divergent/convergent nozzle. Finally, numerical calculations of ventilated supercavitating flows over a hemispherical cylinder body with a hot propulsive jet are conducted to verify the capabilities of the numerical scheme.

  3. An efficient shock-capturing scheme for simulating compressible homogeneous mixture flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Son Tung; Ha, Cong Tu; Park, Warn Gyu; Jung, Chul Min

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the development of a procedure for the numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations for cavitating flows with and without ventilation based on a compressible, multiphase, homogeneous mixture model. The governing equations are discretized on a general structured grid using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme in conjunction with appropriate limiters to prevent the generation of spurious solutions near shock waves or discontinuities. Two well-known limiters are examined, and a new limiter is proposed to enhance the accuracy and stability of the numerical scheme. A sensitivity analysis is first conducted to determine the relative influences of various model parameters on the solution. These parameters are adopted for the computation of water flows over a hemispherical body, conical body and a divergent/convergent nozzle. Finally, numerical calculations of ventilated supercavitating flows over a hemispherical cylinder body with a hot propulsive jet are conducted to verify the capabilities of the numerical scheme

  4. Phase transitions to 120 GPa for shock-compressed pyrolytic and hot-pressed boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gust, W.H.; Young, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Shock-compression characteristics of two types of hexagonal graphitelike boron nitride have been investigated. Highly oriented very pure pyrolytic boron nitride exhibits shock-velocity versus particle-velocity discontinuities that appear to be manifestations of the initiation of a sluggish phase transition. This transition begins at 20 GPa and is driven to completion (melting) at 75 GPa. Discontinuities in the plot for impure hot-pressed boron nitride indicate initiation at 10 GPa and completion at 20 GPa. The (U/sub s/, U/sub p/) plots follow essentially the same paths for 4.0 < U/sub p/ < 5.2 km/sec. No evidence for a transition to a metalliclike state was seen. Temperature calculations indicate that the material is liquid above approx.80 GPa

  5. Polymerized phase and amorphous diamond synthesized from C60 fullerene by shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, K.; Homae, T.; Nakamura, K.G.; Kondo, K.

    2006-01-01

    C 60 fullerene films were shock compressed to 23 and 52GPa. Both the recovered samples exhibit fracture into platelets and broad photoluminescence, and intensity of these increases with increasing pressure. At 23GPa, a characteristic single broad band appears at 1560-1570cm -1 , which is similar to the one found for three-dimensional (3D) polymerized C 60 fullerene under high-pressure-high-temperature treatment. At 52GPa, on the other hand, the single broad band has disappeared and a diamond peak sometimes appears, depending on platelets

  6. Yield degradation in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions due to shock-driven kinetic fuel-species stratification and viscous heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitano, W. T.; Simakov, A. N.; Chacón, L.; Keenan, B.

    2018-05-01

    Anomalous thermonuclear yield degradation (i.e., that not describable by single-fluid radiation hydrodynamics) in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions is ubiquitously observed in both Omega and National Ignition experiments. Multiple experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the origin of such a degradation. Relative concentration changes of fuel-ion species, as well as kinetically enhanced viscous heating, have been among possible explanations proposed for certain classes of ICF experiments. In this study, we investigate the role of such kinetic plasma effects in detail. To this end, we use the iFP code to perform multi-species ion Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of ICF capsule implosions with the fuel comprising various hydrodynamically equivalent mixtures of deuterium (D) and helium-3 (3He), as in the original Rygg experiments [J. R. Rygg et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. We employ the same computational setup as in O. Larroche [Phys. Plasmas 19, 122706 (2012)], which was the first to simulate the experiments kinetically. However, unlike the Larroche study, and in partial agreement with experimental data, we find a systematic yield degradation in multi-species simulations versus averaged-ion simulations when the D-fuel fraction is decreased. This yield degradation originates in the fuel-ion species stratification induced by plasma shocks, which imprints the imploding system and results in the relocation of the D ions from the core of the capsule to its periphery, thereby reducing the yield relative to a non-separable averaged-ion case. By comparing yields from the averaged-ion kinetic simulations and from the hydrodynamic scaling, we also observe yield variations associated with ion kinetic effects other than fuel-ion stratification, such as ion viscous heating, which is typically neglected in hydrodynamic implosions' simulations. Since our kinetic simulations are driven by hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the

  7. Eulerian derivation of non-inertial Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow in constant, pure rotation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Combrinck, ML

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available be either inertial or non-inertial depending on the cases analyzed. This frame shares an origin with the rotational frame Ô. Frame Ô is the non-inertial, rotational frame and is therefore not orientation preserving. Now consider a point P which can... Descriptions This point is described in frame O from where a modified Galilean transformation, GM, will be used to describe it in frame O’. The rotational transform, RΩt, will then be used to transform the resulting equations (as described in frame O...

  8. Shock waves in gas and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1996-01-01

    A shock wave is a discontinuous surface that connects supersonic flow with subsonic flow. After a shock wave, flow velocity is reduced, and pressure and temperature increase; entropy especially increases across a shock wave. Therefore, flow is in nonequilibrium, and irreversible processes occur inside the shock layer. The thickness of a shock wave in neutral gas is of the order of the mean free path of the fluid particle. A shock wave also appears in magnetized plasma. Provided that when the plasma flow is parallel to the magnetic field, a shock wave appears if the governing equation for velocity potential is in hyperbolic type in relation with the Mach number and the Alfven number. When the flow is perpendicular to the magnetic field, the Maxwell stress, in addition to the pressure, plays a role in the shock wave in plasma. When the plasma temperature is so high, as the plasma becomes collision-free, another type of shock wave appears. In a collision-free shock wave, gyromotions of electrons around the magnetic field lines cause the shock formation instead of collisions in a collision-dominant plasma or neutral gas. Regardless of a collision-dominant or collision-free shock wave, the fluid that passes through the shock wave is heated in addition to being compressed. In inertial confinement fusion, the fuel must be compressed. Really, implosion motion performs fuel compression. A shock wave, appearing in the process of implosion, compresses the fuel. The shock wave, however, heats the fuel more intensively, and it makes it difficult to compress the fuel further because high temperatures invite high pressure. Adiabatic compression of the fuel is the desired result during the implosion, without the formation of a shock wave. (Author)

  9. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Iverson, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  10. Ultra high-speed x-ray imaging of laser-driven shock compression using synchrotron light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbinado, Margie P.; Cantelli, Valentina; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Grenzer, Joerg; Pelka, Alexander; Roedel, Melanie; Prencipe, Irene; Laso Garcia, Alejandro; Helbig, Uwe; Kraus, Dominik; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Tom; Scheel, Mario; Pradel, Pierre; De Resseguier, Thibaut; Rack, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    A high-power, nanosecond pulsed laser impacting the surface of a material can generate an ablation plasma that drives a shock wave into it; while in situ x-ray imaging can provide a time-resolved probe of the shock-induced material behaviour on macroscopic length scales. Here, we report on an investigation into laser-driven shock compression of a polyurethane foam and a graphite rod by means of single-pulse synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging with MHz frame rate. A 6 J, 10 ns pulsed laser was used to generate shock compression. Physical processes governing the laser-induced dynamic response such as elastic compression, compaction, pore collapse, fracture, and fragmentation have been imaged; and the advantage of exploiting the partial spatial coherence of a synchrotron source for studying low-density, carbon-based materials is emphasized. The successful combination of a high-energy laser and ultra high-speed x-ray imaging using synchrotron light demonstrates the potentiality of accessing complementary information from scientific studies of laser-driven shock compression.

  11. A surface-micromachining-based inertial micro-switch with compliant cantilever beam as movable electrode for enduring high shock and prolonging contact time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiu [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Micro/Nano Fabrication, School of Electronics Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Yang, Zhuoqing, E-mail: yzhuoqing@sjtu.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Micro/Nano Fabrication, School of Electronics Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Fu, Bo; Li, Jianhua; Wu, Hao [Huaihai Industrial Group Co., Ltd., Changzhi, Shanxi Province, 046012 (China); Zhang, Qihuan; Sun, Yunna; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Micro/Nano Fabrication, School of Electronics Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • The designed cantilever beam attached to the proof mass can endure a larger shock acceleration (∼1000 g order of magnitude) compared to those traditional designs (∼100 g order of magnitude). • Effect of the pulse width on the threshold acceleration, the response time and the contact time is investigated. • A constraint sleeve structure is introduced to lower the off-axis sensitivity. - Abstract: A novel laterally-driven inertial micro-switch with two L-shaped elastic cantilever beams as the movable electrode, which is attached to the proof mass, is proposed in this paper. The advantage of this design is that the contact time of the inertial micro-switch can be prolonged. Meanwhile, the micro-switch can withstand a higher shock than the traditional designs whose cantilever beams are attached to the fixed electrode. The designed inertial micro-switch was simulated and optimized with ANSYS software and fabricated on a quartz substrate by surface micromachining technology. The simulated result demonstrates that the threshold acceleration (a{sub ths}) under stable switch-on state is about 288 g and the contact time is about 198 μs when the pulse width of acceleration loads is 1 ms. At the same time, it indicates that the threshold acceleration, the response time and the contact time of designed micro-switch all increase with the pulse width of acceleration loads. The simulation of impact process in non-sensitive direction shows that the introduced constraint sleeve structure in the novel inertial micro-switch can lower the off-axis sensitivity. The fabricated micro-switch prototype has been tested by a standard dropping hammer system under shock accelerations with various amplitudes and pulse widths. The experimental measurements show that the contact time is about 150 μs when the threshold acceleration is about 288 g. It also indicates that the response time and the contact time both increase with the pulse width, which is consistent with the

  12. Scaling impact and shock-compression response for porous materials: Application to planetary formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2016-12-01

    A thermodynamic model based on the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state does a good job of describing the response of porous materials to impact, so can provide insights into the accretion and cohesion of planetesimals too small to be significantly held together by gravity (e.g., tens of km or less in average diameter). The model identifies an offset in Hugoniot pressure (ΔPH) due to porosity that is found to be in agreement with experimental shock-compression measurements for samples having a wide range of initial porosities. Assuming the Grüneisen parameter (γ) is proportional to volume (γ/V = constant), the relative offset in Hugoniot pressure as a function of initial porosity (φ = 1 - V0/V0por) and compression (η = 1 - V/V0) is ΔPH/PH = γ0 φ/[2(1 - φ) - γ0 (φ + η(1 - φ))] where subscripts 0 and por represent zero-pressure (non-porous) conditions and a porous sample, respectively. This additional thermal pressure at a given volume is due to the extra internal energy and corresponding temperature increase associated with collapsing pores (Fig. 1: near-identical curves for φ = 0.001 and 0.01). This result can be interpreted as indicating that upon collapse individual pores create hot spots with temperatures of order 103-104K above the background, suggesting that impact into an initially porous target can result in cohesion due to partial melting and vaporization. Moreover, the waste heat associated with pore closure far exceeds the dissipation in shock loading of non-porous material, reflecting the ability of a porous target to absorb and dissipate impact energy. The Mie-Grüneisen model along with analysis of waste heat thus provides a scaling for planetesimal impact that might explain how rock and regolith accrete into a gravitationally bound planet. Fig. 1. Porosity-induced anomaly in Hugoniot temperature per unit of porosity, shown as a function of compression for samples with initial porosity φ = 0.001 (green), 0.01 (blue) and 0.1 (gold) assuming

  13. MMS observations of the Earth bow shock during magnetosphere compression and expansion: comparison of whistler wave properties around the shock ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Schwartz, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft, with their state-of-the-art plasma and field instruments onboard, allow us to investigate electromagnetic waves at the bow shock and their association with small-scale disturbances in the shocked plasmas. Understanding these waves could improve our knowledge on the heating of electrons and ions across the shock ramp and the energy dissipation of supercritical shocks. We have found broad-band and narrow band waves across the shock ramp and slightly downstream. The broad-band waves propagate obliquely to the magnetic field direction and have frequencies up to the electron cyclotron frequency, while the narrow-band waves have frequencies of a few hundred Hertz, durations under a second, and are right-handed circularly polarized and propagate along the magnetic field lines. Both wave types are likely to be whistler mode with different generation mechanisms. When the solar wind pressure changes, MMS occasionally observed a pair of bow shocks when the magnetosphere was compressed and then expanded. We compare the wave observations under these two situations to understand their roles in the shock ramp as well as the upstream and downstream plasmas.

  14. Synchrotron hard X-ray imaging of shock-compressed metal powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This poster will present the application of a new, high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray radiography technique to the study of shock-compressed granular materials. Following plate-impact loading, transmission radiography was used to quantitatively observe the compaction and release processes in a range of high-Z metal powders (e.g. Fe, Ni, Cu). By comparing the predictions of 3D numerical models initialized from X-ray tomograms-captured prior to loading-with experimental results, this research represents a new approach to refining mesoscopic compaction models. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  15. Direct Observation of Strong Ion Coupling in Laser-Driven Shock-Compressed Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravasio, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Loupias, B.; Ozaki, N.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Koenig, M.; Gregori, G.; Daligault, J.; Delserieys, A.; Riley, D.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.

    2007-01-01

    In this Letter we report on a near collective x-ray scattering experiment on shock-compressed targets. A highly coupled Al plasma was generated and probed by spectrally resolving an x-ray source forward scattered by the sample. A significant reduction in the intensity of the elastic scatter was observed, which we attribute to the formation of an incipient long-range order. This speculation is confirmed by x-ray scattering calculations accounting for both electron degeneracy and strong coupling effects. Measurements from rear side visible diagnostics are consistent with the plasma parameters inferred from x-ray scattering data. These results give the experimental evidence of the strongly coupled ionic dynamics in dense plasmas

  16. Experimental study of hot electrons propagation and energy deposition in solid or laser-shock compressed targets: applications to fast igniter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisani, F.

    2000-02-01

    In the fast igniter scheme, a recent approach proposed for the inertial confinement fusion, the idea is to dissociate the fuel ignition phase from its compression. The ignition phase would be then achieved by means of an external energy source: a fast electron beam generated by the interaction with an ultra-intense laser. The main goal of this work is to study the mechanisms of the hot electron energy transfer to the compressed fuel. We intent in particular to study the role of the electric and collisional effects involved in the hot electron propagation in a medium with properties similar to the compressed fuel. We carried out two experiments, one at the Vulcan laser facility (England) and the second one at the new LULI 100 TW laser (France). During the first experiment, we obtained the first results on the hot electron propagation in a dense and hot plasma. The innovating aspect of this work was in particular the use of the laser-shock technique to generate high pressures, allowing the strongly correlated and degenerated plasma to be created. The role of the electric and magnetic effects due to the space charge associated with the fast electron beam has been investigated in the second experiment. Here we studied the propagation in materials with different electrical characteristics: an insulator and a conductor. The analysis of the results showed that only by taking into account simultaneously the two propagation mechanisms (collisions and electric effects) a correct treatment of the energy deposition is possible. We also showed the importance of taking into account the induced modifications due to the electrons beam crossing the target, especially the induced heating. (author)

  17. Solid - solid and solid - liquid phase transitions of iron and iron alloys under laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Krygier, A.; Appel, K.; Galtier, E.; Hartley, N.; Konopkova, Z.; Lee, H. J.; McBride, E. E.; Miyanishi, K.; Nagler, B.; Nemausat, R.; Vinci, T.; Zhu, D.; Ozaki, N.; Fiquet, G.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the properties of iron and iron alloys at high pressures and temperatures is crucial for understanding and modelling planetary interiors. While Earth-size and Super-Earth Exoplanets are being discovered in increasingly large numbers, access to detailed information on liquid properties, melting curves and even solid phases of iron and iron at the pressures and temperatures of their interiors is still strongly limited. In this context, XFEL sources coupled with high-energy lasers afford unique opportunities to measure microscopic structural properties at far extreme conditions. Also the achievable time resolution allows the shock history and phase transition mechanisms to be followed during laser compression, improving our understanding of the high pressure and high strain experiments. Here we present recent studies devoted to investigate the solid-solid and solid-liquid transition in laser-shocked iron and iron alloys (Fe-Si, Fe-C and Fe-O alloys) using X-ray diffraction and X-ray diffuse scattering. Experiment were performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS facility at SLAC (USA). Detection of the diffuse scattering allowed the identification of the first liquid peak position along the Hugoniot, up to 4 Mbar. The time resolution shows ultrafast (between several tens and several hundreds of picoseconds) solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions. Future developments at XFEL facilities will enable detailed studies of the solid and liquid structures of iron and iron alloys as well as out-of-Hugoniot studies.

  18. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO COLLE

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959.

  19. Target design for shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurtz, G; Ribeyre, X; Lafon, M

    2010-01-01

    The conventional approach of laser driven inertial fusion involves the implosion of cryogenic shells of deuterium-tritium ice. At sufficiently high implosion velocities, the fuel ignites by itself from a central hot spot. In order to reduce the risks of hydrodynamic instabilities inherent to large implosion velocities, it was proposed to compress the fuel at low velocity, and ignite the compressed fuel by means of a convergent shock wave driven by an intense spike at the end of the laser pulse. This scheme, known as shock ignition, reduces the risks of shell break-up during the acceleration phase, but it may be impeded by a low coupling efficiency of the laser pulse with plasma at high intensities. This work provides a relationship between the implosion velocity and the laser intensity required to ignite the target by a shock. The operating domain of shock ignition at different energies is described.

  20. Effect of a core-softened O-O interatomic interaction on the shock compression of fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Weingarten, N. Scott; Byrd, Edward F. C.

    2018-03-01

    Isotropic soft-core potentials have attracted considerable attention due to their ability to reproduce thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalies observed in tetrahedral network-forming compounds such as water and silica. The aim of the present work is to assess the relevance of effective core-softening pertinent to the oxygen-oxygen interaction in silica to the thermodynamics and phase change mechanisms that occur in shock compressed fused silica. We utilize the MD simulation method with a recently published numerical interatomic potential derived from an ab initio MD simulation of liquid silica via force-matching. The resulting potential indicates an effective shoulder-like core-softening of the oxygen-oxygen repulsion. To better understand the role of the core-softening we analyze two derivative force-matching potentials in which the soft-core is replaced with a repulsive core either in the three-body potential term or in all the potential terms. Our analysis is further augmented by a comparison with several popular empirical models for silica that lack an explicit core-softening. The first outstanding feature of shock compressed glass reproduced with the soft-core models but not with the other models is that the shock compression values at pressures above 20 GPa are larger than those observed under hydrostatic compression (an anomalous shock Hugoniot densification). Our calculations indicate the occurrence of a phase transformation along the shock Hugoniot that we link to the O-O repulsion core-softening. The phase transformation is associated with a Hugoniot temperature reversal similar to that observed experimentally. With the soft-core models, the phase change is an isostructural transformation between amorphous polymorphs with no associated melting event. We further examine the nature of the structural transformation by comparing it to the Hugoniot calculations for stishovite. For stishovite, the Hugoniot exhibits temperature reversal and associated

  1. Dynamic loads on human and animal surrogates at different test locations in compressed-gas-driven shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alay, E.; Skotak, M.; Misistia, A.; Chandra, N.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic loads on specimens in live-fire conditions as well as at different locations within and outside compressed-gas-driven shock tubes are determined by both static and total blast overpressure-time pressure pulses. The biomechanical loading on the specimen is determined by surface pressures that combine the effects of static, dynamic, and reflected pressures and specimen geometry. Surface pressure is both space and time dependent; it varies as a function of size, shape, and external contour of the specimens. In this work, we used two sets of specimens: (1) anthropometric dummy head and (2) a surrogate rodent headform instrumented with pressure sensors and subjected them to blast waves in the interior and at the exit of the shock tube. We demonstrate in this work that while inside the shock tube the biomechanical loading as determined by various pressure measures closely aligns with live-fire data and shock wave theory, significant deviations are found when tests are performed outside.

  2. Laser-excited optical emission response of CdTe quantum dot/polymer nanocomposite under shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Kang, Zhitao; Summers, Christopher J. [Phosphor Technology Center of Excellence, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); Bansihev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Breidenich, Jennifer; Scripka, David A.; Thadhani, Naresh N. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Zhou, Min, E-mail: min.zhou@gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Laser-driven shock compression experiments and corresponding finite element method simulations are carried out to investigate the blueshift in the optical emission spectra under continuous laser excitation of a dilute composite consisting of 0.15% CdTe quantum dots by weight embedded in polyvinyl alcohol polymer. This material is a potential candidate for use as internal stress sensors. The analyses focus on the time histories of the wavelength blue-shift for shock loading with pressures up to 7.3 GPa. The combined measurements and calculations allow a relation between the wavelength blueshift and pressure for the loading conditions to be extracted. It is found that the blueshift first increases with pressure to a maximum and subsequently decreases with pressure. This trend is different from the monotonic increase of blueshift with pressure observed under conditions of quasistatic hydrostatic compression. Additionally, the blueshift in the shock experiments is much smaller than that in hydrostatic experiments at the same pressure levels. The differences in responses are attributed to the different stress states achieved in the shock and hydrostatic experiments and the time dependence of the mechanical response of the polymer in the composite. The findings offer a potential guide for the design and development of materials for internal stress sensors for shock conditions.

  3. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10 12 and 10 13  W/cm 2 , which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also investigated

  4. Electron transport and shock ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, A R; Tzoufras, M, E-mail: t.bell1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) offers one possible route to commercial energy generation. In the proposed 'shock ignition' route to fusion, the target is compressed at a relatively low temperature and then ignited using high intensity laser irradiation which drives a strong converging shock into the centre of the fuel. With a series of idealized calculations we analyse the electron transport of energy into the target, which produces the pressure responsible for driving the shock. We show that transport in shock ignition lies near the boundary between ablative and heat front regimes. Moreover, simulations indicate that non-local effects are significant in the heat front regime and might lead to increased efficiency by driving the shock more effectively and reducing heat losses to the plasma corona.

  5. Investigation of shock compression in toroidal geometry in the high voltage belt pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeldner, F.

    1977-06-01

    Fast magnetic compression in investigated in the High Voltage Belt Pinch at two initial densities nsub(eo) = 3 x 10 13 cm -3 and nsub(eo) = 7 x 10 13 cm -3 . At the lower density the electrons are heated to 3 keV in the piston region, the ions trapped in the piston obtaining an energy of 0.7 keV. A third of the ions are reflected off the piston attaining an energy of 2.5 keV. At the higher initial density a central β = 1 plasma in formed. Electrons are heated to 1 keV in the sheath, the piston ions obtaining an energy of 0.4 keV. The degree of ion reflection is 60%. Ion acoustic turbulence in both cases dominates the implosion phase and gives rise to the anomalous field diffusion and electron heating observed. Steep electron density and temperature gradients decisively enhance the effective drift velocity for wave growth. The experimental results are compared with numerical calculations using a hybrid code which includes anomalous transport. Scaling studies with the hybrid code in a wider density range show in agreement with the experiment increasing efficiency of shock heating for higher initial densities due to increasing ion reflection. (orig.) [de

  6. High level compressive residual stresses produced in aluminum alloys by laser shock processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Rosas, G.; Rubio-Gonzalez, C.; Ocana, J.L; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J.A.; Chi-Moreno, W.; Morales, M.

    2005-01-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) has been proposed as a competitive alternative technology to classical treatments for improving fatigue and wear resistance of metals. We present a configuration and results for metal surface treatments in underwater laser irradiation at 1064 nm. A convergent lens is used to deliver 1.2 J/cm 2 in a 8 ns laser FWHM pulse produced by 10 Hz Q-switched Nd:YAG, two laser spot diameters were used: 0.8 and 1.5 mm. Results using pulse densities of 2500 pulses/cm 2 in 6061-T6 aluminum samples and 5000 pulses/cm 2 in 2024 aluminum samples are presented. High level of compressive residual stresses are produced -1600 MPa for 6061-T6 Al alloy, and -1400 MPa for 2024 Al alloy. It has been shown that surface residual stress level is higher than that achieved by conventional shot peening and with greater depths. This method can be applied to surface treatment of final metal products

  7. Simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with synchrotron undulator sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M X; Zhang, Y Y; E, J C; Luo, S N

    2018-05-01

    Polychromatic synchrotron undulator X-ray sources are useful for ultrafast single-crystal diffraction under shock compression. Here, simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with realistic undulator sources are reported, based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Purely elastic deformation, elastic-plastic two-wave structure, and severe plastic deformation under different impact velocities are explored, as well as an edge release case. Transmission-mode diffraction simulations consider crystallographic orientation, loading direction, incident beam direction, X-ray spectrum bandwidth and realistic detector size. Diffraction patterns and reciprocal space nodes are obtained from atomic configurations for different loading (elastic and plastic) and detection conditions, and interpretation of the diffraction patterns is discussed.

  8. Simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with synchrotron undulator sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, M. X.; Zhang, Y. Y.; E, J. C.; Luo, S. N.

    2018-04-24

    Polychromatic synchrotron undulator X-ray sources are useful for ultrafast single-crystal diffraction under shock compression. Here, simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with realistic undulator sources are reported, based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Purely elastic deformation, elastic–plastic two-wave structure, and severe plastic deformation under different impact velocities are explored, as well as an edge release case. Transmission-mode diffraction simulations consider crystallographic orientation, loading direction, incident beam direction, X-ray spectrum bandwidth and realistic detector size. Diffraction patterns and reciprocal space nodes are obtained from atomic configurations for different loading (elastic and plastic) and detection conditions, and interpretation of the diffraction patterns is discussed.

  9. Nitro Stretch Probing of a Single Molecular Layer to Monitor Shock Compression with Picosecond Time-Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher; Lagutchev, Alexei; Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2011-06-01

    To obtain maximum possible temporal resolution, laser-driven shock compression of a molecular monolayer was studied using vibrational spectroscopy. The stretching transitions of nitro groups bound to aromatic rings was monitored using a nonlinear coherent infrared spectroscopy termed sum-frequency generation, which produced high-quality signals from this very thin layer. To overcome the shock opacity problem, a novel polymer overcoat method allowed us to make the observation window (witness plate) a few micrometers thick. The high signal-to-noise ratios (>100:1) obtained via this spectroscopy allowed us to study detailed behavior of the shocked molecules. To help interpret these vibrational spectra, additional spectra were obtained under conditions of static pressures up to 10 GPa and static temperatures up to 1000 C. Consequently, this experiment represents a significant step in resolving molecular dynamics during shock compression and unloading with both high spatial and temporal resolution. Supported by the Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliance Program from the Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center under grant number DOE CIW 4-3253-13 and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under award number FAA9550-09-1-0163.

  10. Time-resolved light emission of a, c, and r-cut sapphires shock-compressed to 65 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. C.; Zhou, X. M.

    2018-04-01

    To investigate light emission and dynamic deformation behaviors, sapphire (single crystal Al2O3) samples with three crystallographic orientations (a, c, and r-cut) were shock-compressed by the planar impact method, with final stress ranges from 47 to 65 GPa. Emission radiance and velocity versus time profiles were simultaneously measured with a fast pyrometer and a Doppler pin system in each experiment. Wave profile results show anisotropic elastic-plastic transitions, which confirm the literature observations. Under final shock stress of about 52 GPa, lower emission intensity is observed in the r-cut sample, in agreement with the previous report in the literature. When final shock stress increases to 57 GPa and 65 GPa, spectral radiance histories of the r-cut show two stages of distinct features. In the first stage, the emission intensity of r-cut is lower than those of the other two, which agrees with the previous report in the literature. In the second stage, spectral radiance of r-cut increases with time at much higher rate and it finally peaks over those of the a and c-cut. These observations (conversion of intensified emission in the r-cut) may indicate activation of a second slip system and formation of shear bands which are discussed with the resolved shear stress calculations for the slip systems in each of the three cuts under shock compression.

  11. Uncertainty Assessments of 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave - Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Simulations at Compression Corners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Berry, Scott A.; VanNorman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of five papers in a special session organized by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that addresses uncertainty assessments for CFD simulations in hypersonic flow. Simulations of a shock emanating from a compression corner and interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer are evaluated herein. Mission relevant conditions at Mach 7 and Mach 14 are defined for a pre-compression ramp of a scramjet powered vehicle. Three compression angles are defined, the smallest to avoid separation losses and the largest to force a separated flow engaging more complicated flow physics. The Baldwin-Lomax and the Cebeci-Smith algebraic models, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model with the Catrix-Aupoix compressibility modification and two-equation models including Menter SST, Wilcox k-omega 98, and Wilcox k-omega 06 turbulence models are evaluated. Each model is fully defined herein to preclude any ambiguity regarding model implementation. Comparisons are made to existing experimental data and Van Driest theory to provide preliminary assessment of model form uncertainty. A set of coarse grained uncertainty metrics are defined to capture essential differences among turbulence models. Except for the inability of algebraic models to converge for some separated flows there is no clearly superior model as judged by these metrics. A preliminary metric for the numerical component of uncertainty in shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions at compression corners sufficiently steep to cause separation is defined as 55%. This value is a median of differences with experimental data averaged for peak pressure and heating and for extent of separation captured in new, grid-converged solutions presented here. This value is consistent with existing results in a literature review of hypersonic shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions by Roy and Blottner and with more recent computations of MacLean.

  12. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10 4 T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ∼50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities

  13. Demonstration of radiation pulse shaping with nested-tungsten-wire-array pinches for high-yield inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Sinars, D B; Chittenden, J P; Waisman, E M; Lemke, R W; Lebedev, S V; Bliss, D E; Stygar, W A; Porter, J L; Schroen, D G; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Mehlhorn, T A

    2005-10-28

    Nested wire-array pinches are shown to generate soft x-ray radiation pulse shapes required for three-shock isentropic compression and hot-spot ignition of high-yield inertial confinement fusion capsules. We demonstrate a reproducible and tunable foot pulse (first shock) produced by interaction of the outer and inner arrays. A first-step pulse (second shock) is produced by inner array collision with a central CH2 foam target. Stagnation of the inner array at the axis produces the third shock. Capsules optimized for several of these shapes produce 290-900 MJ fusion yields in 1D simulations.

  14. Shock compression of glow discharge polymer (GDP): density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments on Sandia's Z-machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Cochrane, K. R.; Ao, T.; Lemke, R. W.; Flicker, D. G.; Schoff, M. E.; Blue, B. E.; Hamel, S.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Glow discharge polymer (GDP) is used extensively as capsule/ablation material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. Accurate knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) under shock and release is particularly important for high-fidelity design, analysis, and optimization of ICF experiments since the capsule material is subject to several converging shocks as well as release towards the cryogenic fuel. We performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, to gain knowledge of the behavior of GDP - including the effect of changes in chemical composition. The shock pressures calculated from DFT are compared experimental data taken on magnetically launched flyer plate impact experiments on at Sandia's Z-machine. Large GDP samples were grown in a planar geometry to improve the sample quality and maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere following manufacturing, thus allowing for a direct comparison to the DFT/QMD simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Simulations of Converging Shock Collisions for Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Dodd, Evan; Loomis, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) has been proposed as an alternative to achieving high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. A central hot spot below the ignition threshold is created by an initial compression pulse, and a second laser pulse drives a strong converging shock into the fuel. The collision between the rebounding shock from the compression pulse and the converging shock results in amplification of the converging shock and increases the hot spot pressure above the ignition threshold. We investigate shock collision in SI drive schemes for cylindrical targets with a polystyrene foam interior using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with the RAGE code. The configuration is similar to previous targets fielded on the Omega laser. The CH interior results in a lower convergence ratio and the cylindrical geometry facilitates visualization of the shock transit using an axial X-ray backlighter, both of which are important for comparison to potential experimental measurements. One-dimensional simulations are used to determine shock timing, and the effects of low mode asymmetries in 2D computations are also quantified. LA-UR-16-24773.

  16. Process and application of shock compression by nanosecond pulses of frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yuji; Kimura, Motohiko; Mukai, Naruhiko; Yoda, Masaki; Obata, Minoru; Ogisu, Tatsuki

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed a new process of laser-induced shock compression to introduce a residual compressive stress on material surface, which is effective for prevention of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and enhancement of fatigue strength of metal materials. The process developed is unique and beneficial. It requires no pre-conditioning for the surface, whereas the conventional process requires that the so-called sacrificial layer is made to protect the surface from damage. The new process can be freely applied to water- immersed components, since it uses water-penetrable green light of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The process developed has the potential to open up new high-power laser applications in manufacturing and maintenance technologies. The laser-induced shock compression process (LSP) can be used to improve a residual stress field from tensile to compressive. In order to understand the physics and optimize the process, the propagation of a shock wave generated by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the material were analyzed by time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program using laser-induced plasma pressure as an external load. The analysis shows that a permanent strain and a residual compressive stress remain after the passage of the shock wave with amplitude exceeding the yield strength of the material. A practical system materializing the LSP was designed, manufactured, and tested to confirm the applicability to core components of light water reactors (LWRs). The system accesses the target component and remotely irradiates laser pulses to the heat affected zone (HAZ) along weld lines. Various functional tests were conducted using a full-scale mockup facility, in which remote maintenance work in a reactor vessel could be simulated. The results showed that the system remotely accessed the target weld lines and successfully introduced a residual compressive stress. After sufficient training

  17. Shock compression of strongly correlated oxides: A liquid-regime equation of state for cerium(IV) oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Cochrane, Kyle R.; Root, Seth; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Shulenburger, Luke; Carpenter, John H.; Sjostrom, Travis; Mattsson, Thomas R.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2018-03-01

    The shock Hugoniot for full-density and porous CeO2 was investigated in the liquid regime using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations with Erpenbeck's approach based on the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. The phase space was sampled by carrying out NVT simulations for isotherms between 6000 and 100 000 K and densities ranging from ρ =2.5 to 20 g /cm3 . The impact of on-site Coulomb interaction corrections +U on the equation of state (EOS) obtained from AIMD simulations was assessed by direct comparison with results from standard density functional theory simulations. Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations were also performed to model atomic-scale shock compression of larger porous CeO2 models. Results from AIMD and CMD compression simulations compare favorably with Z-machine shock data to 525 GPa and gas-gun data to 109 GPa for porous CeO2 samples. Using results from AIMD simulations, an accurate liquid-regime Mie-Grüneisen EOS was built for CeO2. In addition, a revised multiphase SESAME-type EOS was constrained using AIMD results and experimental data generated in this work. This study demonstrates the necessity of acquiring data in the porous regime to increase the reliability of existing analytical EOS models.

  18. Equation of state of laser-shocked compressed iron; Equation d'etat du fer comprime par choc laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huser, G

    2004-01-01

    This thesis enters the field of highly compressed materials equation of state studies. In particular, it focuses on the case of laser shock compressed iron. This work indeed aims at getting to the conditions of the earth's core, comprising a solid inner core and a liquid outer core. The understanding of phenomena governing the core's thermodynamics and the geodynamic process requires the knowledge of iron melting line locus around the solid-liquid interface at 3.3 Mbar. Several experiments were performed to that extent. First, an absolute measurement of iron Hugoniot was obtained. Following is a study of partially released states of iron into a window material: lithium fluoride (LiF). This configuration enables direct access to compressed iron optical properties such as reflectivity and self-emission. Interface velocity measurement is dominated by compressed LiF optical properties and is used as a pressure gauge. Using a dual wavelength reflectivity diagnostic, compressed iron electrical conductivity was estimated and found to be in good agreement with previous results found in geophysics literature. Self-emission diagnostic was used to measure temperature of partially released iron and revealed a solid-liquid phase transition at Mbar pressures. (author)

  19. Effects of non-local electron transport in one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marocchino, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma 00161 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    In some regions of a laser driven inertial fusion target, the electron mean-free path can become comparable to or even longer than the electron temperature gradient scale-length. This can be particularly important in shock-ignited (SI) targets, where the laser-spike heated corona reaches temperatures of several keV. In this case, thermal conduction cannot be described by a simple local conductivity model and a Fick's law. Fluid codes usually employ flux-limited conduction models, which preserve causality, but lose important features of the thermal flow. A more accurate thermal flow modeling requires convolution-like non-local operators. In order to improve the simulation of SI targets, the non-local electron transport operator proposed by Schurtz-Nicolaï-Busquet [G. P. Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] has been implemented in the DUED fluid code. Both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) simulations of SI targets have been performed. 1D simulations of the ablation phase highlight that while the shock profile and timing might be mocked up with a flux-limiter; the electron temperature profiles exhibit a relatively different behavior with no major effects on the final gain. The spike, instead, can only roughly be reproduced with a fixed flux-limiter value. 1D target gain is however unaffected, provided some minor tuning of laser pulses. 2D simulations show that the use of a non-local thermal conduction model does not affect the robustness to mispositioning of targets driven by quasi-uniform laser irradiation. 2D simulations performed with only two final polar intense spikes yield encouraging results and support further studies.

  20. Effects of non-local electron transport in one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marocchino, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2014-01-01

    In some regions of a laser driven inertial fusion target, the electron mean-free path can become comparable to or even longer than the electron temperature gradient scale-length. This can be particularly important in shock-ignited (SI) targets, where the laser-spike heated corona reaches temperatures of several keV. In this case, thermal conduction cannot be described by a simple local conductivity model and a Fick's law. Fluid codes usually employ flux-limited conduction models, which preserve causality, but lose important features of the thermal flow. A more accurate thermal flow modeling requires convolution-like non-local operators. In order to improve the simulation of SI targets, the non-local electron transport operator proposed by Schurtz-Nicolaï-Busquet [G. P. Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] has been implemented in the DUED fluid code. Both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) simulations of SI targets have been performed. 1D simulations of the ablation phase highlight that while the shock profile and timing might be mocked up with a flux-limiter; the electron temperature profiles exhibit a relatively different behavior with no major effects on the final gain. The spike, instead, can only roughly be reproduced with a fixed flux-limiter value. 1D target gain is however unaffected, provided some minor tuning of laser pulses. 2D simulations show that the use of a non-local thermal conduction model does not affect the robustness to mispositioning of targets driven by quasi-uniform laser irradiation. 2D simulations performed with only two final polar intense spikes yield encouraging results and support further studies

  1. Effects of non-local electron transport in one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchino, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2014-01-01

    In some regions of a laser driven inertial fusion target, the electron mean-free path can become comparable to or even longer than the electron temperature gradient scale-length. This can be particularly important in shock-ignited (SI) targets, where the laser-spike heated corona reaches temperatures of several keV. In this case, thermal conduction cannot be described by a simple local conductivity model and a Fick's law. Fluid codes usually employ flux-limited conduction models, which preserve causality, but lose important features of the thermal flow. A more accurate thermal flow modeling requires convolution-like non-local operators. In order to improve the simulation of SI targets, the non-local electron transport operator proposed by Schurtz-Nicolaï-Busquet [G. P. Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] has been implemented in the DUED fluid code. Both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) simulations of SI targets have been performed. 1D simulations of the ablation phase highlight that while the shock profile and timing might be mocked up with a flux-limiter; the electron temperature profiles exhibit a relatively different behavior with no major effects on the final gain. The spike, instead, can only roughly be reproduced with a fixed flux-limiter value. 1D target gain is however unaffected, provided some minor tuning of laser pulses. 2D simulations show that the use of a non-local thermal conduction model does not affect the robustness to mispositioning of targets driven by quasi-uniform laser irradiation. 2D simulations performed with only two final polar intense spikes yield encouraging results and support further studies.

  2. Shock compression parameters for a boron-loaded, silicone-rubber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gust, W.H.; Van Thiel, M.; Gathers, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    Hugoniot parameters under uniaxial-shock-wave-loading from 0.03 to 0.6 Mbar are presented for a composite with 70 wt percent boron loaded in a silicone-rubber matrix. The plot of shock velocity vs particle velocity was found to be nonlinear. Equations that describe fits of the data are presented. (U.S.)

  3. MacCormack's technique-based pressure reconstruction approach for PIV data in compressible flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shun; Xu, Jinglei; Yu, Kaikai

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes an improved approach for extraction of pressure fields from velocity data, such as obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV), especially for steady compressible flows with strong shocks. The principle of this approach is derived from Navier-Stokes equations, assuming adiabatic condition and neglecting viscosity of flow field boundaries measured by PIV. The computing method is based on MacCormack's technique in computational fluid dynamics. Thus, this approach is called the MacCormack method. Moreover, the MacCormack method is compared with several approaches proposed in previous literature, including the isentropic method, the spatial integration and the Poisson method. The effects of velocity error level and PIV spatial resolution on these approaches are also quantified by using artificial velocity data containing shock waves. The results demonstrate that the MacCormack method has higher reconstruction accuracy than other approaches, and its advantages become more remarkable with shock strengthening. Furthermore, the performance of the MacCormack method is also validated by using synthetic PIV images with an oblique shock wave, confirming the feasibility and advantage of this approach in real PIV experiments. This work is highly significant for the studies on aerospace engineering, especially the outer flow fields of supersonic aircraft and the internal flow fields of ramjets.

  4. Influence of deposited nanoparticles on the spall strength of metals under the action of picosecond pulses of shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, A. A.; Mayer, A. E.

    2018-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations of the generation and propagation of shock pulses of picosecond duration initiated by nanoscale impactors, and their interaction with the rear surface is carried out for aluminum and copper. It is shown that the presence of deposited nanoparticles on the rear surface increases the threshold value of the impact intensity leading to the rear spallation. The interaction of a shock wave with nanoparticles leads to severe plastic deformation in the surface layer of the metal including nanoparticles. A part of the compression pulse energy is expended on the plastic deformation, which suppresses the spall fracture. Spallation threshold substantially increases at large diameters of deposited nanoparticles, but instability develops on the rear surface of the target, which is accompanied by ejection of droplets. The instability disrupts the integrity of the rear surface, though the loss of integrity occurs through the ejection of mass, rather than a spallation.

  5. Compression of an Applied Bz field by a z-pinch onto a Tamped DT Fiber for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Simulations of a z-pinch compressing an applied 100 kG Bz field onto an on-axis DT fiber tamped with beryllium show the field reaching over 100 MG in the tamp, sufficient to confine DT alpha particles and to form a thermal barrier. The barrier allows the DT plasma to burn at a rho*r value as low as 0.045 g/cm^2, and at temperatures over 50 keV for a 63 MA drive current. Driving currents between 21 and 63 MA are considered with cryogenic DT fiber diameters between 600 μm and 1.6 mm. Pinch implosion times are 120 ns with a peak implosion velocity of 35 cm/μs. 1D simulations are of a foil pinch, but for improved stability we propose a nested wire-array. Simulated fusion yields with this system scale as the sixth power of the current, with burn fractions scaling as the fourth power of the current. At 63 MA the simulated yield is 521 MJ from 4.2 mg/cm of DT with a 37% burn fraction at a rho*r of only 0.18 g/cm^2.

  6. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhitao [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N., E-mail: naresh.thadhani@mse.gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Zhou, Min [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  7. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N.; Xiao, Pan; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  8. Multi-scale description of the laser-plasma interaction: application to the physics of shock ignition in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaitis, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript presents a novel formulation of the Laser-Plasma Interaction (LPI) at hydrodynamical scales, that couples the plasma dynamics with linear and nonlinear LPI processes. The standard Ray Tracing model, based on Geometrical Optics, is not well suited for that purpose because it does not readily describe the laser intensity distribution in plasma. We propose an alternative model formulated for a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code. It is based on the ray-based Paraxial Complex Geometrical Optics (PCGO) that describes Gaussian optical beamlets. A method for modeling non-Gaussian laser beams smoothed by Phase Plates is presented, that allows to create intensity variations that reproduce the beam envelope, contrast and high-intensity statistics predicted by paraxial laser propagation codes. We propose in line reduced models for the non-linear laser-plasma interaction, in the case of the Cross-Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) and the generation of Hot Electrons (HE). The in line CBET model is validated against a time-dependent conventional paraxial electromagnetic wave propagation code, in a well-defined plasma configuration with density and velocity profiles corresponding to an inhomogeneous plasma. Good agreement is found past a transient period on the picosecond time scale, notably for the spatial distribution of density perturbations and laser intensities in the interaction region. Application of the model to a direct-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) configuration shows that CBET significantly degrades the irradiation symmetry by amplifying low frequency modes and reducing the laser-capsule coupling efficiency, ultimately leading to large modulations of the shell areal density and lower convergence ratios. The LPI/HE model predicts the HE fluxes, temperatures, angular dispersion and direction from the laser intensity of PCGO beamlets from simplified expressions based on theoretical models and scaling laws obtained in kinetic simulations. The HE beams

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed heterogeneous materials. II. The graphite/diamond transition case for astrophysics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, N.; Soulard, L.; Colombet, L.; Carrard, T.; Pellé, A.; Gillet, Ph.; Clérouin, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the shock compression of copper matrices containing a single graphite inclusion: these model systems can be related to some specific carbon-rich rocks which, after a meteoritic impact, are found to contain small fractions of nanodiamonds embedded in graphite in the vicinity of high impedance minerals. We show that the graphite to diamond transformation occurs readily for nanometer-sized graphite inclusions, via a shock accumulation process, provided the pressure threshold of the bulk graphite/diamond transition is overcome, independently of the shape or size of the inclusion. Although high diamond yields (˜80%) are found after a few picoseconds in all cases, the transition is non-isotropic and depends substantially on the relative orientation of the graphite stack with respect to the shock propagation, leading to distinct nucleation processes and size-distributions of the diamond grains. A substantial regraphitization process occurs upon release and only inclusions with favorable orientations likely lead to the preservation of a fraction of this diamond phase. These results agree qualitatively well with the recent experimental observations of meteoritic impact samples.

  10. A simple, robust and efficient high-order accurate shock-capturing scheme for compressible flows: Towards minimalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwada, Taku; Shibata, Yuki; Kato, Takuma; Nakamura, Taichi

    2018-06-01

    Developed is a high-order accurate shock-capturing scheme for the compressible Euler/Navier-Stokes equations; the formal accuracy is 5th order in space and 4th order in time. The performance and efficiency of the scheme are validated in various numerical tests. The main ingredients of the scheme are nothing special; they are variants of the standard numerical flux, MUSCL, the usual Lagrange's polynomial and the conventional Runge-Kutta method. The scheme can compute a boundary layer accurately with a rational resolution and capture a stationary contact discontinuity sharply without inner points. And yet it is endowed with high resistance against shock anomalies (carbuncle phenomenon, post-shock oscillations, etc.). A good balance between high robustness and low dissipation is achieved by blending three types of numerical fluxes according to physical situation in an intuitively easy-to-understand way. The performance of the scheme is largely comparable to that of WENO5-Rusanov, while its computational cost is 30-40% less than of that of the advanced scheme.

  11. Structure of boron nitride after the high-temperature shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdyumov, A.V.; Ostrovskaya, N.F.; Pilipenko, V.A.; Pilyankevich, A.N.; Savvakin, G.I.; Trefilov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    Boron nitride structure changes as a result of high temperature dynamic compression are studied. The X-ray technique and transmission electron microscopy have been applied. The data on the structure and regularities of formation of diamond-like modifications of boron nitride at high temperature impact compression permit to consider martensite transformation as the first stage of formation of the sphalerite phase stable at high pressures. The second stage is possible if the temperature at the impact moment is sufficiently high for intensive diffusion processes

  12. Estimation of fracture conditions of ceramics by thermal shock with laser beams based on the maximum compressive stress criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Shigeru; Amada, Shigeyasu.

    1992-01-01

    Structural ceramics are attracting attention in the development of space planes, aircraft and nuclear fusion reactors because they have excellent wear-resistant and heat-resistant characteristics. However, in some applications it is anticipated that they will be exposed to very-high-temperature environments of the order of thousands of degrees. Therefore, it is very important to investigate their thermal shock characteristics. In this report, the distributions of temperatures and thermal stresses of cylindrically shaped ceramics under irradiation by laser beams are discussed using the finite-element computer code (MARC) with arbitrary quadrilateral axisymmetric ring elements. The relationships between spot diameters of laser beams and maximum values of compressive thermal stresses are derived for various power densities. From these relationships, a critical fracture curve is obtained, and it is compared with the experimental results. (author)

  13. Deformation of depleted uranium - 0.78 Ti under shock compression to 11.0 GPa at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.; Martin, A.G.; Kelley, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    The present work on depleted uranium alloyed with 0.78% titanium by weight (i.e., U-0.8 Ti) describes the nature of deformation it undergoes when subjected to shock compression at room temperature. The principal results emerging out of the present work are: (1) The stress limits of elastic deformation are dependent on the thickness of U-0.8Ti. The stress limit decreases from over 3.0 GPa at the impact surface to 1.2 GPa at a depth of 9 mm in U-0.8 Ti; (2) The lower limit of the stress agrees with the static yield stress in U-0.8 Ti; (3) Above the elastic stress limit, the deformation of U-0.8 Ti proceeds in a manner of the ideal plastic solid; and (4) The pressure derivative of Lame's parameter of U-0.8 Ti is estimated to be 3.8

  14. Shock-front compression of the magnetic field in the Canis Majoris R1 star-formation region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrba, F.J.; Baierlein, R.; Herbst, W.; Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT; Van Vleck Observatory, Middletown, CT)

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a linear polarization survey at optical wavelengths of over 140 stars in the direction of the CMa R1 star-formation region; 26 of these are clearly associated with nebulosity within the area. The observations were obtained in order to test the argument of Herbst et al. (1978) that star formation in CMa R1 is driven by a shock wave from a nearby supernova (Herbs and Assousa, 1977 and 1978). The polarizations are found to be consistent with a simple model of the compression by a supernova-induced spherical shock front of an initially uniform interstellar magnetic field. The polarization vectors are inconsistent with a scenario of quiescent cloud collapse along magnetic-field lines. Multicolor polarimetry of the nebular stars provides evidence of grain growth toward increasing cloud optical depth, characterized by a ratio of total-to-selective extinction of R = 3.0 at E(B-V) = 0.23, increasing to R = 4.2 at E(B-V) = 0.7. 15 references

  15. Survey of compressions in the SW (1 AU), and after termination shock at Voyager (in sheath & LISM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.

    2017-12-01

    Examples of the plasma compression as it is observed in the solar wind at 1 AU with the suite of instruments in the SC Wind, and after the termination shock with both Voyager SC, as well as with Voyager 1 in the local interstellar medium (LISM) are presented. The work will focus on similarities and differences in the observations at the different locations. At priory is fair to mention that the 4 regions differ in several aspects. At 1 AU the solar wind (SW) flow is mostly alfvenic. In the sheath after the termination shock the possibly subsonic solar wind is mostly compressional but fluctuation modes in scales of one hour are much less observed at Voyager 1 than at Voyager 2 path. Finally Burlaga and Ness1 documented the nature of the compressional flow in the `depletion' layer at the start of the LISM as well later in this medium, showing the low plasma-beta character of this LISM region in Voyager 1 path. 1Burlaga L.F., and N. Ness, ApJ, 784, 146 (14pp), 2014.

  16. Assessing mesoscale material response under shock & isentropic compression via high-resolution line-imaging VISAR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Clint Allen; Furnish, Michael David; Podsednik, Jason W.; Reinhart, William Dodd; Trott, Wayne Merle; Mason, Joshua

    2003-10-01

    Of special promise for providing dynamic mesoscale response data is the line-imaging VISAR, an instrument for providing spatially resolved velocity histories in dynamic experiments. We have prepared two line-imaging VISAR systems capable of spatial resolution in the 10-20 micron range, at the Z and STAR facilities. We have applied this instrument to selected experiments on a compressed gas gun, chosen to provide initial data for several problems of interest, including: (1) pore-collapse in copper (two variations: 70 micron diameter hole in single-crystal copper) and (2) response of a welded joint in dissimilar materials (Ta, Nb) to ramp loading relative to that of a compression joint. The instrument is capable of resolving details such as the volume and collapse history of a collapsing isolated pore.

  17. Design and Testing of CO2 Compression Using Supersonic Shock Wave Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, Aaron [Seattle Technology Center, Bellevue, WA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Ramgen and subcontractors in pursuit of the design and construction of a 10 MW supersonic CO2 compressor and supporting facility. The compressor will demonstrate application of Ramgen’s supersonic compression technology at an industrial scale using CO2 in a closed-loop. The report includes details of early feasibility studies, CFD validation and comparison to experimental data, static test experimental results, compressor and facility design and analyses, and development of aerodynamic tools. A summary of Ramgen's ISC Engine program activity is also included. This program will demonstrate the adaptation of Ramgen's supersonic compression and advanced vortex combustion technology to result in a highly efficient and cost effective alternative to traditional gas turbine engines. The build out of a 1.5 MW test facility to support the engine and associated subcomponent test program is summarized.

  18. A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the NIF (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Sèguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Magoon, J.; Agliata, A.; Shoup, M.; Glebov, V. U.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ayers, S.; Bailey, C. G.; Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock- and compression-bang time using D{sup 3}He-fusion protons and DD-fusion neutrons, respectively, at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This capability, in combination with shock-burn weighted areal density measurements, will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. This design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which records bang times using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D902 (2012)]. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase D{sup 3}He-proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for the first time simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D{sup 3}He-filled surrogate implosions at the NIF.

  19. A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the NIF (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H G; Sio, H; Frenje, J A; Magoon, J; Agliata, A; Shoup, M; Ayers, S; Bailey, C G; Gatu Johnson, M; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Sèguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Kimbrough, J R; Mackinnon, A; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Clancy, T; Zacharias, R; House, A; Döppner, T; Park, H S; LePape, S; Landen, O; Meezan, N; Robey, H; Glebov, V U; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Li, C; Parat, J; Olson, R; Kline, J; Kilkenny, J

    2014-11-01

    A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock- and compression-bang time using D(3)He-fusion protons and DD-fusion neutrons, respectively, at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This capability, in combination with shock-burn weighted areal density measurements, will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. This design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which records bang times using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D902 (2012)]. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase D(3)He-proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for the first time simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D(3)He-filled surrogate implosions at the NIF.

  20. Equation of state and shock compression of carbon-hydrogen and other ablator materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Militzer, B.; Whitley, H.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic compression experiments in planetary interior studies and fusion sciences often implement carbon-hydrogen or other low-Z elements or compounds as ablators. Accurate quantum simulations of these materials enables theoretical investigation of the equation of state (EOS) over temperatures and pressures that are difficult to access experimentally, and can help guide the design of targets for future experiments. In this work, we use path integral Monte Carlo and density functional molecular dynamics to calculate the equation of state of a series of hydrocarbons and other low-Z materials (B, B4C, and BN). For the hydrocarbon with C:H=1:1, we predict the pressure-compression profile to agree remarkably with experiments at low pressures. At high pressures, we find the Hugoniot curve displays a single compression maximum of 4.7 that corresponds to K-shell ionization. This is slightly higher than that of glow-discharge polymers but both occur at the same pressure (0.47 Gbar). We study the linear mixing approximation for the EOS of hydrocarbons and demonstrate its validity at stellar core conditions. We examine the sensitivity of the fusion yield to the EOS of these candidate ablator materials in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of a direct-drive implosion. We also make detailed comparisons of the EOS and atomic and electronic structure of C and BN, which is useful for systematic improvement of existing EOS models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Reply to ''Comment on 'Thermocouple temperature measurements in shock-compressed solids' ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomquist, D.D.; Sheffield, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    We disagree with the interpretation offered in the above comment. The suggestion was made that the anomalously fast response of thin-foil thermocouples reported previously is the result of strain dependence of the thermocouple response and not shock enhanced thermal equilibration. Although the emplacement geometry has a profound effect on the response of embedded thin-foil temperature gauges as noted in the above comment, the evidence presented, along with recent results discussed in this reply, do not support the conclusions presented in the above comment

  2. Elastic precursor wave decay in shock-compressed aluminum over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the dynamic flow behavior of aluminum is considered in the context of precursor wave decay measurements and simulations. In this regard, a dislocation-based model of high-rate metal plasticity is brought into agreement with previous measurements of evolving wave profiles at 300 to 933 K, wherein the amplification of the precursor structure with temperature arises naturally from the dislocation mechanics treatment. The model suggests that the kinetics of inelastic flow and stress relaxation are governed primarily by phonon scattering and radiative damping (sound wave emission from dislocation cores), both of which intensify with temperature. The manifestation of these drag effects is linked to low dislocation density ahead of the precursor wave and the high mobility of dislocations in the face-centered cubic lattice. Simulations performed using other typical models of shock wave plasticity do not reproduce the observed temperature-dependence of elastic/plastic wave structure.

  3. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ 0 /p 0 ) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ 0 is the permeability, and p 0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  4. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Pullin, D. I.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R = √μ0/p0 I/(2π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  5. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R = √μ0/p0 I/(2π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  6. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullin, D. I. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Samtaney, R. [Mechanical Engineering, Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  7. Compression of the Venusian ionosphere on May 10, 1979, by the interplanetary shock generated by the solar eruption of May 8, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryer, M.; Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Taylor, H.A. Jr.; Intriligator, D.S.; Mihalov, J.D.; Rompolt, B.

    1982-01-01

    An interplanetary shock wave that was produced by a solar eruption and its associated coronal transient on May 8, 1979, has been 'tracked' through interplanetary space to a rendezvous 2 days later with Venus. The interaction of the shock wave with the ionospheric obstacle at Venus produced a significant compression of the dayside ionosphere. It is believed that the tracking, as it were, was accomplished for the first time via the diagnostic observations provided by Hα and white light imagery near the sun and the plasma and field measurements of two, nearly radially aligned, spacecraft

  8. Spall strength and ejecta production of gold under explosively driven shock wave compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    2013-01-01

    Explosively driven shock wave experiments were conducted to characterize the spall strength and ejecta production of high-purity cast gold samples. The samples were from 0.75 to 1.84 mm thick and 30 mm in diameter. Peak stresses up to 44 GPa in gold were generated using PBX-9501 high explosive. Sample free surface and ejecta velocities were recorded using photonic Doppler velocimetry techniques. Lithium niobate pins were used to quantify the time dependence of the ejecta density and the total ejected mass. An optical framing camera for time-resolved imaging and a single-image x-ray radiograph were used for additional characterization. Free surface velocities exhibited a range of spall strengths from 1.7 to 2.4 GPa (mean: 2.0 ±0.3 GPa). The pullback signals were faint, minimal ringing was observed in the velocity records, and the spall layer continued to decelerate after first pull back. These results suggest finite tensile strength was present for some time after the initial void formation. Ejecta were observed for every sample with a roughened free surface, and the ejecta density increased with increased surface roughness, which was different in every experiment. The total ejected mass is consistent with the missing mass model.

  9. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along (101 ¯ 2) planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More

  10. Isentropic/shock compression and recovery methodology for materials using high-amplitude laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B.R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Park, H.-S., E-mail: park1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lu, C.-H., E-mail: chiahuilu@gmail.com [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Remington, B.A., E-mail: remington2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Prisbrey, S., E-mail: prisbrey1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kad, B., E-mail: bkad@ucsd.edu [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Luo, R., E-mail: luorwga@gmail.com [General Atomics, 3483 Dunhill Street, San Diego, CA 92121-1200 (United States); Meyers, M.A., E-mail: mameyers@eng.ucsd.edu [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Abstarct: A new method of subjecting samples to high-amplitude laser pulses with durations in the ns range and recovering them for characterization is presented. It is applied to tantalum monocrystals and nanocrystals that are subjected to controlled and prescribed ramp loading configurations, creating a quasi-isentropic loading in the front that is retained up to 40 μm into the specimen. This is enabled by the use of a reservoir into which six laser beams impinge simultaneously, thereby creating plasma in a reservoir, from which the pulse is launched into the metal. This technique enables, with proper wave trapping devices, the recovery of the specimens for subsequent characterization. Successful experiments conducted in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, U. of Rochester, generated pressure pulses with initial amplitudes ranging from 15 to 110 GPa and initial durations of ∼3 ns. The quasi-isotropic loading minimizes thermal effects at the front surface. The compression history of the recovered samples is measured using velocity interferometry from an Al-coated LiF witness target on the same shot driven by a separate, but equivalent set of laser beams. These experimental measurements are compared with computations using a radiation hydrodynamics code. Recovered samples are investigated using optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. The laser damage to the surface is characterized.

  11. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion-source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at. (Auth.)

  12. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at

  13. Shock outcome prediction before and after CPR: a comparative study of manual and automated active compression-decompression CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, M S; Watson, J N; Addison, P S; Clegg, G R; Robertson, C E

    2008-09-01

    We report on a study designed to compare the relative efficacy of manual CPR (M-CPR) and automated mechanical CPR (ACD-CPR) provided by an active compression-decompression (ACD) device. The ECG signals of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients of cardiac aetiology were analysed just prior to, and immediately after, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to assess the likelihood of successful defibrillation at these time points. The cardioversion outcome prediction (COP) measure previously developed by our group was used to quantify the probability of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after counter-shock and was used as a measure of the efficacy of CPR. An initial validation study using COP to predict shock outcome from the patient data set resulted in a performance of 60% specificity achieved at 100% sensitivity on a blind test of the data. This is comparable with previous studies and provided confidence in the robustness of the technique across hardware platforms. Significantly, the COP marker also displayed an ability to stratify according to outcomes: asystole, ventricular fibrillation (VF), pulseless electrical activity (PEA), normal sinus rhythm (NSR). We then used the validated COP marker to analyse the ECG data record just prior to and immediately after the chest compression segments. This was initially performed for 87 CPR segments where VF was both the pre- and post-CPR waveform. An increase in the mean COP values was found for both CPR types. A signed rank sum test found the increase due to manual CPR not to be significant (p>0.05) whereas the automated CPR was found to be significant (pCPR (1.26, p=0.024) than for the manual CPR (0.99, p=0.124). These results indicate that the application of CPR does indeed provide beneficial preparation of the heart prior to defibrillation therapy whether manual or automated CPR is applied. The COP marker shows promise as a definitive, quantitative determinant of the immediate positive effect of both types of CPR

  14. Shock ignition of thermonuclear fuel: principles and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.; Schmitt, A.J.; Canaud, B.; Betti, R.; Perkins, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Shock ignition is an approach to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) in which the stages of compression and hot spot formation are partly separated. The fuel is first imploded at a lower velocity than in conventional ICF. Close to stagnation, an intense laser spike drives a strong converging shock, which contributes to hot spot formation. Shock ignition shows potentials for high gain at laser energies below 1 MJ, and could be tested on the National Ignition Facility or Laser MegaJoule. Shock ignition principles and modelling are reviewed in this paper. Target designs and computer-generated gain curves are presented and discussed. Limitations of present studies and research needs are outlined. (special topic)

  15. Gain curves and hydrodynamic modeling for shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition of a precompressed thermonuclear fuel by means of a converging shock is now considered as a credible scheme to obtain high gains for inertial fusion energy. This work aims at modeling the successive stages of the fuel time history, from compression to final thermonuclear combustion, in order to provide the gain curves of shock ignition (SI). The leading physical mechanism at work in SI is pressure amplification, at first by spherical convergence, and by collision with the shock reflected at center during the stagnation process. These two effects are analyzed, and ignition conditions are provided as functions of the shock pressure and implosion velocity. Ignition conditions are obtained from a non-isobaric fuel assembly, for which we present a gain model. The corresponding gain curves exhibit a significantly lower ignition threshold and higher target gains than conventional central ignition.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Wood, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Edward Teller has been a strong proponent of harnessing nuclear explosions for peaceful purposes. There are two approaches: Plowshare, which utilizes macro- explosions, and inertial confinement fusion, which utilizes microexplosions. The development of practical fusion power plants is a principal goal of the inertial program. It is remarkable that Teller's original thermonuclear problem, how to make super high yield nuclear explosions, and the opposite problem, how to make ultra low yield nuclear explosions, may both be solved by Teller's radiation implosion scheme. This paper reports on the essential physics of these two thermonuclear domains, which are separated by nine orders of magnitude in yield, provided by Teller's similarity theorem and its exceptions. Higher density makes possible thermonuclear burn of smaller masses of fuel. The leverage is high: the scale of the explosion diminishes with the square of the increase in density. The extraordinary compressibility of matter, first noticed by Teller during the Los Alamos atomic bomb program, provides an almost incredible opportunity to harness fusion. The energy density of thermonuclear fuels isentropically compressed to super high-- -densities---even to ten thousand times solid density---is small compared to the energy density at thermonuclear ignition temperatures. In small masses of fuel imploded to these super high matter densities, the energy required to achieve ignition may be greatly reduced by exploiting thermonuclear propagation from a relatively small hot spot

  17. A scheme for reducing deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Wu, J. F.; Liu, Jie; Zhang, W. Y.; He, X. T.

    2016-05-01

    It is demonstrated that the growth of acceleration-phase instabilities in inertial confinement fusion implosions can be controlled, especially in the high-foot implosions [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility. However, the excessive growth of the deceleration-phase instabilities can still destroy the hot spot ignition. A scheme is proposed to retard the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by shock collision near the waist of the inner shell surface. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations confirm the improved deceleration-phase hot spot stability properties without sacrificing the fuel compression.

  18. A scheme for reducing deceleration-phase Rayleigh–Taylor growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L. F., E-mail: wang-lifeng@iapcm.ac.cn; Ye, W. H.; Liu, Jie [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Wu, J. F. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhang, W. Y. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-05-15

    It is demonstrated that the growth of acceleration-phase instabilities in inertial confinement fusion implosions can be controlled, especially in the high-foot implosions [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility. However, the excessive growth of the deceleration-phase instabilities can still destroy the hot spot ignition. A scheme is proposed to retard the deceleration-phase Rayleigh–Taylor instability growth by shock collision near the waist of the inner shell surface. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations confirm the improved deceleration-phase hot spot stability properties without sacrificing the fuel compression.

  19. Terminal-shock and restart control of a Mach 2.5, axisymmetric, mixed compression inlet with 40 percent internal contraction. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Results of experimental tests conducted on a supersonic, mixed-compression, axisymmetric inlet are presented. The inlet is designed for operation at Mach 2.5 with a turbofan engine (TF-30). The inlet was coupled to either a choked orifice plate or a long duct which had a variable-area choked exit plug. Closed-loop frequency responses of selected diffuser static pressures used in the terminal-shock control system are presented. Results are shown for Mach 2.5 conditions with the inlet coupled to either the choked orifice plate or the long duct. Inlet unstart-restart traces are also presented. High-response inlet bypass doors were used to generate an internal disturbance and also to achieve terminal-shock control.

  20. A novel particle time of flight diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He and DT implosions at the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Frenje, J A; Waugh, C J; Li, C K; Sèguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Kimbrough, J R; MacPhee, A; Collins, G W; Hicks, D; Mackinnon, A; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Clancy, T; Zacharias, R; Döppner, T; Park, H S; LePape, S; Landen, O; Meezan, N; Moses, E I; Glebov, V U; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Olson, R; Kline, J; Kilkenny, J

    2012-10-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, fielded alongside a wedge range-filter (WRF) proton spectrometer, will provide an absolute timing for the shock-burn weighted ρR measurements that will validate the modeling of implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In the first phase of the project, pTOF has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT, DT exploding pusher, and D(3)He implosions using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps. In the second phase of the project, a deflecting magnet will be incorporated into the pTOF design for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D(3)He-filled surrogate implosions using D(3)He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively.

  1. A Numerical Scheme Based on an Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Turbulent Flows with Shocks: Application to Two-Dimensional Flows around Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational code adopting immersed boundary methods for compressible gas-particle multiphase turbulent flows is developed and validated through two-dimensional numerical experiments. The turbulent flow region is modeled by a second-order pseudo skew-symmetric form with minimum dissipation, while the monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL scheme is employed in the shock region. The present scheme is applied to the flow around a two-dimensional cylinder under various freestream Mach numbers. Compared with the original MUSCL scheme, the minimum dissipation enabled by the pseudo skew-symmetric form significantly improves the resolution of the vortex generated in the wake while retaining the shock capturing ability. In addition, the resulting aerodynamic force is significantly improved. Also, the present scheme is successfully applied to moving two-cylinder problems.

  2. High Pressure In Situ X-ray Diffraction Study of MnO to 120 GPa and Comparison with Shock Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Takehiko; Kondo, Tadashi; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1997-07-01

    In order to clarify the nature of the phase transformation in MnO observed at around 90 GPa by shock compression experiment (Syono et al., this symposium), high pressure in situ x-ray experiments were carried out up to 120 GPa. Powdered sample was directly compressed in Mao-Bell type diamond anvil and x-ray experiments were carried out using angle dispersive technique by combining synchrotron radiation and imaging plate detector. Distortion of the B1 structured phase into hexagonal unit cell was observed from 25-40 GPa, which continues to increase up to 90 GPa. At around 90 GPa, discontinuous change of the diffraction was observed. This new phase cannot be explained by a simple B2 structure and the analysis of this phase is in progress. This high pressure phase has metallic appearance, which reverses to transparent MnO on release of pressure.

  3. Probing planetary interiors: Shock compression of water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cc, and recent high precision Hugoniot measurements of deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Marcus

    2013-06-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous increase in the number of identified extra-solar planetary systems. Our understanding of the formation of these systems is tied to our understanding of the internal structure of these exoplanets, which in turn rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water and hydrogen. Here we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that shows commonly used models for water in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate the use of this model as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and ``hot Neptune'' exoplanets, and should contribute to improved understanding of the interior structure of these planets, and perhaps improved understanding of formation mechanisms of planetary systems. We also present very recent experiments on deuterium that have taken advantage of continued improvements in both experimental configuration and the understanding of the quartz shock standard to obtain Hugoniot data with a significant increase in precision. These data will prove to provide a stringent test for the equation of state of hydrogen and its isotopes. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL85000.

  4. Inertial fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautray, R.; Watteau, J.-P.

    1980-01-01

    Following a brief historical survey of research into the effects of interaction of laser with matter, the principles of fusion by inertial confinement are described and the main parameters and possible levels given. The development of power lasers is then discussed with details of performances of the main lasers used in various laboratories, and with an assessment of the respective merits of neodymium glass, carbon dioxide or iodine lasers. The phenomena of laser radiation and its interaction with matter is then described, with emphasis on the results of experiments concerned with target implosion with the object of compressing and heating the mixture of heavy hydrogen and tritium to be ignited. Finally, a review is made of future possibilities opened up by the use of large power lasers which have recently become operational or are being constructed, and the ground still to be covered before a reactor can be produced [fr

  5. Inertial fusion experiments and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, Kunioki; Tikhonchuk, V.; Perlado, M.

    2011-01-01

    Inertial fusion research is approaching a critical milestone, namely the demonstration of ignition and burn. The world's largest high-power laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF), is under operation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in the USA. Another ignition machine, Laser Mega Joule (LMJ), is under construction at the CEA/CESTA research centre in France. In relation to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) at LLNL, worldwide studies on inertial fusion applications to energy production are growing. Advanced ignition schemes such as fast ignition, shock ignition and impact ignition, and the inertial fusion energy (IFE) technology are under development. In particular, the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) at the Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka University, and the OMEGA-EP project at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), University Rochester, and the HiPER project in the European Union (EU) for fast ignition and shock ignition are progressing. The IFE technology research and development are advanced in the frameworks of the HiPER project in EU and the LIFE project in the USA. Laser technology developments in the USA, EU, Japan and Korea were major highlights in the IAEA FEC 2010. In this paper, the status and prospects of IFE science and technology are described.

  6. Equations of state and melting curve of boron carbide in the high-pressure range of shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodets, A. M., E-mail: molodets@icp.ac.ru; Golyshev, A. A.; Shakhrai, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We have constructed the equations of state for crystalline boron carbide B{sub 11}C (C–B–C) and its melt under high dynamic and static pressures. A kink on the shock adiabat for boron carbide has been revealed in the pressure range near 100 GPa, and the melting curve with negative curvature in the pressure range 0–120 GPa has been calculated. The results have been used for interpreting the kinks on the shock adiabat for boron carbide in the pressure range of 0–400 GPa.

  7. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, S. A.; Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-01-01

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25

  8. A comprehensive alpha-heating model for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopherson, A. R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Campbell, E. M.; Sanz, J.; Spears, B. K.

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to study alpha-heating in inertially confined plasmas. It describes the time evolution of a central low-density hot spot confined by a compressible shell, heated by fusion alphas, and cooled by radiation and thermal losses. The model includes the deceleration, stagnation, and burn phases of inertial confinement fusion implosions, and is valid for sub-ignited targets with ≤10 × amplification of the fusion yield from alpha-heating. The results of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are used to derive realistic initial conditions and dimensionless parameters for the model. It is found that most of the alpha energy (˜90%) produced before bang time is deposited within the hot spot mass, while a small fraction (˜10%) drives mass ablation off the inner shell surface and its energy is recycled back into the hot spot. Of the bremsstrahlung radiation emission, ˜40% is deposited in the hot spot, ˜40% is recycled back in the hot spot by ablation off the shell, and ˜20% leaves the hot spot. We show here that the hot spot, shocked shell, and outer shell trajectories from this analytical model are in good agreement with simulations. A detailed discussion of the effect of alpha-heating on the hydrodynamics is also presented.

  9. Experimental study of hot electrons propagation and energy deposition in solid or laser-shock compressed targets: applications to fast igniter; Etude experimentale de la propagation et du depot d'energie d'electrons rapides dans une cible solide ou comprimee par choc laser: application a l'allumeur rapide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisani, F

    2000-02-15

    In the fast igniter scheme, a recent approach proposed for the inertial confinement fusion, the idea is to dissociate the fuel ignition phase from its compression. The ignition phase would be then achieved by means of an external energy source: a fast electron beam generated by the interaction with an ultra-intense laser. The main goal of this work is to study the mechanisms of the hot electron energy transfer to the compressed fuel. We intent in particular to study the role of the electric and collisional effects involved in the hot electron propagation in a medium with properties similar to the compressed fuel. We carried out two experiments, one at the Vulcan laser facility (England) and the second one at the new LULI 100 TW laser (France). During the first experiment, we obtained the first results on the hot electron propagation in a dense and hot plasma. The innovating aspect of this work was in particular the use of the laser-shock technique to generate high pressures, allowing the strongly correlated and degenerated plasma to be created. The role of the electric and magnetic effects due to the space charge associated with the fast electron beam has been investigated in the second experiment. Here we studied the propagation in materials with different electrical characteristics: an insulator and a conductor. The analysis of the results showed that only by taking into account simultaneously the two propagation mechanisms (collisions and electric effects) a correct treatment of the energy deposition is possible. We also showed the importance of taking into account the induced modifications due to the electrons beam crossing the target, especially the induced heating. (author)

  10. Shock physics with the nova laser for ICF applications. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammel, B.A.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.

    1995-01-01

    The physics of high pressure shocks plays a central role in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In indirect drive ICF, x-rays from a gold cavity (hohlraum) are used to ablatively drive a series of high pressure shocks into a spherical target (capsule). These shocks converge at the center, compressing the fuel and forming a hot dense core. The target performance, such as peak fuel density and temperature and neutron yield, depends critically on hock timing, and material compressibility. Accurate predictions of NIF target performance depends critically on shock timing and material compressibility. Current measurement techniques enable us to accurately determine shock timing in planar samples of abator material as a function of laser drive. Although this technique does not separately address uncertainties in material EOS and opacity, it does allow us to tune the laser drive until the desired shock timing is achieved. Experiments to directly address the EOS of D 2 ice are planned to further increase the margin for ignition in current target designs

  11. Influence of edge conditions on material ejection from periodic grooves in laser shock-loaded tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rességuier, T. de; Roland, C. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346, CNRS, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, 1 ave. Clément Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Prudhomme, G.; Lescoute, E.; Mercier, P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Loison, D. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-05-14

    In a material subjected to high dynamic compression, the breakout of a shock wave at a rough free surface can lead to the ejection of high velocity debris. Anticipating the ballistic properties of such debris is a key safety issue in many applications involving shock loading, including pyrotechnics and inertial confinement fusion experiments. In this paper, we use laser driven shocks to investigate particle ejection from calibrated grooves of micrometric dimensions and approximately sinusoidal profile in tin samples, with various boundary conditions at the groove edges, including single groove and periodic patterns. Fast transverse shadowgraphy provides ejection velocities after shock breakout. They are found to depend not only on the groove depth and wavelength, as predicted theoretically and already observed in the past, but also, unexpectedly, on the edge conditions, with a jet tip velocity significantly lower in the case of a single groove than behind a periodic pattern.

  12. High pressure in situ X-ray diffraction study of MnO to 137 GPa and comparison with shock compression experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, T.; Kondo, T.; Syono, Y.

    1998-07-01

    In order to clarify the nature of the phase transformation in MnO observed at around 90 GPa by shock compression experiment, high pressure in situ X-ray observations were carried out up to 137 GPa. Powdered sample was directly compressed in Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell and X-ray experiments were carried out using angle dispersive technique by combining synchrotron radiation and imaging plate detector. Distortion of the B1 structured phase was observed above about 40 GPa, which continues to increase up to 90 GPa. Two discontinuous changes of the diffraction profiles were observed at around 90 GPa and 120 GPa. The nature of the intermediate phase between 90 GPa and 120 GPa is not clear yet. It is neither cesium chloride (B2) nor nickel arsenide (B8) structure. On the other hand, the diffraction profile above 120 GPa can be reasonably well explained by the B8 structure. High pressure phases above 90 GPa have metallic luster and all the transformations are reversible on release of pressure.

  13. High-Pressure Shock Compression of Solids VIII The Science and Technology of High-Velocity Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Chhabildas, Lalit C; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Research in the field of shock physics and ballistic impact has always been intimately tied to progress in development of facilities for accelerating projectiles to high velocity and instrumentation for recording impact phenomena. The chapters of this book, written by leading US and European experts, cover a broad range of topics and address researchers concerned with questions of material behaviour under impulsive loading and the equations of state of matter, as well as the design of suitable instrumentation such as gas guns and high-speed diagnostics. Applications include high-speed impact dynamics, the inner composition of planets, syntheses of new materials and materials processing. Among the more technologically-oriented applications treated is the testing of the flight characteristics of aeroballistic models and the assessment of impacts in the aerospace industry.

  14. Dynamic response of materials on subnanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Damian C.; Tierney, Thomas E.; Luo Shengnian; Paisley, Dennis L.; Kyrala, George A.; Hauer, Allan; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Lorenzana, Hector E.; Kalantar, Daniel; Remington, Bruce A.; Peralta, Pedro; Loomis, Eric

    2005-01-01

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. These relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser-induced ablation can be particularly convenient: this technique has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from ∼1 to 200 GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including line imaging surface velocimetry, surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response from the polycrystalline microstructure. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1 TPa

  15. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  16. Development of a ReaxFF reactive force field for ammonium nitrate and application to shock compression and thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; van Duin, Adri C T; Thompson, Aidan P

    2014-02-27

    We have developed a new ReaxFF reactive force field parametrization for ammonium nitrate. Starting with an existing nitramine/TATB ReaxFF parametrization, we optimized it to reproduce electronic structure calculations for dissociation barriers, heats of formation, and crystal structure properties of ammonium nitrate phases. We have used it to predict the isothermal pressure-volume curve and the unreacted principal Hugoniot states. The predicted isothermal pressure-volume curve for phase IV solid ammonium nitrate agreed with electronic structure calculations and experimental data within 10% error for the considered range of compression. The predicted unreacted principal Hugoniot states were approximately 17% stiffer than experimental measurements. We then simulated thermal decomposition during heating to 2500 K. Thermal decomposition pathways agreed with experimental findings.

  17. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Friedman, A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the research status in the following areas of research in the field of heavy ion inertial fusion: (1) RF accelerators, storage rings, and synchrotrons; (2) induction linacs; (3) recirculation induction accelerator approach; (4) a new accelerator concept, the ''Mirrortron''; (5) general issues of transport, including beam merging, production of short, fat quadrupoles with nearly linear focusing, calculations of beam behaviour in image fields; 3-D electrostatic codes on drift compression with misalignments and transport around bends; (6) injectors, ion sources and RFQs, a.o., on the development of a 27 MHz RFQ to be used for the low energy portion of a new injector for all ions up to Uranium, and the development of a 2 MV carbon ion injector to provide 16 C + beams of 0.5 A each for ILSE; (7) beam transport from accelerator to target, reporting, a.o., the feasibility to suppress third-order aberrations; while Particle-in-Cell simulations on the propagation of a non-neutral ion beam in a low density gas identified photo-ionization by thermal X-rays from the target as an important source of defocusing; (9) heavy ion target studies; (10) reviewing experience with laser drivers; (11) ion cluster stopping and muon catalyzed fusion; (12) heavy ion systems, including the option of a fusion-fission burner. 1 tab

  18. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Inertial fusion and energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is a technology for releasing nuclear energy from the fusion of light nuclei. For energy production, the most reactive hydrogen isotopes (deuterium (D) and tritium (T)) are commonly considered. The energy aplication requires the compression of a few milligrams of a DT mixture to great density, approximately 1000 times its liquid-state density, and to a high temperature, nearly 100 million 0 K. Under these conditions, efficient nuclear-fusion reactions occur, which can result in over 30% burn-up of the fusion fuel. The high density and temperature can be achieved by focusing very powerful laser or ion beams onto the target. The resultant ablation of the outer layers of the target compresses the fuel in the target, DT ignition occurs, and burn-up of the fuel results as the thermonuclear burn wave propagates outward. The DT-fuel burn-up occurs in about 199 picoseconds. On this short time scale, inertial forces are sufficiently strong to prevent target disassembly before fuel burn-up occurs. The energy released by the DT fusion is projected to be several hundred times greater than the energy delivered by the driver. The present statuds of ICF technology is described

  20. Contributions to the stability analysis of self-similar supersonic heat waves related to inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastugue, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Exact self-similar solutions of gas dynamics equations with nonlinear heat conduction for semi-infinite slabs of perfect gases are used for studying the stability of flows in inertial confinement fusion. Both the similarity solutions and their linear perturbations are computed with a multi domain Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method, allowing us to account for, without any other approximation, compressibility and unsteadiness. Following previous results (Clarisse et al., 2008; Lombard, 2008) representative of the early ablation of a target by a nonuniform laser flux (electronic conduction, subsonic heat front downstream of a quasi-perfect shock front), we explore here other configurations. For this early ablation phase, but for a nonuniform incident X-radiation (radiative conduction), we study a compressible and a weakly compressible flow. In both cases, we recover the behaviours obtained for compressible flows with electronic heat conduction with a maximal instability for a zero wavenumber. Besides, the spectral method is extended to compute similarity solutions taking into account the supersonic heat wave ahead of the shock front. Based on an analysis of the reduced equations singularities (infinitely stiff front), this method allows us to describe the supersonic heat wave regime proper to the initial irradiation of the target and to recover the ablative solutions which were obtained under a negligible fore-running heat wave approximation. (author) [fr

  1. Micromachined Precision Inertial Instruments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Najafi, Khalil

    2003-01-01

    This program focuses on developing inertial-grade micromachined accelerometers and gyroscopes and their associated electronics and packaging for use in a variety of military and commercial applications...

  2. Inertial navigation without accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M.

    The Kennedy-Thorndike (1932) experiment points to the feasibility of fiber-optic inertial velocimeters, to which state-of-the-art technology could furnish substantial sensitivity and accuracy improvements. Velocimeters of this type would obviate the use of both gyros and accelerometers, and allow inertial navigation to be conducted together with vehicle attitude control, through the derivation of rotation rates from the ratios of the three possible velocimeter pairs. An inertial navigator and reference system based on this approach would probably have both fewer components and simpler algorithms, due to the obviation of the first level of integration in classic inertial navigators.

  3. A Smartphone Inertial Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Garrido, Azael

    2017-01-01

    In order to measure the mass of an object in the absence of gravity, one useful tool for many decades has been the inertial balance. One of the simplest forms of inertial balance is made by two mass holders or pans joined together with two stiff metal plates, which act as springs.

  4. Advances in compact proton spectrometers for inertial-confinement fusion and plasma nuclear science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, F H; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M; Zylstra, A; Manuel, M J-E; Sio, H; Waugh, C; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Petrasso, R; Sangster, T C; Roberts, S

    2012-10-01

    Compact wedge-range-filter proton spectrometers cover proton energies ∼3-20 MeV. They have been used at the OMEGA laser facility for more than a decade for measuring spectra of primary D(3)He protons in D(3)He implosions, secondary D(3)He protons in DD implosions, and ablator protons in DT implosions; they are now being used also at the National Ignition Facility. The spectra are used to determine proton yields, shell areal density at shock-bang time and compression-bang time, fuel areal density, and implosion symmetry. There have been changes in fabrication and in analysis algorithms, resulting in a wider energy range, better accuracy and precision, and better robustness for survivability with indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments.

  5. Shock absorbing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Naoki; Matsushita, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    Small pieces of shock absorbers are filled in a space of a shock absorbing vessel which is divided into a plurality of sections by partitioning members. These sections function to prevent excess deformation or replacement of the fillers upon occurrence of falling accident. Since the shock absorbing small pieces in the shock absorbing vessel are filled irregularly, shock absorbing characteristics such as compression strength is not varied depending on the direction, but they exhibit excellent shock absorbing performance. They surely absorb shocks exerted on a transportation vessel upon falling or the like. If existing artificial fillers such as pole rings made of metal or ceramic and cut pieces such as alumium extrusion molding products are used as the shock absorbing pieces, they have excellent fire-proofness and cold resistance since the small pieces are inflammable and do not contain water. (T.M.)

  6. Twenty years of ''Nuclear Fusion''. Inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial confinement (ICF) fusion research is directed towards demonstrating the feasibility of very rapidly heating and compressing small pellets of suitable fuel until conditions exist where thermonuclear fusion can occur and useful amounts of power can be produced. Major problems which have to be solved are the following: 1) pellet design based on driver-plasma coupling; 2) the technology of energy drivers; 3) feasibility of ICF reactor systems

  7. Inertial fusion with hypervelocity impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, S.

    1998-01-01

    The physics of the compression and ignition processes in inertial fusion is to a certain extent independent of the nature of the incident energy pulse. The present strategy in the field of inertial fusion is to study several alternatives of deposition of the incident energy, and, at the same time, of conducting studies with the aid of available incident laser pulses. In a future reactor based on inertial fusion, the laser beams may be replaced by ion beams, which have a better energy efficiency. The main projects in the field of inertial fusion are the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in USA, Laser Megajoule (LMJ) in France, Gekko XII in Japan and Iskra V in Russia. NIF will be constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in California. LMJ will be constructed near Bordeaux. In the conventional approach to inertial confinement fusion, both the high-density fuel mass and the hot central spot are supposed to be produced by the deposition of the driver energy in the outer layers of the fuel capsule. Alternatively, the driver energy could be used only to produce the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities but relatively low temperatures, while the ignition of fusion reactions in the compressed capsule should be effected by a synchronized hypervelocity impact. Using this arrangement, it was supposed that a 54 μm projectile is incident with a velocity of 3 x 10 6 m s -1 upon a large-yield deuterium-tritium target at rest. The collision of the incident projectile and of the large-yield target takes place inside a high-Z cavity. A laser or heavy-ion pulse is converted at the walls of the cavity into X-rays, which compresses the incident projectile and the large-yield target in high-density states. The laser pulse and the movement of the incident projectile are synchronized such that the collision should take place when the densities are the largest. The collision converts the kinetic energy of the incident projectile into thermal energy, the

  8. Measurements of the Shock Release Of Quartz and Paralyene-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawreliak, James; Karasik, Max; Oh, Jaechul; Aglitskiy, Yefim

    2017-06-01

    The shock and release properties of Quartz and hydrocarbons are important to high energy density (HED) research and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) science. The bulk of HED material research studies single shock or multiple shock conditions. The challenge with measuring release properties is unlike shocks which have a single interface from which to measure the properties, the release establishes gradients in the sample. The streaked x-ray imaging capability of the NIKE laser allow the interface between quartz and CH to be measured during the release, giving measurements of the interface velocity and CH density. Here, we present experimental results from the NIKE laser where quartz and parylene-N are shock compressed to high pressure and temperature and the release state is measured through x-ray imaging. The shock state is characterized by shock front velocity measurements using VISAR and the release state is characterized by using side-on streaked x-ray radiography Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  9. Energy from inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This book contains 22 articles on inertial fusion energy (IFE) research and development written in the framework of an international collaboration of authors under the guidance of an advisory group on inertial fusion energy set up in 1991 to advise the IAEA. It describes the actual scientific, engineering and technological developments in the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It also identifies ways in which international co-operation in ICF could be stimulated. The book is intended for a large audience and provides an introduction to inertial fusion energy and an overview of the various technologies needed for IFE power plants to be developed. It contains chapters on (i) the fundamentals of IFE; (ii) inertial confinement target physics; (iii) IFE power plant design principles (requirements for power plant drivers, solid state laser drivers, gas laser drivers, heavy ion drivers, and light ion drivers, target fabrication and positioning, reaction chamber systems, power generation and conditioning and radiation control, materials management and target materials recovery), (iv) special design issues (radiation damage in structural materials, induced radioactivity, laser driver- reaction chamber interfaces, ion beam driver-reaction chamber interfaces), (v) inertial fusion energy development strategy, (vi) safety and environmental impact, (vii) economics and other figures of merit; (viii) other uses of inertial fusion (both those involving and not involving implosions); and (ix) international activities. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Shock waves in relativistic nuclear matter, I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleeson, A.M.; Raha, S.

    1979-02-01

    The relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot relations are developed for a 3-dimensional plane shock and a 3-dimensional oblique shock. Using these discontinuity relations together with various equations of state for nuclear matter, the temperatures and the compressibilities attainable by shock compression for a wide range of laboratory kinetic energy of the projectile are calculated. 12 references

  11. Novel diagnostics for warm dense matter: application to shock compressed target; Nouveaux diagnostics pour l'etude de la matiere dense et chaude: application aux cibles comprimees par choc laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravasio, A

    2007-03-15

    In this work, we present 3 novel diagnostics for warm dense plasma (WDM) investigations: hard X-ray radiography, proton radiography and X-ray Thomson scattering. Each of these techniques is applied in shock compression experiments. The main objective consists in accessing a new parameter, in addition to shock and particle velocity, for EOS (Equation of State) measurements. In the first chapter we give a deep description of WDM states as strongly coupled and Fermi degenerate states. Then, we introduce how we have generated a WDM state in our experiment: the shock wave. We, in particular, illustrate its formation in the classical laser-matter interaction regime. In the second chapter the principles of standard probing techniques are presented. We see that energetic probe sources are necessary to investigate high Z dense plasmas. The third chapter is dedicated to X-ray radiography results. We report on a first direct density measurement of a shock compressed high Z target using K{alpha} hard X-ray radiation. These results are of great interests as they allow an in-situ characterization of high Z material, impossible with standard techniques. We show that probing a well known material as Al will allow the comparison between our data and the results from already validated simulations. In the fourth chapter, we present the results obtained from proton radiography on low density carbon foam. The data analysis will require the development of a specific Monte-Carlo code to simulate the proton propagation through the shocked target. The comparison of the simulations with the experimental data show a low dependency on density. The fifth chapter is devoted to X-ray Thomson scattering results. For the first time, we have performed collective x-ray Thomson scattering measurement from a shock compressed target, accessing to electron density and temperature. The obtained results are compared with simulated x-ray scattered spectra. The novel technique is then used in the

  12. Statistical Relations for Yield Degradation in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Patel, D.; Gopalaswamy, V.

    2017-10-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the yield-over-clean (YOC) is a quantity commonly used to assess the performance of an implosion with respect to the degradation caused by asymmetries. The YOC also determines the Lawson parameter used to identify the onset of ignition and the level of alpha heating in ICF implosions. In this work, we show that the YOC is a unique function of the residual kinetic energy in the compressed shell (with respect to the 1-D case) regardless of the asymmetry spectrum. This result is derived using a simple model of the deceleration phase as well as through an extensive set of 3-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations using the code DEC3D. The latter has been recently upgraded to include a 3-D spherical moving mesh, the HYPRE solver for 3-D radiation transport and piecewise-parabolic method for robust shock-capturing hydrodynamic simulations. DEC3D is used to build a synthetic single-mode database to study the behavior of yield degradation caused by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the deceleration phase. The relation between YOC and residual kinetic energy is compared with the result in an adiabatic implosion model. The statistical expression of YOC is also applied to the ignition criterion in the presence of multidimensional nonuniformities. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  14. Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mima, K

    2012-09-15

    In 1917, Albert Einstein suggested the theory of stimulated emission of light that led to the development of the laser. The first laser, based on Einstein's theory, was demonstrated by the Maiman experiment in 1960. In association with the invention and developments of the laser, N.G. Basov, A. Prokorov and C.H. Towns received the Nobel prize for physics in 1963. On the other hand, it had been recognized that nuclear fusion energy is the energy source of our universe. It is the origin of the energy in our sun and in the stars. Right after the laser oscillation experiment, it was suggested by J. Nuckolls, E. Teller and S. Colgate in the USA and A. Sakharov in the USSR that nuclear fusion induced by lasers be used to solve the energy problem. Following the suggestion, the pioneering works for heating plasmas to a thermonuclear temperature with a laser were published by N. Basov, O.N. Krohin, J.M. Dawson, C.R. Kastler, H. Hora, F. Flux and S. Eliezer. The new concept of fusion ignition and burn by laser 'implosion' was proposed by J. Nuckolls, which extended the spherically imploding shock concept discovered by G. Guderley to the laser fusion concept. Since then, laser fusion research has started all over the world. For example, many inertial fusion energy (IFE) facilities have been constructed for investigating implosion physics: Lasers: GEKKO I, GEKKO II, GEKKO IV, GEKKO MII and GEKKO xII at ILE, Osaka University, Japan; JANUS, CYCLOPS, ARUGUS, SHIVA and NOVA at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), USA; OMEGA at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), University of Rochester, USA; PHEBUS at Limeil, Paris, France; the ASTERIx iodine laser at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching, Germany; MPI, GLECO at the Laboratoire d'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), ecole Polytecnique, France; HELIOS at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; Shengan II at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, China; VULCAN at the Rutherford

  15. Dragging of inertial frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2007-09-06

    The origin of inertia has intrigued scientists and philosophers for centuries. Inertial frames of reference permeate our daily life. The inertial and centrifugal forces, such as the pull and push that we feel when our vehicle accelerates, brakes and turns, arise because of changes in velocity relative to uniformly moving inertial frames. A classical interpretation ascribed these forces to acceleration relative to some absolute frame independent of the cosmological matter, whereas an opposite view related them to acceleration relative to all the masses and 'fixed stars' in the Universe. An echo and partial realization of the latter idea can be found in Einstein's general theory of relativity, which predicts that a spinning mass will 'drag' inertial frames along with it. Here I review the recent measurements of frame dragging using satellites orbiting Earth.

  16. Phenomenological description of depoling current in Pb0.99Nb0.02(Zr0.95Ti0.05)0.98O3 ferroelectric ceramics under shock wave compression: Relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongdong; Du, Jinmei; Gu, Yan; Feng, Yujun

    2012-05-01

    By assuming a relaxation process for depolarization associated with the ferroelectric (FE) to antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transition in Pb0.99Nb0.02(Zr0.95Ti0.05)0.98O3 ferroelectric ceramics under shock wave compression, we build a new model for the depoling current, which is different from both the traditional constant current source (CCS) model and the phase transition kinetics (PTK) model. The characteristic relaxation time and new-equilibrated polarization are dependent on both the shock pressure and electric field. After incorporating a Maxwell s equation, the relaxation model developed applies to all the depoling currents under short-circuit condition and high-impedance condition. Influences of shock pressure, load resistance, dielectric property, and electrical conductivity on the depoling current are also discussed. The relaxation model gives a good description about the suppressing effect of the self-generated electric field on the FE-to-AFE phase transition at low shock pressures, which cannot be described by the traditional models. After incorporating a time- and electric-field-dependent repolarization, this model predicts that the high-impedance current eventually becomes higher than the short-circuit current, which is consistent with the experimental results in the literature. Finally, we make the comparison between our relaxation model and the traditional CCS model and PTK model.

  17. Shock wave compression and self-generated electric field repolarization in ferroelectric ceramics Pb0.99[(Zr0.90Sn0.10)0.96Ti0.04]0.98Nb0.02O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongdong; Du, Jinmei; Gu, Yan; Feng, Yujun

    2012-03-01

    The shock wave induced depoling current of Pb0.99[(Zr0.90Sn0.10)0.96Ti0.04]0.98Nb0.02O3 ceramics was investigated with a system composed of a resistive load and an unpoled ceramic. Disparity in the depoling current was explained by considering the drawing charge effect of unpoled ceramic. The drawing effect for poled ceramics was analysed by developing a model incorporating a time- and electric-field-dependent repolarization. This model predicts that the high-impedance current eventually becomes higher than the short-circuit current, which is consistent with the experimental results in the literature. This work indicates that both the repolarization of uncompressed ceramics caused by the self-generated electric field and depolarization of compressed ceramics caused by the shock wave govern the output current.

  18. Shock wave compression and self-generated electric field repolarization in ferroelectric ceramics Pb0.99[(Zr0.90Sn0.10)0.96Ti0.04]0.98Nb0.02O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dongdong; Du Jinmei; Gu Yan; Feng Yujun

    2012-01-01

    The shock wave induced depoling current of Pb 0.99 [(Zr 0.90 Sn 0.10 ) 0.96 Ti 0.04 ] 0.98 Nb 0.02 O 3 ceramics was investigated with a system composed of a resistive load and an unpoled ceramic. Disparity in the depoling current was explained by considering the drawing charge effect of unpoled ceramic. The drawing effect for poled ceramics was analysed by developing a model incorporating a time- and electric-field-dependent repolarization. This model predicts that the high-impedance current eventually becomes higher than the short-circuit current, which is consistent with the experimental results in the literature. This work indicates that both the repolarization of uncompressed ceramics caused by the self-generated electric field and depolarization of compressed ceramics caused by the shock wave govern the output current. (paper)

  19. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  20. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 μm—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 μm (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline

  1. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); and others

    2015-11-15

    The direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 μm—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 μm (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James Chien-Chih [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J. Chien-Chih

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li 2 BeF 4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel

  4. Inertial confinement: concept and early history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhart, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of inertial confinement is linked to the general theme of energy compression and staging. It is shown how it arose from the ideas and experiments on dynamic pinches towards the end of the fifties and how the important key concept of a linear was further developed during the sixties. THe various attempts at driving linears to speeds in excess of 1 cm/μs are reviewed in chronological order, mentioning the important impetus given to this field by the consideration of laser as a driver. It is concluded that the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is becoming ever richer in possibilities, and the understanding of the physics of high-energy density has reached now a satisfactory level

  5. The history and hopes of inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhart, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of inertial confinement is followed through its several incarnations starting from hammer and anvil, tamping of chemical explosives to Veksler's idea of collective and impact acceleration. The application of inertial confinement to the controlled nuclear fusion appears as a natural extension of these previous applications. The early association with the research on macroparticle-acceleration is also mentioned. Follows a brief description of the development of ideas on liner-acceleration, including those linked with a rocket-propulsion, or as it is known today-ablation. The recent trends in liner-acceleration, energy-compression and energy-staging are mentioned, as well as the hopes and fears connected with reactor projects

  6. A hybrid-drive nonisobaric-ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X. T., E-mail: xthe@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, J. W.; Wang, L. F.; Liu, J.; Lan, K.; Ye, W. H. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Fan, Z. F.; Wu, J. F. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-08-15

    A new hybrid-drive (HD) nonisobaric ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is proposed, in which a HD pressure to drive implosion dynamics increases via increasing density rather than temperature in the conventional indirect drive (ID) and direct drive (DD) approaches. In this HD (combination of ID and DD) scheme, an assembled target of a spherical hohlraum and a layered deuterium-tritium capsule inside is used. The ID lasers first drive the shock to perform a spherical symmetry implosion and produce a large-scale corona plasma. Then, the DD lasers, whose critical surface in ID corona plasma is far from the radiation ablation front, drive a supersonic electron thermal wave, which slows down to a high-pressure electron compression wave, like a snowplow, piling up the corona plasma into high density and forming a HD pressurized plateau with a large width. The HD pressure is several times the conventional ID and DD ablation pressure and launches an enhanced precursor shock and a continuous compression wave, which give rise to the HD capsule implosion dynamics in a large implosion velocity. The hydrodynamic instabilities at imploding capsule interfaces are suppressed, and the continuous HD compression wave provides main pdV work large enough to hotspot, resulting in the HD nonisobaric ignition. The ignition condition and target design based on this scheme are given theoretically and by numerical simulations. It shows that the novel scheme can significantly suppress implosion asymmetry and hydrodynamic instabilities of current isobaric hotspot ignition design, and a high-gain ICF is promising.

  7. Inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decroisette, M.; Andre, M.; Bayer, C.; Juraszek, D.; Le Garrec, B.; Deutsch, C.; Migus, A.

    2005-01-01

    We first recall the scientific basis of inertial fusion and then describe a generic fusion reactor with the different components: the driver, the fusion chamber, the material treatment unit, the target factory and the turbines. We analyse the options proposed at the present time for the driver and for target irradiation scheme giving the state of art for each approach. We conclude by the presentation of LMJ (laser Megajoule) and NIF (national ignition facility) projects. These facilities aim to demonstrate the feasibility of laboratory DT ignition, first step toward Inertial Fusion Energy. (authors)

  8. Exact Theory of Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivas, Theodore; Eyink, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    We obtain exact results for compressible turbulence with any equation of state, using coarse-graining/filtering. We find two mechanisms of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation: scale-local energy cascade and ``pressure-work defect'', or pressure-work at viscous scales exceeding that in the inertial-range. Planar shocks in an ideal gas dissipate all kinetic energy by pressure-work defect, but the effect is omitted by standard LES modeling of pressure-dilatation. We also obtain a novel inverse cascade of thermodynamic entropy, injected by microscopic entropy production, cascaded upscale, and removed by large-scale cooling. This nonlinear process is missed by the Kovasznay linear mode decomposition, treating entropy as a passive scalar. For small Mach number we recover the incompressible ``negentropy cascade'' predicted by Obukhov. We derive exact Kolmogorov 4/5th-type laws for energy and entropy cascades, constraining scaling exponents of velocity, density, and internal energy to sub-Kolmogorov values. Although precise exponents and detailed physics are Mach-dependent, our exact results hold at all Mach numbers. Flow realizations at infinite Reynolds are ``dissipative weak solutions'' of compressible Euler equations, similarly as Onsager proposed for incompressible turbulence.

  9. Prospect for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents recent inertial fusion experiments at Osaka. The inertial fusion energy reactor used for these experiments was designed according to some principles based on environmental, social and safety considerations. (TEC). 1 fig., 1 ref

  10. Shock interaction with a two-gas interface in a novel dual-driver shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labenski, John R.

    Fluid instabilities exist at the interface between two fluids having different densities if the flow velocity and density gradient are anti-parallel or if a shock wave crosses the boundary. The former case is called the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability and the latter, the Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) instability. Small initial perturbations on the interface destabilize and grow into larger amplitude structures leading to turbulent mixing. Instabilities of this type are seen in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, laser produced plasmas, supernova explosions, and detonations. A novel dual-driver shock tube was used to investigate the growth rate of the R-M instability. One driver is used to create an argon-refrigerant interface, and the other at the opposite end of the driven section generates a shock to force the interface with compressible flows behind the shock. The refrigerant gas in the first driver is seeded with sub-micron oil droplets for visualization of the interface. The interface travels down the driven section past the test section for a fixed amount of time. A stronger shock of Mach 1.1 to 1.3 drives the interface back past the test section where flow diagnostics are positioned. Two schlieren systems record the density fluctuations while light scattering detectors record the density of the refrigerant as a function of position over the interface. A pair of digital cameras take stereo images of the interface, as mapped out by the tracer particles under illumination by a Q-switched ruby laser. The amount of time that the interface is allowed to travel up the driven section determines the interaction time as a control. Comparisons made between the schlieren signals, light scattering detector outputs, and the images quantify the fingered characteristics of the interface and its growth due to shock forcing. The results show that the interface has a distribution of thickness and that the interaction with a shock further broadens the interface. The

  11. Progress in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.; Storm, E.

    1985-10-01

    The requirements for high gain in inertial confinement are given in terms of target implosion requirements. Results of experimental studies of the laser/target interaction and of the dynamics of laser implosion. A report of the progress of advanced laser development is also presented. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. On the Existence of the Kolmogorov Inertial Range in the Terrestrial Magnetosheath Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S. Y.; Yuan, Z. G. [School of Electronic Information, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-UPMC, Palaiseau (France); Deng, X. H., E-mail: shiyonghuang@whu.edu.cn [Institute of Space Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang (China)

    2017-02-10

    In the solar wind, power spectral density (PSD) of the magnetic field fluctuations generally follow the so-called Kolmogorov spectrum f {sup −5/3} in the inertial range, where the dynamics is thought to be dominated by nonlinear interactions between counter-propagating incompressible Alfvén wave parquets. These features are thought to be ubiquitous in space plasmas. The present study gives a new and more complex picture of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence as observed in the terrestrial magnetosheath. The study uses three years of in situ data from the Cluster mission to explore the nature of the magnetic fluctuations at MHD scales in different locations within the magnetosheath, including flanks and subsolar regions. It is found that the magnetic field fluctuations at MHD scales generally have a PSD close to f {sup −1} (shallower than the Kolmogorov one f {sup −5/3}) down to the ion characteristic scale, which recalls the energy-containing scales of solar wind turbulence. The Kolmogorov spectrum is observed only away from the bow shock toward the flank and the magnetopause regions in 17% of the analyzed time intervals. Measuring the magnetic compressibility, it is shown that only a fraction (35%) of the observed Kolmogorov spectra was populated by shear Alfvénic fluctuations, whereas the majority of the events (65%) was found to be dominated by compressible magnetosonic-like fluctuations, which contrasts with well-known turbulence properties in the solar wind. This study gives a first comprehensive view of the origin of the f {sup −1} and the transition to the Kolmogorov inertial range; both questions remain controversial in solar wind turbulence.

  13. X-ray absorption radiography for high pressure shock wave studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, L.; Atzeni, S.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Brambrink, E.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Koenig, M.; Le Bel, E.; Maheut, Y.; Nguyen-Bui, T.; Richetta, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Ribeyre, X.; Schiavi, A.; Trela, J.

    2018-01-01

    The study of laser compressed matter, both warm dense matter (WDM) and hot dense matter (HDM), is relevant to several research areas, including materials science, astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion. X-ray absorption radiography is a unique tool to diagnose compressed WDM and HDM. The application of radiography to shock-wave studies is presented and discussed. In addition to the standard Abel inversion to recover a density map from a transmission map, a procedure has been developed to generate synthetic radiographs using density maps produced by the hydrodynamics code DUED. This procedure takes into account both source-target geometry and source size (which plays a non negligible role in the interpretation of the data), and allows to reproduce transmission data with a good degree of accuracy.

  14. On the effect of conductivity of a shock-compressed gas on interferometric recording of parameters of motion of a liner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikov, V. A., E-mail: root@gdd.vniief.ru; Mikhailov, A. L.; Peshkov, V. V.; Bogdanov, E. N.; Rodionov, A. V.; Sedov, A. A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Nazarov, D. V.; Finyushin, S. A.; Dudoladov, V. I.; Erunov, S. V.; Blikov, A. O. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    We report on the results of a study of the acceleration dynamics of an aluminum liner to a velocity of 5.5 km/s using continuous recording of velocity (velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) and Fabry-Perot interferometer) and motion trajectory (radiointerferometer and resistive transducer) in air and in a helium atmosphere. It is found that for liner velocities exceeding 4.0 and 5.0 km/s, the displacement of the shock wave front is recorded by the radiointerferometer in air and helium, respectively. At these velocities, the conductivities of air and helium behind the shock wave front are estimated.

  15. Thermonuclear plasma physic: inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Ch.; Juraszek, D.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion in which the fuel contained in a spherical capsule is strongly compressed and heated to achieve ignition and burn. The released thermonuclear energy can be much higher than the driver energy, making energetic applications attractive. Many complex physical phenomena are involved by the compression process, but it is possible to use simple analytical models to analyze the main critical points. We first determine the conditions to obtain fuel ignition. High thermonuclear gains are achieved if only a small fraction of the fuel called hot spot is used to trigger burn in the main fuel compressed on a low isentrope. A simple hot spot model will be described. The high pressure needed to drive the capsule compression are obtained by the ablation process. A simple Rocket model describe the main features of the implosion phase. Several parameters have to be controlled during the compression: irradiation symmetry, hydrodynamical stability and when the driver is a laser, the problems arising from interaction of the EM wave with the plasma. Two different schemes are examined: Indirect Drive which uses X-ray generated in a cavity to drive the implosion and the Fast Ignitor concept using a ultra intense laser beam to create the hot spot. At the end we present the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) project. LMJ is scaled to a thermonuclear gain of the order of ten. (authors)

  16. Review of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, M. G.

    The physics of inertial confinement fusion is reviewed. The trend to short-wavelength lasers is argued, and the distinction between direct and indirect (soft X-ray) drive is made. Key present issues include the non-linear growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities, the seeding of this instability by the initial laser imprint, the relevance of self-generated magnetic fields, and the importance of parametric instabilities (stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering) in gas-filled hohlraums. Experiments are reviewed which explore the R-T instability in both planar and converging geometry. The employment of various optical smoothing techniques is contrasted with the overcoating of the capsule by gold coated plastic foams to reduce considerably the imprint problem. The role of spontaneously generated magnetic fields in non-symmetric plasmas is discussed. Recent hohlraum compression results are presented together with gas bag targets which replicate the long-scale-length low density plasmas expected in NIF gas filled hohlraums. The onset of first Brillouin and then Raman scattering is observed. The fast ignitor scheme is a proposal to use an intense short pulse laser to drill a hole through the coronal plasma and then, with laser excited fast electrons, create a propagating thermonuclear spark in a dense, relatively cold laser-compressed target. Some preliminary results of laser hole drilling and 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations of this and the > 10^8 Gauss self-generated magnetic fields are presented. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described.

  17. Shock ignition targets: gain and robustness vs ignition threshold factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Antonelli, Luca; Schiavi, Angelo; Picone, Silvia; Volponi, Gian Marco; Marocchino, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Shock ignition is a laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion scheme, in which the stages of compression and hot spot formation are partly separated. The hot spot is created at the end of the implosion by a converging shock driven by a final ``spike'' of the laser pulse. Several shock-ignition target concepts have been proposed and relevant gain curves computed (see, e.g.). Here, we consider both pure-DT targets and more facility-relevant targets with plastic ablator. The investigation is conducted with 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations. We determine ignition threshold factors ITF's (and their dependence on laser pulse parameters) by means of 1D simulations. 2D simulations indicate that robustness to long-scale perturbations increases with ITF. Gain curves (gain vs laser energy), for different ITF's, are generated using 1D simulations. Work partially supported by Sapienza Project C26A15YTMA, Sapienza 2016 (n. 257584), Eurofusion Project AWP17-ENR-IFE-CEA-01.

  18. Shocks near Jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  19. Work and Inertial Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Richard

    2017-12-01

    A fairly recent paper resolves a large discrepancy in the internal energy utilized to fire a cannon as calculated by two inertial observers. Earth and its small reaction velocity must be considered in the system so that the change in kinetic energy is calculated correctly. This paper uses a car in a similar scenario, but considers the work done by forces acting over distances. An analysis of the system must include all energy interactions, including the work done on the car and especially the (negative) work done on Earth in a moving reference frame. This shows the importance of considering the force on Earth and the distance Earth travels. For calculation of work in inertial reference frames, the center of mass perspective is shown to be useful. We also consider the energy requirements to efficiently accelerate a mass among interacting masses.

  20. Inertial fusion science in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, B.

    2006-01-01

    Europe has built significant laser facilities to study inertial confinement fusion since the beginning of this science. The goal is to understand the processes of ignition and propagation of thermonuclear combustion. Three routes toward fusion are pursued, each of which has advantages and difficulties. The conventional routes are using a central hot spot created by the same compression and heating laser beams, either with indirect or direct drive. A more recent route, 'fast ignition', has been actively studied since the 90's, increasing the need for very high energy lasers to create the hot spot; some European lasers of this kind are already functioning, others are under construction or planned. Among European facilities, Laser Mega Joule (LMJ), which is under construction, will be the most powerful tool at the end of the decade, along with NIF in the Usa, to study and obtain fusion. LMJ is designed not only to obtain fusion but also to carry out experiments on all laser-plasma physics themes thanks to its flexibility. This facility, mainly dedicated to defence programmes, will be accessible to the academic research community. On all these facilities, numerous results are and will be obtained in the fields of High Energy Density Physics and Ultra High Intensity. (author)

  1. Fast ignition schemes for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, C.

    2003-01-01

    The controlled production of a local hot spot in super-compressed deuterium + tritium fuel is examined in details. Relativistic electron beams (REB) in the MeV and proton beams in the few tens MeV energy range produced by PW-lasers are respectively considered. A strong emphasis is given to the propagation issues due to large density gradients in the outer core of compressed fuel. A specific attention is also paid to the final and complete particle stopping resulting in hot spot generation as well as to the interplay of collective vs. particle stopping at the entrance channel on the low density side in plasma target. Moreover, REB production and fast acceleration mechanisms are also given their due attention. Proton fast ignition looks promising as well as the wedged (cone angle) approach circumventing most of transport uncertainties between critical layer and hot spot. Global engineering perspectives for fast ignition scenario (FIS) driven inertial confinement fusion are also detailed. (author)

  2. Laser drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is the technology that we are developing to access the vast stored energy potential of deuterium fuel located in the world's water supply. This form of fusion is accomplished by compressing and heating small volumes of D-T fuel to very high temperatures (greater than 100M 0 C) and to very high densities (greater than 1000 times the normal liquid density). Under these fuel conditions, a thermonuclear reaction can occur, leading to a net energy release compared to the energy used to heat the fuel initially. To accomplish the condition where fusion reactions begin, effective drivers are required. These are lasers or particle beam accelerators which can provide greater than 10 14 W/cm 2 over millimeter scale targets with an appropriately programmed intensity vs time. At present, we are using research lasers to obtain an understanding of the physics and engineering of fuel compression

  3. Mapping in inertial frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1989-05-01

    World space mapping in inertial frames is used to examine the Lorentz covariance of symmetry operations. It is found that the Galilean invariant concepts of simultaneity (S), parity (P), and time reversal symmetry (T) are not Lorentz covariant concepts for inertial observers. That is, just as the concept of simultaneity has no significance independent of the Lorentz inertial frame, likewise so are the concepts of parity and time reversal. However, the world parity (W) [i.e., the space-time reversal symmetry (P-T)] is a truly Lorentz covariant concept. Indeed, it is shown that only those mapping matrices M that commute with the Lorentz transformation matrix L (i.e., [M,L] = 0) are the ones that correspond to manifestly Lorentz covariant operations. This result is in accordance with the spirit of the world space Mach's principle. Since the Lorentz transformation is an orthogonal transformation while the Galilean transformation is not an orthogonal transformation, the formal relativistic space-time mapping theory used here does not have a corresponding non-relativistic counterpart. 12 refs

  4. Review of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-03-29

    Igniting fusion fuel in the laboratory remains an alluring goal for two reasons: the desire to study matter under the extreme conditions needed for fusion burn, and the potential of harnessing the energy released as an attractive energy source for mankind. The inertial confinement approach to fusion involves rapidly compressing a tiny spherical capsule of fuel, initially a few millimeters in radius, to densities and temperatures higher than those in the core of the sun. The ignited plasma is confined solely by its own inertia long enough for a significant fraction of the fuel to burn before the plasma expands, cools down and the fusion reactions are quenched. The potential of this confinement approach as an attractive energy source is being studied in the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program, which is the subject of this report. A complex set of interrelated requirements for IFE has motivated the study of novel potential solutions. Three types of “drivers” for fuel compression are presently studied: high-averagepower lasers (HAPL), heavy-ion (HI) accelerators, and Z-Pinches. The three main approaches to IFE are based on these drivers, along with the specific type of target (which contains the fuel capsule) and chamber that appear most promising for a particular driver.

  5. Review of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Igniting fusion fuel in the laboratory remains an alluring goal for two reasons: the desire to study matter under the extreme conditions needed for fusion burn, and the potential of harnessing the energy released as an attractive energy source for mankind. The inertial confinement approach to fusion involves rapidly compressing a tiny spherical capsule of fuel, initially a few millimeters in radius, to densities and temperatures higher than those in the core of the sun. The ignited plasma is confined solely by its own inertia long enough for a significant fraction of the fuel to burn before the plasma expands, cools down and the fusion reactions are quenched. The potential of this confinement approach as an attractive energy source is being studied in the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program, which is the subject of this report. A complex set of interrelated requirements for IFE has motivated the study of novel potential solutions. Three types of @@@drivers@@@ for fuel compression are presently studied: high-averagepower lasers (HAPL), heavy-ion (HI) accelerators, and Z-Pinches. The three main approaches to IFE are based on these drivers, along with the specific type of target (which contains the fuel capsule) and chamber that appear most promising for a particular driver.

  6. Development of velocity interferometer and its application to piston motion measurement in a compression tube of freepiston shock tube; Sokudo kanshokei no kaihatsu to sono jiyu piston shogekihakan no asshuku kannai no piston undo no keisoku eno oyo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koremoto, K.; Hashimoto, T. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Takayama, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science; Ito, K [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-25

    A free piston shock tunnel has been intensively used as a hypersonic flow ground test facility and its characteristics depend sensitively upon the piston motion in its compression tube. The continuous measurement of the piston motion in its compression tube was studied in an analogue facility in which a piston motion in a 50mm dia. and 2000mm long compression tube was measured continuously and accurately from its start to the collision with bumper section. To achieve it a velocity interferometer was developed particularly to measure the piston speed in it. Then piston motions were successfully measured and result agreed very well with numerical result. (author)

  7. Numerical investigation into the highly nonlinear heat transfer equation with bremsstrahlung emission in the inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibi, M.; Oloumi, M.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Magidi, S. [Plasma and Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A highly nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation that models the electron heat transfer process in laser inertial fusion has been solved numerically. The strong temperature dependence of the electron thermal conductivity and heat loss term (Bremsstrahlung emission) makes this a highly nonlinear process. In this case, an efficient numerical method is developed for the energy transport mechanism from the region of energy deposition into the ablation surface by a combination of the Crank-Nicolson scheme and the Newton-Raphson method. The quantitative behavior of the electron temperature and the comparison between analytic and numerical solutions are also investigated. For more clarification, the accuracy and conservation of energy in the computations are tested. The numerical results can be used to evaluate the nonlinear electron heat conduction, considering the released energy of the laser pulse at the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) targets and preheating by heat conduction ahead of a compression shock in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. The Physics of Inertial Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S

    2004-01-01

    The growing effort in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research, with the upcoming new MJ class laser facilities, NIF in USA and LMJ in France, and the upgraded MJ z-pinch ZR facility in the USA, makes the appearance of this book by Atzeni and Meyer-ter-Vehn very timely. This book is an excellent introduction for graduate or masters level students and for researchers just entering the field. It is written in a very pedagogical way with great attention to the basic understanding of the physical processes involved. The book should also be very useful to researchers already working in the field as a reference containing many key formulas from different relevant branches of physics; experimentalists will especially appreciate the presence of 'ready-to-use' numerical formulas written in convenient practical units. The book starts with a discussion of thermonuclear reactions and conditions required to achieve high gain in ICF targets, emphasizing the importance of high compression of the D-T fuel, and compares the magnetic confinement fusion and inertial confinement fusion approaches. The next few chapters discuss in detail the basic concepts of ICF: the hydrodynamics of a spherically imploding capsule, ignition and energy gain. This is followed by a thorough discussion of the physics of thermal waves, ablative drive and hydrodynamic instabilities, with primary focus on the Rayleigh--Taylor instability. The book also contains very useful chapters discussing the properties of hot dense matter (ionization balance, equation of state and opacity) and the interaction of laser and energetic ion beams with plasma. The book is based on and reflects the research interests of the authors and, more generally, the European activity in this area. This could explain why, in my opinion, some topics are covered in less detail than they deserve, e.g. the chapter on hohlraum physics is too brief. On the other hand, the appearance in the book of an interesting chapter on the concept of

  9. Self-similar solutions for implosion and reflection of coalesced shocks in a plasma : spherical and cylindrical geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavda, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions to the self-similar equations of gas dynamics for a plasma, treated as an ideal gas with specific heat ratio γ=5/3 are obtained for the implosion and subsequent reflection of various types of shock sequences in spherical and cylindrical geometries. This is based on the lowest-order polynomial approximation in the reduced fluid velocity, for a suitable nonlinear function of the sound velocity and the fluid velocity. However, the method developed here is powerful enough to be extended analytically to higher order polynomial approximations, to obtain successive approximations to the exact self-similar solutions. Also obtained, for the first time, are exact asymptotic solutions, in analytic form, for the reflected shocks. Criteria are given that may enable one to make a choice between the two geometries for maximising compression or temperature of the gas. These solutions should be useful in the study of inertial confinement of a plasma. (author)

  10. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.

    1977-01-01

    The principal goal of the inertial confinement fusion program is the development of a practical fusion power plant in this century. Rapid progress has been made in the four major areas of ICF--targets, drivers, fusion experiments, and reactors. High gain targets have been designed. Laser, electron beam, and heavy ion accelerator drivers appear to be feasible. Record-breaking thermonuclear conditions have been experimentally achieved. Detailed diagnostics of laser implosions have confirmed predictions of the LASNEX computer program. Experimental facilities are being planned and constructed capable of igniting high gain fusion microexplosions in the mid 1980's. A low cost long lifetime reactor design has been developed

  11. Inertial Symmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2018-03-19

    We review and expand upon recent work demonstrating that Weyl invariant theories can be broken "inertially," which does not depend upon a potential. This can be understood in a general way by the "current algebra" of these theories, independently of specific Lagrangians. Maintaining the exact Weyl invariance in a renormalized quantum theory can be accomplished by renormalization conditions that refer back to the VEV's of fields in the action. We illustrate the computation of a Weyl invariant Coleman-Weinberg potential that breaks a U(1) symmetry together,with scale invariance.

  12. Experimental results on advanced inertial fusion schemes obtained within the HiPER project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batani, Dimitri; Santos, Jorge J.; Schurtz, Guy; Hulin, Sebastien; Ribeyre, Xavier; Nicolai, Philippe; Vauzour, Benjamin; Dorchies, Fabien; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Koester, Petra; Labate, Luca; Honrubia, Javier; Antonelli, Luca; Morace, Alessio; Volpe, Luca; Nazarov, Wiger; Pasley, John; Richetta, Maria; Lancaster, Kate; Spindloe, Christopher; Tolley, Martin; Neely, David; Kozlova, Michaela; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Rus, Bedrich; Wolowski, Jerzy; Badziak, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments conducted within the Work Package 10 (fusion experimental programme) of the HiPER project. The aim of these experiments was to study the physics relevant for advanced ignition schemes for inertial confinement fusion, i.e. the fast ignition and the shock ignition. Such schemes allow to achieve a higher fusion gain compared to the indirect drive approach adopted in the National Ignition Facility in United States, which is important for the future inertial fusion energy reactors and for realising the inertial fusion with smaller facilities. (authors)

  13. Status of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1987-04-01

    The technology advancement to high-power beams has also given birth to new technologies. That class of Free Electron Lasers that employs rf linacs, synchrotrons, and storage rings - although the use the tools of High Energy Physics (HEP) - was developed well behind the kinetic energy frontier. The induction linac, however, is something of an exception; it was born directly from the needs of the magnetic fusion program, and was not motivated by a high-energy physics application. The heavy-ion approach to inertial fusion starts with picking from the rich menu of accelerator technologies those that have, ab initio, the essential ingredients needed for a power plant driver: multigap acceleration - which leads to reliability/lifetime; electrical efficiency; repetition rate; and beams that can be reliably focused over a suitably long distance. The report describes the programs underway in Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research as well as listing expected advances in driver, target, and beam quality areas in the inertial fusion power program

  14. Inertial fusion commercial power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation discusses the motivation for inertial fusion energy, a brief synopsis of five recently-completed inertial fusion power plant designs, some general conclusions drawn from these studies, and an example of an IFE hydrogen synfuel plant to suggest that future fusion studies consider broadening fusion use to low-emission fuels production as well as electricity

  15. Shocking matter to extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Y.M.; Sharma, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    A good understanding of the thermodynamic response of matter at high compression and high energy densities is important to several areas of physics. Shock-wave experiments are uniquely suited for obtaining data at extreme conditions, and a shock-compressed matter can be viewed as a condensed system with or without dissociation or as a strongly coupled plasma. This article reviews work by Da Silva et al. in which irradiances ranging from 5x10 superscript 12 to 2x10 superscript 14 W/cm 2 were used to generate 8- to 10-ns square pulses in liquid deuterium. The authors demonstrated negligible pre-heating of the sample, steady propagation of the shock wave, and direct determination of the shock wave velocity along with particle velocity and density in the shocked state. Da Silva et al. results are compared with models and other experimental information, and the usefulness of the data in other areas is assessed. 11 refs., 1 fig

  16. Experimental study of fast electron transport in the framework of fast ignition for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauzour, B.

    2012-01-01

    The framework of this PhD thesis is the validation of the fast ignition scheme for the nuclear fusion by inertial confinement. It consists in the experimental study of the various processes involved in fast electron beams propagation, produced by intense laser pulses (10 19 W.cm -2 ), through dense matter either solid or compressed. In this work we present the results of three experiments carried out on different laser facilities in order to generate fast electron beams in various conditions and study their propagation in different states of matter, from the cold solid to the warm and dense plasma.The first experiment was performed with a high intensity contrast on the UHI100 laser facility (CEA Saclay). The study of fast electron energy deposition inside thin aluminium targets highlights a strong target heating at shallow depths, where the collective effects are predominant, thus producing a steep temperature profile between front (300 eV) and rear (20 eV) sides over 20μm thickness. A numerical simulation of the experiment shows that this temperature gradient induces the formation of a shock wave, breaking through the rear side of the target and thus leading to increase the thermal emission. The experimental chronometry of the shock breakthrough allowed validating the model of the collective transport of electrons.Two other experiments were dedicated to the study of fast electron beam propagation inside compressed targets. In the first experiment on the LULI2000 laser facility, the plane compression geometry allowed to precisely dissociate the energy losses due to resistive effects from those due to the collisional ones. By comparing our experimental results with simulations, we observed a significative increase of the fast electron beam energy losses with the compression and the target heating to temperatures close to the Fermi temperature. The second experiment, performed in a cylindrical geometry, demonstrated a fast electron beam guiding phenomenon due to

  17. On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.; Betti, R.; Schurtz, G.P.; Craxton, R.S.; Dunne, A.M.; LaFortune, K.N.; Schmitt, A.J.; McKenty, P.W.; Bailey, D.S.; Lambert, M.A.; Ribeyre, X.; Theobald, W.R.; Strozzi, D.J.; Harding, D.R.; Casner, A.; Atzemi, S.; Erbert, G.V.; Andersen, K.S.; Murakami, M.; Comley, A.J.; Cook, R.C.; Stephens, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term (∼3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of ∼60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around ∼0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R and D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

  18. Study of the dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-loaded metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescoute, E.

    2010-01-01

    The irradiation of a metallic target by a high power laser pulse induces a shock wave in the material. Under some conditions, it leads to the production of high velocity ejecta which can damage the optical environment (lenses, mirrors, windows, etc.). With the ongoing development of high energy laser facilities designed to achieve inertial confinement fusion, such as the Laser MegaJoule in France or the National Ignition Facility in the USA, the question of debris ejection from metallic samples subjected to intense laser irradiation has become a key issue. It is necessary to understand fragmentation processes induced by laser shock, and to anticipate and quantify generated fragments, in order to design suitable protections and experiments, and to preserve laser facilities. The main fragmentation processes which can occur in a laser-shock-loaded metallic target and generate high velocity ejecta are: (i) micro-jetting, which occurs upon reflection of the incident compressive front from the free surface, (ii) spallation, which is due to the later interaction of the release wave reflected from that surface with the incident unloading wave and (iii) dynamic punching of thin targets. Experimental campaigns have been performed on high energy laser facilities in the Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d'Aquitaine (CESTA, CEA, Alise facility) and in the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, LULI 2000 facility). Gold and aluminium have been mainly studied because they are the two main metallic components of the target which will be used to achieved the inertial confinement fusion. Specific diagnostics have been developed and used during these experiments to study the dynamic fragmentation: transverse shadowgraphy, free surface velocity measurement and recovery of generated fragments. Experimental results have been compared with numerical predictions obtained with a bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code, where a specific numerical

  19. Compressible Vortex Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavarasan, Ramasamy; Arakeri, Jayawant; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of a high-speed vortex ring with a shock wave is one of the fundamental issues as it is a source of sound in supersonic jets. The complex flow field induced by the vortex alters the propagation of the shock wave greatly. In order to understand the process, a compressible vortex ring is studied in detail using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and shadowgraphic techniques. The high-speed vortex ring is generated from a shock tube and the shock wave, which precedes the vortex, is reflected back by a plate and made to interact with the vortex. The shadowgraph images indicate that the reflected shock front is influenced by the non-uniform flow induced by the vortex and is decelerated while passing through the vortex. It appears that after the interaction the shock is "split" into two. The PIV measurements provided clear picture about the evolution of the vortex at different time interval. The centerline velocity traces show the maximum velocity to be around 350 m/s. The velocity field, unlike in incompressible rings, contains contributions from both the shock and the vortex ring. The velocity distribution across the vortex core, core diameter and circulation are also calculated from the PIV data.

  20. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  1. Inertial confinement fusion target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdier, A.

    2001-12-01

    A simple, zero-dimensional model describing the temporal behaviour of an imploding-shell, magnetized fuel inertial confinement fusion target is formulated. The addition of a magnetic field to the fuel reduces thermal conduction losses. As a consequence, it might lead to high gains and reduce the driver requirements. This beneficial effect of the magnetic field on thermonuclear gains is confirmed qualitatively by the zero-dimensional model results. Still, the extent of the initial-condition space for which significant gains can occur is not, by far, as large as previously reported. One-dimensional CEA code simulations which confirm this results are also presented. Finally, we suggest to study the approach proposed by Hasegawa. In this scheme, the laser target is not imploded, and the life-time of the plasma can be very much increased. (author)

  2. Ion beam inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1995-01-01

    About twenty years ago, A. W. Maschke of Brookhaven National Laboratory and R. L. Martin of Argonne National Laboratory recognized that the accelerators that have been developed for high energy and nuclear physics are, in many ways, ideally suited to the requirements of inertial fusion power production. These accelerators are reliable, they have a long operating life, and they can be efficient. Maschke and Martin noted that they can focus ion beams to small focal spots over distances of many meters and that they can readily operate at the high pulse repetition rates needed for commercial power production. Fusion, however, does impose some important new constraints that are not important for high energy or nuclear physics applications. The most challenging new constraint from a scientific standpoint is the requirement that the accelerator deliver more than 10 14 W of beam power to a small quantity (less than 100 mg) of matter. The most challenging constraint from an engineering standpoint is accelerator cost. Maschke showed theoretically that accelerators could produce adequate work. Heavy-ion fusion is widely recognized to be a promising approach to inertial fusion power production. It provides an excellent opportunity to apply methods and technology developed for basic science to an important societal need. The pulsed-power community has developed a complementary, parallel approach to ion beam fusion known as light-ion fusion. The talk will discuss both heavy-ion and light-ion fusion. It will explain target physics requirements and show how they lead to constraints on the usual accelerator parameters such as kinetic energy, current, and emittance. The talk will discuss experiments that are presently underway, specifically experiments on high-current ion sources and injectors, pulsed-power machines recirculating induction accelerators, and transverse beam combining. The talk will give a brief description of a proposed new accelerator called Elise

  3. Shocks in fragile matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Non-linear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they unjam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit vanishing elastic moduli and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are continuously compressed, and demonstrate that the resulting excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than linear waves. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and compression speed by a surprisingly simple analytical model. We also treat shear shocks within a simplified viscoelastic model of nearly-isostatic random networks comprised of harmonic springs. In this case, anharmonicity does not originate locally from nonlinear interactions between particles, as in granular media; instead, it emerges from the global architecture of the network. As a result, the diverging width of the shear shocks bears a nonlinear signature of the diverging isostatic length associated with the loss of rigidity in these floppy networks.

  4. On inertial range scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    Inertial-range scaling laws for two- and three-dimensional turbulence are re-examined within a unified framework. A new correction to Kolmogorov's k -5/3 scaling is derived for the energy inertial range. A related modification is found to Kraichnan's logarithmically corrected two-dimensional enstrophy cascade law that removes its unexpected divergence at the injection wavenumber. The significance of these corrections is illustrated with steady-state energy spectra from recent high-resolution closure computations. The results also underscore the asymptotic nature of inertial-range scaling laws. Implications for conventional numerical simulations are discussed

  5. Inertial fusion with heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, R.; Hofmann, I.; Arnold, R.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principle of inertial confinement is the irradiation of a small pellet filled with DT-fuel by laser or particle beams in order to compress the fuel and ignite it. As 'drivers' for this process large laser installations and light-ion devices have been built since then and the results obtained during the past few years have increased our confidence, that the ignition conditions might be reached. Further conditions, however, have to be fulfilled for operating a power plant. In particular, the driver needs to have enough efficiency to be economical, and for a continuous energy production a high repetition rate and availability is required. It is less than ten years since it was realized that heavy ion beams might be a promising candidate for achieving inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Due to the evolution of high-energy and heavy-ion physics during the past 25 years, accelerators have attained a high technical and technological standard and an excellent operational reliability. Nevertheless, the heavy ion driver for a fusion power plant requires beam specifications exceeding those of existing accelerators considerably. (Auth.)

  6. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Tang Daorun; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Liu Yonggang; Xu Tao; Chen Ming; Mei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 10 10 . We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  7. Radiation- and pair-loaded shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2018-06-01

    We consider the structure of mildly relativistic shocks in dense media, taking into account the radiation and pair loading, and diffusive radiation energy transfer within the flow. For increasing shock velocity (increasing post-shock temperature), the first important effect is the efficient energy redistribution by radiation within the shock that leads to the appearance of an isothermal jump, whereby the flow reaches the final state through a discontinuous isothermal transition. The isothermal jump, on scales much smaller than the photon diffusion length, consists of a weak shock and a quick relaxation to the isothermal conditions. Highly radiation-dominated shocks do not form isothermal jump. Pair production can mildly increase the overall shock compression ratio to ≈10 (4 for matter-dominated shocks and 7 of the radiation-dominated shocks).

  8. Physics of inertial confinement pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of inertial confinement fusion pellet physics is given. A discussion is presented of current estimated ICF driver requirements and a couple of pellet examples. The physics of driver/plasma coupling for two drivers which are being considered, namely a laser driver and a heavy ion accelerator driver, is described. Progress towards inertial confinement fusion that has been made using laser drivers in target experiments to date is discussed

  9. Inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, K.

    2001-01-01

    Reviewed is the present status of the inertial confinement energy (IFE) research. The highlights of the IFE presentations are as follows. Toward demonstrating ignition and burning of imploded plasmas, ignition facilities of mega jule class blue laser system are under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the CEA laboratory of Bordeaux. The central ignition by both indirect drive and direct drive will be explored by the middle of 2010's. A new ignition concept so called 'fast ignition' has also been investigated intensively in the last two years. Peta watt level (1PW∼0.1PW output) CPA lasers have been used for heating solid targets and imploded plasmas. With 50J∼500J/psec pulses, solid targets are found to be heated up to 300eV. They were measured by X-ray spectroscopy, neutron energy spectrum, and so on. Summarized are also researches on simulation code developments, target design and fabrication, heavy ion beam fusion, Z-pinch based X-ray source, and laser driver technology. (author)

  10. Antiproton fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    With 180 MJ/microg, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. The use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule and produce high target gains with only modest compression of the main fuel is investigated. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. This can be considered in-situ fast ignition as it obviates the need for the external injection of the ignition energy. In the first of two candidate schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low-energy ion beam. In the second, autocatalytic scheme, the antiprotons are preemplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, the author estimates that ∼10 12 antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition within the ignitor zone. In addition to eliminating the need for a second, energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central ignition without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or Hohlraum debris. However, in addition to the practical difficulties of storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a speculative scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in an external, optimized facility. Estimates suggest that the electrical wall plug energy per pulse required for the separate production of the antiprotons is of the same order as that required for the conventional slow compression driver

  11. Radiative relativistic shock adiabate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsintsadze, L.N.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influences of thermal radiation on the state equation of shock waves, derived in the previous paper [L. N. Tsintsadze, Phys. Plasmas 2, 4462 (1995)], are studied and a series of relations of thermodynamic quantities that hold for shock waves are derived. It is shown that the presence of radiation can strongly change the compressibility of the plasma. It is well known that for polytropic gases the compressibility cannot change more than four times the initial value in the case of nonrelativistic temperatures. The numerical calculations show that there are no such restrictions, when the radiation energy exceeds the kinetic energy of the plasma. The ultrarelativistic temperature range is also covered in our numerical calculations. Also studied are the influences of the radiation on the PT and the TV diagrams. A significant modification due to radiation is found in every case studied. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Dynamic symmetry of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsules on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Kritcher, A.; Jones, O. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Tommasini, R.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Döppner, T.; Dewald, E. L.; Eder, D. C.; Field, J. E.; Glenn, S. M.; Izumi, N.; Haan, S. W.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve ignition using inertial confinement fusion it is important to control the growth of low-mode asymmetries as the capsule is compressed. Understanding the time-dependent evolution of the shape of the hot spot and surrounding fuel layer is crucial to optimizing implosion performance. A design and experimental campaign to examine sources of asymmetry and to quantify symmetry throughout the implosion has been developed and executed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We have constructed a large simulation database of asymmetries applied during different time intervals. Analysis of the database has shown the need to measure and control the hot-spot shape, areal density distribution, and symmetry swings during the implosion. The shape of the hot spot during final stagnation is measured using time-resolved imaging of the self-emission, and information on the shape of the fuel at stagnation can be obtained from Compton radiography [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011)]. For the first time on NIF, two-dimensional inflight radiographs of gas-filled and cryogenic fuel layered capsules have been measured to infer the symmetry of the radiation drive on the capsule. These results have been used to modify the hohlraum geometry and the wavelength tuning to improve the inflight implosion symmetry. We have also expanded our shock timing capabilities by the addition of extra mirrors inside the re-entrant cone to allow the simultaneous measurement of shock symmetry in three locations on a single shot, providing asymmetry information up to Legendre mode 4. By diagnosing the shape at nearly every step of the implosion, we estimate that shape has typically reduced fusion yield by about 50% in ignition experiments

  13. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  14. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  15. Laser driven supersonic flow over a compressible foam surface on the Nike lasera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Plewa, T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Gillespie, R. S.; Weaver, J. L.; Visco, A.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    A laser driven millimeter-scale target was used to generate a supersonic shear layer in an attempt to create a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable interface in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that remains unexplored in HED plasmas, which are relevant to the inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical environments. In the experiment presented here the Nike laser [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to create and drive Al plasma over a rippled foam surface. In response to the supersonic Al flow (Mach=2.6±1.1) shocks should form in the Al flow near the perturbations. The experimental data were used to infer the existence and location of these shocks. In addition, the interface perturbations show growth that has possible contributions from both KH and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Since compressible shear layers exhibit smaller growth, it is important to use the KH growth rate derived from the compressible dispersion relation.

  16. Laser driven supersonic flow over a compressible foam surface on the Nike laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Visco, A.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Weaver, J. L.; Plewa, T.

    2010-01-01

    A laser driven millimeter-scale target was used to generate a supersonic shear layer in an attempt to create a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable interface in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that remains unexplored in HED plasmas, which are relevant to the inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical environments. In the experiment presented here the Nike laser [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to create and drive Al plasma over a rippled foam surface. In response to the supersonic Al flow (Mach=2.6±1.1) shocks should form in the Al flow near the perturbations. The experimental data were used to infer the existence and location of these shocks. In addition, the interface perturbations show growth that has possible contributions from both KH and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Since compressible shear layers exhibit smaller growth, it is important to use the KH growth rate derived from the compressible dispersion relation.

  17. Summary of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindl, J.

    2003-01-01

    There has been rapid progress in inertial fusion since the last IAEA meeting. This progress spans the construction of ignition facilities, a wide range of target concepts, and the pursuit of integrated programs to develop fusion energy using lasers and ion beams. Two ignition facilities are under construction (NIF in the U.S. and LMJ in France) and both projects are progressing toward an initial experimental capability. The LIL prototype beamline for LMJ and the first 4 beams of NIF will be available for experiments in about 1 year. Ignition experiments are expected to begin in 7-9 years at both facilities. There is steady progress in the target science and target fabrication in preparation for indirect drive ignition experiments on NIF and LMJ. Advanced target designs may lead to 5-10 times more yield than initial target designs. There has been excellent progress on the science of ion beam and z-pinch driven indirect drive targets. Excellent progress on direct-drive targets have been obtained at the University of Rochester. This includes improved performance of targets with a pulse shape predicted to result in reduced hydrodynamic instability. Rochester has also obtained encouraging results from initial cryogenic implosions. There is widespread interest in the science of fast ignition because of its potential for achieving higher target gain with lower driver energy and relaxed target fabrication requirements. Researchers from Osaka have achieved outstanding implosion and heating results from the Gekko Petawatt facility. A broad based program to develop lasers and ions beams for IFE is under way with excellent progress in drivers, chambers, target fabrication and target injection. KrF and Diode Pumped Solid-State lasers (DPSSL) are being developed in conjunction with dry-wall chambers and direct drive targets. Induction accelerators for heavy ions are being developed in conjunction with thick-liquid protected wall chambers and indirect-drive targets. (author)

  18. Shock wave physics group (M-6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental facilities and activities of the shock wave physics group at LASL are described. The facilities include a compressed gas gun, two-stage gas gun, high explosive facilities, and a pulsed megagauss field facility

  19. Externally guided target for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Val, J.M.; Piera, M.

    1996-01-01

    A totally new concept is proposed to reach fusion conditions by externally guided inertial confinement. The acceleration and compression of the fuel is guided by a cannon-like external duct with a conical section ending in a small-size cavity around the central point of the tube. The fuel pellets coming from each cannon mouth collide in the central cavity where the implosion and final compression of the fuel take place. Both the tube material density and its areal density must be much higher than the initial density and areal density of the fuel. The external tube will explode into pieces as a consequence of the inner pressures achieved after the fuel central collision. If the collision is suitably driven, a fusion burst can take place before the tube disassembly. because of the features of the central collision needed to trigger ignition, this concept could be considered as tamped impact fusion. Both the fusion products and the debris from the guide tube are caught by a liquid-lithium curtain surrounding the target. Only two driving beams are necessary. The system can be applied to any type of driver and could use a solid pellet at room temperature as the initial target. 54 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  20. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October-December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, J.

    1997-01-01

    The articles in this issue report progress on: Supernova Hydrodynamics Experiments on the Nova Laser; Characterization of Laser-Driven Shock Waves Using Interferometry; Absolute Equation of State Measurements of Compressed Liquid Deuterium Using Nova; Low-Density-Foam Shells; Tetrahedral Hohlraums; The Rosseland Mean Opacity of a Composite Material at High Temperatures.

  1. Studies on the robustness of shock-ignited laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S; Schiavi, A; Marocchino, A

    2011-01-01

    Several aspects of the sensitivity of a shock-ignited inertial fusion target to variation of parameters and errors or imperfections are studied by means of one-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical simulations. The study refers to a simple all-DT target, initially proposed for fast ignition (Atzeni et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 7 052702) and subsequently shown to be also suitable for shock ignition (Ribeyre et al 2009 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 015013). It is shown that the growth of both Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at the ablation front is reduced by laser pulses with an adiabat-shaping picket. An operating window for the parameters of the ignition laser spike is described; the threshold power depends on beam focusing and synchronization with the compression pulse. The time window for spike launch widens with beam power, while the minimum spike energy is independent of spike power. A large parametric scan indicates good tolerance (at the level of a few percent) to target mass and laser power errors. 2D simulations indicate that the strong igniting shock wave plays an important role in reducing deceleration-phase RTI growth. Instead, the high hot-spot convergence ratio (ratio of initial target radius to hot-spot radius at ignition) makes ignition highly sensitive to target mispositioning.

  2. A numerical study of shock-acceleration of a diffuse helium cylinder. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenough, J.A.; Jacobs, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a shock-accelerated diffuse Helium cylindrical inhomogeneity is investigated using a new numerical method. The new algorithm is a higher-order Godunov implementation of the so-called multi-fluid equations. This system correctly models multiple component mixtures by accounting for differential compressibility effects. This base integrator is embedded in an implementation of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) that allows efficient increase in resolution by concentrating the computational effort where high accuracy, or increased resolution, are required. Qualitative and quantitative comparison with previous experimental data is excellent. The simulations show that counter-sign vortex blobs are deposited in the jet core by baroclinic generation of the curved shock wave as it traverses the jet. This vorticity deposition occurs over timescales that scale with the shock passage time (∼ 10microsec). Three phases of development are identified and characterized. The first is the weak deformation (WD) phase, where there is weak distortion of the Helium jet due to weak vorticity induced velocity effects. The second phase is the strong deformation (SD) phase where there is large distortion for the jet and the vortex blobs due to large induced velocity effects. The last is a relaxation/reorganization (RR) phase where the vorticity field is reorganized into point-like vortex pair. This class of problem has applications in such disparate fields as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-speed combustion

  3. Lightweight, Miniature Inertial Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Crassidis, Agamemnon

    2012-01-01

    A miniature, lighter-weight, and highly accurate inertial navigation system (INS) is coupled with GPS receivers to provide stable and highly accurate positioning, attitude, and inertial measurements while being subjected to highly dynamic maneuvers. In contrast to conventional methods that use extensive, groundbased, real-time tracking and control units that are expensive, large, and require excessive amounts of power to operate, this method focuses on the development of an estimator that makes use of a low-cost, miniature accelerometer array fused with traditional measurement systems and GPS. Through the use of a position tracking estimation algorithm, onboard accelerometers are numerically integrated and transformed using attitude information to obtain an estimate of position in the inertial frame. Position and velocity estimates are subject to drift due to accelerometer sensor bias and high vibration over time, and so require the integration with GPS information using a Kalman filter to provide highly accurate and reliable inertial tracking estimations. The method implemented here uses the local gravitational field vector. Upon determining the location of the local gravitational field vector relative to two consecutive sensors, the orientation of the device may then be estimated, and the attitude determined. Improved attitude estimates further enhance the inertial position estimates. The device can be powered either by batteries, or by the power source onboard its target platforms. A DB9 port provides the I/O to external systems, and the device is designed to be mounted in a waterproof case for all-weather conditions.

  4. Study on Reflected Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in a Shock Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong Nat’l Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The interaction between a shock wave and a boundary layer causes boundary layer separation, shock train, and in some cases, strong unsteadiness in the flow field. Such a situation is also observed in a shock tube, where the reflected shock wave interacts with the unsteady boundary layer. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the shock train phenomenon in a shock tube. In the present study, numerical studies were conducted using the two-dimensional axisymmetric domain of a shock tube, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved to clarify the flow characteristics of shock train phenomenon inside a shock tube. A detailed wave diagram was developed based on the present computational results, which were validated with existing experimental data.

  5. Industry's role in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is an address to the Tenth Symposium on Fusion Engineering. The speaker first addressed the subject of industry's role in inertial fusion three years earlier in 1980, outlining programs that included participation in the Shiva construction project, and the industrial participants' program set up in the laser fusion program to bring industrial scientists and engineers into the laboratory to work on laser fusion. The speaker is now the president of KMS Fusion, Inc., the primary industrial participant in the inertial fusion program. The outlook for fusion energy and the attitude of the federal government toward the fusion program is discussed

  6. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  7. Compression stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call your health insurance or prescription plan: Find out if they pay for compression stockings. Ask if your durable medical equipment benefit pays for compression stockings. Get a prescription from your doctor. Find a medical equipment store where they can ...

  8. Shock Ignition Target Design for Inertial Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    on the Nike KrF laser (0.248µm wavelength) are consistent with an intensity limit of about a factor of two higher8,9, and further experiments are...McLean, and C. Manka, “Observations of the Two Plasmon Decay Instability Driven by the Nike KrF Laser” submitted to Physical Review Letters. 9J. L...Lehmberg, J. A. Giuliani, and A. J. Schmitt, Journal Appl . Phys. 106, 023103 (2009). 17In general, we use V 2 ≡ I0.78R/ρ∆R, T ≡ R/V , E ≡ IR2T , and ṁ

  9. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  10. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Boehly, T R; Kress, J D; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ∼20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  11. Inertial thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watteau, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The principles of deuterium tritium (DT) magnetic or inertial thermonuclear fusion are given. Even if results would be better with heavy ions beams, most of the results on fusion are obtained with laser beams. Technical and theoretical aspects of the laser fusion are presented with an extrapolation to the future fusion reactor. (A.B.). 34 refs., 17 figs

  12. High performance inertial fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lindl, J.D.; Mead, W.C.; Pan, Y.L.

    1977-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) designs are considered which may have very high gains (approximately 1000) and low power requirements (<100 TW) for input energies of approximately one megajoule. These include targets having very low density shells, ultra thin shells, central ignitors, magnetic insulation, and non-ablative acceleration

  13. High performance inertial fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lindl, J.D.; Mead, W.C.; Pan, Y.L.

    1978-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target designs are considered which may have very high gains (approximately 1000) and low power requirements (< 100 TW) for input energies of approximately one megajoule. These include targets having very low density shells, ultra thin shells, central ignitors, magnetic insulation, and non-ablative acceleration

  14. Centrifuges and inertial shear forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van J.J.W.A.; Folgering, H.T.E.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Smit, T.H.

    2004-01-01

    Centrifuges are often used in biological studies for 1xg control samples in space flight microgravity experiments as well as in ground based research. Using centrifugation as a tool to generate an Earth like acceleration introduces unwanted inertial shear forces to the sample. Depending on the

  15. Inertial forces and physics teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva Martinez, J.M.; Pontes Pedrajas, A.

    1996-01-01

    An epistemological and didactic analysis about inertial forces and the role of validity of Newton's Laws seen from several reference systems is performed. On the basis of considerations fulfilled, a discussion about the necessity of introducing these topics in the curriculum of physics teaching at different levels is also carried out. (Author) 21 refs

  16. Saturation of equatorial inertial instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterziel, R.C.; Orlandi, P.; Carnevale, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Inertial instability in parallel shear flows and circular vortices in a uniformly rotating system ( $f$f-plane) redistributes absolute linear momentum or absolute angular momentum in such a way as to neutralize the instability. In previous studies we showed that, in the absence of other

  17. Hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses topics on hydrodynamics instabilities in inertial confinement: linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ablation-surface instability; bubble rise in late-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability; and saturation and multimode interactions in intermediate-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  18. Non-LTE effects in inertial confinement fusion target chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Moses, G.A.; Peterson, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    In previous studies of transport processes in inertial confinement fusion target chambers, the radiative properties of the background plasma were calculated under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). In this paper, the authors present a study of the equation of state and the radiative properties of high temperature, low-to-moderate density ( 21 cm -3 ) plasmas for the determination of the conditions under which non-LTE effects become important and for an assessment of the importance of non-LTE processes in target chambers during high yield inertial fusion target explosions. For this purpose, two-body (radiative and dielectronic) and three-body (collisional) recombination and de-excitation processes are considered in calculating the steady state ionization and excitation populations. The results of this study indicate that non-LTE processes generally become important at temperatures of > or approx. 1, 10 and 100 eV for plasma densities of 10 18 , 10 19 and 10 21 cm -3 , respectively. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the equation of state and the opacities for a non-LTE argon plasma were performed to study the response of a background gas to an inertial fusion target explosion. These calculations indicate that non-LTE processes are often the dominant atomic processes in the background plasma and that they can strongly affect the radiative and shock properties as energy is transported away from the point of the target explosion. (author). 22 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  19. Accelerator aspects of heavy ion induced inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, D

    1983-01-01

    Besides the possibilities of the magnetic fusion those of inertial fusion have increasingly found interest. Bundled photon and corpuscular beams shall be symetrically focussed from the outside on a pellet with the fusion fuel being compressed far beyond the density of the ordinary solids. Laser, light ion and heavy ion beams can be used as driver beams. The GSI took over the project leadership for a five years' research programme with formulated questions on heavy ion fusion. The project is promoted by the BMFT. During the international symposium the opportunity of intensive discussions on research work in this field in different countries was made use of.

  20. Repetitive pulsed power technology for inertial-confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, K.R.; Buttram, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The pulsed power requirements for inertial-confinement fusion reactors are defined for ion-beam and laser drivers. Several megajoule beams with 100's of terrawatt peak powers must be delivered to the reactor chamber 1 to 10 times per second. Ion-beam drivers are relatively efficient requiring less energy storage in the pulsed-power system but more time compression in the power flow chain than gas lasers. These high peak powers imply very large numbers of components for conventional pulse-power systems. A new design that significantly reduces the number of components is presented

  1. Shock compression synthesis of hard materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willson, C.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to adapt the high explosives technology that was developed in conjunction with nuclear weapons programs to subjecting materials to ultra-high pressures and to explore the utility of this technique for the synthesis of hard materials. The research was conducted in collaboration with researchers at the University of Texas, Texas Tech University and Pantex (Mason and Hanger Corp.). The group designed, modeled, built, and tested a new device that allows quantitative recovery of grams of material that have been subjected to unprecedented pressures. The modeling work was done at Texas Tech and Pantex. The metal parts and material samples were made at the University of Texas, and Pantex machined the explosives, assembled the devices and conducted the detonations. Sample characterization was carried out at the University of Texas and Texas Tech.

  2. Study on Exploding Wire Compression for Evaluating Electrical Conductivity in Warm-Dense Diamond-Like-Carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Kudo, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aso, Tsukasa; Harada, Nob.; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    To improve a coupling efficiency for the fast ignition scheme of the inertial confinement fusion, fast electron behaviors as a function of an electrical conductivity are required. To evaluate the electrical conductivity for low-Z materials as a diamond-like-carbon (DLC), we have proposed a concept to investigate the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) by using pulsed-power discharges. The concept of the evaluation of DLC for WDM is a shock compression driven by an exploding wire discharge with confined by a rigid capillary. The qualitatively evaluation of the electrical conductivity for the WDM DLC requires a small electrical conductivity of the exploding wire. To analyze the electrical conductivity of exploding wire, we have demonstrated an exploding wire discharge in water for gold. The results indicated that the electrical conductivity of WDM gold for 5000 K of temperature has an insulator regime. It means that the shock compression driven by the exploding wire discharge with confined by the rigid capillary is applied for the evaluation of electrical conductivity for WDM DLC. (paper)

  3. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  4. Dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-melted tin: experiment and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Resseguier, T. [CNRS ENSMA, Lab Combust and Deton, F-86961 Futuroscope (France); Signor, L.; Dragon, A. [CNRS ENSMA, Mecan and Phys Mat Lab, F-86961 Futuroscope (France); Signor, L.; Roy, G. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-07-01

    Dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded metals is an issue of considerable importance for both basic science and a variety of technological applications, such as pyrotechnics or inertial confinement fusion, the latter involving high energy laser irradiation of thin metallic shells. Whereas spall fracture in solid materials has been extensively studied for many years, little data can be found yet about the evolution of this phenomenon after partial or full melting on compression or on release. Here, we present an investigation of dynamic fragmentation in laser shock-melted tin, from the 'micro-spall' process (ejection of a cloud of fine droplets) occurring upon reflection of the compressive pulse from the target free surface, to the late rupture observed in the un-spalled melted layer (leading to the formation of larger spherical fragments). Experimental results consist of time-resolved velocity measurements and post-shock observations of recovered targets and fragments. They provide original information regarding the loss of tensile strength associated with melting, the cavitation mechanism likely to occur in the melted metal, the sizes of the subsequent fragments and their ejection velocities. A theoretical description based on an energetic approach adapted to the case of a liquid metal is implemented as a failure criterion in a one-dimensional hydro-code including a multi-phase equation of state for tin. The resulting predictions of the micro-spall process are compared with experimental data. In particular, the use of a new experimental technique to quantify the fragment size distributions leads to a much better agreement with theory than previously reported. Finally, a complementary approach focused on cavitation is proposed to evaluate the role of this phenomenon in the fragmentation of the melted metal. (authors)

  5. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT THE HELIOSPHERIC TERMINATION SHOCK WITH A STOCHASTIC SHOCK OBLIQUITY APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Aaron D.; Le Roux, Jakobus A.

    2013-01-01

    Observations by the plasma and magnetic field instruments on board the Voyager 2 spacecraft suggest that the termination shock is weak with a compression ratio of ∼2. However, this is contrary to the observations of accelerated particle spectra at the termination shock, where standard diffusive shock acceleration theory predicts a compression ratio closer to ∼2.9. Using our focused transport model, we investigate pickup proton acceleration at a stationary spherical termination shock with a moderately strong compression ratio of 2.8 to include both the subshock and precursor. We show that for the particle energies observed by the Voyager 2 Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instrument, pickup protons will have effective length scales of diffusion that are larger than the combined subshock and precursor termination shock structure observed. As a result, the particles will experience a total effective termination shock compression ratio that is larger than values inferred by the plasma and magnetic field instruments for the subshock and similar to the value predicted by diffusive shock acceleration theory. Furthermore, using a stochastically varying magnetic field angle, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the multiple power-law structure observed for the LECP spectra downstream of the termination shock

  6. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A shock absorber for the support of piping and components in a nuclear power plant is described. It combines a high degree of stiffness under sudden shocks, e.g. seismic disturbances, with the ability to allow for thermal expansion without resistance when so required. (JIW)

  7. POSTURAL SHOCK IN PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Ralph L.; Knauer, John; Larson, Roger K.

    1955-01-01

    Signs and symptoms of shock may be produced in some patients in late pregnancy by putting them in the dorsal recumbent posture. Change from this position will relieve the condition. The features of the supine hypotensive syndrome can be duplicated by applying pressure to the abdomen with the patient in a lateral position. The postural variations of venous pressure, blood pressure, and pulse appear to be due to obstruction of venous return from the lower portion of the body caused by the large uterus of late pregnancy compressing the vena cava. When shock is observed in a woman in late pregnancy, she should be turned to a lateral position before more active measures of treatment are begun. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14351983

  8. Relativistic shocks and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavens, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid dynamics of relativistic shock waves, and use the results to calculate the spectral index of particles accelerated by the Fermi process in such shocks. We have calculated the distributions of Fermi-accelerated particles at shocks propagating into cold proton-electron plasma and also cold electron-positron plasma. We have considered two different power spectra for the scattering waves, and find, in contrast to the non-relativistic case, that the spectral index of the accelerated particles depends on the wave power spectrum. On the assumption of thermal equilibrium both upstream and downstream, we present some useful fits for the compression ratio of shocks propagating at arbitrary speeds into gas of any temperature. (author)

  9. Irreversible thermodynamics of overdriven shocks in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    An isotropic solid capable of transporting heat and of undergoing dissipative plastic flow, is treated. The shock is assumed to be a steady wave, and any phase changes or macroscopic inhomogeneities which might be induced by the shock are neglected. Under these conditions it is established that for an overdriven shock, no solution is possible without heat transport, and when the heat transport is governed by the steady conduction equation, no solution is possible without plastic dissipation as well. Upper and lower bounds are established for the thermodynamic variables, namely the shear stress, temperature, entropy, plastic strain, and heat flux, as functions of compression through the shock

  10. Interplanetary propulsion using inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, C.D.; Hogan, W.J.; Hoffman, N.; Murray, K.; Klein, G.; Diaz, F.C.

    1987-01-01

    Inertial fusion can be used to power spacecraft within the solar system and beyond. Such spacecraft have the potential for short-duration manned-mission performance exceeding other technologies. We are conducting a study to assess the systems aspects of inertial fusion as applied to such missions, based on the conceptual engine design of Hyde (1983) we describe the required systems for an entirely new spacecraft design called VISTA that is based on the use of DT fuel. We give preliminary design details for the power conversion and power conditioning systems for manned missions to Mars of total duration of about 100 days. Specific mission performance results will be published elsewhere, after the study has been completed

  11. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N; Mursenkova, Irina V; Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves. (paper)

  12. Remarks on stability of magneto-elastic shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Domański

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of stability of plane shock waves for a model of perfect magnetoelasticityis investigated. Important mathematical properties, like loss of strict hyperbolicityand loss of genuine nonlinearity, and their consequences for the stability ofmagneto-elastic shocks are discussed. It is shown that some of these shocks do not satisfyclassical Lax stability conditions. Both compressible and incompressible models ofmagneto-elasticity are discussed.[b]Keywords[/b]: perfect magneto-elasticity, shock waves, stability conditions

  13. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien-Chih Liu, James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  15. Inertial objects in complex flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Rayhan; Ho, George; Cavas, Samuel; Bao, Jialun; Yecko, Philip

    2017-11-01

    Chaotic Advection and Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents both describe stirring and transport in complex and time-dependent flows, but FTLE analysis has been largely limited to either purely kinematic flow models or high Reynolds number flow field data. The neglect of dynamic effects in FTLE and Lagrangian Coherent Structure studies has stymied detailed information about the role of pressure, Coriolis effects and object inertia. We present results of laboratory and numerical experiments on time-dependent and multi-gyre Stokes flows. In the lab, a time-dependent effectively two-dimensional low Re flow is used to distinguish transport properties of passive tracer from those of small paramagnetic spheres. Companion results of FTLE calculations for inertial particles in a time-dependent multi-gyre flow are presented, illustrating the critical roles of density, Stokes number and Coriolis forces on their transport. Results of Direct Numerical Simulations of fully resolved inertial objects (spheroids) immersed in a three dimensional (ABC) flow show the role of shape and finite size in inertial transport at small finite Re. We acknowledge support of NSF DMS-1418956.

  16. Economic potential of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1984-04-01

    Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents

  17. Interactive computer graphics applications for compressible aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Three computer applications have been developed to solve inviscid compressible fluids problems using interactive computer graphics. The first application is a compressible flow calculator which solves for isentropic flow, normal shocks, and oblique shocks or centered expansions produced by two dimensional ramps. The second application couples the solutions generated by the first application to a more graphical presentation of the results to produce a desk top simulator of three compressible flow problems: 1) flow past a single compression ramp; 2) flow past two ramps in series; and 3) flow past two opposed ramps. The third application extends the results of the second to produce a design tool which solves for the flow through supersonic external or mixed compression inlets. The applications were originally developed to run on SGI or IBM workstations running GL graphics. They are currently being extended to solve additional types of flow problems and modified to operate on any X-based workstation.

  18. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (with a pulse), atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. The energy dose in cardioversion is less (0.5. - 2 J/kg) than in defibrillation (2 - 4 J/kg). In cardioversion the shock is discharged synchronously with the native R wave of the patient. Without synchronisation,. VF can be induced if a shock is delivered during the refractory period ...

  19. Shock formation within sonoluminescence bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong, V.Q.; Szeri, A.J.; Young, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    A strong case has been made by several authors that sharp, spherically symmetric shocks converging on the center of a spherical bubble driven by a strong acoustic field give rise to rapid compression and heating that produces the brief flash of light known as sonoluminescence. The formation of such shocks is considered. It is found that, although at the main collapse the bubble wall does indeed launch an inwardly-traveling compression wave, and although the subsequent reflection of the wave at the bubble center produces a very rapid temperature peak, the wave is prevented from steepening into a sharp shock by an adverse gradient in the sound speed caused by heat transfer. It is shown that the mathematical characteristics of the flow can be prevented from accumulating into a shock front by this adverse sound speed gradient. A range of results is presented for a variety of bubble ambient radii and sound field amplitudes suggested by experiments. The time scale of the peak temperature in the bubble is set by the dynamics of the compression wave: this is typically in the range 100 - 300 ps (FWHM) in concert with recent measurements of the sonoluminescence pulse width. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  20. Energy production by means of inertially confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoernqvist, N.; Witalis, E.

    1984-01-01

    An account is given, about the general but rather intricate physical principles which are fundamental for the ignition, propagation and burning of some listed energy-producing nuclear fusion reactions. Further, the theory is extended to describe the necessary but high performance combination studied or proposed to be achieved by the radiation sources (drivers) in order to bring about, in particular, the increase density of the nuclear fuel by means of a radiation-driven ablative compression. The analysis is extended by conditions and limitations also for technical and economic reasons. This leads to the identification followed by discussions of five critical parameters, each of which is a necessary condition to obtain inertial fusion. In the sequel, components and assemblies for inertial fusion are described, i.e. drivers (lasers, light ions, x-radiation, heavy ions), the structure and properties of fuel pellets and reactor proposals. Special regard is given to known or anticipated limitations of technical, physical or economic nature. A brief description is given about progress and present situation for magnetic confinement fusion. This provides a background of an attempt for a comparison with inertial fusion. It is then claimed that none of these two main-line techiques of fusion research can at present be regarded or expected to be more likely to succeed in providing economic fusion energy production. In the summary recommendations are given about theoretical studies in combination with close observations of the general and international progress of research. An experimental effort, however, is considered as too much of an expensive venture, in particular with regard to present uncertainties in judging techniques involving accelerator-generated heavy ions and x-ray generation methods for driving the implosion processes of inertial fusion. (Author)

  1. Single and nested tungsten-wire-array dynamics and applications to inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Wire array z-pinches show great promise as x-ray sources for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The double z-pinch hohlraum, for example, has produced capsule radiation drive symmetric to within 3%. This ICF concept will require that each of two 20-mm-diam arrays scale to x-ray powers ˜1 PW, to drive high-yield (>0.2 GJ) capsules to ignition. High-yield fusion will also require a temporally shaped radiation pulse to drive a low-entropy capsule implosion. Recently, improved understanding of high current (11-19 MA) single and nested wire-array dynamics has enabled significant progress towards these goals. As at lower currents, a single wire array (and both the outer and inner arrays of a nested system) shows a wire ablation phase, axial modulation of the ablation rate, a larger ablation rate for larger diameter wires, trailing mass and trailing current. These processes and others produce a broad mass profile that may impact the optimization of x-ray output for single and nested arrays. Our new insights into wire array physics have led to 20-mm-diam single and nested arrays with peak powers of 150-190 TW at implosion times of 55-90 ns, increased from 60-120 TW at 95-110 ns, improving power scaling. Radiation pulse shapes required for 3-shock isentropic compression of high-yield ICF capsules have also been demonstrated with nested wire arrays operating in current-transfer mode. In collaboration with: D.B. Sinars, R.A. Vesey, E.M. Waisman, W.A. Stygar, D.E. Bliss, S.V. Lebedev, J.P. Chittenden, P.V. Sasorov, R.W. Lemke, E.P. Yu, B.B. Afeyan, G.R. Bennett, M.G. Mazarakis, M.R. Lopez, M.E. Savage, J.L. Porter, T.A. Mehlhorn.

  2. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  3. Shock-wave induced mechanoluminescence: A new technique for studying effects of shock pressure on crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, B.P.; Parganiha, S.; Sonwane, V.D. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492010, Chhattisgarh (India); Chandra, V.K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Shivaji Nagar, Kolihapuri, Durg 491001, Chhattisgarh (India); Jha, Piyush, E-mail: piyushjha22@rediffmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Raipur Institute of Technology, Chhatauna, Mandir Hasuad, Raipur 492101, Chhattisgarh (India); Baghel, R.N. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492010, Chhattisgarh (India)

    2016-10-15

    The impact of a projectile propelled to velocities in the range of 0.5–2.5 km/s on to a target (X-cut quartz crystal) produces shock waves travelling at velocity of nearly 10 km/s in target, in which intense mechanoluminescence (ML) pulses of microsecond duration are produced, both in compression and post-compression conditions. The piezoelectric field produced due to surface charges of fractured target, causes band bending and subsequently, the free charge carriers are generated in the respective bands and the emission of ML occurs. The ML appears after a delay time t{sub th} whose value decreases with increasing value of the shock pressure. Initially, the ML intensity increases with the shock pressure because of the creation of more surfaces; however, for higher values of the shock pressure, the ML intensity tends to attain a saturation value because of the hardening of the crystals due to the creation of small crystallites in which the creation of new surfaces becomes difficult. The ratio between peak ML intensity in the uncompressed region and the maximum ML intensity in the compressed region decreases with increasing shock pressure because more defects produced at high pressure generate higher barrier for the relaxation of blocked cracks under compression. The expressions derived for characteristics of shock-induced ML are able to explain satisfactorily the experimental results. Shock-wave velocity, shock pressure, transit time, lifetime of electrons in conduction band, etc. can be determined by the shock-induced ML.As such, the shock-induced ML provides a new optical technique for the studies of materials under shock pressure.

  4. Density Functional Methods for Shock Physics and High Energy Density Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjarlais, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Molecular dynamics with density functional theory has emerged over the last two decades as a powerful and accurate framework for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties with broad application to dynamic compression, high energy density science, and warm dense matter. These calculations have been extensively validated against shock and ramp wave experiments, are a principal component of high-fidelity equation of state generation, and are having wide-ranging impacts on inertial confinement fusion, planetary science, and shock physics research. In addition to thermodynamic properties, phase boundaries, and the equation of state, one also has access to electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and lower energy optical properties. Importantly, all these properties are obtained within the same theoretical framework and are manifestly consistent. In this talk I will give a brief history and overview of molecular dynamics with density functional theory and its use in calculating a wide variety of thermodynamic and transport properties for materials ranging from ambient to extreme conditions and with comparisons to experimental data. I will also discuss some of the limitations and difficulties, as well as active research areas. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person's position unless they are in immediate danger. Do not give fluids by mouth. If person ... the patient with shock. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  6. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  7. Laser driven inertial fusion: the physical basis of current and recently proposed ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S

    2009-01-01

    A brief overview of the inertial fusion principles and schemes is presented. The bases for the laser driven ignition experiments programmed for the near future at the National Ignition Facility are outlined. These experiments adopt indirect-drive and aim at central ignition. The principles of alternate approaches, based on direct-drive and different routes to ignition (fast ignition and shock ignition) are also discussed. Gain curves are compared and discussed.

  8. Inertial fusion in the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.; Dudziak, D.J.; Cartwright, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The 1980s have proven to be an exciting time for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Major new laser and light-ion drivers have been constructed and have produced some encouraging results. The 1990s will be a crucial time for the ICF program. A decision for proceeding with the next facility is scheduled for the early 1990s. If the decision is positive, planning and construction of this facility will occur. Depending on the time required for design and construction, this next-generation facility could become operational near the turn of the century

  9. Inertial confinement fusion at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodner, S.E.; Boris, J.P.; Cooperstein, G.

    1979-01-01

    The NRL Inertial Confinement Fusion Program's emphasis has moved toward pellet concepts which use longer (approximately 10ns) lower intensity driver pulses than previously assumed. For laser drivers, this change was motivated by recent experiments at NRL with enhanced stimulated Brillouin backscatter. For ion drivers, the motivation is the possibility that substantial energy at 10-ns pulse lengths may soon be available. To accept these 10-ns pulses, it may be necessary to consider pellets of larger radius and thinner shell. The computational studies of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at NRL indicate the possibility of a dynamic stabilization of these thinner shells. (author)

  10. Compact inertial confinement multireactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) commercial-applications plant-optimum driver pulse repetition rates may exceed reactor pulse-repetition-rate capabilities. Thus, more than one reactor may be required for low-cost production of electric power, process heat, fissionable fuels, etc., in ICF plants. Substantial savings in expensive reactor containment cells and blankets can be realized by placing more than one reactor in a cell and by surrounding more than one reactor cavity with a single blanket system. There are also some potential disadvantages associated with close coupling in compact multicavity blankets and multireactor cells. Tradeoffs associated with several scenarios have been studied

  11. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  12. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  13. Shock propagation in a heterogeneous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbaz, D.

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the inertial confinement fusion in direct drive, the use of foams as ablator allows the reduction of hydrodynamic instabilities created on the target by the direct laser irradiation. The foam is made up of carbon (CH) fibers impregnated of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT). In the past, studies have been carried out considering this foam to be a homogeneous medium. Yet, the foam presents heterogeneous features. We study the effects of this heterogeneity on the shock velocity when the laser irradiates the target. Thanks to experimental and numerical studies, we show that the shock propagates faster in the heterogeneous medium than in the homogeneous one with the same averaged density. This velocity gap depends on the presence rate of the CH fibers in the foam, the density ratio, the adiabatic coefficient and the foam geometry. We model the foam by different ways, more and more complex. The shock velocity modification is due to the baroclinicity which, during the interaction between the shock front and the interface, creates a vorticity deposition, responsible for the shock acceleration. Accordingly, an interface, which is plane and perpendicular to the front shock, maximizes the vorticity deposition and increases the velocity gaps between heterogeneous and homogeneous media. We found a correlation between the kinetic energy behind the shock front and the velocities relative difference. We compared our results with two analytical models. However, the system is not closed, so we can't for the moment develop a predictive model. (author) [fr

  14. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  15. Generation of high pressure shocks relevant to the shock-ignition intensity regime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.; Atzeni, S.; Badziak, J.; Baffigi, F.; Chodukowski, T.; Consoli, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; De Angelis, R.; Dudžák, Roman; Folpini, G.; Giuffrida, L.; Gizzi, L.A.; Kalinowska, Z.; Koester, P.; Krouský, Eduard; Krůs, Miroslav; Labate, L.; Levato, Tadzio; Maheut, Y.; Malka, G.; Margarone, Daniele; Marocchino, A.; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Nicolai, Ph.; O’Dell, T.; Pisarczyk, T.; Renner, Oldřich; Rhee, Y.-J.; Ribeyre, X.; Richetta, M.; Rosinski, M.; Sawicka, Magdalena; Schiavi, A.; Skála, Jiří; Šmíd, Michal; Spindloe, Ch.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Velyhan, Andriy; Vinci, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2014), 032710-032710 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LM2010014 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : High-pressure shocks * shock ignition * inertial confinement fusion * PALS laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4869715

  16. The ''injection problem'' for quasiparallel shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zank, G. P.; Rice, W. K. M.; le Roux, J. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Webb, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    For a particle to be accelerated diffusively at a shock by the first-order Fermi acceleration mechanism, the particle must be sufficiently energetic that it can scatter across all the micro- and macrostructure of the shock, experiencing compression between the converging upstream and downstream states. This is the well-known ''injection problem.'' Here the interaction of ions with the ramp of a quasiparallel shock is investigated. Some ions incident on the shock experience specular reflection, caused either by the cross-shock electrostatic potential or by mirroring as the magnetic field is bent and compressed through the ramp. Scattering of reflected ions by self-generated and pre-existing turbulence in the region upstream of the shock then acts to trap backstreaming ions and return them to the ramp, where some experience further reflections. Such repeated reflections and scattering energize a subpopulation of ions up to energies sufficiently large that they can be diffusively shock accelerated. Two ion distributions are considered: pickup ions which are assumed to be described by a shell distribution, are thermal solar wind ions which may be described by a kappa distribution. Injection efficiencies are found analytically to be very high for pickup ions and much lower for thermal solar wind ions, suggesting that this injection mechanism, stochastic reflected ion or SRI acceleration, is a natural precursor for the acceleration of the anomalous cosmic ray component at a quasiparallel shock. While significantly less efficient, SRI acceleration is also viable for thermal solar wind ions described by a kappa distribution

  17. Laser shock wave and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaojun; Zhang, Yongkang; Zhou, Jianzhong; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Aixin

    2007-12-01

    The technology of laser shock wave is used to not only surface modification but also metal forming. It can be divided into three parts: laser shock processing, laser shock forming (LSF) and laser peenforming(LPF). Laser shock processing as a surface treatment to metals can make engineering components have a residual compressive stress so that it obviously improves their fatigue strength and stress corrosion performances, while laser shock forming (LSF) is a novel technique that is used in plastic deformation of sheet metal recently and Laser peen forming (LPF) is another new sheet metal forming process presented in recent years. They all can be carried out by a high-power and repetition pulse Nd:Glass laser device made by Jiangsu University. Laser shock technology has characterized of ultrahigh pressure and high strain rate (10 6 - 10 7s -1). Now, for different materials, we are able to form different metals to contours and shapes and simultaneity leave their surfaces in crack-resistant compressive stress state. The results show that the technology of laser shock wave can strengthen surface property and prolong fatigue life and especially can deform metals to shapes that could not be adequately made using conventional methods. With the development of the technology of laser shock wave, the applied fields of laser will become greater and greater.

  18. Error Analysis of Inertial Navigation Systems Using Test Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Vaispacher, Tomáš; Bréda, Róbert; Adamčík, František

    2015-01-01

    Content of this contribution is an issue of inertial sensors errors, specification of inertial measurement units and generating of test signals for Inertial Navigation System (INS). Given the different levels of navigation tasks, part of this contribution is comparison of the actual types of Inertial Measurement Units. Considering this comparison, there is proposed the way of solving inertial sensors errors and their modelling for low – cost inertial navigation applications. The last part is ...

  19. Limiting density ratios in piston-driven compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1985-07-01

    By using global energy and pressure balance applied to a shock model it is shown that for a piston-driven fast compression, the maximum compression ratio is not dependent on the absolute magnitude of the piston power, but rather on the power pulse shape. Specific cases are considered and a maximum density compression ratio of 27 is obtained for a square-pulse power compressing a spherical pellet with specific heat ratio of 5/3. Double pulsing enhances the density compression ratio to 1750 in the case of linearly rising compression pulses. Using this method further enhancement by multiple pulsing becomes obvious. (author)

  20. Mechanical Energy Change in Inertial Reference Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical energy change of a system in an inertial frame of reference equals work done by the total nonconservative force in the same frame. This relation is covariant under the Galilean transformations from inertial frame S to S', where S' moves with constant velocity relative to S. In the presence of nonconservative forces, such as normal…

  1. On-body inertial sensor location recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Goaied, Salma; Baten, Christian T.M.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and past research: In previous work we presented an algorithm for automatically identifying the body segment to which an inertial sensor is attached during walking [1]. Using this method, the set-up of inertial motion capture systems becomes easier and attachment errors are avoided. The

  2. Empirical evidence for inertial mass anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.; Siemieniec, G.

    1985-01-01

    A several attempts at measuring the possible deviations from inertial mass isotropy caused by a non-uniform distribution of matter are reviewed. A simple model of the inertial mass anisotropy and the results of the currently performed measurements concerning this effect are presented. 34 refs. (author)

  3. Spin transport in non-inertial frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Debashree, E-mail: debashreephys@gmail.com; Basu, B., E-mail: sribbasu@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    The influence of acceleration and rotation on spintronic applications is theoretically investigated. In our formulation, considering a Dirac particle in a non-inertial frame, different spin related aspects are studied. The spin current appearing due to the inertial spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is enhanced by the interband mixing of the conduction and valence band states. Importantly, one can achieve a large spin current through the k{sup →}.p{sup →} method in this non-inertial frame. Furthermore, apart from the inertial SOC term due to acceleration, for a particular choice of the rotation frequency, a new kind of SOC term can be obtained from the spin rotation coupling (SRC). This new kind of SOC is of Dresselhaus type and controllable through the rotation frequency. In the field of spintronic applications, utilizing the inertial SOC and SRC induced SOC term, theoretical proposals for the inertial spin filter, inertial spin galvanic effect are demonstrated. Finally, one can tune the spin relaxation time in semiconductors by tuning the non-inertial parameters.

  4. The dynamics analysis of a ferrofluid shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Jie; Chang, Jianjun; Li, Decai; Yang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a shock absorber using three magnets as the inertial mass. Movement of the inertial mass inside a cylindrical body filled with ferrofluid will lead to a viscous dissipation of the oscillating system energy. The influence of a dumbbell-like ferrofluid structure on the energy dissipation is considered and the magnetic restoring force is investigated by experiment and theoretical calculation. A theoretical model of the hydrodynamics and energy dissipation processes is developed, which includes the geometrical characteristics of the body, the fluid viscosity, and the external magnetic field. The theory predicts the experimental results well under some condition. The shock absorber can be used in spacecraft technology. - Highlights: • We study a ferrofluid shock absorber. • The mechanical model of the flow of the ferrofluid has been built. • The theoretical model of the energy dissipation processes is developed. • The magnetic restoring force between the body and the magnets has been measured.

  5. The dynamics analysis of a ferrofluid shock absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jie; Chang, Jianjun [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Li, Decai, E-mail: dcli@bjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Yang, Xiaolong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Guangxi University of Science and Technology, Liuzhou, Guangxi 545006 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The paper presents a shock absorber using three magnets as the inertial mass. Movement of the inertial mass inside a cylindrical body filled with ferrofluid will lead to a viscous dissipation of the oscillating system energy. The influence of a dumbbell-like ferrofluid structure on the energy dissipation is considered and the magnetic restoring force is investigated by experiment and theoretical calculation. A theoretical model of the hydrodynamics and energy dissipation processes is developed, which includes the geometrical characteristics of the body, the fluid viscosity, and the external magnetic field. The theory predicts the experimental results well under some condition. The shock absorber can be used in spacecraft technology. - Highlights: • We study a ferrofluid shock absorber. • The mechanical model of the flow of the ferrofluid has been built. • The theoretical model of the energy dissipation processes is developed. • The magnetic restoring force between the body and the magnets has been measured.

  6. Nonlinear Weibel Instability and Turbulence in Strong Collisionless Shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail M.

    2008-01-01

    This research project was devoted to studies of collisionless shocks, their properties, microphysics and plasma physics of underlying phenomena, such as Weibel instability and generation of small-scale fields at shocks, particle acceleration and transport in the generated random fields, radiation mechanisms from these fields in application to astrophysical phenomena and laboratory experiments (e.g., laser-plasma and beam-plasma interactions, the fast ignition and inertial confinement, etc.). Thus, this study is highly relevant to astrophysical sciences, the inertial confinement program and, in particular, the Fast Ignition concept, etc. It makes valuable contributions to the shock physics, nonlinear plasma theory, as well as to the basic plasma science, in general

  7. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. For the computation of turbulent compressible flows, current methods of averaging and filtering are presented so that the reader is exposed to a consistent development of applicable equation sets for both the mean or resolved fields as well as the transport equations for the turbulent stress field. For the measurement of turbulent compressible flows, current techniques ranging from hot-wire anemometry to PIV are evaluated and limitations assessed. Characterizing dynamic features of free shear flows, including jets, mixing layers and wakes, and wall-bounded flows, including shock-turbulence and shock boundary-layer interactions, obtained from computations, experiments and simulations are discussed. Key features: * Describes prediction methodologies in...

  8. A FOCUSED TRANSPORT APPROACH TO THE TIME-DEPENDENT SHOCK ACCELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES AT A FAST TRAVELING SHOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most sophisticated models for solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejection driven shocks are based on standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, this theory, which only applies when SEP pitch-angle anisotropies are small, might have difficulty in describing first-order Fermi acceleration or the shock pre-heating and injection of SEPs into first-order Fermi acceleration accurately at lower SEP speeds where SEP pitch-angle anisotropies upstream near the shock can be large. To avoid this problem, we use a time-dependent focused transport model to reinvestigate first-order Fermi acceleration at planar parallel and quasi-parallel spherical traveling shocks between the Sun and Earth with high shock speeds associated with rare extreme gradual SEP events. The focused transport model is also used to investigate and compare three different shock pre-heating mechanisms associated with different aspects of the nonuniform cross-shock solar wind flow, namely, the convergence of the flow (adiabatic compression), the shear tensor of the flow, and the acceleration of the flow, and a fourth shock pre-heating mechanism associated with the cross-shock electric field, to determine which pre-heating mechanism contributes the most to injecting shock pre-heated source particles into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. The effects of variations in traveling shock conditions, such as increasing shock obliquity and shock slowdown, and variations in the SEP source with increasing shock distance from the Sun on the coupled processes of shock pre-heating, injection, and first-order Fermi acceleration are analyzed. Besides the finding that the cross-shock acceleration of the solar wind flow yields the dominant shock pre-heating mechanism at high shock speeds, we find that first-order Fermi acceleration at fast traveling shocks differs in a number of respects from the predictions and assumptions of standard steady-state diffusive shock

  9. INTERFERENCE OF COUNTERPROPAGATING SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study. We examined the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves. The necessity of counterpropagating shock waves studying occurs at designing of high Mach number modern internal compression air intakes, Ramjets with subsonic and supersonic combustion, in asymmetrical supersonic nozzles and in some other cases. In a sense, this problem is a generalization of the case of an oblique shock reflection from the wall or from the plane of symmetry. With the renewed vigor, the interest to this problem emerged at the end of the 90s. This was due to the start of the programs for flight study at hypersonic speeds. The first experiments performed with air intakes, which realized the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves have shown that the change in flow velocity is accompanied by abrupt alteration of shock-wave structure, the occurrence of nonstationary and oscillatory phenomena. With an increase of flow velocity these phenomena undesirable for aircraft structure became more marked. The reason is that there are two fundamentally different modes of interaction of counterpropagating shock waves: a four-wave regular and a five-wave irregular. The transition from one mode to another can be nonstationary abrupt or gradual, it can also be accompanied by hysteresis. Main results. Criteria for the transition from regular reflection of counterpropagating shock waves to irregular are described: the criterion of von Neumann and the stationary Mach configuration criterion. We described areas in which the transition from one reflection type to another is possible only in abrupt way, as well as areas of possible gradual transition. Intensity dependences of the reflected shock waves from the intensity of interacting counterpropagating shocks were given. Qualitative pictures of shock-wave structures arising from the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves were shown. Calculation results of the intensity of outgoing gas

  10. Progress on z-pinch inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.; Rochau, G.; Matzen, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented. (author)

  11. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  12. Emissive spectra of shock-heated argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jingyou; Gu Yan; Peng Qixian; Bai Yulin; Li Ping

    2003-01-01

    To study the radiant properties of argon under weak shock compression, an aluminum target filled with gaseous argon at ambient states was impacted by a tungsten alloy projectile which was launched from a two-stage light gun to 2.00 km/s. The radiant signals of single shock-compressed argon were recorded by a six-channel pyrometer and oscilloscopes, which varied with time linearly for the five channels from 405 nm to 700 nm and exponentially for the channel 800 nm, and the corresponding velocity of shock wave was determined to be 4.10 ± 0.09 km/s. By the present experiment, it has been shown that the absorbability of the shock-heated argon is low for visual light and the optical depths of argon gas turn from thin to thick as wavelengths gradually increase. The time-resolved spectra in the rising-front of the radiant signal in the re-shocked argon were recorded by means of an OMA, and strong emissive spectrum bands near 450 nm light-wave length but no linear spectrum were found. The emissive spectrum properties of shock-compression argon were qualitatively explained by the state parameters and ionization degree

  13. Stress relaxation of shear in metals during shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, V.P.; Platova, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Constructed determining equation, taking into account stress relaxation of shear, was used to calculate the evolution of plane shock waves of primary and secondary compression in metals. Values of shear stress and viscosity coefficient were

  14. Fusion-product energy loss in inertial confinement fusion plasmas with applications to target burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Miley, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been proposed as a competitor to magnetic fusion in the drive towards energy production, but ICF target performance still contains many uncertainties. One such area is the energy-loss rate of fusion products. This situation is due in part to the unique plasma parameters encountered in ICF plasmas which are compressed to more than one-thousand times solid density. The work presented here investigates three aspects of this uncertainty

  15. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  16. Effects of shock waves on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongtao; Shu Chiwang; Zhou Ye

    2006-01-01

    A numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations using a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference shock capturing scheme is carried out in this paper, to study the effect of shock waves on the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Shocks with different Mach numbers are introduced ahead or behind the Rayleigh-Taylor interface, and their effect on the transition to instability is demonstrated and compared. It is observed that shock waves can speed up the transition to instability for the Rayleigh-Taylor interface significantly. Stronger shocks are more effective in this speed-up process

  17. Summary on inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J.

    1995-01-01

    Highlights on inertial confinement during the fifteenth international conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion are briefly summarized. Specifically the following topics are discussed: the US National Ignition Facility presently planned by the US Department of Energy; demonstration of diagnostics for hot spot formation; declassification of Hohlraum target design; fusion targets, in particular, the Hohlraum target design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Hohlraum experiments, direct drive implosions, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, laser imprinting (of perturbations by the laser on the laser target surface), hot spot formation and mixing, hot spot implosion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, USA, time resolving hot spot dynamics at the Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka, Japan, laser-plasma interaction

  18. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebel, R.A.; Turner, L.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Barnes, D.C.; Nystrom, W.D.; Bussard, R.W.; Miley, G.H.; Javedani, J.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P. T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2 * 10 10 neutrons/sec. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. Atomic physics effects strongly influence the performance of all of these systems. Important atomic effects include elastic scattering, ionization, excitation, and charge exchange. This paper discusses how an IEC system is influenced by these effects and how to design around them. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented

  19. Alternate fusion -- continuous inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Turner, L.; Nebel, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors argue that alternate approaches to large tokamak confinement are appropriate for fusion applications if: (1) They do not require magnetic confinement of a much higher quality than demonstrated in tokamaks; (2) Their physics basis may be succinctly stated and experimentally tested; (3) They offer near-term applications to important technical problems; and (4) Their cost to proof-of-principle is low enough to be consistent with current budget realities. An approach satisfying all of these criteria is presented. Fusion systems based on continuous inertial confinement are described. In these approaches, the inertia of a nonequilibrium plasma is used to produce local concentrations of plasma density in space and/or time. One implementation (inertial electrostatic confinement) which has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically uses a system of electrostatic grids to accelerate plasma ions toward a spherical focus. This system produced a steady 2 x 10 10 D-T neutrons/second with an overall fusion gain of 10 -5 in a sphere of about 9 cm radius. Recent theoretical developments show how to raise the fusion gain to order unity or greater by replacing the internal grids by a combination of applied magnetic and electrostatic fields. In these approaches, useful thermonuclear conditions may be produced in a system as small as a few mm radius. Confinement is that of a nonneutralized plasma. A pure electron plasma with a radial beam velocity distribution is absolutely confined by an applied Penning trap field. Spherical convergence of the confined electrons forms a deep virtual cathode near r = 0, in which thermonuclear ions are absolutely confined at useful densities. The authors have examined the equilibrium, stability, and classical relaxation of such systems, and obtained many positive physics results. Equilibria exist for both pure electron and partially charge-neutralized systems with arbitrarily high core-plasma densities

  20. Inertial fusion energy development strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, J.; Hogan, W.J.; Nakai, S.; Rozanov, V.B.; Velarde, G.

    1995-01-01

    The research and development strategy for inertial fusion energy (IFE) is delineated. The development strategy must indicate how commercial IFE power can be made available in the first part of the next century, by which is meant that a Demonstration Power Plant (DPP) will have shown that in commercial operation IFE power plants can satisfy the requirements of public and employee safety, acceptably low impact on the environment, technical performance, reliability, maintainability and economic competitiveness. The technical issues associated with the various required demonstrations for each of the subsystems of the power plant (target, driver, reaction chamber, and remainder of plant (ROP) where the tritium for future targets is extracted and thermal energy is converted into electricity) are listed. The many developments required to make IFE commercially available can be oriented towards a few major demonstrations. These demonstrations do not necessarily each need separate facilities. The goals of these demonstrations are: (i) ignition demonstration, to show ignition and thermonuclear burn in an ICF target and determine the minimum required driver conditions; (ii) high gain demonstration, to show adequate driver efficiency-gain product; (iii) engineering demonstrations, to show high pulse rate operations in an integrated system and to choose the best designs of the various reactor systems; (iv) commercial demonstrations, to prove safe, environmentally benign, reliable, economic, near-commercial operation. In this document the present status of major inertial confinement research activities is summarized including a table of the major operating or planned facilities. The aspects involved in each of the required demonstrations are discussed. Also, for each of the subsystems mentioned above the technical developments that are needed are discussed. The document ends with a discussion of the two existing detailed IFE development plans, by the United States and Japan. 9

  1. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized α-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We also discuss some important physics insights gained as a result of developing this model, such as the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated.

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion R and D and Nuclear Proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R and D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  3. Standing shocks in adiabatic black hole accretion of rotating matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Chakrabarti, S.K.

    1988-08-01

    We present all the solutions for stationary, axially symmetric, transonic, adiabatic flows with polytropic, rotating fluid configurations of small transverse thickness, in an arbitrarily chosen potential. Special attention is paid to the formation of the standing shocks in the case of black hole accretion and winds. We point out the possibility of three types of shocks depending upon three extreme physical conditions at the shocks. These are: Rankine-Hugoniot shocks, isentropic compression waves, and isothermal shocks. We write down the shock conditions for these three cases and discuss briefly the physical situations under which these shocks may form. A complete discussion on the properties of these shocks will be presented elsewhere. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs

  4. Shock ignition: a brief overview and progress in the design of robust targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S; Marocchino, A; Schiavi, A

    2015-01-01

    Shock ignition is a laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) scheme in which the stages of compression and hot spot formation are partly separated. The fuel is first imploded at a lower velocity than in conventional ICF, reducing the threats due to Rayleigh–Taylor instability. Close to stagnation, an intense laser spike drives a strong converging shock, which contributes to hot spot formation. This paper starts with a brief overview of the theoretical studies, target design and experimental results on shock ignition. The second part of the paper illustrates original work aiming at the design of robust targets and computation of the relevant gain curves. Following Chang et al (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 135002) a safety factor for high gain, ITF* (analogous to the ignition threshold factor ITF introduced by Clark et al (2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 056305)), is evaluated by means of parametric 1D simulations with artificially reduced reactivity. SI designs scaled as in Atzeni et al (2013 New J. Phys. 15 045004) are found to have nearly the same ITF*. For a given target, such ITF* increases with implosion velocity and laser spike power. A gain curve with a prescribed ITF* can then be simply generated by upscaling a reference target with that value of ITF*. An interesting option is scaling in size by reducing the implosion velocity to keep the ratio of implosion velocity to self-ignition velocity constant. At a given total laser energy, targets with higher ITF* are driven to higher implosion velocity and achieve a somewhat lower gain. However, a 1D gain higher than 100 is achieved at an (incident) energy below 1 MJ, an implosion velocity below 300 km s −1 and a peak incident power below 400 TW. 2D simulations of mispositioned targets show that targets with a higher ITF* indeed tolerate larger displacements. (paper)

  5. Shock waves in helium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepmann, H.W.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from studies of the properties of low temperature He-4 using shock waves as a probe. Ideal shock tube theory is used to show that sonic speeds of Mach 40 are attainable in He at 300 K. Viscosity reductions at lower temperatures minimize boundary layer effects at the side walls. A two-fluid model is described to account for the phase transition which He undergoes at temperatures below 2.2 K, after which the quantum fluid (He II) and the normal compressed superfluid (He I) coexist. Analytic models are provided for pressure-induced shocks in He I and temperature-induced shock waves (called second sound) which appear in He II. The vapor-fluid interface of He I is capable of reflecting second and gasdynamic sound shocks, which can therefore be used as probes for studying phase transitions between He I and He II. 17 references

  6. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  7. On the generalized potential of inertial forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siboni, S

    2009-01-01

    The generalized potential of the inertial forces acting on a holonomic system in an accelerated reference frame is derived in a way which admits a simple physical interpretation. It is shown that the generalized potential refers to all the inertial forces and, apart from the very special case of a uniformly rotating frame, it is impossible to distinguish a contribution to only the Coriolis force and a contribution pertaining to the residual, velocity-independent fictitious forces. Such an approach to the determination of the generalized potential of inertial forces may be helpful in introducing the topic of the generalized potential to advanced undergraduate and graduate students

  8. Spectral gaps, inertial manifolds and kinematic dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2005-10-17

    Inertial manifolds are desirable objects when ones wishes a dynamical process to behave asymptotically as a finite-dimensional ones. Recently [Physica D 194 (2004) 297] these manifolds are constructed for the kinematic dynamo problem with time-periodic velocity. It turns out, however, that the conditions imposed on the fluid velocity to guarantee the existence of inertial manifolds are too demanding, in the sense that they imply that all the solutions tend exponentially to zero. The inertial manifolds are meaningful because they represent different decay rates, but the classical dynamos where the magnetic field is maintained or grows are not covered by this approach, at least until more refined estimates are found.

  9. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  10. Status of light ion inertial fusion research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Barker, R.J.; Colombant, D.G.; Goldstein, S.A.; Meger, R.A.; Mosher, D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the use of high-brightness proton beams, extracted from axial pinch-reflex diodes mounted on the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Gamble II generator, to study light ion inertial fusion. Topics covered include the modular approach, ion beam brightness studies, light-ion beam transport, final focusing, the single diode approach, the inductive storage approach, an energy loss experiment, and future plans. Analysis of a modular inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system using axial pinch-reflex diodes shows that an operational window for transport of light-ion species exists. A proof-of-principle experiment for the required final focusing cell was conducted on Gamble II. Preliminary experiments using vacuum inductive storage and plasma opening switches have demonstrated factorof-three pulse compressions, with corresponding power and voltage multiplications for pulse durations of interest to PBFA II. The stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured in other experiments. It is demonstrated that about 40% enhancement in stopping power over that in cold targets when the deuteron beam is focused on the target to about .25 MA/cm 2 . Includes 6 diagrams

  11. Intracellular Delivery of Nanomaterials via an Inertial Microfluidic Cell Hydroporator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanxiang; Kizer, Megan; Rada, Miran; Sage, Jessica; Wang, Xing; Cheon, Dong-Joo; Chung, Aram J

    2018-04-11

    The introduction of nanomaterials into cells is an indispensable process for studies ranging from basic biology to clinical applications. To deliver foreign nanomaterials into living cells, traditionally endocytosis, viral and lipid nanocarriers or electroporation are mainly employed; however, they critically suffer from toxicity, inconsistent delivery, and low throughput and are time-consuming and labor-intensive processes. Here, we present a novel inertial microfluidic cell hydroporator capable of delivering a wide range of nanomaterials to various cell types in a single-step without the aid of carriers or external apparatus. The platform inertially focuses cells into the channel center and guides cells to collide at a T-junction. Controlled compression and shear forces generate transient membrane discontinuities that facilitate passive diffusion of external nanomaterials into the cell cytoplasm while maintaining high cell viability. This hydroporation method shows superior delivery efficiency, is high-throughput, and has high controllability; moreover, its extremely simple and low-cost operation provides a powerful and practical strategy in the applications of cellular imaging, biomanufacturing, cell-based therapies, regenerative medicine, and disease diagnosis.

  12. Nonuniformity mitigation of beam illumination in heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, S; Noguchi, K; Suzuki, T; Kurosaki, T; Barada, D; Ogoyski, A I; Zhang, W; Xie, J; Zhang, H; Dai, D

    2014-01-01

    In inertial fusion, a target DT fuel should be compressed to typically 1000 times the solid density. The target implosion nonuniformity is introduced by a driver beam’s illumination nonuniformity, for example. The target implosion should be robust against the implosion nonuniformities. In this paper, the requirement for implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion non-uniformity should be less than a few percent. The implosion dynamics is also briefly reviewed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). Heavy ions deposit their energy inside the target energy absorber, and the energy deposition layer is rather thick, depending on the ion particle energy. Then nonuniformity mitigation mechanisms of the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination in HIF are discussed. A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to a radiation energy smoothing. In HIF, wobbling heavy ion beam illumination was also introduced to realize a uniform implosion. The wobbling HIB axis oscillation is precisely controlled. In the wobbling HIBs’ illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space on an HIF target. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may contribute to the reduction of the HIBs’ illumination nonuniformity by its smoothing effect on the HIB illumination nonuniformity and also by a growth mitigation effect on the Rayleigh–Taylor instability. (invited comment)

  13. COST-EFFECTIVE TARGET FABRICATION FOR INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GOODIN, D.T; NOBILE, A; SCHROEN, D.G; MAXWELL, J.L; RICKMAN, W.S

    2004-03-01

    A central feature of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant is a target that has been compressed and heated to fusion conditions by the energy input of the driver. The IFE target fabrication programs are focusing on methods that will scale to mass production, and working closely with target designers to make material selections that will satisfy a wide range of required and desirable characteristics. Targets produced for current inertial confinement fusion experiments are estimated to cost about $2500 each. Design studies of cost-effective power production from laser and heavy-ion driven IFE have found a cost requirement of about $0.25-0.30 each. While four orders of magnitude cost reduction may seem at first to be nearly impossible, there are many factors that suggest this is achievable. This paper summarizes the paradigm shifts in target fabrication methodologies that will be needed to economically supply targets and presents the results of ''nth-of-a-kind'' plant layouts and concepts for IFE power plant fueling. Our engineering studies estimate the cost of the target supply in a fusion economy, and show that costs are within the range of commercial feasibility for laser-driven and for heavy ion driven IFE

  14. Measurement of the equation of state of porous materials through the use of shock waves generated by laser radiation; Mesure de l'equation d'etat de materiaux poreux a l'aide d'ondes de choc generees par laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, F

    2001-12-15

    This work aims at measuring the equation of state of porous plastic materials in the view of their use in inertial confinement fusion. We have experimentally determined the shock polar curve of TMPTA (C{sub 15}H{sub 20}O{sub 6}) by the use of the impedance matching technique. This technique is based on the simultaneous measurement of the shock velocities in the 2 materials composing the target. The shock polar curve has been drawn for pressures ranging from 10 kbar to 3 Mbar and densities from 20 mg/cm{sup 3} to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}. The use of a slit sweep camera to assess the propagation of the shock wave through the target has limited the accuracy of the technique to 10%. Experimental results match well data provided by the Sesame tables that are broadly used by hydrodynamic codes. Nevertheless the statistical distribution of experimental points seems to show a lower compressibility of the foam that might be attributed to a slight pre-heating process or to the effect of the foam micro-structure on the shock wave propagation. In order to improve the accuracy of the method, an attempt was made to use an active doppler interferometric diagnostic to measure shock wave velocities. It has been showed that the shock wave front in the foam is reflecting enough to make this method relevant if we can overcome the difficulty of a high luminous background. Despite that, we have succeeded in measuring with high accuracy, a point of the shock polar curve for 800 mg/cm{sup 3} dense TMPTA. (A.C.)

  15. Measurement of the equation of state of porous materials through the use of shock waves generated by laser radiation; Mesure de l'equation d'etat de materiaux poreux a l'aide d'ondes de choc generees par laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, F

    2001-12-15

    This work aims at measuring the equation of state of porous plastic materials in the view of their use in inertial confinement fusion. We have experimentally determined the shock polar curve of TMPTA (C{sub 15}H{sub 20}O{sub 6}) by the use of the impedance matching technique. This technique is based on the simultaneous measurement of the shock velocities in the 2 materials composing the target. The shock polar curve has been drawn for pressures ranging from 10 kbar to 3 Mbar and densities from 20 mg/cm{sup 3} to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}. The use of a slit sweep camera to assess the propagation of the shock wave through the target has limited the accuracy of the technique to 10%. Experimental results match well data provided by the Sesame tables that are broadly used by hydrodynamic codes. Nevertheless the statistical distribution of experimental points seems to show a lower compressibility of the foam that might be attributed to a slight pre-heating process or to the effect of the foam micro-structure on the shock wave propagation. In order to improve the accuracy of the method, an attempt was made to use an active doppler interferometric diagnostic to measure shock wave velocities. It has been showed that the shock wave front in the foam is reflecting enough to make this method relevant if we can overcome the difficulty of a high luminous background. Despite that, we have succeeded in measuring with high accuracy, a point of the shock polar curve for 800 mg/cm{sup 3} dense TMPTA. (A.C.)

  16. Rarefaction Shock Waves in Collisionless Plasma with Electronic Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Gurovich, Victor Ts.; Fel, Leonid G.

    2011-01-01

    We show that an electronic beam passing through the collisionless plasma of the "cold" ions and the "hot" Boltzmann electrons can give rise to the propagation of the supersonic ion-acoustic rarefaction shock waves. These waves are analogous to those predicted by Zeldovich [5] in gasodynamics and complementary to the ion-acoustic compression shock waves in collisionless plasma described by Sagdeev [3].

  17. Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, S.; Verdon, C.P.; Petrasso, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, it was proposed to use energetic (up to 31 MeV) tertiary protons produced during the final stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions to measure the fuel areal density of compressed deuterium endash tritium (DT). The method is based on seeding the fuel with 3 He. The reaction of 3 He ions with the energetic knock-on deuterons, produced via the elastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons, is a source of very energetic protons capable of escaping from very large areal density targets. This work presents results of detailed time-dependent Monte Carlo simulations of the nuclear processes involved in producing and transporting these protons through imploding targets proposed for direct-drive experiments on OMEGA [D. K. Bradley et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1870 (1998)] and the National Ignition Facility [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2480 (1995)]. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Potential role of advanced fuels in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.

    1981-01-01

    The potential importance of developing advanced (non D-T) fuel pellets for inertial confinement is discussed. Reduced radioactivity due to low tritium involvement and less neutron activation, improved blanket flexibility with the removal of tritium breeding requirements, and improved mating of the output energy spectrum with non-electrical applications such as synthetic fuel production could lead to technical advantages and earlier public acceptance. As a possible first step to advanced-fuel pellets, the A-FLINT concept of a D-T core ignited, deuterium pellet is proposed which would offer tritium self-sufficiency. A design is described that uses 0.1-MJ internal energy in a rhoR1--7 gm/cm2'' compressed pellet, giving a tritium breeding ratio of 1--1.0 and an internal pellet gain of 1--700

  19. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermo, R L; Pogorelov, N V; Burlaga, L F

    2015-01-01

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations. (paper)

  20. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is

  1. Enstrophy generation in a shock-dominated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Hideaki.

    1995-09-01

    A mechanism of enstrophy generation is investigated numerically in a shock-dominated turbulence driven by a random external force which has only the compressible component. Enstrophy is generated, especially on collision of shock, as a pair of vortex tube of opposite sense of rotation behind curved shocks. The roles of various terms in enstrophy equation are clarified in enstrophy generation process. Generation of enstrophy is enhanced by strong alignment of each term of the enstrophy equation with the vorticity vector. (author)

  2. Using Inertial Sensors in Smartphones for Curriculum Experiments of Inertial Navigation Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Qingjiang; Li, You; Li, Qingli; Liu, Jingnan

    2015-01-01

    Inertial technology has been used in a wide range of applications such as guidance, navigation, and motion tracking. However, there are few undergraduate courses that focus on the inertial technology. Traditional inertial navigation systems (INS) and relevant testing facilities are expensive and complicated in operation, which makes it inconvenient and risky to perform teaching experiments with such systems. To solve this issue, this paper proposes the idea of using smartphones, which are ubi...

  3. Analysis of shock implosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, E.A.; Alejaldre, C. (Polytechnic Inst. of New York, Brooklyn (USA))

    1984-06-01

    An imploding shock wave, coming from infinity, moves through an ideal gas with the adiabatic constant ..gamma... To define a single-valued self-similar coefficient over the whole classical interval 1<..gamma..compressed gas passed analytically through all of them. The relative position of P, M, M' leads to three solutions of the quadratic conservation equations. Representative curves of the state of the imploded gas, at various values of ..gamma.., are shown.

  4. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  5. Micro-system inertial sensing technology overview.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, James Joe

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of Micro-System technology as it applies to inertial sensing. Transduction methods are reviewed with capacitance and piezoresistive being the most often used in COTS Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors. Optical transduction is the most recent transduction method having significant impact on improving sensor resolution. A few other methods are motioned which are in a R&D status to hopefully allow MEMS inertial sensors to become viable as a navigation grade sensor. The accelerometer, gyroscope and gravity gradiometer are the type of inertial sensors which are reviewed in this report. Their method of operation and a sampling of COTS sensors and grade are reviewed as well.

  6. Progress in high gain inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jingwen

    2001-01-01

    The author reviews the progress in laboratory high gain inertial confinement fusion (ICF), including ICF capsule physics, high-energy-density science, inertial fusion energy, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and its design of ignition targets and the peta watt laser breakthrough. High power laser, particle beam, and pulsed power facilities around the world have established the new laboratory field of high-energy- density plasma physics and have furthered development of inertial fusion. New capabilities such as those provided by high-brightness peta watt lasers have enabled the study of matter feasible in conditions previously unachievable on earth. Science and technology developed in inertial fusion research have found near-term commercial use and have enabled steady progress toward the goal of fusion ignition and high gain in the laboratory, and have opened up new fields of study for the 21 st century

  7. A new systematic calibration method of ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo; Gao, Chunfeng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Qun; Xiong, Zhenyu; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    Inertial navigation system has been the core component of both military and civil navigation systems. Before the INS is put into application, it is supposed to be calibrated in the laboratory in order to compensate repeatability error caused by manufacturing. Discrete calibration method cannot fulfill requirements of high-accurate calibration of the mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope navigation system with shock absorbers. This paper has analyzed theories of error inspiration and separation in detail and presented a new systematic calibration method for ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system. Error models and equations of calibrated Inertial Measurement Unit are given. Then proper rotation arrangement orders are depicted in order to establish the linear relationships between the change of velocity errors and calibrated parameter errors. Experiments have been set up to compare the systematic errors calculated by filtering calibration result with those obtained by discrete calibration result. The largest position error and velocity error of filtering calibration result are only 0.18 miles and 0.26m/s compared with 2 miles and 1.46m/s of discrete calibration result. These results have validated the new systematic calibration method and proved its importance for optimal design and accuracy improvement of calibration of mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system.

  8. The effects of nonlinear wave propagation on the stability of inertial cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinden, D; Stride, E; Saffari, N

    2009-01-01

    In the context of forecasting temperature and pressure fields generated by high-intensity focussed ultrasound, the accuracy of predictive models is critical for the safety and efficacy of treatment. In such fields 'inertial' cavitation is often observed. Classically, estimations of cavitation thresholds have been based on the assumption that the incident wave at the surface of a bubble is the same as in the far-field, neglecting the effect of nonlinear wave propagation. By modelling the incident wave as a solution to Burgers' equation using weak shock theory, the effects of nonlinear wave propagation on inertial cavitation are investigated using both numerical and analytical techniques. From radius-time curves for a single bubble, it is observed that there is a reduction in the maximum size of a bubble undergoing inertial cavitation and that the inertial collapse occurs earlier in contrast with the classical case. Corresponding stability thresholds for a bubble whose initial radius is slightly below the critical Blake radius are calculated, providing a lower bound for the onset of instability. Bifurcation diagrams and frequency-response curves are presented associated with the loss of stability. The consequences and physical implications of the results are discussed with respect to the classical results.

  9. Heavy ion accelerators for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbia, C.

    1992-01-01

    Particle accelerators are used for accelerating the elementary, stable and separable constituents of matters to relativistic speed. These beams are of fundamental interest in the study on the ultimate constituents of matters and their interaction. Particle accelerators are the most promising driver for the fusion power reactors based on inertial confinement. The principle of inertial confinement fusion, radiation driven indirect drive, the accelerator complex and so on are described. (K.I.)

  10. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  11. Air box shock absorber for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.V.; George, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is an air box type shock absorber primarily for use in an ice condenser compartment of a nuclear reactor. The shock absorber includes a back plate member and sheet metal top, bottom, and front members. The front member is prefolded, and controlled clearances are provided among the members for predetermined escape of air under impact and compression. Prefolded internal sheet metal stiffeners also absorb a portion of the kinetic energy imparted to the shock absorber, and limit rebound. An external restraining rod guided by restraining straps insures that the sheet metal front member compresses inward upon impact. 6 claims, 11 figures

  12. Shock characterization of an ultra-high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzar, B.; Pontiroli, C.; Buzaud, E.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the design of protective structures may imply ultra-high performance concretes. These materials present a compressive strength 5 times higher than standard concretes. However, few reliable data on the shock response of such materials are available in the literature. Thus, a characterization of an ultra-high strength concrete has been conducted by means of hydrostatic and triaxial tests in the quasi-static regime, and plate impact experiments for shock response. Data have been gathered up to 6 GPa and a simple modelling approach has been applied to get a reliable representation of the shock compression of this concrete. (authors)

  13. Scaling Laws for Unstable Interfaces Driven by Strong Shocks in Cylindrical Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q.; Graham, M.J.; Graham, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is an interfacial interface between two fluids of different densities driven by shock waves and plays an important role in the studies of inertial confinement fusion and of supernovas. So far, most of the studies are for RM unstable interfaces driven by weak or intermediate shocks in planar geometry. For experiments conducted at the Nova laser, the unstable material interface is accelerated by very strong shocks. In this Letter, we present scaling laws for the RM unstable interface driven by strong imploding and exploding shocks. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Vorticity dynamics after the shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livescu, D.; Ryu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756:R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms=10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.

  15. The Additional Error of Inertial Sensors Induced by Hypersonic Flight Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachun, Volodimir; Mel'nick, Viktorij; Korobiichuk, Igor; Nowicki, Michał; Szewczyk, Roman; Kobzar, Svitlana

    2016-02-26

    The emergence of hypersonic technology pose a new challenge for inertial navigation sensors, widely used in aerospace industry. The main problems are: extremely high temperatures, vibration of the fuselage, penetrating acoustic radiation and shock N-waves. The nature of the additional errors of the gyroscopic inertial sensor with hydrostatic suspension components under operating conditions generated by forced precession of the movable part of the suspension due to diffraction phenomena in acoustic fields is explained. The cause of the disturbing moments in the form of the Coriolis inertia forces during the transition of the suspension surface into the category of impedance is revealed. The boundaries of occurrence of the features on the resonance wave match are described. The values of the "false" angular velocity as a result of the elastic-stress state of suspension in the acoustic fields are determined.

  16. Inertial fusion energy with krypton fluoride lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. We are developing the science and technologies needed for a practical fusion energy source using high energy krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers. The physics basis for this work is a family of simulations that exploit the unique advantages of KrF lasers. KrF lasers provide uniform enough laser light to illuminate the capsule directly, greatly improving the laser-target coupling efficiency, as well as simplifying the target design. KrF's shorter wavelength allows higher ablation pressures and helps suppress laser-plasma instabilities. These advantages are being demonstrated on the NRL Nike KrF laser facility. A particularly promising approach is shock ignition, in which a high intensity laser pulse drives an intense shock at peak compression. Simulations with experimentally benchmarked codes predict a 1 MJ KrF laser can produce 200 MJ of pure fusion energy. We have similarly advanced the laser technology. We have developed a KrF laser, using technologies that scale to a reactor beamline, that fires 5 times per second for long duration runs and is projected be efficient enough for a reactor. The science and the technology for the key components are developed at the same time as part of a coherent system. A multi-institutional team from industry, national labs, and universities has developed credible solutions for these components. This includes methods to fabricate the spherical pellets on mass production basis, a means to repetitively inject the capsules into the chamber and precisely hit them with the laser, scaled tests to develop the laser optics, and designs for the reaction vessel. Based on these advances NRL and its collaborators have formulated a three stage plan that could lead to practical fusion energy on a much faster time scale than currently believed. Stage I develops full scale components: a laser beam line, target factory and injector, and chamber technologies. Stage II is the Fusion Test Facility (FTF). Simulations

  17. A shock absorber model for structure-borne noise analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaziz, Marouane; Nacivet, Samuel; Thouverez, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    Shock absorbers are often responsible for undesirable structure-borne noise in cars. The early numerical prediction of this noise in the automobile development process can save time and money and yet remains a challenge for industry. In this paper, a new approach to predicting shock absorber structure-borne noise is proposed; it consists in modelling the shock absorber and including the main nonlinear phenomena responsible for discontinuities in the response. The model set forth herein features: compressible fluid behaviour, nonlinear flow rate-pressure relations, valve mechanical equations and rubber mounts. The piston, base valve and complete shock absorber model are compared with experimental results. Sensitivity of the shock absorber response is evaluated and the most important parameters are classified. The response envelope is also computed. This shock absorber model is able to accurately reproduce local nonlinear phenomena and improves our state of knowledge on potential noise sources within the shock absorber.

  18. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  19. Shock Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  20. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    expanded beam of a Q-switched laser pulse at wavelength of λ=532 nm and with pulse duration of ∼4 ns is focused at the center of a water tank using an aberration minimized lens design. Single cavitation bubbles are initiated via optical breakdown at this location which coincides with the position of which the shock wave is focused. The energy of the shock wave source has been altered in 8 steps. The pressure pulse amplitude of the impinging shock wave measured at the distance of about 1.8 mm above the focus location range from 24.4 MPa to 108.1 MPa. The lithotripter shock wave impact time is varied in three steps which provides the possibility of investigation of the bubble dynamics in both cases of collapsing and expanding cavities at the moment of the shock wave impingement. After the shock wave impact, the bubble spherical symmetry is broken and a liquid jet develops in the original direction of the shock propagation. The speed of the jet is increasing with the shock wave energy. Due to the energy transfer from the shock wave to the bubble, the forced cavity implosion is more violent in comparison to free oscillation. The pressure pulse amplitude released from the forced bubble collapse is amplified and the collapse time is reduced. These effects are discussed in chapter 5. Generally, when the bubble is collapsing at the time of the shock impact, the forced cavity collapse is more violent with a resultant of more pressure enhancement compared to the expanding bubbles at the moment of the shock arrival. The maximum pressure enhancement and reduction of bubble collapse time occur when the time interval between the moments of the shock impact and bubble collapse approaches the pulse duration of the compression part of the shock wave profile (i.e. ∼1 μs). For each specific shock wave arrival time, increasing the shock intensity leads to the fact that the bubble collapse takes place earlier relative to the moment of the shock impact and having more collapse pressure

  1. Repetitive pulse accelerator technology for light ion inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttram, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Successful ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellet is calculated to require that several megajoules of energy be deposited in the pellet's centimeter-sized shell within 10 ns. This implies a driver power of several hundreds of terawatts and power density around 100 TW/cm 2 . The Sandia ICF approach is to deposit the energy with beams of 30 MV lithium ions. The first accelerator capable of producing these beams (PBFA II, 100 TW) will be used to study beam formation and target physics on a single pulse basis. To utilize this technology for power production, repetitive pulsing at rates that may be as high as 10 Hz will be required. This paper will overview the technologies being studied for a repetitively pulsed ICF accelerator. As presently conceived, power is supplied by rotating machinery providing 16 MJ in 1 ms. The generator output is transformed to 3 MV, then switched into a pulse compression system using laser triggered spark gaps. These must be synchronized to about 1 ns. Pulse compression is performed with saturable inductor switches, the output being 40 ns, 1.5 MV pulses. These are transformed to 30 MV in a self-magnetically insulated cavity adder structure. Space charge limited ion beams are drawn from anode plasmas with electron counter streaming being magnetically inhibited. The ions are ballistically focused into the entrances of guiding discharge channels for transport to the pellet. The status of component development from the prime power to the ion source will be reviewed

  2. Plasma-Jet Magneto-Inertial Fusion Burn Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarius, John

    2010-11-01

    Several issues exist related to using plasma jets to implode a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) liner onto a magnetized plasmoid and compress it to fusion-relevant temperatures [1]. The poster will explore how well the liner's inertia provides transient plasma confinement and affects the burn dynamics. The investigation uses the University of Wisconsin's 1-D Lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics code, BUCKY, which solves single-fluid equations of motion with ion-electron interactions, PdV work, table-lookup equations of state, fast-ion energy deposition, pressure contributions from all species, and one or two temperatures. Extensions to the code include magnetic field evolution as the plasmoid compresses plus dependence of the thermal conductivity on the magnetic field. [4pt] [1] Y.C. F. Thio, et al.,``Magnetized Target Fusion in a Spheroidal Geometry with Standoff Drivers,'' in Current Trends in International Fusion Research, E. Panarella, ed. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999), p. 113.

  3. A Fast Faraday Cup for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Sefkow, Adam; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kwan, Joe W; Roy, Prabir K; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Heavy ion drivers for high energy density physics applications and inertial fusion energy use space-charge-dominated beams which require longitudinal bunch compression in order to achieve sufficiently high beam intensity at the target. The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-1A (NDCX-1A) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is used to determine the effective limits of neutralized drift compression. NDCX-1A investigates the physics of longitudinal drift compression of an intense ion beam, achieved by imposing an initial velocity tilt on the drifting beam and neutralizing the beam's space-charge with background plasma. Accurately measuring the longitudinal compression of the beam pulse with high resolution is critical for NDCX-1A, and an understanding of the accessible parameter space is modeled using the LSP particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The design and preliminary experimental results for an ion beam probe which measures the total beam current at the focal plane as a function of time are summari...

  4. Theory of inertial waves in rotating fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelash, Andrey; L'vov, Victor; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    The inertial waves emerge in the geophysical and astrophysical flows as a result of Earth rotation [1]. The linear theory of inertial waves is known well [2] while the influence of nonlinear effects of wave interactions are subject of many recent theoretical and experimental studies. The three-wave interactions which are allowed by inertial waves dispersion law (frequency is proportional to cosine of the angle between wave direction and axes of rotation) play an exceptional role. The recent studies on similar type of waves - internal waves, have demonstrated the possibility of formation of natural wave attractors in the ocean (see [3] and references herein). This wave focusing leads to the emergence of strong three-wave interactions and subsequent flows mixing. We believe that similar phenomena can take place for inertial waves in rotating flows. In this work we present theoretical study of three-wave and four-wave interactions for inertial waves. As the main theoretical tool we suggest the complete Hamiltonian formalism for inertial waves in rotating incompressible fluids [4]. We study three-wave decay instability and then present statistical description of inertial waves in the frame of Hamiltonian formalism. We obtain kinetic equation, anisotropic wave turbulence spectra and study the problem of parametric wave turbulence. These spectra were previously found in [5] by helicity decomposition method. Taking this into account we discuss the advantages of suggested Hamiltonian formalism and its future applications. Andrey Gelash thanks support of the RFBR (Grant No.16-31-60086 mol_a_dk) and Dr. E. Ermanyuk, Dr. I. Sibgatullin for the fruitful discussions. [1] Le Gal, P. Waves and instabilities in rotating and stratified flows, Fluid Dynamics in Physics, Engineering and Environmental Applications. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 25-40, 2013. [2] Greenspan, H. P. The theory of rotating fluids. CUP Archive, 1968. [3] Brouzet, C., Sibgatullin, I. N., Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E

  5. 2-Shock layered tuning campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Laurent; Dittrich, T.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G.; Ma, T.; MacLaren, S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J.; Tipton, R.; Los Alamos Natl Lab Team; Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab Team

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform has been developed to maintain shell sphericity throughout the compression phase of an indirect-drive target implosion and produce a stagnating hot spot in a quasi 1D-like manner. A sub-scale, 1700 _m outer diameter, and thick, 200 _m, uniformly Silicon doped, gas-filled plastic capsule is driven inside a nominal size 5750 _m diameter ignition hohlraum. The hohlraum fill is near vacuum to reduce back-scatter and improve laser/drive coupling. A two-shock pulse of about 1 MJ of laser energy drives the capsule. The thick capsule prevents ablation front feed-through to the imploded core. This platform has demonstrated its efficiency to tune a predictable and reproducible 1-D implosion with a nearly round shape. It has been shown that the high foot performance was dominated by the local defect growth due to the ablation front instability and by the hohlraum radiation asymmetries. The idea here is to take advantage of this 2-Shock platform to design a 1D-like layered implosion and eliminates the deleterious effects of radiation asymmetries and ablation front instability growth. We present the design work and our first experimental results of this near one-dimensional 2-Shock layered design. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Internally driven inertial waves in geodynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.; Davidson, P. A.; Christensen, U. R.; Wicht, J.

    2018-05-01

    Inertial waves are oscillations in a rotating fluid, such as the Earth's outer core, which result from the restoring action of the Coriolis force. In an earlier work, it was argued by Davidson that inertial waves launched near the equatorial regions could be important for the α2 dynamo mechanism, as they can maintain a helicity distribution which is negative (positive) in the north (south). Here, we identify such internally driven inertial waves, triggered by buoyant anomalies in the equatorial regions in a strongly forced geodynamo simulation. Using the time derivative of vertical velocity, ∂uz/∂t, as a diagnostic for traveling wave fronts, we find that the horizontal movement in the buoyancy field near the equator is well correlated with a corresponding movement of the fluid far from the equator. Moreover, the azimuthally averaged spectrum of ∂uz/∂t lies in the inertial wave frequency range. We also test the dispersion properties of the waves by computing the spectral energy as a function of frequency, ϖ, and the dispersion angle, θ. Our results suggest that the columnar flow in the rotation-dominated core, which is an important ingredient for the maintenance of a dipolar magnetic field, is maintained despite the chaotic evolution of the buoyancy field on a fast timescale by internally driven inertial waves.

  7. High pressure multiple shock response of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, R.J.; Asay, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    It is well known that both dynamic yield strength and rate-dependent material response exert direct influence on the development of surface and interface instabilities under conditions of strong shock loading. A detailed understanding of these phenomena is therefore an important aspect of the analysis of dynamic inertial confinement techniques which are being used in such applications as the generation of controlled thermonuclear fusion. In these types of applications the surfaces and interfaces under consideration can be subjected to cyclic loading characterized by shock pressures on the order of 100 GPa or more. It thus becomes important to understand how rate effects and material strength differ from the values observed in the low pressure regime where they are usually measured, as well as how they are altered by the loading history

  8. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  9. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Nevzat; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, David D.; Clark, Deborah J.; Danly, Chris R.; Day, Robert D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary; Hsu, Albert H.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Loomis, Eric N.; Mares, Danielle; Martinson, Drew D.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Munson, Carter; Murphy, Thomas J.; Oertel, John A.; Polk, Paul J.; Schmidt, Derek W.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Wilde, Carl H.; Wilke, Mark D.; Wilson, Douglas C.; Atkinson, Dennis P.; Bower, Dan E.; Drury, Owen B.; Dzenitis, John M.; Felker, Brian; Fittinghoff, David N.; Frank, Matthias; Liddick, Sean N.; Moran, Michael J.; Roberson, George P.; Weiss, Paul; Buckles, Robert A.; Cradick, Jerry R.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lutz, Steve S.; Malone, Robert M.; Traille, Albert

    2013-11-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic (CH) capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (10-12 MeV) neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  10. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  11. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book, as a volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library, is primarily concerned with detonation waves or compression shock waves in reactive heterogeneous media, including mixtures of solid, liquid and gas phases. The topics involve a variety of energy release and control processes in such media - a contemporary research field that has found wide applications in propulsion and power, hazard prevention as well as military engineering. The six extensive chapters contained in this volume are: - Spray Detonation (SB Murray and PA Thibault) - Detonation of Gas-Particle Flow (F Zhang) - Slurry Detonation (DL Frost and F Zhang) - Detonation of Metalized Composite Explosives (MF Gogulya and MA Brazhnikov) - Shock-Induced Solid-Solid Reactions and Detonations (YA Gordopolov, SS Batsanov, and VS Trofimov) - Shock Ignition of Particles (SM Frolov and AV Fedorov) Each chapter is self-contained and can be read independently of the others, though, they are thematically interrelated. They offer a t...

  12. Introduction to Shock Waves and Shock Wave Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, William Wyatt [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    M-9 and a number of other organizations at LANL and elsewhere study materials in dynamic processes. Often, this is described as “shock wave research,” but in reality is broader than is implied by that term. Most of our work is focused on dynamic compression and associated phenomena, but you will find a wide variety of things we do that, while related, are not simple compression of materials, but involve a much richer variety of phenomena. This tutorial will introduce some of the underlying physics involved in this work, some of the more common types of phenomena we study, and common techniques. However, the list will not be exhaustive by any means.

  13. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasche, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    A method for recovering energy in an inertial confinement fusion reactor having a reactor chamber and a sphere forming means positioned above an opening in the reactor chamber is described, comprising: embedding a fusion target fuel capsule having a predetermined yield in the center of a hollow solid lithium tube and subsequently embedding the hollow solid lithium tube in a liquid lithium medium; using the sphere forming means for forming the liquid lithium into a spherical shaped liquid lithium mass having a diameter smaller than the length of the hollow solid lithium tube with the hollow solid lithium tube being positioned along a diameter of the spherical shaped mass, providing the spherical shaped liquid lithium mass with the fusion fuel target capsule and hollow solid lithium tube therein as a freestanding liquid lithium shaped spherical shaped mass without any external means for maintaining the spherical shape by dropping the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass from the sphere forming means into the reactor chamber; producing a magnetic field in the reactor chamber; imploding the target capsule in the reactor chamber to produce fusion energy; absorbing fusion energy in the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass to convert substantially all the fusion energy to shock induced kinetic energy of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass which expands the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass; and compressing the magnetic field by expansion of the liquid lithium spherical shaped mass and recovering useful energy

  14. The importance of microjet vs shock wave formation in sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolloch, Lior; Kost, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Low-frequency ultrasound application has been shown to greatly enhance transdermal drug delivery. Skin exposed to ultrasound is affected in a heterogeneous manner, thus mass transport through the stratum corneum occurs mainly through highly permeable localized transport regions (LTRs). Shock waves and microjets generated during inertial cavitations are responsible for the transdermal permeability enhancement. In this study, we evaluated the effect of these two phenomena using direct and indirect methods, and demonstrated that the contribution of microjets to skin permeability enhancement is significantly higher than shock waves. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Rippled shock front solutions for testing hydrodynamic stability simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The response of a shock front to arbitrary small perturbations can be calculated analytically. Such rippled shock front solutions are useful for determining the accuracy of hydrodynamic simulation codes such as LASNEX [Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 2, 51 (1977)], which are used to compute perturbation growth in inertial fusion targets. The LASNEX fractional errors are of order κ 2 L 2 , where κ is the transverse wavenumber of the perturbation, and L is the largest zone dimension. Numerical errors are about 25% for a calculation using 26 zones per transverse wavelength

  16. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere

  17. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial fusion, astrophysical plasma and flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V; Modestov, M; Akkerman, V; Eriksson, L-E

    2007-01-01

    Previous results are reviewed and new results are presented on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confined fusion, flames and supernovae including gravitational and thermonuclear explosion mechanisms. The instability couples micro-scale plasma effects to large-scale hydrodynamic phenomena. In inertial fusion the instability reduces target compression. In supernovae the instability produces large-scale convection, which determines the fate of the star. The instability is often accompanied by mass flux through the unstable interface, which may have either a stabilizing or a destabilizing influence. Destabilization happens due to the Darrieus-Landau instability of a deflagration front. Still, it is unclear whether the instabilities lead to well-organized large-scale structures (bubbles) or to relatively isotropic turbulence (mixing layer)

  18. Inertial-range spectrum of whistler turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theoretical model of an inertial-range energy spectrum for homogeneous whistler turbulence. The theory is a generalization of the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan concept of the inertial-range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. In the model the dispersion relation is used to derive scaling laws for whistler waves at highly oblique propagation with respect to the mean magnetic field. The model predicts an energy spectrum for such whistler waves with a spectral index −2.5 in the perpendicular component of the wave vector and thus provides an interpretation about recent discoveries of the second inertial-range of magnetic energy spectra at high frequencies in the solar wind.

  19. Derivation of the physical equations solved in the inertial confinement stability code DOC. Informal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scannapieco, A.J.; Cranfill, C.W.

    1978-11-01

    There now exists an inertial confinement stability code called DOC, which runs as a postprocessor. DOC (a code that has evolved from a previous code, PANSY) is a spherical harmonic linear stability code that integrates, in time, a set of Lagrangian perturbation equations. Effects due to real equations of state, asymmetric energy deposition, thermal conduction, shock propagation, and a time-dependent zeroth-order state are handled in the code. We present here a detailed derivation of the physical equations that are solved in the code

  20. Derivation of the physical equations solved in the inertial confinement stability code DOC. Informal report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scannapieco, A.J.; Cranfill, C.W.

    1978-11-01

    There now exists an inertial confinement stability code called DOC, which runs as a postprocessor. DOC (a code that has evolved from a previous code, PANSY) is a spherical harmonic linear stability code that integrates, in time, a set of Lagrangian perturbation equations. Effects due to real equations of state, asymmetric energy deposition, thermal conduction, shock propagation, and a time-dependent zeroth-order state are handled in the code. We present here a detailed derivation of the physical equations that are solved in the code.

  1. Using Inertial Sensors in Smartphones for Curriculum Experiments of Inertial Navigation Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoji Niu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inertial technology has been used in a wide range of applications such as guidance, navigation, and motion tracking. However, there are few undergraduate courses that focus on the inertial technology. Traditional inertial navigation systems (INS and relevant testing facilities are expensive and complicated in operation, which makes it inconvenient and risky to perform teaching experiments with such systems. To solve this issue, this paper proposes the idea of using smartphones, which are ubiquitous and commonly contain off-the-shelf inertial sensors, as the experimental devices. A series of curriculum experiments are designed, including the Allan variance test, the calibration test, the initial leveling test and the drift feature test. These experiments are well-selected and can be implemented simply with the smartphones and without any other specialized tools. The curriculum syllabus was designed and tentatively carried out on 14 undergraduate students with a science and engineering background. Feedback from the students show that the curriculum can help them gain a comprehensive understanding of the inertial technology such as calibration and modeling of the sensor errors, determination of the device attitude and accumulation of the sensor errors in the navigation algorithm. The use of inertial sensors in smartphones provides the students the first-hand experiences and intuitive feelings about the function of inertial sensors. Moreover, it can motivate students to utilize ubiquitous low-cost sensors in their future research.

  2. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  3. Inertial effects in laser-driven ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, R.J.; Szeoke, A.; Howard, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The gasdynamic partial differential equations (PDE's) governing the motion of an ablatively accelerated target (rocket) contain an inertial force term that arises from acceleration of the reference frame in which the PDE's are written. We give a simple, intuitive description of this effect, and estimate its magnitude and parametric dependences by means of approximate analytical formulas inferred from our computer hydrocode calculations. Often this inertial term is negligible, but for problems in the areas of laser fusion and laser equation of state studies we find that it can substantially reduce the attainable hydrodynamic efficiency of acceleration and implosion

  4. Inertial Oscillations and the Galilean Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaev, G. K.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a general solution of shallow-water equations on the f-plane. The solution describes the generation of inertial oscillations by wind-pulse forcing over the background of currents arbitrarily changing in time and space in a homogeneous fluid. It is shown that the existence of such a complete solution of shallow-water equations on the f-plane is related to their invariance with respect to the generalized Galilean transformations. Examples of velocity hodographs of inertial oscillations developing over the background of a narrow jet are presented which explain the diversity in their forms.

  5. Inertial and interference effects in optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karstens, W; Smith, D Y

    2015-01-01

    Interference between free-space and material components of the displacement current plays a key role in determining optical properties. This is illustrated by an analogy between the Lorentz optical model and a-c circuits. Phase shifts in material-polarization currents, which are inertial, relative to the non-inertial vacuum-polarization current cause interference in the total displacement current and, hence, variation in E-M wave propagation. If the displacement-current is reversed, forward propagation is inhibited yielding the semimetallic reflectivity exhibited by intrinsic silicon. Complete cancellation involves material currents offsetting free-space currents to form current-loops that correspond to plasmons. (paper)

  6. Shock-Induced and Shock-Assisted Reaction Synthesis of Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thadhani, N. N

    1997-01-01

    The beneficial effects of shock-compression of powders and solid-state chemical reactions were utilized to synthesize Ti-Si and Ti-A1 intermetallics, Ti-B and Ti-C ceramics, and Ti-Si:Ti-A1 composites...

  7. Data collected by the Shock Wave Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Thiel, M.

    1976-01-01

    The Shock Wave Data Center of the Lawrence Livermore Lab collects and disseminates P.V.E. data obtained with shock waves. It has been in existence since 1964. An extensive number of papers reporting shock data had become available by that time. This was so in spite of the fact that the technology was developed only during the 2nd World War. Collection and partial evaluation of this data was therefore of value to facilitate its use by our laboratory and others who were involved with science and engineering in the high pressure field. The pressure range of the data collected is quite extensive and extends from 1 MPa to 1 TPa. One very important difference between shock wave compression data and those obtained with static presses must be emphasized, since it is often not fully appreciated. The pressure-volume locus of shock wave states (Hugoniot), which is obtained by passing increasingly stronger shocks into samples with the same initial state, rapidly increases in temperature as the shocks get stronger and the pressure and compression get higher. As a consequence, this Hugoniot locus must have a lower compressibility than isotherms obtained under static conditions. In fact, if porous or otherwise expanded samples are used, states at or near the critical region of metals can be obtained if the shock pressure is allowed to decrease in a controlled manner. Such pressure release measurements have so far only been utilized to a limited extent since the compression process has been of primary interest to workers in the field. As the use of this data in the energy field increases, however, such data will be needed more often. Applications are discussed that involve transient high pressure processes, practically all of which involve both compressed and expanded states

  8. Relativistic self focussing of laser beams at fast ignitor inertial fusion with volume ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, F.; Castillo, R.; Hora, H.

    1999-01-01

    The alternative to the magnetic confinement fusion is inertial fusion energy mostly using lasers as drivers for compression and heating of pellets with deuterium and tritium fuel. Following the present technology of lasers with pulses of some megajoules energy and nanosecond duration, a power station for very low cost energy production (and without the problems of well erosion of magnetic confinement) could be available within 15 to 20 years. For the pellet compression, the scheme of spark ignition was mostly applied but its numerous problems with asymmetries and instabilities may be overcome by the alternative scheme of high gain volume ignition. This is a well established option of inertial fusion energy with lasers where a large range of possible later improvements is implied with respect to laser technology or higher plasma compression leading to energy production of perhaps five times below the present lowest level cost from fission reactors. A further improvement may be possible by the recent development of lasers with picosecond pulse duration using the fast igniter scheme which may reach even higher fusion gains with laser pulse energies of some 100 kilojoules

  9. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  10. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  11. Inertial algorithms for the stationary Navier-Stokes equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Yanren; Mattheij, R.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Several kind of new numerical schemes for the stationary Navier-Stokes equations based on the virtue of Inertial Manifold and Approximate Inertial Manifold, which we call them inertial algorithms in this paper, together with their error estimations are presented. All these algorithms are constructed

  12. Isentropic compression with the SPHINX machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'almeida, T; Lasalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The SPHINX machine is a generator of pulsed high power (Class 6 MA, 1 μs) that can be used in the framework of inertial fusion for achieving isentropic compression experiments. The magnetic field created by the current impulse generates a quasi-isentropic compression of a metallic liner. In order to optimize this mode of operation, the current impulse is shaped through a device called DLCM (Dynamic Load Current Multiplier). The DLCM device allows both the increase of the amplitude of the current injected into the liner and its shaping. Some preliminary results concerning an aluminium liner are reported. The measurement of the speed of the internal surface of the liner during its implosion and over a quite long trajectory has been possible by interferometry and the results agree well with simulations based on the experimental value of the current delivered to the liner

  13. Free Piston Double Diaphragm Shock Tube

    OpenAIRE

    OGURA, Eiji; FUNABIKI, Katsushi; SATO, Shunichi; ABE, Takashi; 小倉, 栄二; 船曳, 勝之; 佐藤, 俊逸; 安部, 隆士

    1997-01-01

    A free piston double diaphragm shock tube was newly developed for generation of high Mach number shock wave. Its characteristics was investigated for various operation parameters; such as a strength of the diaphragm at the end of the comparession tube, an initial pressure of low pressure tube, an initial pressure of medium pressure tube and the volume of compression tube. Under the restriction of fixed pressures for the driver high pressure tube (32×10^5Pa) and the low pressure tube (40Pa) in...

  14. Shock wave interactions with detonable clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripley, R.C.; Josey, T.; Donahue, L.; Whitehouse, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results from the numerical simulation of compressible multi-species gases in an unstructured mesh CFD code called Chinook. Multiple species gases are significant to a wide range of CFD applications that involve chemical reactions, in particular detonation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interaction of shock waves with localized regions of reactive and non-reactive gas species. Test cases are chosen to highlight shock reflection and acceleration through combustion products resulting from the detonation of an explosive charge, and detonation wave propagation through a fuel-air cloud. Computations are performed in a 2D axi-symmetric framework. (author)

  15. Complete equation of state for shocked liquid nitrogen: Analytical developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamic response of liquid nitrogen has been studied extensively, in part, due to the long-standing interest in the high pressure and high temperature dissociation of shocked molecular nitrogen. Previous equation of state (EOS) developments regarding shocked liquid nitrogen have focused mainly on the use of intermolecular pair potentials in atomistic calculations. Here, we present EOS developments for liquid nitrogen, incorporating analytical models, for use in continuum calculations of the shock compression response. The analytical models, together with available Hugoniot data, were used to extrapolate a low pressure reference EOS for molecular nitrogen [Span, et al., J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 29, 1361 (2000)] to high pressures and high temperatures. Using the EOS presented here, the calculated pressures and temperatures for single shock, double shock, and multiple shock compression of liquid nitrogen provide a good match to the measured results over a broad range of P-T space. Our calculations provide the first comparison of EOS developments with recently-measured P-T states under multiple shock compression. The present EOS developments are general and are expected to be useful for other liquids that have low pressure reference EOS information available.

  16. Inertial frames and breakthrough propulsion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Marc G.

    2017-09-01

    The term ;Breakthrough Propulsion Physics; comes from the NASA project by that name which examined non-rocket space drives, gravity control, and faster-than-light travel. The focus here is on space drives and the related unsolved physics of inertial frames. A ;space drive; is a generic term encompassing any concept for using as-yet undiscovered physics to move a spacecraft instead of existing rockets, sails, or tethers. The collective state of the art spans mostly steps 1-3 of the scientific method: defining the problem, collecting data, and forming hypotheses. The key issues include (1) conservation of momentum, (2) absence of obvious reaction mass, and (3) the net-external thrusting requirement. Relevant open problems in physics include: (1) the sources and mechanisms of inertial frames, (2) coupling of gravitation to the other fundamental forces, and (3) the nature of the quantum vacuum. Rather than following the assumption that inertial frames are an immutable, intrinsic property of space, this paper revisits Mach's Principle, where it is posited that inertia is relative to the distant surrounding matter. This perspective allows conjectures that a space drive could impart reaction forces to that matter, via some as-yet undiscovered interaction with the inertial frame properties of space. Thought experiments are offered to begin a process to derive new hypotheses. It is unknown if this line of inquiry will be fruitful, but it is hoped that, by revisiting unsolved physics from a propulsion point of view, new insights will be gained.

  17. Inertial Confinement Fusion at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Inertial Confinement Fusion: ICF contributions to science and technology; target fabrication; laser-target interaction; KrF laser development; advanced KrF lasers; KrF laser technology; and plasma physics for light-ion program

  18. Inertial reference frames and gravitational forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santavy, I.

    1981-01-01

    The connection between different definitions of inertial, i.e. fundamental, reference frames and the corresponding characterisation of gravitational fields by gravitational forces are considered from the point of view of their possible interpretation in university introductory courses. The introduction of a special class of reference frames, denoted 'mixed reference frames' is proposed and discussed. (author)

  19. Inertial fusion: strategy and economic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Inertial fusion must demonstrate that the high target gains required for practical fusion energy can be achieved with driver energies not larger than a few megajoules. Before a multi-megajoule scale driver is constructed, inertial fusion must provide convincing experimental evidence that the required high target gains are feasible. This will be the principal objective of the NOVA laser experiments. Implosions will be conducted with scaled targets which are nearly hydrodynamically equivalent to the high gain target implosions. Experiments which demonstrate high target gains will be conducted in the early nineties when multi-megajoule drivers become available. Efficient drivers will also be demonstrated by this time period. Magnetic fusion may demonstrate high Q at about the same time as inertial fusion demonstrates high gain. Beyond demonstration of high performance fusion, economic considerations will predominate. Fusion energy will achieve full commercial success when it becomes cheaper than fission and coal. Analysis of the ultimate economic potential of inertial fusion suggests its costs may be reduced to half those of fission and coal. Relative cost escalation would increase this advantage. Fusions potential economic advantage derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy (which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity)

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics on inertial confinement fusion: distribution of electron-beam energy in KrF laser media; electron collision processes in KrF laser media; Krf laser kinetics; and properties of the KrF laser medium

  1. A flexible cell concentrator using inertial focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chunglong; Zhou, Jian; Liang, Yitao; Huang, Bobo; Fang, Yifeng; Liang, Xiao; Ye, Xuesong

    2017-09-11

    Cell concentration adjustment is intensively implemented routinely both in research and clinical laboratories. Centrifuge is the most prevalent technique for tuning biosample concentration. But it suffers from a number of drawbacks, such as requirement of experienced operator, high cost, low resolution, variable reproducibility and induced damage to sample. Herein we report on a cost-efficient alternative using inertial microfluidics. While the majority of existing literatures concentrate on inertial focusing itself, we identify the substantial role of the outlet system played in the device performance that has long been underestimated. The resistances of the outlets virtually involve in defining the cutoff size of a given inertial filtration channel. Following the comprehensive exploration of the influence of outlet system, we designed an inertial device with selectable outlets. Using both commercial microparticles and cultured Hep G2 cells, we have successfully demonstrated the automated concentration modification and observed several key advantages of our device as compared with conventional centrifuge, such as significantly reduced cell loss (only 4.2% vs. ~40% of centrifuge), better preservation of cell viability and less processing time as well as the increased reproducibility due to absence of manual operation. Furthermore, our device shows high effectiveness for concentrated sample (e.g., 1.8 × 10 6 cells/ml) as well. We envision its promising applications in the circumstance where repetitive sample preparation is intensely employed.

  2. CHAOTIC DUFFING TYPE OSCILLATOR WITH INERTIAL DAMPING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamaševicius, Arunas; Mykolaitis, Gytis; Kirvaitis, Raimundas

    2009-01-01

    A novel Duffing-Holmes type autonomous chaotic oscillator is described. In comparison with the well-known non-autonomous Duffing-Holmes circuit it lacks the external periodic drive, but includes two extra linear feedback sub-circuits, namely a direct positive feedback loop, and an inertial negati...... feedback loop. SPICE simulation and hardware experimental results are presented....

  3. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used

  4. Hohlraum manufacture for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreman, L.R.; Gobby, P.; Bartos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Hohlraums are an integral part of indirect drive targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. Hohlraums are made by an electroforming process that combines elements of micromachining and coating technology. The authors describe how these target element are made and extension of the method that allow fabrication of other, more complex target components

  5. Inertial fusion research: Annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.T.; Terry, N.C.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research activities undertaken at KMS Fusion (KMSF) during 1985. It is organized into three main technical sections; the first covers fusion experiments and theoretical physics, the second is devoted to progress in materials development and target fabrication, and the third describes laser technology research. These three individual sections have been cataloged separately

  6. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our ...

  7. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that “DNABIT Compress” algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases. PMID:21383923

  8. Shock Compression and Melting of an Fe-Ni-Si Alloy: Implications for the Temperature Profile of the Earth's Core and the Heat Flux Across the Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youjun; Sekine, Toshimori; Lin, Jung-Fu; He, Hongliang; Liu, Fusheng; Zhang, Mingjian; Sato, Tomoko; Zhu, Wenjun; Yu, Yin

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the melting behavior and the thermal equation of state of Fe-Ni alloyed with candidate light elements at conditions of the Earth's core is critical for our knowledge of the region's thermal structure and chemical composition and the heat flow across the liquid outer core into the lowermost mantle. Here we studied the shock equation of state and melting curve of an Fe-8 wt% Ni-10 wt% Si alloy up to 250 GPa by hypervelocity impacts with direct velocity and reliable temperature measurements. Our results show that the addition of 10 wt% Si to Fe-8 wt% Ni alloy slightly depresses the melting temperature of iron by 200-300 (±200) K at the core-mantle boundary ( 136 GPa) and by 600-800 (±500) K at the inner core-outer core boundary ( 330 GPa), respectively. Our results indicate that Si has a relatively mild effect on the melting temperature of iron compared with S and O. Our thermodynamic modeling shows that Fe-5 wt% Ni alloyed with 6 wt% Si and 2 wt% S (which has a density-velocity profile that matches the outer core's seismic profile well) exhibits an adiabatic profile with temperatures of 3900 K and 5300 K at the top and bottom of the outer core, respectively. If Si is a major light element in the core, a geotherm modeled for the outer core indicates a thermal gradient of 5.8-6.8 (±1.6) K/km in the D″ region and a high heat flow of 13-19 TW across the core-mantle boundary.

  9. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, V.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  10. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  11. A new hybrid code (CHIEF) implementing the inertial electron fluid equation without approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Jain, N.; Kilian, P.; Büchner, J.

    2018-03-01

    We present a new hybrid algorithm implemented in the code CHIEF (Code Hybrid with Inertial Electron Fluid) for simulations of electron-ion plasmas. The algorithm treats the ions kinetically, modeled by the Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method, and electrons as an inertial fluid, modeled by electron fluid equations without any of the approximations used in most of the other hybrid codes with an inertial electron fluid. This kind of code is appropriate to model a large variety of quasineutral plasma phenomena where the electron inertia and/or ion kinetic effects are relevant. We present here the governing equations of the model, how these are discretized and implemented numerically, as well as six test problems to validate our numerical approach. Our chosen test problems, where the electron inertia and ion kinetic effects play the essential role, are: 0) Excitation of parallel eigenmodes to check numerical convergence and stability, 1) parallel (to a background magnetic field) propagating electromagnetic waves, 2) perpendicular propagating electrostatic waves (ion Bernstein modes), 3) ion beam right-hand instability (resonant and non-resonant), 4) ion Landau damping, 5) ion firehose instability, and 6) 2D oblique ion firehose instability. Our results reproduce successfully the predictions of linear and non-linear theory for all these problems, validating our code. All properties of this hybrid code make it ideal to study multi-scale phenomena between electron and ion scales such as collisionless shocks, magnetic reconnection and kinetic plasma turbulence in the dissipation range above the electron scales.

  12. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Alan G; Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ∼10(4) T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (∼10(-10)m(3)) at high plasma densities (∼10(28)m(-3)) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  13. Modeling Small-Amplitude Perturbations in Inertial Confinement Fusion Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesak, Steven; Metzler, N.; Velikovich, A. L.; Gardner, J. H.; Manheimer, W.

    2005-10-01

    Recent advances in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology serve to ensure that imploding laser-driven ICF pellets will spend a significantly larger portion of their time in what is regarded as the ``linear'' portion of their perturbation evolution, i.e., in the presence of small-amplitude but nonetheless evolving perturbations. Since the evolution of these linear perturbations collectively form the initial conditions for the subsequent nonlinear evolution of the pellet, which in turn determines the energy yield of the pellet, the accurate numerical modeling of these small-amplitude perturbations has taken on an increased importance. This modeling is difficult despite the expected linear evolution of the perturbations themselves, because these perturbations are embedded in a highly nonlinear, strongly-shocked, and highly complex flow field which in and of itself stresses numerical computation capabilities, and whose simulation often employs numerical techniques which were not designed with the proper treatment of small-amplitude perturbations in mind. In this paper we will review some of the techniques that we have recently found to be of use toward this end.

  14. Shock-wave propagation and reflection in semicrystalline polyethylene: A molecular-level investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M.; O'Connor, Thomas C.; Chantawansri, Tanya L.; Sliozberg, Yelena R.; Sirk, Timothy W.; Yeh, In-Chul; Robbins, Mark O.; Andzelm, Jan W.

    2017-09-01

    Semicrystalline polyethylene (PE) is attractive for a variety of mechanically demanding applications, where shock compression can occur. Although often highly crystalline, PE invariably contains nanoscale amorphous domains that influence shock propagation. Our objective in this work is to study the effects of such domains. To this end, we adopt a novel approach wherein we parametrize a simple continuum-level theory based on the shock impedance from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using this theory, we predict how crystalline/amorphous interfaces attenuate shocks via energy reflection due to the impedance mismatch between the phases. The theory predicts that these interfaces attenuate weak shocks more effectively than strong shocks. We compare the theory to explicit nonequilibrium MD simulations of compressive shocks in semicrystalline PE containing nanometer-scale amorphous regions of varying size, where we analyze the pressure response and reflection of energy. The theory and simulations show good agreement for strong shocks (≥1.0 km /s ), but for weak shocks (shock front. However, the simulations show that when amorphous domains are narrow—with widths comparable to the shock front—reflection is reduced compared to the predictions. We identify several nanoscale mechanisms that reduce the impedance mismatch, and thus reduce reflection, at thin amorphous domains. First, the two-wave elastic-plastic structure of shocks in crystalline PE allows the faster-moving elastic precursor wave to compress small amorphous domains before the plastic wave arrives. Second, confinement between stiff, ordered crystalline domains increases the stiffness and chain ordering in small amorphous regions. Moreover, in terms of stiffness the interfaces are similar in width to the shock front, which may contribute to the underprediction of the theory for weak shocks, where the shock front is widest. We conclude by discussing the significance of these results, namely, how they can

  15. Estimates of post-acceleration longitudinal bunch compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A simple analytic method is developed, based on physical approximations, for treating transient implosive longitudinal compression of bunches of heavy ions in an accelerator system for ignition of inertial-confinement fusion pellet targets. Parametric dependences of attainable compressions and of beam path lengths and times during compression are indicated for ramped pulsed-gap lines, rf systems in storage and accumulator rings, and composite systems, including sections of free drift. It appears that for high-confidence pellets in a plant producing 1000 MW of electric power the needed pulse lengths cannot be obtained with rings alone unless an unreasonably large number of them are used, independent of choice of rf harmonic number. In contrast, pulsed-gap lines alone can meet this need. The effects of an initial inward compressive drift and of longitudinal emittance are included

  16. Shock response of porous metals: characterization of pressure field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai; Hao Pengcheng; Dong Yinfeng; Wei Xijun; Zhu Jianshi

    2012-01-01

    Shock wave reaction on porous metals is numerically simulated. When the pressure threshold is low, the increasing rate of high-pressure area gives roughly the propagation velocity of the compressive waves in the porous material. and the wave front in the condensed pressure map is nearly a plane: with the increasing of pressure threshold. more low-pressure-spots appear in the high-pressure background, and neighboring spots may coalesce, consequently, the topology of the pressure Turing pattern may change. The deviation from linearity of the increasing rate of high-pressure area is a pronounced effect of porous material under shock. The stronger the initial shock, the more pronounced the porosity effects. When the initial yield of material becomes higher, the material shows more elastic behaviors and the less porous effects, compressive and tension waves propagate more quickly, and the porous material becomes less compressible. (authors)

  17. Conversion of piston-driven shocks from powerful solar flares to blast wave shocks in the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, S.

    1990-01-01

    It was suggested by Smart and Shea (1985) that the time of arrival of solar-flare-generated shock waves at any point in space may be predicted by assuming that they are first driven from the Sun after which they decay into blast shocks. Their study was extended by using the duration of the Type IV radio emission as a phenomenological symptom of the piston-driven phase of these shocks. Using a sample of 39 cases of combined Type II/Type IV observations from 1972 to 1982 solar flares, it was found that the average predicted times-of-arrival of these shocks to Earth (and elsewhere) deviate from the actual times by 1.40 hr with a standard deviation of 1.25 hr. On the average, a representative shock from this sample is emitted from a powerful flare with a velocity of 1,560 km sec -1 ; moves at a constant inertial velocity to a distance of 0.12 AU after which it begins to decelerate as a classical (Sedov-type) blast shock that is convected by the ambient solar wind as suggested by Smart and Shea; and arrives to Earth 45.8 hr after its initiation in the Sun. Shocks that appear to deviate from this phenomenological scenario by virtue of lack of detection on Earth are assumed to decay into fast mode MHD waves. (author). 7 figs., 1 tab., 53 refs

  18. Main drive optimization of a high-foot pulse shape in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Wu, J. F.; Liu, Jie; Zhang, W. Y.; He, X. T.

    2016-12-01

    While progress towards hot-spot ignition has been made achieving an alpha-heating dominated state in high-foot implosion experiments [Hurricane et al., Nat. Phys. 12, 800 (2016)] on the National Ignition Facility, improvements are needed to increase the fuel compression for the enhancement of the neutron yield. A strategy is proposed to improve the fuel compression through the recompression of a shock/compression wave generated by the end of the main drive portion of a high-foot pulse shape. Two methods for the peak pulse recompression, namely, the decompression-and-recompression (DR) and simple recompression schemes, are investigated and compared. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations confirm that the peak pulse recompression can clearly improve fuel compression without significantly compromising the implosion stability. In particular, when the convergent DR shock is tuned to encounter the divergent shock from the capsule center at a suitable position, not only the neutron yield but also the stability of stagnating hot-spot can be noticeably improved, compared to the conventional high-foot implosions [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)].

  19. An Approach Toward Synthesis of Bridgmanite in Dynamic Compression Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppart, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Bridgmanite occurs in heavily shocked meteorites and provides a useful constraint on pressure-temperature conditions during shock-metamorphism. Its occurrence also provides constraints on the shock release path. Shock-release and shock duration are important parameters in estimating the size of impactors that generate the observed shock metamorphic record. Thus, it is timely to examine if bridgmanite can be synthesized in dynamic compression experiments with the goal of establishing a correlation between shock duration and grainsize. Up to now only one high pressure polymorph of an Mg-silicate has been synthesized AND recovered in a shock experiment (wadsleyite). Therefore, it is not given that shock synthesis of bridgmanite is possible. This project started recently, so we present an outline of shock experiment designs and potentially results from the first experiments. FUNDING ACKNOWLEDGMENT UNLV HiPSEC: This research was sponsored (or sponsored in part) by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Cooperative Agreement #DE-NA0001982. HPCAT: "[Portions of this work were]/[This work was] performed at HPCAT (Sector 16), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. HPCAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0001974 and DOE-BES under Award No. DE-FG02-99ER45775, with partial instrumentation funding by NSF. APS is supported by DOE-BES, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357."

  20. X-ray diffraction measurements in KCl shocked along [100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Almeida, T.; Gupta, Y.M.

    2000-01-01

    Real time x-ray diffraction measurements were used to examine the polymorphic phase transformation in KCl shocked along the [100] direction. Shock wave continuum data, obtained previously by Hayes, were used to design the experiments and to predict diffraction from KCl shocked to different peak stresses. Here, we present the results obtained below the transition stress: between 1.4 and 2 GPa. Diffraction data obtained were quantitatively related to macroscopic compression. Interplanar spacing measurements revealed isotropic compression of the unit cell in contrast to previously reported results. Above the transition stress, descriptions of the atomic arrangement with respect to shock propagation (not available in the literature) are required for setting up the detection system. Hence, continuum results in combination with various crystallographic considerations were utilized to obtain data above the transition stress

  1. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  2. Unusual behaviour of usual materials in shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, G I

    2014-01-01

    Exotic results of investigations of inelastic deformation and fracture under shock wave loading are presented and briefly discussed. Temperature effects on the flow stress at high strain rate may differ even in sign from those we observe at low and moderate strain rates. Investigations of the temperature-rate dependence of the yield stress at shock compression demonstrate intense multiplication of dislocations. At the highest strain rates, so-called ideal (ultimate) shear and tensile strength is reached in experiments with picosecond durations of shock loading. Although grain boundaries, in general, reduce resistance to fracture as compared to single crystals, the spall strength of ultra-fine-grained metals usually slightly exceeds that of coarse-grain samples. Failure wave phenomena have been observed in shock-compressed glasses.

  3. Measuring the shock impedance mismatch between high-density carbon and deuterium at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, M.; Celliers, P. M.; Sterne, P. A.; Benedict, L. X.; Correa, A. A.; Hamel, S.; Ali, S. J.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Biener, J.; Collins, G. W.; Coppari, F.; Divol, L.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Haan, S. W.; Le Pape, S.; Meezan, N. B.; Moore, A. S.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Wild, C.; Eggert, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    Fine-grained diamond, or high-density carbon (HDC), is being used as an ablator for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate equation of state (EOS) knowledge over a wide range of phase space is critical in the design and analysis of integrated ICF experiments. Here, we report shock and release measurements of the shock impedance mismatch between HDC and liquid deuterium conducted during shock-timing experiments having a first shock in the ablator ranging between 8 and 14 Mbar. Using ultrafast Doppler imaging velocimetry to track the leading shock front, we characterize the shock velocity discontinuity upon the arrival of the shock at the HDC/liquid deuterium interface. Comparing the experimental data with tabular EOS models used to simulate integrated ICF experiments indicates the need for an improved multiphase EOS model for HDC in order to achieve a significant increase in neutron yield in indirect-driven ICF implosions with HDC ablators.

  4. Fundamental structure of steady plastic shock waves in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, A.; Ravichandran, G.

    2004-01-01

    The propagation of steady plane shock waves in metallic materials is considered. Following the constitutive framework adopted by R. J. Clifton [Shock Waves and the Mechanical Properties of Solids, edited by J. J. Burke and V. Weiss (Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, N.Y., 1971), p. 73] for analyzing elastic-plastic transient waves, an analytical solution of the steady state propagation of plastic shocks is proposed. The problem is formulated in a Lagrangian setting appropriate for large deformations. The material response is characterized by a quasistatic tensile (compression) test (providing the isothermal strain hardening law). In addition the elastic response is determined up to second order elastic constants by ultrasonic measurements. Based on this simple information, it is shown that the shock kinetics can be quite well described for moderate shocks in aluminum with stress amplitude up to 10 GPa. Under the later assumption, the elastic response is assumed to be isentropic, and thermomechanical coupling is neglected. The model material considered here is aluminum, but the analysis is general and can be applied to any viscoplastic material subjected to moderate amplitude shocks. Comparisons with experimental data are made for the shock velocity, the particle velocity and the shock structure. The shock structure is obtained by quadrature of a first order differential equation, which provides analytical results under certain simplifying assumptions. The effects of material parameters and loading conditions on the shock kinetics and shock structure are discussed. The shock width is characterized by assuming an overstress formulation for the viscoplastic response. The effects on the shock structure of strain rate sensitivity are analyzed and the rationale for the J. W. Swegle and D. E. Grady [J. Appl. Phys. 58, 692 (1985)] universal scaling law for homogeneous materials is explored. Finally, the ability to deduce information on the viscoplastic response of

  5. Fundamental structure of steady plastic shock waves in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, A.; Ravichandran, G.

    2004-02-01

    The propagation of steady plane shock waves in metallic materials is considered. Following the constitutive framework adopted by R. J. Clifton [Shock Waves and the Mechanical Properties of Solids, edited by J. J. Burke and V. Weiss (Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, N.Y., 1971), p. 73] for analyzing elastic-plastic transient waves, an analytical solution of the steady state propagation of plastic shocks is proposed. The problem is formulated in a Lagrangian setting appropriate for large deformations. The material response is characterized by a quasistatic tensile (compression) test (providing the isothermal strain hardening law). In addition the elastic response is determined up to second order elastic constants by ultrasonic measurements. Based on this simple information, it is shown that the shock kinetics can be quite well described for moderate shocks in aluminum with stress amplitude up to 10 GPa. Under the later assumption, the elastic response is assumed to be isentropic, and thermomechanical coupling is neglected. The model material considered here is aluminum, but the analysis is general and can be applied to any viscoplastic material subjected to moderate amplitude shocks. Comparisons with experimental data are made for the shock velocity, the particle velocity and the shock structure. The shock structure is obtained by quadrature of a first order differential equation, which provides analytical results under certain simplifying assumptions. The effects of material parameters and loading conditions on the shock kinetics and shock structure are discussed. The shock width is characterized by assuming an overstress formulation for the viscoplastic response. The effects on the shock structure of strain rate sensitivity are analyzed and the rationale for the J. W. Swegle and D. E. Grady [J. Appl. Phys. 58, 692 (1985)] universal scaling law for homogeneous materials is explored. Finally, the ability to deduce information on the viscoplastic response of

  6. Cartesian anisotropic mesh adaptation for compressible flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, W.A.; Lien, F.-S.

    2004-01-01

    Simulating transient compressible flows involving shock waves presents challenges to the CFD practitioner in terms of the mesh quality required to resolve discontinuities and prevent smearing. This paper discusses a novel two-dimensional Cartesian anisotropic mesh adaptation technique implemented for compressible flow. This technique, developed for laminar flow by Ham, Lien and Strong, is efficient because it refines and coarsens cells using criteria that consider the solution in each of the cardinal directions separately. In this paper the method will be applied to compressible flow. The procedure shows promise in its ability to deliver good quality solutions while achieving computational savings. The convection scheme used is the Advective Upstream Splitting Method (Plus), and the refinement/ coarsening criteria are based on work done by Ham et al. Transient shock wave diffraction over a backward step and shock reflection over a forward step are considered as test cases because they demonstrate that the quality of the solution can be maintained as the mesh is refined and coarsened in time. The data structure is explained in relation to the computational mesh, and the object-oriented design and implementation of the code is presented. Refinement and coarsening algorithms are outlined. Computational savings over uniform and isotropic mesh approaches are shown to be significant. (author)

  7. Thermonuclear plasma physic: inertial confinement fusion; Physique des plasmas thermonucleaires: la fusion par confinement inertiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Ch.; Juraszek, D

    2001-07-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion in which the fuel contained in a spherical capsule is strongly compressed and heated to achieve ignition and burn. The released thermonuclear energy can be much higher than the driver energy, making energetic applications attractive. Many complex physical phenomena are involved by the compression process, but it is possible to use simple analytical models to analyze the main critical points. We first determine the conditions to obtain fuel ignition. High thermonuclear gains are achieved if only a small fraction of the fuel called hot spot is used to trigger burn in the main fuel compressed on a low isentrope. A simple hot spot model will be described. The high pressure needed to drive the capsule compression are obtained by the ablation process. A simple Rocket model describe the main features of the implosion phase. Several parameters have to be controlled during the compression: irradiation symmetry, hydrodynamical stability and when the driver is a laser, the problems arising from interaction of the EM wave with the plasma. Two different schemes are examined: Indirect Drive which uses X-ray generated in a cavity to drive the implosion and the Fast Ignitor concept using a ultra intense laser beam to create the hot spot. At the end we present the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) project. LMJ is scaled to a thermonuclear gain of the order of ten. (authors)

  8. Morphological characterization of shocked porous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai; Pan, X F; Zhang Ping; Zhu Jianshi

    2009-01-01

    Morphological measures are introduced to probe the complex procedure of shock wave reaction on porous material. They characterize the geometry and the topology of the pixelized map of a state variable like temperature. The relevance to thermodynamical properties of a material is revealed and various experimental conditions are simulated. Numerical results indicate that the shock wave reaction results in a complicated sequence of compressions and rarefactions in porous material. The increasing rate of the total fractional white area A roughly gives the velocity D of a compressive-wave series. When a velocity D is mentioned, the corresponding threshold contour level of the state variable, such as temperature, should also be stated. When the threshold contour level increases, D becomes smaller. The area A increases parabolically with time t during the initial period. The A(t) curve goes back to being linear in the following three cases: (i) when the porosity δ approaches 1, (ii) when the initial shock becomes stronger and (iii) when the contour level approaches the minimum value of the state variable. The area with high temperature may continue to increase even after the early compressive waves have arrived at the downstream free surface and some rarefactive waves have come back into the target body. In the case of energetic material needing a higher temperature for initiation, a higher porosity is preferred and the material may be initiated after the precursory compressive waves have scanned the entire target body. In some cases we need scattered hot spots, but in others we need connected ones. One may desire the fabrication of a porous body and choose the appropriate shock strength according to what is needed. With the Minkowski measures, the dependence on experimental conditions is reflected simply by a few coefficients. They may be used as order parameters to classify the maps of physical variables in a similar way to thermodynamic phase transitions.

  9. Shock induced melting of lead (experimental study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabire, Catherine; Hereil, Pierre L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate melting on release of lead, two shock compression measurements have been carried out at 51 GPa. In the first one, a pyrometric measurement has been performed at the Pb/LiF interface. In the second one, the Pb/LiF interface velocity has been recorded using VISAR measurement technique. VISAR and radiance profile are in good agreement and seem to show melting on release of lead

  10. Effects of Alfvénic Drift on Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2018-03-01

    Non-detection of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters has challenged diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of cosmic-ray (CR) protons at weak collisionless shocks that are expected to form in the intracluster medium. As an effort to address this problem, we here explore possible roles of Alfvén waves self-excited via resonant streaming instability during the CR acceleration at parallel shocks. The mean drift of Alfvén waves may either increase or decrease the scattering center compression ratio, depending on the postshock cross-helicity, leading to either flatter or steeper CR spectra. We first examine such effects at planar shocks, based on the transport of Alfvén waves in the small amplitude limit. For the shock parameters relevant to cluster shocks, Alfvénic drift flattens the CR spectrum slightly, resulting in a small increase of the CR acceleration efficiency, η. We then consider two additional, physically motivated cases: (1) postshock waves are isotropized via MHD and plasma processes across the shock transition, and (2) postshock waves contain only forward waves propagating along with the flow due to a possible gradient of CR pressure behind the shock. In these cases, Alfvénic drift could reduce η by as much as a factor of five for weak cluster shocks. For the canonical parameters adopted here, we suggest η ∼ 10‑4–10‑2 for shocks with sonic Mach number M s ≈ 2–3. The possible reduction of η may help ease the tension between non-detection of γ-rays from galaxy clusters and DSA predictions.

  11. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Moody, J D; Sater, J; Parham, T; Kozioziemski, B; Dylla- Spears, R; Ross, J S; LePape, S; Ralph, J E; Hohenberger, M; Dewald, E L; Berzak Hopkins, L; Kroll, J J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R; Nikroo, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. (paper)

  12. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  13. Slow-mode shocks in the earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The locations and structure of slow-mode shocks in the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. To date, such shocks have only been identified along the high latitude portions of the lobe-plasma sheet boundary of the geomagnetic tail. Although their intrinsic thickness is of the order of the upstream ion inertial length, they affect the internal state of a relatively much larger volume of surrounding plasma. In particular, they support a well-developed foreshock very similar to that observed upstream of the earth's bow shock, and a turbulent, strongly convecting downstream flow. They also figure importantly in the energy budget of geomagnetic substorms and produce effects which are closely analogous to much of the phenomenology known from solar observations to be associated with two-ribbon flares. 74 refs., 14 figs

  14. Uniform shock waves in disordered granular matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R; Turner, Ari M; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The confining pressure P is perhaps the most important parameter controlling the properties of granular matter. Strongly compressed granular media are, in many respects, simple solids in which elastic perturbations travel as ordinary phonons. However, the speed of sound in granular aggregates continuously decreases as the confining pressure decreases, completely vanishing at the jamming-unjamming transition. This anomalous behavior suggests that the transport of energy at low pressures should not be dominated by phonons. In this work we use simulations and theory to show how the response of granular systems becomes increasingly nonlinear as pressure decreases. In the low-pressure regime the elastic energy is found to be mainly transported through nonlinear waves and shocks. We numerically characterize the propagation speed, shape, and stability of these shocks and model the dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a simple analytical approach.

  15. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book is the second of several volumes on solids in the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library. These volumes are primarily concerned with high-pressure shock waves in solid media, including detonation and high-velocity impact and penetration events. Of the four extensive chapters in this volume, the first two describe the reactive behavior of condensed phase explosives, - Condensed-Phase Explosives: Shock Initiation and Detonation Phenomena (SA Sheffield and R Engelke) - First Principles Molecular Simulations of Energetic Materials at High-Pressures (F Zhang, S Alavi, and TK Woo), and the remaining two discuss the inert, mechanical response of solid materials. - Combined Compression and Shear Plane Waves (ZP Tang and JB Aidun), and - Dynamic Fragmentation of Solids (D Grady). All chapters are each self-contained, and can be read independently of each other. They offer a timely reference, for beginners as well as professional scientists and engineers, on the foundations of detonation phenomen...

  16. Enhanced Subsea Acoustically Aided Inertial Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Juhl

    time is expensive so lots of effort is put into cutting down on time spent on all tasks. Accuracy demanding tasks such as subsea construction and surveying are subject to strict quality control requirements taking up a lot of time. Offshore equipment is rugged and sturdy as the environmental conditions...... are harsh, likewise should the use of it be simple and robust to ensure that it actually works. The contributions of this thesis are all focused on enhancing accuracy and time efficiency while bearing operational reliability and complexity strongly in mind. The basis of inertial navigation, the inertial...... at desired survey points; the other uses a mapping sensor such as subsea lidar to simply map the area in question. Both approaches are shown to work in practice. Generating high resolution maps, as the latter approach, is how the author anticipates all subsea surveys will be conducted in the near future....

  17. Prospects for developing attractive inertial fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwall, T.; Bodner, S.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hogan, W.; Storm, E.; VanDevender, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The authors discuss the role of inertial fusion in relationship to defense activities as well as in relation to energy alternatives. Other general advantages to inertial fusion besides maintaining the system more cheaply and easily, are discussed such as certain designs and the use of very short wavelength with a very modest laser intensity. A discussion on the direct illumination approach is offered. The progress made in high-gain target physics and the potential for development of solid-state lasers as a potential multimegajoule driver and a potential high-rep-rate fusion driver are discussed. Designs for reaction chambers are examined, as is the heavy-ion fusion program. Light-ion accelerators are also discussed

  18. A novel visual-inertial monocular SLAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Wenjuan; Xu, Li; Liu, JiangGuo

    2018-02-01

    With the development of sensors and computer vision research community, cameras, which are accurate, compact, wellunderstood and most importantly cheap and ubiquitous today, have gradually been at the center of robot location. Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) using visual features, which is a system getting motion information from image acquisition equipment and rebuild the structure in unknown environment. We provide an analysis of bioinspired flights in insects, employing a novel technique based on SLAM. Then combining visual and inertial measurements to get high accuracy and robustness. we present a novel tightly-coupled Visual-Inertial Simultaneous Localization and Mapping system which get a new attempt to address two challenges which are the initialization problem and the calibration problem. experimental results and analysis show the proposed approach has a more accurate quantitative simulation of insect navigation, which can reach the positioning accuracy of centimeter level.

  19. Summary of the status of lasers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Laser systems designed for plasma research are operating in many laboratories throughout the world. The laser performance itself has become reasonably consistant from laboratory to laboratory and the focusing properties of the laser beams are understood. The plasma physics data, obtained with these systems, also appears to be reasonably self-consistant and is of great interest for inertial fusion applications. These lasers are commonly providing output powers of 0.5 > 2 TW, and power densities on target of 10 13 -10- 16 W/cm 2 , pulse durations on the order of 100 psec to 3 nsec, wavelengths between 0.5 μ and 10 μ, and focal spot sizes of 100 μ or larger where focal spot edge effects are becoming less dominant. In addition, spurious target responses due to such behavior as pre-pulses, self-focusing, or imprecise focal spot measurement are being observed less often. The technical problems of large multi-beam systems, performing at the 10 TW level, have been overcome and these systems (e.g. the Shiva and Helios lasers) are providing high density compression data with ablative targets. The next step in laser design, the 100 to 300 kJ systems, are under construction and 1 MJ lasers are being contemplated

  20. Review on Recent Developments in Laser Driven Inertial Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghoranneviss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of the laser in 1960 hopes were based on using its very high energy concentration within very short pulses of time and very small volumes for energy generation from nuclear fusion as “Inertial Fusion Energy” (IFE, parallel to the efforts to produce energy from “Magnetic Confinement Fusion” (MCF, by burning deuterium-tritium (DT in high temperature plasmas to helium. Over the years the fusion gain was increased by a number of magnitudes and has reached nearly break-even after numerous difficulties in physics and technology had been solved. After briefly summarizing laser driven IFE, we report how the recently developed lasers with pulses of petawatt power and picosecond duration may open new alternatives for IFE with the goal to possibly ignite solid or low compressed DT fuel thereby creating a simplified reactor scheme. Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks after irradiation of picosecond (PS laser pulses of around terawatt (TW power in the range of 1020 cm/s2 was discovered by Sauerbrey (1996 as measured by Doppler effect where the laser intensity was up to about 1018 W/cm2. This is several orders of magnitude higher than acceleration by irradiation based on thermal interaction of lasers has produced.