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Sample records for shell compression measurements

  1. Spherical implosion experiments on OMEGA: measurements of the cold, compressed shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaakobi, B.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Delettrez, J.A.; Town, R.P.J.; Marshall, F.J.; Glebov, V.Y.; Petrasso, R.D.; Soures, J.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Seka, W. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2000-07-01

    Targets in which a titanium-doped layer is incorporated into the shell provide a variety of diagnostic signatures (absorption lines, K-edge absorption, K{alpha} imaging) for determining the areal density and dimensions of the shell around peak compression. Here we apply these methods to demonstrate the improvement in target performance when SSD is implemented on slow-rising laser pulses. We introduce a new method to study the uniformity of imploded shells: using a recently developed pinhole-array x-ray spectrometer, we obtain core images at energies below and above the K-edge energy of titanium. The ratio between such images reflects the nonuniformity of the shell alone. Finally, we compare the results with those of 1-D LILAC simulations, as well as 2-D ORCHID simulations that allow for the imprinting of laser non-uniformity on the target. The experimental results are replicated much better by ORCHID than by LILAC. (authors)

  2. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R. [Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  3. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred

  4. Workability and Compressive Strength for Concrete With Coconut Shell Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman Alif Syazani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the compressive strength and workability of concrete added with coconut shells. Comparisons were made between conventional concrete with concrete mix coconut shell. In this study, the concretes were mixes with coconut shell by percentage of weight concrete which is 0%, 5%, and 10%. The coconut shell has been crushed first, then it was sieved, to get the optimum size which, that retained on the 5mm sieve and passing 10mm sieve. Experimental tests conducted in this study are slump test and compressive test. The results from this study are workability of concrete added with 0% and 5% of coconut shell has medium degree of workability compared to concrete added with 10% that has low workability. For the compressive strength, the concrete added with 5% and 10% of coconut shell has lower strength compared with normal concrete.

  5. Shock absorbing properties of toroidal shells under compression, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yuji

    1985-01-01

    The author has previously presented the static load-deflection relations of a toroidal shell subjected to axisymmetric compression between rigid plates and those of its outer half when subjected to lateral compression. In both these cases, the analytical method was based on the incremental Rayleigh-Ritz method. In this paper, the effects of compression angle and strain rate on the load-deflection relations of the toroidal shell are investigated for its use as a shock absorber for the radioactive material shipping cask which must keep its structural integrity even after accidental falls at any angle. Static compression tests have been carried out at four angles of compression, 10 0 , 20 0 , 50 0 , 90 0 and the applications of the preceding analytical method have been discussed. Dynamic compression tests have also been performed using the free-falling drop hammer. The results are compared with those in the static compression tests. (author)

  6. optimisation of compressive strength of periwinkle shell aggregate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... In this paper, a regression model is developed to predict and optimise the compressive strength of periwinkle shell aggregate concrete using Scheffe's regression theory. The results obtained from the derived regression model agreed favourably with the experimental data. The model was tested for ...

  7. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Geroux, C.; Viallet, M.; Folini, D.; Constantino, T.; Popov, M.; Walder, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Studies of stellar convection typically use a spherical-shell geometry. The radial extent of the shell and the boundary conditions applied are based on the model of the star investigated. We study the impact of different two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from an established one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star, like our sun at 106 years of age. Aims: We analyze how the radial extent of the spherical shell changes the convective dynamics that result in the deep interior of the young sun model, far from the surface. In the near-surface layers, simple small-scale convection develops from the profiles of temperature and density. A central radiative zone below the convection zone provides a lower boundary on the convection zone. The inclusion of either of these physically distinct layers in the spherical shell can potentially affect the characteristics of deep convection. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over tens or even hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: To measure the impact of the spherical-shell geometry and our treatment of boundaries, we evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, so that our results are focused toward studies exploiting the so

  8. Acoustic coupling of two parallel shells in compressible fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerges, S.N.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications are done in the acoustic impedance for a vibrating shell, due to the pressure of another similar shell. The multi-analysis method of scattering is used. The results of the impedance in function of the shell radius, the wave length, the distance between the shell axis and its vibration models are presented. (E.G.) [pt

  9. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  10. Laser driven compression and neutron generation with spherical shell targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.M.; Hammerling, P.; Johnson, R.R.; Kubis, J.J.; Mayer, F.J.

    1977-01-01

    Laser-driven implosion experiments using DT-gas-filled spherical glass-shell targets are described. Neutron yields to 5 x 10 7 are produced from implosions of small ( -- 55 μm-diameter) targets spherically illuminated with an on-target laser power of 0.4 terawatt. Nuclear reaction product diagnostics, X-ray pinhole photographs, fast-ion spectra and X-ray measurements are used in conjunction with hydrodynamic computer code simulations to investigate the implosion phenomenology as well as the target corona evolution. Simulations using completely classical effects are not able to describe the full range of experimental data. Electron or radiation preheating may be required to explain some implosion measurements. (auth.)

  11. Radiometric measuring method for egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forberg, S; Svaerdstroem, K

    1973-02-01

    A description is given of a fast nondestructive radiometric method for registration of the thickness of egg shells of the tawny owl, hen, osprey, and Canada goose. Certain errors are discussed. Measurement of the thickness of egg shells (mineral content per cm/sup 2/) with an accuracy better than 1% is possible in less than one minute under field conditions. (auth)

  12. Elastic-plastic transition on rotating spherical shells in dependence of compressibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to establish the mathematical model on the elastic-plastic transitions occurring in the rotating spherical shells based on compressibility of materials. The paper investigates the elastic-plastic stresses and angular speed required to start yielding in rotating shells for compressible and incompressible materials. The paper is based on the non-linear transition theory of elastic-plastic shells given by B.R. Seth. The elastic-plastic transition obtained is treated as an asymptotic phenomenon at critical points & the solution obtained at these points generates stresses. The solution obtained does not require the use of semi-empirical yield condition like Tresca or Von Mises or other certain laws. Results are obtained numerically and depicted graphically. It has been observed that Rotating shells made of the incompressible material are on the safer side of the design as compared to rotating shells made of compressible material. The effect of density variation has been discussed numerically on the stresses. With the effect of density variation parameter, rotating spherical shells start yielding at the internal surface with the lower values of the angular speed for incompressible/compressible materials.

  13. Axisymmetric bifurcations of thick spherical shells under inflation and compression

    KAUST Repository

    deBotton, G.; Bustamante, R.; Dorfmann, A.

    2013-01-01

    Incremental equilibrium equations and corresponding boundary conditions for an isotropic, hyperelastic and incompressible material are summarized and then specialized to a form suitable for the analysis of a spherical shell subject to an internal or an external pressure. A thick-walled spherical shell during inflation is analyzed using four different material models. Specifically, one and two terms in the Ogden energy formulation, the Gent model and an I1 formulation recently proposed by Lopez-Pamies. We investigate the existence of local pressure maxima and minima and the dependence of the corresponding stretches on the material model and on shell thickness. These results are then used to investigate axisymmetric bifurcations of the inflated shell. The analysis is extended to determine the behavior of a thick-walled spherical shell subject to an external pressure. We find that the results of the two terms Ogden formulation, the Gent and the Lopez-Pamies models are very similar, for the one term Ogden material we identify additional critical stretches, which have not been reported in the literature before.© 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption of concrete containing palm oil kernel shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Xiang-ONG, Jun; Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Hamid, Noor Azlina Abdul; Kuzaiman, Salsabila; Ali, Adiwijaya

    2017-11-01

    Effect of inclusion of palm oil kernel shell (PKS) and palm oil fibre (POF) in concrete was investigated on the compressive strength and flexural strength. In addition, investigation of palm oil kernel shell on concrete water absorption was also conducted. Total of 48 concrete cubes and 24 concrete prisms with the size of 100mm × 100mm × 100mm and 100mm × 100mm × 500mm were prepared, respectively. Four (4) series of concrete mix consists of coarse aggregate was replaced by 0%, 25%, 50% and 75% palm kernel shell and each series were divided into two (2) main group. The first group is without POF, while the second group was mixed with the 5cm length of 0.25% of the POF volume fraction. All specimen were tested after 7 and 28 days of water curing for a compression test, and flexural test at 28 days of curing period. Water absorption test was conducted on concrete cube age 28 days. The results showed that the replacement of PKS achieves lower compressive and flexural strength in comparison with conventional concrete. However, the 25% replacement of PKS concrete showed acceptable compressive strength which within the range of requirement for structural concrete. Meanwhile, the POF which should act as matrix reinforcement showed no enhancement in flexural strength due to the balling effect in concrete. As expected, water absorption was increasing with the increasing of PKS in the concrete cause by the porous characteristics of PKS

  15. Shell Measuring Machine. History and Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchler, Wilbur D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fresquez, Philip R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Commercialization of the Ring Rotacon Shell Measuring Machine project is a CRADA (NO. LA98C10358) between The University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory) and Moore Tool Company, Bridgeport, CT. The actual work started on this CRADA in December of 1998. Several meetings were held with the interested parties (Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Moore Tool, and the University of North Carolina). The results of these meetings were that the original Ring Rotacon did not measure up to the requirements of the Department of Energy and private industry, and a new configuration was investigated. This new configuration (Shell Measuring Machine [SMM]) much better fits the needs of all parties. The work accomplished on the Shell Measuring Machine in FY 99 includes the following; Specifications for size and weight were developed; Performance error budgets were established; Designs were developed; Analyses were performed (stiffness and natural frequency); Existing part designs were compared to the working SMM volume; Peer reviews were conducted; Controller requirements were studied; Fixture requirements were evaluated; and Machine motions were analyzed. The consensus of the Peer Review Committee was that the new configuration has the potential to satisfy the shell inspection needs of Department of Energy as well as several commercial customers. They recommended that more analyses be performed on error budgets, structural stiffness, natural frequency, and thermal effects and that operational processes be developed. Several design issues need to be addressed. They are the type of bearings utilized to support the tables (air bearings or mechanical roller type bearings), the selection of the probes, the design of the probe sliding mechanisms, and the design of the upper table positioning mechanism. Each item has several possible solutions, and more work is required to obtain the best design. This report includes the background and technical objectives; minutes of the working

  16. Compressible convection in a rotating spherical shell. II. A linear anelastic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Gilman, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    We study the onset of convection for a compressible fluid in a rotating spherical shell via linear anelastic fluid equations for a depth of 40% of the radius, constant kinematic viscosity and thermometric diffusivity, Taylor numbers up to 10 5 , and density stratifications up to seven e-folds across the zone. The perturbations are expanded in spherical harmonics, and the radially dependent equations are solved with a Newton-Raphson relaxation method

  17. L-shell photoelectric cross section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S K; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1981-05-14

    L-shell photoelectric cross sections in Ta, W, Au, Pb, Th and U at 59.5 keV have been determined using three different versions of Sood's method of measuring the absolute yield of fluorescent x-rays when a target is irradiated with a known flux of photons. The results obtained by all the methods agree with one another showing that no hidden systematic errors are involved in the measurements. The present results are found to compare well with the theoretical calculations of Scofield (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Report No 51326).

  18. Compression Characteristics and Energy Requirement of Briquettes Made from a Mixture of Corn Stover and Peanut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Gong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Corn stover and peanut shells are both abundantly available biomass feedstocks in China. To determine the compression characteristics and energy requirement of briquettes, mixtures of the corn stover and peanut shells were compressed under three different pressures (30, 60, and 90 MPa with three moisture contents (9%, 14%, and 19%, wet basis and five corn stover-peanut shell mixtures (0%-100%, 25%-75%, 50%-50%, 75%-25%, and 100%-0% by mass. The results showed that applied pressure, moisture content, and the corn stover-peanut shell mixture all significantly affected briquette density and specific energy consumption. The density of the briquette ranged from 646 to 1052 kg/m3 and the specific energy consumption varied from 6.6 to 25.1 MJ/t. A moisture content of 9% was found to be better for the compression of the corn stover and peanut shells mixture. Adding peanut shells to the corn stover improved briquette density and reduced the specific energy consumption. Linear models were developed to describe the briquette density and the specific energy consumption. The briquette durability ranged from 57% to 94% and durable briquettes can be obtained when corn stover and peanut shells are compressed with the mixing ratio of 1:1 (50%-50% at moisture content of 9%.

  19. High-speed photographic methods for compression dynamics investigation of laser irradiated shell target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Kologrivov, A.A.; Krokhin, O.N.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Three methods are described for a high-speed diagnostics of compression dynamics of shell targets being spherically laser-heated on the installation ''Kal'mar''. The first method is based on the direct investigation of the space-time evolution of the critical-density region for Nd-laser emission (N sub(e) asymptotically equals 10 21 I/cm 3 ) by means of the streak photography of plasma image in the second-harmonic light. The second method involves investigation of time evolution of the second-harmonic spectral distribution by means of a spectrograph coupled with a streak camera. The use of a special laser pulse with two time-distributed intensity maxima for the irradiation of shell targets, and the analysis of the obtained X-ray pin-hole pictures constitute the basis of the third method. (author)

  20. Compression measurement in laser driven implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.; Cambell, E.M.; Ceglio, N.M.; Lane, S.L.; Larsen, J.T.; Matthews, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurement of compression in the context of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Programs' transition from thin-walled exploding pusher targets, to thicker walled targets which are designed to lead the way towards ablative type implosions which will result in higher fuel density and pR at burn time. These experiments promote desirable reactor conditions but pose diagnostic problems because of reduced multi-kilovolt x-ray and reaction product emissions, as well as increasingly more difficult transport problems for these emissions as they pass through the thicker pR pusher conditions. Solutions to these problems, pointing the way toward higher energy twodimensional x-ray images, new reaction product imaging ideas and the use of seed gases for both x-ray spectroscopic and nuclear activation techniques are identified

  1. ECF2: A pulsed power generator based on magnetic flux compression for K-shell radiation production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Eplattenier, P.; Lassalle, F.; Mangeant, C.; Hamann, F.; Bavay, M.; Bayol, F.; Huet, D.; Morell, A.; Monjaux, P.; Avrillaud, G.; Lalle, B.

    2002-01-01

    The 3 MJ energy stored ECF2 generator is developed at Centre d'Etudes de Gramat, France, for K-shell radiation production. This generator is based on microsecond LTD stages as primary generators, and on the magnetic flux compression scheme for power amplification from the microsecond to the 100ns regime. This paper presents a general overview of the ECF2 generator. The flux compression stage, a key component, will be studied in details. We will present its advantages and drawbacks. We will then present the first experimental and numerical results which show the improvements that have already been made on this scheme

  2. Measurements of fusion neutron multiplication in spherical beryllium shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, H.; Kappler, F.; Tayama, R.; Moellendorff, U. von; Alevra, A.; Klein, H.

    1996-01-01

    New results of spherical-shell transmission measurements with 14-MeV neutrons on pure beryllium shells up to 17 cm thick are reported. The spectral flux above 3 MeV was measured using a liquid scintillation detector. At 17 cm thickness, also the total neutron multiplication was measured using a Bonner sphere system. The results agree well with calculations using beryllium nuclear data from the EFF-1 or the ENDF/B-Vi library. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  3. Bright emissive core-shell spherical microparticles for shock compression spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the response to shock compression of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye encapsulated in 1.25 μm diameter silica microspheres. When R6G was encapsulated in microspheres, the emission intensity under steady-state irradiation (the brightness) was 3.4 times greater than the same dye in solution (the free dye). At least part of the brightness improvement was caused by an enhanced radiative rate. When the microspheres were embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate subjected to planar shocks in the 3–8.4 GPa range by laser-driven flyer plates, the dye emission redshifted and lost intensity. The dye emission redshift represents an instantaneous response to changes in the local density. In free dye samples, the shock-induced intensity loss had considerably slower rise times and fall times than the redshift. When dye was encapsulated in microspheres, the time dependence of the intensity loss matched the redshift almost exactly over a range of shock pressures and durations. The faster response to shock of dye in silica microspheres was explained by dye photophysics. The microsphere environment decreased the singlet state lifetime, which decreased the rise time, and it also decreased the triplet state lifetime, which decreased the fall time. Since it is much easier and more convenient to make measurements of intensity rather than spectral shift, these microspheres represent a substantial improvement in optical sensors to monitor shock compression of microstructured materials.

  4. Removal of Arsenic with Oyster Shell: Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Atiqur Rahman, , and

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oyster shell has tremendous potential as a remediation material for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. A single arsenic removal system was developed with oyster shell for tube well water containing arsenic. The system removes arsenic from water by adsorption through fine oyster shell. Various conditions that affect the adsorption/desorption of arsenic were investigated. Adsorption column methods showed the removal of As(III under the following conditions: initial As concentration, 100 µg /L; oyster shell amount, 6 g; particle size, <355µm ; treatment flow rate, 1.7 mL/min; and pH 6.5. Arsenic concentration of the treated water were below the Bangladesh drinking water standard of 50 µg/L for As. The desorption efficiencies with 2M of KOH after the treatment of groundwater were in the range of 80-83%. A combination of techniques was used to measure the pH, conductivity, cations and anions. The average concentrations of other inorganic constituents of health concern (Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe in treated water were below their respective WHO guideline for drinking. The present study might provide new avenues to achieve the arsenic concentrations required for drinking water recommended by Bangladesh and the World Health Organization (WHO.

  5. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  6. Higgs couplings: disentangling new physics with off-shell measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Deandrea, Aldo; La Rochelle, Guillaume Drieu; Flament, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-11-14

    After the discovery of a scalar resonance, resembling the Higgs boson, its couplings have been extensively studied via the measurement of various production and decay channels on the invariant mass peak. Recently, the possibility of using off-shell measurements has been suggested: in particular, the CMS Collaboration has published results based on the high-invariant mass cross section of the process gg→ZZ, which contains a contribution from the Higgs boson. While this measurement has been interpreted as a constraint on the Higgs width after very specific assumptions are taken on the Higgs couplings, in this Letter, we show that a much more model-independent interpretation is possible.

  7. Temperature measurement of tin under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereil, Pierre-Louis; Mabire, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The results of pyrometric measurements performed at the interface of a tin target with a LiF window material are presented for stresses ranging from 38 to 55 GPa. The purpose of the study is to analyze the part of the interface in the temperature measurement by a multi-channel pyrometric device. The results show that the glue used at target/window interface remains transparent under shock. The values of temperature measured at the tin/LiF interface are consistent with the behavior of tin under shock

  8. Electrical resistivity measurement to predict uniaxial compressive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrical resistivity values of 12 different igneous rocks were measured on core samples using a resistivity meter in the ... It was seen that the UCS and tensile strength values were linearly correlated with the ..... Innovation 2 20. Archie G E ...

  9. Measurement of compressed breast thickness by optical stereoscopic photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Albert H; Mawdsley, Gordon E; Yaffe, Martin J

    2009-02-01

    The determination of volumetric breast density (VBD) from mammograms requires accurate knowledge of the thickness of the compressed breast. In attempting to accurately determine VBD from images obtained on conventional mammography systems, the authors found that the thickness reported by a number of mammography systems in the field varied by as much as 15 mm when compressing the same breast or phantom. In order to evaluate the behavior of mammographic compression systems and to be able to predict the thickness at different locations in the breast on patients, they have developed a method for measuring the local thickness of the breast at all points of contact with the compression paddle using optical stereoscopic photogrammetry. On both flat (solid) and compressible phantoms, the measurements were accurate to better than 1 mm with a precision of 0.2 mm. In a pilot study, this method was used to measure thickness on 108 volunteers who were undergoing mammography examination. This measurement tool will allow us to characterize paddle surface deformations, deflections and calibration offsets for mammographic units.

  10. Absolute cross-section measurements of inner-shell ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Hans; Tobehn, Ingo; Ebel, Frank; Hippler, Rainer

    1994-12-01

    Cross section ratios for K- and L-shell ionization of thin silver and gold targets by positron and electron impact have been determined at projectile energies of 30 70 keV. The experimental results are confirmed by calculations in plane wave Born approximation (PWBA) which include an electron exchange term and account for the deceleration or acceleration of the incident projectile in the nuclear field of the target atom. We report first absolute cross sections for K- and L-shell ionization of silver and gold targets by lepton impact in the threshold region. We have measured the corresponding cross sections for electron (e-) impact with an electron gun and the same experimental set-up.

  11. Temperature measurements of shock-compressed deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.; Ross, M.; Nellis, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    The authors measured the temperatures of single and double-shocked D 2 and H 2 up to 85 GPa (0.85 Mbar) and 5,200 K. While single shock temperatures, at pressures to 23 GPa, agree well with previous models, the double shock temperatures are as much as 40% lower than predicted. This is believed to be caused by molecular dissociation, and a new model of the hydrogen EOS at extreme conditions has been developed which correctly predicts their observations. These data and model have important implications for programs which use condensed-phase hydrogen in implosion systems

  12. Confounding compression: the effects of posture, sizing and garment type on measured interface pressure in sports compression clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy-Williams, Ned; Driller, Matthew William; Shing, Cecilia Mary; Fell, James William; Halson, Shona Leigh; Halson, Shona Louise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to measure the interface pressure exerted by lower body sports compression garments, in order to assess the effect of garment type, size and posture in athletes. Twelve national-level boxers were fitted with sports compression garments (tights and leggings), each in three different sizes (undersized, recommended size and oversized). Interface pressure was assessed across six landmarks on the lower limb (ranging from medial malleolus to upper thigh) as athletes assumed sitting, standing and supine postures. Sports compression leggings exerted a significantly higher mean pressure than sports compression tights (P sports compression garments is significantly affected by garment type, size and posture assumed by the wearer.

  13. Measurement of the through thickness compression of a battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shutian; Huang, Xiaosong; Xiao, Xinran

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical integrity of the separator is critical to the reliable operation of a battery. Due to its minimal thickness, compression experiments with a single/a few layers of separator are difficult to perform. In this work, a capacitance based displacement set-up has been developed for the measurement of the through thickness direction (TTD) compression stress-strain behavior of the separator and the investigation of its interaction with the electrode. The experiments were performed for a stack of two layers of Celgard 2400 separator, NMC cathode, and separator/NMC cathode/separator stack in both dry and wet (i.e. submersed in dimethyl carbonate DMC) conditions. The experimental results reveal that the separator compression modulus can be significantly affected by the presence of DMC. The iso-stress based rule of mixtures was used to compute the compressive stress-strain curve for the stack from that of the separator and NMC layer. The computed curve agreed with the experimental curve reasonably well up to about 0.16 strain but deviated significantly to a softer response at higher strains. The results suggest that, in the stack, the TTD compressive deformation of the separator is influenced by the NMC cathode.

  14. Network Compression as a Quality Measure for Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Loic; Reimann, Matthias; Stewart, A. Francis; Schroeder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of large-scale protein interaction studies, there is much debate about data quality. Can different noise levels in the measurements be assessed by analyzing network structure? Because proteomic regulation is inherently co-operative, modular and redundant, it is inherently compressible when represented as a network. Here we propose that network compression can be used to compare false positive and false negative noise levels in protein interaction networks. We validate this hypothesis by first confirming the detrimental effect of false positives and false negatives. Second, we show that gold standard networks are more compressible. Third, we show that compressibility correlates with co-expression, co-localization, and shared function. Fourth, we also observe correlation with better protein tagging methods, physiological expression in contrast to over-expression of tagged proteins, and smart pooling approaches for yeast two-hybrid screens. Overall, this new measure is a proxy for both sensitivity and specificity and gives complementary information to standard measures such as average degree and clustering coefficients. PMID:22719828

  15. Less is More: Bigger Data from Compressive Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Compressive sensing approaches are beginning to take hold in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) [1,2,3]. Compressive sensing is a mathematical theory about acquiring signals in a compressed form (measurements) and the probability of recovering the original signal by solving an inverse problem [4]. The inverse problem is underdetermined (more unknowns than measurements), so it is not obvious that recovery is possible. Compression is achieved by taking inner products of the signal with measurement weight vectors. Both Gaussian random weights and Bernoulli (0,1) random weights form a large class of measurement vectors for which recovery is possible. The measurements can also be designed through an optimization process. The key insight for electron microscopists is that compressive sensing can be used to increase acquisition speed and reduce dose. Building on work initially developed for optical cameras, this new paradigm will allow electron microscopists to solve more problems in the engineering and life sciences. We will be collecting orders of magnitude more data than previously possible. The reason that we will have more data is because we will have increased temporal/spatial/spectral sampling rates, and we will be able ability to interrogate larger classes of samples that were previously too beam sensitive to survive the experiment. For example consider an in-situ experiment that takes 1 minute. With traditional sensing, we might collect 5 images per second for a total of 300 images. With compressive sensing, each of those 300 images can be expanded into 10 more images, making the collection rate 50 images per second, and the decompressed data a total of 3000 images [3]. But, what are the implications, in terms of data, for this new methodology? Acquisition of compressed data will require downstream reconstruction to be useful. The reconstructed data will be much larger than traditional data, we will need space to store the reconstructions during

  16. Compressed Sensing with Linear Correlation Between Signal and Measurement Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    reconstruction algorithms, but is not known in existing literature. The proposed technique reduces reconstruction error considerably in the case of linearly correlated measurements and noise. Numerical experiments confirm the efficacy of the technique. The technique is demonstrated with application to low......Existing convex relaxation-based approaches to reconstruction in compressed sensing assume that noise in the measurements is independent of the signal of interest. We consider the case of noise being linearly correlated with the signal and introduce a simple technique for improving compressed...... sensing reconstruction from such measurements. The technique is based on a linear model of the correlation of additive noise with the signal. The modification of the reconstruction algorithm based on this model is very simple and has negligible additional computational cost compared to standard...

  17. Electrical conductivity measurements in shock compressed liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.

    1985-06-01

    The electrical conductivity of shock compressed liquid nitrogen was measured in the pressure range 20 to 50 GPa using a two-stage light-gas gun. The conductivities covered a range 4 x 10 -2 to 1 x 10 2 ohm -1 cm -1 . The data are discussed in terms of a liquid semiconductor model below the onset of the dissociative phase transition at 30 GPa. 15 refs., 1 fig

  18. Time-Resolved K-shell Photoabsorption Edge Measurement in a Strongly Coupled Matter Driven by Laser-converted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Yang, Jia-Min; Zhang, Ji-Yan; Yang, Guo-Hong; Xiong, Gang; Wei, Min-Xi; Song, Tian-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Yu

    2013-06-01

    A time-resolved K edge absorption measurement of warm dense KCl was performed on Shenguang II laser facility. The x-ray radiation driven shocks were adopted to take colliding shocks compression. By using Dog bone hohlraum the CH/KCl/CH sample was shielded from the laser hitting point to suppress the M band preheating and enhance the compressibility. Thus, an unexplored and extreme region of the plasma state with the maximum 5 times solid density and temperature lower than 3 eV (with coupling constant Γii around 100) was first obtained. The photoabsorption spectra of chlorine near the K-shell edge have been measured with a crystal spectrometer using a short x-ray backlighter. The K edge red shift up to 11.7 eV and broadening of 15.2 eV were obtained for the maximum compression. The electron temperature, inferred by Fermi-Dirac fit of the measured K-edge broadening, was consistent with the hydrodynamic predictions. The comparison of the K edge shift with a plasma model, in which the ionization effect, continuum lowering and partial degeneracy are considered, shows that more improvements are desired to describe in details the variation of K edge shift. This work might extend future study of WDM in extreme conditions of high compression.

  19. NIF Double Shell outer/inner shell collision experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, E. C.; Loomis, E. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Cardenas, T.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Dodd, E. S.; Desjardins, T.; Renner, D. B.; Palaniyappan, S.; Batha, S. H.; Khan, S. F.; Smalyuk, V.; Ping, Y.; Amendt, P.; Schoff, M.; Hoppe, M.

    2017-10-01

    Double shell capsules are a potential low convergence path to substantial alpha-heating and ignition on NIF, since they are predicted to ignite and burn at relatively low temperatures via volume ignition. Current LANL NIF double shell designs consist of a low-Z ablator, low-density foam cushion, and high-Z inner shell with liquid DT fill. Central to the Double Shell concept is kinetic energy transfer from the outer to inner shell via collision. The collision determines maximum energy available for compression and implosion shape of the fuel. We present results of a NIF shape-transfer study: two experiments comparing shape and trajectory of the outer and inner shells at post-collision times. An outer-shell-only target shot measured the no-impact shell conditions, while an `imaging' double shell shot measured shell conditions with impact. The `imaging' target uses a low-Z inner shell and is designed to perform in similar collision physics space to a high-Z double shell but can be radiographed at 16keV, near the viable 2DConA BL energy limit. Work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Tritium-exchange method for obsidian hydration shell measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, J P; Wilson, A T; Lowe, D J; Hodder, A P.W. [Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand)

    1984-12-01

    A new radiochemical method for measuring the amount of water in the hydrated layer on the surface of obsidians exchanges tritiated water with the water in the layer (20 ..mu..l of 5 Ci ml/sup -1/ at 90/sup 0/C for 10 days) and then back-exchanges it (in 150 ml of water at 35/sup 0/C for approx. 200 hr.). The activity of the back-exchange water (F) is monitored by liquid scintillation counting of aliquots extracted at known time intervals (t). The activity so measured is then related to the thickness of the hydration rim. A sheet diffusion model shows that the thickness of the hydration shell (l) is inversely proportional to the slope of the F vs. tsup(1/2) plot. Comparison of l-values so obtained between obsidians, whose age (x) is inferred from archaeological occupation layers containing radiocarbon-dated wood and charcoal, suggests a relationship between l and x. Implications for New Zealand prehistory are briefly considered. The technique, which is non-destructive, appears particularly applicable to young glasses where the development of hydrated layers may be inadequate for accurate optical measurement.

  1. Methods for Sampling and Measurement of Compressed Air Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, L.

    1976-10-01

    In order to improve the technique for measuring oil and water entrained in a compressed air stream, a laboratory study has been made of some methods for sampling and measurement. For this purpose water or oil as artificial contaminants were injected in thin streams into a test loop, carrying dry compressed air. Sampling was performed in a vertical run, down-stream of the injection point. Wall attached liquid, coarse droplet flow, and fine droplet flow were sampled separately. The results were compared with two-phase flow theory and direct observation of liquid behaviour. In a study of sample transport through narrow tubes, it was observed that, below a certain liquid loading, the sample did not move, the liquid remaining stationary on the tubing wall. The basic analysis of the collected samples was made by gravimetric methods. Adsorption tubes were used with success to measure water vapour. A humidity meter with a sensor of the aluminium oxide type was found to be unreliable. Oil could be measured selectively by a flame ionization detector, the sample being pretreated in an evaporation- condensation unit

  2. Methods for Sampling and Measurement of Compressed Air Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroem, L

    1976-10-15

    In order to improve the technique for measuring oil and water entrained in a compressed air stream, a laboratory study has been made of some methods for sampling and measurement. For this purpose water or oil as artificial contaminants were injected in thin streams into a test loop, carrying dry compressed air. Sampling was performed in a vertical run, down-stream of the injection point. Wall attached liquid, coarse droplet flow, and fine droplet flow were sampled separately. The results were compared with two-phase flow theory and direct observation of liquid behaviour. In a study of sample transport through narrow tubes, it was observed that, below a certain liquid loading, the sample did not move, the liquid remaining stationary on the tubing wall. The basic analysis of the collected samples was made by gravimetric methods. Adsorption tubes were used with success to measure water vapour. A humidity meter with a sensor of the aluminium oxide type was found to be unreliable. Oil could be measured selectively by a flame ionization detector, the sample being pretreated in an evaporation- condensation unit

  3. Mass measurements of 56-57Cr and the question of shell reincarnation at N = 32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenaut, C; Audi, G; Beck, D

    2005-01-01

    Binding energies determined with high accuracy provide smooth derivatives of the mass surface for analysis of shell and pairing effects. Measurements with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE were made for 56-57 Cr for which an accuracy of 4 x 10 -8 was achieved. Analysis of the mass surface for the supposed new N = 32 shell closure rather indicates a sub-shell closure, but of a different nature than known cases such as 94 Sr

  4. Mass measurements of 56-57Cr and the question of shell reincarnation at N = 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénaut, C.; Audi, G.; Beck, D.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Delahaye, P.; Herfurth, F.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lunney, D.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Yazidjian, C.

    2005-10-01

    Binding energies determined with high accuracy provide smooth derivatives of the mass surface for analysis of shell and pairing effects. Measurements with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE were made for 56-57Cr for which an accuracy of 4 × 10-8 was achieved. Analysis of the mass surface for the supposed new N = 32 shell closure rather indicates a sub-shell closure, but of a different nature than known cases such as 94Sr.

  5. Mass measurements of $^{56-57}$Cr and the question of shell reincarnation at $N = 32$

    CERN Document Server

    Guenaut, Celine; Beck, D; Blaum, Klaus; Bollen, Georg; Delahaye, P; Herfurth, F; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, M D; Schwarz, S; Schweikhard, L; Yazidjian, C

    2005-01-01

    Binding energies determined with high accuracy provide smooth derivatives of the mass surface for analysis of shell and pairing effects. Measurements with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE were made for $^{56-57}$Cr for which an accuracy of $4 \\times 10^{-8}$ was achieved. Analysis of the mass surface for the supposed new $N = 32$ shell closure rather indicates a sub-shell closure, but of a different nature than known cases such as $^{94}$Sr.

  6. Measurement of critical mass for an assembly of bare uranium shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.L.; Goulding, C.A.; Hollas, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the research into nuclear measurement techniques, a series of measurements was performed that have applications to criticality safety and nuclear material handling. The critical mass of a set of bare, enriched-uranium metal hemispherical shells, known as the Rocky Flats shells, was measured for an assembly having an inside radius of 2.347 cm. The critical mass value was extrapolated from a series of subcritical measurements using three different kinds of sources (AmBe, AmF, and 252 Cf) placed at the center of the shells. Two kinds of neutron detection configurations (a 1% efficiency and a 25% efficiency configuration) were used to make the measurements

  7. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A; Prentice, R [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d` Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Development of a Neutron Spectroscopic System Utilizing Compressed Sensing Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to neutron detection capable of gathering spectroscopic information has been demonstrated. The approach relies on an asymmetrical arrangement of materials, geometry, and an ability to change the orientation of the detector with respect to the neutron field. Measurements are used to unfold the energy characteristics of the neutron field using a new theoretical framework of compressed sensing. Recent theoretical results show that the number of multiplexed samples can be lower than the full number of traditional samples while providing the ability to have some super-resolution. Furthermore, the solution approach does not require a priori information or inclusion of physics models. Utilizing the MCNP code, a number of candidate detector geometries and materials were modeled. Simulations were carried out for a number of neutron energies and distributions with preselected orientations for the detector. The resulting matrix (A consists of n rows associated with orientation and m columns associated with energy and distribution where n < m. The library of known responses is used for new measurements Y (n × 1 and the solver is able to determine the system, Y = Ax where x is a sparse vector. Therefore, energy spectrum measurements are a combination of the energy distribution information of the identified elements of A. This approach allows for determination of neutron spectroscopic information using a single detector system with analog multiplexing. The analog multiplexing allows the use of a compressed sensing solution similar to approaches used in other areas of imaging. A single detector assembly provides improved flexibility and is expected to reduce uncertainty associated with current neutron spectroscopy measurement.

  9. Measurements of the Exerted Pressure by Pelvic Circumferential Compression Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Simon P; van Riel, Marcel P.J.M; Goossens, Richard H.M; van Lieshout, Esther M.M; Patka, Peter; Schipper, Inger B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Data on the efficacy and safety of non-invasive Pelvic Circumferential Compression Devices (PCCDs) is limited. Tissue damage may occur if a continuous pressure on the skin exceeding 9.3 kPa is sustained for more than two or three hours. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the pressure build-up at the interface, by measuring the PCCD-induced pressure when applying pulling forces to three different PCCDs (Pelvic Binder® , SAM-Sling ® and T-POD® ) in a simplified model. Methods: The resulting exerted pressures were measured at four ‘anatomical’ locations (right, left, posterior and anterior) in a model using a pressure measurement system consisting of pressure cuffs. Results: The exerted pressure varied substantially between the locations as well as between the PCCDs. Maximum pressures ranged from 18.9-23.3 kPa and from 19.2-27.5 kPa at the right location and left location, respectively. Pressures at the posterior location stayed below 18 kPa. At the anterior location pressures varied markedly between the different PCCDs. Conclusion: The circumferential compression by the different PCCDs showed high pressures measured at the four locations using a simplified model. Difference in design and functional characteristics of the PCCDs resulted in different pressure build-up at the four locations. When following the manufacturer’s instructions, the exerted pressure of all three PCCDs tested exceeded the tissue damaging level (9.3 kPa). In case of prolonged use in a clinical situation this might put patients at risk for developing tissue damage. PMID:20361001

  10. Measurements of egg shell plasma parameters using laser-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In LIBS, a high-intensity laser is focussed onto the sample, which is strong ... Compared to the production of plasma, qualitative and quantitative analyses are ... In this paper, the elemental composition of the egg shell crushed to a size of about.

  11. Accurate reconstruction of hyperspectral images from compressive sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, John B.; Flake, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    The emerging field of Compressive Sensing (CS) provides a new way to capture data by shifting the heaviest burden of data collection from the sensor to the computer on the user-end. This new means of sensing requires fewer measurements for a given amount of information than traditional sensors. We investigate the efficacy of CS for capturing HyperSpectral Imagery (HSI) remotely. We also introduce a new family of algorithms for constructing HSI from CS measurements with Split Bregman Iteration [Goldstein and Osher,2009]. These algorithms combine spatial Total Variation (TV) with smoothing in the spectral dimension. We examine models for three different CS sensors: the Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imager-Single Disperser (CASSI-SD) [Wagadarikar et al.,2008] and Dual Disperser (CASSI-DD) [Gehm et al.,2007] cameras, and a hypothetical random sensing model closer to CS theory, but not necessarily implementable with existing technology. We simulate the capture of remotely sensed images by applying the sensor forward models to well-known HSI scenes - an AVIRIS image of Cuprite, Nevada and the HYMAP Urban image. To measure accuracy of the CS models, we compare the scenes constructed with our new algorithm to the original AVIRIS and HYMAP cubes. The results demonstrate the possibility of accurately sensing HSI remotely with significantly fewer measurements than standard hyperspectral cameras.

  12. A measurement method for piezoelectric material properties under longitudinal compressive stress–-a compression test method for thin piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Lae-Hyong; Lee, Dae-Oen; Han, Jae-Hung

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new compression test method for piezoelectric materials to investigate changes in piezoelectric properties under the compressive stress condition. Until now, compression tests of piezoelectric materials have been generally conducted using bulky piezoelectric ceramics and pressure block. The conventional method using the pressure block for thin piezoelectric patches, which are used in unimorph or bimorph actuators, is prone to unwanted bending and buckling. In addition, due to the constrained boundaries at both ends, the observed piezoelectric behavior contains boundary effects. In order to avoid these problems, the proposed method employs two guide plates with initial longitudinal tensile stress. By removing the tensile stress after bonding a piezoelectric material between the guide layers, longitudinal compressive stress is induced in the piezoelectric layer. Using the compression test specimens, two important properties, which govern the actuation performance of the piezoelectric material, the piezoelectric strain coefficients and the elastic modulus, are measured to evaluate the effects of applied electric fields and re-poling. The results show that the piezoelectric strain coefficient d 31 increases and the elastic modulus decreases when high voltage is applied to PZT5A, and the compression in the longitudinal direction decreases the piezoelectric strain coefficient d 31 but does not affect the elastic modulus. We also found that the re-poling of the piezoelectric material increases the elastic modulus, but the piezoelectric strain coefficient d 31 is not changed much (slightly increased) by re-poling

  13. Characterization of the Micro-shell Surface Using Holographic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandras, F.; Hermerel, C.; Choux, A.; Merillot, P.; Pin, G.; Jeannot, L. [CEA Valduc, Dept Rech Mat Nucl, Serv Microcibles, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-05-15

    To characterize the shape, the quality, and the roughness of micro-shells, typically used technologies are scanning electron microscopy, scanning interferometric microscopy, or atomic force microscopy. One of the drawbacks of these techniques is that they are generally slow because of their scanning process. Digital holographic microscopy technology is an innovation that can offer ability adapted to these studies. It captures holograms instead of intensity images, as done by conventional microscopes. The holograms are then digitally interpreted (10 per second) to reconstruct a double image, one for the intensity and another one for the phase. Using a rotation axis, the bump counting for the complete micro-shell surface is possible with a very high speed. Using an image stitching software, mapping can be done in a few minutes. Wavelets such as 'Mexican hat' are used to model the bumps. Each bump can then be characterized on the map by its position, diameter, and height. (authors)

  14. Validation of an optical system to measure acetabular shell deformation in cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Philipp; Bone, Martin C; Flohr, Markus; Preuss, Roman; Joyce, Tom J; Deehan, David; Holland, James

    2014-08-01

    Deformation of the acetabular shell at the time of surgery can result in poor performance and early failure of the hip replacement. The study aim was to validate an ATOS III Triple Scan optical measurement system against a co-ordinate measuring machine using in vitro testing and to check repeatability under cadaver laboratory conditions. Two sizes of custom-made acetabular shells were deformed using a uniaxial/two-point loading frame and measured at different loads. Roundness measurements were performed using both the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system and a co-ordinate measuring machine and then compared. The repeatability was also tested by measuring shells pre- and post-insertion in a cadaver laboratory multiple times. The in vitro comparison with the co-ordinate measuring machine demonstrated a maximum difference of 5 µm at the rim and 9 µm at the measurement closest to the pole of the shell. Maximum repeatability was below 1 µm for the co-ordinate measuring machine and 3 µm for the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system. Repeatability was comparable between the pre-insertion (below 2 µm) and post-insertion (below 3 µm) measurements in the cadaver laboratory. This study supports the view that the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system fulfils the necessary requirements to accurately measure shell deformation in cadavers. © IMechE 2014.

  15. Identification of irradiated oysters by EPR measurements on shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Monaca, S., E-mail: sara.dellamonaca@iss.it [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena, 299 Rome (Italy); Fattibene, P.; Boniglia, C.; Gargiulo, R.; Bortolin, E. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena, 299 Rome (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    In this paper the EPR spectra of the radicals induced in oyster shells after irradiation to (0.5-2) kGy ionizing radiation doses are analyzed. EPR spectra of irradiated shells showed the complex radical composition of biocarbonates, characterized by the presence of SO{sub 2}{sup -}, SO{sub 3}{sup -} and CO{sub 2}{sup -} radicals with different symmetries. In particular, the radiation-induced line at g = 2.0038, due to the g{sub x} component of the orthorhombic SO{sub 3}{sup -}, was well distinguishable from the rest of the spectrum. The g{sub x} component of the orthorhombic SO{sub 3}{sup -} was found to be intense and stable enough to allow the identification at least for the whole shelf life of the oyster. Furthermore, it is still well visible at low microwave powers for which the other signals are weak or non-visible and has a linear dose response in the (0.5-2) kGy range. A possible procedure protocol for the identification of irradiated oysters, can be based on acquisitions of the spectrum at low microwave power values (tenths of milliWatt) and low modulation amplitude values (0.03-0.05 mT) and on the identification of the g = 2.0038 signal as a proof of the ionizing radiation treatment performed on the sample.

  16. Identification of irradiated oysters by EPR measurements on shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Monaca, S.; Fattibene, P.; Boniglia, C.; Gargiulo, R.; Bortolin, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the EPR spectra of the radicals induced in oyster shells after irradiation to (0.5-2) kGy ionizing radiation doses are analyzed. EPR spectra of irradiated shells showed the complex radical composition of biocarbonates, characterized by the presence of SO 2 - , SO 3 - and CO 2 - radicals with different symmetries. In particular, the radiation-induced line at g = 2.0038, due to the g x component of the orthorhombic SO 3 - , was well distinguishable from the rest of the spectrum. The g x component of the orthorhombic SO 3 - was found to be intense and stable enough to allow the identification at least for the whole shelf life of the oyster. Furthermore, it is still well visible at low microwave powers for which the other signals are weak or non-visible and has a linear dose response in the (0.5-2) kGy range. A possible procedure protocol for the identification of irradiated oysters, can be based on acquisitions of the spectrum at low microwave power values (tenths of milliWatt) and low modulation amplitude values (0.03-0.05 mT) and on the identification of the g = 2.0038 signal as a proof of the ionizing radiation treatment performed on the sample.

  17. Measurement of vacancy transfer probability from K to L shell using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    73, No. 4. — journal of. October 2009 physics pp. 711–718. Measurement of vacancy transfer probability from K to L shell using K-shell fluorescence yields. ¨O S¨O˘GÜT1,∗, E BÜYÜKKASAP2, A KÜC¸ ÜK¨ONDER1 and T TARAKC¸ IO ˇGLU1. 1Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Letters, Kahramanmaras Sütçü ˙ ...

  18. Quantitative measurement of solvation shells using frequency modulated atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, T.; Higgins, M.; Nakayama, Y.; Sader, J. E.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2005-03-01

    The nanoscale specificity of interaction measurements and additional imaging capability of the atomic force microscope make it an ideal technique for measuring solvation shells in a variety of liquids next to a range of materials. Unfortunately, the widespread use of atomic force microscopy for the measurement of solvation shells has been limited by uncertainties over the dimensions, composition and durability of the tip during the measurements, and problems associated with quantitative force calibration of the most sensitive dynamic measurement techniques. We address both these issues by the combined use of carbon nanotube high aspect ratio probes and quantifying the highly sensitive frequency modulation (FM) detection technique using a recently developed analytical method. Due to the excellent reproducibility of the measurement technique, additional information regarding solvation shell size as a function of proximity to the surface has been obtained for two very different liquids. Further, it has been possible to identify differences between chemical and geometrical effects in the chosen systems.

  19. Development of Special Tools for the Straightness Measurement of JRTR Core Inner Shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinjlawi, Abdullah; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Chung, Jong-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) is an open pool type nuclear research reactor, 5 MW power, JRTR core made from Zircaloy. The JRTR will be used for nuclear applications such as isotopes production, nuclear researches, neutron transmutation doping (NTD), and training. JRTR core structures will be exposed to a large amount of neutron irradiation during the life time of the reactor. The core inner shell also will be exposed to a pressure that comes from heavy water system. JRTR core inner shell will deform due to the neutron irradiation and the mechanical stress. Therefore, the dimensional change of the core inner shell should be periodically (every 10 years) measured as an in-service inspection to confirm the structural integrity. As a result of neutron irradiation, pressure difference of the heavy water vessel, and the mechanical stress, the reactor core will deform as shown in figure 2 to figure 4. The maximum deformation to the normal direction of inner shell wall is 0.75 mm as shown in figure 3. This study discusses development of special tools that will be used for pre-service and in-service inspection of JRTR inner shell. The performance and procedure for the measurements tools will be verified using by the real inner shell of the heavy water vessel at factory before shipping to Jordan.. There will be very delicate working procedure for the measurement in the limited space in JRTR core. Therefore, we will develop the detail procedures to cover the removal of the core components, installation of the measurement tools, measurement, and re-installation of the core components. The measurement of the inner shell at JAEC site during commissioning stage will be the first remote measurement at the same conditions of pool water and heavy water system

  20. Study on the technique for precision measurement of density of SiO_2 foam shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaojun; Gao Dangzhong; Meng Jie

    2013-01-01

    The measuring method based on vertical scanning interference and combined with the relation between refraction index and density of SiO_2 foam shells is introduced, and the relation is analyzed according to formulas of Lorentz-Lorenz and Gladstone-Dale. The experimental result and measuring uncertainty evaluation indicate that the precision measurement of density of low density SiO_2 foam shells can be realized by using the vertical scanning interference technique and combining with Gladstone and Dale analysis method, and the measuring uncertainty is about 5%. (authors)

  1. Compressibility of the protein-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-01

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (˜0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ˜45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than in

  2. Compressibility of the protein-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-07

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (∼0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ∼45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than

  3. Measurements of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios using EDXRF technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacal, Mustafa Recep; Han, İbrahim; Akman, Ferdi

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, the K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios for 30 elements between Ti ( Z = 22) and Er ( Z = 68) were measured by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements were determined by measuring the K shell fluorescence parameters such as the Kα X-ray production cross-sections, K shell fluorescence yields, Kβ-to- Kα X-rays intensity ratios, total atomic absorption cross sections and mass attenuation coefficients. The measurements were performed using an Am-241 radioactive point source and a Si (Li) detector in direct excitation and transmission experimental geometry. The results for jump factors and jump ratios were compared with theoretically calculated and the ones available in the literature.

  4. Quinary excitation method for pulse compression ultrasound measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, D M J; Freear, S

    2008-04-01

    A novel switched excitation method for linear frequency modulated excitation of ultrasonic transducers in pulse compression systems is presented that is simple to realise, yet provides reduced signal sidelobes at the output of the matched filter compared to bipolar pseudo-chirp excitation. Pulse compression signal sidelobes are reduced through the use of simple amplitude tapering at the beginning and end of the excitation duration. Amplitude tapering using switched excitation is realised through the use of intermediate voltage switching levels, half that of the main excitation voltages. In total five excitation voltages are used creating a quinary excitation system. The absence of analogue signal generation and power amplifiers renders the excitation method attractive for applications with requirements such as a high channel count or low cost per channel. A systematic study of switched linear frequency modulated excitation methods with simulated and laboratory based experimental verification is presented for 2.25 MHz non-destructive testing immersion transducers. The signal to sidelobe noise level of compressed waveforms generated using quinary and bipolar pseudo-chirp excitation are investigated for transmission through a 0.5m water and kaolin slurry channel. Quinary linear frequency modulated excitation consistently reduces signal sidelobe power compared to bipolar excitation methods. Experimental results for transmission between two 2.25 MHz transducers separated by a 0.5m channel of water and 5% kaolin suspension shows improvements in signal to sidelobe noise power in the order of 7-8 dB. The reported quinary switched method for linear frequency modulated excitation provides improved performance compared to pseudo-chirp excitation without the need for high performance excitation amplifiers.

  5. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios of 3d transition metals by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaçal, Mustafa Recep; Han, İbrahim; Akman, Ferdi

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF) has been employed for measuring K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios for Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu elements. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements were determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the Kα X-ray production cross-sections, K shell fluorescence yields, Kβ-to-Kα X-rays intensity ratios, total atomic absorption cross sections and mass attenuation coefficients. The measurements were performed using a Cd-109 radioactive point source and an Si(Li) detector in direct excitation and transmission experimental geometry. The measured values for jump factors and jump ratios were compared with theoretically calculated and the ones available in the literature. - Highlights: • This work regard the K shell absorption jump ratios and jump factors of Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu. • This paper presents the first measurement of these parameters using the experimental K shell fluorescence parameters. • A good agreement was found between experimental and theoretical values. • The EDXRF technique was suitable, precise and reliable for the measurement of these atomic parameters

  6. Engineering report single-shell tank farms interim measures to limit infiltration through the vadose zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAASS, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included

  7. Measurements of integral cross-sections of incoherent interactions of photons with L-shell electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, S L; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1983-05-21

    Integral cross-sections of incoherent interactions of 662 and 1250 keV gamma-rays with L-shell electrons of different elements with 74<=Z<=92 have been measured. The experimental results, when interpreted in terms of photoelectric and Compton interaction cross-sections, are found to agree with theory.

  8. Measurement of integral cross-sections of incoherent interactions of photons with K-shell electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, S L; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics. Nuclear Science Labs.

    1981-06-01

    Integral cross-sections of incoherent interactions of 145, 279, 662 and 1250 keV gamma-rays with K-shell electrons of thirty-one different elements with 26 <= Z <= 92 have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of the photoelectric and Compton interactions and are found to agree with theory.

  9. Engineering report single-shell tank farms interim measures to limit infiltration through the vadose zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAASS, C.C.

    1999-10-14

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included.

  10. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios of 3d transition metals by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçal, Mustafa Recep; Han, İbrahim; Akman, Ferdi

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF) has been employed for measuring K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios for Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu elements. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements were determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the Kα X-ray production cross-sections, K shell fluorescence yields, Kβ-to-Kα X-rays intensity ratios, total atomic absorption cross sections and mass attenuation coefficients. The measurements were performed using a Cd-109 radioactive point source and an Si(Li) detector in direct excitation and transmission experimental geometry. The measured values for jump factors and jump ratios were compared with theoretically calculated and the ones available in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of D-T neutron penetration probability spectra for iron ball shell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Shaojie

    1998-06-01

    The D-T neutron penetration probability spectra are measured for iron ball shell systems of the series of samples used in the experiments, and the penetration curves are presented. As the detector is near to samples, the measured results being approximately corrected are compared with those in the literature, and it is shown that the former is compatible with the latter in the range of the experimental error

  12. Measurements of 14 MeV neutron multiplication in spherical beryllium shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellendorff, U. von; Alevra, A.V.; Giese, H.; Kappler, F.; Klein, H.; Klein, H.; Tayama, R.

    1995-01-01

    New results of spherical-shell transmission measurements with 14MeV neutrons on pure beryllium shells up to 17cm thick are reported. The total leakage neutron multiplications were measured using a Bonner sphere system. Independently, the leakage neutron spectra were measured over the entire energy range, 15MeV to thermal energies, by proton-recoil and time-of-flight methods. The total leakage multiplications are in excellent agreement with three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations using beryllium nuclear data based on the Young and Stewart evaluation. The leakage in the evaporation energy window confirms the Be(n,2n) cross-section of the Young and Stewart evaluation rather than that used in the ENDF/B-VI library. At energies below 1keV, a surplus of leakage neutrons over the calculation is found for smaller beryllium thicknesses. (orig.)

  13. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. Results RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1 present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2 design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. Conclusion A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool

  14. A novel full-field experimental method to measure the local compressibility of gas diffusion media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Li, Yongqiang [Electrochemical Energy Research Lab, GM R and D, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472 (United States); Rock, Jeffrey A. [GM Powertrain, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The gas diffusion medium (GDM) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell needs to simultaneously satisfy the requirements of transporting reactant gases, removing product water, conducting electrons and heat, and providing mechanical support to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Concerning the localized over-compression which may force carbon fibers and other conductive debris into the membrane to cause fuel cell failure by electronically shorting through the membrane, we have developed a novel full-field experimental method to measure the local thickness and compressibility of GDM. Applying a uniform air pressure upon a thin polyimide film bonded on the top surface of the GDM with support from the bottom by a flat metal substrate and measuring the thickness change using the 3-D digital image correlation technique with an out-of-plane displacement resolution less than 0.5 {mu}m, we have determined the local thickness and compressive stress/strain behavior in the GDM. Using the local thickness and compressibility data over an area of 11.2 mm x 11.2 mm, we numerically construct the nominal compressive response of a commercial Toray trademark TGP-H-060 based GDM subjected to compression by flat platens. Good agreement in the nominal stress/strain curves from the numerical construction and direct experimental flat-platen measurement confirms the validity of the methodology proposed in this article. The result shows that a nominal pressure of 1.4 MPa compressed between two flat platens can introduce localized compressive stress concentration of more than 3 MPa in up to 1% of the total area at various locations from several hundred micrometers to 1 mm in diameter. We believe that this full-field experimental method can be useful in GDM material and process development to reduce the local hard spots and help to mitigate the membrane shorting failure in PEM fuel cells. (author)

  15. A novel full-field experimental method to measure the local compressibility of gas diffusion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Li, Yongqiang; Rock, Jeffrey A.

    The gas diffusion medium (GDM) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell needs to simultaneously satisfy the requirements of transporting reactant gases, removing product water, conducting electrons and heat, and providing mechanical support to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Concerning the localized over-compression which may force carbon fibers and other conductive debris into the membrane to cause fuel cell failure by electronically shorting through the membrane, we have developed a novel full-field experimental method to measure the local thickness and compressibility of GDM. Applying a uniform air pressure upon a thin polyimide film bonded on the top surface of the GDM with support from the bottom by a flat metal substrate and measuring the thickness change using the 3-D digital image correlation technique with an out-of-plane displacement resolution less than 0.5 μm, we have determined the local thickness and compressive stress/strain behavior in the GDM. Using the local thickness and compressibility data over an area of 11.2 mm × 11.2 mm, we numerically construct the nominal compressive response of a commercial Toray™ TGP-H-060 based GDM subjected to compression by flat platens. Good agreement in the nominal stress/strain curves from the numerical construction and direct experimental flat-platen measurement confirms the validity of the methodology proposed in this article. The result shows that a nominal pressure of 1.4 MPa compressed between two flat platens can introduce localized compressive stress concentration of more than 3 MPa in up to 1% of the total area at various locations from several hundred micrometers to 1 mm in diameter. We believe that this full-field experimental method can be useful in GDM material and process development to reduce the local hard spots and help to mitigate the membrane shorting failure in PEM fuel cells.

  16. Triaxial extensometer for volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Bo; Xu, Ming-long; Zhao, Tian-fei; Zhang, Zhi-jun; Lu, Tian-jian

    2010-01-01

    A new strain gauge-based triaxial extensometer (radial extensometers x, y and axial extensometer z) is presented to improve the volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials. By the triaxial extensometer, triaxial deformations of the foam specimen can be measured directly, from which the volumetric strain is determined. Sensitivities of the triaxial extensometer are predicted using a finite-element model, and verified through experimental calibrations. The axial extensometer is validated by conducting a uniaxial compression test in aluminium foam and comparing deformation measured by the axial extensometer to that by the advanced optical 3D deformation analysis system ARAMIS; the result from the axial extensometer agrees well with that from ARAMIS. A new modus of two-wire measurement and transmission in a hydrostatic environment is developed to avoid the punching and lead sealing techniques on the pressure vessel for the hydro-compression test. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the triaxial extensometer is determined through an experimental test. An application in an aluminium foam hydrostatic compression test shows that the triaxial extensometer is effective for volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials

  17. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  18. Measurements of ionic structure in shock compressed lithium hydride from ultrafast x-ray Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Brown, C R D; Davis, P; Döppner, T; Falcone, R W; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G; Holst, B; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Morse, E C; Pelka, A; Redmer, R; Roth, M; Vorberger, J; Wünsch, K; Glenzer, S H

    2009-12-11

    We present the first ultrafast temporally, spectrally, and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from shock-compressed matter. The experimental spectra yield the absolute elastic and inelastic scattering intensities from the measured density of free electrons. Laser-compressed lithium-hydride samples are well characterized by inelastic Compton and plasmon scattering of a K-alpha x-ray probe providing independent measurements of temperature and density. The data show excellent agreement with the total intensity and structure when using the two-species form factor and accounting for the screening of ion-ion interactions.

  19. High-precision mass measurements of nickel, copper, and gallium isotopes and the purported shell closure at N=40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenaut, C.; Audi, G.; Beck, D.

    2007-01-01

    High-precision mass measurement of more than thirty neutron-rich nuclides around the Z=28 closed proton shell were performed with the triple-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN to address the question of a possible neutron shell closure at N=40. The results for 57,60,64-69 Ni, 65-74,76 Cu (Z=29), and 63-65,68-78 Ga (Z=31), have a relative uncertainty of the order of 10 -8 . In particular, the masses of 72-74,76 Cu have been measured for the first time. We analyse the resulting mass surface for signs of magicity, comparing the behavior of N=40 to that of known magic numbers and to mid-shell behavior. Contrary to nuclear spectroscopy studies, no indications of a shell or sub-shell closure are found for N=40. (authors)

  20. Measurement and Improvement the Quality of the Compressive Strength of Product Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohair Hassan Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The research dealt with studying path technology to manufacture of concrete cubes according to specification design of Iraq to the degree of concrete C20 No. 52 of 1984, and in which sample was cubic shape and the dimensions (150 × 150 × 150 mm for each dimensions and the proportion of mixing of the concrete is (1:2:4 using in the casting floor. For concrete resistance required that achieve the degree of confidence of 100%, were examined compressive strength 40 samples of concrete cubes of age 28 days in the Labs section of Civil Department – Technical Institute of Babylon, all made from the same mixing concrete. Where, these samples classified within the acceptable tests were adopted in the implementation of investment projects in the construction sector. The research aims first, to measure the compressive strength of concrete cubes because the decrease or increase the compressive strength from specification design contributes to the failure of investment projects in the construction sector therefore, test was classified units that produced within damaged units. Second, to study an improvement the quality of compressive strength of concrete cubes. Results show that the proportion of damaged cubes are 0.00685, compressive strength was achieve confidence level 99.5% and producing of concrete cubes within the acceptable level of quality (3 Sigma. The quality of compressive strength was improved to good level use advanced sigma  levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.25130/tjes.24.2017.20

  1. The Karlsruhe Neutron Transmission Experiment (KANT): Spherical shell transmission measurements with 14 MeV neutrons on beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellendorff, U. von; Fischer, U.; Giese, H.; Kappler, F.; Tayama, R.; Wiegner, E.; Klein, H.; Alevra, A.

    1996-01-01

    This is a set of viewgraphs (no additional text) of a presentation on spherical shell transmission measurements with 14 MeV neutrons on beryllium; the cross for 9 Be(n,2n)2α for the energy range between threshold (1.85 MeV) and 20 MeV neutron energy is measured and the measurement is compared with the literature. Also, neutron leakage multiplication in spherical Be shells with various thicknesses are presented. Figs, tabs

  2. Measurement of lower leg compression in vivo: recommendations for the performance of measurements of interface pressure and stiffness: consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, Hugo; Clark, Michael; Bassez, Sophie; Benigni, Jean-Patrick; Becker, Francis; Blazek, Vladimir; Caprini, Joseph; Cornu-Thénard, André; Hafner, Jürg; Flour, Mieke; Jünger, Michael; Moffatt, Christine; Neumann, Martino

    2006-02-01

    Interface pressure and stiffness characterizing the elastic properties of the material are the parameters determining the dosage of compression treatment and should therefore be measured in future clinical trials. To provide some recommendations regarding the use of suitable methods for this indication. This article was formulated based on the results of an international consensus meeting between a group of medical experts and representatives from the industry held in January 2005 in Vienna, Austria. Proposals are made concerning methods for measuring the interface pressure and for assessing the stiffness of a compression device in an individual patient. In vivo measurement of interface pressure is encouraged when clinical and experimental outcomes of compression treatment are to be evaluated.

  3. Neutron measurements in the FRX-C/LSM magnetic compression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.; Baron, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron measurements are being pursued as an ion temperature diagnostic in the FRX-C/LSM Magnetic Compression Experiment. One can easily see that the d-d neutron emission is a sensitive measure of ion heating during adiabatic magnetic compression of FRCs. The reaction rate may be written as R = (1/2) n N left-angle σv right-angle, where n and N are the deuterium density and inventory. The fusion reactivity varies as left-angle σv right-angle ∝ T 5.6 for T ≅ 1 keV. For adiabatic compression, n ∝ B 1.2 and T ∝ B 0.8 so R ∝ B 5.7 in the absence of losses. The neutron yield is also sensitive to the time duration that the plasma remains near its peak temperature. 4 refs., 4 figs

  4. The Heat Flux through the Ice Shell on Europa, Constraints from Measurements in Terrestrial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruba, J.; Kletetschka, G.

    2017-12-01

    Heat transport across the ice shell of Europa controls the thermal evolution of its interior. Such process involves energy sources that drive ice resurfacing (1). More importantly, heat flux through the ice shell controls the thickness of the ice (2), that is poorly constrained between 1 km to 30+ km (3). Thin ice would allow ocean water to be affected by radiation from space. Thick ice would limit the heat ocean sources available to the rock-ocean interface at the ocean's bottom due to tidal dissipation and potential radioactive sources. The heat flux structures control the development of geometrical configurations on the Europa's surface like double ridges, ice diapirs, chaos regions because the rheology of ice is temperature dependent (4).Analysis of temperature record of growing ice cover over a pond and water below revealed the importance of solar radiation during the ice growth. If there is no snow cover, a sufficient amount of solar radiation can penetrate through the ice and heat the water below. Due to temperature gradient, there is a heat flux from the water to the ice (Qwi), which may reduce ice growth at the bottom. Details and variables that constrain the heat flux through the ice can be utilized to estimate the ice thickness. We show with this analog analysis provides the forth step towards measurement strategy on the surface of Europa. We identify three types of thermal profiles (5) and fourth with combination of all three mechanisms.References:(1) Barr, A. C., A. P. Showman, 2009, Heat transfer in Europa's icy shell, University of Arizona Press, p. 405-430.(2) Ruiz, J., J. A. Alvarez-Gómez, R. Tejero, and N. Sánchez, 2007, Heat flow and thickness of a convective ice shell on Europa for grain size-dependent rheologies: Icarus, v. 190, p. 145-154.(3) Billings, S. E., S. A. Kattenhorn, 2005, The great thickness debate: Ice shell thickness models for Europa and comparisons with estimates based on flexure at ridges: Icarus, v. 177, p. 397-412.(4) Quick

  5. Measurement of K-shell photoelectric cross-sections for some characteristic x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S

    1976-03-05

    Because of the non-availability of clean and strong low energy photon sources, external conversion x-rays in various suitable targets have been produced and successfully used to measure relative K shell photoelectric cross-sections in Y for incident energies 17.781, 22.581, 23.618, 25.770, 29.208, 35.478, 41.006, and 43.949 keV in a double reflection geometry experiment. A brief outline of the procedure of measurement and the results obtained are given. (auth)

  6. Influence of video compression on the measurement error of the television system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnik, A. V.; Yarishev, S. N.; Korotaev, V. V.

    2015-05-01

    Video data require a very large memory capacity. Optimal ratio quality / volume video encoding method is one of the most actual problem due to the urgent need to transfer large amounts of video over various networks. The technology of digital TV signal compression reduces the amount of data used for video stream representation. Video compression allows effective reduce the stream required for transmission and storage. It is important to take into account the uncertainties caused by compression of the video signal in the case of television measuring systems using. There are a lot digital compression methods. The aim of proposed work is research of video compression influence on the measurement error in television systems. Measurement error of the object parameter is the main characteristic of television measuring systems. Accuracy characterizes the difference between the measured value abd the actual parameter value. Errors caused by the optical system can be selected as a source of error in the television systems measurements. Method of the received video signal processing is also a source of error. Presence of error leads to large distortions in case of compression with constant data stream rate. Presence of errors increases the amount of data required to transmit or record an image frame in case of constant quality. The purpose of the intra-coding is reducing of the spatial redundancy within a frame (or field) of television image. This redundancy caused by the strong correlation between the elements of the image. It is possible to convert an array of image samples into a matrix of coefficients that are not correlated with each other, if one can find corresponding orthogonal transformation. It is possible to apply entropy coding to these uncorrelated coefficients and achieve a reduction in the digital stream. One can select such transformation that most of the matrix coefficients will be almost zero for typical images . Excluding these zero coefficients also

  7. Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Benton, Nathanael [Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Burns, Patrick [Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-10-18

    Compressed-air systems are used widely throughout industry for many operations, including pneumatic tools, packaging and automation equipment, conveyors, and other industrial process operations. Compressed-air systems are defined as a group of subsystems composed of air compressors, air treatment equipment, controls, piping, pneumatic tools, pneumatically powered machinery, and process applications using compressed air. A compressed-air system has three primary functional subsystems: supply, distribution, and demand. Air compressors are the primary energy consumers in a compressed-air system and are the primary focus of this protocol. The two compressed-air energy efficiency measures specifically addressed in this protocol are: High-efficiency/variable speed drive (VSD) compressor replacing modulating, load/unload, or constant-speed compressor; and Compressed-air leak survey and repairs. This protocol provides direction on how to reliably verify savings from these two measures using a consistent approach for each.

  8. Effect of compression stockings on cutaneous microcirculation: Evaluation based on measurements of the skin thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, E; Gehin, C; McAdams, E; Lun, B; Gobin, J-P; Uhl, J-F

    2016-03-01

    To study of the microcirculatory effects of elastic compression stockings. In phlebology, laser Doppler techniques (flux or imaging) are widely used to investigate cutaneous microcirculation. It is a method used to explore microcirculation by detecting blood flow in skin capillaries. Flux and imaging instruments evaluate, non-invasively in real-time, the perfusion of cutaneous micro vessels. Such tools, well known by the vascular community, are not really suitable to our protocol which requires evaluation through the elastic compression stockings fabric. Therefore, we involve another instrument, called the Hematron (developed by Insa-Lyon, Biomedical Sensor Group, Nanotechnologies Institute of Lyon), to investigate the relationship between skin microcirculatory activities and external compression provided by elastic compression stockings. The Hematron measurement principle is based on the monitoring of the skin's thermal conductivity. This clinical study examined a group of 30 female subjects, aged 42 years ±2 years, who suffer from minor symptoms of chronic venous disease, classified as C0s, and C1s (CEAP). The resulting figures show, subsequent to the pressure exerted by elastic compression stockings, an improvement of microcirculatory activities observed in 83% of the subjects, and a decreased effect was detected in the remaining 17%. Among the total population, the global average increase of the skin's microcirculatory activities is evaluated at 7.63% ± 1.80% (p compression stockings has a direct influence on the skin's microcirculation within this female sample group having minor chronic venous insufficiency signs. Further investigations are required for a deeper understanding of the elastic compression stockings effects on the microcirculatory activity in venous diseases at other stages of pathology. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Time of flight measurements of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphite under cyclic compressive load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodel, W., E-mail: william.bodel@hotmail.com [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Atkin, C. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Buxton (United Kingdom); Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    The time-of-flight technique has been used to investigate the stiffness of nuclear graphite with respect to the grade and grain direction. A loading rig was developed to collect time-of-flight measurements during cycled compressive loading up to 80% of the material's compressive strength and subsequent unloading of specimens along the axis of the applied stress. The transmission velocity (related to Young's modulus), decreased with increasing applied stress; and depending on the graphite grade and orientation, the modulus then increased, decreased or remained constant upon unloading. These tests were repeated while observing the microstructure during the load/unload cycles. Initial decreases in transmission velocity with compressive load are attributed to microcrack formation within filler and binder phases. Three distinct types of behaviour occur on unloading, depending on the grade, irradiation, and loading direction. These different behaviours can be explained in terms of the material microstructure observed from the microscopy performed during loading.

  10. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in the elements between Tm( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, N.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Apaydın, G.

    2008-04-01

    The K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios have been measured in the elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) without having any mass attenuation coefficient at the upper and lower energy branch of the K absorption edge. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements have been determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the total atomic absorption cross-sections, the K α X-ray production cross-sections, the intensity ratio of the K β and K α X-rays and the K shell fluorescence yields. We have performed the measurements for the calculations of these values in attenuation and direct excitation experimental geometry. The K X-ray photons are excited in the target using 123.6 keV gamma-rays from a strong 57Co source, and detected with an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution 0.15 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values have been compared with theoretical and others' experimental values. The results have been plotted versus atomic number.

  11. Mass measurements of {sup 56-57}Cr and the question of shell reincarnation at N = 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenaut, C [CSNSM-IN2P3/CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Audi, G [CSNSM-IN2P3/CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Beck, D [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] [and others

    2005-10-01

    Binding energies determined with high accuracy provide smooth derivatives of the mass surface for analysis of shell and pairing effects. Measurements with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE were made for {sup 56-57}Cr for which an accuracy of 4 x 10{sup -8} was achieved. Analysis of the mass surface for the supposed new N = 32 shell closure rather indicates a sub-shell closure, but of a different nature than known cases such as {sup 94}Sr.

  12. Relative L-shell phototelectric cross-section measurements in W, Pb and U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S K; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1981-06-01

    Measurements of L-shell photoelectric cross sections in W, Pb and U at K X-ray energies of Nb, Mo, Ag, In, Sn, I, Ba, Ce, Gd, and Er have been made. The method yields relative cross sections and is, therefore, simpler and more accurate than those giving absolute values. The problems arising due to the non-monochromatic character of incident and emitted X-rays in the targets have been investigated. The present results show a fairly good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  13. Measurement of the average L-shell fluorescence yields in elements 40<=Z<=53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, N; Mittal, R; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1983-12-01

    The average L-shell fluorescence yields in Zr, Nb, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn and I have been measured using photo-ionization for creating the vacancies. The present results are found to agree well with those calculated using the values of L-subshell fluorescence yields and Coster-Kronig yields of Krause et al., but are lower than the only available experimental results of Lay. To the best of our knowledge, the values in Nb, Cd, In and I are reported for the first time.

  14. Relative L-shell photoelectric cross-section measurements in W, Pb and U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S K; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1981-06-01

    Measurements of L-shell photoelectric cross sections in W, Pb and U at K X-ray energies of Nb, Mo, Ag, In, Sn, I, Ba, Ce, Gd and Er have been made. The method yields relative cross sections and is, therefore, simpler and more accurate than those giving absolute values. The problems arising due to the non-monochromatic character of incident and emitted X-rays in the targets have been investigated. The present results show a fairly good agreement with the theoretical predicitions.

  15. Temperature measurement in a compressible flow field using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    The thermometric capability of a two-line fluorescence technique using iodine seed molecules in air is investigated analytically and verified experimentally in a known steady compressible flow field. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 295 K were measured in the flowfield using two iodine transitions accessed with a 30-GHz dye-laser scan near 543 nm. The effect of pressure broadening on temperature measurement is evaluated.

  16. Measurements and predictions of strain pole figures for uniaxially compressed stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C.; Clausen, B.; Holden, T.M.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Strain pole figures representative of residual intergranular strains were determined from an -2.98% uniaxially compressed austenitic stainless steel sample. The measurements were made using neutron diffraction on the recently commissioned Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The measurements were compared with predictions from an elasto-plastic self-consistent model and found to be in good agreement

  17. Measurements and predictions of strain pole figures for uniaxially compressed stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, C. [Division of Engineering Materials, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linkoeping University, 58183 Linkoeping (Sweden)]. E-mail: clarsson@cfl.rr.com; Clausen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Holden, T.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Strain pole figures representative of residual intergranular strains were determined from an -2.98% uniaxially compressed austenitic stainless steel sample. The measurements were made using neutron diffraction on the recently commissioned Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The measurements were compared with predictions from an elasto-plastic self-consistent model and found to be in good agreement.

  18. Fe L-shell Excitation Cross Section Measurements on EBIT-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.; Boyce, K.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Porter, F.; Gu, M. F.; Kahn, S.

    2006-09-01

    We report the measurement of electron impact excitation cross sections for the strong iron L-shell 3-2 lines of Fe XVII to Fe XXIV at the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center's 6x6 pixel array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well-established cross sections for radiative electron capture. Our results include the excitation cross section for over 50 lines at multiple electron energies. Although we have found that for 3C line in Fe XVII the measured cross sections differ significantly from theory, in most cases the measurements and theory agree within 20%. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 and supported by NASA APRA grants to LLNL, GSFC, and Stanford University.

  19. Measurements of the tensile and compressive properties of micro-concrete used in the Winfrith missile impact experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.A.

    1982-10-01

    Tests to determine the tensile and compressive properties of a micro-concrete mix are described. The material is a nominally 40MPa ultimate compressive strength concrete used in impact tests with scale models in the prediction of responses in prototype concrete structures. Compressive tests were intended to give complete stress-strain relationships beyond initial failure. Tensile properties were measured by the Brazilian splitting technique and direct tension dog-bone specimens for comparison reasons. (U.K.)

  20. Experimental measurement of compressibility coefficients of synthetic sandstone in hydrostatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaei, H; Moosavi, M

    2013-01-01

    For the characterization of the mechanical behavior of porous media in elastic conditions, the theory of poroelasticity is used. The number of poroelastic coefficients is greater in elastic conditions because of the complexity of porous media. The laboratory measurement of poroelastic coefficients needs a system that can control and measure the variables of poroelasticity. In this paper, experimental measurements of these coefficients are presented. Laboratory tests are performed using a system designed by the authors. Laboratory hydrostatic tests are performed on cylindrical samples in drained, pore pressure loading, undrained and dry conditions. Compressibilities (bulk and pore compressibility), effective stress and Skempton coefficients are measured by these tests. Samples are made of a composition (sand and cement) and are made by a compaction process synthetically. Calibration tests are performed for the setup to identify possible errors in the system and to correct the results of the main tests. This is done by performing similar compressibility tests at each stress level on a cylindrical steel sample (5.47 mm in diameter) with a longitudinal hole along it (hollow cylinder). A steel sample is used to assume an incompressible sample. The results of the tests are compared with the theory of poroelasticity and the obtained graphs and their errors are analyzed. This study shows that the results of the drained and pore pressure loading tests are compatible with poroelastic formulation, while the undrained results have errors because of extra fluid volume in the pore pressure system and calibration difficulties. (paper)

  1. Design and construction of a strain gage compression load cell to measure rolling forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeffer, L.; Borchardt, I.G.; Carvalho, L.F.A.

    1978-05-01

    A complete detailed mechanical desion of a strain gauge compression load cell is presented. This cell was specialy designed to measure rolling forces at conventional duo or trio industrial roughing stands. The stands, in general, have little space (height) to adjust to the cells. Moreover the contact stands surfaces are very rough. Do to this facts, load cells of elastic cilindrical geometries are not recommended for accuracies better than 8%. This work describes the complete design and the construction of a circular (membrane) steel plate load cell. A prototype of 300 KN (approximately 30t) capacity, with 2% accuracies and with a height of 6 cm was constructed and tested. The design proposed is a general one and permits the construction of small load cells to measure any compression load [pt

  2. Model-based failure detection for cylindrical shells from noisy vibration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J V; Fisher, K A; Guidry, B L; Chambers, D H

    2014-12-01

    Model-based processing is a theoretically sound methodology to address difficult objectives in complex physical problems involving multi-channel sensor measurement systems. It involves the incorporation of analytical models of both physical phenomenology (complex vibrating structures, noisy operating environment, etc.) and the measurement processes (sensor networks and including noise) into the processor to extract the desired information. In this paper, a model-based methodology is developed to accomplish the task of online failure monitoring of a vibrating cylindrical shell externally excited by controlled excitations. A model-based processor is formulated to monitor system performance and detect potential failure conditions. The objective of this paper is to develop a real-time, model-based monitoring scheme for online diagnostics in a representative structural vibrational system based on controlled experimental data.

  3. Developing the elastic modulus measurement of asphalt concrete using the compressive strength test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Arief; Suparma, Latif Budi; Mulyono, Agus Taufik

    2017-11-01

    Elastic modulus is a fundamental property of an asphalt mixture. An analytical method of the elastic modulus is needed to determine the thickness of flexible pavement. It has a role as one of the input values on a stress-strain analysis in the finite element method. The aim of this study was to develop the measurement of the elastic modulus by using compressive strength testing. This research used a set of specimen mold tool and Delta Dimensi software to record strain changes occurring in the proving ring of compression machine and the specimens. The elastic modulus of the five types of aggregate gradation and 2 types of asphalt were measured at optimum asphalt content. Asphalt Cement 60/70 and Elastomer Modified Asphalt (EMA) were used as a binder. Manufacturing success indicators of the specimens used void-in-the-mix (VIM) 3-5 % criteria. The success rate of the specimen manufacturing was more than 76%. Thus, the procedure and the compressive strength test equipment could be used for the measurement of the elastic modulus. The aggregate gradation and asphalt types significantly affected the elastic modulus of the asphalt concrete.

  4. L-shell x-ray fluorescence measurements of lead in bone: accuracy and precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, Andrew C.; Carroll, Spencer; Khan, Fuad A.; Moshier, Erin L.; Geraghty, Ciaran; Tang, Shida; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the accuracy and precision of a method for in vivo measurements of lead in bone using L-shell x-ray fluorescence (LXRF), the former via comparison with independent measurements of lead in bone obtained using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) following acid digestion. Using LXRF, the lead content of adult human cadaver tibiae was measured, both as intact legs and as dissected tibiae with overlying tissue removed, the latter at several proximal-distal locations. After LXRF, each tibia was divided into nine cross-sectional segments, which were further separated into tibia core and surface samples for AAS measurement. The proximal-distal variability of AAS-measured core and surface tibia lead concentrations has been described elsewhere (the lead concentration was found to decrease towards both ends of the tibia). The subjects of this paper are the proximal-distal variability of the LXRF-measured lead concentrations, the measurement uncertainty and the statistical agreement between LXRF and AAS. There was no clear proximal-distal variability in the LXRF-measured concentrations; the degree of variability in actual tibia lead concentrations is far less than the LXRF measurement uncertainty. Measurement uncertainty was dominated by counting statistics and exceeded the estimate of lead concentration in most cases. The agreement between LXRF and AAS was reasonably good for bare bone measurements but poor for intact leg measurements. The variability of the LXRF measurements was large enough, for both bare bone and intact leg measurements, to yield grave concerns about the analytical use of the technique in vivo. (author)

  5. Compressed RSS Measurement for Communication and Sensing in the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanchao Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The receiving signal strength (RSS is crucial for the Internet of Things (IoT, as it is the key foundation for communication resource allocation, localization, interference management, sensing, and so on. Aside from its significance, the measurement process could be tedious, time consuming, inaccurate, and involving human operations. The state-of-the-art works usually applied the fashion of “measure a few, predict many,” which use measurement calibrated models to generate the RSS for the whole networks. However, this kind of methods still cannot provide accurate results in a short duration with low measurement cost. In addition, they also require careful scheduling of the measurement which is vulnerable to measurement conflict. In this paper, we propose a compressive sensing- (CS- based RSS measurement solution, which is conflict-tolerant, time-efficient, and accuracy-guaranteed without any model-calibrate operation. The CS-based solution takes advantage of compressive sensing theory to enable simultaneous measurement in the same channel, which reduces the time cost to the level of O(log⁡N (where N is the network size and works well for sparse networks. Extensive experiments based on real data trace are conducted to show the efficiency of the proposed solutions.

  6. Measurements of Compression and Emittance Growth after the First LCLS Bunch Compressor Chicane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE xray free-electron laser project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section from RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane was installed during the fall of 2006. The first bunch compressor is located at 250 MeV and nominally compresses a 1-nC electron bunch from an rms length of about 1 mm to 0.2 mm. Transverse phase space and bunch length diagnostics are located immediately after the chicane. We present preliminary measurements and simulations of the longitudinal and transverse phase space after the chicane in various beam conditions, including extreme compression with micron-scale current spikes

  7. Wavelength Measurements of Ni L-shell Lines between 9 and 15 A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ming F.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Thorn, D. B.; Kahn, S. M.

    2006-09-01

    We present accurate wavelength measurements of nikel L-shell X-ray lines resulting from Δ n ≥ 1 transitions (mostly, 2 - 3 transitions) between 9 and 15 Å. We have used the electron beam ion trap, SuperEBIT, at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a flat field grating spectrometer to record the spectra. Most significant emission lines of Ni XIX -- XXVI in our spectral coverage are identified. The resulting data set provides valuable input in the analyses of high resolution X-ray spectra of stellar coronae sources, including the Sun. This work was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE contract No. W-7405-Eng-48, and supported by NASA APRA Grant NAG5-5419.

  8. High-precision mass measurements in the realm of the deformed shell closure N=152

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibach, Martin Andreas

    2013-12-04

    The nuclear masses reflect the sum of all interactions inside a nucleus. Their precise knowledge can be used to benchmark nuclear mass models and to gain nuclear structure information. Penning-trap mass spectrometers have proven their potential to obtain lowest uncertainties. Uniquely located at a nuclear reactor, the double Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP is dedicated to measurements in the neutron-rich region. For a gain in sensitivity a non-destructive detection system for single ion mass measurements was adopted. This includes the implementation of a narrow band-pass filter tuned to the heavy ion cyclotron frequency as well as a cryogenic low-noise amplifier. For on-line mass measurements, the laser ablation ion source was equipped with a newly developed miniature radiofrequency quadrupole trap in order to improve the extraction efficiency. A more economic use of the radioactive material enabled mass measurements using only 10{sup 15} atoms of target material. New mass measurements were performed within this work in the realm of the deformed shell closure N=152. Their implementation into the atomic-mass evaluation improved the uncertainty of more than 80 nuclides in the heavy mass region and simultaneously shifted the absolute mass of two α decay chains.

  9. Measurement of relative intensities of L-shell x-rays in some high-Z elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S; Mittal, R; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1982-10-14

    The L-shell x-ray relative intensities I(Lsub(..cap alpha..))/I(Lsub(l)),I(Lsub(..cap alpha..))/I(Lsub(..beta..)) and I(Lsub(..cap alpha..))/I(Lsub(..gamma..)) for U, Th, Pb and ratios I(Lsub(..cap alpha..+l))/I(Lsub(..beta..)) and I(Lsub(..cap alpha..+l))/I(Lsub(..gamma..)) for W have been measured. The L-shell electrons are excited by 59.57 keV gamma rays from /sup 241/Am and the fluorescent L-shell x-ray intensities are measured with a Si(Li) detector. The experimental results are found to agree well with theory.

  10. Comparison of the performance of different radar pulse compression techniques in an incoherent scatter radar measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Improving an estimate of an incoherent scatter radar signal is vital to provide reliable and unbiased information about the Earth's ionosphere. Thus optimizing the measurement spatial and temporal resolutions has attracted considerable attention. The optimization usually relies on employing different kinds of pulse compression filters in the analysis and a matched filter is perhaps the most widely used one. A mismatched filter has also been used in order to suppress the undesirable sidelobes that appear in the case of matched filtering. Moreover, recently an adaptive pulse compression method, which can be derived based on the minimum mean-square error estimate, has been proposed. In this paper we have investigated the performance of matched, mismatched and adaptive pulse compression methods in terms of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and the variance and bias of the estimator. This is done by using different types of optimal radar waveforms. It is shown that for the case of low SNR the signal degradation associated to an adaptive filtering is less than that of the mismatched filtering. The SNR loss of both matched and adaptive pulse compression techniques was found to be nearly the same for most of the investigated codes for the case of high SNR. We have shown that the adaptive filtering technique is a compromise between matched and mismatched filtering method when one evaluates its performance in terms of the variance and the bias of the estimator. All the three analysis methods were found to have the same performance when a sidelobe-free matched filter code is employed.

  11. Comparison of the performance of different radar pulse compression techniques in an incoherent scatter radar measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Improving an estimate of an incoherent scatter radar signal is vital to provide reliable and unbiased information about the Earth's ionosphere. Thus optimizing the measurement spatial and temporal resolutions has attracted considerable attention. The optimization usually relies on employing different kinds of pulse compression filters in the analysis and a matched filter is perhaps the most widely used one. A mismatched filter has also been used in order to suppress the undesirable sidelobes that appear in the case of matched filtering. Moreover, recently an adaptive pulse compression method, which can be derived based on the minimum mean-square error estimate, has been proposed. In this paper we have investigated the performance of matched, mismatched and adaptive pulse compression methods in terms of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and the variance and bias of the estimator. This is done by using different types of optimal radar waveforms. It is shown that for the case of low SNR the signal degradation associated to an adaptive filtering is less than that of the mismatched filtering. The SNR loss of both matched and adaptive pulse compression techniques was found to be nearly the same for most of the investigated codes for the case of high SNR. We have shown that the adaptive filtering technique is a compromise between matched and mismatched filtering method when one evaluates its performance in terms of the variance and the bias of the estimator. All the three analysis methods were found to have the same performance when a sidelobe-free matched filter code is employed.

  12. Benzene Synthesis for 14C Measurements and Evaluation of Uncertainty in Mollusk Shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero del Hombrebueno, B.; Simon, M. A.; Larena, P.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes the method and Instrumentation used by Environmental Isotopes laboratory of the CIEMAT Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (DIAE) for the synthesis of benzene from carbonates of mollusk shells and the liquid scintillation counting of 14 C for radiocarbon dating in these samples. The usefulness of mollusk shells for 14 C dating are considered. (Author) 15 refs

  13. Liner velocity, current, and symmetry measurements on the 32 MA flux compression generator experiment ALT-1

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, D A; Rodríguez, G; Tabaka, L J

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. A flux compression generator based pulse power system, designed, built, and fielded by a Russian team at the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), was used to successfully drive an aluminum liner to velocities greater than 10 km/sec. The experiment objective was to demonstrate performance of a precision liner implosion at Atlas current of 30 MA or greater. Diagnostics to measure liner performance were an essential part of the experiment. An experimental team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided a suite of diagnostics to measure liner performance. Three diagnostics were fielded. 1. a velocity interferometer (VISAR) to continuously measure the liner inner surface velocity from throughout the entire range of travel. 2. Two Faraday rotation devices to measure liner current during the implosion. 3. Sixteen fiber optic impact pins to record liner impact time and provide axial and azimuthal symmetry information. All diagnostics...

  14. Tamper temperature and compression from simultaneous proton and alpha-particle measurements in laser fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover, R.A.; Kubis, J.J.; Mayer, F.J.; Slater, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The energy loss per unit path length for a charged particle incident on a spatially uniform isothermal Maxwellian plasma is a function of the temperature and density of the medium. Within this model the temperature and compression rhoΔr of the tamper of a laser-driven microshell target can be accurately determined, in the absence of electrostatic acceleration, by the simultaneous measurement of the energy loss from 3.52-MeV α particles from D-T reactions and 3.02-MeV protons from D-D reactions

  15. Noninvasive measurement of lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction under cuff compression paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengyan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, He; Zhao, Kai; Jin, Lixin; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Xiaoying; Fang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using a susceptibility-based MRI technique with asymmetric spin-echo (ASE) sequence to assess the lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) alternations under cuff compression paradigm. Approved by the local institutional human study committee, nine healthy young volunteers participated in this study. All the ASE scans were conducted using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner during resting state (pre), 1-3 min (post1) and 3-5 min (post2) after a pressure of 50 mmHg above individual systolic blood pressure imposed on the thigh. Moreover, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements were performed on the same day under the same cuff compression protocol to verify the accuracy of this susceptibility-based method. In all volunteers, the mean MRI based OEF in gastrocnemius (GAS) muscle increased significantly from 0.28 ± 0.02 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.03 (post1, P measured 1-%HbO2 (percentage of deoxyhemoglobin concentration within total hemoglobin) in GAS rose significantly from 0.29 ± 0.03 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.04 (post1, P measuring skeletal muscle oxygenation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Shell Venster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wit, P.; Looijesteijn, B.; Regeer, B.; Stip, B.

    1995-03-01

    In the bi-monthly issues of 'Shell Venster' (window on Shell) attention is paid to the activities of the multinational petroleum company Shell Nederland and the Koninklijke/Shell Groep by means of non-specialist articles

  17. Interactions of glycine betaine with proteins: insights from volume and compressibility measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Yuen Lai; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2013-01-29

    We report the first application of volume and compressibility measurements to characterization of interactions between cosolvents (osmolytes) and globular proteins. Specifically, we measure the partial molar volumes and adiabatic compressibilities of cytochrome c, ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and ovalbumin in aqueous solutions of the stabilizing osmolyte glycine betaine (GB) at concentrations between 0 and 4 M. The fact that globular proteins do not undergo any conformational transitions in the presence of GB provides an opportunity to study the interactions of GB with proteins in their native states within the entire range of experimentally accessible GB concentrations. We analyze our resulting volumetric data within the framework of a statistical thermodynamic model in which each instance of GB interaction with a protein is viewed as a binding reaction that is accompanied by release of four water molecules. From this analysis, we calculate the association constants, k, as well as changes in volume, ΔV(0), and adiabatic compressibility, ΔK(S0), accompanying each GB-protein association event in an ideal solution. By comparing these parameters with similar characteristics determined for low-molecular weight analogues of proteins, we conclude that there are no significant cooperative effects involved in interactions of GB with any of the proteins studied in this work. We also evaluate the free energies of direct GB-protein interactions. The energetic properties of GB-protein association appear to scale with the size of the protein. For all proteins, the highly favorable change in free energy associated with direct protein-cosolvent interactions is nearly compensated by an unfavorable free energy of cavity formation (excluded volume effect), yielding a modestly unfavorable free energy for the transfer of a protein from water to a GB/water mixture.

  18. Progress on precision measurements of inner shell transitions in highly charged ions at an ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Csilla I.; Indelicato, Paul; LeBigot, Eric-Olivier; Vallette, Alexandre; Amaro, Pedro; Guerra, Mauro; Gumberidze, Alex [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie- Paris 6, Case 74, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Centro de Fisica Atomica, CFA, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie- Paris 6, Case 74, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2012-05-25

    Inner shell transitions of highly charged ions produced in the plasma of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) were observed the first time by a Double Crystal Spectrometer (DCS). The DCS is a well-used tool in precision x-ray spectroscopy due to its ability of precision wavelength measurement traced back to a relative angle measurement. Because of its requirement for a bright x-ray source the DCS has not been used before in direct measurements of highly charged ions (HCI). Our new precision measurement of inner shell transitions in HCI is not just going to provide new x-ray standards for quantum metrology but can also give information about the plasma in which the ions reside. Ionic temperatures and with that the electron density can be determined by thorough examination of line widths measured with great accuracy.

  19. A Space-Frequency Data Compression Method for Spatially Dense Laser Doppler Vibrometer Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto de França Arruda

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available When spatially dense mobility shapes are measured with scanning laser Doppler vibrometers, it is often impractical to use phase-separation modal parameter estimation methods due to the excessive number of highly coupled modes and to the prohibitive computational cost of processing huge amounts of data. To deal with this problem, a data compression method using Chebychev polynomial approximation in the frequency domain and two-dimensional discrete Fourier series approximation in the spatial domain, is proposed in this article. The proposed space-frequency regressive approach was implemented and verified using a numerical simulation of a free-free-free-free suspended rectangular aluminum plate. To make the simulation more realistic, the mobility shapes were synthesized by modal superposition using mode shapes obtained experimentally with a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. A reduced and smoothed model, which takes advantage of the sinusoidal spatial pattern of structural mobility shapes and the polynomial frequency-domain pattern of the mobility shapes, is obtained. From the reduced model, smoothed curves with any desired frequency and spatial resolution can he produced whenever necessary. The procedure can he used either to generate nonmodal models or to compress the measured data prior to modal parameter extraction.

  20. Reconstruction of tissue dynamics in the compressed breast using multiplexed measurements and temporal basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverman, Gregory; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, S. A.; Selb, J. J.; Boas, David A.

    2007-02-01

    In the course of our experiments imaging the compressed breast in conjunction with digital tomosynthesis, we have noted that significant changes in tissue optical properties, on the order of 5%, occur during our imaging protocol. These changes seem to consistent with changes both in total Hemoglobin concentration as well as in oxygen saturation, as was the case for our standalone breast compression study, which made use of reflectance measurements. Simulation experiments show the importance of taking into account the temporal dynamics in the image reconstruction, and demonstrate the possibility of imaging the spatio-temporal dynamics of oxygen saturation and total Hemoglobin in the breast. In the image reconstruction, we make use of spatio-temporal basis functions, specifically a voxel basis for spatial imaging, and a cubic spline basis in time, and we reconstruct the spatio-temporal images using the entire data set simultaneously, making use of both absolute and relative measurements in the cost function. We have modified the sequence of sources used in our imaging acquisition protocol to improve our temporal resolution, and preliminary results are shown for normal subjects.

  1. Compression stockings for treating venous leg ulcers: measurement of interface pressure under a new ulcer kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, B; Partsch, H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the interface pressure of a newly designed two-layer compression stocking (Mediven ulcer kit Medi QMBH, Bayreuth, Germany) in different body positions and to compare the values with those obtained with another two-layer product. Interface pressure was measured on the distal medial leg in 16 legs of volunteers, with the basic layer alone and with the whole stocking kit in the supine, sitting and standing position for both stocking systems. The literature concerning ulcer-healing rates is reviewed. Mediven ulcerkit produced statistically significant higher pressure values than the ulcer stocking with a median resting value of 35.5 mmHg in the supine and 42.5 mmHg in the standing position. The pressure while standing comes close to values exerted by bandages. The basic layer alone applies a pressure of 20.5 mmHg. Especially designed compression stockings exerting sufficient interface pressure may be indicated in patients with small ulcers of short duration.

  2. Spectroscopy of 96-98Ru and neighboring nuclei: shell model calculations and lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharraja, B.; Garg, U.; Ghugre, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    High Spin states in 94,95 Mo, 94-96 Tc, 96-98 Ru and 97,98 Rh were populated via the 65 Cu( 36 S,xpyn) reactions at 142 MeV. Level schemes of these nuclei have been extended up to a spin of J ∼ 20ℎ and an excitation energy of E x ∼12 -14 MeV. Information on the high spin structure for 96 Tc and 98 Rh has been obtained for the first time. Spherical shell model calculations have been performed and compared with the experimental excitation energies. The level structures of the N=51, 52 isotones exhibit single-particle nature even at the highest spins and excitation energies. A fragmentation of intensity into several branches after breaking of the N = 50 core has been observed. There are indications for the onset of collectivity around neutron number N = 53 in this mass region. A sequence of E2 transitions, reminiscent of vibrational degree of freedom, were observed in 98 Ru at spins just above the observed N = 50 core breaking. RDM lifetime measurements have been performed to ascertain the intrinsic structures of these level sequences. (author)

  3. Measurement of relative intensities of L-shell X-rays of some heavy elements using Cd-109 radioisotope source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darko, J.B.; Tetteh, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    The relative L-shell x-ray intensities of Sm, W, Ir, Au, Hg, Pb and U were measured using a Cd-109 radioisotope source and a Si(Li) detector. The measured relative intensities were compared with the theoretically calculated values due to Scofield, computed for the present excitation energy of 22.6 keV. The experimental results were found to agree with theory in most cases. (author)

  4. Measurement of relative intensities of L-shell X-rays of some heavy elements using Cd-109 radioisotope source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darko, J.B.; Tetteh, G.K. (Ghana Univ., Legon (Ghana). Dept. of Physics)

    The relative L-shell x-ray intensities of Sm, W, Ir, Au, Hg, Pb and U were measured using a Cd-109 radioisotope source and a Si(Li) detector. The measured relative intensities were compared with the theoretically calculated values due to Scofield, computed for the present excitation energy of 22.6 keV. The experimental results were found to agree with theory in most cases. (author).

  5. Measurement of L-shell photoelectric cross sections in high Z elements at 37 and 74 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allawadhi, K L; Ghumman, B S; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1977-05-01

    L-shell photoelectric cross section measurements have been made at 36.818 and 74.409 keV for four elements in the range 81<=Z<=92. The measurements at 74.409 keV are found to agree with theory, within experimental uncertainties, but the experimental values at 36.818 keV are found to be higher than the theoretical predictions. The possible reasons for the observed discrepancy are discussed.

  6. Measurements of L shell X-ray yields of thick Ag target by 6–29 keV electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.L.; Tian, L.X.; Li, X.L.; An, Z.; Zhu, J.J.; Liu, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the L shell X-ray yields for a thick Ag target have been measured at incident electron energies of 6–29 keV. The experimental values are compared with the Monte Carlo simulation results that are obtained by using the PENELOPE code, in which the inner-shell ionization cross sections by electron impact calculated in the theoretical frame of distorted wave Born approximation are used. The experimental and simulation values are in agreement with ∼10% difference. Meanwhile, the L shell X-ray production cross sections are also obtained based on the measured L shell X-ray yields for a thick Ag target in this paper, and are compared with other experimental Ag L shell X-ray production cross section data by electron and positron impact measured previously and some theoretical models. Some factors that could affect these comparisons are also discussed in this paper. - Highlights: • We measured L shell X-ray yields of thick Ag target by 6–29 keV electrons. • Our measured X-ray yields are in good agreement with the MC results with ∼10%. • L shell production cross sections are obtained based on the measured X-ray yields. • L shell production cross sections obtained are in good agreement with theories

  7. Initial Measurements of CSR from a Bunch-Compressed Beam at APS

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Borland, M; Sereno, N S

    2005-01-01

    The interest in bunch compression to generate higher peak current electron beams with low emittance continues in the free-electron laser (FEL) community. At the Advanced Photon source (APS) we have both an rf thermionic gun and an rf photocathode (PC) gun on the S-band linac. At the 150-MeV point in the linac, we have a flexible chicane bunch compressor whose four dipoles bend the beam in the horizontal plane. There is also a vertical bend dipole after the chicane that allows measurement of energy and horizontal beam size at the imaging screen station to study possible effects on emittance due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the chicane. A far-infrared (FIR) coherent radiation monitor is located downstream of the chicane as well. We have begun recommissioning of this device with coherent transition radiation (CTR), but we also have directly observed CSR from the bunch-compressed beam as it transits the vertical dipole and goes into the down leg. The unique geometry allows simultaneous tracking of b...

  8. Compressed sampling for boundary measurements in three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) utilizes electrodes on a medium's surface to produce measured data from which the conductivity distribution inside the medium is estimated. For the cases that relocation of electrodes is impractical or no a priori assumptions can be made to optimize the electrodes placement, a large number of electrodes may be needed to cover all possible imaging volume. This may occur in dynamically varying conductivity distribution in 3D EIT. Three-dimensional EIT then requires inverting very large linear systems to calculate the conductivity field, which causes significant problems regarding storage space and reconstruction time in addition to that data acquisition for a large number of electrodes will reduce the achievable frame rate, which is considered as major advantage of EIT imaging. This study proposes an idea to reduce the reconstruction complexity based on the well-known compressed sampling theory. By applying the so-called model-based CoSaMP algorithm to large size data collected by a 256 channel system, the size of forward operator and data acquisition time is reduced to those of a 32 channel system, while accuracy of reconstruction is significantly improved. The results demonstrate great capability of compressed sampling for overriding the challenges arising in 3D EIT. (paper)

  9. Strain Measurement of Steel Roof Truss Using FBG Sensor during Construction of Reverse Shell Shaped Reinforced Concrete Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kun Woo [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hong Chul; Seo, Tae Seok [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Application of FBG (Fiber Bragg Grating) sensors to measure strain of steel roof trusses has been performed. This is to check and confirm the structural integrity of an unusually shaped, reverse shell structure made of reinforced concrete. The issue was to place sensors at proper location and compare the measured values to the results from structural analysis. It has been learned that a deliberate measurement scheme is needed in order to monitor a complex structure during construction. In this study, the measured values were within allowable range of strain, thus confirming the safety of the structure during measurement and construction.

  10. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Compression Strength Measurements Conducted According to ASTM E9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E.; Ma, Li; Graham, Stephen M.; Adler, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Ten commercial laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to establish the repeatability and reproducibility of compression strength tests conducted according to ASTM International Standard Test Method E9. The test employed a cylindrical aluminum AA2024-T351 test specimen. Participants measured elastic modulus and 0.2 % offset yield strength, YS(0.2 % offset), using an extensometer attached to the specimen. The repeatability and reproducibility of the yield strength measurement, expressed as coefficient of variations were cv(sub r)= 0.011 and cv(sub R)= 0.020 The reproducibility of the test across the laboratories was among the best that has been reported for uniaxial tests. The reported data indicated that using diametrically opposed extensometers, instead of a single extensometer doubled the precision of the test method. Laboratories that did not lubricate the ends of the specimen measured yield stresses and elastic moduli that were smaller than those measured in laboratories that lubricated the specimen ends. A finite element analysis of the test specimen deformation for frictionless and perfect friction could not explain the discrepancy, however. The modulus measured from stress-strain data were reanalyzed using a technique that finds the optimal fit range, and applies several quality checks to the data. The error in modulus measurements from stress-strain curves generally increased as the fit range decreased to less than 40 % of the stress range.

  11. High-speed video analysis improves the accuracy of spinal cord compression measurement in a mouse contusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournely, Marion; Petit, Yvan; Wagnac, Éric; Laurin, Jérôme; Callot, Virginie; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2018-01-01

    Animal models of spinal cord injuries aim to utilize controlled and reproducible conditions. However, a literature review reveals that mouse contusion studies using equivalent protocols may show large disparities in the observed impact force vs. cord compression relationship. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate possible sources of bias in these measurements. The specific objective was to improve spinal cord compression measurements using a video-based setup to detect the impactor-spinal cord time-to-contact. A force-controlled 30kDyn unilateral contusion at C4 vertebral level was performed in six mice with the Infinite Horizon impactor (IH). High-speed video was used to determine the time-to-contact between the impactor tip and the spinal cord and to compute the related displacement of the tip into the tissue: the spinal cord compression and the compression ratio. Delayed time-to-contact detection with the IH device led to an underestimation of the cord compression. Compression values indicated by the IH were 64% lower than those based on video analysis (0.33mm vs. 0.88mm). Consequently, the mean compression ratio derived from the device was underestimated when compared to the value derived from video analysis (22% vs. 61%). Default time-to-contact detection from the IH led to significant errors in spinal cord compression assessment. Accordingly, this may explain some of the reported data discrepancies in the literature. The proposed setup could be implemented by users of contusion devices to improve the quantative description of the primary injury inflicted to the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostic method for measuring plasma-induced voltages on the PBX-M [Princeton Beta Experiment-Modified] stabilizing shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Okabayashi, M.; Schweitzer, S.

    1990-07-01

    The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modified (PBX-M) has a close-fitting conducting, passive plate, stabilizing shell which nearly surrounds highly indented, bean-shaped plasmas. The proximity of this electrically isolated shell to a large fraction of the plasma surface allows measurements similar to previous work on other tokamaks using floating probes and limiters. Measurements were performed to characterize the plasma-induced voltages on the PBX-M passive plate stabilizing shell during high-β plasmas. Voltage differences were measured between the respective passive plate toroidal and poloidal gaps, the respective passive plates and the vessel, and an outer poloidal graphite limiter and its passive plate. The calibration and qualification testing procedures are discussed. The initial measurements found that the largest voltages were observed at plasma start-up and at the plasma current disruption and exhibited characteristics depending on operating conditions. The highest voltages observed have been at disruption and were less than 2 kV. 9 refs., 5 figs

  13. Metrological and operational performance of measuring systems used in vehicle compressed natural gas filling stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velosa, Jhonn F.; Abril, Henry; Garcia, Luis E. [CDT de GAS (Venezuela). Gas Technological Development Center Corporation

    2008-07-01

    Corporation CDT GAS financially supported by the Colombian government through COLCIENCIAS, carried out a study aimed at designing, developing and implementing in Colombia a calibration and metrological verification 'specialized service' for gas meters installed at dispensers of filling stations using compressed natural gas. The results permitted the identification of improving opportunities (in measuring systems, equipment and devices used to deliver natural gas) which are focused on achieving the highest security and reliability of trading processes of CNG for vehicles. In the development of the first stage of the project, metrological type variables were initially considered, but given the importance of the measuring system and its interaction with the various elements involving gas supply to the filling station, the scope of the work done included aspects related to the operational performance, that is, those influencing the security of the users and the metrological performance of the measuring system. The development of the second stage counted on the collaboration of national companies from the sector of CNG for vehicles, which permitted the carrying out of multiple calibrations to the measuring systems installed in the CNG dispensers, thus achieving, in a concrete way, valid and reliable technological information of the implemented procedures. (author)

  14. Investigation of test methods for measuring compressive strength and modulus of two-dimensional carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Sawyer, James Wayne; Yamaki, Y. Robert

    1989-01-01

    An experimental evaluation has been conducted to ascertain the the usefulness of two techniques for measuring in-plane compressive failure strength and modulus in coated and uncoated carbon-carbon composites. The techniques involved testing specimens with potted ends as well as testing them in a novel clamping fixture; specimen shape, length, gage width, and thickness were the test parameters investigated for both coated and uncoated 0/90 deg and +/-45 deg laminates. It is found that specimen shape does not have a significant effect on the measured compressive properties. The potting of specimen ends results in slightly higher measured compressive strengths than those obtained with the new clamping fixture. Comparable modulus values are obtained by both techniques.

  15. Real-Time Intracellular Measurements of ROS and RNS in Living Cells with Single Core-Shell Nanowire Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Wei; Qiu, Quan-Fa; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Fu-Li; Liu, Yan-Lin; Amatore, Christian; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2017-10-09

    Nanoelectrodes allow precise and quantitative measurements of important biological processes at the single living-cell level in real time. Cylindrical nanowire electrodes (NWEs) required for intracellular measurements create a great challenge for achieving excellent electrochemical and mechanical performances. Herein, we present a facile and robust solution to this problem based on a unique SiC-core-shell design to produce cylindrical NWEs with superior mechanical toughness provided by the SiC nano-core and an excellent electrochemical performance provided by the ultrathin carbon shell that can be used as such or platinized. The use of such NWEs for biological applications is illustrated by the first quantitative measurements of ROS/RNS in individual phagolysosomes of living macrophages. As the shell material can be varied to meet any specific detection purpose, this work opens up new opportunities to monitor quantitatively biological functions occurring inside cells and their organelles. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Behavioral measures of cochlear compression and temporal resolution as predictors of speech masking release in hearing-impaired listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregan, Melanie J.; Nelson, Peggy B.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show less masking release (MR) than normal-hearing listeners when temporal fluctuations are imposed on a steady-state masker, even when accounting for overall audibility differences. This difference may be related to a loss of cochlear compression in HI listeners. Behavioral estimates of compression, using temporal masking curves (TMCs), were compared with MR for band-limited (500–4000 Hz) speech and pure tones in HI listeners and age-matched, noise-masked normal-hearing (NMNH) listeners. Compression and pure-tone MR estimates were made at 500, 1500, and 4000 Hz. The amount of MR was defined as the difference in performance between steady-state and 10-Hz square-wave-gated speech-shaped noise. In addition, temporal resolution was estimated from the slope of the off-frequency TMC. No significant relationship was found between estimated cochlear compression and MR for either speech or pure tones. NMNH listeners had significantly steeper off-frequency temporal masking recovery slopes than did HI listeners, and a small but significant correlation was observed between poorer temporal resolution and reduced MR for speech. The results suggest either that the effects of hearing impairment on MR are not determined primarily by changes in peripheral compression, or that the TMC does not provide a sufficiently reliable measure of cochlear compression. PMID:24116426

  17. Intelligent condition monitoring method for bearing faults from highly compressed measurements using sparse over-complete features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, H. O. A.; Wong, M. L. D.; Nandi, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    Condition classification of rolling element bearings in rotating machines is important to prevent the breakdown of industrial machinery. A considerable amount of literature has been published on bearing faults classification. These studies aim to determine automatically the current status of a roller element bearing. Of these studies, methods based on compressed sensing (CS) have received some attention recently due to their ability to allow one to sample below the Nyquist sampling rate. This technology has many possible uses in machine condition monitoring and has been investigated as a possible approach for fault detection and classification in the compressed domain, i.e., without reconstructing the original signal. However, previous CS based methods have been found to be too weak for highly compressed data. The present paper explores computationally, for the first time, the effects of sparse autoencoder based over-complete sparse representations on the classification performance of highly compressed measurements of bearing vibration signals. For this study, the CS method was used to produce highly compressed measurements of the original bearing dataset. Then, an effective deep neural network (DNN) with unsupervised feature learning algorithm based on sparse autoencoder is used for learning over-complete sparse representations of these compressed datasets. Finally, the fault classification is achieved using two stages, namely, pre-training classification based on stacked autoencoder and softmax regression layer form the deep net stage (the first stage), and re-training classification based on backpropagation (BP) algorithm forms the fine-tuning stage (the second stage). The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to achieve high levels of accuracy even with extremely compressed measurements compared with the existing techniques.

  18. New method of measuring the K-shell fluorescence yield of As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K; Sahota, H S

    1984-02-01

    A new method for the determination of the K-shell fluorescence yield from the analysis of sum peaks observed with a high-resolution intrinsic Ge semiconductor detector in the decay of /sup 75/Se is described. The value found is ..omega..sub(K)(As)=0.574(18), which is in agreement with the fitted value of previous authors.

  19. Characterization of particle deformation during compression measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H X; Heinämäki, J; Yliruusi, J

    1999-09-20

    Direct compression of riboflavin sodium phosphate tablets was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The technique is non-invasive and generates three-dimensional (3D) images. Tablets of 1% riboflavin sodium phosphate with two grades of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were individually compressed at compression forces of 1.0 and 26.8 kN. The behaviour and deformation of drug particles on the upper and lower surfaces of the tablets were studied under compression forces. Even at the lower compression force, distinct recrystallized areas in the riboflavin sodium phosphate particles were observed in both Avicel PH-101 and Avicel PH-102 tablets. At the higher compression force, the recrystallization of riboflavin sodium phosphate was more extensive on the upper surface of the Avicel PH-102 tablet than the Avicel PH-101 tablet. The plastic deformation properties of both MCC grades reduced the fragmentation of riboflavin sodium phosphate particles. When compressed with MCC, riboflavin sodium phosphate behaved as a plastic material. The riboflavin sodium phosphate particles were more tightly bound on the upper surface of the tablet than on the lower surface, and this could also be clearly distinguished by CLSM. Drug deformation could not be visualized by other techniques. Confocal laser scanning microscopy provides valuable information on the internal mechanisms of direct compression of tablets.

  20. The measurement of electrostatic potentials in core/shell GaN nanowires using off-axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Ciechonski, R

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell GaN nanowires are expected to be building blocks of future light emitting devices. Here we apply off-axis electron holography to map the electrostatic potential distributions in such nanowires. To access the cross-section of selected individual nanowires, focused ion beam (FIB) milling...... is used. Furthermore, to assess the influence of FIB damage, the dopant potential measured from an intact NW is compared with a FIB prepared one. It is shown that in addition to the built-in potential between the p-type shell and unintentionally n-type under-layer there is a potential barrier between...... the core and under-layer which are both unintentionally n-type doped....

  1. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  2. Axial strain in GaAs/InAs core-shell nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Rieger, Torsten; Gruetzmacher, Detlev; Ion Lepsa, Mihail [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum, 52425 Juelich (Germany); JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Bussone, Genziana [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany); ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2013-01-28

    We study the axial strain relaxation in GaAs/InAs core-shell nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Besides a gradual strain relaxation of the shell material, we find a significant strain in the GaAs core, increasing with shell thickness. This strain is explained by a saturation of the dislocation density at the core-shell interface. Independent measurements of core and shell lattice parameters by x-ray diffraction reveal a relaxation of 93% in a 35 nm thick InAs shell surrounding cores of 80 nm diameter. The compressive strain of -0.5% compared to bulk InAs is accompanied by a tensile strain up to 0.9% in the GaAs core.

  3. Thin Foil Acceleration Method for Measuring the Unloading Isentropes of Shock-Compressed Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.R.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Fortov, V.E.; Kanel, G.I.; Khishchenko, K.V.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Mehlhorn, T.; Razorenov, S.V.; Utkin, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    This work has been performed as part of the search for possible ways to utilize the capabilities of laser and particle beams techniques in shock wave and equation of state physics. The peculiarity of these techniques is that we have to deal with micron-thick targets and not well reproducible incident shock wave parameters, so all measurements should be of a high resolution and be done in one shot. Besides the Hugoniots, the experimental basis for creating the equations of state includes isentropes corresponding to unloading of shock-compressed matter. Experimental isentrope data are most important in the region of vaporization. With guns or explosive facilities, the unloading isentrope is recovered from a series of experiments where the shock wave parameters in plates of standard low-impedance materials placed behind the sample are measured [1,2]. The specific internal energy and specific volume are calculated from the measured p(u) release curve which corresponds to the Riemann integral. This way is not quite suitable for experiments with beam techniques where the incident shock waves are not well reproducible. The thick foil method [3] provides a few experimental points on the isentrope in one shot. When a higher shock impedance foil is placed on the surface of the material studied, the release phase occurs by steps, whose durations correspond to that for the shock wave to go back and forth in the foil. The velocity during the different steps, connected with the knowledge of the Hugoniot of the foil, allows us to determine a few points on the isentropic unloading curve. However, the method becomes insensitive when the low pressure range of vaporization is reached in the course of the unloading. The isentrope in this region can be measured by recording the smooth acceleration of a thin witness plate foil. With the mass of the foil known, measurements of the foil acceleration will give us the vapor pressure

  4. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Iverson, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  5. Correlated electron capture and inner-shell excitation measurements in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanis, J.A.; Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    In an ion-atom collision projectile excitation and charge transfer (electron capture) may occur together in a single encounter. If the excitation and capture are correlated, then the process is called resonant transfer and excitation (RTE); if they are uncorrelated, then the process is termed nonresonant transfer and excitation (NTE). Experimental work to date has shown the existence of RTE and provided strong evidence for NTE. Results presented here provide information on the relative magnitudes of RTE and NTE, the charge state dependence of RTE, the effect of the target momentum distribution on RTE, the magnitude of L-shell RTE compared to K-shell RTE, and the target Z dependences of RTE and NTE. 15 refs., 5 figs

  6. Inner-shell/subshell photoionization cross section measurements using a gamma excited variable energy X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, B S; Allawadhi, K L; Arora, S K [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1982-02-15

    The method developed for the determination of K/L shell photoionization cross sections in various elements, 39 <= Z <= 92, in the characteristic X-ray energy region using a gamma excited variable energy X-ray source has been used for the measurement of Lsub(III) subshell photoionization cross section in Pb, Th and U. The measurements are made at the K X-ray energies of Rb, Nb and Mo, since these are able to excite selectively the Lsub(III) subshells of Pb, Th and U, respectively. The results, when compared with theoretical calculations of Scofield, are found to agree within the uncertainties of determination.

  7. Precision mass measurements with ISOLTRAP to study the evolution of the $\\textit{N}$=82 shell gap far from stability

    CERN Multimedia

    Shell effects and their evolution across the nuclear chart impose important constraints on the modelling of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The strength of shell closures in neutron-rich nuclei also influences the path of the $\\textit{r}$-process of nucleo-synthesis and the predicted elemental abundances. We propose to measure the masses of the isotopes $^{132,133}$In, $^{129-132}$Cd, $^{125-129}$Ag with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The recently developed multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separator of ISOLTRAP will allow, as a beam purifier, to handle higher contamination ratios than before and, for the more exotic cases, to directly determine the mass of the nuclides of interest. The masses of the proposed isotopes will allow the investigation of a possible weakening of the $\\textit{N}$ = 82 shell gap for $\\textit{Z}$ < 50 and corresponding $\\textit{r}$-process waiting point. This in turn enables an exploration of the impact on the $\\textit{A}$ = 130 $\\textit{r}$-process abundances.

  8. Measurement of spinal canal narrowing, interpedicular widening, and vertebral compression in spinal burst fractures: plain radiographs versus multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensch, Frank V.; Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K.; Kiuru, Martti J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the reliability of measurements of spinal canal narrowing, vertebral body compression, and interpedicular widening in burst fractures in radiography compared with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Patients who had confirmed acute vertebral burst fractures over an interval of 34 months underwent both MDCT and radiography. Measurements of spinal canal narrowing, vertebral body compression, and interpedicular widening from MDCT and radiography were compared. The 108 patients (30 female, 78 male, aged 16-79 years, mean 39 years) had 121 burst fractures. Eleven patients had multiple fractures, of which seven were not contiguous. Measurements showed a strong positive correlation between radiography and MDCT (Spearman's rank sum test: spinal canal narrowing k = 0.50-0.82, vertebral compression k = 0.55-0.72, and interpedicular widening k = 0.81-0.91, all P 0.25) and for interpedicular widening in the thoracic spine (k = 0.35, P = 0.115). The average difference in measurements between the modalities was 3 mm or fewer. Radiography demonstrates interpedicular widening, spinal canal narrowing and vertebral compression with acceptable precision, with the exception of those of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  9. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm

  10. Measurements of the toroidal plasma rotation velocity in TFTR major-radius compression experiments with auxiliary neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Wong, K.L.; Scott, S.; Hsuan, H.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Tait, G.

    1990-01-01

    The time history of the central toroidal plasma rotation velocity in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2587 (1985)] with auxiliary heating by neutral deuterium beam injection and major-radius compression has been measured from the Doppler shift of the emitted Ti XXI Kα line radiation. The experiments were conducted for neutral beam powers in the range 2.1--3.8 MW and line-averaged densities in the range 1.8--3.0x10 19 m -2 . The observed rotation velocity increase during compression is consistent with theoretical estimates

  11. Buckling strength of spherical shells under combined loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, H.; Kokubo, K.; Takayanagi, M.; Hayasaka, Y.; Kume, T.; Nagata, T.

    1995-01-01

    Many studies on buckling of cylindrical shells have been conducted, and many buckling evaluation equations have been proposed for actual plant designs; however, buckling of spherical shells under combined horizontal and vertical loads cannot be evaluated due to insufficient data. There is a particular lack of buckling data for spherical shells under lateral loads. To establish a method for estimating the buckling strength of spherical shells, we investigate the interactions between horizontal and vertical (compressive tensile) loads by conducting buckling tests. Applying several combinations of these loads in tests and using computer linear analysis, we obtain interaction curves. This study reports on the buckling tests conducted using spherical shell 1120 mm in dia., 0.7 mm thick and 696 mm high, which are shaped individually by press-forming and finally joined together by four meridional welds, using a specially made jig. Initial imperfections before testing and local deformations after each loading increment during testing are measured with special measuring equipment, and the interaction curve of horizontal and vertical loads and effect of imperfection on the buckling strength of spherical shells are obtained. Nonlinear FEM programs are developed using an 8-node isoparametric shell element and a four-node quadrilateral element of C 0 type with reduced integration based upon a Mindlin-Reissner theory which includes transverse shear. Actual initial imperfections are generally in irregular patterns. Thus, there may be several definitions of the equivalent magnitudes of initial imperfections related to buckling loads. Equivalent magnitudes have no practical meaning unless they can be obtained easily not only for small structures such as test shells but also for large actual structures. In the present study, we define the equivalent magnitude of initial imperfections as the maximum local ruggedness measured radially from a circular temperature having a radius equal

  12. Solid phase stability of molybdenum under compression: Sound velocity measurements and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiulu [Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, 621900 Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology, 621010 Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Liu, Zhongli [Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, 621900 Mianyang, Sichuan (China); College of Physics and Electric Information, Luoyang Normal University, 471022 Luoyang, Henan (China); Jin, Ke; Xi, Feng; Yu, Yuying; Tan, Ye; Dai, Chengda; Cai, Lingcang [Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, 621900 Mianyang, Sichuan (China)

    2015-02-07

    The high-pressure solid phase stability of molybdenum (Mo) has been the center of a long-standing controversy on its high-pressure melting. In this work, experimental and theoretical researches have been conducted to check its solid phase stability under compression. First, we performed sound velocity measurements from 38 to 160 GPa using the two-stage light gas gun and explosive loading in backward- and forward-impact geometries, along with the high-precision velocity interferometry. From the sound velocities, we found no solid-solid phase transition in Mo before shock melting, which does not support the previous solid-solid phase transition conclusion inferred from the sharp drops of the longitudinal sound velocity [Hixson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 637 (1989)]. Then, we searched its structures globally using the multi-algorithm collaborative crystal structure prediction technique combined with the density functional theory. By comparing the enthalpies of body centered cubic structure with those of the metastable structures, we found that bcc is the most stable structure in the range of 0–300 GPa. The present theoretical results together with previous ones greatly support our experimental conclusions.

  13. Real-time heart rate measurement for multi-people using compressive tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Ming; Kong, Lingqin; Dong, Liquan; Ma, Feilong; Pang, Zongguang; Cai, Zhi; Zhang, Yachu; Hua, Peng; Yuan, Ruifeng

    2017-09-01

    The rise of aging population has created a demand for inexpensive, unobtrusive, automated health care solutions. Image PhotoPlethysmoGraphy(IPPG) aids in the development of these solutions by allowing for the extraction of physiological signals from video data. However, the main deficiencies of the recent IPPG methods are non-automated, non-real-time and susceptible to motion artifacts(MA). In this paper, a real-time heart rate(HR) detection method for multiple subjects simultaneously was proposed and realized using the open computer vision(openCV) library, which consists of getting multiple subjects' facial video automatically through a Webcam, detecting the region of interest (ROI) in the video, reducing the false detection rate by our improved Adaboost algorithm, reducing the MA by our improved compress tracking(CT) algorithm, wavelet noise-suppression algorithm for denoising and multi-threads for higher detection speed. For comparison, HR was measured simultaneously using a medical pulse oximetry device for every subject during all sessions. Experimental results on a data set of 30 subjects show that the max average absolute error of heart rate estimation is less than 8 beats per minute (BPM), and the processing speed of every frame has almost reached real-time: the experiments with video recordings of ten subjects under the condition of the pixel resolution of 600× 800 pixels show that the average HR detection time of 10 subjects was about 17 frames per second (fps).

  14. Miniature proportional counter for compression measurements of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, S.M.; Dellis, J.H.; Bennett, C.K.; Campbell, E.M.

    1981-10-01

    Direct drive laser fusion targets consisting of DT gas encapsulated in glass microshells produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that can interact with silicon-28 nuclei in the glass to produce a 2.2 minute aluminum-28 activity. From the number of 28 Al nuclei created and the neutron yield, the compressed glass areal density can be found. To determine the number of activated atoms created, we collect approximately one-half of the target debris on a thin metal foil which is transferred to our beta-gamma coincidence detector. This detector consists of a 25 cm x 25 cm NaI(Tl) crystal having a 5 cm x 15 cm well. We have recently built a miniature proportional counter that fits into this well and is used to detect beta particles. It is constructed of .025 cm thick copper and has nine separate chambers through which methane flows. The coincidence background is 0.14 cpm and the measured beta efficiency is 45%. We are now building a .0125 cm thick counter made of aluminum having a predicted efficiency of > 90%

  15. Mechanical Property Measurements and Fracture Propagation Analysis of Longmaxi Shale by Micro-CT Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyue Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and fracture propagation of Longmaxi shale loading under uniaxial compression were measured using eight cylindrical shale specimens (4 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height, with the bedding plane oriented at 0° and 90° to the axial loading direction, respectively, by micro computed tomography (micro-CT. Based on the reconstructed three-dimensional (3-D CT images of cracks, different stages of the crack growth process in the 0° and 90° orientation specimen were revealed. The initial crack generally occurred at relatively smaller loading force in the 0° bedding direction specimen, mainly in the form of tensile splitting along weak bedding planes. Shear sliding fractures were dominant in the specimens oriented at 90°, with a small number of parallel cracks occurring on the bedding plane. The average thickness and volume of cracks in the 90° specimen is higher than those for the specimen oriented at 0°. The geometrical characterization of fractures segmented from CT scan binary images shows that a specific surface area correlates with tortuosity at the different load stages of each specimen. The 3-D box-counting dimension (BCD calculations can accurately reflect crack evolution law in the shale. The results indicate that the cracks have a more complex pattern and rough surface at an orientation of 90°, due to crossed secondary cracks and shear failure.

  16. Measurements of the equations of state and spectrum of nonideal xenon plasma under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chen, Q. F.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental equations of state on generation of nonideal xenon plasma by intense shock wave compression was presented in the ranges of pressure of 2-16 GPa and temperature of 31-50 kK, and the xenon plasma with the nonideal coupling parameter Γ range from 0.6-2.1 was generated. The shock wave was produced using the flyer plate impact and accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light gas gun. Gaseous specimens were shocked from two initial pressures of 0.80 and 4.72 MPa at room temperature. Time-resolved spectral radiation histories were recorded by using a multiwavelength channel pyrometer. The transient spectra with the wavelength range of 460-700 nm were recorded by using a spectrometer to evaluate the shock temperature. Shock velocity was measured and particle velocity was determined by the impedance matching methods. The equations of state of xenon plasma and ionization degree have been discussed in terms of the self-consistent fluid variational theory.

  17. Measurements of the equations of state and spectrum of nonideal xenon plasma under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chen, Q. F.

    2010-08-01

    Experimental equations of state on generation of nonideal xenon plasma by intense shock wave compression was presented in the ranges of pressure of 2-16 GPa and temperature of 31-50 kK, and the xenon plasma with the nonideal coupling parameter Γ range from 0.6-2.1 was generated. The shock wave was produced using the flyer plate impact and accelerated up to ˜6km/s with a two-stage light gas gun. Gaseous specimens were shocked from two initial pressures of 0.80 and 4.72 MPa at room temperature. Time-resolved spectral radiation histories were recorded by using a multiwavelength channel pyrometer. The transient spectra with the wavelength range of 460-700 nm were recorded by using a spectrometer to evaluate the shock temperature. Shock velocity was measured and particle velocity was determined by the impedance matching methods. The equations of state of xenon plasma and ionization degree have been discussed in terms of the self-consistent fluid variational theory.

  18. Modeling complicated rheological behaviors in encapsulating shells of lipid-coated microbubbles accounting for nonlinear changes of both shell viscosity and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Matula, Thomas J; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2013-02-21

    It has been accepted that the dynamic responses of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles will be significantly affected by the encapsulating shell properties (e.g., shell elasticity and viscosity). In this work, a new model is proposed to describe the complicated rheological behaviors in an encapsulating shell of UCA microbubbles by applying the nonlinear 'Cross law' to the shell viscous term in the Marmottant model. The proposed new model was verified by fitting the dynamic responses of UCAs measured with either a high-speed optical imaging system or a light scattering system. The comparison results between the measured radius-time curves and the numerical simulations demonstrate that the 'compression-only' behavior of UCAs can be successfully simulated with the new model. Then, the shell elastic and viscous coefficients of SonoVue microbubbles were evaluated based on the new model simulations, and compared to the results obtained from some existing UCA models. The results confirm the capability of the current model for reducing the dependence of bubble shell parameters on the initial bubble radius, which indicates that the current model might be more comprehensive to describe the complex rheological nature (e.g., 'shear-thinning' and 'strain-softening') in encapsulating shells of UCA microbubbles by taking into account the nonlinear changes of both shell elasticity and shell viscosity.

  19. Modeling complicated rheological behaviors in encapsulating shells of lipid-coated microbubbles accounting for nonlinear changes of both shell viscosity and elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qian; Tu Juan; Guo Xiasheng; Zhang Dong; Matula, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    It has been accepted that the dynamic responses of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles will be significantly affected by the encapsulating shell properties (e.g., shell elasticity and viscosity). In this work, a new model is proposed to describe the complicated rheological behaviors in an encapsulating shell of UCA microbubbles by applying the nonlinear ‘Cross law’ to the shell viscous term in the Marmottant model. The proposed new model was verified by fitting the dynamic responses of UCAs measured with either a high-speed optical imaging system or a light scattering system. The comparison results between the measured radius–time curves and the numerical simulations demonstrate that the ‘compression-only’ behavior of UCAs can be successfully simulated with the new model. Then, the shell elastic and viscous coefficients of SonoVue microbubbles were evaluated based on the new model simulations, and compared to the results obtained from some existing UCA models. The results confirm the capability of the current model for reducing the dependence of bubble shell parameters on the initial bubble radius, which indicates that the current model might be more comprehensive to describe the complex rheological nature (e.g., ‘shear-thinning’ and ‘strain-softening’) in encapsulating shells of UCA microbubbles by taking into account the nonlinear changes of both shell elasticity and shell viscosity. (paper)

  20. Measurement and simulation of anisotropic magnetoresistance in single GaAs/MnAs core/shell nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Wang, J.; Cooley, B. J.; Rench, D. W.; Samarth, N.; Paul, A.; Dellas, N. S.; Mohney, S. E.; Engel-Herbert, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report four probe measurements of the low field magnetoresistance (MR) in single core/shell GaAs/MnAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy, demonstrating clear signatures of anisotropic magnetoresistance that track the field-dependent magnetization. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations reveals that the principal characteristics of the magnetoresistance data can be unambiguously attributed to the nanowire segments with a zinc blende GaAs core. The direct correlation between magnetoresistance, magnetization, and crystal structure provides a powerful means of characterizing individual hybrid ferromagnet/semiconductor nanostructures.

  1. Measurement of differential incoherent scattering cross-sections of 145 keV photons from K-shell electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, V B; Ghumman, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1980-06-01

    Differential cross-sections for incoherent scattering of 145 keV photons from K-shell electrons of tin, silver and molybdenum have been measured at 110deg to investigate the effect of electron binding on differential cross-sections in the low energy region. The incoherent scattered photons are selected in coincidence with X-rays which follow the vacancies caused by the ejection of the electrons. NaI(Tl) scintillators are used for the detection of scattered photons and emitted X-rays. The experimental results are compared with the available theoretical data.

  2. A Feasibility Study for Measuring Accurate Chest Compression Depth and Rate on Soft Surfaces Using Two Accelerometers and Spectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Ruiz de Gauna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR feedback devices are being increasingly used. However, current accelerometer-based devices overestimate chest displacement when CPR is performed on soft surfaces, which may lead to insufficient compression depth. Aim. To assess the performance of a new algorithm for measuring compression depth and rate based on two accelerometers in a simulated resuscitation scenario. Materials and Methods. Compressions were provided to a manikin on two mattresses, foam and sprung, with and without a backboard. One accelerometer was placed on the chest and the second at the manikin’s back. Chest displacement and mattress displacement were calculated from the spectral analysis of the corresponding acceleration every 2 seconds and subtracted to compute the actual sternal-spinal displacement. Compression rate was obtained from the chest acceleration. Results. Median unsigned error in depth was 2.1 mm (4.4%. Error was 2.4 mm in the foam and 1.7 mm in the sprung mattress (p<0.001. Error was 3.1/2.0 mm and 1.8/1.6 mm with/without backboard for foam and sprung, respectively (p<0.001. Median error in rate was 0.9 cpm (1.0%, with no significant differences between test conditions. Conclusion. The system provided accurate feedback on chest compression depth and rate on soft surfaces. Our solution compensated mattress displacement, avoiding overestimation of compression depth when CPR is performed on soft surfaces.

  3. On-shell constrained M 2 variables with applications to mass measurements and topology disambiguation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won Sang; Gainer, James S.; Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Moortgat, Filip; Pape, Luc; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-08-01

    We consider a class of on-shell constrained mass variables that are 3+1 dimensional generalizations of the Cambridge M T2 variable and that automatically incorporate various assumptions about the underlying event topology. The presence of additional on-shell constraints causes their kinematic distributions to exhibit sharper endpoints than the usual M T2 distribution. We study the mathematical properties of these new variables, e.g., the uniqueness of the solution selected by the minimization over the invisible particle 4-momenta. We then use this solution to reconstruct the masses of various particles along the decay chain. We propose several tests for validating the assumed event topology in missing energy events from new physics. The tests are able to determine: 1) whether the decays in the event are two-body or three-body, 2) if the decay is two-body, whether the intermediate resonances in the two decay chains are the same, and 3) the exact sequence in which the visible particles are emitted from each decay chain.

  4. Compressive residual stresses as a preventive measure against stress corrosion cracking on turbine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Ewald, J.; Fischer, K.; Gruendler, O.; Potthast, E.; Stuecker, E.; Winzen, G.

    1987-01-01

    Disk type low pressure turbine rotors have been designed for a large variety of power plant applications. Developing disk type rotors required a concerted effort to design a shaft/disk shrink fit with a minimum of tensile stress concentrations in order to aim for the lowest possible susceptibility to corrosive attack, i.e. stress corrosion cracking. As a result of stresses, the regions of greatest concern are the shrink fit boundaries and the keyways of turbine disks. These stresses are caused by service loading, i.e. centrifugal and shrinkage stresses and by manufacturing procedure, i.e. residual stresses. The compressive residual stresses partly compensate the tensile service stresses so that an increase of compressive residual stresses decreases the whole stress state of the component. Special manufacturing procedures, e.g. accelerated cooling after tempering can induce compressive residual stresses up to about 400 MPa in the hub bore region of turbine disk

  5. Is breast compression associated with breast cancer detection and other early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate early performance measures in a population-based breast cancer screening program stratified by compression force and pressure at the time of mammographic screening examination. Early performance measures included recall rate, rates of screen-detected and interval breast cancers, positive predictive value of recall (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, and histopathologic characteristics of screen-detected and interval breast cancers. Information on 261,641 mammographic examinations from 93,444 subsequently screened women was used for analyses. The study period was 2007-2015. Compression force and pressure were categorized using tertiles as low, medium, or high. χ 2 test, t tests, and test for trend were used to examine differences between early performance measures across categories of compression force and pressure. We applied generalized estimating equations to identify the odds ratios (OR) of screen-detected or interval breast cancer associated with compression force and pressure, adjusting for fibroglandular and/or breast volume and age. The recall rate decreased, while PPV and specificity increased with increasing compression force (p for trend screen-detected cancer, PPV, sensitivity, and specificity decreased with increasing compression pressure (p for trend breast cancer compared with low compression pressure (1.89; 95% CI 1.43-2.48). High compression force and low compression pressure were associated with more favorable early performance measures in the screening program.

  6. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. L X-ray intensity ratio measurements using selective L sub-shell photo-ionisation on synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Himani; Tiwari, M. K.; Mittal, Raj

    2017-10-01

    Lα/Lℓ, Lβ /Lℓ and Lγ/Lℓ intensity ratios have been measured for elements in the range 66≤Z≤83 at tuned photon energies on synchrotron beam line-16 at Indus-2, India. For each element, three incident energies Ei were E3; EL3 EL1 where ELi are Li absorption edge energies of the element. Emitted L X-ray spectrum of an element constitutes a number of X-ray lines generally grouped into four main groups due to limited resolution of available detectors as Lℓ(L3-M1), Lα(L3-M4,5), Lβ(L1-M2,3,4,5,N4; L2-M3,4; L3-N1,4,5,O1,4,5) and Lγ(L2-N1,4,O1,4; L1-N2,3,5,O3,2). Lα and Lℓ both comprise only the lines feeding L3 level and Lβ group comprises X-ray lines feeding all the three sub-shells where as Lγ involves contribution from L1 and L2 feedings. Only E3 excitation gives the ratios free from intra sub-shell Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions while excitations E2 and E1 give CK affected Lβ/Lℓ and Lγ/Lℓ X-ray intensity ratios and Lα/Lℓ still remains free from CKs. The pattern of intensity ratios at three excitation energies of elements was well interpreted in terms of on/off of CK transitions (Bambynek et al., 1972; Campbell, 2003) and outer shell electron filling configuration (Scofield, 1973).

  8. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for the determination of density and compressibility of individual particles and cells undergoing microchannel acoustophoresis in an arbitrary 2D acoustic field. Our method is a critical advancement within acoustophoretic separation of biological cells, as the ability to...

  9. Intra-pulse Cavity Enhanced Measurements of Carbon Monoxide in a Rapid Compression Machine

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir

    2018-01-01

    A laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide concentration was developed for combustion studies in a rapid compression machine using a pulsed quantum cascade laser near 4.89 μm. Cavity enhancement reduced minimum detection limit down to 2.4 ppm

  10. Dissipative measure-valued solutions to the compressible Navier-Stokes system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Gwiazda, P.; Swierczewska-Gwiazda, A.; Wiedemann, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2016), č. článku 141. ISSN 0944-2669 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : singular limit * compressible fluid * viscous fluid Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.532, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00526-016-1089-1

  11. A direct measurement of g-factors in II-VI and III-V core-shell nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradkin, L.; Langof, L.; Lifshitz, E.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A.; Eychmüller, A.; Weller, H.; Micic, O. I.; Nozik, A. J.

    2005-02-01

    This study describes a direct measurement of spectroscopic g-factors of photo-generated carriers in InP/ZnS and HgTe/Hg xCd 1-xTe(S) core-shell nanocrystals. The g-factor of trapped electrons and their spin-lattice versus radiative relaxation ratio ( T1/ τ) were measured by the use of continuous-wave and time-resolved optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectroscopy. The g-factors of excitons and donor-hole pairs were derived by the use of field-induced circular-polarized photoluminescence (CP-PL) spectroscopy. The combined information enabled to determine the g-factors of the individual band-edge electrons and holes. The results suggested an increase of the g-factor of the exciton and conduction electron with a decrease of the nanocrystal size.

  12. Real-time direct measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression: relationship between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yuichiro; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Hino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2007-08-15

    An in vivo study to measure rat spinal cord blood flow in real-time at the site of compression using a newly developed device. To evaluate the change in thoracic spinal cord blood flow by compression force and to clarify the association between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency after a spinal cord compression injury. Until now, no real-time measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression has been conducted. In addition, it has not been clearly determined whether blood flow recovery is related to motor function after a spinal cord injury. Our blood flow measurement system was a combination of a noncontact type laser Doppler system and a spinal cord compression device. The rat thoracic spinal cord was exposed at the 11th vertebra and spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression was continuously measured before, during, and after the compression. The functioning of the animal's hind-limbs was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scoring scale and the frequency of voluntary standing. Histologic changes such as permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier, microglia proliferation, and apoptotic cell death were examined in compressed spinal cord tissue. The spinal blood flow decreased on each increase in the compression force. After applying a 5-g weight, the blood flow decreased to compression), while no significant difference was observed between the 20-minute ischemia group and the sham group. In the 20-minute ischemia group, the rats whose spinal cord blood flow recovery was incomplete showed significant motor function loss compared with rats that completely recovered blood flow. Extensive breakdown of blood-spinal cord barrier integrity and the following microglia proliferation and apoptotic cell death were detected in the 40-minute complete ischemia group. Duration of ischemia/compression and blood flow recovery of the spinal cord are important factors in the recovery of motor function after a spinal cord injury.

  13. Field Measurement of Dynamic Compressive Stress Response of Pavement-Subgrade Induced by Moving Heavy-Duty Trucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingshi An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the dynamic compressive stress response of pavement-subgrade induced by moving heavy-duty trucks. In order to study the distribution characteristic of dynamic pressure of pavement-subgrade in more detail, truck loadings, truck speeds, and dynamic pressure distributions at different depths were monitored under twenty-five working conditions on the section of Qiqihar-Nenjiang Highway in Heilongjiang Province, China. The effects of truck loading, truck speed, and depth on dynamic compressive stress response can be concluded as follows: (1 increasing truck loading will increase the dynamic pressure amplitude of subgrade-pavement and dominant frequencies are close to the characteristic frequencies caused by heavy-duty trucks at the speed of 70 km/h; (2 as truck speed increases, the dynamic pressure amplitudes of measuring points have an increasing tendency; the dynamic pressure spectrums are also significantly influenced by truck speed: the higher the truck speed, the wider the spectrum and the higher the dominant frequencies; (3 as depth increases, the dynamic pressure amplitudes of measuring points decrease rapidly. The influence of the front axle decreases gradually until disappearing and the compressive stress superposition phenomenon caused by rear double axles can be found with increasing depth.

  14. Investigation on molecular interaction of amino acids in aqueous disodium hydrogen phosphate solutions with reference to volumetric and compressibility measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Harsh; Singla, Meenu; Jindal, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Densities and speeds of sound of amino acids in aqueous disodium hydrogen phosphate. • Partial molar volumes and compressibility of transfer. • Positive values of transfer volume indicates interactions between ions of amino acids and TSC. • Ion–hydrophilic and hydrophilic–hydrophilic interactions are present. • Pair-wise interactions are dominant in the mixtures. -- Abstract: The interactions of amino acids glycine (Gly), L-alanine (Ala), and L-valine (Val) with disodium hydrogen phosphate (DSHP) as a function of temperature have been investigated by combination of volumetric and acoustic measurements. Densities (ρ) and speeds of sound (u) of amino acids in aqueous solutions of disodium hydrogen phosphate have been measured at T = (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15) K and atmospheric pressure. The apparent molar volume (V ϕ ), the partial molar volume (V ϕ 0 ) and standard partial molar volumes of transfer (ΔV ϕ 0 ) for amino acids from water to aqueous disodium hydrogen phosphate solutions have been calculated from density data. Partial molar adiabatic compressibility (κ ϕ,s ) and partial molar adiabatic compressibility of transfer (Δκ ϕ,S 0 ) have been calculated from speed of sound data. The pair (V AB , κ AB ) and triplet (V ABB , κ ABB ) interaction coefficient have been calculated from both the properties. The results have been explained based on competing patterns of interactions of co-solvents and the solute

  15. Measurement and calculation of gas compressibility factor for condensate gas and natural gas under pressure up to 116 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ke-Le; Liu, Huang; Sun, Chang-Yu; Ma, Qing-Lan; Chen, Guang-Jin; Shen, De-Ji; Xiao, Xiang-Jiao; Wang, Hai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples were measured with pressure up to 116 MPa. • Dew point pressures at four temperatures for condensate gas sample are obtained. • Correlations and thermodynamic model for describing gas compressibility factor under high pressure were compared. • The thermodynamic model recommended is most suitable for fluids produced from reservoirs with a wide pressure range. -- Abstract: The volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples collected from one condensate gas well and one natural gas well were measured under four groups of temperatures, respectively, with pressure up to 116 MPa. For the two samples examined, the experimental results show that the gas compressibility factor increases with the increase of pressure. But the influence of the temperature is related to the range of the experimental pressure. It approximately decreases with the increase of temperature when the pressure is larger than (45 to 50) MPa, while there is the opposite trend when the pressure is lower than (45 to 50) MPa. The dew point pressure was also determined for the condensate gas sample, which decreases with the increase of temperature. The capabilities of four empirical correlations and a thermodynamic model based on equation of state for describing gas compressibility factor of reservoir fluids under high pressure were investigated. The comparison results show that the thermodynamic model recommended is the most suitable for fluids whatever produced from high-pressure reservoirs or conventional mild-pressure reservoirs

  16. Rapid Anomaly Detection and Tracking via Compressive Time-Spectra Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-12

    characteristic and precision recall curves. New 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION...detection on data in the compressed domain. Detection performance was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic and precision recall curves. New...following categories: (b) Papers published in non-peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) (c) Presentations Received Paper TOTAL : Received Paper TOTAL

  17. Intra-pulse Cavity Enhanced Measurements of Carbon Monoxide in a Rapid Compression Machine

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2018-05-07

    A laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide concentration was developed for combustion studies in a rapid compression machine using a pulsed quantum cascade laser near 4.89 μm. Cavity enhancement reduced minimum detection limit down to 2.4 ppm at combustion relevant conditions. Off-axis alignment and rapid intra-pulse down-chirp resulted in effective suppression of cavity noise.

  18. Measurements of the toroidal plasma rotation velocity in TFTR major-radius compression experiments with auxiliary neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Scott, S.; Wong, K.L.

    1986-07-01

    The time history of the central toroidal plasma rotation velocity in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiments with auxiliary heating by neutral deuterium beam injection and major-radius compression has been measured from the Doppler shift of the emitted TiXXI-Kα line radiation. The experiments were conducted for neutral beam powers in the range from 2.1 to 3.8 MW and line-averaged densities in the range from 1.8 to 3.0 x 10 19 m -2 . The observed rotation velocity increase during compression is in agreement with results from modeling calculations which assume classical slowing-down of the injected fast deuterium ions and momentum damping at the rate established in the precompression plasma

  19. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in the elements between Tm(Z = 69) and Os(Z = 76) by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, N.; Tirasoglu, E.; Apaydin, G.

    2008-01-01

    The K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios have been measured in the elements between Tm (Z = 69) and Os(Z = 76) without having any mass attenuation coefficient at the upper and lower energy branch of the K absorption edge. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements have been determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the total atomic absorption cross-sections, the K α X-ray production cross-sections, the intensity ratio of the K β and K α X-rays and the K shell fluorescence yields. We have performed the measurements for the calculations of these values in attenuation and direct excitation experimental geometry. The K X-ray photons are excited in the target using 123.6 keV gamma-rays from a strong 57 Co source, and detected with an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution 0.15 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values have been compared with theoretical and others' experimental values. The results have been plotted versus atomic number

  20. Measurement of K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in some lanthanide elements using EDXRF technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polat, Recep; İçelli, Orhan; Yalçın, Zeynel; Pesen, Erhan; Orak, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass attenuation coefficients, jump factor and jump ratio for lanthanide elements are obtained. ► The method used in this experiment is combined both transmission and scattering geometry. ► Secondary gamma rays energy is 59.5 keV. ► Experimental values of jump factor and jump ratio for K shell are new. ► The experimental values are in good agreement with those calculated theoretically. - Abstract: 59.5 keV gamma rays scattered by an aluminum foil have been used as a radiation source to measure the absorption jump factor and jump ratios for absorbers Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Tb. The theoretical and experimental values are compared with the corresponding ones in the literature

  1. Design and analysis of a toroidal tester for the measurement of core losses under axial compressive stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alatawneh, Natheer, E-mail: natheer80@yahoo.com [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, QC H3A 0G4 (Canada); Rahman, Tanvir; Lowther, David A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, QC H3A 0E9 (Canada); Chromik, Richard [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, QC H3A 0G4 (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Develop a toroidal tester for magnetic measurements under compressive axial stress. • The shape of the toroidal ring has been verified using 3D stress analysis. • The developed design has been prototyped, and measurements were carried out. • Physical explanations for the core loss trend due to stress are provided. - Abstract: Electric machine cores are subjected to mechanical stresses due to manufacturing processes. These stresses include radial, circumferential and axial components that may have significant influences on the magnetic properties of the electrical steel and hence, on the output and efficiencies of electrical machines. Previously, most studies of iron losses due to mechanical stress have considered only radial and circumferential components. In this work, an improved toroidal tester has been designed and developed to measure the core losses and the magnetic properties of electrical steel under a compressive axial stress. The shape of the toroidal ring has been verified using 3D stress analysis. Also, 3D electromagnetic simulations show a uniform flux density distribution in the specimen with a variation of 0.03 T and a maximum average induction level of 1.5 T. The developed design has been prototyped, and measurements were carried out using a steel sample of grade 35WW300. Measurements show that applying small mechanical stresses normal to the sample thickness rises the delivered core losses, then the losses decrease continuously as the stress increases. However, the drop in core losses at high stresses does not go lower than the free-stress condition. Physical explanations for the observed trend of core losses as a function of stress are provided based on core loss separation to the hysteresis and eddy current loss components. The experimental results show that the effect of axial compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel at high level of inductions becomes less pronounced.

  2. Measurement of Compression Factor and Error Sensitivity Factor of the Modified READ Facsimile Coding Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Compression factor and error sensitivity together with statistical data have also been tabulated. This TIB is a companion drcument to NCS TIB’s 79-7...vu donner la priorit6 pour lour r~alisation. Chaque application est conf ice A un " chef do projet", responsable successivoment do sa conception. de son...pilote depend des r~sultats obtenus et fait I’objet d’une d~cision- de ’.a Direction Gdnerale. Ndanmoins, le chef do projet doit dOs le d~part consid~rer

  3. Development and design of a bone-equivalent cortical shell phantom to determine accuracy measures on DXA and PQCT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, B.C.C.; Beck, T.J. Johns; Turk, B.; Price, R.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Hip Structural Analysis (HSA), is an algorithm that computes bone-structural geometry from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) derived hip images and may be used in a complementary manner to DXA areal bone mineral density (BMD) for bone strength interpretation. DXA is normally used to facilitate the diagnosis and management of bone metabolic diseases such as osteoporosis. HSA provides a biomechanical interpretation of BMD, using its mass profiles to compute cross-sectional structural geometry. In essence, HSA provides insight into bone structural and biomechanical properties, particularly of long bones, which BMD alone cannot. While conventional (vendor-provided) phantoms calibrate DXA machines for densitometric precision, analogous phantoms for calibrating structural geometry are lacking. This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of a densitometric bone-equivalent cylindrical phantom with 'cortical' shells and 'cancellous' core, and the use of this phantom to do a performance test of structural geometry variables such as cortical thickness, bone width and section modulus derived, from pQCT and DXA scan data. Powdered calcium-sulphate (CSC) was water-mixed in vacuum and cured. This mixture exhibited hydroxyapatite-like DXA photon-attenuation properties with density monotonically related to added water-mass. Its mass and BMD maintained temporal stability (CV%=0.03%, n=4 specimens over 321 d). Using CSC designed for a BMD=1.04g/cm, (for plate-thickness 10mm), a cylindrical phantom with cortical shell thicknesses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0mm, an acrylic-based internal core diameter of 26mm, and an acrylic surrounding 'soft-tissue' were constructed. The phantom was scanned using a DXA scanner (Hologic QDRl000W) and pQCT (Stratec XCT2000, pixel resolution 0.15mm). Selected cortical structural-geometric variables, derived from calculated geometry; pQCT mass-projections, and DXA HSA. In conclusion, dimensions of this novel cortical-shell phantom

  4. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  5. Compressive sensing-based wideband capacitance measurement with a fixed sampling rate lower than the highest exciting frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Lijun; Ren, Ying; Sun, Shijie; Cao, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an under-sampling method for wideband capacitance measurement was proposed by using the compressive sensing strategy. As the excitation signal is sparse in the frequency domain, the compressed sampling method that uses a random demodulator was adopted, which could greatly decrease the sampling rate. Besides, four switches were used to replace the multiplier in the random demodulator. As a result, not only the sampling rate can be much smaller than the signal excitation frequency, but also the circuit’s structure is simpler and its power consumption is lower. A hardware prototype was constructed to validate the method. In the prototype, an excitation voltage with a frequency up to 200 kHz was applied to a capacitance-to-voltage converter. The output signal of the converter was randomly modulated by a pseudo-random sequence through four switches. After a low-pass filter, the signal was sampled by an analog-to-digital converter at a sampling rate of 50 kHz, which was three times lower than the highest exciting frequency. The frequency and amplitude of the signal were then reconstructed to obtain the measured capacitance. Both theoretical analysis and experiments were carried out to show the feasibility of the proposed method and to evaluate the performance of the prototype, including its linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, accuracy and stability within a given measurement range. (paper)

  6. Pulsed TV holography measurement and digital reconstruction of compression acoustic wave fields: application to nondestructive testing of thick metallic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo, C; Doval, A F; Deán-Ben, X L; López-Vázquez, J C; Fernández, J L; Hernández-Montes, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique that numerically reconstructs the complex acoustic amplitude (i.e. the acoustic amplitude and phase) of a compression acoustic wave in the interior volume of a specimen from a set of full-field optical measurements of the instantaneous displacement of the surface. The volume of a thick specimen is probed in transmission mode by short bursts of narrowband compression acoustic waves generated at one of its faces. The temporal evolution of the displacement field induced by the bursts emerging at the opposite surface is measured by pulsed digital holographic interferometry (pulsed TV holography). A spatio-temporal 3D Fourier transform processing of the measured data yields the complex acoustic amplitude at the plane of the surface as a sequence of 2D complex-valued maps. Finally, a numerical implementation of the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula is employed to reconstruct the complex acoustic amplitude at other planes in the interior volume of the specimen. The whole procedure can be regarded as a combination of optical digital holography and acoustical holography methods. The technique was successfully tested on aluminium specimens with and without an internal artificial defect and sample results are presented. In particular, information about the shape and position of the defect was retrieved in the experiment performed on the flawed specimen, which indicates the potential applicability of the technique for the nondestructive testing of materials

  7. Design and analysis of a toroidal tester for the measurement of core losses under axial compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatawneh, Natheer; Rahman, Tanvir; Lowther, David A.; Chromik, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Electric machine cores are subjected to mechanical stresses due to manufacturing processes. These stresses include radial, circumferential and axial components that may have significant influences on the magnetic properties of the electrical steel and hence, on the output and efficiencies of electrical machines. Previously, most studies of iron losses due to mechanical stress have considered only radial and circumferential components. In this work, an improved toroidal tester has been designed and developed to measure the core losses and the magnetic properties of electrical steel under a compressive axial stress. The shape of the toroidal ring has been verified using 3D stress analysis. Also, 3D electromagnetic simulations show a uniform flux density distribution in the specimen with a variation of 0.03 T and a maximum average induction level of 1.5 T. The developed design has been prototyped, and measurements were carried out using a steel sample of grade 35WW300. Measurements show that applying small mechanical stresses normal to the sample thickness rises the delivered core losses, then the losses decrease continuously as the stress increases. However, the drop in core losses at high stresses does not go lower than the free-stress condition. Physical explanations for the observed trend of core losses as a function of stress are provided based on core loss separation to the hysteresis and eddy current loss components. The experimental results show that the effect of axial compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel at high level of inductions becomes less pronounced.

  8. Polarization measurement of iron L-shell lines on EBIT-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hui; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Robbins, Darron; Smith, A.J.; Gu, Ming Feng

    2004-01-01

    We report measurements of the line polarization of Ne-like and F-like of iron n=3 to n=2 transitions in the x-ray region. We used the ''two-crystal technique'' developed in previous polarization measurements in our laboratory. Preliminary results from our measurements are presented together with the theoretical calculations using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Our calculations show that contributions from cascades play an important role in the polarization calculations of most of the transitions. The uncertainties and difficulties of our experiments are also discussed. (author)

  9. Data compression of measurements of peculiar velocities of supernovae type Ia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irsic, Vid; Slosar, Anze

    2011-01-01

    We study the compression of information present in the correlated perturbations to the luminosity distance in the low-redshift (z 2 P(k), where f is the logarithmic rate of growth of linear perturbations and P(k) is their power spectrum. We develop an optimal quadratic estimator and show that it recovers all information for ΛCDM models for surveys of N∼10,000 or more supernovae. We explicitly demonstrate robustness with respect to the assumed fiducial model and the number of power spectrum bins. Using mock catalogues of supernovae Ia we estimate that future low-redshift surveys will be able to probe σ 8 to 6% accuracy with 10 000 supernovae Ia.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime measurements to determine the core-shell nanostructure of FITC-doped silica nanoparticles: An optical approach to evaluate nanoparticle photostability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Bertolino, Chiara; Dutta, Debamitra; Cao Zehui; Tan Weihong; Moudgil, Brij M.; Mericle, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we described a novel fluorescence lifetime-based approach to determine the core-shell nanostructure of FITC-(fluorescein isothiocyanate, isomer I) doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). Because of phase homogeneity between the core and the shell, electron microscopic technique could not be used to characterize such core-shell nanostructure. Our optical approach not only revealed the core-shell nanostructure of FSNPs but also evaluated photobleaching of FSNPs both in the solvated and non-solvated (dry) states. The FSNPs were produced via Stoeber's method by hydrolysis and co-condensation reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and fluorescein linked (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (FITC-APTS conjugate) in the presence of ammonium hydroxide catalyst. To obtain a pure silica surface coating, FSNPs were then post-coated with TEOS. The average particle size was 135 nm as determined by TEM (transmission electron microscope) measurements. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectral data demonstrated successful doping of FITC dye molecules in FSNPs. Fluorescence lifetime data revealed that approximately 62% of dye molecules remained in the solvated silica shell, while 38% of dye molecules remained in the non-solvated (dry) silica core. Photobleaching experiments of FSNPs were conducted both in DI water (solution state) and in air (dry state). Severe photobleaching of FSNPs was observed in air. However, FSNPs were moderately photostable in the solution state. Photostability of FSNPs in both solution and dry states was explained on the basis of fluorescence lifetime data

  11. Further measurements of K shell photoelectric cross sections for some elements in the range 26<=Z<=41 at 74 keV. [74. 409 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S K; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1978-12-01

    K shell photoelectric cross sections in elements Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Sr, Zr and Nb have been measured at 74.409 keV. The targets were irradiated with x radiation and gamma radiation beams. In confirmation with the earlier results, the present results also show fairly good agreement with theory.

  12. Measurement of K-shell jump ratios and jump factors for some elements in 76≤Z≤92 using EDXRF spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, N.; Apaydin, G.; Tirasoglu, E.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents experimental values of the K-shell jump factor and jump ratio (ratio of the K-shell photoionization cross section to the photoionization cross section of the rest of the atom at the K edge) for some elements in 76≤Z≤92 using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer and compares those values with the theoretical ones giving reasonable agreement. The experimental values have been determined using the fluorescence parameters: K α production cross sections, K β /K α X-rays intensity ratios, total atomic attenuation cross sections, etc. To the best of our knowledge, K-shell jump ratios and jump factors have been measured without having any data on K edge for the first time in these elements. The results have been plotted versus atomic number.

  13. Feasibility of repetitive lung function measurements by raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression during methacholine challenge in young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, L.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung function measurements by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression (RVRTC) technique during bronchial methacholine challenge in young infants. METHOD: Four hundred two healthy infants were tested at 1 month of age....... The mean acceptability rating among parents was 8 on a scale from 1 to 10, with 13% rating test, with the actual lung function testing accounting for half the time. CONCLUSION: This very comprehensive experience with standardized measurements of lung...... was successfully measured in 87% by transcutaneous oxygen pressure. No serious adverse events were observed during testing or after discharge from the clinic. The methacholine dose range was appropriate as PD could be determined in the majority of infants. FEV(0.5) values in 21% of infants dropped > 40% during...

  14. MR Elastography Can Be Used to Measure Brain Stiffness Changes as a Result of Altered Cranial Venous Drainage During Jugular Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, A; Cheng, S; Tan, K; Sinkus, R; Bilston, L E

    2015-10-01

    Compressing the internal jugular veins can reverse ventriculomegaly in the syndrome of inappropriately low pressure acute hydrocephalus, and it has been suggested that this works by "stiffening" the brain tissue. Jugular compression may also alter blood and CSF flow in other conditions. We aimed to understand the effect of jugular compression on brain tissue stiffness and CSF flow. The head and neck of 9 healthy volunteers were studied with and without jugular compression. Brain stiffness (shear modulus) was measured by using MR elastography. Phase-contrast MR imaging was used to measure CSF flow in the cerebral aqueduct and blood flow in the neck. The shear moduli of the brain tissue increased with the percentage of blood draining through the internal jugular veins during venous compression. Peak velocity of caudally directed CSF in the aqueduct increased significantly with jugular compression (P drainage through the internal jugular veins during jugular compression have stiffer brains than those who divert venous blood through alternative pathways. These methods may be useful for studying this phenomenon in patients with the syndrome of inappropriately low-pressure acute hydrocephalus and other conditions. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Exploiting of the Compression Methods for Reconstruction of the Antenna Far-Field Using Only Amplitude Near-Field Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puskely

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The novel approach exploits the principle of the conventional two-plane amplitude measurements for the reconstruction of the unknown electric field distribution on the antenna aperture. The method combines a global optimization with a compression method. The global optimization method (GO is used to minimize the functional, and the compression method is used to reduce the number of unknown variables. The algorithm employs the Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA as the global optimization approach. The Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT are applied to reduce the number of unknown variables. Pros and cons of methods are investigated and reported for the solution of the problem. In order to make the algorithm faster, exploitation of amplitudes from a single scanning plane is also discussed. First, the algorithm is used to obtain an initial estimate. Subsequently, the common Fourier iterative algorithm is used to reach global minima with sufficient accuracy. The method is examined measuring the dish antenna.

  16. Thick-target method in the measurement of inner-shell ionization cross-sections by low-energy electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Z.; Wu, Y.; Liu, M.T.; Duan, Y.M.; Tang, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied the thick-target method for the measurements of atomic inner-shell ionization cross-section or X-ray production cross-section by keV electron impact. We find that in the processes of electron impact on the thick targets, the ratios of the characteristic X-ray yields of photoelectric ionization by bremsstrahlung to the total characteristic X-ray yields are Z-dependent and shell-dependent, and the ratios also show the weak energy-dependence. In addition, in the lower incident energy region (i.e. U < 5-6), the contribution from the rediffusion effect and the secondary electrons can be negligible. In general, the thick-target method can be appropriately applied to the measurements of atomic inner-shell ionization cross-sections or X-ray production cross-sections by electron impact for low and medium Z elements in the lower incident electron energy (i.e. U < 5-6). The experimental accuracies by the thick-target method can reach to the level equivalent or superior to the accuracies of experimental data based on the thin-target method. This thick-target method has been applied to the measurement of K-shell ionization cross-sections of Ni element by electron impact in this paper

  17. Mass measurements of neutron-rich indium isotopes toward the N =82 shell closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, C.; Klawitter, R.; Leistenschneider, E.; Lascar, D.; Barquest, B. R.; Finlay, A.; Foster, M.; Gallant, A. T.; Hunt, P.; Kootte, B.; Lan, Y.; Paul, S. F.; Phan, M. L.; Reiter, M. P.; Schultz, B.; Short, D.; Andreoiu, C.; Brodeur, M.; Dillmann, I.; Gwinner, G.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Leach, K. G.; Dilling, J.

    2018-02-01

    Precise mass measurements of the neutron-rich In-130125 isotopes have been performed with the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. TITAN's electron beam ion trap was used to charge breed the ions to charge state q =13 + thus providing the necessary resolving power to measure not only the ground states but also isomeric states at each mass number. In this paper, the properties of the ground states are investigated through a series of mass differentials, highlighting trends in the indium isotopic chain as compared to its proton-magic neighbor, tin (Z =50 ). In addition, the energies of the indium isomers are presented. The (8-) level in 128In is found to be 78 keV lower than previously thought and the (21 /2- ) isomer in 127In is shown to be lower than the literature value by more than 150 keV.

  18. Measurements of (p,γ) resonance strengths in the s-d shell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbertink, G.A.P.; Endt, P.M.

    1966-01-01

    Resonace strengths of selected resonances in the Ep=0.3−2.1 MeV region in the (p, γ) reactions on 23Na, 24–24Mg, 27Al, 28–30Si, 31P, 32, 34S, 35, 37Cl, 39, 41K and 40Ca are compared through relative yield measurements, using targets of many different chemical compounds, each containing at least two

  19. Picosecond Time-Resolved Temperature and Density Measurements with K-Shell Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Froula, D. H.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal x-ray emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing a buried-aluminum layer was measured to track the evolution of the bulk plasma conditions. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1 ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 × 1019 W/cm2. A streaked x-ray spectrometer recorded the AlHeα and lithium-like satellite lines with 2-ps temporal resolution and moderate resolving power (E E ΔE 1000 ΔE 1000) . Time-integrated measurements over the same spectral range were used to correct the streaked data for variations in photocathode sensitivity. Linewidths and intensity ratios from the streaked data were interpreted using a collisional radiative atomic kinetics model to provide the average plasma conditions in the buried layer as a function of time. Experimental uncertainties in the measured plasma conditions are quantified within a consistent model-dependent framework. The data demonstrate the production of a 330 +/-56 eV, 0.9 +/-0.3 g/cm3 plasma that evolves slowly during peak Heα emission. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Radiological Image Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Chung Benedict

    The movement toward digital images in radiology presents the problem of how to conveniently and economically store, retrieve, and transmit the volume of digital images. Basic research into image data compression is necessary in order to move from a film-based department to an efficient digital -based department. Digital data compression technology consists of two types of compression technique: error-free and irreversible. Error -free image compression is desired; however, present techniques can only achieve compression ratio of from 1.5:1 to 3:1, depending upon the image characteristics. Irreversible image compression can achieve a much higher compression ratio; however, the image reconstructed from the compressed data shows some difference from the original image. This dissertation studies both error-free and irreversible image compression techniques. In particular, some modified error-free techniques have been tested and the recommended strategies for various radiological images are discussed. A full-frame bit-allocation irreversible compression technique has been derived. A total of 76 images which include CT head and body, and radiographs digitized to 2048 x 2048, 1024 x 1024, and 512 x 512 have been used to test this algorithm. The normalized mean -square-error (NMSE) on the difference image, defined as the difference between the original and the reconstructed image from a given compression ratio, is used as a global measurement on the quality of the reconstructed image. The NMSE's of total of 380 reconstructed and 380 difference images are measured and the results tabulated. Three complex compression methods are also suggested to compress images with special characteristics. Finally, various parameters which would effect the quality of the reconstructed images are discussed. A proposed hardware compression module is given in the last chapter.

  1. Measurement and analysis of thorium fission rate in a polyethylene shell with a D-T neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lei [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang, Yiwei, E-mail: winfield1920@126.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu, Zhujun [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065,China (China); Liu, Rong, E-mail: liurongzy@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jiang, Li; Wang, Mei [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Associated angular dependencies of the source neutron energy and intensity was given. • Two sets of fission yields from evaluated libraries were considered and applied. • Calculated results employing ENDF/B-VII.0 agreed with the experimental ones best. • Small discrepancies exist between thorium fission cross section evaluated libraries. - Abstract: In order to validate the {sup 232}Th fission cross section, an integral experiment was carried out using the activation method in a polyethylene shell with a D-T neutron source. Thorium samples were arranged in the 0° direction to the incident D{sup +} beam. The {sup 232}Th fission rate was determined by measuring the 151.195 keV characteristic γ ray emitted from the fission fragment {sup 85m}Kr, and the experimental uncertainties were about 5.3%. MCNP calculation results employing ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4.0 libraries are in good agreement with that of experiments within uncertainties except that employing ENDF/B-VII.1 (∼6.5%). The experiment results can be used to re-evaluate the {sup 232}Th fission cross section.

  2. Shell supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A new statical and conceptual model for membrane shell structures - the stringer system - has been found. The principle was first published at the IASS conference in Copenhagen (OHL91), and later the theory has been further developed (ALMO3)(ALMO4). From the analysis of the stringer model it can...... be concluded that all membrane shells can be described by a limited number of basic configurations of which quite a few have free edges....

  3. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  4. Storage of compressed air - Optimisation and measurement of an existing project example; Druckluftspeicherung: Optimierung / Ausmessung bestehendes Projektmuster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckmann, P. [Brueckmann Elektronik, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Cyphelly, I. [Cyphelly and Cie, Les Brenets (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This short final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with an additional project that augmented an earlier report on a compressed-air energy storage system. First tests are reported on that revealed that the chosen heat exchanger fulfils the thermal expectations with substantial reserves. Certain effects concerning the liquid piston system are described which showed that further development of the test infrastructure were required. This project was launched to further examine these problems. Difficulties with the liquids available which prohibited the intended exact series of measurements are commented on. The authors note that independent investigations by the Austrian company LINDE came to the same conclusions, thus confirming the function of the heat exchanger.

  5. Compression stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call your health insurance or prescription plan: Find out if they pay for compression stockings. Ask if your durable medical equipment benefit pays for compression stockings. Get a prescription from your doctor. Find a medical equipment store where they can ...

  6. Noise suppression in curved glass shells using macro-fiber-composite actuators studied by the means of digital holography and acoustic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mokrý

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods and experimental results of the semi-active control of noise transmission in a curved glass shell with attached piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC actuators. The semi-active noise control is achieved via active elasticity control of piezoelectric actuators by connecting them to an active electric shunt circuit that has a negative effective capacitance. Using this approach, it is possible to suppress the vibration of the glass shell in the normal direction with respect to its surface and to increase the acoustic transmission loss of the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure. The effect of the MFC actuators connected to the negative capacitance shunt circuit on the surface distribution of the normal vibration amplitude is studied using frequency-shifted digital holography (FSDH. The principle of the used FSDH method is described in the paper. The frequency dependence of the acoustic transmission loss through the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure is estimated using measurements of the specific acoustic impedance of the curved glass shell. The specific acoustic impedance is measured using two microphones and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV. The results from the LDV measurements are compared with the FSDH data. The results of the experiments show that using this approach, the acoustic transmission loss in a glass shell can be increased by 36 dB in the frequency range around 247 Hz and by 25 dB in the frequency range around 258 Hz. The experiments indicate that FSDH measurements provide an efficient tool that can be used for fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic transmission loss in large planar structures.

  7. Apparatus to measure vapor pressure, differential vapor pressure, liquid molar volume, and compressibility of liquids and solutions to the critical point. Vapor pressures, molar volumes, and compressibilities of protiobenzene and deuteriobenzene at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooner, Z.S.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure differences between two similar liquids, such as isotopic isomers, or between a solution and its reference solvent at temperatures and pressures extending to the critical point is described. Vapor-phase volume is minimized and pressure is transmitted to the transducer through the liquid, thereby avoiding several experimental difficulties. Liquid can be injected into the heated part of the system by volumetrically calibrated screw injectors, thus permitting measurements of liquid molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity. The addition of a high-pressure circulating pump and injection valve allows the apparatus to be employed as a continuous dilution differential vapor pressure apparatus for determining partial molar free energies of solution. In the second part of the paper data on the vapor pressure, molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity and their isotope effects for C 6 H 6 and C 6 D 6 from room temperature to near the critical temperature are reported

  8. Measurement of wavelengths and lamb shifts for inner-shell transitions in Fe XVIII-XXIV. [from solar flare X-ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Safronova, U. I.

    1986-01-01

    The wavelengths of inner-shell 1s-2p transitions in the ions Fe XVIII-XXIV have been measured in solar flare spectra recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory crystal spectrometer (SOLFLEX) on the Air Force P78-1 spacecraft. The measurements are compared with previous measurements and with recently calculated wavelengths. It is found that the measured wavelengths are systematically larger than the wavelengths calculated using the Z-expansion method by up to 0.65 mA. For the more highly charged ions, these differences can be attributed to the QED contributions to the transition energies that are not included in the Z-expansion calculations.

  9. Residual stresses in cold-coiled helical compression springs for automotive suspensions measured by neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Brand, P. C.; Drews, A. R.; Krause, A.; Lowe-Ma, C.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 367, 1-2 (2004), s. 306-311 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : residual stress, automotive springs, neutron diffraction Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  10. Absolute cross section measurement for the ionization of the K-shell of titanium and nickel by electron impact (50 KEV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessenberger, J.

    1974-01-01

    The yield of characteristic X-ray K radiation of titanium during bombardment with electrons in the energy region of 6-50 keV and of nickel at 9-50 keV was measured, and the cross sections for th ionization of the K shell of titanium and nickel were determined from this. The results obtained are compared with several theoretical models. (WL/LN) [de

  11. A measurement of the density and compressibility of (U, Pu)-mixed oxide at 3432 kJ/kg (7356 K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.

    1987-05-01

    In a transient in-pile heating test the density of liquid (U, Pu)-mixed oxide at 3432±103 kJ/kg was measured to be 5027±132 kg/m 3 . The corresponding temperature is estimated to 7356±212 K. The isothermal compressibility of the mixed oxide was evaluated to 2.85 (±1.65) x 10 -4 /MPa at the same temperature. Based on these new data and previously existing measurements, new relations are proposed for the following properties of liquid UO 2 and (U, Pu)O 2 , as well: density - enthalpy, density - temperature, thermal expansion - temperature, and isothermal compressibility - temperature. (orig.) [de

  12. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted

  13. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  14. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  15. Core-shell silk hydrogels with spatially tuned conformations as drug-delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Le-Ping; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Oliveira, Ana L; Reis, Rui L

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogels of spatially controlled physicochemical properties are appealing platforms for tissue engineering and drug delivery. In this study, core-shell silk fibroin (SF) hydrogels of spatially controlled conformation were developed. The core-shell structure in the hydrogels was formed by means of soaking the preformed (enzymatically crosslinked) random coil SF hydrogels in methanol. When increasing the methanol treatment time from 1 to 10 min, the thickness of the shell layer can be tuned from about 200 to about 850 μm as measured in wet status. After lyophilization of the rehydrated core-shell hydrogels, the shell layer displayed compact morphology and the core layer presented porous structure, when observed by scanning electron microscopy. The conformation of the hydrogels was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in wet status. The results revealed that the shell layer possessed dominant β-sheet conformation and the core layer maintained mainly random coil conformation. Enzymatic degradation data showed that the shell layers presented superior stability to the core layer. The mechanical analysis displayed that the compressive modulus of the core-shell hydrogels ranged from about 25 kPa to about 1.1 MPa by increasing the immersion time in methanol. When incorporated with albumin, the core-shell SF hydrogels demonstrated slower and more controllable release profiles compared with the non-treated hydrogel. These core-shell SF hydrogels of highly tuned properties are useful systems as drug-delivery system and may be applied as cartilage substitute. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Masses of T/sub z/ = +5/2 nuclei in the s--d shell from β--decay measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alburger, D.E.; Goosman, D.R.; Davids, C.N.; Hardy, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    In this work the existence of five new T/sub z/ = + 5 / 2 nuclides, 23 F, 29 Mg, 31 Al, 33 Si, and 35 P, was established; their properties, including mass values, were determined, along with those of 25 Ne and 27 Na. Two experimental techniques were used, the ''rabbit'' transfer of a solid target and the gas transfer system; some novel features of these are described. A β spectrum of 33 Si observed in coincidence with 1848-keV γ rays is shown; a mass excess of -20569 +- 50 keV was derived for 33 Si. Attempts to produce 21 O were unsuccessful. Comparisons of the measured masses of the T/sub z/ = + 5 / 2 nuclides in the 2s--1d shell with predictions of the Garvey--Kelson mass formulation and with shell-model calculations are shown. The latter produce considerably better agreement with experiment. (3 figures, 1 table) (U.S.)

  17. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  18. Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

  19. Objective measures of motor dysfunction after compression spinal cord injury in adult rats: correlations with locomotor rating scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Joerg; Wellmann, Katharina; Wirth, Felicitas; Stein, Gregor; Angelova, Srebrina; Ashrafi, Mahak; Schempf, Greta; Ankerne, Janina; Ozsoy, Ozlem; Ozsoy, Umut; Schönau, Eckhard; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey

    2011-07-01

    Precise assessment of motor deficits after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in rodents is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of functional recovery and testing therapeutic approaches. Here we analyzed the applicability to a rat SCI model of an objective approach, the single-frame motion analysis, created and used for functional analysis in mice. Adult female Wistar rats were subjected to graded compression of the spinal cord. Recovery of locomotion was analyzed using video recordings of beam walking and inclined ladder climbing. Three out of four parameters used in mice appeared suitable: the foot-stepping angle (FSA) and the rump-height index (RHI), measured during beam walking, and for estimating paw placement and body weight support, respectively, and the number of correct ladder steps (CLS), assessing skilled limb movements. These parameters, similar to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scores, correlated with lesion volume and showed significant differences between moderately and severely injured rats at 1-9 weeks after SCI. The beam parameters, but not CLS, correlated well with the BBB scores within ranges of poor and good locomotor abilities. FSA co-varied with RHI only in the severely impaired rats, while RHI and CLS were barely correlated. Our findings suggest that the numerical parameters estimate, as intended by design, predominantly different aspects of locomotion. The use of these objective measures combined with BBB rating provides a time- and cost-efficient opportunity for versatile and reliable functional evaluations in both severely and moderately impaired rats, combining clinical assessment with precise numerical measures.

  20. High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru [Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation); Bychkov, E. [Universite du Littoral, LPCA, UMR 8101 CNRS (France); Tsiok, O. B. [Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The volumes of glassy germanium chalcogenides GeSe{sub 2}, GeS{sub 2}, Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83}, and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} are precisely measured at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa. The stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} and GeS{sub 2} glasses exhibit elastic behavior in the pressure range up to 3 GPa, and their bulk modulus decreases at pressures higher than 2–2.5 GPa. At higher pressures, inelastic relaxation processes begin and their intensity is proportional to the logarithm of time. The relaxation rate for the GeSe{sub 2} glasses has a pronounced maximum at 3.5–4.5 GPa, which indicates the existence of several parallel structural transformation mechanisms. The nonstoichiometric glasses exhibit a diffuse transformation and inelastic behavior at pressures above 1–2 GPa. The maximum relaxation rate in these glasses is significantly lower than that in the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glasses. All glasses are characterized by the “loss of memory” of history: after relaxation at a fixed pressure, the further increase in the pressure returns the volume to the compression curve obtained without a stop for relaxation. After pressure release, the residual densification in the stoichiometric glasses is about 7% and that in the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} glasses is 1.5%. The volume of the Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glass returns to its initial value within the limits of experimental error. As the pressure decreases, the effective bulk moduli of the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glasses coincide with the moduli after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure, and the bulk modulus of the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glass upon decreasing pressure noticeably exceeds the bulk modulus after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure. Along with the reported data, our results can be used to draw conclusions regarding the diffuse transformations in glassy germanium chalcogenides during compression.

  1. Optical sensor system for time-resolved quantification of methane concentrations: Validation measurements in a rapid compression machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauke, Stephan; Golibrzuch, Kai; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Fendt, Peter; Zigan, Lars; Seefeldt, Stefan; Thiele, Olaf; Berg, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Lowering greenhouse gas emissions is one of the most challenging demands of today's society. Especially, the automotive industry struggles with the development of more efficient internal combustion (IC) engines. As an alternative to conventional fuels, methane has the potential for a significant emission reduction. In methane fuelled engines, the process of mixture formation, which determines the properties of combustion after ignition, differs significantly from gasoline and diesel engines and needs to be understood and controlled in order to develop engines with high efficiency. This work demonstrates the development of a gas sensing system that can serve as a diagnostic tool for measuring crank-angle resolved relative air-fuel ratios in methane-fuelled near-production IC engines. By application of non-dispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy at two distinct spectral regions in the ν3 absorption band of methane around 3.3 μm, the system is able to determine fuel density and temperature simultaneously. A modified spark plug probe allows for straightforward application at engine test stations. Here, the application of the detection system in a rapid compression machine is presented, which enables validation and characterization of the system on well-defined gas mixtures under engine-like dynamic conditions. In extension to a recent proof-of-principle study, a refined data analysis procedure is introduced that allows the correction of artefacts originating from mechanical distortions of the sensor probe. In addition, the measured temperatures are compared to data obtained with a commercially available system based on the spectrally resolved detection of water absorption in the near infrared.

  2. Compressive laser ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package.

  3. Design of Compressed Sensing Algorithm for Coal Mine IoT Moving Measurement Data Based on a Multi-Hop Network and Total Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available As the application of a coal mine Internet of Things (IoT, mobile measurement devices, such as intelligent mine lamps, cause moving measurement data to be increased. How to transmit these large amounts of mobile measurement data effectively has become an urgent problem. This paper presents a compressed sensing algorithm for the large amount of coal mine IoT moving measurement data based on a multi-hop network and total variation. By taking gas data in mobile measurement data as an example, two network models for the transmission of gas data flow, namely single-hop and multi-hop transmission modes, are investigated in depth, and a gas data compressed sensing collection model is built based on a multi-hop network. To utilize the sparse characteristics of gas data, the concept of total variation is introduced and a high-efficiency gas data compression and reconstruction method based on Total Variation Sparsity based on Multi-Hop (TVS-MH is proposed. According to the simulation results, by using the proposed method, the moving measurement data flow from an underground distributed mobile network can be acquired and transmitted efficiently.

  4. Design of Compressed Sensing Algorithm for Coal Mine IoT Moving Measurement Data Based on a Multi-Hop Network and Total Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Zhikai; Ning, Yongjie

    2018-05-28

    As the application of a coal mine Internet of Things (IoT), mobile measurement devices, such as intelligent mine lamps, cause moving measurement data to be increased. How to transmit these large amounts of mobile measurement data effectively has become an urgent problem. This paper presents a compressed sensing algorithm for the large amount of coal mine IoT moving measurement data based on a multi-hop network and total variation. By taking gas data in mobile measurement data as an example, two network models for the transmission of gas data flow, namely single-hop and multi-hop transmission modes, are investigated in depth, and a gas data compressed sensing collection model is built based on a multi-hop network. To utilize the sparse characteristics of gas data, the concept of total variation is introduced and a high-efficiency gas data compression and reconstruction method based on Total Variation Sparsity based on Multi-Hop (TVS-MH) is proposed. According to the simulation results, by using the proposed method, the moving measurement data flow from an underground distributed mobile network can be acquired and transmitted efficiently.

  5. Moment measurements in dynamic and quasi-static spine segment testing using eccentric compression are susceptible to artifacts based on loading configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Toen, Carolyn; Carter, Jarrod W; Oxland, Thomas R; Cripton, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    The tolerance of the spine to bending moments, used for evaluation of injury prevention devices, is often determined through eccentric axial compression experiments using segments of the cadaver spine. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory demonstrated that eccentric axial compression resulted in "unexpected" (artifact) moments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the static and dynamic effects of test configuration on bending moments during eccentric axial compression typical in cadaver spine segment testing. Specific objectives were to create dynamic equilibrium equations for the loads measured inferior to the specimen, experimentally verify these equations, and compare moment responses from various test configurations using synthetic (rubber) and human cadaver specimens. The equilibrium equations were verified by performing quasi-static (5 mm/s) and dynamic experiments (0.4 m/s) on a rubber specimen and comparing calculated shear forces and bending moments to those measured using a six-axis load cell. Moment responses were compared for hinge joint, linear slider and hinge joint, and roller joint configurations tested at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Calculated shear force and bending moment curves had similar shapes to those measured. Calculated values in the first local minima differed from those measured by 3% and 15%, respectively, in the dynamic test, and these occurred within 1.5 ms of those measured. In the rubber specimen experiments, for the hinge joint (translation constrained), quasi-static and dynamic posterior eccentric compression resulted in flexion (unexpected) moments. For the slider and hinge joints and the roller joints (translation unconstrained), extension ("expected") moments were measured quasi-statically and initial flexion (unexpected) moments were measured dynamically. In the cadaver experiments with roller joints, anterior and posterior eccentricities resulted in extension moments, which were unexpected and expected, for those

  6. Measurements of gamma rays from keV-neutron resonance capture by odd-Z nuclei in the 2s-1d shell region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashira, Masayuki; Lee, Sam Yol; Mizuno, Satoshi; Hori, Jun-ichi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Kitazawa, Hideo

    1998-03-01

    Measurements of gamma rays from keV-neutron resonance capture by {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, and {sup 27}Al, which are odd-Z nuclei in the 2s-1d shell region, were performed, using an anti-Compton HPGe spectrometer and a pulsed neutron source by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Capture gamma rays from the 27-, 49-, and 97-keV resonances of {sup 19}F, the 35- and 53-keV resonances of {sup 23}Na, and the 35-keV resonance of {sup 27}Al were observed. Some results are presented. (author)

  7. A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the NIF (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Sèguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Magoon, J.; Agliata, A.; Shoup, M.; Glebov, V. U.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ayers, S.; Bailey, C. G.; Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock- and compression-bang time using D{sup 3}He-fusion protons and DD-fusion neutrons, respectively, at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This capability, in combination with shock-burn weighted areal density measurements, will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. This design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which records bang times using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D902 (2012)]. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase D{sup 3}He-proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for the first time simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D{sup 3}He-filled surrogate implosions at the NIF.

  8. A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the NIF (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H G; Sio, H; Frenje, J A; Magoon, J; Agliata, A; Shoup, M; Ayers, S; Bailey, C G; Gatu Johnson, M; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Sèguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Kimbrough, J R; Mackinnon, A; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Clancy, T; Zacharias, R; House, A; Döppner, T; Park, H S; LePape, S; Landen, O; Meezan, N; Robey, H; Glebov, V U; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Li, C; Parat, J; Olson, R; Kline, J; Kilkenny, J

    2014-11-01

    A magnetic particle time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock- and compression-bang time using D(3)He-fusion protons and DD-fusion neutrons, respectively, at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This capability, in combination with shock-burn weighted areal density measurements, will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. This design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which records bang times using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D902 (2012)]. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase D(3)He-proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for the first time simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D(3)He-filled surrogate implosions at the NIF.

  9. Random three-dimensional jammed packings of elastic shells acting as force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jissy; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2016-06-01

    In a jammed solid of granular particles, the applied stress is in-homogeneously distributed within the packing. A full experimental characterization requires measurement of all the interparticle forces, but so far such measurements are limited to a few systems in two and even fewer in three dimensions. Particles with the topology of (elastic) shells are good local force sensors as relatively large deformations of the shells result from relatively small forces. We recently introduced such fluorescent shells as a model granular system in which force distributions can be determined in three dimensions using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. An interesting aspect about these shells that differentiates them from other soft deformable particles is their buckling behavior at higher compression. This leads to deformations that do not conserve the inner volume of the particle. Here we use this system to accurately measure the contact forces in a three-dimensional packing of shells subjected to a static anisotropic compression and to shear. At small deformations forces are linear, however, for a buckled contact, the restoring force is related to the amount of deformation by a square root law, as follows from the theory of elasticity of shells. Near the unjamming-jamming transition (point J ), we found the probability distribution of the interparticle forces P (f ) to decay nearly exponentially at large forces, with little evidence of long-range force chains in the packings. As the packing density is increased, the tail of the distribution was found to crossover to a Gaussian, in line with other experimental and simulation studies. Under a small shear strain, up to 0.216, applied at an extremely low shear rate, we observed a shear-induced anisotropy in both the pair correlation function and contact force network; however, no appreciable change was seen in the number of contacts per particle.

  10. Contribution to a torsional wave guide for the measurement of compressible fluids; Contribution a la theorie d'un guide a onde de torsion pour la mesure de niveau de liquides compressibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goubel-Lenoel, A

    1999-10-01

    In order to provide complementary means for measurement of water levels in pressurized vessels of nuclear reactors, the possibilities of an immersed torsional wave sensor are being looked into. It has already been modeled, considering an incompressible fluid. Yet, because the fluid can turn into a two-phase fluid, we have investigated how to extend the existing model. As a first step, we have taken into account the compressibility of the surrounding fluid. We focus on a cylindrical waveguide with an elliptic cross-section. Its transverse dimensions are small compared with its length and the wavelengths in the fluid. We start with the elasticity equations for the waveguide. Then, from the exact expression of the pressure exerted by the fluid on the waveguide boundary, a long wavelength approximation is obtained. We end by applying Hamilton's principle of energy conservation, which leads to an approximate equation governing the fluid-loaded waveguide motion, and to an expression of the apparent phase velocity of the torsional wave in the immersed waveguide. Finally, fluid level measurement is possible. Some simulations are made, highlighting the influence of the compressibility. (author)

  11. M sub shell X-ray emission cross section measurements for Pt, Au, Hg, Pb, Th and U at 8 and 10 keV synchrotron photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Gupta, Sheenu; Tiwari, M.K.; Mittal, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First time M sub shell fluorescence cross section measurements at 8 and 10 keV photons. • Comparison with theoretical evaluations from different model data for parameters. • Explained the large deviations from the trend of parameters with atomic number Z. • A specific pattern of cross sections with Z is predicted in the region, 78 ⩽ Z ⩽ 92. • Confirmation of prediction requires more experiment in these Z and energy region. -- Abstract: M sub shell X-ray emission cross sections of Pt, Au, Hg, Pb, Th and U at 8 and 10 keV photon energies have been determined with linearly polarized photon beam from Indus-2 synchrotron source. The measured cross sections have been reported for the first time and were used to check the available theoretical Dirac–Hartree–Slater (DHS) and Dirac–Fock (DF) values reported in literature and also the presently derived Non Relativistic Hartree–Slater (NRHS), DF and DHS values for M ξ , M δ , M α , M β , M γ , M m1 and M m2 group of X-rays

  12. Spinal cord blood flow measured by 14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography during and after graded spinal cord compression in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.G.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The relations between degree of thoracic spinal cord compression causing myelographic block, reversible paraparesis, and extinction of the sensory evoked potential on one hand, and spinal cord blood flow on the other, were investigated. This was done in rats using the blocking weight-technique and 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. A load of 9 g caused myelographic block. Five minutes of compression with that load caused a reduction of spinal cord blood flow to about 25%, but 5 and 60 minutes after the compression spinal cord blood flow was restored to 60% of the pretrauma value. A load of 35 g for 5 minutes caused transient paraparesis. Recovery to about 30% was observed 5 and 60 minutes thereafter. During compression at a load of 55 g, which caused almost total extinction of sensory evoked potential and irreversible paraplegia, spinal cord blood flow under the load ceased. The results indicate that myelographic block occurs at a load which does not cause irreversible paraparesis and that a load which permits sensory evoked potential to be elicited results in potentially salvageable damage

  13. Compressive strength measurements of hybrid dental composites treated with dry heat and light emitting diodes (LED post cure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites are mostly used on large cavities as restorative dental materials, whether it is used directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of composite resin shall increase if it is treated with post cure treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate compressive strength differences between dry heat and Light Emitting Diodes (LED treatment on the hybrid dental composite. A quasi-experimental was applied on this research with a total of 30 samples that were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using LLOYD Universal Testing Machine with 1 mm/min speed to evaluate the compressive strength. The compressive strength results were marked when the sample was broken. The results of two groups were then analyzed using t-test statistical calculation. The results of this study show that post cure treatment on hybrid composite using LED light box (194.138 MPa was lower than dry heat treatment (227.339 MPa, which was also significantly different from statistical analysis. It can be concluded that compressive strength of LED light box was lower than dry heat post-cure treatment on the hybrid composite resin.

  14. UHPFRC in large span shell structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maten, R.N.; Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-High Performance Fibre-Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) is an innovative concrete type with a high compressive strength and a far more durable character compared to conventional concrete. UHPFRC can be applied in structures with aesthetic appearance and high material efficiency. Shell structures

  15. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly

  16. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  17. Impact of errors in recorded compressed breast thickness measurements on volumetric density classification using volpara v1.5.0 software

    OpenAIRE

    Waade, G; Highnam, R; Hauge, I; McEntee, M; Hofvind, S; Denton, E; Kelly, J; Sarwar, J; Hogg, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been demonstrated to predict breast cancer risk. It has been proposed that it could be used for stratifying screening pathways and recommending additional imaging. Volumetric density tools use the recorded compressed breast thickness (CBT) of the breast measured at the x-ray unit in their calculation, however the accuracy of the recorded thickness can vary. The aim of this study was to investigate whether inaccuracies in recorded CBT impact upon volumetric de...

  18. Core-shell particles as model compound for studying fouling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Troels Bach; Andersen, Morten Boel Overgaard

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic colloidal particles with hard cores and soft, water-swollen shells were used to study cake formation during ultrafiltration. The total cake resistance was lowest for particles with thick shells, which indicates that interparticular forces between particles (steric hindrance...... and electrostatic repulsion) influenced cake formation. At low pressure the specific cake resistance could be predicted from the Kozeny-Carman equation. At higher pressures, the resistance increased due to cake compression. Both cake formation and compression were reversible. For particles with thick shells...

  19. Characterization of the failure in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite under plane strain compression using full field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuelle, P.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Failure by strain localization is commonly observed in geo-materials. Cracks are detected in Underground Research Laboratories (URL) on the walls of galleries (e.g., Andra in Meuse/Haute Marne laboratory, SCK-CEN in Mol), they have been induced by the stress relaxation that results from the excavation. The cracks represent material discontinuities which could impact the flow properties of the rock mass in some circumstances. Generally, experimental characterization of the localization in rocks is performed with classical axisymmetric triaxial compression tests. The effect of the confining pressure can be observed on several aspects: onset of localization, pattern of localization, porosity evolution inside bands or cracks aperture, grain scale mechanisms of deformation (e.g., [1]). However the history (time evolution) of the localization is not accessible because the observations are post-mortem. Strain field measurement and evolution in time of the strain field are particularly useful to study the strain localization (initiation of the deformation bands) and the post-localization regime. Such tools have been developed for soils (e.g., sand specimens in plane strain condition [2] or in triaxial conditions using X-ray tomography [3]). Similar developments for rocks are still difficult, especially because the pertinent confining pressure to reproduce in situ stresses are higher than for soils. We present here first results obtained in a new true triaxial apparatus that allows observation of the rock specimen under loading and especially the complex development of deformation bands and faults. As for [4] and [5], the three principal stresses are different. However, for selected tests discussed here, the intermediate stress is controlled in order to impose a plane strain condition (zero strain in this direction). Observation of a specimen under load is possible as one surface of the prismatic specimen, which is

  20. Challenges to the Application of δ15N measurements of the organic fraction of archaeological and fossil mollusk shells to assess paleoenvironmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope analysis of the organic fraction of mollusk shells is beginning to be applied to questions of past anthropogenic and natural environmental variation using samples from archaeological and fossil deposits. Fairly extensive proxy validation research has been conducted in the past decade, documenting the relationship between the δ15N of ambient particulate organic matter, mollusk soft tissues, and shell organic matrix. However, comparatively little research has addressed the potential effects of taphonomy and diagenesis on these proxy records. Assessing archaeological samples are especially complex in that humans may have transported and/or cooked shell prior to deposition. Shell δ15N data will be presented from modern and archaeological oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and clam shell (Mercenaria spp.) of various late Holocene ages and late Cretaceous Crassatellites vadosus shells. Archaeological shells show some loss of organic matter over time, yet some Cretaceous shells retain enough matrix to permit δ15N analysis. The Cretaceous samples required concentration of the remaining organic matrix by removing carbonate via acid pretreatment prior to EA-IRMS analysis, but modern and archaeological shells had sufficient organic matrix to permit analysis without acid pretreatment. The δ15N data from the archaeological shells do not display obvious alteration from the loss of organic matrix. The results of cooking experiments performed on modern oyster shells also indicate little alteration of δ15N values, unless the shell was heated to the point of disintegration. While these experiments indicate promise for the application of δ15N analysis of shell organic matter, the results are incomplete and lack ideal control over initial δ15N values in ancient samples used for comparisons. Future research, perhaps focused on compound-specific δ15N analysis and additional controlled experiments on moderns shells, may improve this assessment.

  1. Effect of supercritical water shell on cavitation bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Wei-Hang; Chen Wei-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Based on reported experimental data, a new model for single cavitation bubble dynamics is proposed considering a supercritical water (SCW) shell surrounding the bubble. Theoretical investigations show that the SCW shell apparently slows down the oscillation of the bubble and cools the gas temperature inside the collapsing bubble. Furthermore, the model is simplified to a Rayleigh–Plesset-like equation for a thin SCW shell. The dependence of the bubble dynamics on the thickness and density of the SCW shell is studied. The results show the bubble dynamics depends on the thickness but is insensitive to the density of the SCW shell. The thicker the SCW shell is, the smaller are the wall velocity and the gas temperature in the bubble. In the authors’ opinion, the SCW shell works as a buffering agent. In collapsing, it is compressed to absorb a good deal of the work transformed into the bubble internal energy during bubble collapse so that it weakens the bubble oscillations. (paper)

  2. A method for the measurement of dispersion curves of circumferential guided waves radiating from curved shells: experimental validation and application to a femoral neck mimicking phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauleau, Pierre; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Chekroun, Mathieu; Cassereau, Didier; Laugier, Pascal; Prada, Claire; Grimal, Quentin

    2016-07-01

    Our long-term goal is to develop an ultrasonic method to characterize the thickness, stiffness and porosity of the cortical shell of the femoral neck, which could enhance hip fracture risk prediction. To this purpose, we proposed to adapt a technique based on the measurement of guided waves. We previously evidenced the feasibility of measuring circumferential guided waves in a bone-mimicking phantom of a circular cross-section of even thickness. The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of the complex geometry of the femoral neck on the measurement of guided waves. Two phantoms of an elliptical cross-section and one phantom of a realistic cross-section were investigated. A 128-element array was used to record the inter-element response matrix of these waveguides. This experiment was simulated using a custom-made hybrid code. The response matrices were analyzed using a technique based on the physics of wave propagation. This method yields portions of dispersion curves of the waveguides which were compared to reference dispersion curves. For the elliptical phantoms, three portions of dispersion curves were determined with a good agreement between experiment, simulation and theory. The method was thus validated. The characteristic dimensions of the shell were found to influence the identification of the circumferential wave signals. The method was then applied to the signals backscattered by the superior half of constant thickness of the realistic phantom. A cut-off frequency and some portions of modes were measured, with a good agreement with the theoretical curves of a plate waveguide. We also observed that the method cannot be applied directly to the signals backscattered by the lower half of varying thicknesses of the phantom. The proposed approach could then be considered to evaluate the properties of the superior part of the femoral neck, which is known to be a clinically relevant site.

  3. Uniaxial Compressive Strength and Fracture Mode of Lake Ice at Moderate Strain Rates Based on a Digital Speckle Correlation Method for Deformation Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijian Lian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding of the complex mechanical properties of ice is the foundation to predict the ice fail process and avoid potential ice threats. In the present study, uniaxial compressive strength and fracture mode of natural lake ice are investigated over moderate strain-rate range of 0.4–10 s−1 at −5 °C and −10 °C. The digital speckle correlation method (DSCM is used for deformation measurement through constructing artificial speckle on ice sample surface in advance, and two dynamic load cells are employed to measure the dynamic load for monitoring the equilibrium of two ends’ forces under high-speed loading. The relationships between uniaxial compressive strength and strain-rate, temperature, loading direction, and air porosity are investigated, and the fracture mode of ice at moderate rates is also discussed. The experimental results show that there exists a significant difference between true strain-rate and nominal strain-rate derived from actuator displacement under dynamic loading conditions. Over the employed strain-rate range, the dynamic uniaxial compressive strength of lake ice shows positive strain-rate sensitivity and decreases with increasing temperature. Ice obtains greater strength values when it is with lower air porosity and loaded vertically. The fracture mode of ice seems to be a combination of splitting failure and crushing failure.

  4. Indentation of Ellipsoidal and Cylindrical Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2012-10-01

    Thin shells are found in nature at scales ranging from viruses to hens\\' eggs; the stiffness of such shells is essential for their function. We present the results of numerical simulations and theoretical analyses for the indentation of ellipsoidal and cylindrical elastic shells, considering both pressurized and unpressurized shells. We provide a theoretical foundation for the experimental findings of Lazarus etal. [following paper, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 144301 (2012)PRLTAO0031-9007] and for previous work inferring the turgor pressure of bacteria from measurements of their indentation stiffness; we also identify a new regime at large indentation. We show that the indentation stiffness of convex shells is dominated by either the mean or Gaussian curvature of the shell depending on the pressurization and indentation depth. Our results reveal how geometry rules the rigidity of shells. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  5. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  6. Stability of accelerated metal shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahsiri, H.

    1976-01-01

    A systematic treatment has been developed for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an accelerated liner. It is applicable to one-dimensional models either compressible or incompressible. With this model several points have been clarified. For an incompressible liner model, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability will have about five e-folding periods and the usual growth rate is independent of the current distribution or current rise time. Adequate stability will therefore depend on the magnitude of the initial perturbations or the precision of the initial liner and the thickness over which the shell is accelerated. However, for a compressible model, theory predicts that the current rise time is important and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is suppressed if the current rise time is less than the shock transit time

  7. OPTIMISATION OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF PERIWINKLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a regression model is developed to predict and optimise the compressive strength of periwinkle shell aggregate concrete using Scheffe's regression theory. The results obtained from the derived regression model agreed favourably with the experimental data. The model was tested for adequacy using a student ...

  8. Delamination of Compressed Thin Layers at Corners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim D.; Jensen, Henrik Myhre; Clausen, Johan

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of delamination for a thin elastic layer under compression, attached to a substrate at a corner is carried out. The analysis is performed by combining results from interface fracture mechanics and the theory of thin shells. In contrast with earlier results for delamination on a flat...

  9. Communication: spin-orbit splittings in degenerate open-shell states via Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster theory: a measure for the coupling contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-03-21

    We propose a generally applicable scheme for the computation of spin-orbit (SO) splittings in degenerate open-shell systems using multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) theory. As a specific method, Mukherjee's version of MRCC (Mk-MRCC) in conjunction with an effective mean-field SO operator is adapted for this purpose. An expression for the SO splittings is derived and implemented using Mk-MRCC analytic derivative techniques. The computed SO splittings are found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Due to the symmetry properties of the SO operator, SO splittings can be considered a quality measure for the coupling between reference determinants in Jeziorski-Monkhorst based MRCC methods. We thus provide numerical insights into the coupling problem of Mk-MRCC theory. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  10. Measurements of L-shell x-ray production cross-sections of Au and Ag by low energy electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y; An, Z; Liu, M T; Duan, Y M; Tang, C H; Luo, Z M

    2004-01-01

    Au L α and L β and Ag L-shell x-ray production cross-sections by electron impact have been measured in the incident energy region from near threshold to about 25 keV. Thin films with thick aluminium substrates were used as targets in the experiments. The effect of directional and energy spreading of the electron beam within the active films and x-ray enhancement due to backscattering electrons and bremsstrahlung photons from the substrates are corrected by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The corrected experimental data provided by this method are compared with calculated cross-sections from a PWBA theory with Coulomb, relativistic and exchange corrections and with other experimental data available in the literature

  11. Structure of 14C via elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from 13C: Measurement, R-matrix analysis, and shell model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resler, D.A.

    1987-03-01

    The specific purpose of this work is to provide a better understanding of the 14 C level structure; the general purpose is to provide the details for using shell model calculations in R-matrix analyses. Using the TOF facilities of the Ohio University Accelerator Laboratory, the elastic and first 3 inelastic differential scattering cross sections for 13 C + n were measured at 69 energies for 4.5 ≤ E/sub n/ ≤ 11 MeV. A multiple scattering code was developed which provided a simulation of the experimental scattering process allowing accurate corrections to the small inelastic data. The integrated 13 C(n,α) 10 Be cross section is estimated. The sequential 2n-decay of 14 C states populated by 13 C + n was observed. A shell model code was developed. Normal and nonnormal parity calculations were made for the lithium isotopes using a new two-body interaction. The results for 5 Li predict the 2s/sub 1/2/ and 1d/sub 5/2/ single-particle states to be located below the 3/2 + state. Similar calculations were made for 13 C, 13 N, and 14 C. Results for 13 C and 13 N show for E/sub x/ 7 Li and 14 C, 2 h-barω calculations were done. Shell model calculations generated the R-matrix parameters for the elastic and first 3 inelastic channels of 13 C + n. After adjusting some energies, the predicted structure generally agrees with experiment for E/sub n/ 13 C + n data were refit to replace R 0 background terms by more realistic broad states and to get better agreement with model calculations. R-matrix fitting of the full data set produced new 14 C level information. For E/sub n/ > 4 MeV (E/sub x/ > 12 MeV), 5 states are given definite J/sup π/ assignments; 3, tentative assignments. 122 refs., 91 figs., 30 tabs

  12. Compression under a mechanical counter pressure space suit glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldie, James M A.; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Tourbier, Dietmar; Webb, Paul; Jarvis, Christine W.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Current gas-pressurized space suits are bulky stiff shells severely limiting astronaut function and capability. A mechanical counter pressure (MCP) space suit in the form of a tight elastic garment could dramatically improve extravehicular activity (EVA) dexterity, but also be advantageous in safety, cost, mass and volume. The purpose of this study was to verify that a prototype MCP glove exerts the design compression of 200 mmHg, a pressure similar to the current NASA EVA suit. Methods: Seven male subjects donned a pressure measurement array and MCP glove on the right hand, which was placed into a partial vacuum chamber. Average compression was recorded on the palm, the bottom of the middle finger, the top of the middle finger and the dorsum of the hand at pressures of 760 (ambient), 660 and 580 mmHg. The vacuum chamber was used to simulate the pressure difference between the low breathing pressure of the current NASA space suits (approximately 200 mmHg) and an unprotected hand in space. Results: At ambient conditions, the MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand at 203.5 +/- 22.7 mmHg, the bottom of the middle finger at 179.4 +/- 16.0 mmHg, and the top of the middle finger at 183.8 +/- 22.6 mmHg. The palm compression was significantly lower (59.6 +/- 18.8 mmHg, pglove compression with the chamber pressure reductions. Conclusions: The MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand and middle finger at the design pressure.

  13. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D 3 He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D 3 He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R cm ) from the downshift of the shock-produced D 3 He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR

  14. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  15. Plasma heating by adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.A. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    These two lectures will cover the following three topics: (i) The application of adiabatic compression to toroidal devices is reviewed. The special case of adiabatic compression in tokamaks is considered in more detail, including a discussion of the equilibrium, scaling laws, and heating effects. (ii) The ATC (Adiabatic Toroidal Compressor) device which was completed in May 1972, is described in detail. Compression of a tokamak plasma across a static toroidal field is studied in this device. The device is designed to produce a pre-compression plasma with a major radius of 17 cm, toroidal field of 20 kG, and current of 90 kA. The compression leads to a plasma with major radius of 38 cm and minor radius of 10 cm. Scaling laws imply a density increase of a factor 6, temperature increase of a factor 3, and current increase of a factor 2.4. An additional feature of ATC is that it is a large tokamak which operates without a copper shell. (iii) Data which show that the expected MHD behavior is largely observed is presented and discussed. (U.S.)

  16. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  17. Relationship between the edgewise compression strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study were used to determine the linear regression constants in the Maltenfort model by correlating the measured board edgewise compression strength (ECT) with the predicted strength, using the paper components' compression strengths, measured with the short-span compression test (SCT) and the ...

  18. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  19. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  20. Discrete Wigner Function Reconstruction and Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jia-Ning; Fang, Lei; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2011-01-01

    A new reconstruction method for Wigner function is reported for quantum tomography based on compressed sensing. By analogy with computed tomography, Wigner functions for some quantum states can be reconstructed with less measurements utilizing this compressed sensing based method.

  1. Development of the apparatus for measuring magnetic properties of electrical steel sheets in arbitrary directions under compressive stress normal to their surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Maeda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In designing motors, one must grasp the magnetic properties of electrical steel sheets considering actual conditions in motors. Especially important is grasping the stress dependence of magnetic power loss. This paper describes a newly developed apparatus to measure two-dimensional (2-D magnetic properties (properties under the arbitrary alternating and the rotating flux conditions of electrical steel sheets under compressive stress normal to the sheet surface. The apparatus has a 2-D magnetic excitation circuit to generate magnetic fields in arbitrary directions in the evaluation area. It also has a pressing unit to apply compressive stress normal to the sheet surface. During measurement, it is important to apply uniform stress throughout the evaluation area. Therefore, we have developed a new flux density sensor using needle probe method. It is composed of thin copper foils sputtered on electrical steel sheets. By using this sensor, the stress can be applied to the surface of the specimen without influence of this sensor. This paper described the details of newly developed apparatus with this sensor, and measurement results of iron loss by using are shown.

  2. Development of the apparatus for measuring magnetic properties of electrical steel sheets in arbitrary directions under compressive stress normal to their surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Urata, Shinya; Nakai, Hideo; Takeuchi, Yuuya; Yun, Kyyoul; Yanase, Shunji; Okazaki, Yasuo

    2017-05-01

    In designing motors, one must grasp the magnetic properties of electrical steel sheets considering actual conditions in motors. Especially important is grasping the stress dependence of magnetic power loss. This paper describes a newly developed apparatus to measure two-dimensional (2-D) magnetic properties (properties under the arbitrary alternating and the rotating flux conditions) of electrical steel sheets under compressive stress normal to the sheet surface. The apparatus has a 2-D magnetic excitation circuit to generate magnetic fields in arbitrary directions in the evaluation area. It also has a pressing unit to apply compressive stress normal to the sheet surface. During measurement, it is important to apply uniform stress throughout the evaluation area. Therefore, we have developed a new flux density sensor using needle probe method. It is composed of thin copper foils sputtered on electrical steel sheets. By using this sensor, the stress can be applied to the surface of the specimen without influence of this sensor. This paper described the details of newly developed apparatus with this sensor, and measurement results of iron loss by using are shown.

  3. An exploratory study to determine applicability of nano-hardness and micro-compression measurements for yield stress estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosemann, P.; Swadener, J. G.; Kiener, D.; Was, G. S.; Maloy, S. A.; Li, N.

    2008-03-01

    The superior properties of ferritic/martensitic steels in a radiation environment (low swelling, low activation under irradiation and good corrosion resistance) make them good candidates for structural parts in future reactors and spallation sources. While it cannot substitute for true reactor experiments, irradiation by charged particles from accelerators can reduce the number of reactor experiments and support fundamental research for a better understanding of radiation effects in materials. Based on the nature of low energy accelerator experiments, only a small volume of material can be uniformly irradiated. Micro and nanoscale post irradiation tests thus have to be performed. We show here that nanoindentation and micro-compression testing on T91 and HT-9 stainless steel before and after ion irradiation are useful methods to evaluate the radiation induced hardening.

  4. K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os ( Z = 76) derived from new mass attenuation coefficient measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Necati; Tıraşoğlu, Engin; Apaydın, Gökhan; Aylıkcı, Volkan; Cengiz, Erhan

    2007-08-01

    The K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios were derived from new mass attenuation coefficients measured using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer for Tm, Yb elements being Tm 2O 3, Yb 2O 3 compounds and pure Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os. The measurements, in the region 56-77 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the K α1 , K α2 , K β1 and K β2 X- rays from different secondary source targets (Yb, Ta, Os, W, Re and Ir, etc.) excited by the 123.6 keV γ-photons from an 57Co annular source and detected by an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values. The measured values of Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os are reported here for the first time.

  5. K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in elements between Tm (Z = 69) and Os (Z = 76) derived from new mass attenuation coefficient measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, Necati; Tirasoglu, Engin; Apaydin, Goekhan; Aylikci, Volkan; Cengiz, Erhan

    2007-01-01

    The K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios were derived from new mass attenuation coefficients measured using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer for Tm, Yb elements being Tm 2 O 3 , Yb 2 O 3 compounds and pure Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os. The measurements, in the region 56-77 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the K α1 , K α2 , K β1 and K β2 X- rays from different secondary source targets (Yb, Ta, Os, W, Re and Ir, etc.) excited by the 123.6 keV γ-photons from an 57 Co annular source and detected by an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values. The measured values of Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os are reported here for the first time

  6. 75 FR 18849 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ...] Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation--Small... requiring shell egg producers to implement measures to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from...

  7. Structure of the first- and second-neighbor shells of simulated water: Quantitative relation to translational and orientational order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhenyu; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Kumar, Pradeep; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-11-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of water using the five-site transferable interaction potential (TIP5P) model to quantify structural order in both the first shell (defined by four nearest neighbors) and second shell (defined by twelve next-nearest neighbors) of a central water molecule. We find that the anomalous decrease of orientational order upon compression occurs in both shells, but the anomalous decrease of translational order upon compression occurs mainly in the second shell. The decreases of translational order and orientational order upon compression (called the “structural anomaly”) are thus correlated only in the second shell. Our findings quantitatively confirm the qualitative idea that the thermodynamic, structural, and hence dynamic anomalies of water are related to changes upon compression in the second shell.

  8. Penning-trap mass measurements of the neutron-rich K and Ca isotopes: Resurgence of the N=28 shell strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, A.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Ettenauer, S.; Finlay, P.; Gallant, A. T.; Simon, V. V.; Delheij, P.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.; Savajols, H.; Dilling, J.

    2012-02-01

    We present Penning-trap mass measurements of neutron-rich 44,47-50K and 49,50Ca isotopes carried out at the TITAN facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. The 44K mass measurement was performed with a charge-bred 4+ ion utilizing the TITAN electron beam ion trap and agrees with the literature. The mass excesses obtained for 47K and 49,50Ca are more precise and agree with the values published in the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME’03). The 48,49,50K mass excesses are more precise than the AME’03 values by more than 1 order of magnitude. For 48,49K, we find deviations of 7σ and 10σ, respectively. The new 49K mass excess lowers significantly the two-neutron separation energy at the neutron number N=30 compared with the separation energy calculated from the AME’03 mass-excess values and thus increases the N=28 neutron-shell gap energy at Z=19 by approximately 1 MeV.

  9. Study on reinforced lightweight coconut shell concrete beam behavior under shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, K.; Annadurai, R.; Kumar, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Coconut shell used as aggregate in concrete production. • Coconut shell concrete beam behavior studied under shear. • Coconut shell concrete beam behavior are compared with control concrete beams. - Abstract: Lightweight concrete has been produced using crushed coconut shell as coarse aggregate. The shear behavior of reinforced concrete beam made with coconut shell is analyzed and compared with the normal control concrete. Eight beams, four with coconut shell concrete and four with normal control concrete were fabricated and tested. Study includes the structural shear behavior, shear capacity, cracking behavior, deflection behavior, ductility, strains in concrete and in reinforcement. It was observed that the shear behavior of coconut shell concrete is comparable to that of other lightweight concretes. The results of concrete compression strain and steel tension strain showed that coconut shell concrete is able to achieve its full strain capacity under shear loadings. However, the failure zones of coconut shell concrete were larger than for control concrete beams

  10. A novel particle time of flight diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He and DT implosions at the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Frenje, J A; Waugh, C J; Li, C K; Sèguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Kimbrough, J R; MacPhee, A; Collins, G W; Hicks, D; Mackinnon, A; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Clancy, T; Zacharias, R; Döppner, T; Park, H S; LePape, S; Landen, O; Meezan, N; Moses, E I; Glebov, V U; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Olson, R; Kline, J; Kilkenny, J

    2012-10-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, fielded alongside a wedge range-filter (WRF) proton spectrometer, will provide an absolute timing for the shock-burn weighted ρR measurements that will validate the modeling of implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In the first phase of the project, pTOF has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT, DT exploding pusher, and D(3)He implosions using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps. In the second phase of the project, a deflecting magnet will be incorporated into the pTOF design for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D(3)He-filled surrogate implosions using D(3)He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively.

  11. Core excitations across the neutron shell gap in 207Tl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wilson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The single closed-neutron-shell, one proton–hole nucleus 207Tl was populated in deep-inelastic collisions of a 208Pb beam with a 208Pb target. The yrast and near-yrast level scheme has been established up to high excitation energy, comprising an octupole phonon state and a large number of core excited states. Based on shell-model calculations, all observed single core excitations were established to arise from the breaking of the N=126 neutron core. While the shell-model calculations correctly predict the ordering of these states, their energies are compressed at high spins. It is concluded that this compression is an intrinsic feature of shell-model calculations using two-body matrix elements developed for the description of two-body states, and that multiple core excitations need to be considered in order to accurately calculate the energy spacings of the predominantly three-quasiparticle states.

  12. Thermodynamics of the ternary systems: (water + glycine, L-alanine and L-serine + di-ammonium hydrogen citrate) from volumetric, compressibility, and (vapour + liquid) equilibria measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Gholamireza, Afsaneh

    2011-01-01

    The apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibility of glycine, L-alanine and L-serine in water and in aqueous solutions of (0.500 and 1.00) mol . kg -1 di-ammonium hydrogen citrate {(NH 4 ) 2 HCit} and those of (NH 4 ) 2 HCit in water have been obtained over the (288.15 to 313.15) K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from measurements of density and ultrasonic velocity. The apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values at infinite dilution of the investigated amino acids have been obtained and their variations with temperature and their transfer properties from water to aqueous solutions of (NH 4 ) 2 HCit have also been obtained. The results have been interpreted in terms of the hydration of the amino acids. In the second part of this work, water activity measurements by the isopiestic method have been carried out on the aqueous solutions of {glycine + (NH 4 ) 2 HCit}, {alanine + (NH 4 ) 2 HCit}, and {serine + (NH 4 ) 2 HCit} at T = 298.15 K at atmospheric pressure. From these measurements, values of vapour pressure, osmotic coefficient, activity coefficient and Gibbs free energy were obtained. The effect of the type of amino acids on the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of the systems investigated has been studied. The experimental water activities have been correlated successfully with the segment-based local composition Wilson model. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behaviour of the ternary solutions investigated has been studied by using the semi-ideal hydration model and the linear concentration relations have been tested by comparing with the isopiestic measurements for the studied systems at T = 298.15 K.

  13. Thermodynamics of the ternary systems: (water + glycine, L-alanine and L-serine + di-ammonium hydrogen citrate) from volumetric, compressibility, and (vapour + liquid) equilibria measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat, E-mail: rahsadeghi@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholamireza, Afsaneh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibility of glycine, L-alanine and L-serine in water and in aqueous solutions of (0.500 and 1.00) mol . kg{sup -1} di-ammonium hydrogen citrate {l_brace}(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace} and those of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit in water have been obtained over the (288.15 to 313.15) K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from measurements of density and ultrasonic velocity. The apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values at infinite dilution of the investigated amino acids have been obtained and their variations with temperature and their transfer properties from water to aqueous solutions of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit have also been obtained. The results have been interpreted in terms of the hydration of the amino acids. In the second part of this work, water activity measurements by the isopiestic method have been carried out on the aqueous solutions of {l_brace}glycine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace}, {l_brace}alanine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace}, and {l_brace}serine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace} at T = 298.15 K at atmospheric pressure. From these measurements, values of vapour pressure, osmotic coefficient, activity coefficient and Gibbs free energy were obtained. The effect of the type of amino acids on the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of the systems investigated has been studied. The experimental water activities have been correlated successfully with the segment-based local composition Wilson model. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behaviour of the ternary solutions investigated has been studied by using the semi-ideal hydration model and the linear concentration relations have been tested by comparing with the isopiestic measurements for the studied systems at T = 298.15 K.

  14. Reaction cross section measurements of neutron-rich exotic nuclei in the vicinity of closed shells N=20 and N=28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouaja, A.

    2003-12-01

    Using the direct method, the mean energy integrated reaction cross section was investigated for a wide range of neutron-rich nuclei (N → Ar) at GANIL. Using the parametrisation of S. Kox, 19 new radii measurements (reaction cross sections) were obtained. By the isotopic, isotonic and isospin dependence, the evolution of the strong reduced radius was studied according to the excess of neutrons. New halo effect is proposed to the nuclei of Mg 35 and S 44 . A quadratic parametrization is also proposed for the nuclear radius as a function of the isospin in the region of closed shells N=8 and N=28. In addition, we used a modified version of the Glauber model for studying the tail and matter distribution of nuclei. Indeed, using our new data the effects of the nuclear size (root mean square radii) and the matter distribution (diffusivity) were de-convoluted for each isotope. The root mean square radii of Na and Mg isotopes obtained so far were consistent with the ones from literature. (author)

  15. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  16. Compressibility measurements and phonon spectra of hexagonal transition-metal nitrides at high pressure: ε-TaN, δ-MoN, and Cr2N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soignard, Emmanuel; Shebanova, Olga; McMillan, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    We report compressibility measurements for three transition metal nitrides (ε-TaN, δ-MoN, Cr 2 N) that have structures based on hexagonal arrangements of the metal atoms. The studies were performed using monochromatic synchrotron x-ray diffraction at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell. The three nitride compounds are well-known high hardness materials, and they are found to be highly incompressible. The bulk modulus values measured for ε-TaN, Cr 2 N, and δ-MoN are K 0 =288(6) GPa, 275(23) GPa, and 345(9) GPa, respectively. The data were analyzed using a linearized plot of reduced pressure (F) vs the Eulerian finite strain variable f within a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state formulation. The K 0 ' values for ε-TaN and δ-MoN were 4.7(0.5) and 3.5(0.3), respectively, close to the value of K 0 ' =4 that is typically assumed in fitting compressibility data in equation of state studies using a Birch-Murnaghan equation. However, Cr 2 N was determined to have a much smaller value, K 0 ' =2.0(2.0), indicating a significantly smaller degree of structural stiffening with increased pressure. We also present Raman data for ε-TaN and δ-MoN at high pressure in order to characterize the phonon behavior in these materials. All of the Raman active modes for ε-TaN were identified using polarized spectroscopy. Peaks at low frequency are due to Ta motions, whereas modes at higher wave number contain a large component of N motion. The high frequency modes associated with Ta-N stretching vibrations are more sensitive to compression than the metal displacements occurring at lower wave number. The mode assignments can be generally extended to δ-MoN, that has a much more complex Raman spectrum. The x-ray and Raman data for ε-TaN show evidence for structural disordering occurring above 20 GPa, whereas no such change is observed for δ-MoN

  17. In-vehicle measurement of ultrafine particles on compressed natural gas, conventional diesel, and oxidation-catalyst diesel heavy-duty transit buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Davyda; Jones, Steven; Lalor, Melinda

    2007-02-01

    Many metropolitan transit authorities are considering upgrading transit bus fleets to decrease ambient criteria pollutant levels. Advancements in engine and fuel technology have lead to a generation of lower-emission buses in a variety of fuel types. Dynamometer tests show substantial reductions in particulate mass emissions for younger buses (vehicle particle number concentration measurements on conventional diesel, oxidation-catalyst diesel and compressed natural gas transit buses are compared to estimate relative in-vehicle particulate exposures. Two primary consistencies are observed from the data: the CNG buses have average particle count concentrations near the average concentrations for the oxidation-catalyst diesel buses, and the conventional diesel buses have average particle count concentrations approximately three to four times greater than the CNG buses. Particle number concentrations are also noticeably affected by bus idling behavior and ventilation options, such as, window position and air conditioning.

  18. The Compression Flow as a Measure to Estimate the Cognitive Impairment Severity in Resting State fMRI and 18FDG-PET Alzheimer's Disease Connectomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giuliano Zippo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The human brain appears organized in compartments characterized by seemingly specific functional purposes on many spatial scales. A complementary functional state binds information from specialized districts to return what is called integrated information. This fundamental network dynamics undergoes to severe disarrays in diverse degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's Diseases (AD. The AD represents a multifarious syndrome characterized by structural, functional and metabolic landmarks. In particular, in the early stages of AD, adaptive functional modifications of the brain networks mislead initial diagnoses because cognitive abilities may result indiscernible from normal subjects. As a matter of facts, current measures of functional integration fail to catch significant differences among normal, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and even AD subjects. The aim of this work is to introduce a new topological feature called Compression Flow (CF to finely estimate the extent of the functional integration in the brain networks. The method uses a Monte Carlo-like estimation of the information integration flows returning the compression ratio between the size of the injected information and the size of the condensed information within the network. We analyzed the resting state connectomes of 75 subjects of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 (ADNI repository. Our analyses are focused on the 18FGD-PET and functional MRI (fMRI acquisitions in several clinical screening conditions. Results indicated that CF effectively discriminate MCI, AD and normal subjects by showing a significant decrease of the functional integration in the AD and MCI brain connectomes. This result did not emerge by using a set of common complex network statistics. Furthermore, CF was best correlated with individual clinical scoring scales. In conclusion, we presented a novel measure to quantify the functional integration that resulted efficient to discriminate

  19. The status of experimental buckling investigations of shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, J.

    1982-01-01

    The recent developments in shell buckling experiments are surveyed and related to a review of the progress in the seventies. Model fabrication, imperfection measurements, boundary conditions, nondestructive testing, combined loading, postbuckling behavior, composite shells and other aspects of shell buckling tests are discussed. The motivation for experiments and the conclusions drawn in the previous review are reassessed. (orig.)

  20. Compressed normalized block difference for object tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yun; Zhang, Dengzhuo; Cai, Donglan; Zhou, Hao; Lan, Ge

    2018-04-01

    Feature extraction is very important for robust and real-time tracking. Compressive sensing provided a technical support for real-time feature extraction. However, all existing compressive tracking were based on compressed Haar-like feature, and how to compress many more excellent high-dimensional features is worth researching. In this paper, a novel compressed normalized block difference feature (CNBD) was proposed. For resisting noise effectively in a highdimensional normalized pixel difference feature (NPD), a normalized block difference feature extends two pixels in the original formula of NPD to two blocks. A CNBD feature can be obtained by compressing a normalized block difference feature based on compressive sensing theory, with the sparse random Gaussian matrix as the measurement matrix. The comparative experiments of 7 trackers on 20 challenging sequences showed that the tracker based on CNBD feature can perform better than other trackers, especially than FCT tracker based on compressed Haar-like feature, in terms of AUC, SR and Precision.

  1. Spectroscopic factors measurements in the s,d and f,p shells below and above the Coulomb barrier by (3He,d) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghdadi, Ahmed.

    1974-01-01

    The overlap of t and d or 3 He and d wave functions may be measured by one neutron transfer in (d,t) or one proton transfer in ( 3 He,d). The measurement of the resulting normalization constant has been performed in subcoulombic conditions in the case of 58 Ni( 3 He,d) 59 Cu and 60 Ni( 3 He,d) 61 Cu leading to the first 3/2 - and 1/2 - states with a position sensitive detector in a Buechner spectrograph. The result: D 2 =2.7+-0.2 10 4 MeV 2 fm 3 is in agreement with the D 2 measurement for (t,d) reactions [3.1+-0.2 10 4 MeV 2 fm 3 ] and with the theoretical value proposed by L.J.B. Goldfarg and coworkers. This result was used for a determination of the spectroscopic factors of the 1.379MeV 3/2 - state, the 1.507MeV 1/2 - state and the 1.758MeV 3/2 - state in 57 Co. The subcoulombic approximation is also shown to be valid even in the case of (d,p) reactions, by the measurement of angular distributions and excitation curves of 60 Ni(d,p) reactions leading to the excited states at 4.760MeV (l=2) and 4.907MeV (l=0). In the second part, some spectroscopic factors in the s-d shell were measured by ( 3 He,d) reactions at MP Tandem energies. In the case of 27 Al( 3 He,d) 28 Si (states at 4.62, 6.88, 6.89, 9.32 and 0.38MeV) the normalization constant D 0 2 (deduced from the subcoulombic D 2 value) together with the first order finite range approximation leads to spectroscopic factors in good agreement with Wildenthal theoretical results. For 28 Si( 3 He,d) 29 p however, the values are too high compared to 29 Si. The conclusion is that it is better to use the DWBA treatment at subcoulombic energies everytime the experimental conditions may be fulfilled [fr

  2. Importance-truncated shell model for multi-shell valence spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, Christina; Vobig, Klaus; Roth, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The valence-space shell model is one of the work horses in nuclear structure theory. In traditional applications, shell-model calculations are carried out using effective interactions constructed in a phenomenological framework for rather small valence spaces, typically spanned by one major shell. We improve on this traditional approach addressing two main aspects. First, we use new effective interactions derived in an ab initio approach and, thus, establish a connection to the underlying nuclear interaction providing access to single- and multi-shell valence spaces. Second, we extend the shell model to larger valence spaces by applying an importance-truncation scheme based on a perturbative importance measure. In this way, we reduce the model space to the relevant basis states for the description of a few target eigenstates and solve the eigenvalue problem in this physics-driven truncated model space. In particular multi-shell valence spaces are not tractable otherwise. We combine the importance-truncated shell model with refined extrapolation schemes to approximately recover the exact result. We present first results obtained in the importance-truncated shell model with the newly derived ab initio effective interactions for multi-shell valence spaces, e.g., the sdpf shell.

  3. Longitudinally Jointed Edge-wise Compression Honeycomb Composite Sandwich Coupon Testing and FE Analysis: Three Methods of Strain Measurement, and Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokh, Babak; AbdulRahim, Nur Aida; Segal, Ken; Fan, Terry; Jones, Justin; Hodges, Ken; Mashni, Noah; Garg, Naman; Sang, Alex; Gifford, Dawn; hide

    2013-01-01

    Three means (i.e., typical foil strain gages, fiber optic sensors, and a digital image correlation (DIC) system) were implemented to measure strains on the back and front surfaces of a longitudinally jointed curved test article subjected to edge-wise compression testing, at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, according to ASTM C364. The Pre-test finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to assess ultimate failure load and predict strain distribution pattern throughout the test coupon. The predicted strain pattern contours were then utilized as guidelines for installing the strain measurement instrumentations. The strain gages and fiber optic sensors were bonded on the specimen at locations with nearly the same strain values, as close as possible to each other, so that, comparisons between the measured strains by strain gages and fiber optic sensors, as well as the DIC system are justified. The test article was loaded to failure (at approximately 38 kips), at the strain value of approximately 10,000mu epsilon As a part of this study, the validity of the measured strains by fiber optic sensors is examined against the strain gage and DIC data, and also will be compared with FEA predictions.

  4. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our ...

  5. Schlieren-based temperature measurement inside the cylinder of an optical spark ignition and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiferis, Pavlos; Charalambides, Alexandros; Hardalupas, Yannis; Soulopoulos, Nikolaos; Taylor, A M K P; Urata, Yunichi

    2015-05-10

    Schlieren [Schlieren and Shadowgraphy Techniques (McGraw-Hill, 2001); Optics of Flames (Butterworths, 1963)] is a non-intrusive technique that can be used to detect density variations in a medium, and thus, under constant pressure and mixture concentration conditions, measure whole-field temperature distributions. The objective of the current work was to design a schlieren system to measure line-of-sight (LOS)-averaged temperature distribution with the final aim to determine the temperature distribution inside the cylinder of internal combustion (IC) engines. In a preliminary step, we assess theoretically the errors arising from the data reduction used to determine temperature from a schlieren measurement and find that the total error, random and systematic, is less than 3% for typical conditions encountered in the present experiments. A Z-type, curved-mirror schlieren system was used to measure the temperature distribution from a hot air jet in an open air environment in order to evaluate the method. Using the Abel transform, the radial distribution of the temperature was reconstructed from the LOS measurements. There was good agreement in the peak temperature between the reconstructed schlieren and thermocouple measurements. Experiments were then conducted in a four-stroke, single-cylinder, optical spark ignition engine with a four-valve, pentroof-type cylinder head to measure the temperature distribution of the reaction zone of an iso-octane-air mixture. The engine optical windows were designed to produce parallel rays and allow accurate application of the technique. The feasibility of the method to measure temperature distributions in IC engines was evaluated with simulations of the deflection angle combined with equilibrium chemistry calculations that estimated the temperature of the reaction zone at the position of maximum ray deflection as recorded in a schlieren image. Further simulations showed that the effects of exhaust gas recirculation and air

  6. Image quality (IQ) guided multispectral image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Chen, Genshe; Wang, Zhonghai; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Image compression is necessary for data transportation, which saves both transferring time and storage space. In this paper, we focus on our discussion on lossy compression. There are many standard image formats and corresponding compression algorithms, for examples, JPEG (DCT -- discrete cosine transform), JPEG 2000 (DWT -- discrete wavelet transform), BPG (better portable graphics) and TIFF (LZW -- Lempel-Ziv-Welch). The image quality (IQ) of decompressed image will be measured by numerical metrics such as root mean square error (RMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. Given an image and a specified IQ, we will investigate how to select a compression method and its parameters to achieve an expected compression. Our scenario consists of 3 steps. The first step is to compress a set of interested images by varying parameters and compute their IQs for each compression method. The second step is to create several regression models per compression method after analyzing the IQ-measurement versus compression-parameter from a number of compressed images. The third step is to compress the given image with the specified IQ using the selected compression method (JPEG, JPEG2000, BPG, or TIFF) according to the regressed models. The IQ may be specified by a compression ratio (e.g., 100), then we will select the compression method of the highest IQ (SSIM, or PSNR). Or the IQ may be specified by a IQ metric (e.g., SSIM = 0.8, or PSNR = 50), then we will select the compression method of the highest compression ratio. Our experiments tested on thermal (long-wave infrared) images (in gray scales) showed very promising results.

  7. Double shell planar experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Wilson, D. C.; Loomis, E. N.; Batha, S. H.; Ping, Y.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Amendt, P. A.

    2017-10-01

    The double shell project is aimed at fielding neutron-producing capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in which an outer low-Z ablator collides with an inner high-Z shell to compress the fuel. However, understanding these targets experimentally can be challenging when compared with conventional single shell targets. Halfraum-driven planar targets at OMEGA are being used to study physics issues important to double shell implosions outside of a convergent geometry. Both VISAR and radiography through a tube have advantages over imaging through the hohlraum and double-shell capsule at NIF. A number physics issues are being studied with this platform that include 1-d and higher dimensional effects such as defect-driven hydrodynamic instabilities from engineering features. Additionally, the use of novel materials with controlled density gradients require study in easily diagnosed 1-d systems. This work ultimately feeds back into the NIF capsule platform through manufacturing tolerances set using data from OMEGA. Supported under the US DOE by the LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-17-25386.

  8. Delamination of Compressed Thin Layers at Corners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim D.; Jensen, Henrik Myhre; Clausen, Johan

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of delamination for a thin elastic layer under compression, attached to a substrate at a corner is carried out. The analysis is performed by combining results from interface fracture mechanics and the theory of thin shells. In contrast with earlier results for delamination on a flat s...... layers, Fracture mechanics, Crack closure, Steady state crack propagation.......An analysis of delamination for a thin elastic layer under compression, attached to a substrate at a corner is carried out. The analysis is performed by combining results from interface fracture mechanics and the theory of thin shells. In contrast with earlier results for delamination on a flat...... results for the fracture mechanical properties have been obtained, and these are applied in a study of the effect of contacting crack faces. Special attention has been given to analyse conditions under which steady state propagation of buckling driven delamination takes place. Keywords: Delamination, Thin...

  9. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that “DNABIT Compress” algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases. PMID:21383923

  10. Investigation and measurement of radio thermoluminescence properties of some calci tic mollusc shells of the Persian Gulf and the Oman Sea (for γ radiation dosimetry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafourian, H.; Rabbani, M.; Rouhi, U.

    2000-01-01

    Biogenic Calcium Carbonate, particularly as naturally thermoluminescent calci tic mollusc shells may serve as excellent radio thermoluminescent dosimeters. In this study the radio thermoluminescence properties of 8 different bivalves of the Persian Gulf, the Oman Sea and the internal calcite shell of Sepia sp. are investigated. The results of this investigation have shown that the shells of Sepia sp., Pinctata radiata and Card ita bicolor as appropriate dosimeters for both personal and industrial dosimetry purposes, among which Sepia sp. is the most sensitive one. Callista umbonella and Mactra sp. are relatively less thermoluminescent while Saccostrea Cucullata and Chlamys ruschenbergerii are completely inert with respect to γ - thermoluminescence. Thermoluminescence properties of Anadara refescens and Anadara secticostata decrease surprisingly by an increase in the absorbed dose of γ radiation, which can mainly be interpreted as the result of crystal lattice destruction caused by ionizing radiation

  11. The Use of Compressive Sensing to Reconstruct Radiation Characteristics of Wide-Band Antennas from Sparse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    adequately reconstructed by taking the inverse transform of only the large coefficients. In transform coding, a data set can be represented as ...transformed back into the measurement domain using the inverse transform , which in this case is the inverse Fourier transform or inverse cosine

  12. Strontium and fluorine in tuatua shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trompetter, W.J.; Coote, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the research to date on the elemental distributions of strontium, calcium, and fluorine in a collection of 24 tuatua shells (courtesy of National Museum). Variations in elemental concentrations were measured in the shell cross-sections using a scanning proton microprobe (PIXE and PIGME). In this paper we report the findings to date, and present 2-D measurement scans as illustrative grey-scale pictures. Our results support the hypothesis that increased strontium concentrations are deposited in the shells during spawning, and that fluorine concentration is proportional to growth rate. (author). 15 refs.; 13 figs.; 1 appendix

  13. Impact of errors in recorded compressed breast thickness measurements on volumetric density classification using volpara v1.5.0 software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waade, Gunvor Gipling; Highnam, Ralph; Hauge, Ingrid H R; McEntee, Mark F; Hofvind, Solveig; Denton, Erika; Kelly, Judith; Sarwar, Jasmine J; Hogg, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Mammographic density has been demonstrated to predict breast cancer risk. It has been proposed that it could be used for stratifying screening pathways and recommending additional imaging. Volumetric density tools use the recorded compressed breast thickness (CBT) of the breast measured at the x-ray unit in their calculation; however, the accuracy of the recorded thickness can vary. The aim of this study was to investigate whether inaccuracies in recorded CBT impact upon volumetric density classification and to examine whether the current quality control (QC) standard is sufficient for assessing mammographic density. Raw data from 52 digital screening mammograms were included in the study. For each image, the clinically recorded CBT was artificially increased and decreased in increments of 1 mm to simulate measurement error, until ±15% from the recorded CBT was reached. New images were created for each 1 mm step in thickness resulting in a total of 974 images which then had volpara density grade (VDG) and volumetric density percentage assigned. A change in VDG was observed in 38.5% (n = 20) of mammograms when applying ±15% error to the recorded CBT and 11.5% (n = 6) was within the QC standard prescribed error of ±5 mm. The current QC standard of ±5 mm error in recorded CBT creates the potential for error in mammographic density measurement. This may lead to inaccurate classification of mammographic density. The current QC standard for assessing mammographic density should be reconsidered.

  14. Using neutrons to measure keV temperatures in highly compressed plastic at multi-Gbar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, J.; Bachmann, B.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Hatarik, R.; Döppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Collins, G. W.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kraus, D.; Landen, O. L.; Kritcher, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    We have designed an experiment for the National Ignition Facility to measure the Hugoniot of materials such as plastic at extreme pressures. The design employs a strong spherically converging shock launched through a solid ball of material using a hohlraum radiation drive. The shock front conditions can be characterized using X-ray radiography until background from shock coalescence overtakes the backlit signal. Shock coalescence at the center is predicted to reach tens of Gbars and can be further characterized by measuring the X-ray self-emission and 2.45 MeV neutrons emitted from the shock flash region. In this simulation design work the standard plastic sphere is replaced with a deuterated polyethylene sphere, CD2, that reaches sufficiently high densities and temperatures in the central hot spot to produce neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) fusion reactions that can be measured by a neutron time of flight spectrometer (nTOF) and act as a temperature diagnostic. This paper focuses on the design of these experiments, based on an extensive suite of radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, and the interpretation of the predicted DD neutron signals. The simulations predict mean temperatures of 1 keV in the central hot spot with mean densities of 33 g/cc and mean pressures of 25 Gbar. A preliminary comparison with early experimental results looks promising with an average ion temperature of 1.06 ± 0.15 keV in the central hot spot estimated from the nTOF spectral width and measured neutron yield of 7.0 (±0.5) × 109 DD neutrons.

  15. Measurements of Skin Friction of the Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Cone with Foreign Gas Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Constantine C.; Ukuno, Arthur F.

    1960-01-01

    Measurements of average skin friction of the turbulent boundary layer have been made on a 15deg total included angle cone with foreign gas injection. Measurements of total skin-friction drag were obtained at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.7, 3.5, and 4.7 and within a Reynolds number range from 0.9 x 10(exp 6) to 5.9 x 10(exp 6) with injection of helium, air, and Freon-12 (CCl2F2) through the porous wall. Substantial reductions in skin friction are realized with gas injection within the range of Mach numbers of this test. The relative reduction in skin friction is in accordance with theory-that is, the light gases are most effective when compared on a mass flow basis. There is a marked effect of Mach number on the reduction of average skin friction; this effect is not shown by the available theories. Limited transition location measurements indicate that the boundary layer does not fully trip with gas injection but that the transition point approaches a forward limit with increasing injection. The variation of the skin-friction coefficient, for the lower injection rates with natural transition, is dependent on the flow Reynolds number and type of injected gas; and at the high injection rates the skin friction is in fair agreement with the turbulent boundary layer results.

  16. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  17. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  18. Breakup of an accelerated shell owing to Rayleigh--Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suydam, B.R.

    1978-06-01

    A simplified model for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an accelerated shell is examined, and it is found that the most dangerous wavelength to be about that of the shell thickness. The shell material is assumed to be an inviscid, incompressible fluid. Effects of finite compressibility and of surface tension are found to be negligible, but the effects of viscosity are shown to be very large. The need for better knowledge of viscosity at high pressure is pointed out

  19. Measurements of inner-shell characteristic X-ray yields of thick W, Mo and Zr targets by low-energy electron impact and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.L.; Zhao, J.L.; Tian, L.X.; An, Z.; Zhu, J.J.; Liu, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We measured characteristic X-ray yields of thick W, Mo, Zr by 5–29 keV electrons. •Our measured data are in general in good agreement with the MC results with ∼10%. •Error of 10% of characteristic X-ray yields will produce errors of 2–7% for BIXS. -- Abstract: Inner-shell characteristic X-ray yields are one of the important ingredients in the β-ray induced X-ray spectrometry (BIXS) technique which can be used to perform tritium content and depth distribution analyses in plasma facing materials (PLMs) and other tritium-containing materials, such as W, Mo, Zr. In this paper, the measurements of K, L, M-shell X-ray yields Y(E) of pure thick W (Z = 74), Mo (Z = 42) and Zr (Z = 40) element targets produced by electron impact in the energy range of 5–29 keV are presented. The experimental data for Y(E) are compared with the corresponding predictions from Monte Carlo (MC) calculations using the general purpose MC code PENELOPE. In general, a good agreement is obtained between the experiment and the MC calculations for the variation of Y(E) with the impact energy both in shape and in magnitude with ∼10%. The effect of uncertainty of inner-shell characteristic X-ray yields on the BIXS technique is also discussed

  20. Subjective evaluation of compressed image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heesub; Rowberg, Alan H.; Frank, Mark S.; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Yongmin

    1992-05-01

    Lossy data compression generates distortion or error on the reconstructed image and the distortion becomes visible as the compression ratio increases. Even at the same compression ratio, the distortion appears differently depending on the compression method used. Because of the nonlinearity of the human visual system and lossy data compression methods, we have evaluated subjectively the quality of medical images compressed with two different methods, an intraframe and interframe coding algorithms. The evaluated raw data were analyzed statistically to measure interrater reliability and reliability of an individual reader. Also, the analysis of variance was used to identify which compression method is better statistically, and from what compression ratio the quality of a compressed image is evaluated as poorer than that of the original. Nine x-ray CT head images from three patients were used as test cases. Six radiologists participated in reading the 99 images (some were duplicates) compressed at four different compression ratios, original, 5:1, 10:1, and 15:1. The six readers agree more than by chance alone and their agreement was statistically significant, but there were large variations among readers as well as within a reader. The displacement estimated interframe coding algorithm is significantly better in quality than that of the 2-D block DCT at significance level 0.05. Also, 10:1 compressed images with the interframe coding algorithm do not show any significant differences from the original at level 0.05.

  1. Coal option. [Shell Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This paper notes the necessity of developing an international coal trade on a very large scale. The role of Shell in the coal industry is examined; the regions in which Shell companies are most active are Australia, Southern Africa, Indonesia; Europe and North America. Research is being carried out on marketing and transportation, especially via slurry pipelines; coal-oil emulsions; briquets; fluidized-bed combustion; recovery of coal from potential waste material; upgrading of low-rank coals; unconventional forms of mining; coal conversion (the Shell/Koppers high-pressure coal gasification process). Techniques for cleaning flue gas (the Shell Flue Gas Desulfurization process) are being examined.

  2. Shell-like structures

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2011-01-01

    In this volume, scientists and researchers from industry discuss the new trends in simulation and computing shell-like structures. The focus is put on the following problems: new theories (based on two-dimensional field equations but describing non-classical effects), new constitutive equations (for materials like sandwiches, foams, etc. and which can be combined with the two-dimensional shell equations), complex structures (folded, branching and/or self intersecting shell structures, etc.) and shell-like structures on different scales (for example: nano-tubes) or very thin structures (similar

  3. Measured energy dependence of L-shell photoelectric cross sections of lead in the energy region 17-50 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S K; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1980-08-28

    The energy dependence of L-shell photoelectric cross sections for lead in the energy region 17-50 keV has been investigated. The method utilises external conversion x-rays as the source of photons and it yields relative rather than absolute cross sections, but is simpler and more accurate. The results show fairly good agreement with theory.

  4. Neutron diffraction measurements for the determination of heat treatment effectiveness in generating compressive residual stress in an automotive crown gear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, G.; Fiori, F.; Girardin, E.; Giuliani, A.; Pyzalla, A.; Quadrini, E.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Thermal austenitizing and tempering treatments are being developed in automotive industry to prevent crack initiation and avoid crack propagation, especially in components where stress intensity factors influence the stress field and then the fatigue life of the component itself. This is the case of crown gears, where the teeth root undergoes frequently to cracking when tensile residual stresses are present at the surface, as typical loads are impulsive and very high. The sign reversal of these stresses is the aim of austenitizing and tempering treatments. In this work residual stress measurements carried out at HMI-BENSC are presented, in a UNI55Cr3 steel crown gear submitted to such kind of treatments, performed with a new multi-frequency induction technique whose effectiveness is checked. (author)

  5. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  6. Quasi-isentropic compressibility of a strongly nonideal deuterium plasma at pressures of up to 5500 GPa: Nonideality and degeneracy effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalov, M. A., E-mail: postmaster@ifv.vniief.ru; Il’kaev, R. I. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Research Institute for Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, A. L.; Blikov, A. O.; Ogorodnikov, V. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Research Institute for Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Gryaznov, V. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation); Iosilevskii, I. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We report on the experimental results on the quasi-isentropic compressibility of a strongly nonideal deuterium plasma that have been obtained on setups of cylindrical and spherical geometries in the pressure range of up to P ≈ 5500 GPa. We describe the characteristics of experimental setups, as well as the methods for the diagnostics and interpretation of the experimental results. The trajectory of metal shells that compress the deuterium plasma was detected using powerful pulsed X-ray sources with a maximal electron energy of up to 60 MeV. The values of the plasma density, which varied from ρ ≈ 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} to ρ ≈ 6 g/cm{sup 3}, which corresponds to pressure P ≈ 5500 GPa (55 Mbar), were determined from the measured value of the shell radius at the instant that it was stopped. The pressure of the compressed plasma was determined using gasdynamic calculations taking into account the actual characteristics of the experimental setups. We have obtained a strongly compressed deuterium plasma in which electron degeneracy effects under the conditions of strong interparticle interaction are significant. The experimental results have been compared with the theoretical models of a strongly nonideal partly degenerate plasma. We have obtained experimental confirmation of the plasma phase transition in the pressure range near 150 GPa (1.5 Mbar), which is in keeping with the conclusion concerning anomaly in the compressibility of the deuterium plasma drawn in [1].

  7. A micro-gas phase chromatography with a re-compression system used to measure impurities in low pressure tritiated gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godot, A.; Colas, S.; Hubinois, J.C. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2008-07-15

    The measurement of the amount of impurities in tritiated gases can be achieved by means of mass spectrometry or gas phase chromatography. A growing number of disadvantages associated to the 'life expectancy' of the mass spectrometer and its tricky maintenance (when enclosed in a gloves box) have led us to acquire a micro gas phase chromatograph. This device is based on a modular concept with the injector, the column and the detector packed in a compact unit which is easy to replace. Thanks to constant improvement in the field of capillary column, new micro chromatographs are now able to perform measurement in absence of pre-column and presence of argon instead of nitrogen as a carrier gas. Of importance, this new apparatus allow better performances (running time: 1 m 30 sec, limit of detection: {<=}10 ppm). However, in normal use, this apparatus requires 800 milli-bar in the inlet, a pressure that doesn't match with the feature of our process gas. To overcome this inconvenience, we have developed an automatic functioning system with a bellows that samples and compresses the gas to pressures compatible with the micro gas chromatograph. The apparatus and the experimental procedures will be presented as well as experimental performances (reproducibility, detection limits..) for some impurities such as nitrogen, oxygen and helium. (authors)

  8. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  9. Shell energy scenarios to 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Shell developed two scenarios that describe alternative ways the energy future may develop. In the first scenario (Scramble) policymakers pay little attention to more efficient energy use until supplies are tight. Likewise, greenhouse gas emissions are not seriously addressed until there are major climate shocks. In the second scenario (Blueprints) growing local actions begin to address the challenges of economic development, energy security and environmental pollution. A price is applied to a critical mass of emissions giving a huge stimulus to the development of clean energy technologies, such as carbon dioxide capture and storage, and energy efficiency measures. The result is far lower carbon dioxide emissions. Both these scenarios can help Shell to test their strategy against a range of possible developments over the long-term. However, according to Shell, the Blueprints' outcomes offer the best hope for a sustainable future, whether or not they arise exactly in the way described. However, with the right combination of policy, technology and commitment from governments, industry and society globally, Shell believes it can be realized. But achieving the targets will not be easy, and time is short. Clear thinking, huge investment, and effective leadership are required

  10. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leary, Rowan; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Holland, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform

  11. Amplitude structure of off-shell processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.; Goldstein, G.R.; Moravcsik, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The structure of M matrices, or scattering amplitudes, and of potentials for off-shell processes is discussed with the objective of determining how one can obtain information on off-shell amplitudes of a process in terms of the physical observables of a larger process in which the first process is embedded. The procedure found is inevitably model dependent, but within a particular model for embedding, a determination of the physically measurable amplitudes of the larger process is able to yield a determination of the off-shell amplitudes of the embedded process

  12. Shell coal gasification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennekes, B. [Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc. (United States). Technology Marketing

    2002-07-01

    The presentation, on which 17 slides/overheads are included in the papers, explained the principles of the Shell coal gasification process and the methods incorporated for control of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulates and mercury. The economics of the process were discussed. The differences between gasification and burning, and the differences between the Shell process and other processes were discussed.

  13. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells

  14. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  15. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  16. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F; Calle, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    BACKGROUND AND GOAL OF STUDY: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with decreased depth. In patients undergoing prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation by health care professionals, chest compression rate and depth were recorded using an accelerometer (E-series monitor-defibrillator, Zoll, U.S.A.). Compression depth was compared for rates 120/min. A difference in compression depth ≥0.5 cm was considered clinically significant. Mixed models with repeated measurements of chest compression depth and rate (level 1) nested within patients (level 2) were used with compression rate as a continuous and as a categorical predictor of depth. Results are reported as means and standard error (SE). One hundred and thirty-three consecutive patients were analysed (213,409 compressions). Of all compressions 2% were 120/min, 36% were 5 cm. In 77 out of 133 (58%) patients a statistically significant lower depth was observed for rates >120/min compared to rates 80-120/min, in 40 out of 133 (30%) this difference was also clinically significant. The mixed models predicted that the deepest compression (4.5 cm) occurred at a rate of 86/min, with progressively lower compression depths at higher rates. Rates >145/min would result in a depth compression depth for rates 80-120/min was on average 4.5 cm (SE 0.06) compared to 4.1 cm (SE 0.06) for compressions >120/min (mean difference 0.4 cm, Pcompression rates and lower compression depths. Avoiding excessive compression rates may lead to more compressions of sufficient depth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling the properties of closed-cell cellular materials from tomography images using finite shell elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caty, O.; Maire, E.; Youssef, S.; Bouchet, R.

    2008-01-01

    Closed-cell cellular materials exhibit several interesting properties. These properties are, however, very difficult to simulate and understand from the knowledge of the cellular microstructure. This problem is mostly due to the highly complex organization of the cells and to their very fine walls. X-ray tomography can produce three-dimensional (3-D) images of the structure, enabling one to visualize locally the damage of the cell walls that would result in the structure collapsing. These data could be used for meshing with continuum elements of the structure for finite element (FE) calculations. But when the density is very low, the walls are fine and the meshes based on continuum elements are not suitable to represent accurately the structure while preserving the representativeness of the model in terms of cell size. This paper presents a shell FE model obtained from tomographic 3-D images that allows bigger volumes of low-density closed-cell cellular materials to be calculated. The model is enriched by direct thickness measurement on the tomographic images. The values measured are ascribed to the shell elements. To validate and use the model, a structure composed of stainless steel hollow spheres is firstly compressed and scanned to observe local deformations. The tomographic data are also meshed with shells for a FE calculation. The convergence of the model is checked and its performance is compared with a continuum model. The global behavior is compared with the measures of the compression test. At the local scale, the model allows the local stress and strain field to be calculated. The calculated deformed shape is compared with the deformed tomographic images

  18. P-shell hyperon binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetsier, D.; Amos, K.

    1991-01-01

    A shell model for lambda hypernuclei has been used to determine the binding energy of the hyperon in nuclei throughout the p shell. Conventional (Cohen and Kurath) potential energies for nucleon-nucleon interactions were used with hyperon-nucleon interactions taken from Nijmegen one boson exchange potentials. The hyperon binding energies calculated from these potentials compare well with measured values. 7 refs., 2 figs

  19. X-ray backlighting requirements for the double-shell target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    We have analyzed one specific NOVA double-shell target design and have determined the x-ray energies required for probing the performance of the implosion. It is virtually impossible to study the compression of the fuel or the motion of the inner pusher. An x-ray energy of about 9 keV appears to be ideal for measuring the behavior of the outer TaCOH shell for the majority of its travel. However, it would be advantageous to have an x-ray source of about 25 keV to measure the contact between the two shells. Development of narrowband x-ray line sources are more desirable than broadband continuum sources since the intensity per keV is many times greater in the line. Intensities of the probes are determined by the self-emission levels of the target capsule. For the 9 keV line source, an intensity of upwards to 10 15 keV/keV/sh/cm 2 /sr is required with a source area of about 0.01 cm 2

  20. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Compressibility, Turbulence and High Speed Flow introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range, through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. The book provides the reader with the necessary background and current trends in the theoretical and experimental aspects of compressible turbulent flows and compressible turbulence. Detailed derivations of the pertinent equations describing the motion of such turbulent flows is provided and an extensive discussion of the various approaches used in predicting both free shear and wall bounded flows is presented. Experimental measurement techniques common to the compressible flow regime are introduced with particular emphasis on the unique challenges presented by high speed flows. Both experimental and numerical simulation work is supplied throughout to provide the reader with an overall perspective of current tre...

  1. Development velocity interferometer system for any reflector for measurement of mechanical properties of materials during high strain - rate compression and decompression process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, K.D.; Rav, Amit S.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2011-02-01

    Velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) has been developed to study the dynamic mechanical properties of materials subjected to high strain rates. This instrument is essentially a wide angle Michelson interferometer for measuring the Doppler shift of the monochromatic light from a laser (in our case λ 0 = 532 nm) after it gets reflected off the free surface of the moving target. A fiber optical arrangement directs the laser beam to the target and transports the scattered light signal into the interferometer. The interferometer beats the light signals reflected from the target at the two different instant of time separated by the delay (τ) decided by the length of the etalon in one of the leg of the interferometer. The interferometer signal is fed to the photomultiplier tube, the output of which is recorded in a digital storage oscilloscope. The oscilloscope record is then analysed to deduce the velocity history of moving free surface of target which is then used to determine various important mechanical properties during high strain rate compression and decompression. This instrument has been used to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (σ HEL ), spall strength (σ s ) and dynamic yield strength (Y) of Al2024-T4 and SS304 alloys shocked to peak pressures of 4.4 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively in gas gun experiments. The σ HEL , σ s and Y determined from measured free surface velocity profiles of shocked Al2024-T4 target plate are 0.70 GPa, 1.46 GPa and 0.36 GPa, respectively. These values determined for SS304 target plate are 1.35 GPa, 2.6 GPa and 0.8 GPa, respectively. (author)

  2. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness.

  3. Variation in Orthologous Shell-Forming Proteins Contribute to Molluscan Shell Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Reim, Laurin; Randow, Clemens; Cerveau, Nicolas; Degnan, Bernard M; Fleck, Claudia

    2017-11-01

    Despite the evolutionary success and ancient heritage of the molluscan shell, little is known about the molecular details of its formation, evolutionary origins, or the interactions between the material properties of the shell and its organic constituents. In contrast to this dearth of information, a growing collection of molluscan shell-forming proteomes and transcriptomes suggest they are comprised of both deeply conserved, and lineage specific elements. Analyses of these sequence data sets have suggested that mechanisms such as exon shuffling, gene co-option, and gene family expansion facilitated the rapid evolution of shell-forming proteomes and supported the diversification of this phylum specific structure. In order to further investigate and test these ideas we have examined the molecular features and spatial expression patterns of two shell-forming genes (Lustrin and ML1A2) and coupled these observations with materials properties measurements of shells from a group of closely related gastropods (abalone). We find that the prominent "GS" domain of Lustrin, a domain believed to confer elastomeric properties to the shell, varies significantly in length between the species we investigated. Furthermore, the spatial expression patterns of Lustrin and ML1A2 also vary significantly between species, suggesting that both protein architecture, and the regulation of spatial gene expression patterns, are important drivers of molluscan shell evolution. Variation in these molecular features might relate to certain materials properties of the shells of these species. These insights reveal an important and underappreciated source of variation within shell-forming proteomes that must contribute to the diversity of molluscan shell phenotypes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Molluscan shell colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Suzanne T

    2017-05-01

    The phylum Mollusca is highly speciose, and is the largest phylum in the marine realm. The great majority of molluscs are shelled, including nearly all bivalves, most gastropods and some cephalopods. The fabulous and diverse colours and patterns of molluscan shells are widely recognised and have been appreciated for hundreds of years by collectors and scientists alike. They serve taxonomists as characters that can be used to recognise and distinguish species, however their function for the animal is sometimes less clear and has been the focus of many ecological and evolutionary studies. Despite these studies, almost nothing is known about the evolution of colour in molluscan shells. This review summarises for the first time major findings of disparate studies relevant to the evolution of shell colour in Mollusca and discusses the importance of colour, including the effects of visual and non-visual selection, diet and abiotic factors. I also summarise the evidence for the heritability of shell colour in some taxa and recent efforts to understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning synthesis of shell colours. I describe some of the main shell pigments found in Mollusca (carotenoids, melanin and tetrapyrroles, including porphyrins and bile pigments), and their durability in the fossil record. Finally I suggest that pigments appear to be distributed in a phylogenetically relevant manner and that the synthesis of colour is likely to be energetically costly. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  5. Study on reinforced lightweight coconut shell concrete beam behavior under flexure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, K.; Annadurai, R.; Kumar, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Use of coconut shell as aggregate in concrete. ► Behavior of coconut shell concrete under flexure. ► SEM images of cement, sand, coconut shell and coconut shell aggregate concrete. ► Coconut shell hollow blocks and precast slabs are used in practice. - Abstract: Coconut shell has been used as coarse aggregate in the production of concrete. The flexural behavior of reinforced concrete beam made with coconut shell is analyzed and compared with the normal control concrete. Twelve beams, six with coconut shell concrete and six with normal control concrete, were fabricated and tested. This study includes the moment capacity, deflection, cracking, ductility, corresponding strains in both compression and tension, and end rotation. It was found that the flexural behavior of coconut shell concrete is comparable to that of other lightweight concretes. The results of concrete compression strain and steel tension strain showed that coconut shell concrete is able to achieve its full strain capacity under flexural loadings. Under serviceability condition, deflection and cracking characteristics of coconut shell concrete are comparable with control concrete. However, the failure zones of coconut shell concrete were larger than for control concrete beams. The end rotations of the coconut shell concrete beams just prior to failure values are comparable to other lightweight concretes. Coconut shell concrete was used to produce hollow blocks and precast slab in 2007 and they are being subjected to some practical loading till today without any problems such as deflection, bending, cracks, and damages for the past five years

  6. Measurements for the radiation spectra of fast Z-pinches produced at compression of multi-wire arrays on the 'Angara-5-1' facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolkhovitinov, E.A.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.; Fedulov, M.V.; Grabovsky, E.V.; Gritsuk, A.N.; Oleinik, G.M.; Volkov, G.S.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The measurements results on the radiation spectra of fast z-pinches produced at compression of cylindrical multi-wire tungsten and aluminum arrays in the experiments on a high-current 'Angara-5-1' facility are presented. Cylindrical multi-wire arrays has linear mass 200-400 μg/cm and the initial diameter 12-20 mm. The pinch current was about 3 MA with pulse duration of 140 ns and peak power 3 TW. The radiation spectra are measured within the range of 50-900 eV quanta by a spectrometer with transmission diffraction grating, where the radiation is recorded on the UF-4 X-ray film. An electromagnetic curtain shutter was used to protect the transmission grating from fast microparticles produced by the erosion of high-voltage electrodes. The radiation spectrum of 1-3 keV quanta was recorded by a convex crystal wide-range spectrometer. Total yield of the radiation was measured by a thermocouple calorimeter. The main part of the tungsten plasma radiative energy proves to correspond to the quasi-continuous spectrum within the range of 80-300 eV quanta. Measurements of the tungsten plasma radiation spectrum with spatial resolution by a pinch radius have shown that the effective transversal size (diameter) of the pinch as not higher than 1 mm. In the case of aluminum plasma an intensive linear radiation of the [H]- and [He]-like ions have been recorded along with a continuous and linear radiation of the [Li]- and [Be]-like ions with the range of 100-300 eV quanta. Spectral measurements of the aluminum plasma radiation with spatial resolution by the pinch radius have shown that the effective transversal size (diameter) of the pinch is around the value of 1.5 mm. Within the framework of the stationary collisional-radiative model, in respect of the [H]- and [He]-like ion spectral lines relative intensities, the parameters of the aluminum plasma pinch, namely, the electron temperature T e ∼ 550 eV and electron density n e ∼ 3 x 10 20 cm

  7. Nuclear shell theory

    CERN Document Server

    de-Shalit, Amos; Massey, H S W

    1963-01-01

    Nuclear Shell Theory is a comprehensive textbook dealing with modern methods of the nuclear shell model. This book deals with the mathematical theory of a system of Fermions in a central field. It is divided into three parts. Part I discusses the single particle shell model. The second part focuses on the tensor algebra, two-particle systems. The last part covers three or more particle systems. Chapters on wave functions in a central field, tensor fields, and the m-Scheme are also presented. Physicists, graduate students, and teachers of nuclear physics will find the book invaluable.

  8. Four-body interaction energy for compressed solid krypton from quantum theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunling; Wu, Na; Liu, Fusheng; Saxena, Surendra K; Zheng, Xingrong

    2012-07-28

    The importance of the four-body contribution in compressed solid krypton was first evaluated using the many-body expansion method and the coupled cluster theory with full single and double excitations plus perturbative treatment of triples. All different four-atom clusters existing in the first- and second-nearest neighbor shells of face-centered cubic krypton were considered, and both self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock and correlation parts of the four-body interaction were accurately determined from the ambient conditions up to eightfold volume compression. We find that the four-body interaction energy is negative at compression ratio lower than 2, where the dispersive forces play a dominant role. With increasing the compression, the four-body contribution becomes repulsive and significantly cancels the over-softening effects of the three-body potential. The obtained equation of state (EOS) was compared with the experiments and the density-functional theory calculations. It shows that combination of the four-body effects with two- and three-body interactions leads to an excellent agreement with EOS measurements throughout the whole experimental range 0-130 GPa, and extends the prediction to 300 GPa.

  9. Comparing biological networks via graph compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashida Morihiro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of various kinds of biological data is one of the main problems in bioinformatics and systems biology. Data compression methods have been applied to comparison of large sequence data and protein structure data. Since it is still difficult to compare global structures of large biological networks, it is reasonable to try to apply data compression methods to comparison of biological networks. In existing compression methods, the uniqueness of compression results is not guaranteed because there is some ambiguity in selection of overlapping edges. Results This paper proposes novel efficient methods, CompressEdge and CompressVertices, for comparing large biological networks. In the proposed methods, an original network structure is compressed by iteratively contracting identical edges and sets of connected edges. Then, the similarity of two networks is measured by a compression ratio of the concatenated networks. The proposed methods are applied to comparison of metabolic networks of several organisms, H. sapiens, M. musculus, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, C. elegans, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, and B. subtilis, and are compared with an existing method. These results suggest that our methods can efficiently measure the similarities between metabolic networks. Conclusions Our proposed algorithms, which compress node-labeled networks, are useful for measuring the similarity of large biological networks.

  10. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Gregson, James; Wetzstein, Gordon; Raskar, Ramesh; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  11. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  12. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    . In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity......Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  13. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  14. Shell Buckling Knockdown Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor (SBKF) Project, NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Assessment #: 07-010-E, was established in March of 2007 by the NESC in...

  15. Mining compressing sequential problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, T.L.; Mörchen, F.; Fradkin, D.; Calders, T.G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Compression based pattern mining has been successfully applied to many data mining tasks. We propose an approach based on the minimum description length principle to extract sequential patterns that compress a database of sequences well. We show that mining compressing patterns is NP-Hard and

  16. Shells and Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  17. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, C.S., E-mail: Lam@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Q.C., H3A 2T8 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Yao, York-Peng, E-mail: yyao@umich.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The Cachazo–He–Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  18. Compressed Sensing with Rank Deficient Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Johansen, Daniel Højrup; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    In compressed sensing it is generally assumed that the dictionary matrix constitutes a (possibly overcomplete) basis of the signal space. In this paper we consider dictionaries that do not span the signal space, i.e. rank deficient dictionaries. We show that in this case the signal-to-noise ratio...... (SNR) in the compressed samples can be increased by selecting the rows of the measurement matrix from the column space of the dictionary. As an example application of compressed sensing with a rank deficient dictionary, we present a case study of compressed sensing applied to the Coarse Acquisition (C...

  19. Perceptual Image Compression in Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Eckstein, Miguel; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The next era of space exploration, especially the "Mission to Planet Earth" will generate immense quantities of image data. For example, the Earth Observing System (EOS) is expected to generate in excess of one terabyte/day. NASA confronts a major technical challenge in managing this great flow of imagery: in collection, pre-processing, transmission to earth, archiving, and distribution to scientists at remote locations. Expected requirements in most of these areas clearly exceed current technology. Part of the solution to this problem lies in efficient image compression techniques. For much of this imagery, the ultimate consumer is the human eye. In this case image compression should be designed to match the visual capacities of the human observer. We have developed three techniques for optimizing image compression for the human viewer. The first consists of a formula, developed jointly with IBM and based on psychophysical measurements, that computes a DCT quantization matrix for any specified combination of viewing distance, display resolution, and display brightness. This DCT quantization matrix is used in most recent standards for digital image compression (JPEG, MPEG, CCITT H.261). The second technique optimizes the DCT quantization matrix for each individual image, based on the contents of the image. This is accomplished by means of a model of visual sensitivity to compression artifacts. The third technique extends the first two techniques to the realm of wavelet compression. Together these two techniques will allow systematic perceptual optimization of image compression in NASA imaging systems. Many of the image management challenges faced by NASA are mirrored in the field of telemedicine. Here too there are severe demands for transmission and archiving of large image databases, and the imagery is ultimately used primarily by human observers, such as radiologists. In this presentation I will describe some of our preliminary explorations of the applications

  20. Type I Shell Galaxies as a Test of Gravity Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakili, Hajar; Rahvar, Sohrab [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: vakili@physics.sharif.edu [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen-und Kernphysik, Universität Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-10-10

    Shell galaxies are understood to form through the collision of a dwarf galaxy with an elliptical galaxy. Shell structures and kinematics have been noted to be independent tools to measure the gravitational potential of the shell galaxies. We compare theoretically the formation of shells in Type I shell galaxies in different gravity theories in this work because this is so far missing in the literature. We include Newtonian plus dark halo gravity, and two non-Newtonian gravity models, MOG and MOND, in identical initial systems. We investigate the effect of dynamical friction, which by slowing down the dwarf galaxy in the dark halo models limits the range of shell radii to low values. Under the same initial conditions, shells appear on a shorter timescale and over a smaller range of distances in the presence of dark matter than in the corresponding non-Newtonian gravity models. If galaxies are embedded in a dark matter halo, then the merging time may be too rapid to allow multi-generation shell formation as required by observed systems because of the large dynamical friction effect. Starting from the same initial state, the observation of small bright shells in the dark halo model should be accompanied by large faint ones, while for the case of MOG, the next shell generation patterns iterate with a specific time delay. The first shell generation pattern shows a degeneracy with the age of the shells and in different theories, but the relative distance of the shells and the shell expansion velocity can break this degeneracy.

  1. Cosmological Particle Data Compression in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyen, M.; Ahrens, J.; Hagen, H.; Heitmann, K.; Habib, S.

    2017-12-01

    In cosmological simulations trillions of particles are handled and several terabytes of unstructured particle data are generated in each time step. Transferring this data directly from memory to disk in an uncompressed way results in a massive load on I/O and storage systems. Hence, one goal of domain scientists is to compress the data before storing it to disk while minimizing the loss of information. To prevent reading back uncompressed data from disk, this can be done in an in-situ process. Since the simulation continuously generates data, the available time for the compression of one time step is limited. Therefore, the evaluation of compression techniques has shifted from only focusing on compression rates to include run-times and scalability.In recent years several compression techniques for cosmological data have become available. These techniques can be either lossy or lossless, depending on the technique. For both cases, this study aims to evaluate and compare the state of the art compression techniques for unstructured particle data. This study focuses on the techniques available in the Blosc framework with its multi-threading support, the XZ Utils toolkit with the LZMA algorithm that achieves high compression rates, and the widespread FPZIP and ZFP methods for lossy compressions.For the investigated compression techniques, quantitative performance indicators such as compression rates, run-time/throughput, and reconstruction errors are measured. Based on these factors, this study offers a comprehensive analysis of the individual techniques and discusses their applicability for in-situ compression. In addition, domain specific measures are evaluated on the reconstructed data sets, and the relative error rates and statistical properties are analyzed and compared. Based on this study future challenges and directions in the compression of unstructured cosmological particle data were identified.

  2. Recognizable or Not: Towards Image Semantic Quality Assessment for Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Dandan; Li, Houqiang

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally, image compression was optimized for the pixel-wise fidelity or the perceptual quality of the compressed images given a bit-rate budget. But recently, compressed images are more and more utilized for automatic semantic analysis tasks such as recognition and retrieval. For these tasks, we argue that the optimization target of compression is no longer perceptual quality, but the utility of the compressed images in the given automatic semantic analysis task. Accordingly, we propose to evaluate the quality of the compressed images neither at pixel level nor at perceptual level, but at semantic level. In this paper, we make preliminary efforts towards image semantic quality assessment (ISQA), focusing on the task of optical character recognition (OCR) from compressed images. We propose a full-reference ISQA measure by comparing the features extracted from text regions of original and compressed images. We then propose to integrate the ISQA measure into an image compression scheme. Experimental results show that our proposed ISQA measure is much better than PSNR and SSIM in evaluating the semantic quality of compressed images; accordingly, adopting our ISQA measure to optimize compression for OCR leads to significant bit-rate saving compared to using PSNR or SSIM. Moreover, we perform subjective test about text recognition from compressed images, and observe that our ISQA measure has high consistency with subjective recognizability. Our work explores new dimensions in image quality assessment, and demonstrates promising direction to achieve higher compression ratio for specific semantic analysis tasks.

  3. Spectral Compressive Sensing with Polar Interpolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten; Dadkhahi, Hamid; F. Duarte, Marco

    2013-01-01

    . In this paper, we introduce a greedy recovery algorithm that leverages a band-exclusion function and a polar interpolation function to address these two issues in spectral compressive sensing. Our algorithm is geared towards line spectral estimation from compressive measurements and outperforms most existing...

  4. Compression for radiological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1992-07-01

    The viewing of radiological images has peculiarities that must be taken into account in the design of a compression technique. The images may be manipulated on a workstation to change the contrast, to change the center of the brightness levels that are viewed, and even to invert the images. Because of the possible consequences of losing information in a medical application, bit preserving compression is used for the images used for diagnosis. However, for archiving the images may be compressed to 10 of their original size. A compression technique based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) takes the viewing factors into account by compressing the changes in the local brightness levels. The compression technique is a variation of the CCITT JPEG compression that suppresses the blocking of the DCT except in areas of very high contrast.

  5. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  6. Partial molar volume and isentropic compressibility of symmetrical and asymmetrical quaternary ammonium bromides in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Nicolás; Buchner, Richard; Vargas, Edgar F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Structural effects of the cations on surrounding water molecules are discussed. • Alkyl-chain geometry determines the hydration of Bu 4 N + isomers. • The “compactness” in the hydration shells varies significantly among the isomers. - Abstract: Values of apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility of symmetric and asymmetric isomers of tetrabutylammonium bromide, namely tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, tetra-iso-butylammonium bromide, tetra-sec-butylammonium bromide, di-n-butyl-di-iso-butylammonium bromide and di-n-butyl-di-sec-butylammonium bromide, in aqueous solution were determined from density and speed of sound measurements. These properties were obtained as a function of molal concentration within the range of 0.01 < m/mol · kg −1 < 0.1 covering temperatures from 278.15 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 293.15. The partial molar volumes and the apparent isentropic molar compressibility at infinite dilution were calculated and their dependence on temperature examined. The results show that cations with sec-butyl chains have larger structural volumes compared to those with iso-butyl chains. In addition, cations with sec-butyl chains induce smaller structural changes in their hydration shell than the others

  7. Measurement of conversion electrons with the $^{208}Pb(p,n)^{208}Bi$ reaction and derivation of the shell model proton neutron hole interaction from the properties of $^{208}Bi$

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, K H; Dracoulis, G D; Boutachkov, P; Aprahamian, A; Byrne, A P; Davidson, P M; Lane, G L; Marie-Jeanne, Mélanie; Nieminen, P; Watanabe, H

    2007-01-01

    Conversion electrons from 208Bi have been measured using singles and coincidence techniques with the 208Pb(p,n)208Bi reaction at 9 MeV. The new information on multipolarities and spins complements that available from recent gamma-gamma-coincidence studies with the same reaction [Boutachkov et al., Nucl. Phys. A768, 22 (2006)]. The results on electromagnetic decays taken together with information on spectroscopic factors from earlier single-particle transfer reaction measurements represent an extensive data set on the properties of the one-proton one-neutron-hole states below 3 MeV, a spectrum which is virtually complete. Comparison of the experimental observables, namely, energies, spectroscopic factors, and gamma-branching ratios, with those calculated within the shell model allows extraction of the matrix elements of the shell model residual interaction. More than 100 diagonal and nondiagonal elements can be determined in this way, through a least squares fit to the experimental data. This adjustment of the...

  8. Pattern Transitions in a Soft Cylindrical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yifan; Dai, Hui-Hui; Xu, Fan; Potier-Ferry, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Instability patterns of rolling up a sleeve appear more intricate than the ones of walking over a rug on floor, both characterized as systems of uniaxially compressed soft film on stiff substrate. This can be explained by curvature effects. To investigate pattern transitions on a curved surface, we study a soft shell sliding on a rigid cylinder by experiments, computations and theoretical analyses. We reveal a novel postbuckling phenomenon involving multiple successive bifurcations: smooth-wrinkle-ridge-sagging transitions. The shell initially buckles into periodic axisymmetric wrinkles at the threshold and then a wrinkle-to-ridge transition occurs upon further axial compression. When the load increases to the third bifurcation, the amplitude of the ridge reaches its limit and the symmetry is broken with the ridge sagging into a recumbent fold. It is identified that hysteresis loops and the Maxwell equal-energy conditions are associated with the coexistence of wrinkle-ridge or ridge-sagging patterns. Such a bifurcation scenario is inherently general and independent of material constitutive models.

  9. Durability of coconut shell powder (CSP) concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. S.; Shahidan, S.; Senin, M. S.; Shamsuddin, S. M.; Anak Guntor, N. A.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd; Khalid, F. S.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Razak, N. H. S.

    2017-11-01

    The rising cost of construction in developing countries like Malaysia has led concrete experts to explore alternative materials such as coconut shells which are renewable and possess high potential to be used as construction material. Coconut shell powder in varying percentages of1%, 3% and 5% was used as filler material in concrete grade 30 and evaluated after a curing period of 7 days and 28days respectively. Compressive strength, water absorption and carbonation tests were conducted to evaluate the strength and durability of CSP concrete in comparison with normal concrete. The test results revealed that 1%, 3% and 5% of CSP concrete achieved a compressive strength of 47.65 MPa, 45.6 MPa and 40.55% respectively. The rate of water absorption of CSP concrete was recorded as 3.21%, 2.47%, and 2.73% for 1%, 3% and 5% of CSP concrete respectively. Although CSP contained a carbon composition of 47%, the carbonation test showed that CSP no signs of carbon were detected inside the concrete. To conclude, CSP offers great prospects as it demonstrated relatively high durability as a construction material.

  10. Simulations of Ar gas-puff Z-pinch radiation sources with double shells and central jets on the Z generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangri, V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Velikovich, A. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Ouart, N. D.; Dasgupta, A.; Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations using the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium Mach2-Tabular Collisional-Radiative Equilibrium code in (r, z) geometry are performed for two pairs of recent Ar gas-puff Z-pinch experiments on the refurbished Z generator with an 8 cm diameter nozzle. One pair of shots had an outer-to-inner shell mass ratio of 1:1.6 and a second pair had a ratio of 1:1. In each pair, one of the shots had a central jet. The experimental trends in the Ar K-shell yield and power are reproduced in the calculations. However, the K-shell yield and power are significantly lower than the other three shots for the case of a double-shell puff of 1:1 mass ratio and no central jet configuration. Further simulations of a hypothetical experiment with the same relative density profile of this configuration, but higher total mass, show that the coupled energy from the generator and the K-shell yield can be increased to levels achieved in the other three configurations, but not the K-shell power. Based on various measures of effective plasma radius, the compression in the 1:1 mass ratio and no central jet case is found to be less because the plasma inside the magnetic piston is hotter and of lower density. Because of the reduced density, and the reduced radiation cooling (which is proportional to the square of the density), the core plasma is hotter. Consequently, for the 1:1 outer-to-inner shell mass ratio, the load mass controls the yield and the center jet controls the power.

  11. Dyson shells: a retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert J.

    2001-08-01

    More than 40 years have passed since Freeman Dyson suggested that advanced technological civilizations are likely to dismantle planets in their solar systems to harvest all of the energy their stars wastefully radiate into space. Clearly this was an idea that was ahead of its time. Since that time, dozens of SETI searches have been conducted and almost all of them have focused their attention on stars which by definition cannot be the advanced civilizations that Dyson envisioned. I will review the data that created the confusion between Dyson spheres and Dyson shells. The sources that disprove Dyson spheres while still allowing Dyson shells will be discussed. The use of outmoded ideas that have biased the few searches for Dyson Shells that have occurred will be pointed out. An update of the concept of Dyson shells to include our current knowledge of biotechnology, nanotechnology and computer science will be explored. Finally, an approach to setting limits on the abundance of Dyson shells in our galaxy using existing optical astronomical data and future optical satellites will be proposed.

  12. The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions - a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Richard A; Soar, Jasmeet; Davies, Robin P; Akhtar, Naheed; Perkins, Gavin D

    2012-03-01

    Chest compressions are often performed at a variable rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The effect of compression rate on other chest compression quality variables (compression depth, duty-cycle, leaning, performance decay over time) is unknown. This randomised controlled cross-over manikin study examined the effect of different compression rates on the other chest compression quality variables. Twenty healthcare professionals performed 2 min of continuous compressions on an instrumented manikin at rates of 80, 100, 120, 140 and 160 min(-1) in a random order. An electronic metronome was used to guide compression rate. Compression data were analysed by repeated measures ANOVA and are presented as mean (SD). Non-parametric data was analysed by Friedman test. At faster compression rates there were significant improvements in the number of compressions delivered (160(2) at 80 min(-1) vs. 312(13) compressions at 160 min(-1), P<0.001); and compression duty-cycle (43(6)% at 80 min(-1) vs. 50(7)% at 160 min(-1), P<0.001). This was at the cost of a significant reduction in compression depth (39.5(10)mm at 80 min(-1) vs. 34.5(11)mm at 160 min(-1), P<0.001); and earlier decay in compression quality (median decay point 120 s at 80 min(-1) vs. 40s at 160 min(-1), P<0.001). Additionally not all participants achieved the target rate (100% at 80 min(-1) vs. 70% at 160 min(-1)). Rates above 120 min(-1) had the greatest impact on reducing chest compression quality. For Guidelines 2005 trained rescuers, a chest compression rate of 100-120 min(-1) for 2 min is feasible whilst maintaining adequate chest compression quality in terms of depth, duty-cycle, leaning, and decay in compression performance. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of the Guidelines 2010 recommendation for deeper and faster chest compressions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of velocity interferometer and its application to piston motion measurement in a compression tube of freepiston shock tube; Sokudo kanshokei no kaihatsu to sono jiyu piston shogekihakan no asshuku kannai no piston undo no keisoku eno oyo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koremoto, K.; Hashimoto, T. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Takayama, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science; Ito, K [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-25

    A free piston shock tunnel has been intensively used as a hypersonic flow ground test facility and its characteristics depend sensitively upon the piston motion in its compression tube. The continuous measurement of the piston motion in its compression tube was studied in an analogue facility in which a piston motion in a 50mm dia. and 2000mm long compression tube was measured continuously and accurately from its start to the collision with bumper section. To achieve it a velocity interferometer was developed particularly to measure the piston speed in it. Then piston motions were successfully measured and result agreed very well with numerical result. (author)

  14. Electron induced atomic inner-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarles, C.A.

    1974-01-01

    The current status of cross section measurements for atomic inner-shell ionization by electron bombardment is reviewed. Inner shell ionization studies using electrons as projectiles compliment the similar studies being done with heavy particles, and in addition can provide tests of the theory in those cases when relativistic effects and exchange effects are expected to be important. Both total cross sections and recently measured differential cross sections will be discussed and compared with existing theories where possible. Prospects for further experimental and theoretical work in this area of atomic physics using small electron accelerators will also be discussed

  15. The Density and Compressibility of BaCO3-SrCO3-CaCO3-K2CO3-Na2CO3-Li2CO3 Liquids: New Measurements and a Systematic Trend with Cation Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, S. M.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The volumetric properties of multi-component carbonate liquids are required to extend thermodynamic models that describe partial melting of the deep mantle (e.g. pMELTS; Ghiorso et al., 2003) to carbonate-bearing lithologies. Carbonate in the mantle is an important reservoir of carbon, which is released to the atmosphere as CO2 through volcanism, and thus contributes to the carbon cycle. Although MgCO3 is the most important carbonate component in the mantle, it is not possible to directly measure the 1-bar density and compressibility of MgCO3 liquid because, like other alkaline-earth carbonates, it decomposes at a temperature lower than its melting temperature. Despite this challenge, Liu and Lange (2003) and O'Leary et al. (2015) showed that the one bar molar volume, thermal expansion and compressibility of the CaCO3 liquid component could be obtained by measuring the density and sound speeds of stable liquids in the CaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary system at one bar. In this study, this same strategy is employed on SrCO3- and BaCO3-bearing alkali carbonate liquids. The density and sound speed of seven liquids in the SrCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary and three liquids in the BaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary were measured from 739-1367K, with SrCO3 and BaCO3 concentrations ranging from 10-50 mol%. The density measurements were made using the double-bob Archimedean method and sound speeds were obtained with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer. The molar volume and sound speed measurements were used to calculate the isothermal compressibility of each liquid, and the results show the volumetric properties mix ideally with composition. The partial molar volume and compressibility of the SrCO3 and BaCO3 components are compared to those obtained for the CaCO3 component as a function of cation field strength. The results reveal a systematic trend that allows the partial molar volume and compressibility of the MgCO3 liquid component to be estimated.

  16. Systematic study of shell effect near drip-lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.; Samanta, C.

    2004-01-01

    The variation of nuclear shell effects with nucleon numbers is evaluated using the modified Bethe–Weizsaecker mass formula (BWM) and the measured atomic masses. The shell effects at magic neutron numbers N=8, 20, 28, 50, 82 and 126 and magic proton numbers Z=8, 20, 28, 50 and 82 are found to vary rapidly approaching the drip-lines. The shell effect due to one magic number increases on approaching another magic number. Thus, shell effects are not always negligible near the drip-lines. (author)

  17. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  18. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Waugh, C J; Séguin, F H; Sio, H; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Yeamans, C B; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Bionta, R M; Talison, B; Casey, D T; Landen, O L; Moran, M J; Zacharias, R A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ∼1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  19. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  20. A concept of PWR using plate and shell heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de

    2015-01-01

    In previous work it was verified the physical possibility of using plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in a PWR for merchant ships. This work studies the possibility of using GESMEX commercial of the shelf plate and shell heat exchanger of series XPS. It was found it is feasible for this type of heat exchanger to meet operational and accidental requirements for steam generation in PWR. Additionally, it is proposed an arrangement of such heat exchangers inside the reactor pressure vessel. Such arrangement may avoid ANSI/ANS51.1 nuclear class I requirements on those heat exchangers because they are contained in the reactor coolant pressure barrier and play no role in accidental scenarios. Additionally, those plates work under compression, preventing the risk of rupture. Being considered non-nuclear safety, having a modular architecture and working under compression may turn such architectural choice a must to meet safety objectives with improved economics. (author)

  1. A concept of PWR using plate and shell heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: luciano.ondir@gmail.com, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In previous work it was verified the physical possibility of using plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in a PWR for merchant ships. This work studies the possibility of using GESMEX commercial of the shelf plate and shell heat exchanger of series XPS. It was found it is feasible for this type of heat exchanger to meet operational and accidental requirements for steam generation in PWR. Additionally, it is proposed an arrangement of such heat exchangers inside the reactor pressure vessel. Such arrangement may avoid ANSI/ANS51.1 nuclear class I requirements on those heat exchangers because they are contained in the reactor coolant pressure barrier and play no role in accidental scenarios. Additionally, those plates work under compression, preventing the risk of rupture. Being considered non-nuclear safety, having a modular architecture and working under compression may turn such architectural choice a must to meet safety objectives with improved economics. (author)

  2. Experimental study on the strength parameter of Quarry Dust mixed Coconut Shell Concrete adding Coconut Fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matangulu Shrestha, Victor; Anandh, S.; Sindhu Nachiar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous mixture constitute of cement as the main ingredient with a different mix of fine and coarse aggregate. The massive use of conventional concrete has a shortfall in its key ingredients, natural sand and coarse aggregate, due to increased industrialisation and globalisation. To overcome the shortage of material, an alternate material with similar mechanical properties and composition has to be studied, as replacement of conventional concrete. Coconut shell concrete is a prime option as replacement of key ingredients of conventional concrete as coconut is produced in massive quantity in south East Asia. Coconut shell concrete is lightweight concrete and different research is still ongoing concerning about its mix design and composition in the construction industry. Concrete is weak in tension as compared to compression, hence the fibre is used to refrain the crack in the concrete. Coconut fibre is one of many fibres which can be used in concrete. The main aim of this project is to analyse the use of natural by-products in the construction industry, make light weight concrete and eco-friendly construction. This project concerns with the comparison of the mechanical properties of coconut shell concrete and conventional concrete, replacing fine aggregate with quarry dust using coconut fibre. M25 grade of concrete was adopted and testing of concrete was done at the age of 3, 7 and 28 days. In this concrete mix, sand was replaced completely in volumetric measurement by quarry dust. The result was analysed and compared with addition of coconut fibre at varying percentage of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5%. From the test conducted, coconut shell concrete with quarry dust has the maximum value at 4% of coconut fibre while conventional concrete showed the maximum value at 2% of coconut fibre.

  3. Morphology and properties of periwinkle shell asbestos-free brake pad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Yawas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of asbestos-free automotive brake pad using periwinkle shell particles as frictional filler material is presented. This was with a view to exploiting the characteristics of the periwinkle shell, which is largely deposited as a waste, in replacing asbestos which has been found to be carcinogenic. Five sets of brake pads with different sieve size (710–125 μm of periwinkle shell particles with 35% resin were produced using compressive moulding. The physical, mechanical and tribological properties of the periwinkle shell particle-based brake pads were evaluated and compared with the values for the asbestos-based brake pads. The results obtained showed that compressive strength, hardness and density of the developed brake pad samples increased with decreasing the particle size of periwinkle shell from 710 to 125 μm, while the oil soak, water soak and wear rate decreased with decreasing the particle size of periwinkle shell. The results obtained at 125 μm of periwinkle shell particles compared favourably with that of commercial brake pad. The results of this research indicate that periwinkle shell particles can be effectively used as a replacement for asbestos in brake pad manufacture.

  4. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branderhorst, W.; Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den; Neeleman, C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic breast

  5. Microwave moisture meter for in-shell almonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining almond kernel moisture content while still in the shell is important for both almond growers and processors. A dielectric method was developed for almond kernel moisture determination from dielectric measurements on in-shell almonds at a single microwave frequency. A sample holder was fi...

  6. Sidewall coring shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A; Konstantinov, L P; Martyshin, A N

    1966-12-12

    A sidewall coring shell consists of a housing and a detachable core catcher. The core lifter is provided with projections, the ends of which are situated in another plane, along the longitudinal axis of the lifter. The chamber has corresponding projections.

  7. Measurement of ground state properties of neutron-rich nuclei on the r-process path between the N=50 and N=82 shells

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of the unknown ground-state ${\\beta}$-decay properties of the neutron-rich $^{84-89}$Ge, $^{90-93}$Se and $^{102-104}$Sr isotopes near the r-process path is of high interest for the study of the abundance peaks around the N=50 and N=82 neutron shells. At ISOLDE, beams of certain elements with sufficient isotopic purity are produced as molecular sidebands rather than atomic beams. This applies e.g, to germanium, separated as GeS$^{+}$, selenium separated as SeCO$^{+}$ and strontium separated as SrF$^{+}$. However, in case of neutron-rich isotopes produced in actinide targets, new "isobaric" background of atomic ions appears on the mass of the molecular sideband. For this particular case, the ECR charge breeder, positioned in the experimental hall after ISOLDE first mass separation, can be advantageously used as a purification device, by breaking the molecules and removing the molecular contaminants. This proposal indicates our interest in the study of basic nuclear structure properties of neutron...

  8. Nonlinear problems of the theory of heterogeneous slightly curved shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, B. Y.

    1973-01-01

    An account if given of the variational method of the solution of physically and geometrically nonlinear problems of the theory of heterogeneous slightly curved shells. Examined are the bending and supercritical behavior of plates and conical and spherical cupolas of variable thickness in a temperature field, taking into account the dependence of the elastic parameters on temperature. The bending, stability in general and load-bearing capacity of flexible isotropic elastic-plastic shells with different criteria of plasticity, taking into account compressibility and hardening. The effect of the plastic heterogeneity caused by heat treatment, surface work hardening and irradiation by fast neutron flux is investigated. Some problems of the dynamic behavior of flexible shells are solved. Calculations are performed in high approximations. Considerable attention is given to the construction of a machine algorithm and to the checking of the convergence of iterative processes.

  9. Stability of charged thin shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    In this article we study the mechanical stability of spherically symmetric thin shells with charge, in Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Born-Infeld theories. We analyze linearized perturbations preserving the symmetry, for shells around vacuum and shells surrounding noncharged black holes.

  10. Temporal structures in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, F.

    2001-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent Gledzer, Ohkitani, and Yamada shell-model is completely characterized by a single type of burstlike structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell...

  11. Compression experiments on the TOSKA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cima, G.; McGuire, K.M.; Robinson, D.C.; Wootton, A.J.

    1980-10-01

    Results from minor radius compression experiments on a tokamak plasma in TOSCA are reported. The compression is achieved by increasing the toroidal field up to twice its initial value in 200μs. Measurements show that particles and magnetic flux are conserved. When the initial energy confinement time is comparable with the compression time, energy gains are greater than for an adiabatic change of state. The total beta value increases. Central beta values approximately 3% are measured when a small major radius compression is superimposed on a minor radius compression. Magnetic field fluctuations are affected: both the amplitude and period decrease. Starting from low energy confinement times, approximately 200μs, increases in confinement times up to approximately 1 ms are measured. The increase in plasma energy results from a large reduction in the power losses during the compression. When the initial energy confinement time is much longer than the compression time, the parameter changes are those expected for an adiabatic change of state. (author)

  12. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  13. Experiments with automata compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J.; Yu, S; Daley, M; Eramian, M G

    2001-01-01

    Several compression methods of finite-state automata are presented and evaluated. Most compression methods used here are already described in the literature. However, their impact on the size of automata has not been described yet. We fill that gap, presenting results of experiments carried out on

  14. Composition, Shell Strength, and Metabolizable Energy of Mulinia lateralis and Ischadium recurvum as Food for Wintering Surf Scoters (Melanitta perspicillata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M Wells-Berlin

    Full Text Available Decline in surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata waterfowl populations wintering in the Chesapeake Bay has been associated with changes in the availability of benthic bivalves. The Bay has become more eutrophic, causing changes in the benthos available to surf scoters. The subsequent decline in oyster beds (Crassostrea virginica has reduced the hard substrate needed by the hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum, one of the primary prey items for surf scoters, causing the surf scoter to switch to a more opportune species, the dwarf surfclam (Mulinia lateralis. The composition (macronutrients, minerals, and amino acids, shell strength (N, and metabolizable energy (kJ of these prey items were quantified to determine the relative foraging values for wintering scoters. Pooled samples of each prey item were analyzed to determine composition. Shell strength (N was measured using a shell crack compression test. Total collection digestibility trials were conducted on eight captive surf scoters. For the prey size range commonly consumed by surf scoters (6-12 mm for M. lateralis and 18-24 mm for I. recurvum, I. recurvum contained higher ash, protein, lipid, and energy per individual organism than M. lateralis. I. recurvum required significantly greater force to crack the shell relative to M. lateralis. No difference in metabolized energy was observed for these prey items in wintering surf scoters, despite I. recurvum's higher ash content and harder shell than M. lateralis. Therefore, wintering surf scoters were able to obtain the same amount of energy from each prey item, implying that they can sustain themselves if forced to switch prey.

  15. Effect of Compression Garments on Physiological Responses After Uphill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struhár, Ivan; Kumstát, Michal; Králová, Dagmar Moc

    2018-03-01

    Limited practical recommendations related to wearing compression garments for athletes can be drawn from the literature at the present time. We aimed to identify the effects of compression garments on physiological and perceptual measures of performance and recovery after uphill running with different pressure and distributions of applied compression. In a random, double blinded study, 10 trained male runners undertook three 8 km treadmill runs at a 6% elevation rate, with the intensity of 75% VO2max while wearing low, medium grade compression garments and high reverse grade compression. In all the trials, compression garments were worn during 4 hours post run. Creatine kinase, measurements of muscle soreness, ankle strength of plantar/dorsal flexors and mean performance time were then measured. The best mean performance time was observed in the medium grade compression garments with the time difference being: medium grade compression garments vs. high reverse grade compression garments. A positive trend in increasing peak torque of plantar flexion (60º·s-1, 120º·s-1) was found in the medium grade compression garments: a difference between 24 and 48 hours post run. The highest pain tolerance shift in the gastrocnemius muscle was the medium grade compression garments, 24 hour post run, with the shift being +11.37% for the lateral head and 6.63% for the medial head. In conclusion, a beneficial trend in the promotion of running performance and decreasing muscle soreness within 24 hour post exercise was apparent in medium grade compression garments.

  16. Micromagnetic studies of three-dimensional pyramidal shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittel, A; Franchin, M; Fischbacher, T; Fangohr, H; Nasirpouri, F; Bending, S J

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic numerical analysis of the magnetic properties of pyramidal-shaped core-shell structures in a size range below 400 nm. These are three-dimensional structures consisting of a ferromagnetic shell which is grown on top of a non-magnetic core. The standard micromagnetic model without the magnetocrystalline anisotropy term is used to describe the properties of the shell. We vary the thickness of the shell between the limiting cases of an ultra-thin shell and a conventional pyramid and delineate different stable magnetic configurations. We find different kinds of single-domain states, which predominantly occur at smaller system sizes. In analogy to equivalent states in thin square films we term these onion, flower, C and S states. At larger system sizes, we also observe two types of vortex states, which we refer to as symmetric and asymmetric vortex states. For a classification of the observed states, we derive a phase diagram that specifies the magnetic ground state as a function of structure size and shell thickness. The transitions between different ground states can be understood qualitatively. We address the issue of metastability by investigating the stability of all occurring configurations for different shell thicknesses. For selected geometries and directions hysteresis measurements are analysed and discussed. We observe that the magnetic behaviour changes distinctively in the limit of ultra-thin shells. The study has been motivated by the recent progress made in the growth of faceted core-shell structures.

  17. Emittance Growth during Bunch Compression in the CTF-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    1999-02-26

    Measurements of the beam emittance during bunch compression in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF-II) are described. The measurements were made with different beam charges and different energy correlations versus the bunch compressor settings which were varied from no compression through the point of full compression and to over-compression. Significant increases in the beam emittance were observed with the maximum emittance occurring near the point of full (maximal) compression. Finally, evaluation of possible emittance dilution mechanisms indicate that coherent synchrotron radiation was the most likely cause.

  18. CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELL FORMATION IN SYMBIOTIC RECURRENT NOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We present models of spherically symmetric recurrent nova shells interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) in a symbiotic system composed of a red giant (RG) expelling a wind and a white dwarf accreting from this material. Recurrent nova eruptions periodically eject material at high velocities ({approx}> 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) into the RG wind profile, creating a decelerating shock wave as CSM is swept up. High CSM densities cause the shocked wind and ejecta to have very short cooling times of days to weeks. Thus, the late-time evolution of the shell is determined by momentum conservation instead of energy conservation. We compute and show evolutionary tracks of shell deceleration, as well as post-shock structure. After sweeping up all the RG wind, the shell coasts at a velocity {approx}100 km s{sup -1}, depending on system parameters. These velocities are similar to those measured in blueshifted CSM from the symbiotic nova RS Oph, as well as a few Type Ia supernovae that show evidence of CSM, such as 2006X, 2007le, and PTF 11kx. Supernovae occurring in such systems may not show CSM interaction until the inner nova shell gets hit by the supernova ejecta, days to months after the explosion.

  19. Capillary micromechanics for core-shell particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kong, T.; Wang, Liqiu; Wyss, H.M.; Shum, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have developed a facile, economical microfluidic approach as well as a simple model description to measure and predict the mechanical properties of composite core–shell microparticles made from materials with dramatically different elastic properties. By forcing the particles

  20. Comparing the effects of oil palm kernel shell and cockle shell on properties of pervious concrete pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Khankhaje

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, pervious concrete pavement is one of the best materials used in construction industry as a top layer of permeable pavement system to control the storm water at source. In addition, increasing production of waste materials, increased the interest in utilising the waste materials for environmental and technical benefits. Therefore, this paper compared the effect of using two different sizes of oil palm kernel shell (OPKS and cockleshell (CS as partial replacement of natural coarse aggregate on properties of pervious concrete pavement. Thirteen mixtures were made, in which 6.30-mm natural gravel was replaced with 0, 25, 50 and 75% of 6.30-mm and 4.75-mm of both shells. The relationships between the properties of pervious concrete mixtures was also determined. The replacement of OPKS and CS as the natural aggregate decreased the compressive strength, while the angular shape of both shells caused higher void content and permeability as compared to those of control pervious concrete. On the other hand, pervious concrete containing CS showed better properties than those of incorporating OPKS. Apart from that, strong relationships between density, void content, permeability, compressive strength values indicated that they can be used as a pervious concrete quality control tests for prediction of properties of pervious concrete pavement before placement in the field. Keywords: Pervious concrete pavement, Void content, Permeability, Cockleshell, Palm oil kernel shell

  1. Probing planetary interiors: Shock compression of water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cc, and recent high precision Hugoniot measurements of deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Marcus

    2013-06-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous increase in the number of identified extra-solar planetary systems. Our understanding of the formation of these systems is tied to our understanding of the internal structure of these exoplanets, which in turn rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water and hydrogen. Here we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that shows commonly used models for water in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate the use of this model as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and ``hot Neptune'' exoplanets, and should contribute to improved understanding of the interior structure of these planets, and perhaps improved understanding of formation mechanisms of planetary systems. We also present very recent experiments on deuterium that have taken advantage of continued improvements in both experimental configuration and the understanding of the quartz shock standard to obtain Hugoniot data with a significant increase in precision. These data will prove to provide a stringent test for the equation of state of hydrogen and its isotopes. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL85000.

  2. Fast optics for the Rutherford laser compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micholas, D.J.

    1976-12-01

    The compression chamber optical system proposed for the Rutherford Laboratory Laser compression experiments is described. The system corrects for longitudinal spherical aberration giving a final spot size approximately 15 μm. This could theoretically be improved. The two laser beams are focused via a pair of F/1.2 aspheric lenses onto a double-pass 'clam shell' aspheric mirror system. An analysis of the lens and mirror system is given and compared with an alternative ellipsoidal system already developed. The problems of manufacturing aspheric lenses to operate at 1.06 μm are outlined and an alternative novel approach to this design given. (author)

  3. Tests results of Nb$_{3}$Sn quadrupole magnets using a shell-based support structure

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, S

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a 90 mm aperture Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting quadrupole for the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP), test results of five quadrupole magnets are compared. All five assemblies used key and bladder technology to compress and support the coils within an iron yoke and an aluminium shell. The first three models (TQS01a, b, c) used Nb$_{3}$Sn MJR conductor and segmented bronze poles. The last two models (TQS02a, b) used Nb$_{3}$Sn RRP conductor, and segmented titanium alloy (TiAl6V4) poles, with no axial gaps during reaction. This presentation summarizes the magnets performance during assembly, cool-down and excitation and compares measurements with design expectations.

  4. Effects of Low Volume Fraction of Polyvinyl Alcohol Fibers on the Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Shell Lightweight Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kun Yew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of low volume fraction (Vf of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA fibers on the mechanical properties of oil palm shell (OPS high strength lightweight concrete mixtures. The slump, density, compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, and modulus of elasticity under various curing conditions have been measured and evaluated. The results indicate that an increase in PVA fibers decreases the workability of the concrete and decreases the density slightly. The 28-day compressive strength of oil palm shell fiber-reinforced concrete (OPSFRC high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC subject to continuous moist curing was within the range of 43–49 MPa. The average modulus of elasticity (E value is found to be 16.1 GPa for all mixes, which is higher than that reported in previous studies and is within the range of normal weight concrete. Hence, the findings of this study revealed that the PVA fibers can be used as an alternative material to enhance the properties of OPS HSLWC for building and construction applications.

  5. Insertion profiles of 4 headless compression screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of -3.1 mm, -2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of -2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of -2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws, and enable the surgeon to optimize compression. Copyright

  6. Shells on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Y.C.; Kedia, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    No realistic analytical work in the area of Shells on Elastic Foundations has been reported in the literature. Various foundation models have been proposed by several authors. These models involve one or more than one parameters to characterise the foundation medium. Some of these models cannot be used to derive the basic equations governing the behaviour of shells on elastic foundations. In the present work, starting from an elastic continuum hypothesis, a mathematical model for foundation has been derived in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates by the help of principle of virtual displacements, treating one of the virtual displacements as known to satisfy certain given conditions at its edge surfaces. In this model, several foundation parameters can be considered and it can also be used for layered medium of both finite and infinite thickness. (Auth.)

  7. Fast Ignition Thermonuclear Fusion: Enhancement of the Pellet Gain by the Colossal-Magnetic-Field Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The fast ignition fusion pellet gain can be enhanced by a laser generated B-field shell. The B-field shell, (similar to Earth's B-field, but with the alternating B-poles), follows the pellet compression in a frozen-in B-field regime. A properly designed laser-pellet coupling can lead to the generation of a B-field shell, (up to 100 MG), which inhibits electron thermal transport and confines the alpha-particles. In principle, a pellet gain of few-100s can be achieved in this manner. Supported in part by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University, 1010 Pearl, La Jolla, CA 92038-1007.

  8. Effects of Boundary Conditions on the Parametric Resonance of Cylindrical Shells under Axial Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Y. Ng

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a formulation for the dynamic stability analysis of circular cylindrical shells under axial compression with various boundary conditions is presented. The present study uses Love’s first approximation theory for thin shells and the characteristic beam functions as approximate axial modal functions. Applying the Ritz procedure to the Lagrangian energy expression yields a system of Mathieu–Hill equations the stability of which is analyzed using Bolotin’s method. The present study examines the effects of different boundary conditions on the parametric response of homogeneous isotropic cylindrical shells for various transverse modes and length parameters.

  9. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. For the computation of turbulent compressible flows, current methods of averaging and filtering are presented so that the reader is exposed to a consistent development of applicable equation sets for both the mean or resolved fields as well as the transport equations for the turbulent stress field. For the measurement of turbulent compressible flows, current techniques ranging from hot-wire anemometry to PIV are evaluated and limitations assessed. Characterizing dynamic features of free shear flows, including jets, mixing layers and wakes, and wall-bounded flows, including shock-turbulence and shock boundary-layer interactions, obtained from computations, experiments and simulations are discussed. Key features: * Describes prediction methodologies in...

  10. Parameterized Finite Element Modeling and Buckling Analysis of Six Typical Composite Grid Cylindrical Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Changliang; Wang, Junbiao; Liu, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    Six typical composite grid cylindrical shells are constructed by superimposing three basic types of ribs. Then buckling behavior and structural efficiency of these shells are analyzed under axial compression, pure bending, torsion and transverse bending by finite element (FE) models. The FE models are created by a parametrical FE modeling approach that defines FE models with original natural twisted geometry and orients cross-sections of beam elements exactly. And the approach is parameterized and coded by Patran Command Language (PCL). The demonstrations of FE modeling indicate the program enables efficient generation of FE models and facilitates parametric studies and design of grid shells. Using the program, the effects of helical angles on the buckling behavior of six typical grid cylindrical shells are determined. The results of these studies indicate that the triangle grid and rotated triangle grid cylindrical shell are more efficient than others under axial compression and pure bending, whereas under torsion and transverse bending, the hexagon grid cylindrical shell is most efficient. Additionally, buckling mode shapes are compared and provide an understanding of composite grid cylindrical shells that is useful in preliminary design of such structures.

  11. Systematic study of the giant monopolar resonance via inelastic scattering of 108.5 MeV 3He. Measurement of the nuclear compressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, Didier.

    1981-09-01

    The giant monopole resonance has been studied via inelastic scattering of 108.5 MeV 3 He at very small angles (including 0 0 ) on approximately 50 nuclei. Its angular distribution reaches its maximum in this region and leads to clear separation with GQR. DWBA analysis shows a smooth increase of the strength from few per cent of the sum rule in light nuclei up to 100% in heavier ones. The excitation energy analysis shows a crossing effect of the monopole and quadrupole frequencies in A = 40-50 region, a coupling effect between the two modes in deformed nuclei, an asymmetry effect in several series of isotopes. Compressibility moduli of nuclear matter Ksub(infinity), surface Ksub(s) and asymmetry Ksub(tau) have seen extracted, as well as the Landau parameter F 0 at saturation [fr

  12. Compressible Vortex Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavarasan, Ramasamy; Arakeri, Jayawant; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of a high-speed vortex ring with a shock wave is one of the fundamental issues as it is a source of sound in supersonic jets. The complex flow field induced by the vortex alters the propagation of the shock wave greatly. In order to understand the process, a compressible vortex ring is studied in detail using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and shadowgraphic techniques. The high-speed vortex ring is generated from a shock tube and the shock wave, which precedes the vortex, is reflected back by a plate and made to interact with the vortex. The shadowgraph images indicate that the reflected shock front is influenced by the non-uniform flow induced by the vortex and is decelerated while passing through the vortex. It appears that after the interaction the shock is "split" into two. The PIV measurements provided clear picture about the evolution of the vortex at different time interval. The centerline velocity traces show the maximum velocity to be around 350 m/s. The velocity field, unlike in incompressible rings, contains contributions from both the shock and the vortex ring. The velocity distribution across the vortex core, core diameter and circulation are also calculated from the PIV data.

  13. Triggered Snap-Through of Bistable Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yijie; Huang, Shicheng; Trase, Ian; Hu, Nan; Chen, Zi

    Elastic bistable shells are common structures in nature and engineering, such as the lobes of the Venus flytrap or the surface of a toy jumping poppers. Despite their ubiquity, the parameters that control the bistability of such structures are not well understood. In this study, we explore how the geometrical features of radially symmetric elastic shells affect the shape and potential energy of a shell's stable states, and how to tune certain parameters in order to generate a snap-through transition from a convex semi-stable state to concave stable state. We fabricated a series of elastic shells with varying geometric parameters out of silicone rubber and measured the resulting potential energy in the semi-stable state. Finite element simulations were also conducted in order to determine the deformation and stress in the shells during snap-through. It was found that the energy of the semi-stable state is controlled by only two geometric parameters and a dimensionless ratio. We also noted two distinct transitions during snap-through, one between monostability and semi-bistability (the state a popper toy is in before it snaps-through and jumps), and a second transition between semi-bistability and true bistability. This work shows that it is possible to use a set of simple parameters to tailor the energy landscape of an elastic shell in order to generate complex trigger motions for their potential use in smart applications. Z.C. acknowledge support from Society in Science-Branco Weiss Fellowship, administered by ETH Zurich.

  14. Benzene Synthesis for ''14C Measurements and Evaluation of Uncertainty in Mollusk Shells; Sintesis de Benceno para la Determinacion de C''14 y Evaluacion de su Incertidumbre en Conchas de Moluscos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero del Hombrebueno, B.; Simon, M. A.; Larena, P.

    2002-07-01

    This work describes the method and instrumentation used by Environmental Isotopes laboratory of the CIEMAT Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (DIAE) for the synthesis of benzene from carbonates of mollusk shells and the liquid scintillation counting of ''14C for radiocarbon dating in these samples. The usefulness of mollusk shells for ''14 C dating are considered. (Author)

  15. Highly Efficient Compression Algorithms for Multichannel EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Laxmi; Rahman, Daleef; Routray, Aurobinda

    2018-05-01

    The difficulty associated with processing and understanding the high dimensionality of electroencephalogram (EEG) data requires developing efficient and robust compression algorithms. In this paper, different lossless compression techniques of single and multichannel EEG data, including Huffman coding, arithmetic coding, Markov predictor, linear predictor, context-based error modeling, multivariate autoregression (MVAR), and a low complexity bivariate model have been examined and their performances have been compared. Furthermore, a high compression algorithm named general MVAR and a modified context-based error modeling for multichannel EEG have been proposed. The resulting compression algorithm produces a higher relative compression ratio of 70.64% on average compared with the existing methods, and in some cases, it goes up to 83.06%. The proposed methods are designed to compress a large amount of multichannel EEG data efficiently so that the data storage and transmission bandwidth can be effectively used. These methods have been validated using several experimental multichannel EEG recordings of different subjects and publicly available standard databases. The satisfactory parametric measures of these methods, namely percent-root-mean square distortion, peak signal-to-noise ratio, root-mean-square error, and cross correlation, show their superiority over the state-of-the-art compression methods.

  16. Hanford double shell tank corrosion monitoring instrument tree prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    High-level nuclear wastes at the Hanford site are stored underground in carbon steel double-shell and single-shell tanks (DSTs and SSTs). The installation of a prototype corrosion monitoring instrument tree into DST 241-A-101 was completed in December 1995. The instrument tree has the ability to detect and discriminate between uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) through the use of electrochemical noise measurements and a unique stressed element, three-electrode probe. The tree itself is constructed of AISI 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), with probes in the vapor space, vapor/liquid interface and liquid. Successful development of these trees will allow their application to single shell tanks and the transfer of technology to other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Keywords: Hanford, radioactive waste, high-level waste tanks, electrochemical noise, probes, double-shell tanks, single-shell tanks, corrosion

  17. A hybrid data compression approach for online backup service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Zhou, Ke; Qin, MingKang

    2009-08-01

    With the popularity of Saas (Software as a service), backup service has becoming a hot topic of storage application. Due to the numerous backup users, how to reduce the massive data load is a key problem for system designer. Data compression provides a good solution. Traditional data compression application used to adopt a single method, which has limitations in some respects. For example data stream compression can only realize intra-file compression, de-duplication is used to eliminate inter-file redundant data, compression efficiency cannot meet the need of backup service software. This paper proposes a novel hybrid compression approach, which includes two levels: global compression and block compression. The former can eliminate redundant inter-file copies across different users, the latter adopts data stream compression technology to realize intra-file de-duplication. Several compressing algorithms were adopted to measure the compression ratio and CPU time. Adaptability using different algorithm in certain situation is also analyzed. The performance analysis shows that great improvement is made through the hybrid compression policy.

  18. Single-shell tank riser resistance to ground test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiewert, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    This Test Procedure provides the general directions for conducting Single-Shell Tank Riser to Earth Measurements which will be used by engineering as a step towards providing closure for the Lightning Hazard Issue

  19. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  20. Laboratory Measurements Of Charge-exchange Produced X-ray Emission From K-shell Transitions In Hydrogenic And Helium-like Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Boyce, K. R.; Chen, H.; Gu, M. F.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Thorn, D.; Wargelin, B.

    2006-09-01

    We have used a microcalorimeter and solid state detectors to measure x-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between bare and hydrogenic Fe colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. We show the measured spectral signature produced by different neutral donors and compare our results to theory where available. We also compare our results to measurements of the Fe K line emission from the Galactic Center measured by the XIS on the Suzaku x-ray observatory. This comparison shows that charge exchange recombination between highly charged ions (either cosmic rays or thermal ions) and neutral gas is probably not the dominant source of diffuse line emission in the Galactic Center. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48, and is also supported by NASA APRA grants to LLNL, GSFC, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, and Stanford University.

  1. Multimode seeded Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing in a convergent, compressible, miscible plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanier, N.E.; Barnes, Cris W.; Batha, S.H.; Day, R.D.; Magelssen, G.R.; Scott, J.M.; Dunne, A.M.; Parker, K.W.; Rothman, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing seeded by multimode initial surface perturbations in a convergent, compressible, miscible plasma system is measured on the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser system. A strong shock (Mach 12-20), created by 50 laser beams, is used to accelerate impulsively a thin aluminum shell into a lower density foam. As the system converges, both interfaces of the aluminum are RM unstable and undergo mixing. Standard x-ray radiographic techniques are employed to survey accurately the zero-order hydrodynamics, the average radius and overall width, of the marker. LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman et al., Comments on Plasma Physics 2, 51 (1975)] simulations are consistent with the zero-order behavior of initially smooth markers. In experiments with smooth aluminum markers, the measured marker width shortly after shock passage behaves incompressibly and thickens due to Bell-Plesset effects. At high convergence (>4), the marker begins to compress as the rebounding shock passes back through the marker. When an initial multimode perturbation is introduced to the outer surface of the marker, the measured marker width is observed to increase by 10-15 μm, and is substantially smaller than as-shot simulations using RAGE [R. M. Baltrusaitis et al., Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)] would predict

  2. Seismic analysis of axisymmetric shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jospin, R.J.; Toledo, E.M.; Feijoo, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Axisymmetric shells subjected to multiple support excitation are studied. The shells are spatialy discretized by the finite element method and in order to obtain estimates for the maximum values of displacements and stresses the response spectrum tecnique is used. Finally, some numerical results are presented and discussed in the case of a shell of revolution with vertical symmetry axis, subjected to seismic ground motions in the horizontal, vertical and rocking directions. (Author) [pt

  3. Creep analysis of orthotropic shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehra, V.K.; Ghosh, A.

    1975-01-01

    A method of creep analysis of orthotropic cylindrical shells subjected to axisymmetric loads has been developed. A general study of creep behaviour of cylindrical shells subjected to a uniform internal pressure has been conducted for a wide range of values of anisotropy coefficients and creep law exponent. Analysis includes determination of stress re-distribution, strain rates, stationary state stresses. Application of reference stress technique has been extended to analysis of shells. (author)

  4. The direct manipulation shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.E.; Christiansen, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accelerator controls systems provide parameter display pages which allow the operator to monitor and manipulate selected control points in the system. Display pages are generally implemented as either hand-crafted, purpose-built programs; or by using a specialized display page layout tool. These two methods of display page development exhibit the classic trade-off between functionality vs. ease of implementation. In the Direct Manipulation Shell we approach the process of developing a display page in a manifestly object-oriented manner. This is done by providing a general framework for interactively instantiating and manipulating display objects. (author)

  5. Compression evaluation of surgery video recordings retaining diagnostic credibility (compression evaluation of surgery video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplaga, M.; Leszczuk, M. I.; Papir, Z.; Przelaskowski, A.

    2008-12-01

    Wider dissemination of medical digital video libraries is affected by two correlated factors, resource effective content compression that directly influences its diagnostic credibility. It has been proved that it is possible to meet these contradictory requirements halfway for long-lasting and low motion surgery recordings at compression ratios close to 100 (bronchoscopic procedures were a case study investigated). As the main supporting assumption, it has been accepted that the content can be compressed as far as clinicians are not able to sense a loss of video diagnostic fidelity (a visually lossless compression). Different market codecs were inspected by means of the combined subjective and objective tests toward their usability in medical video libraries. Subjective tests involved a panel of clinicians who had to classify compressed bronchoscopic video content according to its quality under the bubble sort algorithm. For objective tests, two metrics (hybrid vector measure and hosaka Plots) were calculated frame by frame and averaged over a whole sequence.

  6. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed....

  7. [Compression treatment for burned skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Fadhel; Lassoued, Mohamed A; Sahnoun, Mahdi; Sfar, Souad; Cheikhrouhou, Morched

    2012-02-01

    The regularity of a compressive knit is defined as its ability to perform its function in a burnt skin. This property is essential to avoid the phenomenon of rejection of the material or toxicity problems But: Make knits biocompatible with high burnet of human skin. We fabric knits of elastic material. To ensure good adhesion to the skin, we made elastic material, typically a tight loop knitted. The Length of yarn absorbed by stitch and the raw matter are changed with each sample. The physical properties of each sample are measured and compared. Surface modifications are made to these samples by impregnation of microcapsules based on jojoba oil. Knits are compressif, elastic in all directions, light, thin, comfortable, and washable for hygiene issues. In addition, the washing can find their compressive properties. The Jojoba Oil microcapsules hydrated the human burnet skin. This moisturizer is used to the firmness of the wound and it gives flexibility to the skin. Compressive Knits are biocompatible with burnet skin. The mixture of natural and synthetic fibers is irreplaceable in terms comfort and regularity.

  8. Compressibility effects on turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify compressibility effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a compressive mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Automatic determination of 3D orientations of fossilized oyster shells from a densely packed Miocene shell bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttonen, Ana; Harzhauser, Mathias; Puttonen, Eetu; Mandic, Oleg; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2018-02-01

    Shell beds represent a useful source of information on various physical processes that cause the depositional condition. We present an automated method to calculate the 3D orientations of a large number of elongate and platy objects (fossilized oyster shells) on a sedimentary bedding plane, developed to support the interpretation of possible depositional patterns, imbrications, or impact of local faults. The study focusses on more than 1900 fossil oyster shells exposed in a densely packed Miocene shell bed. 3D data were acquired by terrestrial laser scanning on an area of 459 m2 with a resolution of 1 mm. Bivalve shells were manually defined as 3D-point clouds of a digital surface model and stored in an ArcGIS database. An individual shell coordinate system (ISCS) was virtually embedded into each shell and its orientation was determined relative to the coordinate system of the entire, tectonically tilted shell bed. Orientation is described by the rotation angles roll, pitch, and yaw in a Cartesian coordinate system. This method allows an efficient measurement and analysis of the orientation of thousands of specimens and is a major advantage compared to the traditional 2D approach, which measures only the azimuth (yaw) angles. The resulting data can variously be utilized for taphonomic analyses and the reconstruction of prevailing hydrodynamic regimes and depositional environments. For the first time, the influence of possible post-sedimentary vertical displacements can be quantified with high accuracy. Here, the effect of nearby fault lines—present in the reef—was tested on strongly tilted oyster shells, but it was found out that the fault lines did not have a statistically significant effect on the large tilt angles. Aside from the high reproducibility, a further advantage of the method is its non-destructive nature, which is especially suitable for geoparks and protected sites such as the studied shell bed.

  10. Measurement of effective analyzing powers for the NTOF polarimeter at LAMPF and DLL(0 degree) for Gamow-Teller transitions in p-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of neutron polarization from (rvec p,rvec n) reactions can provide valuable clues toward understanding the isovector nucleon-nucleus interaction. A neutron time-of-flight polarimeter has been constructed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility to perform such measurements, but before the polarimeter can be used, its effective analyzing powers must be determined. This is accomplished by using the 14 C(rvec p,rvec n) 14 N reaction at a bombarding energy of 494 MeV to produce a beam of neutrons with known polarization, illuminating the detector with these neutrons, and measuring the azimuthal asymmetries after scattering from a hydrogenous analyzer fluid within the detector. Secondary measurements are made using the 2 H(rvec p,rvec n) 2 p reaction with bombarding energies of 318 and 494 MeV to produce a polarized neutron beam. The results from (rvec np) analyzing reactions within the detector agree with values anticipated from free nucleon-nucleon analyzing powers, but the results from (rvec np) analyzing reactions display a more than 33% reduction from the anticipated values. Additionally, measurements are made of the polarization transfer coefficient D LL (0 degree) for rvec p,rvec n Gamow-Teller reactions on 2 H, 7 Li 12 C, and 14 C targets. For a purely central interaction, one would expect that D LL (0 degree) ∼ -1/3 in the plane wave limit, but a simple average of the Jπ = 0 + → 1 + results at a bombardment energy of 494 MeV gives D LL (0 degree) = -0.689 ± 0.044. Thus, the measurements indicate that the nucleon-nucleus interaction -- which is largely central at 200 MeV -- has strong tensor contributions at higher energy

  11. Suitability of Recycled Polyethylene/Palm Kernel Shell-Iron Filings Composite for Automobile Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Samotu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A recycling aimed research was carried out to produce a new composite material and proffer suggestion for the possible use of the newly developed composite material. The empty water sachet (commonly called pure water nylon in Nigeria, was used as a matrix, which was reinforced by carbonized palm kernel shell (CPKS particulate and iron fillings. The percentage composition of iron fillings was maintained at 5 wt%, while that of palm kernel shell ash was varied from 5 wt% - 20 wt% at an interval of 5 %. The composites were compounded and compressively moulded. Physical and mechanical properties of the composites were tested for alongside three conventional car bumper samples, and the results obtained shows that the composite material could be used to produce a car bumper among other parts of automobile like dashboard due to their impact strength and low density. Impact strength - density ratio for the materials gave prime information on the possible application of the developed material. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM was used to examine the distribution of the reinforcement within the matrix. After results analysis, materials with 5 wt% of CPKS and that with 10 wt% of CPKS were recommended for the car bumper production following their high impact strength - density ratio of 0.26 and 0.19 respectively, which are higher as compared to that of a conventional bumper material measured alongside the composite materials.

  12. Modifying Cement Hydration with NS@PCE Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fine particles could accelerate cement hydration process, or, more specifically, this accelerating effect can be attributed to additional surface area introduced by fine particles. In addition to this view, the surface state of fine particles is also an important factor, especially for nanoparticles. In the previous study, a series of nano-SiO2-polycarboxylate superplasticizer core-shell nanoparticles (NS@PCE were synthesized, which have a similar particle size distribution but different surface properties. In this study, the impact of NS@PCE on cement hydration was investigated by heat flow calorimetry, mechanical property measurement, XRD, and SEM. Results show that, among a series of NS@PCE, NS@PCE-2 with a moderate shell-core ratio appeared to be more effective in accelerating cement hydration. As dosage increases, the efficiency of NS@PCE-2 would reach a plateau which is quantified by various characteristic values. Compressive strength results indicate that strength has a linear correlation with cumulative heat release. A hypothesis was proposed to explain the modification effect of NS@PCE, which highlights a balance between initial dispersion and pozzolanic reactivity. This paper provides a new understanding for the surface modification of supplementary cementitious materials and their application and also sheds a new light on nano-SiO2 for optimizing cement-based materials.

  13. Task-oriented lossy compression of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark C.; Atkins, M. Stella; Vaisey, Jacques

    1996-04-01

    A new task-oriented image quality metric is used to quantify the effects of distortion introduced into magnetic resonance images by lossy compression. This metric measures the similarity between a radiologist's manual segmentation of pathological features in the original images and the automated segmentations performed on the original and compressed images. The images are compressed using a general wavelet-based lossy image compression technique, embedded zerotree coding, and segmented using a three-dimensional stochastic model-based tissue segmentation algorithm. The performance of the compression system is then enhanced by compressing different regions of the image volume at different bit rates, guided by prior knowledge about the location of important anatomical regions in the image. Application of the new system to magnetic resonance images is shown to produce compression results superior to the conventional methods, both subjectively and with respect to the segmentation similarity metric.

  14. Dossier Shell Eco-Marathon; Dossier Shell Eco-Marathon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matla, P.

    2012-05-15

    Three articles address subjects concerning the annual race with highly energy efficient cars: the Shell Eco-Marathon. [Dutch] In 3 artikelen wordt aandacht besteed aan de ontwerpen voor de jaarlijkse race met superzuinige auto's, de Shell Eco-Marathon.

  15. An efficient compression scheme for bitmap indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow J.; Shoshani, Arie

    2004-04-13

    When using an out-of-core indexing method to answer a query, it is generally assumed that the I/O cost dominates the overall query response time. Because of this, most research on indexing methods concentrate on reducing the sizes of indices. For bitmap indices, compression has been used for this purpose. However, in most cases, operations on these compressed bitmaps, mostly bitwise logical operations such as AND, OR, and NOT, spend more time in CPU than in I/O. To speedup these operations, a number of specialized bitmap compression schemes have been developed; the best known of which is the byte-aligned bitmap code (BBC). They are usually faster in performing logical operations than the general purpose compression schemes, but, the time spent in CPU still dominates the total query response time. To reduce the query response time, we designed a CPU-friendly scheme named the word-aligned hybrid (WAH) code. In this paper, we prove that the sizes of WAH compressed bitmap indices are about two words per row for large range of attributes. This size is smaller than typical sizes of commonly used indices, such as a B-tree. Therefore, WAH compressed indices are not only appropriate for low cardinality attributes but also for high cardinality attributes.In the worst case, the time to operate on compressed bitmaps is proportional to the total size of the bitmaps involved. The total size of the bitmaps required to answer a query on one attribute is proportional to the number of hits. These indicate that WAH compressed bitmap indices are optimal. To verify their effectiveness, we generated bitmap indices for four different datasets and measured the response time of many range queries. Tests confirm that sizes of compressed bitmap indices are indeed smaller than B-tree indices, and query processing with WAH compressed indices is much faster than with BBC compressed indices, projection indices and B-tree indices. In addition, we also verified that the average query response time

  16. DNA nanoparticles with core-shell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Preethi L; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lisziewicz, Julianna; Speransky, Vlad; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-10-14

    Mannobiose-modified polyethylenimines (PEI) are used in gene therapy to generate nanoparticles of DNA that can be targeted to the antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. We report that the sugar modification alters the DNA organization within the nanoparticles from homogenous to shell-like packing. The depth-dependent packing of DNA within the nanoparticles was probed using AFM nano-indentation. Unmodified PEI-DNA nanoparticles display linear elastic properties and depth-independent mechanics, characteristic of homogenous materials. Mannobiose-modified nanoparticles, however, showed distinct force regimes that were dependent on indentation depth, with 'buckling'-like response that is reproducible and not due to particle failure. By comparison with theoretical studies of spherical shell mechanics, the structure of mannobiosylated particles was deduced to be a thin shell with wall thickness in the order of few nanometers, and a fluid-filled core. The shell-core structure is also consistent with observations of nanoparticle denting in altered solution conditions, with measurements of nanoparticle water content from AFM images, and with images of DNA distribution in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  17. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  18. Comparison of 230Th/234U Dating Results Obtained on Fossil Mollusk Shell from Morocco and Fossil Coral Samples from Egypt. Research of Methodological Criteria to Valid the Measured Age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choukri, A.; Hakam, O.K.; Reyss, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiochemical ages of 126 unrecrystallized coral samples from the Egyptian shoreline and 125 fossil mollusk shell samples from the Atlantic coast of Moroccan High Atlas are discussed.For corals, the obtained ages are in good agreement with the ages reported previously on urecristallized corals except in some sites where some samples are affected by a cementation of younger aragonite.For mollusk shells, the obtained ages are in the most of cases, rejuvenated.This rejuvenation is due eventually to a post-incorporation of secondary uranium that is responsible of the wide dispersion of apparent ages of mollusk shells.

  19. Development of Knitted Materials Selection for Compression Underwear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The presented research deals with the development of comfortable male underwear taking into account the development of pattern block methods and the analysis of the relationships existing between the compression pressure, the knitted materials properties, and some push-up effects. The main aim of this study is to achieve the technical selection of the materials based on KES-FB evaluations.The ease value has been used as the main index to connect the structural design of underwear, on one hand, and the body sizes, on other hand. A “bodyshell” system for testing the soft tissue of male bodies by FlexiForce sensor has been implemented. The pressures under the shells at six different places on the male body with ease changing have been tested.The collected results including maximum-possible pressure and material tensile indexes measured thanks to KES-FB have been analyzed in order to find the most relevant indexes of the material properties. A mathematical equations based on relationships combining theoretical model with practical application have been established. These equations will be helpful for the consumers and designers to select “the suitable knitting materials for male underwear” and they can be used too in the perspective of parameterization in CAD, in order to improve product developments efficiency.

  20. Hi shells, supershells, shell-like objects, and ''worms''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiles, C.

    1984-01-01

    We present photographic representations of the combination of two Hi surveys, so as to eliminate the survey boundaries at Vertical BarbVertical Bar = 10 0 . We also present high-contrast photographs for particular velocities to exhibit weak Hi features. All of these photographs were used to prepare a new list of Hi shells, supershells, and shell-like objects. We discuss the structure of three shell-like objects that are associated with high-velocity gas, and with gas at all velocities that is associated with radio continuum loops I, II, and III. We use spatial filtering to find wiggly gas filaments: ''worms'': crawling away from the galactic plane in the inner Galaxy. The ''worms'' are probably parts of shells that are open at the top; such shells should be good sources of hot gas for the galactic halo

  1. Studies on Freezing of Shell-Fish-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dae Jin; Konagaya, Shiro; Tanaka, Takeo

    Ark shell, Anadara broughtonii(Shrenk), are commonly eaten raw or under-done in Korea, Japan, and East Asian countries. Along with a recent remarkable development of culture fisheries, Ark shell has become one of the commercially important shell-fish species. Transportation and storage of large quantities of shell-fish is becoming increasingly important. This work was begun with this background to make clear the effects of temperature and length of storage time on the quality of frozen stored ark shell. Results are as follows : (1) There was little chang in amounts of free and expressible drip from ark shell flesh frozen stored at -40°CdegC for 6 months. Water holding capacity of the same meat was almost constant over 6 months storage. However, a mounts of both drip increased markedly after 2 months storage at -10°C. (2) Protein extractibility of ark shell flesh tended to decrease gradually from the begining when stored at -10°C, while at -20°C, the protein extractibility was stable for 3 months before decreasing gradually. However at -40°C, the protein extractibility was stable for 6 months. It was found that paramyosin was very stable even when the ark shell was frozen stored at -10°C. (3) It was observed that ark shell flesh became tough when frozen. The toughness of ark shell flesh as measured by an instrument increased with frozen storage time and increased temperature. (4) In the smooth muscle, it was histologically observed that initial small ice crystals formed between muscle bundles grew larger during frozen storage. It was found that the higher the storage temperature, the bigger the ice crystals formed. Aggregation of some muscle fiber and empty spaces between muscle bundles were observd after thawed muscles frozen stored at relatively high temperature such as -10°C.

  2. NIF-Scale Hohlraum Asymmetry Studies Using Point-Projection Radiograph of Thin Shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollaine, S.; Bradley, D.; Landen, O.; Wallace, R.; Jones, O.

    2000-01-01

    Our current OMEGA experimental campaign is developing the thin shell diagnostic for use on NIF with the needed accuracy. The thin shell diagnostic has the advantage of linearity over alternative measurement techniques, so that low-order modes will not corrupt the measurement of high-order modes. Although our random measurement errors are adequate, we need to monitor beam balance and ensure that the thin shells have a uniform thickness

  3. Pulsed Compression Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roestenberg, T. [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-06-07

    The advantages of the Pulsed Compression Reactor (PCR) over the internal combustion engine-type chemical reactors are briefly discussed. Over the last four years a project concerning the fundamentals of the PCR technology has been performed by the University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands. In order to assess the feasibility of the application of the PCR principle for the conversion methane to syngas, several fundamental questions needed to be answered. Two important questions that relate to the applicability of the PCR for any process are: how large is the heat transfer rate from a rapidly compressed and expanded volume of gas, and how does this heat transfer rate compare to energy contained in the compressed gas? And: can stable operation with a completely free piston as it is intended with the PCR be achieved?.

  4. Medullary compression syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga T, L.; Echegaray, A.; Zaharia, M.; Pinillos A, L.; Moscol, A.; Barriga T, O.; Heredia Z, A.

    1994-01-01

    The authors made a retrospective study in 105 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases from 1973 to 1992. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the influence of radiotherapy in patients with medullary compression syndrome in aspects concerning pain palliation and improvement of functional impairment. Treatment sheets of patients with medullary compression were revised: 32 out of 39 of patients (82%) came to hospital by their own means and continued walking after treatment, 8 out of 66 patients (12%) who came in a wheelchair or were bedridden, could mobilize by their own after treatment, 41 patients (64%) had partial alleviation of pain after treatment. In those who came by their own means and did not change their characteristics, functional improvement was observed. It is concluded that radiotherapy offers palliative benefit in patients with medullary compression syndrome. (authors). 20 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Isotopic characteristics of shells Mytilus galloprovincialis from eastern coastal area of Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Kanduč

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis were collected from entire Eastern Adriatic coast to determine δ18O and δ13C performed on calcite and aragonite shell layers. The aim of this work was to check whether shells of M. galloprovincialis are good environmental indicators (water temperature, salinity. Based on measured isotopic composition of oxygen in shell layers and assumed isotopic composition in water temperatures of calcite and aragonite of shell layers were calculated. The calculated temperatures for M. galloprovincialis shell growth of calcite and aragonite shell layer are in good agreement with measured temperatures of sea water. According to our results of δ18O and δ13C in shell layers we canseparate the locations of the investigated area into three groups: those with more influence of fresh water, those with less influence of fresh water and those of marine environments.

  6. Deformation Behavior of Press Formed Shell by Indentation and Its Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Yamashita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformation behavior and energy absorbing performance of the press formed aluminum alloy A5052 shells were investigated to obtain the basic information regarding the mutual effect of the shell shape and the indentor. Flat top and hemispherical shells were indented by the flat- or hemispherical-headed indentor. Indentation force in the rising stage was sharper for both shell shapes when the flat indentor was used. Remarkable force increase due to high in-plane compressive stress arisen by the appropriate tool constraint was observed in the early indentation stage, where the hemispherical shell was deformed with the flat-headed indentor. This aspect is preferable for energy absorption performance per unit mass. Less fluctuation in indentation force was achieved in the combination of the hemispherical shell and similar shaped indentor. The consumed energy in the travel length of the indentor equal to the shell height was evaluated. The increase ratio of the energy is prominent when the hemispherical indentor is replaced by a flat-headed one in both shell shapes. Finite element simulation was also conducted. Deformation behaviors were successfully predicted when the kinematic hardening plasticity was introduced in the material model.

  7. Atomic inner shell ionization: a new method of nuclear interaction lifetimes in the range 10-16-10-18 second. Lifetime measurement of the compound nucleus in the reaction 106Cd+p (Ep=10 and 12 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemin, J.-F.

    1978-01-01

    A new method to measure the lifetime of the compound nucleus formed in the reaction 106 Cd+p at Ep=10 and 12 MeV is described. The nuclear lifetime is compared to the known lifetime of an atomic inner shell vacancy created in the entrance channel of the nuclear reaction. If the ionization probability in he way-in of the nuclear reaction is kown the compound nucleus lifetime is deduced by a simple relation from the number of compound X-rays measured in coincidence with one of the reaction products. A large number of ionization probability values measured in very small impact parameter collisions induced by H + , He + , D + on Al, Cu, S, Ti, Si, Ag, Cd are reported. The data are interpreted in terms of the corrected SCA theory of ionization. New effects such as angular dependence and trajectory effect (hair-pin-curve effect) are shown experimentally. The influence of a nuclear delay time on the ionization probability value is considered; the effect on a nuclear reaction of the energy losses by the projectile during the ionization process is analysed in detail. The yield curve of the resonant nuclear reaction 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si is taken as an example. A detailed analysis of the compound nucleus 107 In lifetimes is given. Attention has been paid to competitive processes leading to X ray emission of same energy as the compound X rays. Extensions of the method to measure compound nucleus lifetimes in collision induced by heavy ions and to separate the shape elastic and compound elastic mechanisms are presented [fr

  8. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous silica core-shell particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Nikolić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Core-shell particles were formed by deposition of primary silica particles synthesized from sodium silicate solution on functionalized silica core particles (having size of ~0.5 µm prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylortosilicate. The obtained mesoporous shell has thickness of about 60 nm and consists of primary silica particles with average size of ~21 nm. Scanning electron microscopy and zeta potential measurements showed that continuous silica shell exists around functionalized core particles which was additionally proved by FTIR and TEM results.

  9. Shell Trumpets from Western Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Novella

    1991-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine shells have been used as musical instruments in almost all parts of the world (Izikowitz 1935, including Mesoamerica, where large univalves, also called conch shells in the literature, had a utilitarian function as trumpets. Their use is well documented in most cultural areas of Mesoamerica, as in Western Mexico, through their various occurrences in archaeological contexts and museums collections.

  10. Cylindrical thin-shell wormholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    A general formalism for the dynamics of nonrotating cylindrical thin-shell wormholes is developed. The time evolution of the throat is explicitly obtained for thin-shell wormholes whose metric has the form associated with local cosmic strings. It is found that the throat collapses to zero radius, remains static, or expands forever, depending only on the sign of its initial velocity

  11. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poves, P.

    2007-01-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  12. Conventional shell model: some issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallieres, M.; Pan, X.W.; Feng, D.H.; Novoselsky, A.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss some important issues in shell-model calculations related to the effective interactions used in different regions of the periodic table; in particular the quality of different interactions is discussed, as well as the mass dependence of the interactions. Mention is made of the recently developed Drexel University shell-model (DUSM). (orig.)

  13. Expert system development (ESD) shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmini, S.; Diwakar, M.P.; Rathode, N.C.; Bairi, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    An Expert System Development (ESD) Shell design implementation is desribed in detail. The shell provides high-level generic facilities for Knowledge Representation (KR) and inferencing and tools for developing user interfaces. Powerful set of tools in the shell relieves much of the programming burden in the ES development. The shell is written in PROLOG under IBM PC/AT. KR facilities are based on two very powerful formalisms namely, frames and rules. Inference Engine (IE) draws most of its power from unification and backward reasoning strategy in PROLOG. This basic mechanism is enhanced further by incorporating both forward and backward chaining of rules and frame-based inferencing. Overall programming style integrates multiple paradigms including logic, object oriented, access-oriented and imperative programming. This permits ES designer a lot of flexibility in organizing inference control. Creation and maintainance of knowledge base is a major activity. The shell, therefore, provides number of facilities to simplify these tasks. Shell design also takes note of the fact that final success of any system depends on end-user satisfaction and hence provides features to build use-friendly interfaces. The shell also provides a set of interfacing predicates so that it can be embedded within any PROLOG program to incorporate functionalilty of the shell in the user program. (author). 10 refs., 8 figs

  14. Graph Compression by BFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Apostolico

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Web Graph is a large-scale graph that does not fit in main memory, so that lossless compression methods have been proposed for it. This paper introduces a compression scheme that combines efficient storage with fast retrieval for the information in a node. The scheme exploits the properties of the Web Graph without assuming an ordering of the URLs, so that it may be applied to more general graphs. Tests on some datasets of use achieve space savings of about 10% over existing methods.

  15. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  16. Gate-stack engineering for self-organized Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe-shell MOS capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting eLai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the first-of-its-kind, self-organized gate-stack heterostructure of Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe-shell on Si fabricated in a single step through the selective oxidation of a SiGe nano-patterned pillar over a Si3N4 buffer layer on a Si substrate. Process-controlled tunability of the Ge-dot size (7.5−90 nm, the SiO2 thickness (3−4 nm, and as well the SiGe-shell thickness (2−15 nm has been demonstrated, enabling a practically-achievable core building block for Ge-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS devices. Detailed morphologies, structural, and electrical interfacial properties of the SiO2/Ge-dot and SiO2/SiGe interfaces were assessed using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and temperature-dependent high/low-frequency capacitance-voltage measurements. Notably, NiGe/SiO2/SiGe and Al/SiO2/Ge-dot/SiO2/SiGe MOS capacitors exhibit low interface trap densities of as low as 3-5x10^11 cm^-2·eV^-1 and fixed charge densities of 1-5x10^11 cm^-2, suggesting good-quality SiO2/SiGe-shell and SiO2/Ge-dot interfaces. In addition, the advantage of having single-crystalline Si1-xGex shell (x > 0.5 in a compressive stress state in our self-aligned gate-stack heterostructure has great promise for possible SiGe (or Ge MOS nanoelectronic and nanophotonic applications.

  17. Elastic stability of cylindrical shells with soft elastic cores: Biomimicking natural tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Gebran Nizar

    1994-01-01

    Thin walled cylindrical shell structures are widespread in nature: examples include plant stems, porcupine quills, and hedgehog spines. All have an outer shell of almost fully dense material supported by a low density, cellular core. In nature, all are loaded in combination of axial compression and bending: failure is typically by buckling. Natural structures are often optimized. Here we have analyzed the elastic buckling of a thin cylindrical shell supported by an elastic core to show that this structural configuration achieves significant weight saving over a hollow cylinder. The results of the analysis are compared with data from an extensive experimental program on uniaxial compression and four point bending tests on silicone rubber shells with and without compliant foam cores. The analysis describes the results of the mechanical tests well. Characterization of the microstructures of several natural tubular structures with foamlike cores (plant stems, quills, and spines) revealed them to be close to the optimal configurations predicted by the analytical model. Biomimicking of natural cylindrical shell structures and evolutionary design processes may offer the potential to increase the mechanical efficiency of engineering cylindrical shells.

  18. Dynamic centering of liquid shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsamopoulos, J.A.; Brown, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The moderate-amplitude axisymmetric oscillations of an inviscid liquid shell surrounding an incompressible gas bubble are calculated by a multiple-time-scale expansion for initial deformations composed of two-lobed perturbations of the shell and a displacement of the bubble from the center of mass of the liquid. Two types of small-amplitude motion are identified and lead to very different nonlinear dynamic interactions, as described by the results valid up to second order in the amplitude of the initial deformation. In the ''bubble mode,'' the oscillations of the captive bubble and the liquid shell are exactly in phase and the bubble vibrates about its initial eccentric location. The bubble moves toward the center of the drop when the shell is perturbed into a ''sloshing mode'' of oscillation where both interfaces move out of phase. These results explain the centering of liquid shells observed in several experiments

  19. Comparison of the effectiveness of compression stockings and layer compression systems in venous ulceration treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawień, Arkadiusz; Cierzniakowska, Katarzyna; Cwajda-Białasik, Justyna; Mościcka, Paulina

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the research was to compare the dynamics of venous ulcer healing when treated with the use of compression stockings as well as original two- and four-layer bandage systems. Material and methods A group of 46 patients suffering from venous ulcers was studied. This group consisted of 36 (78.3%) women and 10 (21.70%) men aged between 41 and 88 years (the average age was 66.6 years and the median was 67). Patients were randomized into three groups, for treatment with the ProGuide two-layer system, Profore four-layer compression, and with the use of compression stockings class II. In the case of multi-layer compression, compression ensuring 40 mmHg blood pressure at ankle level was used. Results In all patients, independently of the type of compression therapy, a few significant statistical changes of ulceration area in time were observed (Student’s t test for matched pairs, p ulceration area in each of the successive measurements was observed in patients treated with the four-layer system – on average 0.63 cm2/per week. The smallest loss of ulceration area was observed in patients using compression stockings – on average 0.44 cm2/per week. However, the observed differences were not statistically significant (Kruskal-Wallis test H = 4.45, p > 0.05). Conclusions A systematic compression therapy, applied with preliminary blood pressure of 40 mmHg, is an effective method of conservative treatment of venous ulcers. Compression stockings and prepared systems of multi-layer compression were characterized by similar clinical effectiveness. PMID:22419941

  20. Properties of palm oil fuel ash cement sand brick containing pulverized cockle shell as partial sand replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Aris, S.; Muthusamy, K.; Uzer, A.; Ahmad, S. Wan

    2018-04-01

    Environmental pollution caused by the disposal of solid wastes generated from both palm oil industry and cockle shell trade has motivated researches to explore the potential of these wastes. Integrating these wastes in production of construction material is one of the ways to reduce amount of waste thrown at dumping area. Thus, the present investigation investigates the performance of palm oil fuel ash (POFA) cement sand brick containing pulverized cockle shell as partial fine aggregate replacement. All mixes used contain 20% of POFA as partial cement replacement. Total of six mixes were prepared by adding a range of pulverized cockle shell that is 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% as partial sand replacement. The mixes were prepared in form of brick. All the water cured samples were tested for compressive strength and flexural strength until 28 days. Findings show that brick produced using 20% pulverized cockle shell exhibit the highest compressive strength and flexural strength also the lowest water absorption value.

  1. Muonic atoms with vacant electron shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, R.; Gotta, D.; Simons, L.M.; Missimer, J.; Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1985-01-01

    We show that the cascade in muonic atoms with Z<20 ejects sufficient atomic electrons to ionize an isolated muonic atom completely. In gases, the rates with which electrons refill the atomic shell can be accurately deduced from measured and calculated electron transfer cross sections. Thus, we can conclude that completely ionized muonic atoms can be prepared in gases, and that they remain isolated for long enough times at attainable pressures to facilitate studies of fundamental interactions in muonic atoms

  2. Filtration and compression of organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Keiding, Kristian

    is to use more simple systems. Dextran-MnO2 particles and polystyrene particles with a water-swollen polyacrylic acid shell have therefore been synthesised. These particles have been filtered and used to study the non-linear filtration behaviour. The compressibility of the formed cake has been investigated......The conventional filtration theory has been based on filtrations of incompressible particles such as anatase, kaolin and clay. The filtration models have later been used for organic slurries but can often not explain the observed experimental data. At constant pressure, the filtrate volume does...... and the discrepancy between the filtration theory and the observed filtration behaviour explained as a time-dependent collapse of the formed cake (creep). Thus, the creep phenomenon has been adopted in the conventional filtration models and it will be shown that the model can be used to simulate filtration data...

  3. Characterizing inner-shell with spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Oguri, Katsuya; Suda, Akira; Gotoh, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In many atomic, molecular and solid systems, Lorentzian and Fano profiles are commonly observed in a broad research fields throughout a variety of spectroscopies. As the profile structure is related to the phase of the time-dependent dipole moment, it plays an important role in the study of quantum properties. Here we determine the dipole phase in the inner-shell transition using spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER) with isolated attosecond pulses (IAPs). In addition, we propose a scheme for pulse generation and compression by manipulating the inner-shell transition. The electromagnetic radiation generated by the transition is temporally compressed to a few femtoseconds in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) region. The proposed pulse-compression scheme may provide an alternative route to producing attosecond pulses of light. PMID:25510971

  4. Compressible generalized Newtonian fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Málek, Josef; Rajagopal, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2010), s. 1097-1110 ISSN 0044-2275 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : power law fluid * uniform temperature * compressible fluid Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.290, year: 2010

  5. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    best for bits-per-pixel rates below 1.4 bpp, while HEVC obtains best performance in the range 1.4 to 6.5 bpp. The compression performance is also evaluated based on maximum errors. These results also show that HEVC can achieve a precision of 1°C with an average of 1.3 bpp....

  6. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  7. Image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Pan, Shumin; Cheng, Shan; Zhou, Zhihong

    2016-08-01

    Most image encryption algorithms based on low-dimensional chaos systems bear security risks and suffer encryption data expansion when adopting nonlinear transformation directly. To overcome these weaknesses and reduce the possible transmission burden, an efficient image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing is proposed. The original image is measured by the measurement matrices in two directions to achieve compression and encryption simultaneously, and then the resulting image is re-encrypted by the cycle shift operation controlled by a hyper-chaotic system. Cycle shift operation can change the values of the pixels efficiently. The proposed cryptosystem decreases the volume of data to be transmitted and simplifies the keys distribution simultaneously as a nonlinear encryption system. Simulation results verify the validity and the reliability of the proposed algorithm with acceptable compression and security performance.

  8. Slow expansion of the shell of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis and detection of a faint extended envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shara, M.M.; Moffat, A.F.J.; Williams, R.E.; Cohen, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    New H-alpha narrow-based CCD imaging of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis and the detection of a very faint, extended H-alpha halo surrounding the already known shell are reported. A forbidden O III image containing an emitting shell with a morphology different from that of the H-alpha shell is presented, and measurements of the H-alpha shell expansion are reported which rule out the 1966 eruption date for the shell origin, assuming uniform expansion. It is proposed that the observed shell consists of slowly moving, solar abundance ejecta which are photoionized. 18 references

  9. Competing hydrostatic compression mechanisms in nickel cyanide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Lucas, T.C. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Cairns, A.B.; Funnell, N.P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Tucker, M.G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Kleppe, A.K. [Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Hriljac, J.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Goodwin, A.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    We use variable-pressure neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements to determine the uniaxial and bulk compressibilities of nickel(II) cyanide, Ni(CN){sub 2}. Whereas other layered molecular framework materials are known to exhibit negative area compressibility, we find that Ni(CN){sub 2} does not. We attribute this difference to the existence of low-energy in-plane tilt modes that provide a pressure-activated mechanism for layer contraction. The experimental bulk modulus we measure is about four times lower than that reported elsewhere on the basis of density functional theory methods [Phys. Rev. B 83 (2011) 024301].

  10. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    relations dictate that shell carbonate should be preferentially enriched in C-13 by 3 to 5 per mill (from 30° to 0°C) compared to EPF at a pH of 7.5. Anomalous positive excursions are rarely, if ever, observed in shell carbonate and they have yet to be associated with growth cessation markers in bivalves. The most likely explanation for the lack of anomalous positive values is that the percentage of metabolic carbon increases in EPF when bivalves experience stressful condition. This influx of metabolic carbon is balanced to a measureable extent by the enhanced fractionation of carbon isotopes during shell deposition from EPF at relatively low pH. These two processes may be combined in a quantitative model to extract a historical record of metabolic activity from the carbon isotope profiles of bivalve shells.

  11. Comparison of changes in tidal volume associated with expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to compare and clarify the relationship between expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression in patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, with a focus on tidal volume. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 18 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, who had undergone tracheostomy. Each patient received expiratory rib cage compression and expiratory abdominal compression; the order of implementation was randomized. Subjects were positioned in a 30° lateral recumbent position, and a 2-kgf compression was applied. For expiratory rib cage compression, the rib cage was compressed unilaterally; for expiratory abdominal compression, the area directly above the navel was compressed. Tidal volume values were the actual measured values divided by body weight. [Results] Tidal volume values were as follows: at rest, 7.2 ± 1.7 mL/kg; during expiratory rib cage compression, 8.3 ± 2.1 mL/kg; during expiratory abdominal compression, 9.1 ± 2.2 mL/kg. There was a significant difference between the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression and that at rest. The tidal volume in expiratory rib cage compression was strongly correlated with that in expiratory abdominal compression. [Conclusion] These results indicate that expiratory abdominal compression may be an effective alternative to the manual breathing assist procedure.

  12. Nanomechanics of biocompatible hollow thin-shell polymer microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynos, Emmanouil; Koutsos, Vasileios; McDicken, W Norman; Moran, Carmel M; Pye, Stephen D; Ross, James A; Sboros, Vassilis

    2009-07-07

    The nanomechanical properties of biocompatible thin-shell hollow polymer microspheres with approximately constant ratio of shell thickness to microsphere diameter were measured by nanocompression tests in aqueous conditions. These microspheres encapsulate an inert gas and are used as ultrasound contrast agents by releasing free microbubbles in the presence of an ultrasound field as a result of free gas leakage from the shell. The tests were performed using an atomic force microscope (AFM) employing the force-distance curve technique. An optical microscope, on which the AFM was mounted, was used to guide the positioning of tipless cantilevers on top of individual microspheres. We performed a systematic study using several cantilevers with spring constants varying from 0.08 to 2.3 N/m on a population of microspheres with diameters from about 2 to 6 microm. The use of several cantilevers with various spring constants allowed a systematic study of the mechanical properties of the microsphere thin shell at different regimes of force and deformation. Using thin-shell mechanics theory for small deformations, the Young's modulus of the thin wall material was estimated and was shown to exhibit a strong size effect: it increased as the shell became thinner. The Young's modulus of thicker microsphere shells converged to the expected value for the macroscopic bulk material. For high applied forces, the force-deformation profiles showed a reversible and/or irreversible nonlinear behavior including "steps" and "jumps" which were attributed to mechanical instabilities such as buckling events.

  13. Analysis and characterization of double shell tank 241-AP-108

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document is the first part of a three-part report describing the analysis and characterization of double shell tank 241-AP-108 which is located at the Hanford Reservation.This document is the analytical laboratory data package entitled 'Analysis and Characterization of Double Shell Tank 241-AP-108' which contains a case sampling history, the sampling protocols, the analytical procedures, sampling and analysis quality assurance and quality control measures, and chemical analysis results for samples obtained from the tank

  14. Shell closure in stable and unstable Fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the findings of calculations performed with the density functional method in connection with shell closure are presented. In nuclei, some evidences seam to confirm the existence of a shell closure at N or Z=16, for Z or N<11. More data, particularly spectroscopic measurements would provide further information. Single particle energies for Z=16 isotopes as function of the neutron number N are given. (G.P.) 9 refs.; 6 figs

  15. Measurements of the divergence of fast electrons in laser-irradiated spherical targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, B.; Solodov, A. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Delettrez, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    In recent experiments using directly driven spherical targets on the OMEGA laser system, the energy in fast electrons was found to reach ∼1% of the laser energy at an irradiance of ∼1.1 × 10 15 W/cm 2 . The fraction of these fast electrons absorbed in the compressed fuel shell depends on their angular divergence. This paper describes measurements of this divergence deduced from a series of shots where Mo-coated shells of increasing diameter (D) were suspended within an outer CH shell. The intensity of the Mo–Kα line and the hard x-ray radiation were found to increase approximately as ∼D 2 , indicating wide divergence of the fast electrons. Alternative interpretations of these results (electron scattering, radiation excitation of Kα, and an electric field due to return current) are shown to be unimportant

  16. Shells of Nerita gastropod bio-monitors of heavy metals pollution around the Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badran, M.I.

    1999-01-01

    Minor and heavy metals Mg, Sr, Mn, Fe and Zn were measured in individual shells of four different Nerita species collected from Phuket Island, Thailand. Shell weight and crystallography were also recorded. Heavy metal concentrations were poorly correlated with both shell weight and crystallography. Out of the four species, N. albicilla acquired the highest heavy metal concentrations. Subsequently shells of N. albicilla collected from different sites around the Indian Ocean were compared for their metal concentrations. Shells of industrial sites in Kenya and India had significantly higher heavy metal concentrations than shells from pristine sites in Mauritius and Aldabra. Discussing the factors that may affect the shell metal concentration, the variations encountered herein are best attributed to the ambient bio-available metal concentration. (author)

  17. Buckling of pressure-loaded, long, shear deformable, cylindrical laminated shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadis, John S.; Simitses, George J.

    A higher-order shell theory was developed (kinematic relations, constitutive relations, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions), which includes initial geometric imperfections and transverse shear effects for a laminated cylindrical shell under the action of pressure, axial compression and in-plane shear. Through the perturbation technique, buckling equations are derived for the corresponding 'perfect geometry' symmetric laminated configuration. Critical pressures are computed for very long cylinders for several stacking sequences, several radius-to-total-thickness ratios, three lamina materials (boron/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, and Kevlar/epoxy), and three shell theories: classical, first-order shear deformable and higher- (third-)order shear deformable. The results provide valuable information concerning the applicability (accurate prediction of buckling pressures) of the various shell theories.

  18. Molluscan shell evolution with review of shell calcification hypothesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Furuhashi, T.; Schwarzinger, C.; Mikšík, Ivan; Smrž, Miloslav; Beran, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 154, č. 3 (2009), s. 351-371 ISSN 1096-4959 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : mollusca * shell * biomineralization Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.607, year: 2009

  19. Compressible Fluid Suspension Performance Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoogterp, Francis

    2003-01-01

    ... compressible fluid suspension system that was designed and installed on the vehicle by DTI. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the possible performance benefits of the compressible fluid suspension system...

  20. Shell Analysis Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-04-01

    1.34-8) ax 2 X=0 2 A A 9 1 •z t/2 V2 = ii 1/ 1~ e1 +2 2 + 12 121 91 0 -t/2•1 2 e r" + e- 0 + T e aa 1 td +2 121a d•, 2 d (1.34-9) The strain and stress...Rk sin2 01 -24Rksin2 0 1 Et 2Et tD 0 1 - i To obtain N,, Ne0 Q10 Mo, M enter C 1 and C2 in the preceding general formulas. Table 2. 64-1 presents a...Formulas for the Elastic Constants of Plates with Integral Waffle-Like Stiffening. NACA RM L53 El3a (1953). 3-27 Gerard, G. "Compressive Stability of

  1. MicroShell Minimalist Shell for Xilinx Microprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werne, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroShell is a lightweight shell environment for engineers and software developers working with embedded microprocessors in Xilinx FPGAs. (MicroShell has also been successfully ported to run on ARM Cortex-M1 microprocessors in Actel ProASIC3 FPGAs, but without project-integration support.) Micro Shell decreases the time spent performing initial tests of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) designs, simplifies running customizable one-time-only experiments, and provides a familiar-feeling command-line interface. The program comes with a collection of useful functions and enables the designer to add an unlimited number of custom commands, which are callable from the command-line. The commands are parameterizable (using the C-based command-line parameter idiom), so the designer can use one function to exercise hardware with different values. Also, since many hardware peripherals instantiated in FPGAs have reasonably simple register-mapped I/O interfaces, the engineer can edit and view hardware parameter settings at any time without stopping the processor. MicroShell comes with a set of support scripts that interface seamlessly with Xilinx's EDK tool. Adding an instance of MicroShell to a project is as simple as marking a check box in a library configuration dialog box and specifying a software project directory. The support scripts then examine the hardware design, build design-specific functions, conditionally include processor-specific functions, and complete the compilation process. For code-size constrained designs, most of the stock functionality can be excluded from the compiled library. When all of the configurable options are removed from the binary, MicroShell has an unoptimized memory footprint of about 4.8 kB and a size-optimized footprint of about 2.3 kB. Since MicroShell allows unfettered access to all processor-accessible memory locations, it is possible to perform live patching on a running system. This can be useful, for instance, if a bug is

  2. Effect of Compression Garments on Physiological Responses After Uphill Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struhár Ivan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Limited practical recommendations related to wearing compression garments for athletes can be drawn from the literature at the present time. We aimed to identify the effects of compression garments on physiological and perceptual measures of performance and recovery after uphill running with different pressure and distributions of applied compression. In a random, double blinded study, 10 trained male runners undertook three 8 km treadmill runs at a 6% elevation rate, with the intensity of 75% VO2max while wearing low, medium grade compression garments and high reverse grade compression. In all the trials, compression garments were worn during 4 hours post run. Creatine kinase, measurements of muscle soreness, ankle strength of plantar/dorsal flexors and mean performance time were then measured. The best mean performance time was observed in the medium grade compression garments with the time difference being: medium grade compression garments vs. high reverse grade compression garments. A positive trend in increasing peak torque of plantar flexion (60o·s-1, 120o·s-1 was found in the medium grade compression garments: a difference between 24 and 48 hours post run. The highest pain tolerance shift in the gastrocnemius muscle was the medium grade compression garments, 24 hour post run, with the shift being +11.37% for the lateral head and 6.63% for the medial head. In conclusion, a beneficial trend in the promotion of running performance and decreasing muscle soreness within 24 hour post exercise was apparent in medium grade compression garments.

  3. Toward an MRI-based method to measure non-uniform cartilage deformation: an MRI-cyclic loading apparatus system and steady-state cyclic displacement of articular cartilage under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, C P; Hull, M L

    2003-04-01

    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential for measuring non-uniform deformations throughout the volume (i.e. three-dimensional (3D) deformations) in small orthopedic tissues such as articular cartilage. However, to analyze cartilage deformation using MRI techniques, a system is required which can construct images from multiple acquisitions of MRI signals from the cartilage in both the underformed and deformed states. The objectives of the work reported in this article were to 1) design an apparatus that could apply highly repeatable cyclic compressive loads of 400 N and operate in the bore of an MRI scanner, 2) demonstrate that the apparatus and MRI scanner can be successfully integrated to observe 3D deformations in a phantom material, 3) use the apparatus to determine the load cycle necessary to achieve a steady-state deformation response in normal bovine articular cartilage samples using a flat-surfaced and nonporous indentor in unconfined compression. Composed of electronic and pneumatic components, the apparatus regulated pressure to a double-acting pneumatic cylinder so that (1) load-controlled compression cycles were applied to cartilage samples immersed in a saline bath, (2) loading and recovery periods within a cycle varied in time duration, and (3) load magnitude varied so that the stress applied to cartilage samples was within typical physiological ranges. In addition the apparatus allowed gating for MR image acquisition, and operation within the bore of an MRI scanner without creating image artifacts. The apparatus demonstrated high repeatability in load application with a standard deviation of 1.8% of the mean 400 N load applied. When the apparatus was integrated with an MRI scanner programmed with appropriate pulse sequences, images of a phantom material in both the underformed and deformed states were constructed by assembling data acquired through multiple signal acquisitions. Additionally, the number of cycles to reach

  4. Method for studying the plastic buckling of shells. Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alix, M.; Combescure, A.; Hoffmann, A.; Roche, R.

    1980-05-01

    In this article a description is given of the method selected for studying the elasto-plastic buckling of shells of any shape. The emphasis is mainly on three points: the difficulty in making a strict formulation with respect to plasticity, the model selected (MOTAN model) is presented; the effect of so called 'non conservative' forces; and the effect of great deformations that might precede the buckling. The method is compared to tests: basket handle buckling of bottoms, buckling of elliptical bottoms under internal pressure, of compresses thin tubes, of metal drums, spherical diaphragm, shearing rings [fr

  5. LZ-Compressed String Dictionaries

    OpenAIRE

    Arz, Julian; Fischer, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We show how to compress string dictionaries using the Lempel-Ziv (LZ78) data compression algorithm. Our approach is validated experimentally on dictionaries of up to 1.5 GB of uncompressed text. We achieve compression ratios often outperforming the existing alternatives, especially on dictionaries containing many repeated substrings. Our query times remain competitive.

  6. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  7. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  8. Effects of alga polysaccharide capsule shells on in-vivo bioavailability and disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Guo, Shuju; Ma, Lin; Yuan, Yi; Han, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Gelatin has been used in hard capsule shells for more than a century, and some shortcomings have appeared, such as high moisture content and risk of transmitting diseases of animal origin to people. Based on available studies regarding gelatin and vegetable shells, we developed a new type of algal polysaccharide capsule (APPC) shells. To test whether our products can replace commercial gelatin shells, we measured in-vivo plasma concentration of 12 selected volunteers with a model drug, ibuprofen, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), by calculating the relative bioavailability of APPC and Qualicaps® referenced to gelatin capsules and assessing bioequivalence of the three types of shells, and calculated pharmacokinetic parameters with the software DAS 2.0 (China). The results show that APPC shells possess bioequivalence with Qualicaps® and gelatin shells. Moreover, the disintegration behavior of four types of shells (APPC, Vegcaps®, Qualicaps® and gelatin shells) with the content of lactose and radioactive element (99mTc) was observed via gamma-scintigraphic images. The bioavailability and gamma-scintigraphic studies showed that APPC was not statistically different from other vegetable and gelatin capsule shells with respect to in-vivo behavior. Hence, it can be concluded that APPCs are exchangeable with other vegetable and gelatin shells.

  9. Assembly of Robust Bacterial Microcompartment Shells Using Building Blocks from an Organelle of Unknown Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassila, JK; Bernstein, SL; Kinney, JN; Axen, SD; Kerfeld, CA

    2014-05-29

    Bacterial microconnpartnnents (BMCs) sequester enzymes from the cytoplasmic environment by encapsulation inside a selectively permeable protein shell. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that many bacteria encode BMC clusters of unknown function and with diverse combinations of shell proteins. The genome of the halophilic myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum encodes one of the most atypical sets of shell proteins in terms of composition and primary structure. We found that microconnpartnnent shells could be purified in high yield when all seven H. ochraceum BMC shell genes were expressed from a synthetic operon in Escherichia coll. These shells differ substantially from previously isolated shell systems in that they are considerably smaller and more homogeneous, with measured diameters of 39 2 nm. The size and nearly uniform geometry allowed the development of a structural model for the shells composed of 260 hexagonal units and 13 hexagons per icosahedral face. We found that new proteins could be recruited to the shells by fusion to a predicted targeting peptide sequence, setting the stage for the use of these remarkably homogeneous shells for applications such as three-dimensional scaffolding and the construction of synthetic BMCs. Our results demonstrate the value of selecting from the diversity of BMC shell building blocks found in genomic sequence data for the construction of novel compartments. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of triangular Au core-Ag shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Akhilesh; Chaudhary, Minakshi; Ahmad, Absar; Bhargava, Suresh; Sastry, Murali

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of triangular Au core-Ag shell nanoparticles. The triangular gold core is obtained by the reduction of gold ions by lemongrass extract. Utilizing the negative charge on the gold nanotriangles, silver ions are bound to their surface and thereafter reduced by ascorbic acid under alkaline conditions. The thickness of the silver shell may be modulated by varying the pH of the reaction medium. The formation of the Au core-Ag shell triangular nanostructures has been followed by UV-vis-NIR Spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The sharp vertices of the triangles coupled with the core-shell structure is expected to have potential for application in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and in the sensitive detection of biomolecules

  11. Direct double photoionization of the valence shell of Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citrini, F.; Malegat, L.; Selles, P.; Kazansky, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The hyperspherical R-matrix method with semiclassical outgoing waves is used to study the direct double photoionization (DPI) of the valence shell of the lightest alkaline earth-metal Be. The absolute fully integrated, singly, doubly, and triply differential cross sections obtained are compared with the single set of measurements available and with recent calculations based on the convergent close coupling and time-dependent close coupling methods. The level of agreement between all these data is very encouraging. A comparison is also made between the DPI of He and the direct DPI of the valence shell of Be. It confirms that the electron-electron correlations are stronger in the valence 2s shell of Be than in the 1s shell of He, thus contributing to a desirable clarification

  12. CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELLS IN ABSORPTION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2009-01-01

    Progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe) have been predicted to modify their ambient circumstellar (CSM) and interstellar environments through the action of their powerful winds. While there is X-ray and optical evidence for circumstellar interaction in several remnants of Type Ia SNe, widespread evidence for such interaction in Type Ia SNe themselves has been lacking. We consider prospects for the detection of CSM shells that have been predicted to be common around Type Ia SNe. Such shells are most easily detected in Na I absorption lines. Variable (declining) absorption is expected to occur soon after the explosion, primarily during the SN rise time, for shells located within ∼1-10 pc of a SN. The distance of the shell from the SN can be determined by measuring the timescale for line variability.

  13. Digital cinema video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husak, Walter

    2003-05-01

    The Motion Picture Industry began a transition from film based distribution and projection to digital distribution and projection several years ago. Digital delivery and presentation offers the prospect to increase the quality of the theatrical experience for the audience, reduce distribution costs to the distributors, and create new business opportunities for the theater owners and the studios. Digital Cinema also presents an opportunity to provide increased flexibility and security of the movies for the content owners and the theater operators. Distribution of content via electronic means to theaters is unlike any of the traditional applications for video compression. The transition from film-based media to electronic media represents a paradigm shift in video compression techniques and applications that will be discussed in this paper.

  14. Fingerprints in compressed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed into a context-free grammar of size n that supports efficient Karp–Rabin fingerprint queries to any substring of S. That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S......[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(log⁡N) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(log⁡log⁡N) query time...

  15. Compressibility and thermal expansion of cubic silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Lindelov, H.; Gerward, Leif

    2002-01-01

    The compressibility and thermal expansion of the cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4) phase have been investigated by performing in situ x-ray powder-diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation, complemented with computer simulations by means of first-principles calculations. The bulk...... compressibility of the c-Si3N4 phase originates from the average of both Si-N tetrahedral and octahedral compressibilities where the octahedral polyhedra are less compressible than the tetrahedral ones. The origin of the unit cell expansion is revealed to be due to the increase of the octahedral Si-N and N-N bond...

  16. Temporal compression in episodic memory for real-life events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunehomme, Olivier; Folville, Adrien; Stawarczyk, David; Van der Linden, Martial; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2018-07-01

    Remembering an event typically takes less time than experiencing it, suggesting that episodic memory represents past experience in a temporally compressed way. Little is known, however, about how the continuous flow of real-life events is summarised in memory. Here we investigated the nature and determinants of temporal compression by directly comparing memory contents with the objective timing of events as measured by a wearable camera. We found that episodic memories consist of a succession of moments of prior experience that represent events with varying compression rates, such that the density of retrieved information is modulated by goal processing and perceptual changes. Furthermore, the results showed that temporal compression rates remain relatively stable over one week and increase after a one-month delay, particularly for goal-related events. These data shed new light on temporal compression in episodic memory and suggest that compression rates are adaptively modulated to maintain current goal-relevant information.

  17. WSNs Microseismic Signal Subsection Compression Algorithm Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouzhou Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For wireless network microseismic monitoring and the problems of low compression ratio and high energy consumption of communication, this paper proposes a segmentation compression algorithm according to the characteristics of the microseismic signals and the compression perception theory (CS used in the transmission process. The algorithm will be collected as a number of nonzero elements of data segmented basis, by reducing the number of combinations of nonzero elements within the segment to improve the accuracy of signal reconstruction, while taking advantage of the characteristics of compressive sensing theory to achieve a high compression ratio of the signal. Experimental results show that, in the quantum chaos immune clone refactoring (Q-CSDR algorithm for reconstruction algorithm, under the condition of signal sparse degree higher than 40, to be more than 0.4 of the compression ratio to compress the signal, the mean square error is less than 0.01, prolonging the network life by 2 times.

  18. Instant Windows PowerShell

    CERN Document Server

    Menon, Vinith

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A practical, hands-on tutorial approach that explores the concepts of PowerShell in a friendly manner, taking an adhoc approach to each topic.If you are an administrator who is new to PowerShell or are looking to get a good grounding in these new features, this book is ideal for you. It's assumed that you will have some experience in PowerShell and Windows Server, as well being familiar with the PowerShell command-line.

  19. Patterning of the turtle shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Gilbert, Scott F

    2017-08-01

    Interest in the origin and evolution of the turtle shell has resulted in a most unlikely clade becoming an important research group for investigating morphological diversity in developmental biology. Many turtles generate a two-component shell that nearly surrounds the body in a bony exoskeleton. The ectoderm covering the shell produces epidermal scutes that form a phylogenetically stable pattern. In some lineages, the bones of the shell and their ectodermal covering become reduced or lost, and this is generally associated with different ecological habits. The similarity and diversity of turtles allows research into how changes in development create evolutionary novelty, interacting modules, and adaptive physiology and anatomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fast ignition upon the implosion of a thin shell onto a precompressed deuterium-tritium ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.

    2012-11-01

    Fast ignition of a precompressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target by a hydrodynamic material flux is investigated. A model system of hydrodynamic objects consisting of a central deuterium-tritium (DT) ball and a concentric two-layer shell separated by a vacuum gap is analyzed. The outer layer of the shell is an ablator, while the inner layer consists of DT ice. The igniting hydrodynamic flux forms as a result of laser-driven acceleration and compression of the shell toward the system center. A series of one-dimensional numerical simulations of the shell implosion, the collision of the shell with the DT ball, and the generation and propagation of thermonuclear burn waves in both parts of the system are performed. Analytic models are developed that describe the implosion of a thin shell onto a central homogeneous ball of arbitrary radius and density and the initiation and propagation of a thermonuclear burn wave induced by such an implosion. Application of the solution of a model problem to analyzing the implosion of a segment of a spherical shell in a conical channel indicates the possibility of fast ignition of a spherical ICF target from a conical target driven by a laser pulse with an energy of 500-700 kJ.

  1. The influence of stiffeners on axial crushing of glass-fabric-reinforced epoxy composite shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vasanthanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A generic static and impact experimental procedure has been developed in this work aimed at improving the stability of glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell structures by bonding with axial stiffeners. Crashworthy structures fabricated from composite laminate with stiffeners would offer energy absorption superior to metallic structures under compressive loading situations. An experimental material characterisation of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite under uni-axial tension has been carried out in this study. This work provides a numerical simulation procedure to describe the static and dynamic response of unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (without stiffeners and stiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (with axial stiffeners under static and impact loading using the Finite Element Method. The finite element calculation for the present study was made with ANSYS®-LS-DYNA® software. Based upon the experimental and numerical investigations, it has been asserted that glass fabric reinforced epoxy shells stiffened with GFRP stiffeners are better than unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell and glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell stiffened with aluminium stiffeners. The failure surfaces of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell structures tested under impact were examined by SEM.

  2. 40 Years of Shell Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Shell has been using scenario planning for four decades. During that time these scenarios have helped the company and governments across the world to make better strategic choices. Scenarios provide lenses that help see future prospects more clearly, make richer judgments and be more sensitive to uncertainties. Discover how the Shell Scenarios team has helped guide decision makers at major moments in history and get a peek at the team future focus, including the intricate relationship between energy, water and food.

  3. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is of interest to study compression-system surge to understand its dynamics in order ... Internal problems like compressor going into rotating stall, resulting in loss of ... of water column, was used for mass-flow measurement at the impeller entry.

  4. Terminology: resistance or stiffness for medical compression stockings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cornu-Thenard

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on previous experimental work with medical compression stockings it is proposed to restrict the term stiffness to measurements on the human leg and rather to speak about resistance when it comes to characterize the elastic property of compression hosiery in the textile laboratory.

  5. Fracture Energy of High-Strength Concrete in Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, H.; Brincker, Rune

    1989-01-01

    is essential for understanding the fracture mechanism of concrete in compression. In this paper a series of tests is reported, carried out for the purpose of studying the fracture mechanical properties of concrete in compression. Including the measurement and study of the descending branch, a new experimental...

  6. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2012-09-04

    This paper constitutes the first steps in our work concerning isogeometric shell analysis. An isogeometric shell model of the Reissner-Mindlin type is introduced and a study of its accuracy in the classical pinched cylinder benchmark problem presented. In contrast to earlier works [1,2,3,4], the formulation is based on a shell model where the displacement, strain and stress fields are defined in terms of a curvilinear coordinate system arising from the NURBS description of the shell middle surface. The isogeometric shell formulation is implemented using the PetIGA and igakit software packages developed by the authors. The igakit package is a Python package used to generate NURBS representations of geometries that can be utilised by the PetIGA finite element framework. The latter utilises data structures and routines of the portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc), [5,6]. The current shell implementation is valid for static, linear problems only, but the software package is well suited for future extensions to geometrically and materially nonlinear regime as well as to dynamic problems. The accuracy of the approach in the pinched cylinder benchmark problem and present comparisons against the h-version of the finite element method with bilinear elements. Quadratic, cubic and quartic NURBS discretizations are compared against the isoparametric bilinear discretization introduced in [7]. The results show that the quadratic and cubic NURBS approximations exhibit notably slower convergence under uniform mesh refinement as the thickness decreases but the quartic approximation converges relatively quickly within the standard variational framework. The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  7. Results of subscale MTF compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Mossman, A.; Donaldson, M.; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    In magnetized target fusion (MTF) a magnetized plasma torus is compressed in a time shorter than its own energy confinement time, thereby heating to fusion conditions. Understanding plasma behavior and scaling laws is needed to advance toward a reactor-scale demonstration. General Fusion is conducting a sequence of subscale experiments of compact toroid (CT) plasmas being compressed by chemically driven implosion of an aluminum liner, providing data on several key questions. CT plasmas are formed by a coaxial Marshall gun, with magnetic fields supported by internal plasma currents and eddy currents in the wall. Configurations that have been compressed so far include decaying and sustained spheromaks and an ST that is formed into a pre-existing toroidal field. Diagnostics measure B, ne, visible and x-ray emission, Ti and Te. Before compression the CT has an energy of 10kJ magnetic, 1 kJ thermal, with Te of 100 - 200 eV, ne 5x1020 m-3. Plasma was stable during a compression factor R0/R >3 on best shots. A reactor scale demonstration would require 10x higher initial B and ne but similar Te. Liner improvements have minimized ripple, tearing and ejection of micro-debris. Plasma facing surfaces have included plasma-sprayed tungsten, bare Cu and Al, and gettering with Ti and Li.

  8. The possibilities of compressed sensing based migration

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    Linearized waveform inversion or Least-square migration helps reduce migration artifacts caused by limited acquisition aperture, coarse sampling of sources and receivers, and low subsurface illumination. However, leastsquare migration, based on L2-norm minimization of the misfit function, tends to produce a smeared (smoothed) depiction of the true subsurface reflectivity. Assuming that the subsurface reflectivity distribution is a sparse signal, we use a compressed-sensing (Basis Pursuit) algorithm to retrieve this sparse distribution from a small number of linear measurements. We applied a compressed-sensing algorithm to image a synthetic fault model using dense and sparse acquisition geometries. Tests on synthetic data demonstrate the ability of compressed-sensing to produce highly resolved migrated images. We, also, studied the robustness of the Basis Pursuit algorithm in the presence of Gaussian random noise.

  9. The possibilities of compressed sensing based migration

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2013-09-22

    Linearized waveform inversion or Least-square migration helps reduce migration artifacts caused by limited acquisition aperture, coarse sampling of sources and receivers, and low subsurface illumination. However, leastsquare migration, based on L2-norm minimization of the misfit function, tends to produce a smeared (smoothed) depiction of the true subsurface reflectivity. Assuming that the subsurface reflectivity distribution is a sparse signal, we use a compressed-sensing (Basis Pursuit) algorithm to retrieve this sparse distribution from a small number of linear measurements. We applied a compressed-sensing algorithm to image a synthetic fault model using dense and sparse acquisition geometries. Tests on synthetic data demonstrate the ability of compressed-sensing to produce highly resolved migrated images. We, also, studied the robustness of the Basis Pursuit algorithm in the presence of Gaussian random noise.

  10. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, A; Stubley, P G; Comley, A J; Eggert, J H; Foster, J M; Kalantar, D H; McGonegle, D; Patel, S; Peacock, L J; Rothman, S D; Smith, R F; Suggit, M J; Wark, J S

    2016-04-13

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported 'anomalous' elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.

  11. Uranium contents and 234U/238U activity ratios of modern and fossil marine bivalle molluscan shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuda, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    Uranium contents and 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios in modern and fossil marine bivalle molluscan shells were measured by alpha-spectrometry. Uranium contents and 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios in modern shells were averaged to be 0.266 (dpm/g), and 1.18, respectively and those in fossil shells were averaged to be 0.747 (dpm/g), and 1.19, respectivily. Uranium contents in fossil shells were obviously higher than those in modern shells. It can be explained by the addition of uranium to shell during the deposition. In fossil shells, 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio decreases as 238 U content increases the same tendency is not found in modern shells. The author proposed a mechanism of selective loss of 238 U from the fossil shells for the explanation of this tendency. The height activity ratio of 234 U/ 238 U measured on the fossil shells than that measured on the modern shells, also support the selective loss of 238 U from the fossil shells. (author)

  12. Enhancement and prediction of modulus of elasticity of palm kernel shell concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alengaram, U. Johnson; Mahmud, Hilmi; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Micro-pores of size 16-24 μm were found on the outer surface of palm kernel shell. → Infilling of pores by mineral admixtures was evident. → Sand content influenced both modulus of elasticity and compressive strength. → Proposed equation predicts modulus of elasticity within ±1.5 kN/mm 2 of test results. -- Abstract: This paper presents results of an investigation conducted to enhance and predict the modulus of elasticity (MOE) of palm kernel shell concrete (PKSC). Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis on palm kernel shell (PKS) was conducted. Further, the effect of varying sand and PKS contents and mineral admixtures (silica fume and fly ash) on compressive strength and MOE was investigated. The variables include water-to-binder (w/b) and sand-to-cement (s/c) ratios. Nine concrete mixes were prepared, and tests on static and dynamic moduli of elasticity and compressive strength were conducted. The SEM result showed presence of large number of micro-pores on PKS. The mineral admixtures uniformly filled the micro-pores on the outer surface of PKS. Further, the increase in sand content coupled with reduction in PKS content enhanced the compressive strength and static MOE: The highest MOE recorded in this investigation, 11 kN/mm 2 , was twice that previously published. Moreover, the proposed equation based on CEB/FIP code formula appears to predict the MOE close to the experimental values.

  13. Creep buckling of shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.M.; Nickell, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Because of the characteristics of LMFBR primary piping components (thin-walled, low pressure, high temperature), the designer must guard against creep buckling as a potential failure mode for certain critical regions, such as elbows, where structural flexibility and inelastic response may combine to concentrate deformation and cause instability. The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, through its elevated temperature Code Case 1592 (Section III, Division 1) provides design rules for Class 1 components aimed at preventing creep buckling during the design life. A similar set of rules is being developed for Class 2 and 3 components at this time. One of the original concepts behind the creep buckling rules was that the variability in creep properties (especially due to the effects of prior heat treatment), the uncertainty about initial imperfections, and the lack of confirmed accuracy of design analysis meant that conservatism would be difficult to assure. As a result, a factor of ten on service life was required (i.e. analysis must show that, under service conditions that extrapolate the life of the component by ten times, creep buckling does not occur). Two obvious problems with this approach are that: first, the creep behavior must also be extrapolated (since most creep experiments are terminated at a small fraction of the design life, extrapolation of creep data is already an issue, irrespective of the creep buckling question); second the nonlinear creep analysis, which is very nearly prohibitively expensive for design life histograms, becomes even more costly. Analytical results for an aluminum cylindrical shell subjected to axial loads at elevated temperatures are used to examine the supposed equivalence of two types of time-dependent buckling safety factors - a factor of ten on service life and a factor of 1.5 on loading

  14. Shell finite element of reinforced concrete for internal pressure analysis of nuclear containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Pyo, E-mail: hplee@kepri.re.k [Nuclear Power Laboratory, Korea Electric Power Research Institute, 103-16 Munji-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: Finite element program with 9-node degenerated shell element was developed. The developed program was mainly forced to analyze nuclear containment building. Concrete material model is adapted Niwa and Yamada failure criteria. The performance of program developed is verified through various numerical examples. The numerical analysis results similar to the experimental data. - Abstract: This paper describes a 9-node degenerated shell finite element (FE), an analysis program developed for ultimate pressure capacity evaluation and nonlinear analysis of a nuclear containment building. The shell FE developed adopts the Reissner-Mindlin (RM) assumptions to consider the degenerated shell solidification technique and the degree of transverse shear strain occurring in the structure. The material model of the concrete determines the level of the concrete stress and strain by using the equivalent stress-equivalent strain relationship. When a crack occurs in the concrete, the material behavior is expressed through the tension stiffening model that takes adhesive stress into account and through the shear transfer mechanism and compressive strength reduction model of the crack plane. In addition, the failure envelope proposed by Niwa is adopted as the crack occurrence criteria for the compression-tension region, and the failure envelope proposed by Yamada is used for the tension-tension region. The performance of the program developed is verified through various numerical examples. The analysis based on the application of the shell FE developed from the results of verified examples produced results similar to the experiment or other analysis results.

  15. Shell finite element of reinforced concrete for internal pressure analysis of nuclear containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Finite element program with 9-node degenerated shell element was developed. → The developed program was mainly forced to analyze nuclear containment building. → Concrete material model is adapted Niwa and Yamada failure criteria. → The performance of program developed is verified through various numerical examples. → The numerical analysis results similar to the experimental data. - Abstract: This paper describes a 9-node degenerated shell finite element (FE), an analysis program developed for ultimate pressure capacity evaluation and nonlinear analysis of a nuclear containment building. The shell FE developed adopts the Reissner-Mindlin (RM) assumptions to consider the degenerated shell solidification technique and the degree of transverse shear strain occurring in the structure. The material model of the concrete determines the level of the concrete stress and strain by using the equivalent stress-equivalent strain relationship. When a crack occurs in the concrete, the material behavior is expressed through the tension stiffening model that takes adhesive stress into account and through the shear transfer mechanism and compressive strength reduction model of the crack plane. In addition, the failure envelope proposed by Niwa is adopted as the crack occurrence criteria for the compression-tension region, and the failure envelope proposed by Yamada is used for the tension-tension region. The performance of the program developed is verified through various numerical examples. The analysis based on the application of the shell FE developed from the results of verified examples produced results similar to the experiment or other analysis results.

  16. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); Xiangxiang, Gong [Testing Center, Yangzhou University, No. 48 Wenhui East Road, Yangzhou (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Jie, Han [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China)

    2016-03-07

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution.

  17. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuanqiang, Zhou; Xiangxiang, Gong; Jie, Han

    2016-01-01

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure and function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution

  18. Blind compressive sensing dynamic MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel blind compressive sensing (BCS) frame work to recover dynamic magnetic resonance images from undersampled measurements. This scheme models the dynamic signal as a sparse linear combination of temporal basis functions, chosen from a large dictionary. In contrast to classical compressed sensing, the BCS scheme simultaneously estimates the dictionary and the sparse coefficients from the undersampled measurements. Apart from the sparsity of the coefficients, the key difference of the BCS scheme with current low rank methods is the non-orthogonal nature of the dictionary basis functions. Since the number of degrees of freedom of the BCS model is smaller than that of the low-rank methods, it provides improved reconstructions at high acceleration rates. We formulate the reconstruction as a constrained optimization problem; the objective function is the linear combination of a data consistency term and sparsity promoting ℓ1 prior of the coefficients. The Frobenius norm dictionary constraint is used to avoid scale ambiguity. We introduce a simple and efficient majorize-minimize algorithm, which decouples the original criterion into three simpler sub problems. An alternating minimization strategy is used, where we cycle through the minimization of three simpler problems. This algorithm is seen to be considerably faster than approaches that alternates between sparse coding and dictionary estimation, as well as the extension of K-SVD dictionary learning scheme. The use of the ℓ1 penalty and Frobenius norm dictionary constraint enables the attenuation of insignificant basis functions compared to the ℓ0 norm and column norm constraint assumed in most dictionary learning algorithms; this is especially important since the number of basis functions that can be reliably estimated is restricted by the available measurements. We also observe that the proposed scheme is more robust to local minima compared to K-SVD method, which relies on greedy sparse coding

  19. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%).

  20. Relative performance evaluation of a custom-made near infrared reflectance instrument and two commercial instruments (Foss and ASD) in the nondestructive moisture content measurement of in-shell peanuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A custom made Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) spectroscope was used to determine the moisture content of in-shell peanuts of Virginia type peanuts. Peanuts were conditioned to different moisture levels between 6 and 26 % (wet basis) and samples from different moisture levels were separated into two...