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Sample records for shade tolerance canopy

  1. An individual-based forest model links canopy dynamics and shade tolerances along a soil moisture gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Jean; Strigul, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how forested ecosystems respond to climatic changes is a challenging problem as forest self-organization occurs simultaneously across multiple scales. Here, we explore the hypothesis that soil water availability shapes above-ground competition and gap dynamics, and ultimately alters the dominance of shade tolerant and intolerant species along the moisture gradient. We adapt a spatially explicit individual-based model with simultaneous crown and root competitions. Simulations show that the transition from xeric to mesic soils is accompanied by an increase in shade-tolerant species similar to the patterns documented in the North American forests. This transition is accompanied by a change from water to sunlight competitions, and happens at three successive stages: (i) mostly water-limited parkland, (ii) simultaneously water- and sunlight-limited closed canopy forests featuring a very sparse understory, and (iii) mostly sunlight-limited forests with a populated understory. This pattern is caused by contrasting successional dynamics that favour either shade-tolerant or shade-intolerant species, depending on soil moisture and understory density. This work demonstrates that forest patterns along environmental gradients can emerge from spatial competition without physiological trade-offs between shade and growth tolerance. Mechanistic understanding of population processes involved in the forest-parkland-desert transition will improve our ability to explain species distributions and predict forest responses to climatic changes.

  2. Wood density and its radial variation in six canopy tree species differing in shade-tolerance in western Thailand

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    Nock, Charles A.; Geihofer, Daniela; Grabner, Michael; Baker, Patrick J.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Hietz, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Wood density is a key variable for understanding life history strategies in tropical trees. Differences in wood density and its radial variation were related to the shade-tolerance of six canopy tree species in seasonally dry tropical forest in Thailand. In addition, using tree ring measurements, the influence of tree size, age and annual increment on radial density gradients was analysed. Methods Wood density was determined from tree cores using X-ray densitometry. X-ray films were digitized and images were measured, resulting in a continuous density profile for each sample. Mixed models were then developed to analyse differences in average wood density and in radial gradients in density among the six tree species, as well as the effects of tree age, size and annual increment on radial increases in Melia azedarach. Key Results Average wood density generally reflected differences in shade-tolerance, varying by nearly a factor of two. Radial gradients occurred in all species, ranging from an increase of (approx. 70%) in the shade-intolerant Melia azedarach to a decrease of approx. 13% in the shade-tolerant Neolitsea obtusifolia, but the slopes of radial gradients were generally unrelated to shade-tolerance. For Melia azedarach, radial increases were most-parsimoniously explained by log-transformed tree age and annual increment rather than by tree size. Conclusions The results indicate that average wood density generally reflects differences in shade-tolerance in seasonally dry tropical forests; however, inferences based on wood density alone are potentially misleading for species with complex life histories. In addition, the findings suggest that a ‘whole-tree’ view of life history and biomechanics is important for understanding patterns of radial variation in wood density. Finally, accounting for wood density gradients is likely to improve the accuracy of estimates of stem biomass and carbon in tropical trees. PMID:19454592

  3. Shading performance of a vertical deciduous climbing plant canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, Kenneth; Lam, Marta; Miller, Andrew [Centre for Sustainability of the Built Environment, School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, Cockcroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Deciduous climbing plant canopies strategically integrated to building facades can act as dynamic solar shading devices responsive to the seasonal climatic changes. Maximum shading occurs in the summer when the plant is at its peak growth. The shedding of leaves in autumn and winter reduces the shading and allows beneficial solar radiation to be absorbed by the opaque surface of the building facade or penetrated through the windows to the building interior. Although climbing plants have long been used for moderating the microclimate of buildings, there are very few scientific investigations to quantify such effects. This paper reports the findings of a study with specific focus on the shading performance of a vertical deciduous climbing plant canopy. It justifies the selection of Virginia Creeper as an appropriate plant for growth in the UK climate and describes the planting, monitoring and analysis procedures adopted to determine a proposed dynamic Bioshading Coefficient Function - which is used to represent the shading performance of the climbing plant canopy over its annual growing and wilting cycle. A thermal model was developed which identified the key parameters required for establishing the Bioshading Coefficients. Two climbing plant canopies (referred to as Bioshaders) were set up in an existing building in Southeast UK and monitored for 2 years. Measured data were used to calculate a series of daily Bioshading Coefficients which were subsequently applied to establish the Bioshading Coefficient Function. The research also identified issues affecting the indoor environment as a result of the application of Bioshaders. (author)

  4. A Novel Two-Step Method for Screening Shade Tolerant Mutant Plants via Dwarfism

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    Li, Wei; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Krishnan, Sanalkumar; Thammina, Chandra; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Yer, Huseyin; Merewitz, Emily; Guillard, Karl; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J.; Liu, Zongrang; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    When subjected to shade, plants undergo rapid shoot elongation, which often makes them more prone to disease and mechanical damage. Shade-tolerant plants can be difficult to breed; however, they offer a substantial benefit over other varieties in low-light areas. Although perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is a popular species of turf grasses because of their good appearance and fast establishment, the plant normally does not perform well under shade conditions. It has been reported that, in turfgrass, induced dwarfism can enhance shade tolerance. Here we describe a two-step procedure for isolating shade tolerant mutants of perennial ryegrass by first screening for dominant dwarf mutants, and then screening dwarf plants for shade tolerance. The two-step screening process to isolate shade tolerant mutants can be done efficiently with limited space at early seedling stages, which enables quick and efficient isolation of shade tolerant mutants, and thus facilitates development of shade tolerant new cultivars of turfgrasses. Using the method, we isolated 136 dwarf mutants from 300,000 mutagenized seeds, with 65 being shade tolerant (0.022%). When screened directly for shade tolerance, we recovered only four mutants from a population of 150,000 (0.003%) mutagenized seeds. One shade tolerant mutant, shadow-1, was characterized in detail. In addition to dwarfism, shadow-1 and its sexual progeny displayed high degrees of tolerance to both natural and artificial shade. We showed that endogenous gibberellin (GA) content in shadow-1 was higher than wild-type controls, and shadow-1 was also partially GA insensitive. Our novel, simple and effective two-step screening method should be applicable to breeding shade tolerant cultivars of turfgrasses, ground covers, and other economically important crop plants that can be used under canopies of existing vegetation to increase productivity per unit area of land. PMID:27752260

  5. A novel two-step method for screening shade tolerant mutant plants via dwarfism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When subjected to shade, plants undergo rapid shoot elongation, which often makes them more prone to disease and mechanical damage. Shade-tolerant plants can be difficult to breed; however, they offer a substantial benefit over other varieties in low-light areas. Although perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. is a popular species of turf grasses because of their good appearance and fast establishment, the plant normally does not perform well under shade conditions. It has been reported that, in turfgrass, induced dwarfism can enhance shade tolerance. Here we describe a two-step procedure for isolating shade tolerant mutants of perennial ryegrass by first screening for dominant dwarf mutants, and then screening dwarf plants for shade tolerance. The two-step screening process to isolate shade tolerant mutants can be done efficiently with limited space at early seedling stages, which enables quick and efficient isolation of shade tolerant mutants, and thus facilitates development of shade tolerant new cultivars of turfgrasses. Using the method, we isolated 136 dwarf mutants from 300,000 mutagenized seeds, with 65 being shade tolerant (0.022%. When screened directly for shade tolerance, we recovered only four mutants from a population of 150,000 (0.003% mutagenized seeds. One shade tolerant mutant, shadow-1, was characterized in detail. In addition to dwarfism, shadow-1 and its sexual progeny displayed high degrees of tolerance to both natural and artificial shade. We showed that endogenous gibberellin (GA content in shadow-1 was higher than wild-type controls, and shadow-1 was also partially GA insensitive. Our novel, simple and effective two-step screening method should be applicable to breeding shade tolerant cultivars of turfgrasses, ground covers, and other economically important crop plants that can be used under canopies of existing vegetation to increase productivity per unit area of land.

  6. Light-related variation in sapling architecture of three shade-tolerant tree species of the Mexican rain forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Sanchez, J.L.; Meave, J.; Bongers, F.

    2008-01-01

    The crown architecture of three shade-tolerant tree species (two subcanopy and one mid-canopy) was analyzed in relation to the light regime of the forest understorey. The aim was to examine to which extent shade-tolerant species variate in their crown architecture. Tree saplings (265) between 50 and

  7. Competition among surface roots in a selectively-logged, semi-deciduous forest in southeastern Mexico - effects on seedlings of two species of contrasting shade tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Dickinson; D.F. Wigham

    2013-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of root competition on naturally established seedlings were conducted across canopy openness and soil depth gradients in a selectively-logged, semideciduous forest on limestone-derived soils in southeastern Mexico. We studied the relatively shade intolerant mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla, Meliaceae) and shade tolerant...

  8. Shade tolerance of selected afforestation species on Loess Plateau, China

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    Naijiang Wang; Yong Wang; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2011-01-01

    To select tree and vegetation species for afforestation on Loess Plateau of China, we tested the shade tolerance of nine tree and one vine species. We planted 3-year-old seedlings in the greenhouse of the Seedling Nursery at Northwest Agriculture and Forest University in China.

  9. Efficient modeling of sun/shade canopy radiation dynamics explicitly accounting for scattering

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    P. Bodin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The separation of global radiation (Rg into its direct (Rb and diffuse constituents (Rg is important when modeling plant photosynthesis because a high Rd:Rg ratio has been shown to enhance Gross Primary Production (GPP. To include this effect in vegetation models, the plant canopy must be separated into sunlit and shaded leaves. However, because such models are often too intractable and computationally expensive for theoretical or large scale studies, simpler sun-shade approaches are often preferred. A widely used and computationally efficient sun-shade model was developed by Goudriaan (1977 (GOU. However, compared to more complex models, this model's realism is limited by its lack of explicit treatment of radiation scattering.

    Here we present a new model based on the GOU model, but which in contrast explicitly simulates radiation scattering by sunlit leaves and the absorption of this radiation by the canopy layers above and below (2-stream approach. Compared to the GOU model our model predicts significantly different profiles of scattered radiation that are in better agreement with measured profiles of downwelling diffuse radiation. With respect to these data our model's performance is equal to a more complex and much slower iterative radiation model while maintaining the simplicity and computational efficiency of the GOU model.

  10. An appraisal of the classic forest succession paradigm with the shade tolerance index

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    Jean Lienard; Ionut Florescu; Nikolay. Strigul

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the classic theory of forest succession that relates shade tolerance and species replacement and assess its validity to understand patch-mosaic patterns of forested ecosystems of the USA. We introduce a macroscopic parameter called the “shade tolerance index” and compare it to the classic continuum index in southern Wisconsin forests. We exemplify shade...

  11. Leaf traits show different relationships with shade tolerance in moist versus dry tropical forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, L.

    2009-01-01

    ¿ Shade tolerance is the central paradigm for understanding forest succession and dynamics, but there is considerable debate as to what the salient features of shade tolerance are, whether adult leaves show similar shade adaptations to seedling leaves, and whether the same leaf adaptations are found

  12. Assessing the Spectral Properties of Sunlit and Shaded Components in Rice Canopies with Near-Ground Imaging Spectroscopy Data.

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    Zhou, Kai; Deng, Xinqiang; Yao, Xia; Tian, Yongchao; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Ustin, Susan L; Cheng, Tao

    2017-03-13

    Monitoring the components of crop canopies with remote sensing can help us understand the within-canopy variation in spectral properties and resolve the sources of uncertainties in the spectroscopic estimation of crop foliar chemistry. To date, the spectral properties of leaves and panicles in crop canopies and the shadow effects on their spectral variation remain poorly understood due to the insufficient spatial resolution of traditional spectroscopy data. To address this issue, we used a near-ground imaging spectroscopy system with high spatial and spectral resolutions to examine the spectral properties of rice leaves and panicles in sunlit and shaded portions of canopies and evaluate the effect of shadows on the relationships between spectral indices of leaves and foliar chlorophyll content. The results demonstrated that the shaded components exhibited lower reflectance amplitude but stronger absorption features than their sunlit counterparts. Specifically, the reflectance spectra of panicles had unique double-peak absorption features in the blue region. Among the examined vegetation indices (VIs), significant differences were found in the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) between leaves and panicles and further differences in the transformed chlorophyll absorption reflectance index (TCARI) between sunlit and shaded components. After an image-level separation of canopy components with these two indices, statistical analyses revealed much higher correlations between canopy chlorophyll content and both PRI and TCARI of shaded leaves than for those of sunlit leaves. In contrast, the red edge chlorophyll index (CIRed-edge) exhibited the strongest correlations with canopy chlorophyll content among all vegetation indices examined regardless of shadows on leaves. These findings represent significant advances in the understanding of rice leaf and panicle spectral properties under natural light conditions and demonstrate the significance of commonly overlooked shaded

  13. Morphological and Physiological Characteristics of Shading Tolerant and Sensitive Mungbean Genotypes

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    TITIK SUNDARI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of morphological and physiological characteristics of the tolerant and sensitive mungbean genotypes to shading was carried out in the Station Research of the Indonesian Legume and Tuber Crops Research Institute (ILETRI from September to December 2004. Nine tolerant genotypes (MMC 87 D-KP-2, MLG 369, MLG 310, MLG 424, MLG 336, MLG 428, MLG 237, MLG 429, and VC2768B and three sensitive genotypes to shading (Nuri, MLG 460, and MLG 330 were tested in two shading levels, that were without shading and shading of 52%. The randomized complete block design with three replications analysis. The results showed that leaf characters of shading tolerant and sensitive genotypes were different. The shading tolerant mungbean genotypes had good response to light stress so that the growth and development of the leaves were better than that of sensitive genotypes. The shading tolerant mungbean genotypes had bigger and thicker leaves than that of sensitive genotypes. The shading treatments caused reducing rate of PAR absorption, transpiration, photosynthesis, and CO2 stomata conductance. The reduction of all parameters in tolerant genotype was smaller than that of sensitive genotype. The specific leaf area at four weeks after planting could be used as shading tolerant indicator of mungbeans.

  14. Light and competition gradients fail to explain the coexistence of shade-tolerant Fagus sylvatica and shade-intermediate Quercus petraea seedlings.

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    Van Couwenberghe, Rosalinde; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Lacombe, Eric; Collet, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    The coexistence of forest tree species has often been linked to differences among species in terms of their response to light availability during the regeneration stage. From this perspective, species coexistence results from growth-growth or mortality-growth trade-offs along spatial light gradients. Experimental evidence of growth-growth trade-offs in natural conditions is sparse due to various confounding factors that potentially hinder the relationship. This study examined growth hierarchies along light gradients between two tree species with contrasting shade tolerance by controlling potential confounding factors such as seedling size, seedling status, seedling density and species composition. Natural regenerated shade-tolerant Fagus sylvatica and shade-intermediate Quercus petraea seedlings were used, and growth rankings over a 4-year period were compared in 8- to 10-year-old tree seedlings. No rank reversal occurs between the two species along the light gradient, or along the density, mixture or seedling size gradients. The shade-tolerant species was always the more competitive of the two. Pronounced effects of initial size on seedling growth were observed, whereas the effects of light and competition by neighbours were of secondary importance. The paramount effect of size, which results from the asymmetric nature of interseedling competition, gives a strong advantage to tall seedlings over the long term. This study extends previous efforts to identify potential drivers of rank reversals in young tree mixtures. It does not support the classical assumption that spatial heterogeneity in canopy opening explains the coexistence of the two species studied. It suggests that spatial variation in local size hierarchies among seedlings that may be caused by seedling emergence time or seedling initial performance is the main driver of the dynamics of these mixed stands.

  15. Evaluating relationships among tree growth rate, shade tolerance, and browse tolerance following disturbance in an eastern deciduous forest

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    Lisa M. Krueger; Chris J. Peterson; Alejandro Royo; Walter P. Carson

    2009-01-01

    Interspecific differences in shade tolerance among woody species are considered a primary driving force underlying forest succession. However, variation in shade tolerance may be only one of many interspecific differences that cause species turnover. For example, tree species may differ in their sensitivity to herbivory. Nonetheless,...

  16. Scaling allometric relationships in pure, crowded, even-aged stands: do tree shade-tolerance, repro-ductive mode and wood productivity matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Gafta; Florin Crişan

    2013-01-01

    Tree allometric relationships are likely to be influenced by species tolerance to shade, nutrient availability and plant ontogenetic origin. The aim of this paper was to test to what extent these factors affect the scaling exponents of two allometric relationships in pure, even-aged, canopy-closed forest stands: stem diameter (D) versus stem height (H) and versus stem density (N). Data were collected by tree species (Betula pendula, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea), wood productivity clas...

  17. Functional significance of shade-induced leaf senescence in dense canopies: an experimental test using transgenic tobacco.

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    Boonman, Alex; Anten, Niels P R; Dueck, Tom A; Jordi, Wilco J R M; van der Werf, Adrie; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pons, Thijs L

    2006-11-01

    Canopy photosynthesis models have predicted an optimal leaf area index (LAI; leaf area per unit surface area) and leaf nitrogen distribution at which whole-plant carbon gain per unit N is maximized. In this study we experimentally tested these models, using transgenic P(SAG12)-IPT tobacco (SAG; Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants with delayed leaf senescence and therefore a greater LAI and more uniform N distribution than the wild type (WT). In a competition experiment, the increased density of surrounding WT plants caused a greater reduction in dry mass of mature SAG target plants than in that of WT target plants, indicating negative effects of delayed leaf senescence on performance at high canopy density. Vegetative SAG plants achieved a lower calculated daily carbon gain than competing WT plants because the former retained leaves with a negative carbon gain in the shaded, lower part of the canopy. Sensitivity analyses showed that the carbon gain of SAG plants would increase if these lower leaves were shed and the N reallocated from these leaves were used to form additional leaf area at the canopy top. This strategy, which is adopted by the WT, is most advantageous because it results in the shading of competing neighbors.

  18. Salinity tolerance of 'Valencia' orange trees on rootstocks with contrasting salt tolerance is not improved by moderate shade.

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    García-Sánchez, F; Syvertsen, J P; Martínez, V; Melgar, J C

    2006-01-01

    The effects of shading in combination with salinity treatments were studied in citrus trees on two rootstocks with contrasting salt tolerance to determine if shading could reduce the negative effects of salinity stress. Well-nourished 2-year-old 'Valencia' orange trees grafted on Cleopatra mandarin (Cleo, relatively salt tolerant) or Carrizo citrange (Carr, relatively salt sensitive), were grown either under a 50% shade cloth or left unshaded in full sunlight. Half the trees received no salinity treatment and half were salinized with 50 mM Cl- during two 9 week salinity periods in the spring and autumn interrupted by an 11 week rainy period. The shade treatment reduced midday leaf temperature and leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit regardless of salinity treatments. In non-salinized trees, shade increased midday CO2 assimilation rate (A(CO2)) and stomatal conductance, but had no effect on leaf transpiration (E(lf)). Shade also increased leaf chlorophyll and photosynthetic water use efficiency (A(CO2)/E(lf)) in leaves on both rootstocks and increased total plant dry weight in Cleo. The salinity treatment reduced leaf growth and leaf gas exchange parameters. Shade decreased Cl- concentrations in leaves of salinized Carr trees, but had no effect on leaf or root Cl- of trees on Cleo. There were no significant differences in leaf gas exchange parameters of shaded and unshaded salinized plants but the growth reduction from salinity stress was actually greater for shaded than for unshaded trees. Shaded trees on both rootstocks had higher leaf Na+ than unshaded trees after the first salinity period, and this shade-induced elevated leaf Na+ persisted after the second salinity period in trees on Carr. Thus, shading did not alleviate the negative effects of salinity on growth and Na+ accumulation.

  19. Tree cover at fine and coarse spatial grains interacts with shade tolerance to shape plant species distributions across the Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Lugilde, Diego; Lenoir, Jonathan; Abdulhak, Sylvain; Aeschimann, David; Dullinger, Stefan; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Guisan, Antoine; Pauli, Harald; Renaud, Julien; Theurillat, Jean-Paul; Thuiller, Wilfried; Van Es, Jérémie; Vittoz, Pascal; Willner, Wolfgang; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2015-06-01

    The role of competition for light among plants has long been recognised at local scales, but its importance for plant species distributions at larger spatial scales has generally been ignored. Tree cover modifies the local abiotic conditions below the canopy, notably by reducing light availability, and thus, also the performance of species that are not adapted to low-light conditions. However, this local effect may propagate to coarser spatial grains, by affecting colonisation probabilities and local extinction risks of herbs and shrubs. To assess the effect of tree cover at both the plot- and landscape-grain sizes (approximately 10-m and 1-km), we fit Generalised Linear Models (GLMs) for the plot-level distributions of 960 species of herbs and shrubs using 6,935 vegetation plots across the European Alps. We ran four models with different combinations of variables (climate, soil and tree cover) at both spatial grains for each species. We used partial regressions to evaluate the independent effects of plot- and landscape-grain tree cover on plot-level plant communities. Finally, the effects on species-specific elevational range limits were assessed by simulating a removal experiment comparing the species distributions under high and low tree cover. Accounting for tree cover improved the model performance, with the probability of the presence of shade-tolerant species increasing with increasing tree cover, whereas shade-intolerant species showed the opposite pattern. The tree cover effect occurred consistently at both the plot and landscape spatial grains, albeit most strongly at the former. Importantly, tree cover at the two grain sizes had partially independent effects on plot-level plant communities. With high tree cover, shade-intolerant species exhibited narrower elevational ranges than with low tree cover whereas shade-tolerant species showed wider elevational ranges at both limits. These findings suggest that forecasts of climate-related range shifts for herb

  20. Tree cover at fine and coarse spatial grains interacts with shade tolerance to shape plant species distributions across the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Lugilde, Diego; Lenoir, Jonathan; Abdulhak, Sylvain; Aeschimann, David; Dullinger, Stefan; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Guisan, Antoine; Pauli, Harald; Renaud, Julien; Theurillat, Jean-Paul; Thuiller, Wilfried; Van Es, Jérémie; Vittoz, Pascal; Willner, Wolfgang; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2015-01-01

    The role of competition for light among plants has long been recognised at local scales, but its importance for plant species distributions at larger spatial scales has generally been ignored. Tree cover modifies the local abiotic conditions below the canopy, notably by reducing light availability, and thus, also the performance of species that are not adapted to low-light conditions. However, this local effect may propagate to coarser spatial grains, by affecting colonisation probabilities and local extinction risks of herbs and shrubs. To assess the effect of tree cover at both the plot- and landscape-grain sizes (approximately 10-m and 1-km), we fit Generalised Linear Models (GLMs) for the plot-level distributions of 960 species of herbs and shrubs using 6,935 vegetation plots across the European Alps. We ran four models with different combinations of variables (climate, soil and tree cover) at both spatial grains for each species. We used partial regressions to evaluate the independent effects of plot- and landscape-grain tree cover on plot-level plant communities. Finally, the effects on species-specific elevational range limits were assessed by simulating a removal experiment comparing the species distributions under high and low tree cover. Accounting for tree cover improved the model performance, with the probability of the presence of shade-tolerant species increasing with increasing tree cover, whereas shade-intolerant species showed the opposite pattern. The tree cover effect occurred consistently at both the plot and landscape spatial grains, albeit most strongly at the former. Importantly, tree cover at the two grain sizes had partially independent effects on plot-level plant communities. With high tree cover, shade-intolerant species exhibited narrower elevational ranges than with low tree cover whereas shade-tolerant species showed wider elevational ranges at both limits. These findings suggest that forecasts of climate-related range shifts for herb

  1. Herbivory on temperate rainforest seedlings in sun and shade: resistance, tolerance and habitat distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Salgado-Luarte

    Full Text Available Differential herbivory and/or differential plant resistance or tolerance in sun and shade environments may influence plant distribution along the light gradient. Embothrium coccineum is one of the few light-demanding tree species in the temperate rainforest of southern South America, and seedlings are frequently attacked by insects and snails. Herbivory may contribute to the exclusion of E. coccineum from the shade if 1 herbivory pressure is greater in the shade, which in turn can result from shade plants being less resistant or from habitat preferences of herbivores, and/or 2 consequences of damage are more detrimental in the shade, i.e., shade plants are less tolerant. We tested this in a field study with naturally established seedlings in treefall gaps (sun and forest understory (shade in a temperate rainforest of southern Chile. Seedlings growing in the sun sustained nearly 40% more herbivore damage and displayed half of the specific leaf area than those growing in the shade. A palatability test showed that a generalist snail consumed ten times more leaf area when fed on shade leaves compared to sun leaves, i.e., plant resistance was greater in sun-grown seedlings. Herbivore abundance (total biomass was two-fold greater in treefall gaps compared to the forest understory. Undamaged seedlings survived better and showed a slightly higher growth rate in the sun. Whereas simulated herbivory in the shade decreased seedling survival and growth by 34% and 19%, respectively, damaged and undamaged seedlings showed similar survival and growth in the sun. Leaf tissue lost to herbivores in the shade appears to be too expensive to replace under the limiting light conditions of forest understory. Following evaluations of herbivore abundance and plant resistance and tolerance in contrasting light environments, we have shown how herbivory on a light-demanding tree species may contribute to its exclusion from shade sites. Thus, in the shaded forest understory

  2. Plasticity in seedling morphology, biomass allocation and physiology among ten temperate tree species in response to shade is related to shade tolerance and not leaf habit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, D J; Modrzyński, J; Chmielarz, P; Tjoelker, M G

    2017-03-01

    Mechanisms of shade tolerance in tree seedlings, and thus growth in shade, may differ by leaf habit and vary with ontogeny following seed germination. To examine early responses of seedlings to shade in relation to morphological, physiological and biomass allocation traits, we compared seedlings of 10 temperate species, varying in their leaf habit (broadleaved versus needle-leaved) and observed tolerance to shade, when growing in two contrasting light treatments - open (about 20% of full sunlight) and shade (about 5% of full sunlight). We analyzed biomass allocation and its response to shade using allometric relationships. We also measured leaf gas exchange rates and leaf N in the two light treatments. Compared to the open treatment, shading significantly increased traits typically associated with high relative growth rate (RGR) - leaf area ratio (LAR), specific leaf area (SLA), and allocation of biomass into leaves, and reduced seedling mass and allocation to roots, and net assimilation rate (NAR). Interestingly, RGR was not affected by light treatment, likely because of morphological and physiological adjustments in shaded plants that offset reductions of in situ net assimilation of carbon in shade. Leaf area-based rates of light-saturated leaf gas exchange differed among species groups, but not between light treatments, as leaf N concentration increased in concert with increased SLA in shade. We found little evidence to support the hypothesis of a increased plasticity of broadleaved species compared to needle-leaved conifers in response to shade. However, an expectation of higher plasticity in shade-intolerant species than in shade-tolerant ones, and in leaf and plant morphology than in biomass allocation was supported across species of contrasting leaf habit. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Size-symmetric competition in a shade-tolerant invasive plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Xiao-Yun; Weiner, Jacob; Li, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Plant responses to crowding have been investigated extensively in stands of light‐demanding species, but shade‐tolerant species may react differently. In the present study, we investigated the effect of density on the mortality, size inequality, and biomass allocation of Alternanthera philoxeroid...... that are shade tolerant, cooperative, and follow a relatively fixed allometric trajectory with low plasticity....

  4. Phytochrome A Mediates the Promotion of Seed Germination by Very Low Fluences of Light and Canopy Shade Light in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botto, J. F.; Sanchez, R. A.; Whitelam, G. C.; Casal, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Seeds of the wild type (WT) and of the phyA and phyB mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to single red light (R)/far-red light (FR) pulses predicted to establish a series of calculated phytochrome photoequilibria (Pfr/P). WT and phyB seeds showed biphasic responses to Pfr/P. The first phase, i.e. the very-low-fluence response (VLFR), occurred below Pfr/P = 10-1%. The second phase, i.e. the low-fluence response, occurred above Pfr/P = 3%. The VLFR was similarly induced by either a FR pulse saturating photoconversion or a subsaturating R pulse predicted to establish the same Pfr/P. The VLFR was absent in phyA seeds, which showed a strong low-fluence response. In the field, even brief exposures to the very low fluences of canopy shade light (R/FR ratio FR ratios or under deep canopy shade light supplemented with R from light-emitting diodes. We propose that phytochrome A mediates VLFR of A. thaliana seeds. PMID:12226195

  5. Relative lack of regeneration of shade-intolerant canopy species in some South African forests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Midgley, JJ

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Some species such as Celtis Africana, are experiencing relative recruitment bottlenecks, because there are usually fewer recruits [i.e. individuals <20 cm diameter at breast height, (dbh)] than canopy individuals. The species with low recruitment...

  6. Explaining interspecific differences in sapling growth and shade tolerance in temperate forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse-ten Klooster, S.H.; Thomas, E.J.P.; Sterck, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    1. Species differences in growth and shade tolerance might contribute to coexistence of tree species. To explore how such differences depend on underlying plant traits, 14 tree species were investigated in temperate forests on sand and loess soils in the Netherlands. Plant traits were measured for

  7. Canopy gaps decrease microbial densities and disease risk for a shade-intolerant tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt O. Reinhart; Alejandro A. Royo; Stacie A. Kageyama; Keith. Clay

    2010-01-01

    Canopy disturbances such as windthrowevents have obvious impacts on forest structure and composition aboveground, but changes in soil microbial communities and the consequences of these changes are less understood.We characterized the densities of a soil-borne pathogenic oomycete (Pythium) and a common saprotrophic zygomycete (Mortierella...

  8. Effects of CO2 enrichment on the photosynthetic light response of sun and shade leaves of canopy sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) in a forest ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick; Thomas

    1999-10-01

    To investigate whether sun and shade leaves respond differently to CO2 enrichment, we examined photosynthetic light response of sun and shade leaves in canopy sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) trees growing at ambient and elevated (ambient + 200 microliters per liter) atmospheric CO2 in the Brookhaven National Laboratory/Duke University Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment. The sweetgum trees were naturally established in a 15-year-old forest dominated by loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Measurements were made in early June and late August 1997 during the first full year of CO2 fumigation in the Duke Forest FACE experiment. Sun leaves had a 68% greater leaf mass per unit area, 63% more leaf N per unit leaf area, 27% more chlorophyll per unit leaf area and 77% greater light-saturated photosynthetic rates than shade leaves. Elevated CO2 strongly stimulated light-saturated photosynthetic rates of sun and shade leaves in June and August; however, the relative photosynthetic enhancement by elevated CO2 for sun leaves was more than double the relative enhancement of shade leaves. Elevated CO2 stimulated apparent quantum yield by 30%, but there was no interaction between CO2 and leaf position. Daytime leaf-level carbon gain extrapolated from photosynthetic light response curves indicated that sun leaves were enhanced 98% by elevated CO2, whereas shade leaves were enhanced 41%. Elevated CO2 did not significantly affect leaf N per unit area in sun or shade leaves during either measurement period. Thus, the greater CO2 enhancement of light-saturated photosynthesis in sun leaves than in shade leaves was probably a result of a greater amount of nitrogen per unit leaf area in sun leaves. A full understanding of the effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations on forest ecosystems must take account of the complex nature of the light environment through the canopy and how light interacts with CO2 to affect photosynthesis.

  9. Shading areas, sky-view factor and UV radiation in urban canopy of Moscow city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, P. I.; Samsonov, T. E.; Zhdanova, E. Yu.; Chubarova, N. Ye.

    2017-02-01

    The main goal of this investigation is to develop a kind of "urban reanalysis" - the database of meteorological and radiation fields under Moscow megalopolis with high spatial resolution. Sky View Factor (SVF) is widely used for evaluating the solar irradiance attenuation in urban canopy. In this study we suggested raster-based calculation of SVF. We applied this technique for evaluating specific features in UV irradiance at Moscow megalopolis conditions. We showed that relative frequency of SVF over the territory of Moscow higher than 80% is observed in more than 86% of cases. The maps of UV losses due to sky obscuring over the territory of Moscow have been obtained for different seasons.

  10. The effects of forest canopy shading and turbulence on boundary layer ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, P. A.; Staebler, R. M.; Akingunola, A.; Zhang, J.; McLinden, C.; Kharol, S. K.; Pabla, B.; Cheung, P.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-05-01

    The chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere close to the surface is known to be strongly influenced by vegetation. However, two critical aspects of the forest environment have been neglected in the description of the large-scale influence of forests on air pollution: the reduction of photolysis reaction rates and the modification of vertical transport due to the presence of foliage. Here we show that foliage shading and foliage-modified vertical diffusion have a profound influence on atmospheric chemistry, both at the Earth's surface and extending throughout the atmospheric boundary layer. The absence of these processes in three-dimensional models may account for 59-72% of the positive bias in North American surface ozone forecasts, and up to 97% of the bias in forested regions within the continent. These processes are shown to have similar or greater influence on surface ozone levels as climate change and current emissions policy scenario simulations.

  11. The effect of irradiance on the carbon balance and tissue characteristics of five herbaceous species differing in shade-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Thijs L.; Poorter, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    The carbon balance is defined here as the partitioning of daily whole-plant gross CO2 assimilation (A) in C available for growth and C required for respiration (R). A scales positively with growth irradiance and there is evidence for an irradiance dependence of R as well. Here we ask if R as a fraction of A is also irradiance dependent, whether there are systematic differences in C-balance between shade-tolerant and shade-intolerant species, and what the causes could be. Growth, gas exchange, chemical composition and leaf structure were analyzed for two shade-tolerant and three shade-intolerant herbaceous species that were hydroponically grown in a growth room at five irradiances from 20 μmol m−2 s−1 (1.2 mol m−2 day−1) to 500 μmol m−2 s−1 (30 mol m−2 day−1). Growth analysis showed little difference between species in unit leaf rate (dry mass increase per unit leaf area) at low irradiance, but lower rates for the shade-tolerant species at high irradiance, mainly as a result of their lower light-saturated rate of photosynthesis. This resulted in lower relative growth rates in these conditions. Daily whole-plant R scaled with A in a very tight manner, giving a remarkably constant R/A ratio of around 0.3 for all but the lowest irradiance. Although some shade-intolerant species showed tendencies toward a higher R/A and inefficiencies in terms of carbon and nitrogen investment in their leaves, no conclusive evidence was found for systematic differences in C-balance between the shade-tolerant and intolerant species at the lowest irradiance. Leaf tissue of the shade-tolerant species was characterized by high dry matter percentages, C-concentration and construction costs, which could be associated with a better defense in shade environments where leaf longevity matters. We conclude that shade-intolerant species have a competitive advantage at high irradiance due to superior potential growth rates, but that shade-tolerance is not necessarily associated

  12. Seedling growth and biomass allocation in relation to leaf habit and shade tolerance among 10 temperate tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrzyński, Jerzy; Chmura, Daniel J; Tjoelker, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Initial growth of germinated seeds is an important life history stage, critical for establishment and succession in forests. Important questions remain regarding the differences among species in early growth potential arising from shade tolerance. In addition, the role of leaf habit in shaping relationships underlying shade tolerance-related differences in seedling growth remains unresolved. In this study we examined variation in morphological and physiological traits among seedlings of 10 forest tree species of the European temperate zone varying in shade tolerance and leaf habit (broadleaved winter-deciduous species vs needle-leaved conifers) during a 10-week period. Seeds were germinated and grown in a controlled environment simulating an intermediate forest understory light environment to resolve species differences in initial growth and biomass allocation. In the high-resource experimental conditions during the study, seedlings increased biomass allocation to roots at the cost of leaf biomass independent of shade tolerance and leaf habit. Strong correlations between relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), leaf area ratio (LAR), specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf mass fraction (LMF) indicate that physiology and biomass allocation were equally important determinants of RGR as plant structure and leaf morphology among these species. Our findings highlight the importance of seed mass- and seed size-related root morphology (specific root length-SRL) for shade tolerance during early ontogeny. Leaf and plant morphology (SLA, LAR) were more successful in explaining variation among species due to leaf habit than shade tolerance. In both broadleaves and conifers, shade-tolerant species had lower SRL and greater allocation of biomass to stems (stem mass fraction). Light-seeded shade-intolerant species with greater SRL had greater RGR in both leaf habit groups. However, the greatest plant mass was accumulated in the group of heavy-seeded shade-tolerant

  13. Hydraulics and life history of tropical dry forest tree species: coordination of species' drought and shade tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markesteijn, L.; Poorter, L.; Bongers, F.; Paz, H.; Sack, L.

    2011-01-01

    Plant hydraulic architecture has been studied extensively, yet we know little about how hydraulic properties relate to species’ life history strategies, such as drought and shade tolerance. The prevailing theories seem contradictory. We measured the sapwood (Ks) and leaf (Kl) hydraulic

  14. Ranking the shade tolerance of forty-five candidate groundcovers for agroforestry plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.W. Van Sambeek; N.E. Navarrete-Tindall; H.E. Garrett; C.-H. Lin; R.L. McGraw; D.C. Wallace

    2007-01-01

    Several large-scale screening trials evaluating native and introduced herbaceous ground covers have been conducted in the last half century. Most trials have used shade cloth to evaluate growth of potted plants under moderate shade (45 to 55 percent of full sunlight) similar to what might be found in many agroforestry practices and heavy shade (20 to 30 percent of full...

  15. Functional significance of shade-induced leaf senescence in dense canopies: an experimental test using transgenic tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman, A.; Anten, N.P.R.; Dueck, T.A.; Jordi, W.J.R.M.; Werf, van der A.K.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; Pons, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Canopy photosynthesis models have predicted an optimal leaf area index (LAI; leaf area per unit surface area) and leaf nitrogen distribution at which whole-plant carbon gain per unit N is maximized. In this study we experimentally tested these models, using transgenic PSAG12-IPT tobacco (SAG;

  16. Patterns of shading tolerance determined from experimental light reduction studies of seagrasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extensive review of the experimental literature on seagrass shading evaluated the relationship between experimental light reductions, duration of experiment and seagrass response metrics to determine whether there were consistent statistical patterns. There were highly signif...

  17. Microclimatological and Physiological Controls of Stomatal Conductance and Transpiration of Co-Occurring Seedlings with Varying Shade Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, C. M.; Levia, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    Forest ecosystems provide a significant portion of fresh water to the hydrologic cycle through transpiration, the majority of which is supplied by saplings and mature trees. However, a smaller, yet measurable, proportion is also supplied by seedlings. The contribution of seedlings is dependent upon physiological characteristics of the species, whose range of habitat is ultimately controlled by microclimate. The objectives of this study were to (1) observe meteorological conditions of two forest microlimates and (2) assess the intra- and interspecific stomatal conductance and transpiration responses of naturally occurring seedlings of varying shade tolerance. Naturally established seedlings in a deciduous forest understory and an adjacent clearing were monitored throughout the 2008 growing season in southeastern Pennsylvania (39°49'N, 75°43'W). Clear spatial and temporal trends of stomatal conductance and transpiration were observed throughout this study. The understory microclimate conditions overall had a lower degree of variability and had consistently lower mean quantum flux density, air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, volumetric water content, and soil temperature than the clearing plot. Shade tolerant understory seedlings (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) and Prunus serotina L. (black cherry)) had significantly lower mean monthly rates of water loss (p = 0.05) than shade intolerant clearing seedlings (P. serotina and Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar)). Additionally, water loss by shade grown P. serotina was significantly lower (p = 0.05) than by sun grown P. serotina. Significant intraspecific responses (p = 0.05) were also observed on a monthly basis, with the exception of L. tulipifera. These findings indicate that physiological differences, specifically shade tolerance, play an important role in determining rates of stomatal conductance and transpiration in tree seedlings. To a lesser degree, microclimate variability was also shown

  18. Acclimation of C4 metabolism to low light in mature maize leaves could limit energetic losses during progressive shading in a crop canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-07-01

    C4 plants have a biochemical carbon-concentrating mechanism that increases CO2 concentration around Rubisco in the bundle sheath. Under low light, the activity of the carbon-concentrating mechanism generally decreases, associated with an increase in leakiness (ϕ), the ratio of CO2 retrodiffusing from the bundle sheath relative to C4 carboxylation. This increase in ϕ had been theoretically associated with a decrease in biochemical operating efficiency (expressed as ATP cost of gross assimilation, ATP/GA) under low light and, because a proportion of canopy photosynthesis is carried out by shaded leaves, potential productivity losses at field scale. Maize plants were grown under light regimes representing the cycle that leaves undergo in the canopy, whereby younger leaves initially developed under high light and were then re-acclimated to low light (600 to 100 μE·m(-2)·s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation) for 3 weeks. Following re-acclimation, leaves reduced rates of light-respiration and reached a status of lower ϕ, effectively optimizing the limited ATP resources available under low photosynthetically active radiation. Direct estimates of respiration in the light, and ATP production rate, allowed an empirical estimate of ATP production rate relative to gross assimilation to be derived. These values were compared to modelled ATP/GA which was predicted using leakiness as the sole proxy for ATP/GA, and, using a novel comprehensive biochemical model, showing that irrespective of whether leaves are acclimated to very low or high light intensity, the biochemical efficiency of the C4 cycle does not decrease at low photosynthetically active radiation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Population structure of Rudgea parquioides (Rubiaceae, a shade-tolerant shrub species, in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C.G. Cardoso

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The expectations that shade-tolerant forest species show 1 a population structure composed by a high amount of small individuals, and 2 biomass allocation for diameter higher than for height growth, were tested for Rudgea parquioides, a typical shrub in Southern Brazil. We described the size structure (height and stem diameter and allometrical relations of a R. parquioides population by counting and measuring all the individuals in a 725m² area in the municipality of Curitiba (25"25'S; 49"19'W. A total of 916 individuals (12,634 ind.ha-1 were recorded in the area. The firstexpectation was supported, since distribution by height and diameter classes showed a predominance of small individuals (skewness coefficients > 1. On the other hand, the regression between height and stem base diameter showed slope β Foram testadas duas hipóteses relativas a espécies florestaistolerantes à sombra em uma população de Rudgea parquioides, um arbusto característico do sul do Brasil: 1 espécies tolerantes à sombra possuem uma estrutura populacional composta por um grande número de indivíduos pequenos e 2 a alocação de biomassa para o crescimento em diâmetro é maior que para o crescimento em altura. Foram descritas as estruturas de tamanho (altura e diâmetro do tronco e relações alométricas através da contagem e medição de todos os indivíduos de R. parquioides em uma área de 725m² no município de Curitiba (25"25'S; 49"19'W. Um total de 916 indivíduos(12.634 ind.ha-1 foi medido nesta área. A primeira hipótese foi aceita, uma vez que a distribuição em classes de altura e de diâmetro mostrou um predomínio de indivíduos pequenos (coeficiente de assimetria > 1. Por outro lado, a regressão entre altura e diâmetro na base do caule mostrou inclinação β < 1, o que indica que o crescimento em altura é maior que em diâmetro, não suportando a segunda hipótese. Esses resultados mostram que as estratégias de crescimento em esp

  20. Scaling allometric relationships in pure, crowded, even-aged stands: do tree shade-tolerance, repro-ductive mode and wood productivity matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Gafta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tree allometric relationships are likely to be influenced by species tolerance to shade, nutrient availability and plant ontogenetic origin. The aim of this paper was to test to what extent these factors affect the scaling exponents of two allometric relationships in pure, even-aged, canopy-closed forest stands: stem diameter (D versus stem height (H and versus stem density (N. Data were collected by tree species (Betula pendula, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea, wood productivity class and reproductive mode (seed origin and sprouting stands from published forest yield tables. Reduced major axis analysis was used to estimate the slopes of regression lines in the log-log space of H-D and D-N. The scaling exponent of the H-D relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (0.897 versus 0.745, and in low productivity, beech stands as compared with their high productivity counterparts (0.876 versus 0.745. However, no significant difference was detected between high stands and coppices of durmast oak. The scaling exponent of the D-N relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (-0.690 versus -0.558, in low than in high productivity beech stands (-0.694 versus -0.558, and in seed origin than in sprouting stands of durmast oak (-0.609 versus -0.580. We explained these results in terms of plant stem growth strategies and resource availability from a biomechanical perspective. Contrary to certain studies that have reported an invariant scaling relation between stem diameter and density across tree species and communities, but in accordance with other recent studies, we have brought new evidence on species-specific allometric scaling under self-thinning. In addition, we have revealed within-species variance of the scaling exponent of stem diameter-density relationship.

  1. Scaling allometric relationships in pure, crowded, even-aged stands: do tree shade-tolerance, repro-ductive mode and wood productivity matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Gafta

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tree allometric relationships are likely to be influenced by species tolerance to shade, nutrient availability and plant ontogenetic origin. The aim of this paper was to test to what extent these factors affect the scaling exponents of two allometric relationships in pure, even-aged, canopy-closed forest stands: stem diameter (D versus stem height (H and versus stem density (N. Data were collected by tree species (Betula pendula, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea, wood productivity class and reproductive mode (seed origin and sprouting stands from published forest yield tables. Reduced major axis analysis was used to estimate the slopes of regression lines in the log-log space of H-D and D-N. The scaling exponent of the H-D relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (0.897 versus 0.745, and in low productivity, beech stands as compared with their high productivity counterparts (0.876 versus 0.745. However, no significant difference was detected between high stands and coppices of durmast oak. The scaling exponent of the D-N relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (-0.690 versus -0.558, in low than in high productivity beech stands (-0.694 versus -0.558, and in seed origin than in sprouting stands of durmast oak (-0.609 versus -0.580. We explained these results in terms of plant stem growth strategies and resource availability from a biomechanical perspective.Contrary to certain studies that have reported an invariant scaling relation between stem diameter and density across tree species and communities, but in accordance with other recent studies, we have brought new evidence on species-specific allometric scaling under self-thinning. In addition, we have revealed within-species variance of the scaling exponent of stem diameter-density relationship.

  2. Phytochrome B Nuclear Bodies Respond to the Low Red to Far-Red Ratio and to the Reduced Irradiance of Canopy Shade in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trupkin, Santiago Ariel; Legris, Martina; Buchovsky, Ana Sabrina; Tolava Rivero, María Belén; Casal, Jorge José

    2014-01-01

    The current consensus is that plant responses to canopy shade involve the perception of low red to far-red ratios (R:FRs) by phytochrome B (phyB), which leads to the direct activation of auxin synthesis genes by PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs). In addition to its effect on R:FRs, shade also reduces irradiance, but whether shade-induced drops in irradiance affect phyB activity has not been demonstrated. To address this issue, we investigated whether irradiance and R:FRs have similar effects on the nuclear distribution of phyB in petiole cells of light-grown plants. Under high-irradiance white light, phyB formed large nuclear bodies. Lowering irradiance without changing R:FRs or lowering R:FRs by adding far-red light led to the appearance of small nuclear bodies containing phyB. Large nuclear bodies remained but with some concomitant reduction in diameter. The appearance of small nuclear bodies was rapid, stable, and reversible upon the return to high irradiance and high R:FRs. High levels of red light but not of blue light were enough to restrain the formation of small phyB nuclear bodies. Irradiance was effective within the range found in natural canopies and even under relatively low R:FRs. The promotion of leaf hyponasty by lowering irradiance was impaired in phyB and pif mutants, as previously reported for the response to R:FRs. The expression of auxin-related genes showed a similar hierarchy of response to low R:FRs and low irradiance. We propose that phyB is able to perceive not only the low R:FRs, but also the low irradiance of shade. PMID:24948827

  3. Life in the Treetops: Drought Tolerance and Water Balance of Canopy Epiphytes in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsch, S. G.; Nadkarni, N.; Darby, A.; Dix, M.; Glunk, A.; Davidson, K.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) inhabit regions rich in biodiversity that play an important role in the local and regional water cycle. Canopy plants such as epiphytes and hemiepiphytes are an important component of the biodiversity in the TMCF and therefore play a significant role in the carbon, nutrient and water cycles. With only partial or no access to resources on the ground, canopy plants may be vulnerable to changes in climate that increase canopy temperatures and decrease atmospheric humidity or precipitation inputs. Despite their importance in the TMCF, there is little information regarding drought tolerance and water balance in this community. In this study we quantified variation in functional traits and water relations in 12 species of epiphytes and hemiepiphytes in a Costa Rican TMCF. We also generated pressure-volume curves and xylem vulnerability curves that we used as indicators of drought tolerance. Lastly, we determined the capacity for foliar water uptake in the laboratory and measured whole-plant transpiration in the field. We found that all species had a high turgor loss point (ψTLP), high vulnerability to cavitation (P50), and low bulk elastic modulus (ɛmax, i.e. high cell wall elasticity). These results indicate that capacitance may be high in canopy plants and that stored water may help to maintain high leaf water potentials during dry periods. We also found that all species had the capacity for foliar uptake and that this process contributed substantially to their water status and water balance. On average, foliar uptake contributed to the reabsorption of 70% of the water transpired over a 34-day period at the beginning of the dry season. Our results indicate that canopy plants can mitigate water loss substantially, but they may be vulnerable to changes in the overall precipitation patterns or increases in cloud base heights.

  4. Estimating Canopy Dark Respiration for Crop Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje Mejia, Oscar Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Crop production is obtained from accurate estimates of daily carbon gain.Canopy gross photosynthesis (Pgross) can be estimated from biochemical models of photosynthesis using sun and shaded leaf portions and the amount of intercepted photosyntheticallyactive radiation (PAR).In turn, canopy daily net carbon gain can be estimated from canopy daily gross photosynthesis when canopy dark respiration (Rd) is known.

  5. Light-related variation in sapling architecture of three shade-tolerant tree species of the Mexican rain forest Variación arquitectural de árboles juveniles en relación con la luz en tres especies tolerantes a la sombra en una selva húmeda mexicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ LUIS MARTÍNEZ-SÁNCHEZ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The crown architecture of three shade-tolerant tree species (two subcanopy and one mid-canopy was analyzed in relation to the light regime of the forest understorey. The aim was to examine to which extent shade-tolerant species variate in their crown architecture. Tree saplings (265 between 50 and 300 cm height, and distributed from understorey to variously-sized canopy gaps, were measured for 13 architectural traits in the lowland rain forest of Los Tuxtlas, México. The analysis showed that the three species changed their architecture as light increased but in a different way. No species conformed to the typical wide-crown type expected for shade-tolerant species, and in contrast they presented some traits of light demanding species. The two sub-canopy species tended to adopt a crown form between a narrow- and wide-crown type, and the mid-canopy species showed more traits of a narrow-crown type. The horizontal crown area appeared as the more related trait to the light and sapling height. It is concluded that despite being shade-tolerant, the studied species make use of better-lit environments in the forest understorey. The crown architecture of shade-tolerant species is not as rigid as originally conceived.Se analizó la arquitectura de la copa de tres especies tolerantes a la sombra (dos del sotobosque y una del dosel medio en relación con el ambiente lumínico del sotobosque de la selva. El objetivo fue examinar el grado de variación que presenta la arquitectura de la copa de especies tolerantes a la sombra. Para esto, se midieron 13 variables arquitecturales en 265 árboles juveniles (50-300 cm de altura distribuidos desde sitios de selva madura hasta claros de diversos tamaños, en la selva húmeda tropical de Los Tuxtlas, México. El análisis mostró que las tres especies cambian la arquitectura de su copa a medida que aumenta la disponibilidad de luz, pero de diferente forma. Ninguna especie presentó el típico modelo de copa plana

  6. Throughfall deposition and canopy exchange processes along a vertical gradient within the canopy of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Sandy; Hansen, Karin; Staelens, Jeroen; Wuyts, Karen; De Schrijver, An; Baeten, Lander; Boeckx, Pascal; Samson, Roeland; Verheyen, Kris

    2012-03-15

    To assess the impact of air pollution on forest ecosystems, the canopy is usually considered as a constant single layer in interaction with the atmosphere and incident rain, which could influence the measurement accuracy. In this study the variation of througfall deposition and derived dry deposition and canopy exchange were studied along a vertical gradient in the canopy of one European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree and two Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) trees. Throughfall and net throughfall deposition of all ions other than H(+) increased significantly with canopy depth in the middle and lower canopy of the beech tree and in the whole canopy of the spruce trees. Moreover, throughfall and net throughfall of all ions in the spruce canopy decreased with increasing distance to the trunk. Dry deposition occurred mainly in the upper canopy and was highest during the growing season for H(+), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-) and highest during the dormant season for Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) (beech and spruce) and K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (spruce only). Canopy leaching of K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) was observed at all canopy levels and was higher for the beech tree compared to the spruce trees. Canopy uptake of inorganic nitrogen and H(+) occurred mainly in the upper canopy, although significant canopy uptake was found in the middle canopy as well. Canopy exchange was always higher during the growing season compared to the dormant season. This spatial and temporal variation indicates that biogeochemical deposition models would benefit from a multilayer approach for shade-tolerant tree species such as beech and spruce. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Shade Tree Selection and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wonde

    Abstract. There is a traditional practice of forest management in coffee producing communities in. Ethiopian moist Afromontane forests to increase coffee production. The practice involves removal of big canopy trees with excessive shade and selectively retaining specific tree species as preferred shade trees. This study was ...

  8. Diferencias en la flora herbácea y arbustiva entre claros y áreas bajo dosel en un bosque de Nothofagus pumilio en Argentina Differences in the herb and shrub flora growing under canopy gaps and under closed canopies in a Nothofagus pumilio forest of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ANGÉLICA DAMASCOS

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Se comparó la distribución de las hierbas y arbustos bajo el dosel y en dos tamaños de claros del bosque deciduo de Nothofagus pumilio de Argentina. La riqueza total y promedio de especies por cuadrado fueron similares bajo el dosel y en los claros pequeños (diámetro mayor The distribution of herbs and shrubs under closed canopies and in two canopy gaps of different size was compared in a Nothofagus pumilio deciduous forest of Argentina. The total and the average species richness per plot were similar between the areas under the canopy and in small (maximum diameter < 5 m and medium size gaps (maximum diameter 5-10 m. Generalist species were the most numerous (46 %, while obligate and facultatively shade-tolerant (heliophobous and intolerant (heliophilous species accounted for 19 and 15 % of the species, respectively. The absence of differences in species richness may be attributed to: (1 high frequency of generalist species (2 low effect of gap formation on shade-tolerant species distribution, (3 persistence of facultatively shade-tolerant species in small gaps, (4 gap invasion by obligate shade-intolerant species. The heterogeneity of light environment beneath the canopy and the effects on gap microclimate of edge trees and gap shrubs are possible causes of these patterns. Although with variations between the different biological groups, forest species are probably tolerant to the low level of disturbance generated by the natural forest dynamics

  9. Lack of Physiological Depth Patterns in Conspecifics of Endemic Antarctic Brown Algae: A Trade-Off between UV Stress Tolerance and Shade Adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Gómez

    Full Text Available A striking characteristic of endemic Antarctic brown algae is their broad vertical distribution. This feature is largely determined by the shade adaptation in order to cope with the seasonal variation in light availability. However, during spring-summer months, when light penetrates deep in the water column these organisms have to withstand high levels of solar radiation, including UV. In the present study we examine the light use characteristics in parallel to a potential for UV tolerance (measured as content of phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and maximum quantum yield of fluorescence in conspecific populations of four Antarctic brown algae (Ascoseira mirabilis, Desmarestia menziesii, D. anceps and Himantothallus grandifolius distributed over a depth gradient between 5 and 30 m. The main results indicated that a photosynthetic efficiency was uniform along the depth gradient in all the studied species, and b short-term (6 h exposure to UV radiation revealed a high tolerance measured as chlorophyll fluorescence, phlorotannin content and antioxidant capacity. Multivariate analysis of similarity indicated that light requirements for photosynthesis, soluble phlorotannins and antioxidant capacity are the variables determining the responses along the depth gradient in all the studied species. The suite of physiological responses of algae with a shallower distribution (A. mirabilis and D. menziesii differed from those with deeper vertical range (D. anceps and H. grandifolius. These patterns are consistent with the underwater light penetration that defines two zones: 0-15 m, with influence of UV radiation (1% of UV-B and UV-A at 9 m and 15 m respectively and a zone below 15 m marked by PAR incidence (1% up to 30 m. These results support the prediction that algae show a UV stress tolerance capacity along a broad depth range according to their marked shade adaptation. The high contents of phlorotannins and antioxidant potential appear to be

  10. Seedling root morphology and biomass allocation of 62 tropical tree species in relation to drought- and shade-tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markesteijn, L.; Poorter, L.

    2009-01-01

    Water availability is the main determinant of species' distribution in lowland tropical forests. Species' occurrence along water availability gradients depends on their ability to tolerate drought. To identify species' traits underlying drought-tolerance we excavated first year seedlings of 62 dry

  11. DESIGNING OF CONSTRUCTIVE SHADING DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Borukhava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows how to determine dimensions of stationary horizontal (canopies and vertical (ribs shading devices in order to prevent penetration of normal beam solar radiation into the buildings during warm season of the year. While analyzing formulae for insolation rate equations for determination of dimensions of canopies and ribs which are perpendicular and inclined to the plane of intensively irradiated fenestrations orientated to the South, South-East, South-West, East and West have been obtained in the paper. Sloping canopies have the smallest dimensions. What is more, an angle of slope with regard to opening plane must correspond to elevation of sun station at an hour when there is a maximum specific heat flow rate of normal beam solar radiation. The paper considers an influence of canopies and ribs on transmission of diffuse solar radiation which along with normal beam solar radiation serves for creation of natural illumination. As follows from the analysis of formulae it is possible to make a conclusion about an inefficiency of vertical shading elements due to large rib dimensions and decrease in transmission of diffuse solar radiation. Minimum distances from fenestration reveal to the canopy have been determined for various orientations proceeding from the position that the opening must be maximally illuminated by normal beam solar radiation during the cold season of a year in order to reduce heat inputs for building heating. On the basis of dependence analysis we have come to a conclusion that it is appropriate to design stationary shading devices for fenestrations orientated only to the South and they must be sloping canopies. It is necessary to select glazing with a small index of solar factor for openings orientated to other corners of the Earth and reduction of solar radiation heat inputs.

  12. Best of both worlds: simultaneous high-light and shade-tolerance adaptations within individual leaves of the living stone Lithops aucampiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie J Field

    Full Text Available "Living stones" (Lithops spp. display some of the most extreme morphological and physiological adaptations in the plant kingdom to tolerate the xeric environments in which they grow. The physiological mechanisms that optimise the photosynthetic processes of Lithops spp. while minimising transpirational water loss in both above- and below-ground tissues remain unclear. Our experiments have shown unique simultaneous high-light and shade-tolerant adaptations within individual leaves of Lithops aucampiae. Leaf windows on the upper surfaces of the plant allow sunlight to penetrate to photosynthetic tissues within while sunlight-blocking flavonoid accumulation limits incoming solar radiation and aids screening of harmful UV radiation. Increased concentration of chlorophyll a and greater chlorophyll a:b in above-ground regions of leaves enable maximum photosynthetic use of incoming light, while inverted conical epidermal cells, increased chlorophyll b, and reduced chlorophyll a:b ensure maximum absorption and use of low light levels within the below-ground region of the leaf. High NPQ capacity affords physiological flexibility under variable natural light conditions. Our findings demonstrate unprecedented physiological flexibility in a xerophyte and further our understanding of plant responses and adaptations to extreme environments.

  13. Acclimation of shade-tolerant and light-resistant Tradescantia species to growth light: chlorophyll a fluorescence, electron transport, and xanthophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanin, Vladimir I; Trubitsin, Boris V; Patsaeva, Svetlana V; Ptushenko, Vasily V; Solovchenko, Alexei E; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we have compared the photosynthetic characteristics of two contrasting species of Tradescantia plants, T. fluminensis (shade-tolerant species), and T. sillamontana (light-resistant species), grown under the low light (LL, 50-125 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) or high light (HL, 875-1000 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) conditions during their entire growth period. For monitoring the functional state of photosynthetic apparatus (PSA), we measured chlorophyll (Chl) a emission fluorescence spectra and kinetics of light-induced changes in the heights of fluorescence peaks at 685 and 740 nm (F 685 and F 740). We also compared the light-induced oxidation of P700 and assayed the composition of carotenoids in Tradescantia leaves grown under the LL and HL conditions. The analyses of slow induction of Chl a fluorescence (SIF) uncovered different traits in the LL- and HL-grown plants of ecologically contrasting Tradescantia species, which may have potential ecophysiological significance with respect to their tolerance to HL stress. The fluorometry and EPR studies of induction events in chloroplasts in situ demonstrated that acclimation of both Tradescantia species to HL conditions promoted faster responses of their PSA as compared to LL-grown plants. Acclimation of both species to HL also caused marked changes in the leaf anatomy and carotenoid composition (an increase in Violaxanthin + Antheraxantin + Zeaxanthin and Lutein pools), suggesting enhanced photoprotective capacity of the carotenoids in the plants grown in nature under high irradiance. Collectively, the results of the present work suggest that the mechanisms of long-term PSA photoprotection in Tradescantia are based predominantly on the light-induced remodeling of pigment-protein complexes in chloroplasts.

  14. Shade tree selection and management practices by farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a traditional practice of forest management in coffee producing communities in Ethiopian moist Afromontane forests to increase coffee production. The practice involves removal of big canopy trees with excessive shade and selectively retaining specific tree species as preferred shade trees. This study was initiated ...

  15. Removing forest canopy cover restores a reptile assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, David A; Webb, Jonathan K; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Humans are rapidly altering natural systems, leading to changes in the distribution and abundance of species. However, so many changes are occurring simultaneously (e.g., climate change, habitat fragmentation) that it is difficult to determine the cause of population fluctuations from correlational studies. We used a manipulative field experiment to determine whether forest canopy cover directly influences reptile assemblages on rock outcrops in southeastern Australia. Our experimental design consisted of three types of rock outcrops: (1) shady sites in which overgrown vegetation was manually removed (n = 25); (2) overgrown controls (n = 30); and (3) sun-exposed controls (n = 20). Following canopy removal, we monitored reptile responses over 30 months. Canopy removal increased reptile species richness, the proportion of shelter sites used by reptiles, and relative abundances of five species that prefer sun-exposed habitats. Our manipulation also decreased the abundances of two shade-tolerant species. Canopy cover thus directly influences this reptile assemblage, with the effects of canopy removal being dependent on each species' habitat preferences (i.e., selection or avoidance of sun-exposed habitat). Our study suggests that increases in canopy cover can cause declines of open-habitat specialists, as previously suggested by correlative studies from a wide range of taxa. Given that reptile colonization of manipulated outcrops occurred rapidly, artificially opening the canopy in ecologically informed ways could help to conserve imperiled species with patchy distributions and low vagility that are threatened by vegetation overgrowth. One such species is Australia's most endangered snake, the broadheaded snake (Hoplocephalus bungaroides).

  16. Responses of legumes and grasses to non-, moderate, and dense shade in Missouri, USA. I. Forage yield and its species-level plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejia Pang; J.W. Van Sambeek; Nadia E. Navarrete-Tindall; Chung-Ho Lin; Shibu Jose; H. E. Garrett

    2017-01-01

    Annual screenings of forage grasses and legumes for shade tolerance were conducted from 1996 to 2001 in the outdoor Shade Tolerance Screening Laboratory at the Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center, University of Missouri. Forty-three forages were grown under non-shade (100% of full sunlight), moderate shade (45%), and dense shade (20%) without competition for...

  17. Responses of legumes and grasses to non-, moderate, and dense shade in Missouri, USA. II. Forage quality and its species-level plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejia Pang; J.W. Van Sambeek; Nadia E. Navarrete-Tindall; Chung-Ho Lin; Shibu Jose; H. E. Garrett

    2017-01-01

    From a series of shade tolerance screening trials conducted in an outdoor Shade Tolerance Screening Laboratory, 22 forages (16 grasses and 6 legumes) were selected for quality evaluation. The forages were grown under non-shade (100% of full sun, the control), moderate shade (45%), and dense shade (20%) with adequate water and nutrients and free of competition from...

  18. Automatic Coregistration Algorithm to Remove Canopy Shaded Pixels in UAV-Borne Thermal Images to Improve the Estimation of Crop Water Stress Index of a Drip-Irrigated Cabernet Sauvignon Vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Tomas; Ortega-Farías, Samuel; Ryu, Dongryeol

    2018-01-30

    Water stress caused by water scarcity has a negative impact on the wine industry. Several strategies have been implemented for optimizing water application in vineyards. In this regard, midday stem water potential (SWP) and thermal infrared (TIR) imaging for crop water stress index (CWSI) have been used to assess plant water stress on a vine-by-vine basis without considering the spatial variability. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-borne TIR images are used to assess the canopy temperature variability within vineyards that can be related to the vine water status. Nevertheless, when aerial TIR images are captured over canopy, internal shadow canopy pixels cannot be detected, leading to mixed information that negatively impacts the relationship between CWSI and SWP. This study proposes a methodology for automatic coregistration of thermal and multispectral images (ranging between 490 and 900 nm) obtained from a UAV to remove shadow canopy pixels using a modified scale invariant feature transformation (SIFT) computer vision algorithm and Kmeans++ clustering. Our results indicate that our proposed methodology improves the relationship between CWSI and SWP when shadow canopy pixels are removed from a drip-irrigated Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard. In particular, the coefficient of determination (R²) increased from 0.64 to 0.77. In addition, values of the root mean square error (RMSE) and standard error (SE) decreased from 0.2 to 0.1 MPa and 0.24 to 0.16 MPa, respectively. Finally, this study shows that the negative effect of shadow canopy pixels was higher in those vines with water stress compared with well-watered vines.

  19. When growing tall is not an option : contrasting shade avoidance responses in two wild Geranium species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommers, C.M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37273023X

    2016-01-01

    Plants can deal with shade in different ways. Sun-adapted species express a set of growth traits to reach for light; the so-called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). However, shade-tolerant species from the forest understory are not able to outgrow surrounding trees and adopt a tolerance strategy

  20. Regulation of leaf traits in canopy gradients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pons, T.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069365822

    2016-01-01

    The gradient of leaf traits in a canopy from sunlit upper regions to shaded lower ones is regulated in response to the density of its leaf area. The gradients of environmental factors act as signals for the regulation. The result is improved resource use efficiency for carbon gain at the whole plant

  1. Mechanisms of drought-induced dissipation of excitation energy in sun- and shade-adapted drought-tolerant mosses studied by fluorescence yield change and global and target analysis of fluorescence decay kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hisanori; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Heber, Ulrich; Itoh, Shigeru

    2017-11-18

    Some mosses stay green and survive long even under desiccation. Dissipation mechanisms of excess excitation energy were studied in two drought-tolerant moss species adapted to contrasting niches: shade-adapted Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus and sun-adapted Rhytidium rugosum in the same family. (1) Under wet conditions, a light-induced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) mechanism decreased the yield of photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence in both species. The NPQ extent saturated at a lower illumination intensity in R. squarrosus, suggesting a larger PSII antenna size. (2) Desiccation reduced the fluorescence intensities giving significantly lower F 0 levels and shortened the overall fluorescence lifetimes in both R. squarrosus and R. rugosum, at room temperature. (3) At 77 K, desiccation strongly reduced the PSII fluorescence intensity. This reduction was smaller in R. squarrosus than in R. rugosum. (4) Global and target analysis indicated two different mechanisms of energy dissipation in PSII under desiccation: the energy dissipation to a desiccation-formed strong fluorescence quencher in the PSII core in sun-adapted R. rugosum (type-A quenching) and (5) the moderate energy dissipation in the light-harvesting complex/PSII in shade-adapted R. squarrosus (type-B quenching). The two mechanisms are consistent with the different ecological niches of the two mosses.

  2. Effects of shading on morphology, physiology and grain yield of winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Huawei; Jiang, Dong; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    the shading treatments applied, leaf area index, length of the peduncle internode, area of the upper leaves and content of pigments increased, which favoured efficient light capture. Shading modified light quality in the canopy as indicated by increases of diffuse- and blue light fractions and a reduction...

  3. Fossil Leaves and Fossil Leaf n-Alkanes: Reconstructing the First Closed Canopied Rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    characteristics associated with canopy effect. A biomass flux-weighted model of alkane chain-length distribution and δ13Cleaf indicate n-alkanes extracted from bulk rock are consistent with inputs integrated over time from plants represented by fossil leaves. In a modern rainforest, we found leaf lipid amounts markedly higher in the shaded and moist understory, consistent with studies that show alkanes proffer fungal protection. Shade tolerance is associated with higher plant orders and, consistent with this, literature data for modern plants from 30 plant orders shows alkane production in asterids and rosids is 2 to 3 times greater than in basal angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lower clades tend to contain greater amounts of terpenoids and novel benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, rather than alkanes. For our three fossil floras, alkane abundance is strongly influenced by depositional setting, with preservation best in the lacustrine setting. Within each site, abundance patterns are potentially influenced by both taxonomic affiliation and by canopy structure as measured by δ13Cleaf values, and such relationships shed light on the combined influences of plant evolution, canopy structure and the function of biochemical resources on the geochemical record of the first rainforests.

  4. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...... the current models of restraint and benevolence, other ways of understanding the politics of democratic pluralism might be developed, which will enable us to conceive of tolerance's future in terms different than those currently on offer. Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics develops...

  5. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... these alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech....

  6. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... these alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech.......Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...

  7. Bird communities in sun and shade coffee farms in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Smith

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural expansion to meet rising crop demand is one of the greatest threats to terrestrial biodiversity. Coffee, one of the most valuable trade items in tropical countries, can provide both economic livelihood and wildlife habitat. Previous work, conducted primarily on Neotropical coffee farms, indicates that birds are generally more abundant and diverse in farms with a canopy of shade trees, though regional variation exists. To date, few studies have examined birds on coffee farms in Africa, which contains 20% of the world’s coffee acreage. We studied differences in the bird communities between sun and shade monoculture coffee in central Kenya, and we examined effects of vegetation on bird abundance and diversity. Sun coffee had higher species richness and abundances of all major guilds (omnivores, insectivores, and granivores, and showed low community similarity to shade. Unlike findings from the Neotropics, canopy cover appeared to have a negative influence on all guilds, while understory volume of weeds increased bird abundance and species richness with a similar magnitude as canopy cover. These differences highlight the need for further studies in the general East Africa region with a wider variety of shade coffee systems.

  8. SHADE3 server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Østergaard; Hoser, Anna Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    A major update of the SHADE server (http://shade.ki.ku.dk) is presented. In addition to all of the previous options for estimating H-atom anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) that were offered by SHADE2, the newest version offers two new methods. The first method combines the original...... translation-libration-screw analysis with input from periodic ab initio calculations. The second method allows the user to input experimental information from spectroscopic measurements or from neutron diffraction experiments on related structures and utilize this information to evaluate ADPs of H atoms...

  9. Lightness, chroma and hue differences on visual shade matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecho, Oscar E; Pérez, María M; Ghinea, Razvan; Della Bona, Alvaro

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the influence of lightness, chroma and hue differences on visual shade matching performed by dental students. 100 dental students (DS) volunteers with normal vision participated in the study. A spectroradiometer (SP) was used to measure the spectral reflectance of 4 extracted human upper central incisors (UCI 1-4) and shade tabs from Vita Classical (VC) and Vita Toothguide 3D-Master (3D) shade guides. Measurements were performed over a gray background, inside a viewing booth and under D65 illuminant (diffuse/0° geometry). Color parameters (L*, a*, b*, C* and h°) were calculated. DS used VC and 3D to visually select the best shade match for each UCI. CIE metric differences (Δa*,Δb*,ΔL', ΔC' and ΔH') and CIEDE2000(2:1:1) lightness (ΔEL), chroma (ΔEC) and hue (ΔEH) differences were obtained from each UCI and the first three shades selected by DS and the first option using CIELAB, CIEDE2000(1:1:1) and CIEDE2000(2:1:1) color difference metrics. The closest CIELAB color-discrimination ellipsoid (from RIT-DuPont visual color-difference data) to each UCI was selected for the analysis of visual shade matching. DS showed a preference for shades with lower chroma (ΔC' and ΔEC) and/or hue (ΔH' and ΔEH) values instead of shades with lower lightness values (ΔL' and ΔEL). Most best visual matches were near the tolerance ellipsoid centered on tooth shade. This study is an attempt to partially explain the inconsistencies between visual and instrumental shade matching and the limitations of shade guides. Visual shade matching was driven by color differences with lower chroma and hue values. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Shade selection in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    H. Benaz

    1996-01-01

    Identifying the shades is difficult and needs not only the science but also the art. In order to match and coordinate the shades, distinguishing them is essential. As well as hue, chroma and value, Maverick stains are also considered. Various factors effect color perception such as the difference between the eyes' vision, age, drugs and psychology of the colors. Surface texture is considerably important in adjusting teeth color. Color is the light reflected from teeth struct...

  11. Modelling Amazonian forest eddy covariance data: a comparison of big leaf versus sun/shade models for the C-14 tower at Manaus I. Canopy photosynthesis Modelagem de dados de covariância de fluxo turbulento na floresta amazônica: uma comparação entre os modelos "folha-grande" e "sol/sombra" para a torre C-14 em Manaus. I. Fotossíntese do dossel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Mercado

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we concentrate on modelling gross primary productivity using two simple approaches to simulate canopy photosynthesis: "big leaf" and "sun/shade" models. Two approaches for calibration are used: scaling up of canopy photosynthetic parameters from the leaf to the canopy level and fitting canopy biochemistry to eddy covariance fluxes. Validation of the models is achieved by using eddy covariance data from the LBA site C14. Comparing the performance of both models we conclude that numerically (in terms of goodness of fit and qualitatively, (in terms of residual response to different environmental variables sun/shade does a better job. Compared to the sun/shade model, the big leaf model shows a lower goodness of fit and fails to respond to variations in the diffuse fraction, also having skewed responses to temperature and VPD. The separate treatment of sun and shade leaves in combination with the separation of the incoming light into direct beam and diffuse make sun/shade a strong modelling tool that catches more of the observed variability in canopy fluxes as measured by eddy covariance. In conclusion, the sun/shade approach is a relatively simple and effective tool for modelling photosynthetic carbon uptake that could be easily included in many terrestrial carbon models.Neste trabalho foi modelada a produtividade primária bruta através de duas técnicas simples para simular a fotossíntese no dossel: os modelos "folha-grande" e "sol/sombra". Para calibrar os modelos foram utilizados os parâmetros de fotossíntese da folha, estendidos à escala do dossel e um ajuste da bioquímica do dossel em relação à covariância de vórtices turbulentos. Os modelos foram validados com as medidas feitas através da técnica de covariância de vórtices turbulentos da estação C14 do projeto LBA. Ao comparar o desempenho de ambos os modelos, conclui-se que o modelo "sol/sombra" apresenta melhores resultados numericamente (do ponto de vista da

  12. Intrarater repeatability of shade selections with two shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ihab A

    2003-01-01

    Color research has shown that shade guides do not always represent the color of natural teeth. Moreover, visual evaluation has been found to be unreliable and inconsistent. This investigation evaluated the effects of 2 shade guides on the intrarater repeatability (reliability) of prosthodontists and general practitioners with regard to shade selection. Ten prosthodontists and ten general practitioners (all men, 35-45 years old) with an average practice experience of 14 years participated in this study. Examiners were tested to eliminate color blindness. Each clinician used Vita Lumin Vacuum and Vitapan 3D-Master shade guides to determine the shades of the maxillary right canines of 20 patients following a standard protocol. The identification codes of the shade tabs were masked to prevent shade memory. All teeth were polished before each shade selection, and the selection process was standardized for controlled lighting and procedures. Shade selections were randomly repeated 1 month later by the same practitioners on the same group of patients in accordance with the same shade-selection protocol. Analysis of variance and t tests for individual comparisons among means were performed (P3D-Master shade guide significantly improved the intrarater repeatability of general practitioners compared with the Vita Lumin Vacuum shade guide (P3D-Master shade guide notably improved intrarater repeatability among the general practitioners.

  13. Shading of ceramic crowns using digital tooth shade matching devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, A; Kaufmann-Jinoian, V

    2005-04-01

    In the 1990s, there was great optimism due to the development of devices for measuring tooth shade. The frequently not so simple, visual determination of the shade of a tooth was to be done with the aid of a device which recognizes the shade and describes it accurately by reference to a color chart. However, the skepticism towards such devices was also great. It is known that the color effect frequently differs strongly when comparing a tooth from the shade guide with a metal ceramic crown, despite identical shade designation. Anyone who considers visual shade determination to be inadequate and places his hopes in digital shade matching devices will be disappointed. It is the shade-generating structures of the metal ceramic and frequently of the veneer layers that turn out to be too thin which, despite correct shade selection, cause a different color perception. Such problems have been reduced decisively with the development of fracture-proof hard porcelain caps (Vita In-Ceram) with optical characteristics similar to teeth. In addition, the Vita System 3D-Master tooth shade system developed in 1998 by Vita in cooperation with Dr. Hall from Australia, leads the practitioner to a better understanding of the primary tooth shade characteristics of "brightness (value)", "color intensity (chroma)" and "color (wave length of the visible light, hue)". These two innovations allow a more accurate estimate of the basic shade of a natural tooth (reference tooth) and the imitation in the laboratory of its natural, shade-generating structures. If digital shade measurement supplements the visual shade estimate, then a further improvement can be expected--especially in the recognition of the basic shade. Qualitative descriptions of subjective shade measurement of a natural tooth and of its imitation in the dental laboratory by ceramics can be found frequently in professional journals and publications. With digital tooth shade matching devices, which apart from the color code of

  14. Solar shading how to integrate solar shading in sustainable buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Dolmans, Dick; Dutoo, Gonzague; Hall, Anders; Seppänen, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Solar Shading Guidebook gives a solid background on the physics of solar radiation and its behaviour in window with solar shading systems. Major focus of the Guidebook is on the effect of solar shading in the use of energy for cooling, heating and lighting. The book gives also practical guidance for selection, installation and operation of solar shading as well as future trends in integration of HVAC-systems with solar control.

  15. Physiological mechanism of population differentiation in shade-avoidance responses between woodland and clearing genotypes of Impatiens capensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wettberg, Eric J; Schmitt, Johanna

    2005-05-01

    Forest understory plants often respond less intensely to reduced ratios of red to far red (R : FR) light, an important signal of foliage shade, than conspecific or congeneric plants from open-canopy sites. Reduced responsiveness to low R : FR in plants from closed-canopy sites could be caused by two physiological mechanisms. First, closed-canopy plants could have less sensitive shade-avoidance responses to low R : FR. Second, the high irradiance response to FR (FR-HIR), which allows seedling de-etiolation under low R : FR, might be stronger or persist longer after de-etiolation in closed-canopy plants, thus counteracting shade-avoidance responses to low R : FR. These hypotheses were tested using diodes that emit red and far-red light to distinguish the responses to altered R : FR of genotypes of Impatiens capensis collected from a pair of open- and closed-canopy populations that have previously been shown to differ in sensitivity to R : FR. Genotypes from the open-canopy environment exhibited typical shade-avoidance responses, elongating in response to supplemental FR. However, genotypes from the closed-canopy environment responded to supplemental FR by elongating less than under ambient control conditions, indicating a persistent FR-HIR. Thus, the observed population differentiation in response to low R : FR may be linked to population differences in FR-HIR.

  16. Modeling Tree Shade Effect on Urban Ground Surface Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Marco; Massetti, Luciano; Brandani, Giada; Petralli, Martina; Orlandini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the role that urban forests can play as urban microclimate modifiers. Tree shade and evapotranspiration affect energy fluxes and mitigate microclimate conditions, with beneficial effects on human health and outdoor comfort. The aim of this study was to investigate surface temperature () variability under the shade of different tree species and to test the capability in predicting of a proposed heat transfer model. Surface temperature data on asphalt and grass under different shading conditions were collected in the Cascine park, Florence, Italy, and were used to test the performance of a one-dimensional heat transfer model integrated with a routine for estimating the effect of plant canopies on surface heat transfer. Shading effects of 10 tree species commonly used in Italian urban settings were determined by considering the infrared radiation and the tree canopy leaf area index (LAI). The results indicate that, on asphalt, was negatively related to the LAI of trees ( reduction ranging from 13.8 to 22.8°C). On grass, this relationship was weaker probably because of the combined effect of shade and grass evapotranspiration on ( reduction ranged from 6.9 to 9.4°C). A sensitivity analysis confirmed that other factors linked to soil water content play an important role in reduction of grassed areas. Our findings suggest that the energy balance model can be effectively used to estimate of the urban pavement under different shading conditions and can be applied to the analysis of microclimate conditions of urban green spaces. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Effects of light, temperature and canopy position on net photosynthesis and isoprene emission from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Zimmerman, P.

    1996-01-01

    In June 1993, net photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance and isoprene emission rates of sweetgum leaves (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) were measured at the top of the forest canopy (sun leaves) and within the canopy at a height of 8-10 m above ground level (shade leaves). Large differences in net photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance were found between sun and shade leaves. Mean rates of isoprene emission, expressed on a leaf area basis, were significantly lower in shade leaves than in sun leaves (4.1 versus 17.1 nmol m(-2) s(-1)); however, because specific leaf area of sun leaves was lower than that of shade leaves (0.0121 versus 0.0334 m(2) g(-1)), the difference between sun and shade leaves was less, though still significant, when isoprene emissions were expressed on a dry mass basis (45.5 versus 29.0 micro g C g(-1) h(-1)). Saturation of both net photosynthesis and isoprene emission occurred at lower PPFDs in shade leaves than in sun leaves. The effect of leaf temperature on isoprene emissions also differed between sun and shade leaves. Sun leaves lost a significantly greater percentage of fixed carbon as isoprene than shade leaves. The leaf-level physiological measurements were used to derive parameters for a canopy-level isoprene flux model. The importance of incorporating differences between sun- and shade-leaf properties into existing models is discussed.

  18. Regeneration of Rhizophora mangle in a Caribbean mangrove forest: interacting effects of canopy disturbance and a stem-boring beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Wayne P; Quek, Swee P; Mitchell, Betsy J

    2003-11-01

    Current theory predicts that in low-density, seed-limited plant populations, seed predation will be more important than competition in determining the number of individuals that reach maturity. However, when plant density is high, competition for microsites suitable for establishment and growth is expected to have a relatively greater effect. This dichotomous perspective does not account for situations in which the risk of seed predation differs inside versus outside recruitment microsites. We report the results of a field experiment and sampling studies that demonstrate such an interaction between microsite quality and the risk of propagule predation in mangrove forests on the Caribbean coast of Panama, where it appears to play a key role in shaping the demography and dynamics of the mangrove, Rhizophora mangle. Rhizophora's water-borne propagules establish wherever they strand, but long-term sampling revealed that only those that do so in or near lightning-created canopy gaps survive and grow to maturity. These microsites afford better growth conditions than the surrounding understory and, as importantly, provide a refuge from predation by the scolytid beetle, Coccotrypes rhizophorae. This refuge effect was confirmed with a field experiment in which Rhizophora seedlings were planted at different positions relative to gap edges, from 5 m inside to 20 m outside the gap. Mortality due to beetle attack increased linearly from an average of 10% inside a gap to 72% at 20 m into the forest. The interaction between canopy disturbance and propagule predation may be having a large impact on the composition of our study forests. Being shade-tolerant, Rhizophora seedlings that escape or survive beetle attack can persist in the understory for years. However, the high rate of beetle-induced mortality effectively eliminates the contribution of advance regeneration by Rhizophora saplings to gap succession. This may explain why the shade-intolerant mangrove, Laguncularia racemosa

  19. A comparison of models to estimate in-canopy photosynthetically active radiation and their influence on canopy stomatal resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiming Zhang [Rumble Research, Ontario (Canada); Moran, M.D.; Brook, J. R. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The models for photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) used in a multi-layer canopy stomatal resistance (CSR) model developed by Baldocchi et al. (Atmospheric Environment 21 (1987) 91-101) and in a two-big-leaf CSR model developed by Hicks et al. (Water, Air and Soil Pollution 36 (1987) 311) are investigated in this study. The PAR received by shaded leaves in Baldocchi et al. (1987) is found to be larger than that predicted by a canopy radiative-transfer model developed by Norman (in: Barfield, Gerber, (Eds.), Modification of the Aerial Environment of Crops. ASAE Monograph No. 2. American Society for Agricultural. Engineering, St. Joseph, MI, 1979, p. 249) by as much as 50% even though the Baldocchi et al. (1987) model is indirectly based on Norman's model. This larger value of PAR results in turn in a smaller CSR by as much as 30% for canopies with larger leaf area indexes. A new formula to predict vertical profiles for PAR received by shaded leaves inside a canopy is suggested in the present study based on Norman (1979) and agrees well with the original model of Norman (1979). The simple treatment used in Hicks et al. (1987) for canopy-average PAR received by shaded leaves is found to diverge for canopies with leaf area indexes not close to two A new empirical formula for canopy-average PAR is then suggested for use in a two-big-leaf model, and it is shown that under most conditions the modified two-big-leaf CSR model can predict reasonable values when compared with the more complex multi-layer CSR model. Both the modified multi-layer CSR model and the modified two-big-leaf CSR model are also shown to predict reasonable dry deposition velocities for 03 when compared to several sets of measurements. (author)

  20. Cacao Cultivation under Diverse Shade Tree Cover Allows High Carbon Storage and Sequestration without Yield Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Rajab, Yasmin; Leuschner, Christoph; Barus, Henry; Tjoa, Aiyen; Hertel, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    One of the main drivers of tropical forest loss is their conversion to oil palm, soy or cacao plantations with low biodiversity and greatly reduced carbon storage. Southeast Asian cacao plantations are often established under shade tree cover, but are later converted to non-shaded monocultures to avoid resource competition. We compared three co-occurring cacao cultivation systems (3 replicate stands each) with different shade intensity (non-shaded monoculture, cacao with the legume Gliricidia sepium shade trees, and cacao with several shade tree species) in Sulawesi (Indonesia) with respect to above- and belowground biomass and productivity, and cacao bean yield. Total biomass C stocks (above- and belowground) increased fivefold from the monoculture to the multi-shade tree system (from 11 to 57 Mg ha-1), total net primary production rose twofold (from 9 to 18 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). This increase was associated with a 6fold increase in aboveground biomass, but only a 3.5fold increase in root biomass, indicating a clear shift in C allocation to aboveground tree organs with increasing shade for both cacao and shade trees. Despite a canopy cover increase from 50 to 93%, cacao bean yield remained invariant across the systems (variation: 1.1-1.2 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). The monocultures had a twice as rapid leaf turnover suggesting that shading reduces the exposure of cacao to atmospheric drought, probably resulting in greater leaf longevity. Thus, contrary to general belief, cacao bean yield does not necessarily decrease under shading which seems to reduce physical stress. If planned properly, cacao plantations under a shade tree cover allow combining high yield with benefits for carbon sequestration and storage, production system stability under stress, and higher levels of animal and plant diversity.

  1. Growth and morphogenesis of sun and shade plants I. The influence of light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corre, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    A number of herbacious sun and shade plants were grown at different light levels to investigate their adaptations in morphology and growth to light intensity. All species examined respond to low light intensity strongly, but very much the same. It is concluded that shade tolerance is not based on

  2. Shading and root-shoot relations in saplings of silver birch, pedunculate oak and beech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, van A.F.M.; Clerkx, A.P.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) can regenerate successfully under a canopy of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Shading reduces plant growth and modifies plant form, two related aspects. This study focuses on the effects of

  3. Electromagnetic wave extinction within a forested canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    A forested canopy is modeled by a collection of randomly oriented finite-length cylinders shaded by randomly oriented and distributed disk- or needle-shaped leaves. For a plane wave exciting the forested canopy, the extinction coefficient is formulated in terms of the extinction cross sections (ECSs) in the local frame of each forest component and the Eulerian angles of orientation (used to describe the orientation of each component). The ECSs in the local frame for the finite-length cylinders used to model the branches are obtained by using the forward-scattering theorem. ECSs in the local frame for the disk- and needle-shaped leaves are obtained by the summation of the absorption and scattering cross-sections. The behavior of the extinction coefficients with the incidence angle is investigated numerically for both deciduous and coniferous forest. The dependencies of the extinction coefficients on the orientation of the leaves are illustrated numerically.

  4. Shades of green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinschmit, Daniela; Lindstad, Berit Hauger; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2014-01-01

    Politics increasingly introduces initiatives supporting a shift toward a bioeconomy aiming at a society relying strongly on renewable biological sources while achieving economic growth efficiently and sustainably. However, the agenda of bioeconomy comprises different “shades of green,” in the sense......, and identify a core set of potential contributions from social sciences for enhancing the bioeconomy in the forest sector. The paper focuses on studies within policy analysis, economics, and business administration disciplines. Thus it presents diverse disciplinary perspectives on the forest sector...

  5. Tree diversity and canopy cover in cocoa systems in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asare, Richard; Ræbild, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growing systems in Ghana and West Africa consist of diverse tree species and densities.This study was conducted to determine factors that influence tree species configurations and how tree characteristics affect canopy cover in cocoa farms. Eighty-six farmers...... and corresponding farms were selected in a systematic approach in four districts across two agro-ecological zones in Ghana. Results show that men tend to have larger farm sizes, higher tree density and diversity than women. Tree density and canopy cover of shade trees were low on large farms, but diversity...... increased with increasing farm sizes. Even though there was a significant correlation between diameter at breast height and crown area for all species investigated, tree species differed considerably in their crown area and thus the amount of ground cover provided. Current recommendations for shade...

  6. PowerShades. Transparent photovoltaics and solar shading. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezzel, E. (PhotoSolar ApS, Taastrup (Denmark)); Univ. of Neuchatel, Institute of Microtechnology, Neuchatel (CH)); Savcor Denmark A/S, Ballerup (Denmark)); Chem-Tec Plating A/S, Uldum (Denmark)); Danish Technological Institute (DTI), Taastrup (Denmark))

    2008-06-15

    This report marks the end of the PSO funded R and D project PowerShades. The objective of the project has been to establish knowledge about the manufacturing of PowerShade transparent photovoltaics and to demonstrate the viability of PowerShade, both as a product and when considered a building element. It has not been the objective to demonstrate a full-scale manufacturing of PowerShade, but to establish the knowledge that enables industrial manufacturing. The overall objective of the project has been achieved, and the large majority of the milestones defined have been met to full extent. It has been shown that PowerShade photovoltaic cells with an electrical efficiency of 5% can be reached, and it is expected that future work will lead to even better efficiency. Also, it has been demonstrated by full size side by side comparison that PowerShade transparent photovoltaics may replace exterior solar shading devices without compromise to the thermal properties of the building. The project has identified a number of work areas that must be addressed before an industrial manufacturing can be established. The efficiency of the photovoltaic generator must be increased and the stability of the entire product documented. Also, some of the identified processing steps must be scaled in capacity before manufacturing can be considered. (author)

  7. Canopy Chemistry (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Canopy characteristics: leaf chemistry, specific leaf area, LAI, PAR, IPAR, NPP, standing biomass--see also: Meteorology (OTTER) for associated meteorological...

  8. Electron transport efficiency at opposite leaf sides: effect of vertical distribution of leaf angle, structure, chlorophyll content and species in a forest canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mänd, Pille; Hallik, Lea; Peñuelas, Josep; Kull, Olevi

    2013-02-01

    We investigated changes in chlorophyll a fluorescence from alternate leaf surfaces to assess the intraleaf light acclimation patterns in combination with natural variations in radiation, leaf angles, leaf mass per area (LMA), chlorophyll content (Chl) and leaf optical parameters. Measurements were conducted on bottom- and top-layer leaves of Tilia cordata Mill. (a shade-tolerant sub-canopy species, sampled at heights of 11 and 16 m) and Populus tremula L. (a light-demanding upper canopy species, sampled at canopy heights of 19 and 26 m). The upper canopy species P. tremula had a six times higher PSII quantum yield (Φ(II)) and ratio of open reaction centres (qP), and a two times higher LMA than T. cordata. These species-specific differences were also present when the leaves of both species were in similar light conditions. Leaf adaxial/abaxial fluorescence ratio was significantly larger in the case of more horizontal leaves. Populus tremula (more vertical leaves), had smaller differences in fluorescence parameters between alternate leaf sides compared with T. cordata (more horizontal leaves). However, optical properties on alternate leaf sides showed a larger difference for P. tremula. Intraspecifically, the measured optical parameters were better correlated with LMA than with leaf Chl. Species-specific differences in leaf anatomy appear to enhance the photosynthetic potential of leaf biochemistry by decreasing the interception of excess light in P. tremula and increasing the light absorptance in T. cordata. Our results indicate that intraleaf light absorption gradient, described here as leaf adaxial/abaxial side ratio of chlorophyll a fluorescence, varies significantly with changes in leaf light environment in a multi-layer multi-species tree canopy. However, this variation cannot be described merely as a simple function of radiation, leaf angle, Chl or LMA, and species-specific differences in light acclimation strategies should also be considered.

  9. Shading decreases the abundance of the herbivorous California horn snail, Cerithidea californica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda, Julio; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the intertidal zone in estuaries of California, USA and Baja California, Mexico is covered with vascular vegetation. Shading by these vascular plants influences abiotic and biotic processes that shape benthic community assemblages. We present data on the effects of shading on the California horn snail, Cerithidea californica. This species is important because it is the most common benthic macrofaunal species in these systems and acts as an obligate intermediate host of several species of rematode parasites that infect several other species. Using observational and experimental studies, we found a negative effect of shade on the distribution and abundance of the California horn snail. We hypothesized that shading reduces the abundance of the epipelic diatoms that the snails feeds on, causing snails to leave haded areas. We observed a negative relationship between vascular plant cover, sub-canopy light levels, and snail density in Mugu Lagoon. Then we experimentally manipulated light regimes, by clipping vegetation and adding shade structures, and found higher snail densities at higher light levels. In Goleta Slough, we isolated the effect of shade from vegetation by documenting a negative relationship between the shade created by two bridges and diatom and snail densities. We also found that snails moved the greatest distances over shaded channel banks compared to unshaded channel banks. Further, we documented the effect of water depth and channel bank orientation on shading in this system. An additional effect of shading is the reduction of temperature, providing an alternative explanation for some of our results. These results broaden our knowledge of how variation in the light environment influences the ecology of estuarine ecosystems.

  10. Shade Tree Diversity, Cocoa Pest Damage, Yield Compensating Inputs and Farmers' Net Returns in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghela Bisseleua, Hervé Bertin; Fotio, Daniel; Yede; Missoup, Alain Didier; Vidal, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cocoa agroforests can significantly support biodiversity, yet intensification of farming practices is degrading agroforestry habitats and compromising ecosystem services such as biological pest control. Effective conservation strategies depend on the type of relationship between agricultural matrix, biodiversity and ecosystem services, but to date the shape of this relationship is unknown. We linked shade index calculated from eight vegetation variables, with insect pests and beneficial insects (ants, wasps and spiders) in 20 cocoa agroforests differing in woody and herbaceous vegetation diversity. We measured herbivory and predatory rates, and quantified resulting increases in cocoa yield and net returns. We found that number of spider webs and wasp nests significantly decreased with increasing density of exotic shade tree species. Greater species richness of native shade tree species was associated with a higher number of wasp nests and spider webs while species richness of understory plants did not have a strong impact on these beneficial species. Species richness of ants, wasp nests and spider webs peaked at higher levels of plant species richness. The number of herbivore species (mirid bugs and cocoa pod borers) and the rate of herbivory on cocoa pods decreased with increasing shade index. Shade index was negatively related to yield, with yield significantly higher at shade and herb coverscocoa farms do not necessarily result in a higher net return. In conclusion, our study shows the importance of a diverse shade canopy in reducing damage caused by cocoa pests. It also highlights the importance of conservation initiatives in tropical agroforestry landscapes. PMID:23520451

  11. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Is a Better Proxy for Sunlit Leaf Than Total Canopy Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, F.; Mo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) results from non-photochemical quenching during plant photosynthesis under excessive radiation. We explore the relationship between gross primary productivity (GPP) and CF using a process ecosystem model, which separates a vegetation canopy into sunlit and shaded leaf groups and simulates the total canopy GPP as the sum of sunlit and shaded leaf GPP. Using GOME-2 and GOSAT data acquired in 2010 over the global land surface, we found that measured CF signals gridded in 1 degree resolution are well correlated with simulated total GPP and its sunlit and shaded components, but the correlation coefficients (R) are largest for the sunlit GPP and smallest for shaded GPP. The seasonal R2 values vary from 0.57 to 0.74, 0.58 to 0.71, and 0.48 to 0.56 for sunlit, total and shaded GPP, respectively. The significance levels for these correlations are all greater than pleaves. The significant correlation between measured canopy-level CF and the shaded GPP is likely due to the correlation between shaded and sunlit GPP as both increase with leaf area index. Our simulation confirms the validity of using canopy-level CF measurements to assess the total GPP as the first approximation, although these measurements are a consistently better indicator of sunlit GPP than total GPP. In previous studies, the R2 values for the correlation between CF and total GPP were found to range from 0.76 to 0.88, 0.56 to 0.78, and 0.57 to 0.77 for MPI-BGC, MODIS and CASA model results, respectively. These values are similar or larger than those for sunlit GPP simulated in our study, but are considerably larger than those for total GPP in our study because the correlation for total GPP is contaminated by the inclusion of shaded GPP. All these three models use canopy total light use efficiency without considering the differences between sunlit and shaded leaves, and therefore they mostly capture spatio-temporal variations in sunlit GPP. We therefore argue that solar

  12. The canopy camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry E. Brown

    1962-01-01

    The canopy camera is a device of new design that takes wide-angle, overhead photographs of vegetation canopies, cloud cover, topographic horizons, and similar subjects. Since the entire hemisphere is photographed in a single exposure, the resulting photograph is circular, with the horizon forming the perimeter and the zenith the center. Photographs of this type provide...

  13. Photosynthetic responses to understory shade and elevated carbon dioxide concentration in four northern hardwood tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcik, Lesley T; Zak, Donald R; Ellsworth, David S

    2006-12-01

    Seedling responses to elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) and solar irradiance were measured over two growing seasons in shade-tolerant Acer saccharum Marsh. and Fagus grandifolia J.F. Ehrh. and shade-intolerant Prunus serotina, a J.F. Ehrh. and Betula papyrifera Marsh. Seedlings were exposed to a factorial combination of [CO2] (ambient and elevated (658 micromol mol-1)) and understory shade (deep and moderate) in open-top chambers placed in a forest understory. The elevated [CO(2)] treatment increased mean light-saturated net photosynthetic rate by 63% in the shade-tolerant species and 67% in the shade-intolerant species. However, when measured at the elevated [CO(2)], long-term enhancement of photosynthesis was 10% lower than the instantaneous enhancement seen in ambient-[CO(2)]-grown plants (P < 0.021). Overall, growth light environment affected long-term photosynthetic enhancement by elevated [CO(2)]: as the growth irradiance increased, proportional enhancement due to elevated [CO(2)] decreased from 97% for plants grown in deep shade to 47% for plants grown in moderate shade. Results suggest that in N-limited northern temperate forests, trees grown in deep shade may display greater photosynthetic gains from a CO(2)-enriched atmosphere than trees growing in more moderate shade, because of greater downregulation in the latter environment. If photosynthetic gains by deep-shade-grown plants in response to elevated [CO(2)] translate into improved growth and survival of shade-intolerant species, it could alter the future composition and dynamics of successional forest communities.

  14. Technology reviews: Shading systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  15. Shading, a view from inside

    OpenAIRE

    Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Pont, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Shape from shading arose from artistic practice, and later experimental psychology, but its formal structure has only been established recently by computer vision. Some of its algorithms have led to useful applications. Psychology has reversely borrowed these formalisms in attempts to come to grips with shading as a depth cue. Results have been less than spectacular. The reason might well be that these formalisms are all based on Euclidean geometry and physics (radiometry), which, are the rig...

  16. Interactions between canopy cover density and regeneration cores of older saplings in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchi, M.; Nocentini, S.; Ducci, F.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: This paper provides an analysis of growth and survival of twenty–year–old Scots pine saplings in relation to canopy cover density (CCD) gradients, from dense (D–CCD), sparse (S–CCD), and gap (G–CCD) situations. Area of study: Aladag (Bolu) in northern Turkey. Material and methods: Sparse canopy cover density (S–CCD), dense canopy cover density (D–CCD) and gap canopy (G–CCD) were chosen within ten different strip sample plots (10 × 50 m) with sapling regeneration cores. Those regeneration cores were divided into two portions (individuals at the edge and middle of the regeneration cores) and from each portion three individuals was were obtained from a sample. The growth relationships of individual saplings were calculated with stem analyses. Honowski Light Factor (HLF) (ratio of Terminal sprout length (T) to Lateral sprout length (L)) was used to present growth potential measure of seedlings. Main results: The largest sapling regeneration cores were found in the G–CCD followed by S–CCD, and finally D–CCD, all tested for significance with Kruskal–Wallis Test. Compared with saplings in the middle of regeneration cores (crop saplings), those at the edge were always reduced in terms of mean height. Significant difference was only found between the ‘Main Crop’ and the ‘Edge 1’ of the regeneration cores for G–CCD suggesting that sapling regeneration cores are more typical under G–CCD conditions. HLF ratios were greater than 1 with high growth potentials for both CCD gradients (G–CCD and S–CCD) and there were no significant variations between G–CCD and S–CCD for main crop and edges. The thinning after 12–14 years increased sapling growth. However, under D–CCD, growth had virtually ceased. Research highlights: Naturally occurring Scots pine saplings are suppressed by a dense canopy. However, they are tolerant of shade to the extent that they can survive over relatively long time–periods (10–12 years) and

  17. Regeneration in bottomland forest canopy gaps 6 years after variable retention harvests to enhance wildlife habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Twedt; Scott G. Somershoe

    2013-01-01

    To promote desired forest conditions that enhance wildlife habitat in bottomland forests, managers prescribed and implemented variable-retention harvest, a.k.a. wildlife forestry, in four stands on Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge, LA. These treatments created canopy openings (gaps) within which managers sought to regenerate shade-intolerant trees. Six years after...

  18. Plant acclimation to the light gradient in canopies; functional significance and regulation by cytokinin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Plants growing in dense leaf canopies are exposed to a vertical light gradient due to mutual shading of the leaves. Theoretical models have predicted an optimal leaf area index (LAI) and leaf nitrogen distribution at which whole-plant daily carbon gain is maximized. In this thesis, these model

  19. The effects of mechanical stress and spectral shading on the growth and allocation of ten genotypes of a stoloniferous plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yun; Schieving, F.; Stuefer, J.F.; Anten, N.P.R.

    2007-01-01

    † Background and Aims Because plants protect each other from wind, stand density affects both the light climate and the amount of mechanical stress experienced by plants. But the potential interactive effects of mechanical stress and canopy shading on plant growth have rarely been investigated and

  20. Shading responses of carbon allocation dynamics in mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, M.; Lattanzi, F. A.; Brueggemann, N.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Global environmental changes can alter source - sink relations of plants with potential implications for C allocation. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. To analyze effects of assimilate supply (i.e. C source strength) on ecosystem C allocation dynamics and the role of non-structural carbohydrates, canopy sections of a mountain meadow were pulse labeled with 13CO2 and subsequently shaded for a week or left unshaded (control). Tracer dynamics in above- and belowground sucrose and starch pools were analysed and coupled using compartmental modelling. The hypothesis was tested that shading affects tracer dynamics in non-structural carbohydrates and diminishes the transfer of recently assimilated C to roots and their storage pools. In unshaded plots up to 40% of assimilated C was routed through short-term storage in shoot starch and sucrose to buffer day / night cycles in photosynthesis. Shoot- and root sucrose and shoot starch were kinetically closely related pools. The tracer dynamics of the modelled root sucrose pool corresponded well with those in soil CO2 efflux. Root starch played no role in buffering day / night cycles and likely acted as a seasonal store. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots but not roots and resulted in a massive reduction of leaf respiration, while root respiration was much less diminished. Shading affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots: shoot starch rapidly lost tracer, while sucrose transiently increased its tracer content. Surprisingly, shading did not alter the dynamics of root carbohydrates. Even under severe C limitation after one week of shading, tracer C continued to be incorporated in root starch. Also the amount of 13C incorporated in phospholipid fatty acids of soil microbial communities was not reduced by shading, though its

  1. Effects of shading on relative competitive advantage of three species of Sphagnum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Z. Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available (1 Sphagnum is an important genus of bryophytes holding 10–15 % of the terrestrial carbon stock. With climate change a drier surface may increase the abundance of vascular plants on peatlands, so shading of Sphagnum may increase. Here we describe growth cabinet experiments to reveal the effects of shading on interactions among mixtures of three species: S. capillifolium, S. palustre (hummock species, and S. fallax (a hollow species. We measured the six traits: growth in length, growth as increase in dry mass, side-shoot production, nitrogen and carbon proportion of the capitulum dry mass, and C:N ratio in the capitulum. (2 Shading had no effect on biomass production or side-shoot production but increased height increment in all three species. It also increased the C and N proportions of total dry mass but decreased C:N ratio in the capitula. (3 Neighbours of a different species reduced biomass and side-shoot production in the two hummock species but had no effect on the hollow species. (4 All three species showed interaction between shading and neighbour in two or more plant traits. S. fallax showed competitive advantage over S. palustre in no-shading treatments and over S. capillifolium in moderate shading treatments. In addition, under deep shading, S. fallax showed a competitive advantage over both hummock species. A clear competitive hierarchy S. fallax>S. capillifolium>S. palustre emerged which was consistent with the hierarchy of side-shoot production. (5 The results suggest that all the species appear to tolerate deep shade (for a few months at least. In a shaded environment, especially under deeply shaded conditions, S. fallax retains its dominance in hollow habitats (if water availability is guaranteed by virtue of its advantage in side-shoot production. (6 If shading increases then the abundance of different Sphagnum species is likely to change.

  2. Examining vertical patterns in Arctic tundra shrub canopies: Implications for carbon cycling in a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, M.; Atkin, O.; Turnbull, M.; Rastetter, E.; Griffin, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is facilitating the northward encroachment and expansion of woody shrub species into the Arctic tundra, which in turn is altering a number of physical and biogeochemical processes that are likely to affect how carbon is cycled in this region. Greater shrub presence also increases leaf area index and canopy complexity in the tundra, introducing the potential for vertical variation in nitrogen, photosynthesis, and respiration through the canopy. For these reasons, Arctic tundra shrub communities represent an ecologically relevant case study for investigating carbon cycling-nitrogen relationships and testing optimization models. Here, we measured photosynthesis, respiration in the dark and light, the light inhibition of respiration, stomatal conductance, leaf nitrogen, and related leaf traits at different heights representing variation in light availability in multiple Arctic Alaskan shrub communities dominated by Salix pulchra and Betula nana to examine if the relatively low-stature canopies exhibit vertical patterns. Highest rates of photosynthesis and respiration (P top of the canopy, suggesting substrate-limitation of respiration at lower, more shaded canopy levels. Leaves at the top of the canopy also exhibited the lowest inhibition of respiration by light (NS), and the highest nitrogen concentrations. (P photosynthesis, nitrogen, and a relaxation of light-inhibition to optimize metabolic efficiency. Data from this study was also used to test leaf-level and canopy nitrogen optimization models. These data emphasize the need to include canopy complexity in tundra carbon models, as neglecting physiological differences through a canopy may lead to an underestimation of stored carbon.

  3. The Relationship between On-Farm Shade Trees and Cocoa Yields in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asare, Richard

    Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) is a crop that is widely cultivated across West Africa with Côte d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Ghana and Nigeria contributing about 70% of the global production. In Ghana cocoa contributes significantly to the national economy as over 20% of the world’s cocoa production comes from...... the country, making it the world’s second largest producer with an annual production level of over 700,000 metric tons, and an estimated cultivation area of ca. 1.6 million ha. Cocoa is mostly cultivated by smallholder farmers either as a monocrop or in association with other food crops, tree crops and under...... the cover of shade trees – cocoa agroforestry. This thesis hypothesizes that canopy cover of shade trees in low input (low-to-no fertilizer application) cocoa growing systems can contribute to cocoa yield improvements. The main theme deals with shade trees diversity and its effects on cocoa production...

  4. Impact of shade on outdoor thermal comfort—a seasonal field study in Tempe, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middel, Ariane; Selover, Nancy; Hagen, Björn; Chhetri, Nalini

    2016-12-01

    Shade plays an important role in designing pedestrian-friendly outdoor spaces in hot desert cities. This study investigates the impact of photovoltaic canopy shade and tree shade on thermal comfort through meteorological observations and field surveys at a pedestrian mall on Arizona State University's Tempe campus. During the course of 1 year, on selected clear calm days representative of each season, we conducted hourly meteorological transects from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and surveyed 1284 people about their thermal perception, comfort, and preferences. Shade lowered thermal sensation votes by approximately 1 point on a semantic differential 9-point scale, increasing thermal comfort in all seasons except winter. Shade type (tree or solar canopy) did not significantly impact perceived comfort, suggesting that artificial and natural shades are equally efficient in hot dry climates. Globe temperature explained 51 % of the variance in thermal sensation votes and was the only statistically significant meteorological predictor. Important non-meteorological factors included adaptation, thermal comfort vote, thermal preference, gender, season, and time of day. A regression of subjective thermal sensation on physiological equivalent temperature yielded a neutral temperature of 28.6 °C. The acceptable comfort range was 19.1 °C-38.1 °C with a preferred temperature of 20.8 °C. Respondents exposed to above neutral temperature felt more comfortable if they had been in air-conditioning 5 min prior to the survey, indicating a lagged response to outdoor conditions. Our study highlights the importance of active solar access management in hot urban areas to reduce thermal stress.

  5. Impact of shade on outdoor thermal comfort-a seasonal field study in Tempe, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middel, Ariane; Selover, Nancy; Hagen, Björn; Chhetri, Nalini

    2016-12-01

    Shade plays an important role in designing pedestrian-friendly outdoor spaces in hot desert cities. This study investigates the impact of photovoltaic canopy shade and tree shade on thermal comfort through meteorological observations and field surveys at a pedestrian mall on Arizona State University's Tempe campus. During the course of 1 year, on selected clear calm days representative of each season, we conducted hourly meteorological transects from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and surveyed 1284 people about their thermal perception, comfort, and preferences. Shade lowered thermal sensation votes by approximately 1 point on a semantic differential 9-point scale, increasing thermal comfort in all seasons except winter. Shade type (tree or solar canopy) did not significantly impact perceived comfort, suggesting that artificial and natural shades are equally efficient in hot dry climates. Globe temperature explained 51 % of the variance in thermal sensation votes and was the only statistically significant meteorological predictor. Important non-meteorological factors included adaptation, thermal comfort vote, thermal preference, gender, season, and time of day. A regression of subjective thermal sensation on physiological equivalent temperature yielded a neutral temperature of 28.6 °C. The acceptable comfort range was 19.1 °C-38.1 °C with a preferred temperature of 20.8 °C. Respondents exposed to above neutral temperature felt more comfortable if they had been in air-conditioning 5 min prior to the survey, indicating a lagged response to outdoor conditions. Our study highlights the importance of active solar access management in hot urban areas to reduce thermal stress.

  6. Shading, a view from inside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Pont, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Shape from shading arose from artistic practice, and later experimental psychology, but its formal structure has only been established recently by computer vision. Some of its algorithms have led to useful applications. Psychology has reversely borrowed these formalisms in attempts to come to grips

  7. Ecophysiological consequences of contrasting microenvironments on the desiccation tolerant moss Tortula ruralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerlynck, Erik P; Csintalan, Zsolt; Nagy, Zoltan; Tuba, Zoltan; Goodin, Doug; Henebry, Geoffrey M

    2002-05-01

    Tortula ruralis is a homoiochlorophyllous-desiccation-tolerant (HDT) moss that retains all pigments when dehydrated and rapidly recovers physiological function upon rehydration. This moss forms extensive cover in exposed and shaded areas in the sandy semi-arid grasslands of Central Europe. We hypothesized that contrasting drying regimes between these microhabitats would affect plant N status, constraints to gas exchange and growth, as well as result in altered pigment concentrations and ratios, and photochemical light-response dynamics. Furthermore, we believed T. ruralis's HDT habit would limit its ability to acclimate to altered light environment. We found that sun plant T. ruralis had lower plant mass, as well as lower tissue N, C, total photosynthetic pigment concentrations and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) values compared to shade plant counterparts. Carotenoid/chlorophyll ratios in sun plants were typical of high light-adapted tissue, but chlorophyll a/chlorophyll b ratios were lower, more characteristic of low light-adapted tissue. This unique combination of pigment responses was accompanied by sustained lower levels of optimal quantum efficiency of PSII (F v /F m ) in sun plant T. ruralis, even during favorable diurnal conditions, and reduced engagement of energy-dependent thermal dissipation (NPQ). Reciprocal transplants of sun and shade plants showed that T. ruralis is capable of short-term adjustment to altered light level, as evidenced by increases in F v /F m , NPQ, and light-adapted PSII yield (φ PSII ) in transplanted sun plants, and concurrent decreases in sun-transplanted shade plants. However, the performance of transplanted sun plants remained consistently below that of undisturbed shade plants. These findings show that microenvironmental variation results in different patterns of resource acquisition in this HDT moss, and that growth in the open imparts greater desiccation tolerance, and the development of a greater standing engagement of

  8. Redundant roles of photoreceptors and cytokinins in regulating photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonman, A; Prinsen, E; Voesenek, L A C J; Pons, T L

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density was investigated in tobacco canopies and in tobacco and Arabidopsis plants with part of their foliage experimentally shaded. Both species acclimated to canopy light gradients and partial shading by allocating photosynthetic capacity to leaves in high light and adjusting chloroplast organization to the local light conditions. An investigation was carried out to determine whether signalling mediated by photoreceptors, sugars, cytokinin, and nitrate is involved in and necessary for proper photosynthetic acclimation. No evidence was found for a role for sugars, or for nitrate. The distribution of cytokinins in tobacco stands of contrasting density could be explained in part by irradiance-dependent delivery of cytokinins through the transpiration stream. Functional studies using a comprehensive selection of Arabidopsis mutants and transgenics showed that normal wild-type responses to partial shading were retained when signalling mediated by photoreceptors or cytokinins was disrupted. This indicates that these pathways probably operate in a redundant manner. However, the reduction of the chlorophyll a/b ratio in response to local shade was completely absent in the Arabidopsis Ws-2 accession mutated in PHYTOCHROME D and in the triple phyAphyCphyD mutant. Moreover, cytokinin receptor mutants also showed a reduced response, suggesting a previously unrecognized function of phyD and cytokinins.

  9. Throughfall and soil properties in shaded and unshaded coffee plantations and a secondary forest: a case study from Southern Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Gaitán

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia coffee production is facing risks due to an increase in the variability and amount of rainfall, which may alter hydrological cycles and negatively influence yield quality and quantity. Shade trees in coffee plantations, however, are known to produce ecological benefits, such as intercepting rainfall and lowering its velocity, resulting in a reduced net-rainfall and higher water infiltration. In this case study, we measured throughfall and soil hydrological properties in four land use systems in Cauca, Colombia, that differed in stand structural parameters: shaded coffee, unshaded coffee, secondary forest and pasture. We found that throughfall was rather influenced by stand structural characteristics than by rainfall intensity. Lower throughfall was recorded in the shaded coffee compared to the other systems when rain gauges were placed at a distance of 1.0 m to the shade tree. The variability of throughfall was high in the shaded coffee, which was due to different canopy characteristics and irregular arrangements of shade tree species. Shaded coffee and secondary forest resembled each other in soil structural parameters, with an increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity and microporosity, whereas bulk density and macroporosity decreased, compared to the unshaded coffee and pasture. In this context tree-covered systems indicate a stronger resilience towards changing rainfall patterns, especially in mountainous areas where coffee is cultivated.

  10. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  11. Clinical effect of different shade guide systems on the tooth shades of ceramic-veneered restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Alexander J; Koke, Ulrich; Schmitter, Marc; Beck, Joachim; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether a systematically arranged shade guide system (Vita 3D-Master) allows clinicians to achieve a better shade match of a restoration, as compared to a conventional shade guide with a design based on empirical values (Vita Classical). Fifty-nine restorations in 42 patients being treated by student clinicians were assessed. Using 1 of the 2 shade systems assigned randomly, each student independently determined the tooth shade. With the aid of a visual rating scale, the accuracy of the shade match of the finished restoration was assessed. All restorations whose shades had been determined with the 3D-Master could be placed without any further shade corrections. In contrast, almost 17% of restorations determined with the conventional system required subsequent shade modifications. The match of the shades selected with the 3D-Master was judged significantly better by the clinicians. Within the limitations of the study, clinicians with less clinical experience who use a system that guides them through the shade-taking procedure in a relatively systematic manner will be more successful in selecting the correct tooth shade and in avoiding shade corrections. Clinical assessment of the restoration shades showed significant differences between the shade guide with a systematic design and that based on empirical values.

  12. Regeneration in bottomland forest canopy gaps six years after variable retention harvests to enhance wildlife habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Somershoe, Scott G.; Guldin, James M.

    2013-01-01

    To promote desired forest conditions that enhance wildlife habitat in bottomland forests, managers prescribed and implemented variable-retention harvest, a.k.a. wildlife forestry, in four stands on Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge, LA. These treatments created canopy openings (gaps) within which managers sought to regenerate shade-intolerant trees. Six years after prescribed harvests, we assessed regeneration in 41 canopy gaps and 4 large (>0.5-ha) patch cut openings that resulted from treatments and in 21 natural canopy gaps on 2 unharvested control stands. Mean gap area of anthropogenic gaps (582 m²) was greater than that of natural gaps (262 m²). Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and red oaks (Quercus nigra, Q. nuttallii, and Q. phellos) were common in anthropogenic gaps, whereas elms (Ulmus spp.) and sugarberry (Celtis laevigata) were numerous in natural gaps. We recommend harvest prescriptions include gaps with diameter >25 m, because the proportion of shade-intolerant regeneration increased with gap area up to 500 m². The proportion of shade-intolerant definitive gap fillers (individuals likely to occupy the canopy) increased with gap area: 35 percent in natural gaps, 54 percent in anthropogenic gaps, and 84 percent in patch cuts. Sweetgum, green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), and red oaks were common definitive gap fillers.

  13. Response of reptile and amphibian communities to canopy gaps created by wind disturbance in the Southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathryn H. Greenberg

    2001-01-01

    Reptile and amphibian communities were sampled in intact gaps created by wind disturbance, salvage-logged gaps, and closed canopy mature forest (controls). Sampling was conducted during June–October in 1997 and 1998 using drift fences with pitfall and funnel traps. Basal area of live trees, shade, leaf litter coverage, and litter depth was highest in controls and...

  14. Selecting VITA classical shades with the VITA 3D-master shade guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenthöfer, Andreas; Wiesberg, Stefan; Hildenbrandt, Achim; Reinelt, Gerhard; Rammelsberg, Peter; Hassel, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Although the VITA 3D-Master (3D) shade guide offers improved shade-matching performance, many dental materials are only available in VITA Classical (VC) shades. This study aimed to clarify whether it is possible to convert 3D shades determined by observers into VC shades (indirect method) without adding a clinically significant error in comparison with direct shade determination using the VC shade guide. Forty ceramic specimens were fabricated. L*a*b* values were recorded using a spectroradiometer. Sixty participants (35 dentists, 15 technicians, and 10 students) were recruited and asked to determine the shades of specimens using the VC and 3D shade guides under standardized conditions. Conversion tables were constructed by allocating the closest VC shade tab to every matched 3D shade and by use of an optimization algorithm (indirect methods). Differences between ΔE values for VC matches and for the indirect methods were evaluated using t tests. A mean ΔE (SD) of 4.34 (2.00) for VC and 4.22 (2.21) for 3D was observed (P = .040). Compared with direct shade matching using VC, the indirect method with the optimized tables resulted in a mean ΔE of 4.32 (1.96), which was not significantly different (P = .586). Within the limitations of this study, the conversion tables were suitable for the determination of tooth color using the 3D shade guide followed by conversion into VC shades without adding a clinically significant error.

  15. Shade tree diversity, cocoa pest damage, yield compensating inputs and farmers' net returns in West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Bertin Bisseleua Daghela

    Full Text Available Cocoa agroforests can significantly support biodiversity, yet intensification of farming practices is degrading agroforestry habitats and compromising ecosystem services such as biological pest control. Effective conservation strategies depend on the type of relationship between agricultural matrix, biodiversity and ecosystem services, but to date the shape of this relationship is unknown. We linked shade index calculated from eight vegetation variables, with insect pests and beneficial insects (ants, wasps and spiders in 20 cocoa agroforests differing in woody and herbaceous vegetation diversity. We measured herbivory and predatory rates, and quantified resulting increases in cocoa yield and net returns. We found that number of spider webs and wasp nests significantly decreased with increasing density of exotic shade tree species. Greater species richness of native shade tree species was associated with a higher number of wasp nests and spider webs while species richness of understory plants did not have a strong impact on these beneficial species. Species richness of ants, wasp nests and spider webs peaked at higher levels of plant species richness. The number of herbivore species (mirid bugs and cocoa pod borers and the rate of herbivory on cocoa pods decreased with increasing shade index. Shade index was negatively related to yield, with yield significantly higher at shade and herb covers<50%. However, higher inputs in the cocoa farms do not necessarily result in a higher net return. In conclusion, our study shows the importance of a diverse shade canopy in reducing damage caused by cocoa pests. It also highlights the importance of conservation initiatives in tropical agroforestry landscapes.

  16. Experimental canopy removal enhances diversity of vernal pond amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, David K; Bolden, Susan R; Freidenburg, L Kealoha

    2014-03-01

    Vernal ponds are often treated as protected environments receiving special regulation and management. Within the landscapes where they are found, forest vegetation frequently dominates surrounding uplands and can grow to overtop and shade pond basins. Two bodies of research offer differing views of the role of forest canopy for vernal pond systems. Studies of landscape conversion suggest that removing forest overstory within uplands can cause local extinctions of amphibians by altering terrestrial habitat or hindering movement. Studies of canopy above pond basins imply an opposite relationship; encroachment of overstory vegetation can be associated with local extinctions potentially via changes in light, thermal, and food resource environments. Unresolved uncertainties about the role of forest canopy reveal significant gaps in our understanding of wetland species distributions and dynamics. Any misunderstanding of canopy influences is simultaneously important to managers because current practices emphasize promoting or conserving vegetation growth particularly within buffers immediately adjacent to ponds. We evaluated this apparent contradiction by conducting a landscape-scale, long-term experiment using 14 natural vernal ponds. Tree felling at six manipulated ponds was limited in spatial scope but was nevertheless effective in increasing water temperature. Compared with eight control ponds, manipulated ponds maintained more amphibian species during five years post-manipulation. There was little evidence that any species was negatively influenced, and the reproductive effort of species for which we estimated egg inputs maintained pretreatment population densities in manipulated compared with control ponds. Overall, our experiment shows that a carefully circumscribed reduction of overhead forest canopy can enhance the capacity of vernal ponds to support wildlife diversity and suggests a scale dependence of canopy influences on amphibians. These findings have

  17. What is the most prominent factor limiting photosynthesis in different layers of a greenhouse cucumber canopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsu-Wei; Henke, Michael; de Visser, Pieter H B; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard; Wiechers, Dirk; Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2014-09-01

    Maximizing photosynthesis at the canopy level is important for enhancing crop yield, and this requires insights into the limiting factors of photosynthesis. Using greenhouse cucumber (Cucumis sativus) as an example, this study provides a novel approach to quantify different components of photosynthetic limitations at the leaf level and to upscale these limitations to different canopy layers and the whole plant. A static virtual three-dimensional canopy structure was constructed using digitized plant data in GroIMP. Light interception of the leaves was simulated by a ray-tracer and used to compute leaf photosynthesis. Different components of photosynthetic limitations, namely stomatal (S(L)), mesophyll (M(L)), biochemical (B(L)) and light (L(L)) limitations, were calculated by a quantitative limitation analysis of photosynthesis under different light regimes. In the virtual cucumber canopy, B(L) and L(L) were the most prominent factors limiting whole-plant photosynthesis. Diffusional limitations (S(L) + M(L)) contributed Photosynthesis in the lower canopy was more limited by the biochemical capacity, and the upper canopy was more sensitive to light than other canopy parts. Although leaves in the upper canopy received more light, their photosynthesis was more light restricted than in the leaves of the lower canopy, especially when the light condition above the canopy was poor. An increase in whole-plant photosynthesis under diffuse light did not result from an improvement of light use efficiency but from an increase in light interception. Diffuse light increased the photosynthesis of leaves that were directly shaded by other leaves in the canopy by up to 55%. Based on the results, maintaining biochemical capacity of the middle-lower canopy and increasing the leaf area of the upper canopy would be promising strategies to improve canopy photosynthesis in a high-wire cucumber cropping system. Further analyses using the approach described in this study can be expected to

  18. Shade determination using camouflaged visual shade guides and an electronic spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalheim, S F; Øilo, M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare a camouflaged visual shade guide to a spectrophotometer designed for restorative dentistry. Two operators performed analyses of 66 subjects. One central upper incisor was measured four times by each operator; twice with a camouflaged visual shade guide and twice with a spectrophotometer Both methods had acceptable repeatability rates, but the electronic shade determination showed higher repeatability. In general, the electronically determined shades were darker than the visually determined shades. The use of a camouflaged visual shade guide seems to be an adequate method to reduce operator bias.

  19. Color Parameters of the Chromascop Shade Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. O'Brien

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study are: (1 determine the color of the twenty shades in the Ivoclar’s Chromascop shade guide, (2 determine the color representation of the shade guide described as coverage error (CE, and (3 compare this shade guide with the Vita Classical and Bioform shade guides. The spectral data was collected using Beckman model DU reflectance spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere. Commission International de l’Eclairage (CIE chromaticity coordinates were calculated using CIE illuminant C and 1931 observer data, then converted to CIE L*a*b* and Munsell notation. Each shade was spectrophotometrically compared to the published colors of 335 human teeth. The minimum CIE L*a*b* color difference was calculated for each tooth and the average of these color differences was defined as the CE. The measured colors of the Chromascop guide had a CIE L* range of 79.67 to 65.61, an a* range of -0.71 to 3.85, and a b* range of 14.58 to 27.69. The average CE of the Chromascop shade guide was 3.38. The Chromascop shade guide has similar colors and a CE compared with the Bioform and Vita Classical shade guides, but with some shades of higher red and yellow components.

  20. Making biodiversity-friendly cocoa pay: combining yield, certification, and REDD for shade management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, A; Justicia, R; Smith, L E

    2015-03-01

    The twin United Nations' Millennium Development Goals of biodiversity preservation and poverty reduction both strongly depend on actions in the tropics. In particular, traditional agroforestry could be critical to both biological conservation and human livelihoods in human-altered rainforest areas. However, traditional agroforestry is rapidly disappearing, because the system itself is economically precarious, and because the forest trees that shade traditional crops are now perceived to be overly detrimental to agricultural yield. Here, we show a case where the commonly used agroforestry shade metric, canopy cover, would indeed suggest complete removal of shade trees to maximize yield, with strongly negative biodiversity and climate implications. However, a yield over 50% higher was achievable if approximately 100 shade trees per hectare were planted in a spatially organized fashion, a win-win for biodiversity and the smallholder. The higher yield option was detected by optimizing simultaneously for canopy cover, and a second shade metric, neighboring tree density, which was designed to better capture the yield value of ecological services flowing from forest trees. Nevertheless, even a 50% yield increase may prove insufficient to stop farmers converting away from traditional agroforestry. To further increase agroforestry rents, we apply our results to the design of a sustainable certification (eco-labelling) scheme for cocoa-based products in a biodiversity hotspot, and consider their implications for the use of the United Nations REDD (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation) program in agroforestry systems. Combining yield boost, certification, and REDD has the potential to incentivize eco-friendly agroforestry and lift smallholders out of poverty, simultaneously.

  1. Modeling canopy-level productivity: is the "big-leaf" simplification acceptable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprintsin, M.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    The "big-leaf" approach to calculating the carbon balance of plant canopies assumes that canopy carbon fluxes have the same relative responses to the environment as any single unshaded leaf in the upper canopy. Widely used light use efficiency models are essentially simplified versions of the big-leaf model. Despite its wide acceptance, subsequent developments in the modeling of leaf photosynthesis and measurements of canopy physiology have brought into question the assumptions behind this approach showing that big leaf approximation is inadequate for simulating canopy photosynthesis because of the additional leaf internal control on carbon assimilation and because of the non-linear response of photosynthesis on leaf nitrogen and absorbed light, and changes in leaf microenvironment with canopy depth. To avoid this problem a sunlit/shaded leaf separation approach, within which the vegetation is treated as two big leaves under different illumination conditions, is gradually replacing the "big-leaf" strategy, for applications at local and regional scales. Such separation is now widely accepted as a more accurate and physiologically based approach for modeling canopy photosynthesis. Here we compare both strategies for Gross Primary Production (GPP) modeling using the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) at local (tower footprint) scale for different land cover types spread over North America: two broadleaf forests (Harvard, Massachusetts and Missouri Ozark, Missouri); two coniferous forests (Howland, Maine and Old Black Spruce, Saskatchewan); Lost Creek shrubland site (Wisconsin) and Mer Bleue petland (Ontario). BEPS calculates carbon fixation by scaling Farquhar's leaf biochemical model up to canopy level with stomatal conductance estimated by a modified version of the Ball-Woodrow-Berry model. The "big-leaf" approach was parameterized using derived leaf level parameters scaled up to canopy level by means of Leaf Area Index. The influence of sunlit/shaded

  2. Effects of structural complexity on within-canopy light environments and leaf traits in a northern mixed deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotis, Alexander T; Curtis, Peter S

    2017-10-01

    Canopy structure influences forest productivity through its effects on the distribution of radiation and the light-induced changes in leaf physiological traits. Due to the difficulty of accessing and measuring forest canopies, few field-based studies have quantitatively linked these divergent scales of canopy functioning. The objective of our study was to investigate how canopy structure affects light profiles within a forest canopy and whether leaves of mature trees adjust morphologically and biochemically to the light environments characteristic of canopies with different structural complexity. We used a combination of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and hemispherical photographs to quantify canopy structure and light environments, respectively, and a telescoping pole to sample leaves. Leaf mass per area (LMA), nitrogen on an area basis (Narea) and chlorophyll on a mass basis (Chlmass) were measured in red maple (Acer rubrum), american beech (Fagus grandifolia), white pine (Pinus strobus), and northern red oak (Quercus rubra) at different heights in plots with similar leaf area index but contrasting canopy complexity (rugosity). We found that more complex canopies had greater porosity and reduced light variability in the midcanopy while total light interception was unchanged relative to less complex canopies. Leaf phenotypes of F. grandifolia, Q. rubra and P. strobus were more sun-acclimated in the midstory of structurally complex canopies while leaf phenotypes of A. rubrum were more shade-acclimated (lower LMA) in the upper canopy of more complex stands, despite no differences in total light interception. Broadleaf species showed further differences in acclimation with increased Narea and reduced Chlmass in leaves with higher LMA, while P. strobus showed no change in Narea and Chlmass with higher LMA. Our results provide new insight on how light distribution and leaf acclimation in mature trees might be altered when natural and anthropogenic

  3. Visual and instrumental agreement in dental shade selection: three distinct observer populations and shade matching protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Barrett, Allyson A; Rosa, Vinicius; Pinzetta, Caroline

    2009-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the agreement between observer visual dental shade matches and instrumental shade identification is higher using the Vita 3D-Master (3D) shade guide than the Vita classical (VC) shade guide. Three populations selected shade matches: non-dental observers (GP) matched shade tabs-to-tabs and dental students (DS) and dentists (DD) matched an in vivo natural right upper central incisor (RUCI). All observers (n=600) used both shade guides (3D and VC) in two lighting conditions, cool white fluorescent lighting (CWF) and natural sunlight (NSL). The shade tabs and natural teeth were identified using an intra-oral spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade) to determine the instrumental agreement with the visual shade selection. The percent visual-instrumental shade agreement (PVIA) was analyzed statistically considering: observer population, shade guide set, and lighting condition. A "substantial" intra-examiner agreement (k=0.76) was observed. The PVIA ranged from 12% (DS) for the 3D-NSL condition to 42% (DD) with the VC-CWF condition, which also resulted in the highest PVIA for GP (38.5%) and DS (35%). Results indicated that the GP with neither dental knowledge nor shade guide experience had a significantly higher PVIA using the VC rather than the 3D shade guide. Dentists demonstrated the highest PVIA (42%) for both lighting conditions and shade guides, thereby rejecting the study hypothesis. A significantly higher visual-instrumental shade agreement was demonstrated by the clinically experienced dentists (DD), regardless of shade guides and lighting conditions.

  4. Dental shade matching using a digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, W K; Lee, H J

    2012-12-01

    Digital cameras could be substitutes for contact-type instruments in shade selection and overcome their drawbacks. The images taken show morphology and color texture of teeth. A new method was proposed to compare the color of shade tabs taken by a digital camera using appropriate color features. Vita 3D-MASTER shade guide and Canon EOS 1100D digital camera were employed. Shade tab images were compared in two reference strategies. The color of tooth surface was presented by a content manually cropped out of the image. The content was divided into 10 × 2 blocks to encode the color distribution. Color features from commonly used color spaces were evaluated. The top n matches were selected when the least n shade distances between the shade tabs were attained. Using Sa*b* features, the top one accuracy was 0.87, where the feature S is defined in HSV color space, a* and b* features are defined in L*a*b* color space. This rate was higher than previous reports using contact-type instruments. The top three matching accuracy was 0.94. Sa*b* were suitable features for shade matching using a digital cameras in this study. Both the color and texture of the tooth surface could be presented by the proposed content-based descriptor. Clinical use of digital cameras in shade matching became possible. This in vitro study proposed a method for shade matching using digital cameras through the comparisons of the color patterns on the shade tab surfaces. The method overcame some drawbacks from the devices such as colorimeters or spectrophotometers. The results supported the use of digital cameras in shade matching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance assessment of dental shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravina, Rade D

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate influence of different shade guides and respective shade matching methods on shade matching results and to analyze user satisfaction with these products and methods. Eighty-eight pre-doctoral dental students completed the study. The color of four target shade tabs was matched using Toothguide 3D-Master (TG), Vitapan Classical (VC), and the prototype of Linearguide 3D-Master (LG). Shade matching was performed using color-corrected light source and 0/45 degrees optical geometry. An intra-oral spectrophotometer was used for color measurements of target tabs and shade guide tabs. Results for the first 10 best matching shade guide tabs were expressed as ranks (best match - 10 points to 10th match - 1 point). Participants also performed subjective evaluation of three shade guides/tab arrangements. Descriptive statistics were calculated. T-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for statistical analysis of the data (alpha=0.05). The best shade matching results were achieved using LG, followed by VC and TG, and the ranks were 9.1+/-1.2, 8.8+/-1.9 and 8.4+/-2.8. Differences in DeltaE* values for the first 10 matches between TG/LG (4.5+/-1.8) and VC (6.2+/-2.2) were found to be statistically significant (p3D-Master enabled better shade matching results compared to Toothguide 3D-Master (p3D-Master shade guides exhibited significantly smaller DeltaE* values for the first 10 matches compared to Vitapan Classical (p3D-Master was superior in a subjective evaluation compared to Toothguide 3D-Master and Vitapan Classical (p<0.001).

  6. The Growth of Agarwood Plants on the Different Canopy Covers Level and Fertilizer in Oil Palm Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu Prastyaningsih, Sri; Azwin

    2017-12-01

    The development of agar wood plants in oil palm plantation requires the forestry techniques in order to obtain maximum production. In an oil palm stands, the age of plant will affect the height, diameter, population and stands density. The older age of an oil palm stands will affect the canopy cover on the forest floor. Agar wood plants are semi-tolerant growth and oil palm can be used as shade. Unilak has an oil palm plantation area of 10 hectares around the campus with 10 years old and 20 years old. The soil condition at the study is Podsolik Merah Kuning (PMK) which poor nutrient and needs fertilization to increase soil fertility. This study aims to find out the effect of age of oil palm stands and fertilization for optimal growth. The split plot design with 2 main plots of the age of palm tree ( 10 years old and 20 years old) and five kinds of fertilizing sub plot (without fertilizer, 40 gram/plant of NPK, 80 gram/plat of NPK, 120 gram/plant of NPK and 180 gram/plant of NPK were used. The results of this research showed that the age of palm tree (canopy cover) treatment gave non-significant influence on the growing of agar wood until it reaches 4 months of growth. The canopyy cover by 10 years old of oil palm tree produce the best response on height (15 cm) and diameter (0,4 cm) growth of agar woods..Fertilizing treatment di not give any significant influence on the heigh and diameter growth of agarwood plants until reach 3 months. The interaction by 10 years old of palm with fertilizing gave non significant results.

  7. A continent-wide analysis of the shade requirements of red and western grey kangaroos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J A; Coulson, G; Munn, A J; Kearney, M R

    2016-01-01

    Foraging time may be constrained by a suite of phenomena including weather, which can restrict a species' activity and energy intake. This is recognized as pivotal for many species whose distributions are known to correlate with climate, including kangaroos, although such impacts are rarely quantified. We explore how differences in shade seeking, a thermoregulatory behavior, of 2 closely-related kangaroo species, Macropus rufus (red kangaroos) and M. fuliginosus (western grey kangaroos), might reflect differences in their distributions across Australia. We observed foraging and shade-seeking behavior in the field and, together with local weather observations, calculated threshold radiant temperatures (based on solar and infrared radiant heat loads) over which the kangaroos retreated to shade. We apply these calculated tolerance thresholds to hourly microclimatic estimates derived from daily-gridded weather data to predict activity constraints across the Australian continent over a 10-year period. M. fuliginosus spent more time than M. rufus in the shade (7.6 ± 0.7 h versus 6.4 ± 0.9 h) and more time foraging (11.8 ± 0.5 h vs. 10.0 ± 0.6 h), although total time resting was equivalent (∼8.2 h). M. rufus tolerated 19°C higher radiant temperatures than M. fuliginosus (89°C versus 70°C radiant temperature). Across Australia, we predicted M. fuliginosus to be more restricted to shade than M. rufus, with higher absolute shade requirements farther north. These results corroborate previous findings that M. rufus is more adept at dealing with heat than M. fuliginosus and indicate that M. rufus is less dependent on shade on a continental scale.

  8. Growth and posture control strategies in Fagus sylvatica and Acer pseudoplatanus saplings in response to canopy disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Catherine; Fournier, Mériem; Ningre, François; Hounzandji, Ablo Paul-Igor; Constant, Thiéry

    2011-06-01

    Forest tree saplings that grow in the understorey undergo frequent changes in their light environment to which they must adapt to ensure their survival and growth. Crown architecture, which plays a critical role in light capture and mechanical stability, is a major component of sapling adaptation to canopy disturbance. Shade-adapted saplings typically have plagiotropic stems and branches. After canopy opening, they need to develop more erect shoots in order to exploit the new light conditions. The objective of this study was to test whether changes in sapling stem inclination occur after canopy opening, and to analyse the morphological changes associated with stem reorientation. A 4-year canopy-opening field experiment with naturally regenerated Fagus sylvatica and Acer pseudoplatanus saplings was conducted. The appearance of new stem axes, stem basal diameter and inclination along the stem were recorded every year after canopy opening. Both species showed considerable stem reorientation resulting primarily from uprighting (more erect) shoot movements in Fagus, and from uprighting movements, shoot elongation and formation of relay shoots in Acer. In both species, the magnitude of shoot uprighting movements was primarily related to initial stem inclination. Both the basal part and the apical part of the stem contributed to uprighting movements. Stem movements did not appear to be limited by stem size or by stem growth. Stem uprighting movements in shade-adapted Fagus and Acer saplings following canopy disturbance were considerable and rapid, suggesting that stem reorientation processes play a significant role in the growth strategy of the species.

  9. 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Hawaii, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  10. 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  11. Stomatal Conductance, Plant Hydraulics, and Multilayer Canopies: A New Paradigm for Earth System Models or Unnecessary Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture stress is a key regulator of canopy transpiration, the surface energy budget, and land-atmosphere coupling. Many land surface models used in Earth system models have an ad-hoc parameterization of soil moisture stress that decreases stomatal conductance with soil drying. Parameterization of soil moisture stress from more fundamental principles of plant hydrodynamics is a key research frontier for land surface models. While the biophysical and physiological foundations of such parameterizations are well-known, their best implementation in land surface models is less clear. Land surface models utilize a big-leaf canopy parameterization (or two big-leaves to represent the sunlit and shaded canopy) without vertical gradients in the canopy. However, there are strong biometeorological and physiological gradients in plant canopies. Are these gradients necessary to resolve? Here, I describe a vertically-resolved, multilayer canopy model that calculates leaf temperature and energy fluxes, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf water potential at each level in the canopy. In this model, midday leaf water stress manifests in the upper canopy layers, which receive high amounts of solar radiation, have high leaf nitrogen and photosynthetic capacity, and have high stomatal conductance and transpiration rates (in the absence of leaf water stress). Lower levels in the canopy become water stressed in response to longer-term soil moisture drying. I examine the role of vertical gradients in the canopy microclimate (solar radiation, air temperature, vapor pressure, wind speed), structure (leaf area density), and physiology (leaf nitrogen, photosynthetic capacity, stomatal conductance) in determining above canopy fluxes and gradients of transpiration and leaf water potential within the canopy.

  12. Gainesville's urban forest canopy cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco Escobedo; Jennifer A. Seitz; Wayne Zipperer

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystem benefits from trees are linked directly to the amount of healthy urban forest canopy cover. Urban forest cover is dynamic and changes over time due to factors such as urban development, windstorms, tree removals, and growth. The amount of a city's canopy cover depends on its land use, climate, and people's preferences. This fact sheet examines how...

  13. Canopy for VERAView Installation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ronald W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-12

    With the addition of the 3D volume slicer widget, VERAView now relies on Mayavi and its dependents. Enthought's Canopy Python environment provides everything VERAView needs, and pre-built Canopy versions for Windows, Mac OSX, and Linux can be downloaded.

  14. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Xin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily timescales. We demonstrate that ambient CO2 concentrations influence daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  15. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-06-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily timescales. We demonstrate that ambient CO2 concentrations influence daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  16. Physiological reactions in goat breeds maintained under shade, sun and partially shaded areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Fernando Dias Medeiros

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Medeiros L.F.D., Rodrigues V.C., Vieira D.H., Souza S.L.G. de, Neto O.C., Figueiredo N. de, Pinto C.F.D., Miranda A.L. & Violento C.B. [Physiological reactions in goat breeds maintained under shade, sun and partially shaded areas.] Reações fisiológicas de cabras em diferentes ambientes e coeficiente de tolerância ao calor em cabritos. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(4:286-296, 2015. Departamento de Reprodução e Avaliação Animal, Instituto de Zootecnia, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23851-970, Brasil. E-mail: diasmedeiros@yahoo.com.br The experiment was carried out to measure the effects of thermal stress on the rectal temperature (RT and respiratory frequency (RF, in animals of Boer and Saanen breeds, under the conditions of hot and humid climate of city of Rio de Janeiro, Baixada Fluminense, South East Region of Brazil; also the heat tolerance coefficient (HTC of Amakiri e Funcho was applied on pure and crossbreeds kids. The goats were divided into three groups, each group consisting of four females from each breed group. Each group was subjected to different surroundings, constituted by three experimental treatment: treatment A, with a sun protected enclosed area; treatment B, a sun exposed area without covering; and treatment C, area with a 50% covered section and a 50% sun exposed area, which permitted free circulation of the goats. A Balanced Latin Square was used. The RT and RF of the goats, in the afternoon periods (l5h00, were higher, than in the morning periods (09h00. The animals kept in the sun presented much higher results, especially in the afternoon periods, than the animals in the other two confinement areas. There were no differences in the RT and RF of the groups maintained in the shade or in partially covered area. There were differences in the RT and RF measurements between the two breeds, in the morning periods and in the afternoon periods

  17. Determination of VITA Classical shades with the 3D-Master shade guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Alexander J; Zenthöfer, Andreas; Corcodel, Nicoleta; Hildenbrandt, Achim; Reinelt, Gerhard; Wiesberg, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Because of its good matching performance the VITA 3D-Master shade guide (3D) is frequently used for determination of tooth color. Numerous composites/ceramics are, however, available in VITA Classical (VC) shades only. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of performing a shade match with 3D Master and converting this result via a table in a VC shade (indirect method) without this resulting in an apparent inferior shade matching in comparison with direct shade matching with the VC. Experiments were performed with an artificial, computer-generated tooth color space. Conversion tables were generated by calculating the color difference (ΔE) between a 3D shade and the closest VC shade (simple conversion table) and with the aid of optimization procedures. Statistical differences between the direct and indirect methods and between the indirect methods were assessed by use of a U-test. Median ΔE was 2.38 for direct matching with the VC and 2.86 for indirect matching by use of a simple conversion table (p < 0.01). Optimized tables performed slightly better (median ΔE = 2.81). Within the limitations of the study, it is usually possible to determine tooth color with the 3D and convert it, via a table, into a VC shade without adding a clinically apparent error to the direct shade match with the VC.

  18. Influence of personality on tooth shade selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Al-Shehri, Khalid Saleh; Assiri, Hassan Mohammed; Al-Qahtani, Mushabab AbdulRahman

    2016-01-01

    The harmonious shade matching of restorations with adjacent natural teeth is a prerequisite for a successful esthetic restoration. Color is a combined effect of the physical properties of an object, the light source, and the perception of the observer. The interpretation of color is influenced by both the physiological and psychological health of an individual. It is critical to understand the influence of an individual's psychological state on the shade selection procedure to achieve better shade matching and post-treatment patient counseling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of personality on tooth shade selection capability. Two porcelain fused to metal (PFM) discs were fabricated. A reference shade was determined using a spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade, Vita). The personalities of volunteers were identified using a Myers- Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) questionnaire. The volunteers visually identified the shade of the two PFM discs under a controlled light source. The mean color difference was determined between the visual and the spectrophotometer values. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc comparison tests to ascertain the difference between the groups. The groups that performed better in tooth shade selection were ENTJ (2.923 ± 2.36), ISTJ (3.086 ± 2.56), ENFJ (3.197 ± 2.936), and ESTJ (3.431± 2.78). The groups INTP (9.383 ± 3.30), ISTP (9.133 ± 3.44), ISFP (8.737 ± 2.81), and INTJ (8.480 ± 3.35) showed poor tooth shade selection ability. The Kruskal- Wallis test showed lower mean rank for group ENTJ (89.75), followed by ISTJ (92.25), and ENFJ (94.80). Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there was a statistically significant difference between the different personalities with regard to tooth shade selection ability.

  19. Partitioning adaptive differentiation across a patchy landscape: shade avoidance traits in impatiens capensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wettberg, Eric J; Remington, David L; Schmitt, Johanna

    2008-03-01

    Adaptation to different habitat types across a patchy landscape may either arise independently in each patch or occur due to repeated colonization of each patch by the same specialized genotype. We tested whether open- and closed-canopy forms of Impatiens capensis, an herbaceous annual plant of eastern North America, have evolved repeatedly by comparing hierarchical measures of F(ST) estimated from AFLPs to morphological differentiation measured by Q(ST) for five pairs of populations found in open and closed habitats in five New England regions. Morphological differentiation between habitats (Q(HT)) in elongation traits was greater than marker divergence (F(HT)), suggesting adaptive differentiation. Genotypes from open- and closed-canopy habitats differed in shade avoidance traits in several population pairs, whereas patterns of AFLP differentiation suggest this differentiation does not have a single origin. These results suggest that open- and closed-canopy habitats present different selective pressures, but that the outcome of diversifying selection may differ depending on specific closed- and open-canopy habitats and on starting genetic variation. Hierarchical partitioning of F(ST) and Q(ST) makes it possible to distinguish global stabilizing selection on traits across a landscape from diversifying selection between habitat types within regions.

  20. A photosynthesis-based two-leaf canopy stomatal conductance model for meteorology and air quality modeling with WRF/CMAQ PX LSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    A coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model with single-layer sunlit and shaded leaf canopy scaling is implemented and evaluated in a diagnostic box model with the Pleim-Xiu land surface model (PX LSM) and ozone deposition model components taken directly from the meteorol...

  1. Tree age dependence and within-canopy variation of leaf gas exchange and antioxidative defence in Fagus sylvatica under experimental free-air ozone exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbinger, K. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria)]. E-mail: karin.herbinger@uni-graz.at; Then, Ch. [Bundesamt und Forschungszentrum fuer Wald, Abteilung Forstpflanzenphysiologie, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]|[Lehrstuhl fuer Oekophysiologie der Pflanzen, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Sciences Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Loew, M.; Koch, N. [Lehrstuhl fuer Oekophysiologie der Pflanzen, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Sciences Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Haberer, K.; Alexous, M. [Institut fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Universitaet Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 053/054, D-79085 Freiburg (Germany); Remele, K. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Heerdt, C. [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Grill, D. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Rennenberg, H. [Institut fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Universitaet Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 053/054, D-79085 Freiburg (Germany); Haeberle, K.-H.; Matyssek, R. [Lehrstuhl fuer Oekophysiologie der Pflanzen, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Life Sciences Center Weihenstephan, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Tausz, M. [Institut fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften, Universitaet Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, A-8010 Graz (Austria)]|[[School of Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne, Water Street, Creswick, Vic. 3363 (Australia); Wieser, G. [Bundesamt und Forschungszentrum fuer Wald, Abteilung Forstpflanzenphysiologie, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2005-10-15

    We characterized leaf gas exchange and antioxidative defence of two-year-old seedlings and 60-year-old trees of Fagus sylvatica exposed to ambient (1xO{sub 3}) or two-fold ambient (2xO{sub 3}) O{sub 3} concentrations (maximum of 150 ppb) in a free-air canopy exposure system throughout the growing season. Decline in photosynthesis from sun-exposed to shaded conditions was more pronounced in adult than juvenile trees. Seedling leaves and leaves in the sun-exposed canopy had higher stomatal conductance and higher internal CO{sub 2} concentrations relative to leaves of adult trees and leaves in shaded conditions. There was a weak overall depression of photosynthesis in the 2xO{sub 3} variants across age classes and canopy positions. Pigment and tocopherol concentrations of leaves were significantly affected by canopy position and tree age, whereas differences between 1xO{sub 3} and 2xO{sub 3} regimes were not observed. Glutathione concentrations were significantly increased under 2xO{sub 3} across both age classes and canopy levels. Seedlings differed from adult trees in relevant physiological and biochemical traits in ozone response. The water-soluble antioxidative systems responded most sensitively to 2xO{sub 3} without regard of tree age or canopy position. - Ozone effects on leaf gas exchange and antioxidative systems of beech across tree age and canopy level were investigated in a free air exposure system.

  2. Lake Bathymetric DEM Shaded Relief Image

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Geo-referenced, shaded relief image of lake bathymetry classified at 5-foot depth intervals. This dataset has a cell resolution of 5 meters (occasionally 10m) as...

  3. Shaded Relief of Minnesota Elevation - Color

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This file is a product of a shaded relief process on the 30 meter resolution Digital Elevation Model data (dem30im3). This image was created using a custom AML...

  4. Shaded Relief of Minnesota Elevation - Black & White

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This file is a product of a shaded relief process on the 30 meter resolution Digital Elevation Model data (dem30im3). This image was created using a custom AML...

  5. Power producing sun shades; Elproducerende solafskaermninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, K.; Soerensen, Henrik; Katic, I.; Schmidt-Petersen, H.; AAroe, D.

    2012-01-15

    Integrating photovoltaics into sun shades takes advantage of the best opportunities to capture and utilize solar energy when the shades are most needed to shield users from solar radiation. The report describes results of a development project for solar shading in the form of broad, horizontal and rotating lamellae with solar cells and an integrated control function that simultaneously is optimized based on energy consumption and thermal and visual indoor climate. The project idea was to meet the needs for effective sun protection in the present office, commercial and public buildings, where glass facades are dominant. The conclusion of the development project is that it rarely would be optimal to integrate solar cells into movable shades. This will normally only be relevant in cases where it is justified by architectural considerations. (LN)

  6. Plant photomorphogenesis and canopy growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballare, C.L.; Scopel, A.L. [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1994-12-31

    An important motivation for studying photomorphogenesis is to understand the relationships among plant photophysiology in canopies, canopy productivity, and agronomic yield. This understanding is essential to optimize lighting systems used for plant farming in controlled environments (CE) and for the design of genetically engineered crop strains with altered photoresponses. This article provides an overview of some basic principles of plant photomorphogenesis in canopies and discusses their implications for (1) scaling up information on plant photophysiology from individual plants in CE to whole canopies in the field, and (2), designing lighting conditions to increase plant productivity in CE used for agronomic purposes [e.g. space farming in CE Life-Support-Systems]. We concentrate on the visible ({lambda} between 400 and 700 nm) and far red (FR; {lambda} > 700 nm) spectral regions, since the ultraviolet (UV; 280 to 400 nm) is covered by other authors in this volume.

  7. Utilizing In Situ Directional Hyperspectral Measurements to Validate Bio-Indicator Simulations for a Corn Crop Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Zhang, Qingyuan; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Russ, Andrew L.; Kustas, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Two radiative transfer canopy models, SAIL and the two-layer Markov-Chain Canopy Reflectance Model (MCRM), were coupled with in situ leaf optical properties to simulate canopy-level spectral band ratio vegetation indices with the focus on the photochemical reflectance index in a cornfield. In situ hyperspectral measurements were made at both leaf and canopy levels. Leaf optical properties were obtained from both sunlit and shaded leaves. Canopy reflectance was acquired for eight different relative azimuth angles (psi) at three different view zenith angles (Theta (sub v)), and later used to validate model outputs. Field observations of photochemical reflectance index (PRI) for sunlit leaves exhibited lower values than shaded leaves, indicating higher light stress. Canopy PRI expressed obvious sensitivity to viewing geometry, as a function of both Theta (sub v) and psi . Overall, simulations from MCRM exhibited better agreements with in situ values than SAIL. When using only sunlit leaves as input, the MCRM-simulated PRI values showed satisfactory correlation and RMSE, as compared to in situ values. However, the performance of the MCRM model was significantly improved after defining a lower canopy layer comprised of shaded leaves beneath the upper sunlit leaf layer. Four other widely used band ratio vegetation indices were also studied and compared with the PRI results. MCRM simulations were able to generate satisfactory simulations for these other four indices when using only sunlit leaves as input; but unlike PRI, adding shaded leaves did not improve the performance of MCRM. These results support the hypothesis that the PRI is sensitive to physiological dynamics while the others detect static factors related to canopy structure. Sensitivity analysis was performed on MCRM in order to better understand the effects of structure related parameters on the PRI simulations. Leaf area index (LAI) showed the most significant impact on MCRM-simulated PRI among the parameters

  8. The Influence of Dental Shade Guides and Experience on the Accuracy of Shade Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Ghanbarzadeh, Jalil; Amirinejad, Sahar; Alavi, Samin; Rajatihaghi, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    There is limited and inconsistent information on some factors affecting visual shade selection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of shade guide type and professional experience on shade-matching results. Thirty Dental students (DS), 30 General dentists (GDs) and 30 Dental specialists (S) participated in this study. The participants were asked to match six target tabs using two dental shade guides: Vitapan Classical (VC) and Vitapan 3D-Master (3D). An intraoral spectrophotometer was used for color measurement of target tabs and selected tabs. The color difference (ΔE) values between the target tab and selected tab were calculated. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired f-test (α = 0.05). Results of the first five best matches for each target tab were expressed as ΔE1 to ΔE5. Differences in the mean values of ΔE1 to ΔE5 between VC and 3D were compared using descriptive statistics. There were no significant differences among the three participating groups in ΔE values when the 3D was used (p = 0.389). However, significant differences were found with VC (p 3D-Master shade guide was used. Compared with Vitapan Classical shade guide, use of the Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide improves shade-matching results. Color, Experience, Gender, Selection, Shade, Visual. How to cite this article: Nakhaei M, Ghanbarzadeh J, Amirinejad S, Alavi S, Rajatihaghi H. The Influence of Dental Shade Guides and Experience on the Accuracy of Shade Matching. J Contemp Dent Pract 2016;17(1):22-26. Source of support: This study was supported by a grant (No. 920903) from the Vice Chancellor for Research of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The results presented here are based on undergraduate thesis (No. 2686) submitted to Mashhad School of Dentistry and Dental Research Center. None.

  9. Reliability and accuracy of four dental shade-matching devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Pusateri, Seungyee; Brewer, Jane D; Davis, Elaine L; Wee, Alvin G

    2009-03-01

    There are several electronic shade-matching instruments available for clinical use, but the reliability and accuracy of these instruments have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of 4 dental shade-matching instruments in a standardized environment. Four shade-matching devices were tested: SpectroShade, ShadeVision, VITA Easyshade, and ShadeScan. Color measurements were made of 3 commercial shade guides (Vitapan Classical, Vitapan 3D-Master, and Chromascop). Shade tabs were placed in the middle of a gingival matrix (Shofu GUMY) with shade tabs of the same nominal shade from additional shade guides placed on both sides. Measurements were made of the central region of the shade tab positioned inside a black box. For the reliability assessment, each shade tab from each of the 3 shade guide types was measured 10 times. For the accuracy assessment, each shade tab from 10 guides of each of the 3 types evaluated was measured once. Differences in reliability and accuracy were evaluated using the Standard Normal z test (2 sided) (alpha=.05) with Bonferroni correction. Reliability of devices was as follows: ShadeVision, 99.0%; SpectroShade, 96.9%; VITA Easyshade, 96.4%; and ShadeScan, 87.4%. A significant difference in reliability was found between ShadeVision and ShadeScan (P=.008). All other comparisons showed similar reliability. Accuracy of devices was as follows: VITA Easyshade, 92.6%; ShadeVision, 84.8%; SpectroShade, 80.2%; and ShadeScan, 66.8%. Significant differences in accuracy were found between all device pairs (P<.001) for all comparisons except for SpectroShade versus ShadeVision (P=.033). Most devices had similar high reliability (over 96%), indicating predictable shade values from repeated measurements. However, there was more variability in accuracy among devices (67-93%), and differences in accuracy were seen with most device comparisons.

  10. Sustaining northern red oak forests: managing oak from regeneration to canopy dominance in mature stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Dey; Gary W. Miller; John M. Kabrick

    2008-01-01

    Across the range of northern red oak, managers have problems sustaining current stocking of northern red oak in forests. Oak species are adapted to frequent stand disturbances that reduce the abundance of shade tolerant competitors and control fast-growing pioneer species. A widely recommended approach to regenerating northern red oak is to develop relatively large...

  11. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 1. Interplay between vertical structure and photosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation acclimation to changing climate, in particular elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), has been observed to include modifications to the biochemical and ecophysiological functioning of leaves and the structural components of the canopy. These responses have the potential to significantly modify plant carbon uptake and surface energy partitioning, and have been attributed with large-scale changes in surface hydrology over recent decades. While the aggregated effects of vegetation acclimation can be pronounced, they often result from subtle changes in canopy properties that require the resolution of physical, biochemical and ecophysiological processes through the canopy for accurate estimation. In this paper, the first of two, a multilayer canopy-soil-root system model developed to capture the emergent vegetation responses to environmental change is presented. The model incorporates both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways, and resolves the vertical radiation, thermal, and environmental regimes within the canopy. The tight coupling between leaf ecophysiological functioning and energy balance determines vegetation responses to climate states and perturbations, which are modulated by soil moisture states through the depth of the root system. The model is validated for three growing seasons each for soybean (C3) and maize (C4) using eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2, latent, and sensible heat collected at the Bondville (Illinois) Ameriflux tower site. The data set provides an opportunity to examine the role of important environmental drivers and model skill in capturing variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange. Vertical variation in radiative states and scalar fluxes over a mean diurnal cycle are examined to understand the role of canopy structure on the patterns of absorbed radiation and scalar flux magnitudes and the consequent differences in sunlit and shaded source/sink locations through the canopies. An analysis is made of the impact of

  12. Forests and Their Canopies: Achievements and Horizons in Canopy Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Kitching, Roger L; Cao, Min; Creedy, Thomas J; Fayle, Tom M; Freiberg, Martin; Hewitt, C N; Itioka, Takao; Koh, Lian Pin; Ma, Keping; Malhi, Yadvinder; Mitchell, Andrew; Novotny, Vojtech; Ozanne, Claire M P; Song, Liang; Wang, Han; Ashton, Louise A

    2017-06-01

    Forest canopies are dynamic interfaces between organisms and atmosphere, providing buffered microclimates and complex microhabitats. Canopies form vertically stratified ecosystems interconnected with other strata. Some forest biodiversity patterns and food webs have been documented and measurements of ecophysiology and biogeochemical cycling have allowed analyses of large-scale transfer of CO2, water, and trace gases between forests and the atmosphere. However, many knowledge gaps remain. With global research networks and databases, and new technologies and infrastructure, we envisage rapid advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the spatial and temporal dynamics of forests and their canopies. Such understanding is vital for the successful management and conservation of global forests and the ecosystem services they provide to the world. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Recruitment and attrition of associated plants under a shading crop canopy: Model selection and calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stilma, E.S.C.; Keesman, K.J.; Werf, van der W.

    2009-01-01

    Associated plant and animal diversity provides ecosystem services within crop production systems. The importance of the maintenance or restoration of diversity is therefore increasingly acknowledged. Here we study the population dynamics of associated annual plants (`weeds¿) during the growth of a

  14. Does Sub-canopy Longwave Radiation Enhancement Affect Boreal Snowmelt Dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranty, M. M.; Rutter, N.; Fletcher, C. G.; Kropp, H.; Derksen, C.; Mudryk, L.; Thackeray, C. W.; Todt, M.; Wang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Climate models currently underestimate the effects of warming air temperatures on springtime snow retreat across the northern hemisphere. This effect is particularly pronounced in boreal forests, where rates of warming are among the most rapid on earth. Inaccuracies in the timing of springtime snow retreat effectively alter land surface albedo and subsequently atmospheric temperatures, contributing to uncertainty in projections of future climate. Enhanced emission of longwave radiation beneath forest canopies is a potential mechanism for inaccurate model snowmelt dynamics. Specifically, the absorption of shortwave radiation and downward subsequent re-emission of longwave radiation by forest canopies is not accounted for in most climate models. Several observational studies have demonstrated enhanced downwelling longwave radiation fluxes beneath forest canopies, yet there has been little research as to whether this phenomenon affects snowmelt dynamics. In this study we examine the rate of decline in snow water equivalent (SWE) per unit temperature increase (i.e. mm °C-1) across the northern high-latitude regions using monthly GlobSnow and CRU data in conjunction with the GLC2000 vegetation map and several geospatial indicators of vegetation cover. We find greater reductions in SWE per unit temperature increase in boreal forests than in tundra. Within boreal forests, SWE reduction per unit temperature increase exhibits a significant positive correlation with forest canopy cover, and this relationship varies between dominant forest types. Greater declines in SWE per unit temperature increase in areas with higher forest canopy cover suggests that enhanced downwelling longwave radiation fluxes are stronger than canopy-shading effects on understory microclimate for determining rates of spring snowmelt across the boreal biome. Accurate process representation of sub-canopy longwave radiation fluxes may help to improve climate model representations of springtime snow cover

  15. Does triacylglycerol (TAG) serve a photoprotective function in plant leaves? An examination of leaf lipids under shading and drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchin, Renée M; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Deheinzelin, Audrey I; Adams, Mark A

    2017-11-01

    Plant survival in many ecosystems requires tolerance of large radiation loads, unreliable water supply and suboptimal soil fertility. We hypothesized that increased production of neutral lipids (triacylglycerols, TAGs) in plant leaves is a mechanism for dissipating excess radiation energy. In a greenhouse experiment, we combined drought and shade treatments and examined responses among four species differing in life form, habitat, and drought- and shade-tolerance. We also present a lipid extraction protocol suitable for sclerophyllous leaves of native Australian trees (e.g. Acacia, Eucalyptus). Fluorescence measurements indicated that plants exposed to full sunlight experienced mild photoinhibition during our experiment. Accumulation of TAGs did not follow photosynthetic capacity, but instead, TAG concentration increased with non-photochemical quenching. This suggests that plants under oxidative stress may increase biosynthesis of TAGs. Moderate drought stress resulted in a 60% reduction in TAG concentration in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Shading had no effect on TAGs, but increased concentrations of polar lipids in leaves; for example, acclimation to shade in Austrodanthonia spp., a native Australian grass, resulted in a 60% increase in associated polar lipids and higher foliar chlorophyll concentrations. Shading also reduced the digalactosyldiacylglycerol:monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG:MGDG) ratio in leaves, with a corresponding increase in the degree of unsaturation and thus fluidity of thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. Our results suggest that prevention of photodamage may be coordinated with accumulation of TAGs, although further research is required to determine if TAGs serve a photoprotective function in plant leaves. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Electromagnetic Scattering from Vegetation Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    Satellite-borne imaging radar has been proposed by the remote sensing community as a potential sensor for the acquisition of quantitative information about forested area on a global scale. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to develop retrieved algorithms that can provide reasonable estimate of vegetation biomass, leaf moisture content, and other physical parameters of tree canopies from multifrequency/multipolarization observations of their radar backscattering coefficients. Retrieval algorithms often are called "inverse problem" because their input/output parameters are the inverse of those associated with the direct problem, which in the present case refers to the development of a radar scattering model that relates the radar response to the canopy architecture and associated parameters. This thesis provides electromagnetic solutions to several problems associated with scattering from tree canopies. The forest canopy is modelled in the form of layers comprised of randomly distributed particles with known statistical properties. In Chapters 2-8 effective scattering models for different constituent particles of vegetation canopies are developed by employing appropriate asymptotic solutions and approximations. The effects of various physical features of the particles, such as curvature and variation in thickness for planar leaves and roughness for tree trunks, on their scattering behavior are examined. In Chapter 9 the scattering problem of inhomogeneous layered media is formulated via the vector radiative transfer equations and a first-order solution for the radar scattering coefficients is obtained. The radiative transfer solution is formulated in terms of two sets of input functions: the scattering matrices of the constituent particles, which are given in Chapters 2-8, and the size and orientation distribution functions of the particles. The radar scattering model and associated input functions can be used to conduct sensitivity analyses to determine the

  17. Color match of two different ceramic systems to selected shades of one shade guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corciolani, Gabriele; Vichi, Alessandro; Louca, Chris; Ferrari, Marco

    2011-03-01

    There are no consistent indications given by dental manufacturers on how to layer ceramics to achieve a color match to a shade selected from a dental shade guide. The technique for ceramic layering relies primarily on the skill and experience of ceramists and is not easily predictable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using a clinical spectrophotometer, the ability to color match shades selected with the 3D-Master shade guide using 2 different ceramic systems. Two ceramic systems were selected for this study, the VITA Omega 900 and VITA VM 13. For both systems, shades 2M3, 3M2, 4M2 of the VITA 3D-Master shade guide were selected. Thirty ceramic discs, 15 mm in diameter, were fabricated with different layer thickness ratios of opaque dentin, dentin, and enamel, maintaining a constant overall thickness. A clinical spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade) was used for color comparison. The measured ΔE values were statistically analyzed with a 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The 3-way ANOVA showed that the ceramic system (P3D-Master shade guide to be within the limits for clinical acceptability (ΔE≤ 3.3). VM 13 showed a statistically better color match. The layering scheme influenced the definitive color of the restoration. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of prolonged drought on the anatomy of sun and shade needles in young Norway spruce trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Roman; Volařík, Daniel; Urban, Josef; Børja, Isabella; Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Eldhuset, Toril Drabløs; Krokene, Paal

    2015-11-01

    Predicted increases in the frequency and duration of drought are expected to negatively affect tree vitality, but we know little about how water shortage will influence needle anatomy and thereby the trees' photosynthetic and hydraulic capacity. In this study, we evaluated anatomical changes in sun and shade needles of 20-year-old Norway spruce trees exposed to artificial drought stress. Canopy position was found to be important for needle structure, as sun needles had significantly higher values than shade needles for all anatomical traits (i.e., cross-sectional needle area, number of tracheids in needle, needle hydraulic conductivity, and tracheid lumen area), except proportion of xylem area per cross-sectional needle area. In sun needles, drought reduced all trait values by 10-40%, whereas in shade needles, only tracheid maximum diameter was reduced by drought. Due to the relatively weaker response of shade needles than sun needles in drought-stressed trees, the difference between the two needle types was reduced by 25% in the drought-stressed trees compared to the control trees. The observed changes in needle anatomy provide new understanding of how Norway spruce adapts to drought stress and may improve predictions of how forests will respond to global climate change.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Modelling of Solar Shading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Frederik Vildbrad; Liu, Mingzhe; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2017-01-01

    The use of solar shading in future low energy office buildings is essential for minimizing energy consumption for building services, while maintaining thermal conditions. Implementing solar shading technologies in energy calculations and thermal building simulation programs is essential in order...

  20. Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America map layer shows depth ranges using colors, with relief enhanced by shading. The image was derived from the National...

  1. USGS Hill Shade Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Hill Shade (or Shaded Relief) is a tile cache base map created from the National Elevation Dataset (NED), a seamless dataset of best available raster elevation...

  2. Topographic and Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Topographic and Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America map layer shows depth and elevation ranges using colors, with relief enhanced by shading. The image...

  3. The effect of colour defective vision on shade matching accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethell, J; Jarad, F D; Youngson, C C

    2006-09-01

    One hundred and forty one male dental students and staff were screened for colour-defective vision. Ten colour-defective and 20 non colour-defective subjects then carried out a shade matching exercise using nine selected shades and another matched, shade tab (to test for consistency) from Vita shade guides. All shade matching took place under standard lighting conditions. Each subject also completed a short questionnaire relevant to shade matching. There were no significant differences found between colour-defective and non colour-defective subjects in shade matching abilities. Although both subject groups were similar in their shade matching abilities, individuals with colour defective vision perceived it to be a slightly more difficult exercise.

  4. 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of Hawaii, with relief shading added to accentuate terrain...

  5. 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of Alaska, with relief shading added to accentuate terrain...

  6. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Modelling of Solar Shading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Frederik Vildbrad; Liu, Mingzhe; Heiselberg, Per

    2017-01-01

    The use of solar shading in future low energy office buildings is essential for minimizing energy consumption for building services, while maintaining thermal conditions. Implementing solar shading technologies in energy calculations and thermal building simulation programs is essential in order...... to demonstrate the effect of adaptive solar shading. In order to document the benefits of the shading technology, the description of the shading device in the thermal building simulation software must be described at a reasonably accurate level, related to the specific solar shading device. This research...... presents different approaches for modeling solar shading devices, demonstrating the level of accuracy in relation to measurement conducted in a full-scale façade test facility at Aalborg University. The research bridges the gap between increased complexity of solar shading technologies and the use...

  7. Species-specific variation in the importance of the spectral quality gradient in canopies as a signal for photosynthetic resource partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Thijs L; de Jong-VAN Berkel, Yvonne E M

    2004-11-01

    Plants adjust the distribution of photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll to canopy density. The importance of the gradient in the red : far-red ratio (R : FR) relative to the irradiance gradient was studied for its perception with respect to this partitioning of photosynthetic resources. Whether the relative importance of these two signals varied between six species of different growth habit (Phaseolus vulgaris, Lysimachia vulgaris, Hedera helix, Ficus benjamina, Carex acutiformis and Brachypodium pinnatum) was investigated further. Single leaves of plants were shaded in daylight by a spectrally neutral filter or a leaf. In another experiment, leaves were treated with supplemental FR. In most cases, treatment effects were evaluated after 2 weeks. Nitrogen and photosynthetic capacity (Amax) per leaf area, parameters pertaining to between-leaf resource partitioning, were strongly reduced in neutral shade but not additionally by spectral leaf shade. Supplemental FR reduced these parameters also, except in Carex. Acceleration of induction of senescence was observed in spectral leaf shade in primary bean leaves. Amax per unit chlorophyll, a parameter pertaining to within-leaf resource partitioning, was reduced in neutral shade, but not in spectral leaf shade or supplemental FR. Signalling mechanisms associated with perception of the R : FR gradient in canopies were less important than those associated with the irradiance gradient for between-leaf and within-leaf partitioning of photosynthetic resources. The relative importance of the signals differed between species because Carex was the only species for which no indications were found for an involvement of the spectral gradient in perception of canopy density.

  8. Solar shading control strategy for office buildings in cold climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røseth Karlsen, Line; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Bryn, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •Solar shading control strategy for office buildings in cold climate is developed. •Satisfying energy and indoor environmental performance is confirmed. •Importance of integrated evaluations when selecting shading strategy is illustrated.......Highlights •Solar shading control strategy for office buildings in cold climate is developed. •Satisfying energy and indoor environmental performance is confirmed. •Importance of integrated evaluations when selecting shading strategy is illustrated....

  9. Net herbage accumulation rate and crude protein content of Urochloa brizantha cultivars under shade intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto de Lima Meirelles

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of silvopastoral systems is a sustainable alternative for animal production in various regions of the Brazil. However to obtain satisfactory results in these systems, the selection of forage species that grows well in the shade should be done. The tolerance of plants to light restriction and the correctly choice of species, considering good nutritional values for these conditions has great importance. The study of artificial shading for forage production helps the clarification of issues related to the behavior of plants under reduced light prior to use in integrations with forests. The aim of the study was to evaluate the net herbage accumulation rate of forage (HAR and crude protein (CP of Urochloa brizantha cultivars (Marandu and Piatã under natural light and shading of 30 and 60%. The experiment was conducted at FMVZ - UNESP, Botucatu. The experimental design was a randomized block in factorial arrangement 3 x 2 (three shading levels: 0, 30 and 60%, two cultivars: Marandu and Piatã with three replications and repeated measures (3 cuts. Sample collection occurred when the cultivars reached 35 cm in height. The treatments with shading showed lower cutting intervals as compared to those subjected to full sunlight, because they have reached in a shorter time to time as determined cut-off criterion (mean of 37, 45 and 61 days for reduction of 60%, reduction of 30% and full sun. Significant effects (P<0.05 interaction cultivar x shade x cut on the net herbage accumulation rate (HAR. Most HAR (P<0.05 was observed for cv. Marandu 60% reduction in lightness (127 kg/ha/day due to increased production of stem during the first growing cycle. The lower HAR also occurred to Marandu, but under natural light in the third cut (34 kg/ha/day due to adverse weather conditions during the growth interval. The shadow effect and the cutting (P<0.05 affected CP. The percentage of CP on cultivars showed the highest values (average value of 9.27% in 60

  10. Canopy temperature depression at grain filling correlates to winter wheat yield in the U.S. southern high plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat breeding has improved drought tolerance over the years. However, our knowledge on drought tolerance in relation to the canopy temperature (CT) and grain yield is limited. A three-season wheat field study ending 2012, 2015, and 2016 was conducted at Bushland, Texas to investigate the relationsh...

  11. Young Women's Perceptions of the Relationship in Fifty Shades of Grey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Amy E; Nichols, Emily M; Carotta, Christin L; Kiuchi, Yuya; Perry, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    Millions of women are interacting with Fifty Shades of Grey-a best-selling novel and film. Yet, to date, no social science study has been undertaken to examine women's perceptions of the Fifty Shades relationship narrative in its film adaptation-what they deem appealing, what they deem unappealing, and what they would welcome or resist in their own relationship. In the present study, we used focus groups to examine women's perceptions of the relationship patterns in the Fifty Shades of Grey film. Focus groups were conducted with 35 young adult women (randomly sampled from the registrar's office of a large Midwestern university) immediately after watching the Fifty Shades film with the study team at a local theater within two days of the film's release. Seven semistructured questions concentrating on reactions to the relationship patterns between Christian Grey and Anastasia Steele depicted in the Fifty Shades film were asked, including general reactions, appealing and unappealing characteristics, romantic and dangerous elements, and aspects that participants would tolerate (or not tolerate) in their own relationships. While participants assessed parts of the relationship between Christian and Anastasia as exciting and romantic, they consistently indicated an unappealing lack of health in the relationship. Participants expressed grave concerns over Christian's stalking, controlling, manipulative, and emotionally abusive behavior, anger in sexual interactions, and neglect of Anastasia's needs. At the same time, they sympathized with and rationalized Christian's behaviors as a function of his personality, needs, and abilities. A small contingent implicated Anastasia in the unhealthy relationship process, whereas a broader majority of participants highlighted the challenges with trying to "speak up" in an unhealthy relationship like Christian and Anastasia's. When asked where participants would draw the line in their own relationship, participants indicated they would

  12. Effect of Dominant Shade Trees on Coffee Production in Manasibu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of shade trees species on coffee production in Manasibu district, West Ethiopia was assessed by the current study. It was aimed to (i) identify the most suitable dominant shade tree species for coffee production; (ii) assess the status of coffee production under different dominant coffee shade trees and unshaded areas ...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A glycidyl...

  14. Effects of street tree shade on asphalt concrete pavement performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson; J. Muchnick

    2005-01-01

    Forty-eight street segments were paired into 24 high-and low-shade pairs in Modesto, California, U.S. Field data were collected to calculate a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and Tree Shade Index (TSI) for each segment. Statistical analyses found that greater PCI was associated with greater TSI, indicating that tree shade was partially responsible for reduced pavement...

  15. Remote canopy hemispherical image collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Liu, Bingyu; Yang, Yi; Han, Fang; Cui, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Canopies are major part of plant photosynthesis and have distinct architectural elements such as tree crowns, whorls, branches, shoots, etc. By measuring canopy structural parameters, the solar radiation interception, photosynthesis effects and the spatio-temporal distribution of solar radiation under the canopy can be evaluated. Among canopy structure parameters, Leaf Area Index (LAI) is the key one. Leaf area index is a crucial variable in agronomic and environmental studies, because of its importance for estimating the amount of radiation intercepted by the canopy and the crop water requirements. The LAI can be achieved by hemispheric images which are obtained below the canopy with high accuracy and effectiveness. But existing hemispheric images canopy-LAI measurement technique is based on digital SLR camera with a fisheye lens. Users need to collect hemispheric image manually. The SLR camera with fisheye lens is not suit for long-term canopy-LAI outdoor measurement too. And the high cost of SLR limits its capacity. In recent years, with the development of embedded system and image processing technology, low cost remote canopy hemispheric image acquisition technology is becoming possible. In this paper, we present a remote hemispheric canopy image acquisition system with in-field/host configuration. In-field node based on imbed platform, low cost image sensor and fisheye lens is designed to achieve hemispherical image of plant canopy at distance with low cost. Solar radiation and temperature/humidity data, which are important for evaluating image data validation, are obtained for invalid hemispherical image elimination and node maintenance too. Host computer interacts with in-field node by 3G network. The hemispherical image calibration and super resolution are used to improve image quality in host computer. Results show that the remote canopy image collection system can make low cost remote canopy image acquisition for LAI effectively. It will be a potential

  16. Influence of Shading on Cooling Energy Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabczak, Sławomir; Bukowska, Maria; Proszak-Miąsik, Danuta; Nowak, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    The article presents an analysis of the building cooling load taking into account the variability of the factors affecting the size of the heat gains. In order to minimize the demand for cooling, the effect of shading elements installed on the outside on the windows and its effect on size of the cooling capacity of air conditioning system for the building has been estimated. Multivariate building cooling load calculations to determine the size of the reduction in cooling demand has derived. Determination of heat gain from the sun is laborious, but gives a result which reflects the influence of the surface transparent partitions, devices used as sunscreen and its location on the building envelope in relation to the world, as well as to the internal heat gains has great attention in obtained calculation. In this study, included in the balance sheet of solar heat gains are defined in three different shading of windows. Calculating the total demand cooling is made for variants assuming 0% shading baffles transparent, 50% shading baffles transparent external shutters at an angle of 45 °, 100% shading baffles transparent hours 12 from the N and E and from 12 from the S and W of the outer slat blinds. The calculation of the average hourly cooling load was taken into account the option assuming the hypothetical possibility of default by up to 10% of the time assumed the cooling season temperatures in the rooms. To reduce the consumption of electricity energy in the cooling system of the smallest variant identified the need for the power supply for the operation of the cooling system. Also assessed the financial benefits of the temporary default of comfort.

  17. EXAMINING THE PREFERENCE FOR SHADE STRUCTURES IN FARMED GREEN SEA TURTLES (CHELONIA MYDAS) AND SHADE'S EFFECT ON GROWTH AND TEMPERATURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martha; Mustin, Walter

    2017-03-01

    The Cayman Turtle Farm raises thousands of green sea turtles ( Chelonia mydas ) annually under aquaculture conditions. Historically, the turtles have been raised in tanks without routine access to a shade structure. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of adding a shade structure on curved carapace length (CCL) and weight gain of green sea turtles. In addition, water and cloacal temperatures were compared across treatment groups and shade cover preferences observed. Ninety turtles were split equally into three treatment groups for this 8-wk study. In the first group turtles were kept in tanks in full sun, the second group in half-shaded tanks, and the third group in tanks completely covered with shade cloth. Time-lapse cameras mounted above half-shaded tanks were used to determine turtle shade structure preferences throughout the day. There were no differences in CCL among treatment groups. Significant increases in weights were noted in turtles kept in full sun and half-shaded tanks versus the fully shaded tanks. Significantly higher water and cloacal turtle temperatures were noted in the full-sun tank compared with the half-shaded or completely shaded tanks. A significantly lower number of turtles was observed in the sun in the half-shaded tanks, indicating a possible preference by turtles for a shade structure. Results suggest that providing shade structures for sea turtles results in a significant decrease in both overall water temperature as well as a reduction in maximum high daily temperatures. Results also suggest that turtles exhibit a preference for shade structures when it is provided as an option. From these results, we recommend that a shade structure be provided when housing green sea turtles in outdoor enclosures.

  18. Interactive effects of spectral shading and mechanical stress on the expression and costs of shade avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anten, Niels P R; von Wettberg, Eric J; Pawlowski, Marcin; Huber, Heidrun

    2009-02-01

    The interacting effects of different environmental cues in determining a plant's phenotype and performance are poorly understood aspects of phenotypic plasticity. We examined the interacting effects of shading and mechanical stress (MS) on growth, reproduction, and mechanical stability. We subjected 10 grassland genotypes and 10 forest genotypes of Impatiens capensis to two levels of spectral shading and two levels of MS. Shade induced the production of taller, thinner internodes, but this response was inhibited by MS. This interactive effect was stronger in the grassland genotypes than in the forest genotypes, indicating that shade avoidance can be suppressed by MS and that the degree of this suppression differs between habitats. Among genotypes, greater plasticity in shade-induced internode elongation resulted in a larger reduction in the ability of plants to carry their own weight. This suggests that the occurrence of mechanical constraints may strongly contribute to the selection against shade-induced elongation responses in forest understory genotypes. Our results show that combined responses to different environmental cues can result in a fine-tuning of phenotypic expression by plants by maintaining the potential to strongly respond to single environmental cues but also by preventing potential future costs resulting from poor adaptation to other stresses.

  19. Compliance of secondary production and eco-exergy as indicators of benthic macroinvertebrates assemblages' response to canopy cover conditions in Neotropical headwater streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Marden Seabra; Callisto, Marcos; Marques, João Carlos

    2018-02-01

    Riparian vegetation cover influences benthic assemblages structure and functioning in headwater streams, as it regulates light availability and autochthonous primary production in these ecosystems.Secondary production, diversity, and exergy-based indicators were applied in capturing how riparian cover influences the structure and functioning of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in tropical headwater streams. Four hypotheses were tested: (1) open canopy will determine the occurrence of higher diversity in benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages; (2) streams with open canopy will exhibit more complex benthic macroinvertebrate communities (in terms of information embedded in the organisms' biomass); (3) in streams with open canopy benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages will be more efficient in using the available resources to build structure, which will be reflected by higher eco-exergy values; (4) benthic assemblages in streams with open canopy will exhibit more secondary productivity. We selected eight non-impacted headwater streams, four shaded and four with open canopy, all located in the Neotropical savannah (Cerrado) of southeastern Brazil. Open canopy streams consistently exhibited significantly higher eco-exergy and instant secondary production values, exemplifying that these streams may support more complex and productive benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Nevertheless, diversity indices and specific eco-exergy were not significantly different in shaded and open canopy streams. Since all the studied streams were selected for being considered as non-impacted, this suggests that the potential represented by more available food resources was not used to build a more complex dissipative structure. These results illustrate the role and importance of the canopy cover characteristics on the structure and functioning of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in tropical headwater streams, while autochthonous production appears to play a crucial role as food

  20. Impact of Canopy Cover on Butterfly Abundance and Diversity in Intermediate Zone Forest of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M.B Weerakoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify the influence of canopy cover on butterfly abundance in young secondary forest and regenerating forest at Maragamuwa area of Kumaragala forest reserve in Naula, Matale district of Sri Lanka. Line transect method was used to collect data. Hundred meter long five transects were established in each forest area. Butterfly abundance data were collected weekly for eight months from January to August 2014. Regenerating forest had low canopy cover (<50% than young secondary forest (20-90%. Total of 2,696 butterflies belonging to 87 species in six families were recorded. Some butterfly species were restricted to shady areas, but most butterflies were abundant in sunny areas. Butterflies in some families (Family Lycanidae, Nymphalidae, Pieridae were abundant in sunny conditions and some families (Family Hesperiidae, Papilionidae abundant in shade. ANOVA was conducted to identify the variation of number of species (F=54.05, p<0.001 and among abundance (F=10.49, p<0.05 with the canopy cover. Species richness was high in moderate canopy cover (20±5%. Negative Pearson correlation coefficient stated butterfly abundance decreased with the canopy cover (r=-0.91 and species richness decreased with canopy cover (r=-0.85.Some butterflies were common in sunny areas and some species were confined to shady areas. However, most of the species were generally found throughout the area. Regenerating forest encountered more shrubs than in young secondary forest, which butterflies preferred to food on. Main findings of the study were that butterfly abundance was high in sunny areas and butterfly species richness was high in moderate shady areas.

  1. Forests and their canopies: Archievements and horizons in canopy science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nakamura, A.; Kitching, R. L.; Cao, M.; Creedy, T. J.; Fayle, Tom Maurice; Freiberg, M.; Hewitt, C. N.; Itioka, T.; Koh, L. P.; Ma, K.; Malhi, Y.; Mitchell, A.; Novotný, Vojtěch; Ozanne, C. M. P.; Song, L.; Wang, H.; Ashton, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2017), s. 438-451 ISSN 0169-5347 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09427S; GA ČR GB14-36098G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 669609 - Diversity6continents Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity * canopy * cranes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 15.268, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534717300599

  2. Effects of shading on Vallisneria natans (Lour.) H. Hara growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Anthony David; Meng, F; Shen, X

    2013-01-01

    Effects of surface shading were measured on above- and below-ground biomass and fruit production of Vallisneria natans (Lour.) H. Hara plants grown from seed in replicated microcosm experiments, based on a control (no shading) and four treatments (25%, 50%, 75% and 90% shading). Above- and below......, but dry weight fruit production was significantly reduced at 90% shading. We conclude that above 50% surface shading, V. natans plants suffer reductions in accumulated biomass and investment in sexual reproduction. We contend that recent expansions in the extent of the native floating water chestnut Trapa...

  3. An audit of shade reproduction of fixed metal ceramic prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Karl; Jarad, Fadi D; Adeyemi, Adejumoke Adeola; Al-Shamaa, Sawsan

    2011-09-01

    This investigation aimed to evaluate the colour difference between metal ceramic restorations and their corresponding shades and any reasons for a colour mismatch in the dental laboratory. The colour of 50 consecutive metal ceramic restorations produced in a laboratory was measured using a spectrophotometer and compared to the shade tabs. Colour reproduction was optimal at porcelain thicknesses between 1.4-1.6 mm, varied between technicians within the same laboratory and was better for shades in the 2M group. Most crowns were above the threshold for a clinically acceptable shade match and almost all crowns were lighter than the corresponding shade tab.

  4. CO2-induced decrease of canopy stomatal conductance of mature conifer and broadleaved trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor-ngern, P.; Oren, R.; Ward, E. J.; Palmroth, S.; McCarthy, H. R.; domec, J.

    2013-12-01

    Together with canopy leaf area, mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS) controls forest-atmosphere exchanges of energy and mass. Expectations for stomatal response to elevated atmospheric [CO2] (CO2E) based on seedling studies range from large decreases of conductance in foliage of broadleaved species to little or no response in conifers. These responses are not directly translatable to forest canopies, and their underlying mechanisms are ill-defined. The uncertainty of canopy-scale stomatal response to CO2E reduces confidence in modeled predictions of future forest productivity and carbon sequestration, and of partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux. Thus, debates on the potential effects of CO2E-induced stomatal closure continue. We used a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in a 27-year-old, 25 m tall forest, to generate a whole-canopy CO2-response and test whether canopy-scale GS response to CO2E of widely distributed, fast growing shade-intolerant species, Pinus taeda (L.) and co-occurring broadleaved species dominated by Liquidambar styraciflua (L.), was indirectly affected by slow changes such as hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, as opposed to quickly responding to CO2 concentrations in the leaf-internal air space. Our results show indirect CO2E-induced reductions of GS of 10% and 30%, respectively, and no signs of a direct stomatal response even as CO2E was pushed to 685 μmol mol-1 (~1.8 of ambient). Modeling the effect of CO2E on the water, energy and carbon cycles of forests must consider slow-response indirect mechanisms producing large variation in the reduction of GS, such as the previously observed inconsistent CO2E effect on canopy leaf area and plant hydraulics. Moreover, the new generation of CO2E studies in forests must allow indirect effects caused by, e.g., hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, to play out. Such acclimation will be particularly prolonged in slowly developing ecosystems, such

  5. Exploring canopy structure and function as a potential mechanism of sustain carbon sequestration in aging forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotis, A. T.; Curtis, P.; Ricart, R.

    2013-12-01

    The notion that old-growth forests reach carbon neutrality has recently been challenged, but the mechanisms responsible for continued productivity have remained elusive. Increases in canopy structural complexity, defined by high horizontal and vertical variability in leaf distribution (rugosity), has been proposed as a mechanism for sustained high rates of above ground net primary production (ANPPw) in forests up to ~170 years by enhancing light use efficiency (LUE) and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). However, a detailed understanding of how rugosity affects resource distribution within and among trees leading to greater LUE and NUE is not known. We propose that leaves in high rugosity plots receive greater photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) than leaves in low rugosity plots, causing shifts from shade- to sun- adapted leaves into deeper portions of the canopy, which is thought to increase the photosynthetic capacity of individuals and lead to higher carbon assimilation in forests. The goal of this research was to: 1) quantify different canopy structural characteristics using a portable canopy LiDAR (PCL) and; 2) assess how these structural characteristics affect resource distribution and subsequent changes in leaf morphological, physiological and biochemical traits in three broadleaf species (e.g., Acer rubrum, Quercus rubra and Fagus grandifolia) and one conifer species (e.g., Pinus strobus) at different levels in the canopy in plots with similar leaf are index (LAI) but highly contrasting rugosity levels. We found that gap fraction had a strong positive correlation with rugosity. High rugosity plots had a bimodal distribution of LAI that was concentrated at the top and bottom of the canopy with an open midstory (between 10-50% of total canopy height) whereas low rugosity plots had a more even distribution of leaves. Leaf mass per area (LMA) of all broadleaved species had a strong positive correlation with cumulative gap fraction (P. strobus had a relatively

  6. Does greater specific leaf area plasticity help plants to maintain a high performance when shaded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Dawson, Wayne; Prati, Daniel; Haeuser, Emily; Feng, Yanhao; van Kleunen, Mark

    2016-12-01

    It is frequently assumed that phenotypic plasticity can be very advantageous for plants, because it may increase environmental tolerance (fitness homeostasis). This should, however, only hold for plastic responses that are adaptive, i.e. increase fitness. Numerous studies have shown shade-induced increases in specific leaf area (SLA), and there is wide consensus that this plastic response optimizes light capture and thus has to be adaptive. However, it has rarely been tested whether this is really the case. In order to identify whether SLA plasticity does contribute to the maintenance of high biomass of plant species under shaded conditions, a meta-analytical approach was employed. The data set included 280 species and 467 individual studies from 32 publications and two unpublished experiments. Plants increased their SLA by 55·4 % on average when shaded, while they decreased their biomass by 59·9 %. Species with a high SLA under high-light control conditions showed a significantly greater ability to maintain biomass production under shade overall. However, in contrast to the expectation of a positive relationship between SLA plasticity and maintenance of plant biomass, the results indicated that species with greater SLA plasticity were less able to maintain biomass under shade. Although a high SLA per se contributes to biomass homeostasis, there was no evidence that plasticity in SLA contributes to this. Therefore, it is argued that some of the plastic changes that are frequently thought to be adaptive might simply reflect passive responses to the environment, or result as by-products of adaptive plastic responses in other traits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Variation in color between intended matched shade and fabricated shade of dental porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Alvin G; Monaghan, Peter; Johnston, William M

    2002-06-01

    The total quantifiable color difference between shade matching and shade duplication has not been investigated formally. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the color difference of the total color replication process and the direction of the individual color parameters for 3 dental porcelain shade-matching systems. The shade of 11 porcelain master disks was determined visually and instrumentally using 3 porcelain shade-matching systems: (1) Vita Lumin/Vita VMK 68, (2) Vitapan 3D-Master/Vita Omega 900, and (3) Shofu ShadeEye-EX/Vintage Halo. Corresponding porcelain disks made of 4.5 mm opaque and 1 mm dentin porcelain were fabricated with each of the porcelain systems. The colors of the master disks and fabricated disks (CIE L* a* b* coordinates) were measured with a spectroradiometer with a 45 degrees /0 degrees configuration. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate within-group differences among the porcelain systems for the total color difference (Delta E) and direction of the color parameters (Delta L, Delta a, and Delta b). The Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range test was used for post-hoc analysis (alpha=.05). The largest mean Delta E was recorded for the Vitapan 3D-Master system, which was significantly different from the other systems (P=.0024). A significant difference was found between the interaction of the different systems and the direction of color (P=.0024). The amount of change within each color parameter was dependent on the porcelain system, as well as the amount of change among the color parameters. Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that reliable delivery of a properly matched restoration to existing porcelain restorations cannot be ensured regardless of the shade assessment method used (visual or computer-generated).

  8. Comparing L*a*b* color coordinates for natural teeth shades and corresponding shade tabs using a spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Alexander J; Doz, Priv; Nitschke, Ina; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    It was investigated whether L*a*b* values for teeth as well as shade tabs for one 3D-Master shade were similar to one another. Teeth were measured using Vita Easyshade and L*a*b* values and the closest 3D shade was then recorded. The shade-guide tabs were also measured using the same device. 3D-Master shades yielded different L*a*b* values for the teeth than for the tabs. L* and a* values, especially, were systematically different. Therefore, Easyshade L*a*b* values for teeth and tabs could not be directly compared.

  9. Effect of shading from jointing to maturity on high molecular weight glutenin subunit accumulation and glutenin macropolymer concentration in grain of winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, X.; Cai, J.; Li, H.

    2012-01-01

    the accumulation and concentration of HMW-GS in the grains. Consequently, S1 reduced falling number and SDS-sedimentation volume, while shortened dough development time (DDT) and dough stability time (DST). In contrast, S2 and S3 increased falling number, wet-gluten concentration and SDS-sedimentation volume......Accumulations of high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) and glutenin macropolymer (GMP) in wheat grains are important indicators of grain quality. Two wheat cultivars, Yangmai 158 (shading tolerant) and Yangmai 11 (shading intolerant) which contains the same subunit pairs of 7 + 8 and 2...... + 12, were used to evaluate the impacts of shading on HMW-GS accumulation and GMP concentration in the grain. Three shading levels were implemented from jointing to maturity, i.e. S1, S2 and S3, in which the plants received 8 %, 15 % and 23 % less radiation of the control (S0), respectively...

  10. Slow induction of photosynthesis on shade to sun transitions in wheat may cost at least 21% of productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Samuel H; Long, Stephen P

    2017-09-26

    Wheat is the second most important direct source of food calories in the world. After considerable improvement during the Green Revolution, increase in genetic yield potential appears to have stalled. Improvement of photosynthetic efficiency now appears a major opportunity in addressing the sustainable yield increases needed to meet future food demand. Effort, however, has focused on increasing efficiency under steady-state conditions. In the field, the light environment at the level of individual leaves is constantly changing. The speed of adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency can have a profound effect on crop carbon gain and yield. Flag leaves of wheat are the major photosynthetic organs supplying the grain of wheat, and will be intermittently shaded throughout a typical day. Here, the speed of adjustment to a shade to sun transition in these leaves was analysed. On transfer to sun conditions, the leaf required about 15 min to regain maximum photosynthetic efficiency. In vivo analysis based on the responses of leaf CO2 assimilation (A) to intercellular CO2 concentration (ci) implied that the major limitation throughout this induction was activation of the primary carboxylase of C3 photosynthesis, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). This was followed in importance by stomata, which accounted for about 20% of the limitation. Except during the first few seconds, photosynthetic electron transport and regeneration of the CO2 acceptor molecule, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RubP), did not affect the speed of induction. The measured kinetics of Rubisco activation in the sun and de-activation in the shade were predicted from the measurements. These were combined with a canopy ray tracing model that predicted intermittent shading of flag leaves over the course of a June day. This indicated that the slow adjustment in shade to sun transitions could cost 21% of potential assimilation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis

  11. Comparison of accuracies of an intraoral spectrophotometer and conventional visual method for shade matching using two shade guide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Vidhya; Anilkumar, S; Lylajam, S; Rajesh, C; Narayan, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the shade matching abilities of an intraoral spectrophotometer and the conventional visual method using two shade guides. The results of previous investigations between color perceived by human observers and color assessed by instruments have been inconclusive. The objectives were to determine accuracies and interrater agreement of both methods and effectiveness of two shade guides with either method. In the visual method, 10 examiners with normal color vision matched target control shade tabs taken from the two shade guides (VITAPAN Classical™ and VITAPAN 3D Master™) with other full sets of the respective shade guides. Each tab was matched 3 times to determine repeatability of visual examiners. The spectrophotometric shade matching was performed by two independent examiners using an intraoral spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade™) with five repetitions for each tab. Results revealed that visual method had greater accuracy than the spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer; however, exhibited significantly better interrater agreement as compared to the visual method. While VITAPAN Classical shade guide was more accurate with the spectrophotometer, VITAPAN 3D Master shade guide proved better with visual method. This in vitro study clearly delineates the advantages and limitations of both methods. There were significant differences between the methods with the visual method producing more accurate results than the spectrophotometric method. The spectrophotometer showed far better interrater agreement scores irrespective of the shade guide used. Even though visual shade matching is subjective, it is not inferior and should not be underrated. Judicious combination of both techniques is imperative to attain a successful and esthetic outcome.

  12. Combined surface and volumetric occlusion shading

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Matthias O.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The proposed algorithm extends the recently proposed Directional Occlusion Shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Shading, a view from the inside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea; Pont, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Shape from shading arose from artistic practice, and later experimental psychology, but its formal structure has only been established recently by computer vision. Some of its algorithms have led to useful applications. Psychology has reversely borrowed these formalisms in attempts to come to grips with shading as a depth cue. Results have been less than spectacular. The reason might well be that these formalisms are all based on Euclidean geometry and physics (radiometry), which, are the right tools in third person accounts, but have little relevance to first person accounts, and thus are biologically (and consequently psychologically) of minor interest. We propose a formal theory of the shading cue in the first person account, 'a view from the inside'. Such a perspective is also required for autonomous robots in AI. This formalism cannot be based on Euclidean geometry, nor on radiometry, but on the structure of pictorial space, and the structure of brightness space. The formalism, though different in kind, has a simple relation to the computer vision accounts. It has great robustness, is free from calibration issues, and allows purely local shape inferences. It is especially suited to biological (and thus AI) implementation. We consider a number of predictions and confront them with available empirical evidence.

  14. An evaluation of shade differences between natural anterior teeth in different age groups and gender using commercially available shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Shobha; Shetty, S Ramanand; Prithviraj, D R

    2012-12-01

    Shade selection with the help of shade guides and color matching the restorations to the natural dentition continues to be one of the most perplexing and frustrating problems in fixed prosthodontics. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the shade differences of the natural anterior teeth in different age groups and gender, within the cross sectional Bangalore, Karnataka population, using commercially available shade guides. The shade of a cross section of the population comprising of 400 subjects of both the sexes (800 incisors; 400 maxillary central incisors; 400 mandibular central incisors) visiting the outpatient Department of Government Dental College was selected randomly and evaluated visually by a single observer using three commonly used shade guides i.e. Vita Lumin, Chromascop and the Vita 3D Master. The incidence of the most common shades in the different age groups and gender using these shade guides was obtained and this data was subjected to the χ(2) test (p age group is A2/2R1.5/140 and A1/1M2/120 for the males and females using Vita Lumin, Vita 3D Master and Chromascop shade guides respectively. In the advanced age group the most common shade for the maxillary and mandibular incisors is A2/2R2.5/140 using the same order of shade guides. However the results showed no statistical significance in shade variation in males and females in different age groups using different shade guides. Although the incidence of males with darker teeth as compared to females was higher; the study showed no statistical significant correlation between shade differences in both the sexes. It is also observed that there is a significant darkening of teeth as the age advances.

  15. Effects of chronic elevated ozone exposure on gas exchange responses of adult beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) as related to the within-canopy light gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Löw, Markus; Heerdt, Christian; Grams, Thorsten E E; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer

    2009-02-01

    The effects of elevated O3 on photosynthetic properties in adult beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) were investigated in relation to leaf mass per area as a measure of the gradually changing, within-canopy light availability. Leaves under elevated O3 showed decreased stomatal conductance at unchanged carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, which was consistent with enhanced delta 13C of leaf organic matter, regardless of the light environment during growth. In parallel, increased energy demand for O3 detoxification and repair was suggested under elevated O3 owing to enhanced dark respiration. Only in shade-grown leaves,light-limited photosynthesis was reduced under elevated O3, this effect being accompanied by lowered F(v)/F(m). These results suggest that chronic O3 exposure primarily caused stomatal closure to adult beech trees in the field regardless of the within-canopy light gradient. However, light limitation apparently raised the O3 sensitivity of photosynthesis and accelerated senescence in shade leaves.

  16. Ozone Flux Measurement and Modelling on Leaf/Shoot and Canopy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Gerosa

    2011-02-01

    calculated by SVAT models often based on the energy balance of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system and on the big-leaf concept. This latter assumes the canopy as equivalent to a single leaf having a leaf area equal to the total area of all the plant’s leaves and lying at a certain height above the ground. The complexity of SVAT models ranges from one-dimensional to three-dimensional models. The most used are one-dimensional models in single-layer, dual-source or multi-layer version. The main uncertainties in flux modelling are currently associated to the estimation of the non-stomatal flux component and to the up-scaling process from leaf to canopy and stand level. For the latter a separate representation of sunlit and shaded leaves is recommended.

  17. Ozone Flux Measurement and Modelling on Leaf/Shoot and Canopy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludger Grünhage

    calculated by SVAT models often based on the energy balance of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system and on the big-leaf concept. This latter assumes the canopy as equivalent to a single leaf having a leaf area equal to the total area of all the plant’s leaves and lying at a certain height above the ground. The complexity of SVAT models ranges from one-dimensional to three-dimensional models. The most used are one-dimensional models in single-layer, dual-source or multi-layer version. The main uncertainties in flux modelling are currently associated to the estimation of the non-stomatal flux component and to the up-scaling process from leaf to canopy and stand level. For the latter a separate representation of sunlit and shaded leaves is recommended.

  18. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Jespersen, Michael L.

    2010-07-27

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMS) are organic - inorganic hybrids in which a core nanostructure is functionalized with a covalently attached corona and an ionically tethered organic canopy. NIMS are engineered to be liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and are of interest for a variety of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulse-field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments to measure the canopy dynamics of NIMS prepared from 18-nm silica cores modified by an alkylsilane monolayer possessing terminal sulfonic acid functionality, paired with an amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer canopy. Carbon NMR studies show that the block copolymer canopy is mobile both in the bulk and in the NIMS and that the fast (ns) dynamics are insensitive to the presence of the silica nanoparticles. Canopy diffusion in the NIMS is slowed relative to the neat canopy, but not to the degree predicted from the diffusion of hard-sphere particles. Canopy diffusion is not restricted to the surface of the nanoparticles and shows unexpected behavior upon addition of excess canopy. Taken together, these data indicate that the liquid-like behavior in NIMS is due to rapid exchange of the block copolymer canopy between the ionically modified nanoparticles. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  19. VitiCanopy: A Free Computer App to Estimate Canopy Vigor and Porosity for Grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bei, Roberta; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Steve; Edwards, Everard; Bianchini, Nicolò; Smith, Jason; Collins, Cassandra

    2016-04-23

    Leaf area index (LAI) and plant area index (PAI) are common and important biophysical parameters used to estimate agronomical variables such as canopy growth, light interception and water requirements of plants and trees. LAI can be either measured directly using destructive methods or indirectly using dedicated and expensive instrumentation, both of which require a high level of know-how to operate equipment, handle data and interpret results. Recently, a novel smartphone and tablet PC application, VitiCanopy, has been developed by a group of researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of Melbourne, to estimate grapevine canopy size (LAI and PAI), canopy porosity, canopy cover and clumping index. VitiCanopy uses the front in-built camera and GPS capabilities of smartphones and tablet PCs to automatically implement image analysis algorithms on upward-looking digital images of canopies and calculates relevant canopy architecture parameters. Results from the use of VitiCanopy on grapevines correlated well with traditional methods to measure/estimate LAI and PAI. Like other indirect methods, VitiCanopy does not distinguish between leaf and non-leaf material but it was demonstrated that the non-leaf material could be extracted from the results, if needed, to increase accuracy. VitiCanopy is an accurate, user-friendly and free alternative to current techniques used by scientists and viticultural practitioners to assess the dynamics of LAI, PAI and canopy architecture in vineyards, and has the potential to be adapted for use on other plants.

  20. Sharing rotting wood in the shade: ectomycorrhizal communities of co-occurring birch and hemlock seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanovic, Sarah K; Lilleskov, Erik A; Webster, Christopher R

    2015-02-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important nursery environment for many tree species. Understanding the communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECMF)and the effect of ECMF species on tree seedling condition in CWD will elucidate the potential for ECMF-mediated effects on seedling dynamics. In hemlock-dominated stands, we characterized ECMF communities associated with eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt) seedling pairs growing on CWD. Seedling foliage and CWD were analyzed chemically, and seedling growth, canopy cover, and canopy species determined. Thirteen fungal taxa, 12 associated with birch, and 6 with hemlock, were identified based on morphology and ITS sequencing. Five species were shared by co-occurring birch and hemlock, representing 75% of ectomycorrhizal root tips. Rarified ECMF taxon richness per seedling was higher on birch than hemlock. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed significant correlations between ordination axes, the mutually exclusive ECMF Tomentella and Lactarius spp., foliar N and K, CWD pH, and exchangeable Ca and Mg. Seedlings colonized by Lactarius and T. sublilacina differed significantly in foliar K and N, and CWD differed in exchangeable Ca and Mg. CWD pH and nutrient concentrations were low but foliar macro-nutrient concentrations were not. We hypothesize that the dominant ECMF are adapted to low root carbohydrate availability typical in shaded environments but differ in their relative supply of different nutrients.

  1. Ground based remote sensing and physiological measurements provide novel insights into canopy photosynthetic optimization in arctic shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magney, T. S.; Griffin, K. L.; Boelman, N.; Eitel, J.; Greaves, H.; Prager, C.; Logan, B.; Oliver, R.; Fortin, L.; Vierling, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Because changes in vegetation structure and function in the Arctic are rapid and highly dynamic phenomena, efforts to understand the C balance of the tundra require repeatable, objective, and accurate remote sensing methods for estimating aboveground C pools and fluxes over large areas. A key challenge addressing the modelling of aboveground C is to utilize process-level information from fine-scale studies. Utilizing information obtained from high resolution remote sensing systems could help to better understand the C source/sink strength of the tundra, which will in part depend on changes in photosynthesis resulting from the partitioning of photosynthetic machinery within and among deciduous shrub canopies. Terrestrial LiDAR and passive hyperspectral remote sensing measurements offer an effective, repeatable, and scalable method to understand photosynthetic performance and partitioning at the canopy scale previously unexplored in arctic systems. Using a 3-D shrub canopy model derived from LiDAR, we quantified the light regime of leaves within shrub canopies to gain a better understanding of how light interception varies in response to the Arctic's complex radiation regime. This information was then coupled with pigment sampling (i.e., xanthophylls, and Chl a/b) to evaluate the optimization of foliage photosynthetic capacity within shrub canopies due to light availability. In addition, a lab experiment was performed to validate evidence of canopy level optimization via gradients of light intensity and leaf light environment. For this, hyperspectral reflectance (photochemical reflectance index (PRI)), and solar induced fluorescence (SIF)) was collected in conjunction with destructive pigment samples (xanthophylls) and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements in both sunlit and shaded canopy positions.

  2. Reliability of conventional shade guides in teeth color determination

    OpenAIRE

    Todorović Ana; Todorović Aleksandar; Špadijer-Gostović Aleksandra; Lazić Vojkan; Miličić Biljana; Đurišić Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Color matching in prosthodontic therapy is a very important task because it influences the esthetic value of dental restorations. Visual shade matching represents the most frequently applied method in clinical practice. Instrumental measurements provide objective and quantified data in color assessment of natural teeth and restorations. In instrumental shade analysis, the goal is to achieve the smallest ΔE value possible, indicating the most accurate shade match. The aim...

  3. Fine Root Abundance and Dynamics of Stone Pine (Pinus cembra) at the Alpine Treeline Is Not Impaired by Self-shading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubisch, Petra; Leuschner, Christoph; Coners, Heinz; Gruber, Andreas; Hertel, Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    Low temperatures are crucial for the formation of the alpine treeline worldwide. Since soil temperature in the shade of tree canopies is lower than in open sites, it was assumed that self-shading may impair the trees' root growth performance. While experiments with tree saplings demonstrate root growth impairment at soil temperatures below 5-7°C, field studies exploring the soil temperature - root growth relationship at the treeline are missing. We recorded soil temperature and fine root abundance and dynamics in shaded and sun-exposed areas under canopies of isolated Pinus cembra trees at the alpine treeline. In contrast to the mentioned assumption, we found more fine root biomass and higher fine root growth in colder than in warmer soil areas. Moreover, colder areas showed higher fine root turnover and thus lower root lifespan than warmer places. We conclude that P. cembra balances enhanced fine root mortality in cold soils with higher fine root activity and by maintaining higher fine root biomass, most likely as a response to shortage in soil resource supply. The results from our study highlight the importance of in situ measurements on mature trees to understand the fine root response and carbon allocation pattern to the thermal growth conditions at the alpine treeline.

  4. The effect of canopy cover and seasonal change on host plant quality for the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundel, Ralph; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Sulzman, Christina L.

    1998-01-01

    Larvae of the Karner blue butterfly, Lycaeides melissa samuelis, feed solely on wild lupine, Lupinus perennis, from the emergence to summer senescence of the plant. Wild lupine is most abundant in open areas but Karner blue females oviposit more frequently on lupines growing in moderate shade. Can differences in lupine quality between open and shaded areas help explain this disparity in resource use? Furthermore, many lupines are senescent before the second larval brood completes development. How does lupine senescence affect larval growth? We addressed these questions by measuring growth rates of larvae fed lupines of different phenological stages and lupines growing under different shade conditions. The habitat conditions under which lupines grew and plant phenological stage did not generally affect final larval or pupal weight but did significantly affect duration of the larval period. Duration was shortest for larvae fed leaves from flowering lupines and was negatively correlated with leaf nitrogen concentration. Ovipositing in areas of moderate shade should increase second-brood larval exposure to flowering lupines. In addition, larval growth was significantly faster on shade-grown lupines that were in seed than on similar sun-grown lupines. These are possible advantages of the higher-than-expected oviposition rate on shade-grown lupines. Given the canopy-related trade-off between lupine abundance and quality, maintenance of canopy heterogeneity is an important conservation management goal. Larvae were also fed leaves growing in poor soil conditions and leaves with mildew infection. These and other feeding treatments that we anticipated would inhibit larval growth often did not. In particular, ant-tended larvae exhibited the highest weight gain per amount of lupine eaten and a relatively fast growth rate. This represents an advantage of ant tending to Karner blue larvae.

  5. Effects of shading on Vallisneria natans (Lour. H. Hara growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox A.D.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Effects of surface shading were measured on above- and below-ground biomass and fruit production of Vallisneria natans (Lour. H. Hara plants grown from seed in replicated microcosm experiments, based on a control (no shading and four treatments (25%, 50%, 75% and 90% shading. Above- and below-ground biomass was significantly reduced at treatments above 50% shading and first pistillate and staminate florescence dates were significantly delayed above 75% and 50% shading, respectively. Ratios of mature to unripe fruits produced (both in number or dry weight did not differ between shading treatments, but dry weight fruit production was significantly reduced at 90% shading. We conclude that above 50% surface shading, V. natans plants suffer reductions in accumulated biomass and investment in sexual reproduction. We contend that recent expansions in the extent of the native floating water chestnut Trapa spp. at seasonally inundated wetlands in the Yangtze River floodplain could, by shading, have contributed to the reduction in annual biomass and seed production of V. natans, contributing to declines in distribution and abundance.

  6. Digital shaded-relief map of Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Christopher P.; Hackley, Paul C.; Urbani, Franco

    2004-01-01

    The Digital Shaded-Relief Map of Venezuela is a composite of more than 20 tiles of 90 meter (3 arc second) pixel resolution elevation data, captured during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in February 2000. The SRTM, a joint project between the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), provides the most accurate and comprehensive international digital elevation dataset ever assembled. The 10-day flight mission aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle Endeavour obtained elevation data for about 80% of the world's landmass at 3-5 meter pixel resolution through the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology. SAR is desirable because it acquires data along continuous swaths, maintaining data consistency across large areas, independent of cloud cover. Swaths were captured at an altitude of 230 km, and are approximately 225 km wide with varying lengths. Rendering of the shaded-relief image required editing of the raw elevation data to remove numerous holes and anomalously high and low values inherent in the dataset. Customized ArcInfo Arc Macro Language (AML) scripts were written to interpolate areas of null values and generalize irregular elevation spikes and wells. Coastlines and major water bodies used as a clipping mask were extracted from 1:500,000-scale geologic maps of Venezuela (Bellizzia and others, 1976). The shaded-relief image was rendered with an illumination azimuth of 315? and an altitude of 65?. A vertical exaggeration of 2X was applied to the image to enhance land-surface features. Image post-processing techniques were accomplished using conventional desktop imaging software.

  7. Sinai Peninsula, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Sinai Peninsula, located between Africa and Asia, is a result of those two continents pulling apart from each other. Earth's crust is cracking, stretching, and lowering along the two northern branches of the Red Sea, namely the Gulf of Suez, seen here on the west (left), and the Gulf of Aqaba, seen to the east (right). This color-coded shaded relief image shows the triangular nature of the peninsula, with the coast of the Mediterranean Sea forming the northern side of the triangle. The Suez Canal can be seen as the narrow vertical blue line in the upper left connecting the Red Sea to the Mediterranean. The peninsula is divided into three distinct parts; the northern region consisting chiefly of sandstone, plains and hills, the central area dominated by the Tih Plateau, and the mountainous southern region where towering peaks abound. Much of the Sinai is deeply dissected by river valleys, or wadis, that eroded during an earlier geologic period and break the surface of the plateau into a series of detached massifs with a few scattered oases. Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations. Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed

  8. OpenGL 4 shading language cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, David

    2013-01-01

    OpenGL Shading Language 4 Cookbook is a hands-on guide that gets straight to the point - actually creating graphics, instead of just theoretical learning. Each recipe is specifically tailored to satisfy your appetite for producing real-time 3-D graphics using the latest GLSL specification.This book is for OpenGL programmers looking to use the modern features of GLSL 4 to create real-time, three-dimensional graphics. Familiarity with OpenGL programming, along with the typical 3D coordinate systems, projections, and transformations is assumed. It can also be useful for experienced GLSL programme

  9. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia N.M. Yanagi; Marcos H. Costa

    2011-01-01

    .... Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy...

  10. Fifty shades of exploitation: Fan labor and Fifty Shades of Grey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethan Jones

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This exploration of the debates that have taken place in fandom over the ethics of pulling fan fiction and publishing it as original work draws on the notion of the fannish gift economy, which postulates that gifts such as fan fiction and fan art have value in the fannish community because they are designed to create and cement its social structure. Tension exists between fans who subscribe to the notion of a fannish gift economy and those who exploit fandom by using it to sell their pulled-to-publish works. An examination of E. L. James's 2012 Fifty Shades trilogy (comprising the books Fifty Shades of Grey, Fifty Shades Darker, and Fifty Shades Freed, which began as Twilight fan fiction, in addition to Twilight fan art sold through sites such as Redbubble and Etsy, demonstrates a tension between the two modes of fan expression: sale of artworks appears to be an acceptable practice in fandom, but the commercial sale of fan fic, even when marketed as original fiction, is widely contested.

  11. Nondestructive, stereological estimation of canopy surface area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulfsohn, Dvora-Laio; Sciortino, Marco; Aaslyng, Jesper M.

    2010-01-01

    a canopy using the smooth fractionator, (ii) sampling of leaves from the selected plants using the fractionator, and (iii) area estimation of the sampled leaves using point counting. We apply this procedure to estimate the total area of a chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium L.) canopy and evaluate both...

  12. The impact of modifying antenna size of photosystem II on canopy photosynthetic efficiency – development of a new canopy photosynthesis model scaling from metabolism to canopy level processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canopy photosynthesis describes photosynthesis of an entire crop field and positively correlates with biomass production. Much effort in crop breeding has focused on improving canopy architecture and hence light distribution inside the canopy. Here, we develop a new integrated canopy photosynthesis ...

  13. [Effects of shade and competition of Chenopodium album on photosynthesis, fluorescence and growth characteristics of Flaveria bidentis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Li, Jing-Shi; Guo, Ai-Ying; Qi, Yan-Ling; Li, Yan-Sheng; Zhang, Feng-Juan

    2014-09-01

    It is necessary to elucidate its growth mechanism in order to prevent and control the further spread of Flaveria bidentis, an invasive plant in China. The effects of shading (shading rate of 0, 50% and 80%, respectively) and planting pattern (single cropping of F. bidentis, single cropping of Chenopodium album and their intercropping) on germination rate, fluorescence characteristics and growth characteristics of the two plants were investigated. The results showed that moderate shading contributed to emergence rate, but emergence rate of F. bidentis was not uniform, which was one of important factors as a stronger invader. With the increasing light intensity, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), photochemical quenching (qP), electron transport rate of PS II (ETR), quantum yield of PS II (Y), non-photochemical quenching (qN), water use efficiency (WUE), shoot bio-mass rate (SMR), crown width (CW) and dry biomass (DM) increased, specific leaf area (SLA) decreased, LMR of F. bidentis significantly increased, LMR of C. album changed insignificantly, and the increment of DM of F. bidentis was higher than that of C. album. In 80% shade treatment, Pn and DM of F. bidentis were lower than those of C. album. In natural light treatment, Pn, qN, WUE and relative competitive index (RCI) were the highest, CW and DM of intercropped F. bidentis and Pn, Y of C. album were significantly lower than that of the respective single treatment. F. bidentis had higher light saturation point (LSP) and light compensation point (LCP). In conclusion, the shade-tolerant ability of F. bidentis was weaker than that of C. album, but it was reversed in natural light treatment. The two plants adapted to the weak light in 80% shade treatment by increasing SLA and decreasing LMR. F. bidentis improved competition under natural light by increasing SMR and decreasing CW.

  14. Differential effect of whole-ear shading after heading on the physiology, biochemistry and yield index of stay-green and non-stay-green wheat genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhong, Shengfu; Sun, Sifan; Fatima, Syeda Akash; Zhang, Min; Chen, Wanquan; Huang, Qianglan; Tang, Shengwen; Luo, Peigao

    2017-01-01

    Two winter wheat cultivars (the functional stay-green CN12 and non-stay-green CN19) were used to investigate the effects of ear-shading on grain yield and to elucidate the differential mechanisms of different cultivars. The photosynthetic parameters, chlorophyll fluorescence, antioxidant enzyme activities, and chlorophyll contents were measured 0, 15 and 30 days after heading (DAH) under both shaded and non-shaded conditions. The final grain-yield index was also measured. Shading had a smaller effect on the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), stomatal conductance (Gs), maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and coefficient of non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (qN) but a greater effect on both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in CN12 than it did in CN19. Shading slightly altered the timeframe of leaf senescence in CN12 and may have accelerated leaf senescence in CN19. Moreover, shading had only a small effect on the weight of grains per spike (WGS) in CN12 compared with CN19, mainly resulting from the number of grains per spike (NGS) rather than the 1000-grain weight (SGW). In conclusion, the flag leaves of functional stay-green wheat could serve as potential "buffers" and/or "compensators" for ear photosynthesis, which is actively regulated by the antioxidant enzyme system and prevents yield loss. Thus, a functional stay-green genotype could be more tolerant to environmental stress than a non-stay-green genotype.

  15. Microwave Propagation Through Cultural Vegetation Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Ahad

    The need to understand the interaction of microwaves with vegetation canopies has markedly increased in recent years. This is due to advances made in remote sensing science, microwave technology, and signal processing circuits. One class of the earth's vegetation cover is man-made canopies, such as agricultural fields, orchards, and artificial forests. Contrary to natural vegetation terrain, location, spacing, and density of plants in a man-made vegetation canopy are deterministic quantities. As a result, the semi-deterministic nature of cultural vegetation canopies violate the random assumption of the radiative transfer theory and leads to experimented results that are in variance with model calculations. Hence, an alternative approach is needed to model the interaction of microwaves with such canopies. This thesis examines the propagation behavior through a canopy of corn plants. The corn canopy was selected as a representative of cultural vegetation canopies that are planted in parallel rows with an approximately fixed spacing between adjacent plants. Several experimental measurements were conducted to determine the transmission properties of a corn canopy in the 1-10 GHz range. The measurements which included horizontal propagation through the canopy as well as propagation at oblique incidence, were performed for defoliated canopies and for canopies with leaves. Through experimental observations and model development, the propagation behavior was found to be strongly dependent on the wavelength and the path length. At a wavelength in the neighborhood of 20 cm, for example, it was found that scattering by the stalks was coherent in nature for waves propagating horizontally through the canopy, which necessitated the development of a coherent-field model that uses Bragg scattering to account for the observed interference pattern in the transmitted beam. As the wavelength is made shorter, the semi-random spacing between plants becomes significant relative to the

  16. [Application and comparison of two shade guide training systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Xu, Tong-kai; Xu, Ming-ming; Feng, Hai-lan; Song, Guang-ying

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of shade guide training box and shade guide training software on shade matching ability of observers when used separately. To find out the difference between two training plans when the two training methods were used in combination, and to provide information on shade matching training system. Sixty-two postgraduate dental students who specialized in prosthodontics with 1 to 5 year clinical experience were enrolled in this study. At base line, each participant were asked to match 7 standard shade tabs which have been randomly chosen from Vita 3D-Master shade guide and 7 intermediate shade tabs from Vita bleached guide 3D-Master. Then the subjects were allocated to 2 groups [Toothguide Training Box (TTB) group and Toothguide Training (TT) group] according to the baseline data. Participants in group TTB received training session once a week for 3 weeks, while those in group TT received TT training session once a week for 3 weeks. All participants took a middle term shade-matching test. Then the two groups exchange the training methods and repeat the whole process, a final test was given to each participant. The elapsed time and number of accurate shade matching were recorded for each training session. Wilcoxon signed ranks test and ANOVA were used in data analysis. There were no significant differences in the number of accurate shade matching (standard shade tab and the sum) between group TTB (4.4 +/- 1.3 and 5.3 +/- 1.6) and TT (4.0 +/- 1.4 and 4.9 +/- 1.5) in the middle term test with higher value found in group TTB. In the final test, the number of accurate shade matching (standard shade tab and the sum) in group TT (4.9 +/- 0.8 and 6.4 +/- 0.8) was higher than that in group TTB (4.7 +/- 1.1 and 5.8 +/- 0.9), but significant difference was found only when the sum number of accurate shade matching was compared between the two groups (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between data from middle term test and from final test in group

  17. Influence of Gender on Visual Shade Matching in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; Perez, Maria M; Della Bona, Alvaro

    2017-04-01

    Accuracy on visual shade matching (VSM) is one of the most difficult procedures in esthetic dentistry. Some variables can influence on this process and gender is one of the most controversial. This observational study evaluated the influence of gender on accuracy of VSM. One-hundred observers (65 females and 35 males) shade matched four human upper central incisors (UCI) to shade tabs from Vita Classical (VC) shade guide. In addition, the spectral reflectance values from the four UCI and from the 16 VC shade tabs were measured using a spectroradiometer (SP). Measurements were performed over a gray background, inside a viewing booth and under D65 illuminant (diffuse/0º geometry). CIELAB coordinates (L*, a*, and b*) were calculated according to CIE D65 illuminant and CIE 2º Standard Observer. Instrumental shade matching for each UCI, based on minimum color difference, was performed using two color difference metrics (CIELAB and CIEDE2000(2:1:1)). Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and McNemar test (α = 0.05). Irrespective of the color difference metric, the most prevalent shade performed by females showed greater success (50% for CIELAB and 100% for CIEDE2000(2:1:1)) than males (25% for CIELAB and 50% for CIEDE2000(2:1:1)). However, such difference on gender was statistically significant only when using CIEDE2000(2:1:1) color difference metric (p ≤ 0.05). The most prevalent shade option resultant from VSM performed by females using VC shade guide perfectly agreed (100% success rate) with measurements from SP and CIEDE2000(2:1:1) color difference metric. The ability to understand and distinguish color differences in VSM is critical in clinical dentistry. Variation in shade perception due to observer gender can be minimized using additional observers and/or improving shade matching ability. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:E15-E23, 2017). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Leaves in a Cotton Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Kupinski, Meredith; French, Andrew; Chipman, Russell; Dahlgren, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Remotely sensing plant canopy water status remains a long-term goal of remote sensing research. Established approaches to estimating canopy water status the Crop Water Stress Index, the Water Deficit Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness involve measurements in the thermal or reflective infrared. Here we report plant water status estimates based upon analysis of polarized visible imagery of a cotton canopy measured by ground Multi-Spectral Polarization Imager (MSPI). Such estimators potentially provide access to the plant hydrological photochemistry that manifests scattering and absorption effects in the visible spectral region.Twice during one day, +- 3 hours from solar noon, we collected polarized imagery and relative water content data on a cotton test plot located at the Arid Land Agricultural Research Center, United States Department of Agriculture, Maricopa, AZ. The test plot, a small portion of a large cotton field, contained stressed plants ready for irrigation. The evening prior to data collection we irrigated several rows of plants within the test plot. Thus, ground MSPI imagery from both morning and afternoon included cotton plants with a range of water statuses. Data analysis includes classifying the polarized imagery into sunlit reflecting, sunlit transmitting, shaded foliage and bare soil. We estimate the leaf surface reflection and interior reflection based upon the per pixel polarization and sunview directions. We compare our cotton results with our prior polarization results for corn and soybean leaves measured in the lab and corn leaves measured in the field.

  19. A photosynthesis-based two-leaf canopy stomatal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model with single-layer sunlit and shaded leaf canopy scaling is implemented and evaluated in a diagnostic box model with the Pleim-Xiu land surface model (PX LSM) and ozone deposition model components taken directly from the meteorology and air quality modeling system—WRF/CMAQ (Weather Research and Forecast model and Community Multiscale Air Quality model). The photosynthesis-based model for PX LSM (PX PSN) is evaluated at a FLUXNET site for implementation against different parameterizations and the current PX LSM approach with a simple Jarvis function (PX Jarvis). Latent heat flux (LH) from PX PSN is further evaluated at five FLUXNET sites with different vegetation types and landscape characteristics. Simulated ozone deposition and flux from PX PSN are evaluated at one of the sites with ozone flux measurements. Overall, the PX PSN simulates LH as well as the PX Jarvis approach. The PX PSN, however, shows distinct advantages over the PX Jarvis approach for grassland that likely result from its treatment of C3 and C4 plants for CO2 assimilation. Simulations using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) leaf area index (LAI) rather than LAI measured at each site assess how the model would perform with grid averaged data used in WRF/CMAQ. MODIS LAI estimates degrade model performance at all sites but one site having exceptionally old and tall trees. Ozone deposition velocity and ozone flux along with LH

  20. Twenty-two years of warming, fertilisation and shading of subarctic heath shrubs promote secondary growth and plasticity but not primary growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Campioli

    Full Text Available Most manipulation experiments simulating global change in tundra were short-term or did not measure plant growth directly. Here, we assessed the growth of three shrubs (Cassiope tetragona, Empetrum hermaphroditum and Betula nana at a subarctic heath in Abisko (Northern Sweden after 22 years of warming (passive greenhouses, fertilisation (nutrients addition and shading (hessian fabric, and compare this to observations from the first decade of treatment. We assessed the growth rate of current-year leaves and apical stem (primary growth and cambial growth (secondary growth, and integrated growth rates with morphological measurements and species coverage. Primary- and total growth of Cassiope and Empetrum were unaffected by manipulations, whereas growth was substantially reduced under fertilisation and shading (but not warming for Betula. Overall, shrub height and length tended to increase under fertilisation and warming, whereas branching increased mostly in shaded Cassiope. Morphological changes were coupled to increased secondary growth under fertilisation. The species coverage showed a remarkable increase in graminoids in fertilised plots. Shrub response to fertilisation was positive in the short-term but changed over time, likely because of an increased competition with graminoids. More erected postures and large, canopies (requiring enhanced secondary growth for stem reinforcement likely compensated for the increased light competition in Empetrum and Cassiope but did not avoid growth reduction in the shade intolerant Betula. The impact of warming and shading on shrub growth was more conservative. The lack of growth enhancement under warming suggests the absence of long-term acclimation for processes limiting biomass production. The lack of negative effects of shading on Cassiope was linked to morphological changes increasing the photosynthetic surface. Overall, tundra shrubs showed developmental plasticity over the longer term. However, such

  1. The influence of apical and basal defoliation on the canopy structure and biochemical composition of Vitis vinifera cv. Shiraz grapes and wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pangzhen; Wu, Xiwen; Needs, Sonja; Liu, Di; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Howell, Kate

    2017-07-01

    Defoliation is a commonly used viticultural technique to balance the ratio between grapevine vegetation and fruit. Defoliation is conducted around the fruit zone to reduce the leaf photosynthetic area, and to increase sunlight exposure of grape bunches. Apical leaf removal is not commonly practiced, and therefore its influence on canopy structure and resultant wine aroma is not well studied. This study quantified the influences of apical and basal defoliation on canopy structure parameters using canopy cover photography and computer vision algorithms. The influence of canopy structure changes on the chemical compositions of grapes and wines was investigated over two vintages (2010-11 and 2015-16) in Yarra Valley, Australia. The Shiraz grapevines were subjected to five different treatments: no leaf removal (Ctrl); basal (TB) and apical (TD) leaf removal at veraison and intermediate ripeness, respectively. Basal leaf removal significantly reduced the leaf area index and foliage cover and increased canopy porosity, while apical leaf removal had limited influences on canopy parameters. However, the latter tended to result in lower alcohol level in the finished wine. Statistically significant increases in pH and decreases in TA was observed in shaded grapes, while no significant changes in the color profile and volatile compounds of the resultant wine were found. These results suggest that apical leaf removal is an effective method to reduce wine alcohol concentration with minimal influences on wine composition.

  2. The Influence of Apical and Basal Defoliation on the Canopy Structure and Biochemical Composition of Vitis vinifera cv. Shiraz Grapes and Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangzhen Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Defoliation is a commonly used viticultural technique to balance the ratio between grapevine vegetation and fruit. Defoliation is conducted around the fruit zone to reduce the leaf photosynthetic area, and to increase sunlight exposure of grape bunches. Apical leaf removal is not commonly practiced, and therefore its influence on canopy structure and resultant wine aroma is not well-studied. This study quantified the influences of apical and basal defoliation on canopy structure parameters using canopy cover photography and computer vision algorithms. The influence of canopy structure changes on the chemical compositions of grapes and wines was investigated over two vintages (2010–2011 and 2015–2016 in Yarra Valley, Australia. The Shiraz grapevines were subjected to five different treatments: no leaf removal (Ctrl; basal (TB and apical (TD leaf removal at veraison and intermediate ripeness, respectively. Basal leaf removal significantly reduced the leaf area index and foliage cover and increased canopy porosity, while apical leaf removal had limited influences on canopy parameters. However, the latter tended to result in lower alcohol level in the finished wine. Statistically significant increases in pH and decreases in TA was observed in shaded grapes, while no significant changes in the color profile and volatile compounds of the resultant wine were found. These results suggest that apical leaf removal is an effective method to reduce wine alcohol concentration with minimal influences on wine composition.

  3. Socioeconomic benefits of shade trees in coffee production systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffea Arabica is extensively cultivated by households under a variety of shade trees in southwestern Ethiopia. The main purpose of this study was to assess the overall farmers' perception on the benefits of shade trees in coffee production systems in southwestern part of Ethiopia. Semistructured questionnaires were ...

  4. Growth and morphogenesis of sun and shade plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    A number of species of sun and shade plants in the vegetative phase were grown in different light intensities, different light qualities (r/fr ratio) and different combinations of light intensity and nutrient supply. Sun and shade species were also grown at various plant densities and in

  5. Safety Analysis of Solar Module under Partial Shading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hot spot often occurs in a module when the qualities of solar cells mismatch and bypass diodes are proved to be an efficient alternative to reduce the effect of hot spot. However, these principles choosing a diode are based on the parameters of bypass diodes and PV cells without consideration of the maximum heating power of the shaded cell, which may cause serious consequences. On this basis, this paper presents a new approach to investigate partially shaded cells in different numbers of PV cells and different shading scenarios, including inhomogeneous illumination among solar cells and incomplete shading in one cell, which innovatively combines the same cells or divides one affected cell into many small single cells and then combines the same ones, and analyzes the shaded cell. The results indicate that the maximum power dissipation of the shaded cell occurs at short-circuit conditions. With the number of solar cells increasing, the shaded cell transfers from generating power to dissipating power and there is a maximum point of power dissipation in different shading situations that may lead to severe hot spot. Adding up the heat converted from solar energy, the heating power can be higher. In this case, some improvements about bypass diodes are proposed to reduce hot spot.

  6. Data analysis for effective monitoring of partially shaded photovoltaic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsafarakis, O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412471329; Sinapis, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411291572; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628526

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of an algorithmic tool to automate the process of analyzing monitoring data of partially shaded PV systems. The approach is to compare long-term and high resolution yield data of a partially shaded Photovoltaic (PV) system (investigated PV) with the yield

  7. Solar shading system based on daylight directing glass lamellas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Jacob B.; Santos, Ines D. P.; Svendsen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    The overheating problems in office buildings must be solved with efficient solar shadings in order to reduce the energy demand for cooling and ventilation. At the same time the solar shading should not reduce the daylight level in the building on overcast days because it would result in a lower...

  8. Indirect interactions between ant-tended hemipterans, a dominant ant Azteca instabilis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and shade trees in a tropical agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, George F; White, Adam M; Kratz, Carley J

    2008-06-01

    The occurrence, intensity, and composition of mutualisms are dependent not only on the co-occurrence of mutualists, but also the broader biotic context in which they are embedded. Here, the influence of the specific nest tree identity of the ant Azteca instabilis (F. Smith) on the density of the green coffee scale (Coccus viridis Green) was studied in a coffee agroecosystem in southern Mexico. The hypothesis that an indirect competitive interaction for ant attendance occurs between a scale species (Octolecanium sp. Kondo) in the canopy of the shade tree Inga micheliana Harms and C. viridis, which inhabits coffee bushes (Coffea arabica) beneath the shade trees was tested. Coffee bushes beneath a different shade tree species (Alchornea latifolia Swartz) were used as an indication of C. viridis density in a noncompetitive environment. Results indicate that C. viridis occurs in significantly lower density adjacent to nests in Inga, supporting the hypothesis of indirect competition. Additional experimentation suggests that there is a mutualism between Azteca and Octolecanium and that this interaction may be mediated by a hierarchy in ant attendance of scale insects. Our results show the importance of considering the biotic context of ant-hemipteran mutualisms. In coffee agroecosystems, consideration of shade tree diversity and species composition may be directly applicable to the biological control of insect pests.

  9. Reliability of conventional shade guides in teeth color determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Color matching in prosthodontic therapy is a very important task because it influences the esthetic value of dental restorations. Visual shade matching represents the most frequently applied method in clinical practice. Instrumental measurements provide objective and quantified data in color assessment of natural teeth and restorations. In instrumental shade analysis, the goal is to achieve the smallest ΔE value possible, indicating the most accurate shade match. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of commercially available ceramic shade guides. Methods. VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer (VITA, Germany was used for instrumental color determination. Utilizing this device, color samples of ten VITA Classical and ten VITA 3D - Master shade guides were analyzed. Each color sample from all shade guides was measured three times and the basic parameters of color quality were examined: ΔL, ΔC, ΔH, ΔE, ΔElc. Based on these parameters spectrophotometer marks the shade matching as good, fair or adjust. Results. After performing 1,248 measurements of ceramic color samples, frequency of evaluations adjust, fair and good were statistically significantly different between VITA Classical and VITA 3D Master shade guides (p = 0.002. There were 27.1% cases scored as adjust, 66.3% as fair and 6.7% as good. In VITA 3D - Master shade guides 30.9% cases were evaluated as adjust, 66.4% as fair and 2.7% cases as good. Conclusion. Color samples from different shade guides, produced by the same manufacturer, show variability in basic color parameters, which once again proves the lack of precision and nonuniformity of the conventional method.

  10. Repeatability and reliability of human eye in visual shade selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özat, P B; Tuncel, İ; Eroğlu, E

    2013-12-01

    Deficiencies in the human visual percep-tion system have challenged the efficiency of the visual shade-matching protocol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability and reliability of human eye in visual shade selection. Fifty-four volunteering dentists were asked to match the shade of an upper right central incisor tooth of a single subject. The Vita 3D-Master shade guide was used for the protocol. Before each shade-matching procedure, the definitive codes of the shade tabs were hidden by an opaque strip and the shade tabs were placed into the guide randomly. The procedure was repeated 1 month later to ensure that visual memory did not affect the results. The L*, a* and b* values of the shade tabs were measured with a dental spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade) to produce quantitative values to evaluate the protocol. The paired samples t-test and Pearson correlation test were used to compare the 1st and 2nd selections. The Yates-corrected chi-square test was use to compare qualitative values. Statistical significance was accepted at P < 0·05. Comparing baseline and 1st month records, statistical significance (P < 0·001) was found among qualitative data regarding repeatability on a yes/no (1/0) basis, revealing a very low percentage of repeatability (11·1%). Comparing baseline and 1st month records, statistical significance was not found (P = 0·000) among the L*, a*, b* and ΔE variables. These results indicate that dentists perform insufficiently regarding repeatability in visual shade matching, but they are able to select clinically acceptable shades. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Shade matching assisted by digital photography and computer software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schropp, Lars

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of digital photographs and graphic computer software for color matching compared to conventional visual matching. The shade of a tab from a shade guide (Vita 3D-Master Guide) placed in a phantom head was matched to a second guide of the same type by nine observers. This was done for twelve selected shade tabs (tests). The shade-matching procedure was performed visually in a simulated clinic environment and with digital photographs, and the time spent for both procedures was recorded. An alternative arrangement of the shade tabs was used in the digital photographs. In addition, a graphic software program was used for color analysis. Hue, chroma, and lightness values of the test tab and all tabs of the second guide were derived from the digital photographs. According to the CIE L*C*h* color system, the color differences between the test tab and tabs of the second guide were calculated. The shade guide tab that deviated least from the test tab was determined to be the match. Shade matching performance by means of graphic software was compared with the two visual methods and tested by Chi-square tests (alpha= 0.05). Eight of twelve test tabs (67%) were matched correctly by the computer software method. This was significantly better (p < 0.02) than the performance of the visual shade matching methods conducted in the simulated clinic (32% correct match) and with photographs (28% correct match). No correlation between time consumption for the visual shade matching methods and frequency of correct match was observed. Shade matching assisted by digital photographs and computer software was significantly more reliable than by conventional visual methods.

  12. New shade guide for tooth whitening monitoring: visual assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravina, Rade D

    2008-03-01

    Shade guides currently used to monitor tooth bleaching lack logical order, uniform color distribution, and light shade tabs, thus, limiting the design of bleaching studies and diminishing the validity of obtained results. The purpose of this study was to perform a visual evaluation of a new shade guide designed primarily for monitoring tooth whitening and to compare this shade guide with 2 commercial shade guides. Tab arrangement of 3 shade guides (prototype of new VITA Bleachedguide 3D-Master (BG), value scale of Vitapan Classical (VC), and color-ordered Trubyte Bioform porcelain shade guide (TB)) was evaluated. The tabs from each shade guide, one at a time, were scattered and visually reordered from the lightest to the darkest by 15 observers under controlled conditions of a viewing booth. Visual ranking was compared to manufacturer-suggested ranking. Interobserver repeatability was compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (alpha=.05). All observers responded to a questionnaire grading the 3 shade guides using a Likert scale (1, strongly disagree, to 5, strongly agree). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov z-test (alpha=.05) was used to process the results obtained in the questionnaire Visually determined BG order was found to be identical to the order given by the manufacturer. This was not the case with the 2 other products: visual and manufacturers' order were identical for 7 of 16 VC tabs and 9 of 24 TB tabs. Interobserver repeatability for BG was significantly higher (P3D-Master. The same shade guide was also superior based on the scores given in the questionnaire. These findings support the use of the new VITA Bleachedguide 3D-Master for monitoring tooth whitening.

  13. Effects of shade on physiological changes, oxidative stress, and total antioxidant power in Thai Brahman cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Kongbuntad, Watee; Boonsorn, Thongchai

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of artificial shade, tree shade, and no shade on physiological changes, oxidative stress, and total antioxidant power in Thai Brahman cattle. Twenty-one cattle were divided into three groups: cattle maintained under artificial shade, under tree shade, and without shade. On days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 of the experimental period, after the cattle were set in individual stalls for 2 h, physiological changes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and total antioxidant power were investigated. The results revealed that the respiratory rate, heart rate, sweat rate and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio of the no-shade cattle were significantly higher than those of cattle maintained under artificial shade and tree shade ( P total antioxidant power of the no-shade cattle was lower than those of cattle maintained under artificial shade and tree shade, but the total antioxidant power of cattle maintained under artificial shade and tree shade were not different ( P > 0.05). However, rectal temperature and packed cell volume of the cattle in all groups did not differ ( P > 0.05). These results showed that artificial shade and tree shade can protect cattle from sunlight compared to no shade, and that the effectiveness of tree shade for sunlight protection is at an intermediate level.

  14. Performance Improvement of Partially Shaded Photovoltaic Arrays under Moving Shadow Conditions through Shade Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalekshmy, S.; Bindu, G. R.; Rama Iyer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Photovoltaic arrays, which are prone to partial shading (PS) reduce the output power than the real power rating of the array. This paper presents the comparative analyses on the electrical characteristics and power losses of a conventional totally cross tied (TCT) configuration, and rearranged TCT (RTCT) in which the modules are physically rearranged in such a way that there is an improvement of power output of array under moving illumination condition (moving cloud). In RTCT, the physical position of the modules is organized based on the Sudoku puzzle pattern so as to scatter the shading effect over the entire array. The rearrangement of modules is performed without varying the electrical connection of the modules in the array. It is validated that the power generation of array under amoving shadow condition is enhanced and the various PS losses are reduced in rearranged configuration.

  15. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Renata C; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    . This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces...... with visible canopy coverage was associated with plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, bone formation rate, and the extent of remodeling surfaces. Collectively, these data support the conclusion that canopies respond to the elevated PTH levels in CKD and that they possess the molecular machinery necessary...

  16. Olduvai Gorge, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Three striking and important areas of Tanzania in eastern Africa are shown in this color-coded shaded relief image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The largest circular feature in the center right is the caldera, or central crater, of the extinct volcano Ngorongoro. It is surrounded by a number of smaller volcanoes, all associated with the Great Rift Valley, a geologic fault system that extends for about 4,830 kilometers (2,995 miles) from Syria to central Mozambique. Ngorongoro's caldera is 22.5 kilometers (14 miles) across at its widest point and is 610 meters (2,000 feet) deep. Its floor is very level, holding a lake fed by streams running down the caldera wall. It is part of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area and is home to over 75,000 animals. The lakes south of the crater are Lake Eyasi and Lake Manyara, also part of the conservation area. The relatively smooth region in the upper left of the image is the Serengeti National Park, the largest in Tanzania. The park encompasses the main part of the Serengeti ecosystem, supporting the greatest remaining concentration of plains game in Africa including more than 3,000,000 large mammals. The animals roam the park freely and in the spectacular migrations, huge herds of wild animals move to other areas of the park in search of greener grazing grounds (requiring over 4,000 tons of grass each day) and water. The faint, nearly horizontal line near the center of the image is Olduvai Gorge, made famous by the discovery of remains of the earliest humans to exist. Between 1.9 and 1.2 million years ago a salt lake occupied this area, followed by the appearance of fresh water streams and small ponds. Exposed deposits show rich fossil fauna, many hominid remains and items belonging to one of the oldest stone tool technologies, called Olduwan. The time span of the objects recovered dates from 2,100,000 to 15,000 years ago. Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of

  17. Discrete Line Congruences for Shading and Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Two-parameter families of straight lines (line congruences) are implicitly present in graphics and geometry processing in several important ways including lighting and shape analysis. In this paper we make them accessible to optimization and geometric computing, by introducing a general discrete version of congruences based on piecewise-linear correspondences between triangle meshes. Our applications of congruences are based on the extraction of a so-called torsion-free support structure, which is a procedure analogous to remeshing a surface along its principal curvature lines. A particular application of such structures are freeform shading and lighting systems for architecture. We combine interactive design of such systems with global optimization in order to satisfy geometric constraints. In this way we explore a new area where architecture can greatly benefit from graphics.

  18. An in vitro study to evaluate the difference in shade between commercially available shade guides and glazed porcelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Smile is one of the most important interactive communication skills of a person. A smile is the key factor for an aesthetic appearance. Hence aesthetics is one of the motivating factor for the patients to seek dental care. Correction of unaesthetic appearance gives a positive effect to the self esteem of the patient. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the difference in the shade between the commercially available shade guides namely Vita Classical And Ivoclar Chromascop and the fired porcelain samples fabricated using Vita Zahnfabrik VMK 95 and Ivoclar Classic Materials respectively. Objectives: The objective of this study was to obtain a matching brand of material that has a particular shade tab among the brands used. Conclusion: To conclude, Ivoclar material matched the chromascop shade guide better than the vita material matched the vita classic shade guide.

  19. Metameric effect between natural teeth and the shade tabs of a shade guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcodel, Nicoleta; Helling, Stephan; Rammelsberg, Peter; Hassel, Alexander J

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate metameric effects, that is, the dependence of the colours of teeth and shade tabs on the illuminant used. The colours of 49 teeth of 37 participants and of the corresponding shade tabs of the 3D-Master (VITA Zahnfabrik; colour match DeltaE(ab)< 2) were measured using an intra-oral spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade). Spectral reflectance data (from 400 to 700 nm) were recorded. Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* values were calculated for D65 (reference daylight), A (incandescent light), and TL84 (store/office light) as reference illuminants. A modified metamerism index (Mod-M) and hue-angle ratios were calculated to express differences between tooth and tab colour relative to the difference observed under D65 illumination. The Mod-M for teeth and tabs was greater than unity (indicating a greater colour difference relative to D65) by 57.1% for A and by 49.3% for TL84. Hue-angle ratios of teeth and tabs using the test illuminants were different from those obtained using the standard illuminant D65. If teeth and shade tab matching is conducted using daylight illumination, the colour difference may not be the same under other lighting conditions, leading to perceptible, or even unacceptable, colour differences under these conditions.

  20. Modification of VanWagner's canopy fire propagation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Dickinson; Andrew Robinson; Richy Harrod; Paul Gessler; Alistair Smith

    2007-01-01

    The conditions necessary for the combustion of canopy fuels are not well known but are assumed to be highly influenced by the volume through which the canopy fuels are dispersed, known as canopy bulk density (CBD). Propagating crown fire is defined as a continuous wall of flame from the bottom to the top of the canopy, implying crown fire propagation is actually...

  1. VitiCanopy: A Free Computer App to Estimate Canopy Vigor and Porosity for Grapevine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta De Bei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index (LAI and plant area index (PAI are common and important biophysical parameters used to estimate agronomical variables such as canopy growth, light interception and water requirements of plants and trees. LAI can be either measured directly using destructive methods or indirectly using dedicated and expensive instrumentation, both of which require a high level of know-how to operate equipment, handle data and interpret results. Recently, a novel smartphone and tablet PC application, VitiCanopy, has been developed by a group of researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of Melbourne, to estimate grapevine canopy size (LAI and PAI, canopy porosity, canopy cover and clumping index. VitiCanopy uses the front in-built camera and GPS capabilities of smartphones and tablet PCs to automatically implement image analysis algorithms on upward-looking digital images of canopies and calculates relevant canopy architecture parameters. Results from the use of VitiCanopy on grapevines correlated well with traditional methods to measure/estimate LAI and PAI. Like other indirect methods, VitiCanopy does not distinguish between leaf and non-leaf material but it was demonstrated that the non-leaf material could be extracted from the results, if needed, to increase accuracy. VitiCanopy is an accurate, user-friendly and free alternative to current techniques used by scientists and viticultural practitioners to assess the dynamics of LAI, PAI and canopy architecture in vineyards, and has the potential to be adapted for use on other plants.

  2. Heterotrophic respiration in drained tropical peat temperatures influenced by shading gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Kerojoki, Otto; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2015-04-01

    Lowland peatlands in Southeast Asia constitute a highly concentrated carbon (C) pool of global significance. These peatlands have formed over periods of several millennia by forest vegetation tolerant to flooding and poor substrates. Uncontrollable drainage and reoccurring wild fires in lack of management after removal of forest cover has impaired the C-storing functions in large reclaimed areas. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reporting sees drained tropical organic soils as one of the largest greenhouse gas emissions releasing terrestrial systems. Vast areas of deforested tropical peatlands do not receive noteworthy shading by vegetation, which increases the amount of solar radiation reaching the peat surface. We studied heterotrophic carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) fluxes in tropical peat in conditions, where; (i) peat temperatures were modified by artificial shading (no shade, 28%, 51% and 90% from the full sun exposure), (ii) root respiration was minimized, (iii) nutrient availability for peat decomposer community was changed (NPK fertilization of 0 and 313 kg ha-1). The experiment was repeated at two over 20 years ago drained fallow agricultural- and degraded sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Enhanced shading created a lasting decrease in peat temperatures, and decreased diurnal temperature fluctuations, in comparison to less shaded plots. The largest peat temperature difference was between the unshaded and 90% shaded peat surface, where the average temperatures within the topmost 50-cm peat profile differed 3 °C, and diurnal temperatures at 5 cm depth varied up to 4.2 °C in the unshaded and 0.4 °C in the 90% shaded conditions. Highest impacts on the heterotrophic CO2 fluxes caused by the treatments were on agricultural land, where 90% shading from the full exposure resulted in a 33% lower CO2 emission average on the unfertilised plots and a 66% lower emission average on the fertilised plots. Correlation

  3. Microhardness of different resin cement shades inside the root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignolo, Valeria; Fuentes, Maria-Victoria; Garrido, Miguel-Angel; Rodríguez, Jesús; Ceballos, Laura

    2012-09-01

    To compare microhardness along the root canal post space of two resin cements in different shades and a dual-cure resin core material. Root canals of 21 bovine incisors were prepared for post space. Translucent posts (X∘Post, Dentsply DeTrey) were luted using one the following resin luting agent: Calibra (Dentsply DeTrey) in Translucent, Medium and Opaque shades, RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) in Translucent, A2 and A3 shades and the dual-cure resin core material Core∘X flow. All materials were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and were all photopolymerized (Bluephase LED unit, Ivoclar Vivadent, 40s). After 24 hours, roots were transversally cut into 9 slices 1 mm thick from the coronal to apical extremes, three corresponding to each root third. Then, VHNs were recorded (100gf, 30 s) on the resin luting materials along the adhesive interface in all sections. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and SNK tests (α=0.05). A significant influence on microhardness of resin luting material in their respective shades (pmicrohardness values and Calibra the lowest, regardless of the shade selected. All resin luting materials tested exhibited a significantly higher microhardness in the cervical third. Microhardness of resin luting agents tested inside the canal is dependent on material brand and resin cement shade seems to be a less relevant factor. Microhardness decreased along the root canal, regardless of the shade selected.

  4. Improved grazing activity of dairy heifers in shaded tropical grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristina Tavares de Mello

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Trees in the production systems can effectively reduce hot weather-induced stress in the Brazilian Midwest. High temperatures cause changes in animals daily routine, and trees into pastures can promote benefits. The aim of this research was to evaluate the behavior of dairy heifers in silvopastoral systems in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. A herd of 24 crossbreed heifers (3/4 and 7/8 Holstein/Zebu, 350kg average weight, was evaluated over three seasons. Piatã grass was managed under three shade levels: full-sun, moderate-shade, and intensive-shade provided by 10 to 12m high Eucalyptus trees. Behavior data were collected every 15 minutes from 8:30h to 16h. Shade availability significantly impacted heifer behavior, mainly affecting grazing frequency and time during the hottest hours. Grazing behavior was affected by shade levels during the different seasons. Heifers showed preferred grazing times. Heifers in the intensive-shade system visited shady areas during the hottest hours throughout the seasons. Heifers in the full sun-system avoided grazing during the warmer times, ceasing feeding activities. Our results from the Brazilian Midwest showed that shade availability causes breed heifers to change their daily routine.

  5. Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C.; Meydbray, J.; Donovan, M.; Forrest, J.

    2012-05-01

    This document describes a repeatable test procedure that attempts to simulate shading situations, as would be experienced by typical residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. This type of shading test is particularly useful to evaluate the impact of different power conversion setups, including microinverters, DC power optimizers and string inverters, on overall system performance. The performance results are weighted based on annual estimates of shade to predict annual performance improvement. A trial run of the test procedure was conducted with a side by side comparison of a string inverter with a microinverter, both operating on identical 8kW solar arrays. Considering three different shade weighting conditions, the microinverter was found to increase production by 3.7% under light shading, 7.8% under moderate shading, and 12.3% under heavy shading, relative to the reference string inverter case. Detail is provided in this document to allow duplication of the test method at different test installations and for different power electronics devices.

  6. BOREAS HYD-03 Canopy Density Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The BOREAS HYD-03 team collected several data sets related to the hydrology of forested areas. This data set contains measurements of canopy density...

  7. BOREAS HYD-03 Canopy Density Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The BOREAS HYD-03 team collected several data sets related to the hydrology of forested areas. This data set contains measurements of canopy density (closure) from a...

  8. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Renata C; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is characterized by changes in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume that are brought about by alterations in bone resorption and formation. The resorptive and formative surfaces on the cancellous bone are separated from the marrow cavity by canopies...... and their association with biochemical and bone histomorphometric parameters in 106 pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (stage 2-5) across the spectrum of ROD. Canopies in CKD patients often appeared as thickened multilayered canopies, similar to previous reports in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism....... This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces...

  9. Is methane released from the forest canopy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Ambus, Per

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that rates of CH4 emission from plant material depend exponentially on temperature and linearly on UV irradiance. The UV irradiance shall be spectrally weighted and shorter wavelengths results in higher CH4 emissions. Global upscaling models for estimating aerobic CH4......, based on lab results, have be conducted with varying results, but until now field measurements based on profile and eddy covariance measurements have failed to show CH4 emissions from forest canopies. To detect CH4 production or consumption in the canopy of a beech stand we connected a CH4 analyzer...... indications of periodic CH4 emissions in the canopy, but more data need to be analyzed before the magnitude of the canopy source of CH4 can be established....

  10. Modelling the canopy development of bambara groundnut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunaratne, A.S.; Azam-Ali, S.N.; Al-Shareef, I.

    2010-01-01

    Canopy development of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) is affected by temperature stress, drought stress and photoperiod. The quantification of these documented effects by means of a suitable crop model, BAMGRO is presented in this paper. Data on canopy development from five growth...... and drought stress. The leaf area expansion is calculated as a function of leaf number and individual leaf size. The canopy development of bambara groundnut is modelled (and tested) in BAMGRO model by means of leaf initiation and leaf area expansion and branching and stem production are not considered. Nash.......80) with maximum MAE less than ±0.50 thus explaining canopy development under temperature stress, drought stress and variable photoperiods....

  11. Drought tolerance of tropical tree species : functional traits, trade-offs and species distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markesteijn, L.

    2010-01-01

    KEY-WORDS: Bolivia, drought tolerance, shade tolerance, functional traits, trade-offs, ecophysiology, species distribution Tropical forests occur under rainfall regimes that vary greatly in the rainfall pattern and frequency and intensity of drought. Consequently water availability is one of the

  12. Freezing tolerance and the histology of recovering nodes in St. Augustinegrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Augustinegrass [Stenataphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze] is a coarse-textured turfgrass commonly utilized for its excellent shade tolerance. However, inferior cold tolerance in comparison to other warm-season grasses limits its range primarily to the southeastern U. S., The objectives of this stu...

  13. A Custom Made Intrinsic Silicone Shade Guide for Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, K V; Behanam, Mohammed; Ahila, S C; Jei, J Brintha

    2016-04-01

    Replication of natural skin colour in maxillofacial prosthesis has been traditionally done using trial and error method, as concrete shade guides are unavailable till date. Hence a novel custom made intrinsic silicone shade guide has been attempted for Indian population. Reconstruction of maxillofacial defects is challenging, as achieving an aesthetic result is not always easy. A concoction of a novel intrinsic silicone shade guide was contemplated for the study and its reproducibility in clinical practice was analysed. Medical grade room temperature vulcanising silicone was used for the fabrication of shade tabs. The shade guide consisted of three main groups I, II and III which were divided based upon the hues yellow, red and blue respectively. Five distinct intrinsic pigments were added in definite proportions to subdivide each group of different values from lighter to darker shades. A total number of 15 circular shade tabs comprised the guide. To validate the usage of the guide, visual assessment of colour matching was done by four investigators to investigate the consent of perfect colour correspondence. Data was statistically analysed using kappa coefficients. The kappa values were found to be 0.47 to 0.78 for yellow based group I, 0.13 to 0.65 for red based group II, and 0.07 to 0.36 for blue based group III. This revealed that the shade tabs of yellow and red based hues matched well and showed a statistically good colour matching. This intrinsic silicone shade guide can be effectively utilised for fabrication of maxillofacial prosthesis with silicone in Indian population. A transparent colour formula with definite proportioning of intrinsic pigments is provided for obtaining an aesthetic match to skin tone.

  14. Guiana Highlands, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Doyle's 1912 best-seller 'The Lost World.'Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.Location: 0.2 South to 8.7 degrees North latitude, 60 to 67.9 degrees West longitude Orientation: North toward the top Image Data: shaded and colored SRTM30 and GTOPO30 elevation models Data Resolution: SRTM 30 arcsecond (about 928 meters or 1496 feet) Date Acquired: February 2000 for SRTM

  15. Australia, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Australia is the world's smallest, flattest, and (after Antarctica) driest continent, but at 7.7 million square kilometers (3.0 million square miles) it is also the sixth largest country. Its low average elevation (300 meters, or less than 1000 feet) is caused by its position near the center of a tectonic plate, where there are no volcanic or other geologic forces of the type that raise the topography of other continents. In fact Australia is the only continent without any current volcanic activity at all - the last eruption took place 1400 years ago at Mt. Gambier. The Australian continent is also one of the oldest land masses, with some of its erosion-exposed bedrock age dated at more than 3 billion years. More than one-fifth of the land area is desert, with more than two-thirds being classified as arid or semi-arid and unsuitable for settlement. The coldest regions are in the highlands and tablelands of Tasmania and the Australian Alps at the southeastern corner of the continent, location of Australia's highest point, Mt. Kosciusko (2228 meters, or 7310 feet.) Prominent features of Australia include the Lake Eyre basin, the darker green region visible in the center-right. At 16 meters (52 feet) below sea level this depression is one of the largest inland drainage systems in the world, covering more than 1.3 million square kilometers (500,000 square miles). The mountain range near the east coast is called the Great Dividing Range, forming a watershed between east and west flowing rivers. Erosion has created deep valleys, gorges and waterfalls in this range where rivers tumble over escarpments on their way to the sea. The crescent shaped uniform green region in the south, just left of center, is the Nullarbor Plain, a low-lying limestone plateau which is so flat that the Trans-Australian Railway runs through it in a straight line for more than 483 kilometers (300 miles). Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of

  16. Properly placed shade trees reduce summertime electricity bills in Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffery H. Donovan; David R. Butry

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that shade trees can reduce home cooling costs is hardly surprising. Anybody who has sat under a tree on a warm summer day understands the shade benefit of trees. However, quantifying the effect a shade tree has on home energy use and carbon footprint, and identifying the optimal location for a shade tree, is less straightforward. Past studies that have...

  17. Grayscale North America Shaded Relief ? 1-Kilometer Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale North America shaded relief data were derived from the GTOPO30 elevation data. GTOPO30 is a global digital elevation model (DEM) with a horizontal grid...

  18. Evaluation of the Aurora Application Shade Measurement Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-12-01

    Aurora is an integrated, Web-based application that helps solar installers perform sales, engineering design, and financial analysis. One of Aurora's key features is its high-resolution remote shading analysis.

  19. Grayscale Hawaii Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale Hawaii shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Hawaii at a resolution of 200 meters. The...

  20. Dynamic Shade and Irradiance Simulation of Aquatic Landscapes and Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumbra is a landscape shade and irradiance simulation model that simulates how solar energy spatially and temporally interacts within dynamic ecosystems such as riparian zones, forests, and other terrain that cast topological shadows. Direct and indirect solar energy accumulate...

  1. Satellite View of Hawaii, with Shaded Relief - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Hawaii, with Shaded Relief map layer is a 200- meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Hawaii. Vegetation is generally green, with...

  2. Color Alaska Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  3. Color Hawaii Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Hawaii shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Hawaii at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  4. Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief map layer is a 200- meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with...

  5. Effects of chronic elevated ozone exposure on gas exchange responses of adult beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) as related to the within-canopy light gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi [Hokkaido Research Center, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Sapporo 062-8516 (Japan)], E-mail: kitao@ffpri.affrc.go.jp; Loew, Markus [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Heerdt, Christian [Bioclimatology and Air Pollution Research, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Grams, Thorsten E.E.; Haeberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    The effects of elevated O{sub 3} on photosynthetic properties in adult beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) were investigated in relation to leaf mass per area as a measure of the gradually changing, within-canopy light availability. Leaves under elevated O{sub 3} showed decreased stomatal conductance at unchanged carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, which was consistent with enhanced {delta}{sup 13}C of leaf organic matter, regardless of the light environment during growth. In parallel, increased energy demand for O{sub 3} detoxification and repair was suggested under elevated O{sub 3} owing to enhanced dark respiration. Only in shade-grown leaves, light-limited photosynthesis was reduced under elevated O{sub 3}, this effect being accompanied by lowered F{sub v}/F{sub m}. These results suggest that chronic O{sub 3} exposure primarily caused stomatal closure to adult beech trees in the field regardless of the within-canopy light gradient. However, light limitation apparently raised the O{sub 3} sensitivity of photosynthesis and accelerated senescence in shade leaves. - Across leaf differentiation in adult beech crowns, elevated ozone acted through stomatal closure on gas exchange although enhancing photosynthetic sensitivity of shaded leaves.

  6. The role of enamel crystallography on tooth shade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eimar, Hazem; Marelli, Benedetto; Nazhat, Showan N; Abi Nader, Samer; Amin, Wala M; Torres, Jesus; de Albuquerque, Rubens F; Tamimi, Faleh

    2011-12-01

    Tooth shade is influenced by a combination of extrinsic-stains that are adsorbed to the enamel surface and by its intrinsic-shade resulting from the interaction of light with tooth structures. This study was designed to investigate how the variations in enamel ultrastructure may affect tooth optical properties. One-hundred extracted teeth were collected from adult patients attending McGill-Undergraduate Dental Clinics. Shade-spectrophotometry, FTIR and XRD were used to assess tooth shade, enamel chemical composition and crystallography. The data obtained was analysed for Pearson correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. The statistical significance was set at P enamel hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal size (R = -0.358; B = -0.866; P = 0.007), tooth chroma was associated with enamel HA carbonization (R = -0.419; B = -99.06; P = 0.005), and tooth lightness was associated with both enamel HA crystal size (R = -0.313; B = -1.052; P = 0.019) and the degree of HA carbonization (R = -0.265; B=-57.95; P = 0.033). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the size of enamel HA crystals and the relative content of mineral carbonate were the most important predictors for tooth shade lightness (P = 0.018) and chroma (P=0.008), respectively. In contrast, enamel organic content had no correlation with tooth shade. In the present study we have revealed that the tooth shade is regulated by the size of their HA enamel crystals. On the other hand, variation in the degree of enamel HA carbonization can also affect the tooth shade. These findings are of great relevance in dentistry since it provides better understanding of tooth aesthetics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of various disinfectants on dental shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peterson Y; Masri, Radi; Romberg, Elaine; Driscoll, Carl F

    2014-09-01

    Dental shade guides are used to evaluate tooth color before prosthodontic procedures and are subjected to disinfection after use. The effect of disinfection on shade guides has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of disinfectants on the color of shade tabs. Changes in the color (ΔE) of VITA Classical Shade Guide tabs were measured with a VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer in the CIELAB system and calculated after being subjected to Cavicide, Asepticare TB, Sporicidin, and distilled water (control) over a simulated period of 2 years. Statistical analysis was accomplished by a 2-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) test (α=.05). A significant difference was noted in the degree of shade tab color change, depending on the type of disinfectant used (F=153.2, P<.001). No significant difference was noted in the amount of shade tab color change that occurred after disinfection among the different shade tabs used (F=0.611, P=.865), nor was a significant interaction noted between the type of disinfectant and the different shade tabs used (F=0.7, P=.919). Asepticare TB showed the least significant amount of change (ΔE=0.401), and Sporicidin (ΔE=0.889) and the control (ΔE=0.969) showed significantly more color change than Asepticare TB but less than Cavicide (ΔE=1.198). The average total CIELAB color difference for 50% human perceptibility is approximately 1 unit (under standardized laboratory conditions). In the oral cavity, however, an average change of 3.7 ΔE units could still allow teeth to be perceived as having the same color. Therefore, although the results are statistically significant, they may not be clinically important. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. On the Impact of Partial Shading on PV Output Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso; Baghzouz, Yahia

    2008-01-01

    clarifies the mechanism of partial PV shading on a number of PV cells connected in series and/or parallel with and without bypass diodes. The analysis is presented in simple terms and can be useful to someone who wishes to determine the impact of some shading geometry on a PV system. The analysis...... is illustrated by measurements on a commercial 70 W panel, and a 14.4 kW PV array....

  9. Elements of a dynamic systems model of canopy photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xin-Guang; Song, Qingfeng; Ort, Donald R

    2012-06-01

    Improving photosynthesis throughout the full canopy rather than photosynthesis of only the top leaves of the canopy is central to improving crop yields. Many canopy photosynthesis models have been developed from physiological and ecological perspectives, however most do not consider heterogeneities of microclimatic factors inside a canopy, canopy dynamics and associated energetics, or competition among different plants, and most models lack a direct linkage to molecular processes. Here we described the rationale, elements, and approaches necessary to build a dynamic systems model of canopy photosynthesis. A systems model should integrate metabolic processes including photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen metabolism, resource re-mobilization and photosynthate partitioning with canopy level light, CO(2), water vapor distributions and heat exchange processes. In so doing a systems-based canopy photosynthesis model will enable studies of molecular ecology and dramatically improve our insight into engineering crops for improved canopy photosynthetic CO(2) uptake, resource use efficiencies and yields. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Scaling up stomatal conductance from leaf to canopy using a dual-leaf model for estimating crop evapotranspiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng Ding

    Full Text Available The dual-source Shuttleworth-Wallace model has been widely used to estimate and partition crop evapotranspiration (λET. Canopy stomatal conductance (Gsc, an essential parameter of the model, is often calculated by scaling up leaf stomatal conductance, considering the canopy as one single leaf in a so-called "big-leaf" model. However, Gsc can be overestimated or underestimated depending on leaf area index level in the big-leaf model, due to a non-linear stomatal response to light. A dual-leaf model, scaling up Gsc from leaf to canopy, was developed in this study. The non-linear stomata-light relationship was incorporated by dividing the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions and calculating each fraction separately according to absorbed irradiances. The model includes: (1 the absorbed irradiance, determined by separately integrating the sunlit and shaded leaves with consideration of both beam and diffuse radiation; (2 leaf area for the sunlit and shaded fractions; and (3 a leaf conductance model that accounts for the response of stomata to PAR, vapor pressure deficit and available soil water. In contrast to the significant errors of Gsc in the big-leaf model, the predicted Gsc using the dual-leaf model had a high degree of data-model agreement; the slope of the linear regression between daytime predictions and measurements was 1.01 (R2 = 0.98, with RMSE of 0.6120 mm s-1 for four clear-sky days in different growth stages. The estimates of half-hourly λET using the dual-source dual-leaf model (DSDL agreed well with measurements and the error was within 5% during two growing seasons of maize with differing hydrometeorological and management strategies. Moreover, the estimates of soil evaporation using the DSDL model closely matched actual measurements. Our results indicate that the DSDL model can produce more accurate estimation of Gsc and λET, compared to the big-leaf model, and thus is an effective alternative approach for estimating and

  11. Comparison of accuracies of an intraoral spectrophotometer and conventional visual method for shade matching using two shade guide systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhya Parameswaran

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This in vitro study clearly delineates the advantages and limitations of both methods. There were significant differences between the methods with the visual method producing more accurate results than the spectrophotometric method. The spectrophotometer showed far better interrater agreement scores irrespective of the shade guide used. Even though visual shade matching is subjective, it is not inferior and should not be underrated. Judicious combination of both techniques is imperative to attain a successful and esthetic outcome.

  12. Polychromatic supplemental lighting from underneath canopy is more effective to enhance tomato plant development by improving leaf photosynthesis and stomatal regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Light insufficient stress caused by canopy interception and mutual shading is a major factor limiting plant growth and development in intensive crop cultivation. Supplemental lighting can be used to give light to the lower canopy leaves and is considered to be an effective method to cope with low irradiation stress. Leaf photosynthesis, stomatal regulation and plant growth and development of young tomato plants were examined to estimate the effects of supplemental lighting with various composite spectra and different light orientations. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs of polychromatic light quality, red + blue (R/B, white + red + blue (W/R/B, white + red + far-red (W/R/FR, and white + blue (W/B were assembled from the underneath canopy or from the inner canopy as supplemental lighting resources. The results showed that the use of supplemental lighting significantly increased the photosynthetic efficiency, and reduced stomatal closure while promoting plant growth. Among all supplemental lighting treatments, the W/R/B and W/B from the underneath canopy had best performance. The different photosynthetic performances among the supplemental lighting treatments are resulted from variations in CO2 utilization. The enhanced blue light fraction in the W/R/B and W/B could better stimulate stomatal opening and promote photosynthetic electron transport activity, thus better improving photosynthetic rate. Compared with the inner canopy treatment, the supplemental lighting from the underneath canopy could better enhance the carbon dioxide assimilation efficiency and excessive energy dissipation, leading to an improved photosynthetic performance. Stomatal morphology was highly correlated to leaf photosynthesis and plant development, and should thus be an important determinant for the photosynthesis and the growth of greenhouse tomatoes.

  13. Flow and Dispersion in Urban Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britter, Rex; Hanna, Steven

    2001-11-01

    Atmospheric flow and pollutant dispersion within and above the urban canopy are important for urban air quality, for assessing the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous material within cities, for assessing the air exchange between buildings and their environment, and consequently for rationalising energy usage. Different techniques for parameterising the urban canopy will be described including the application of digital elevation models to several European and American cities. Models have been developed, guided by theory and experiment, to describe the flow and turbulence within and above cities and some observations based on these models will be discussed as will the exchange processes between the urban canopy and the flow above. The work has been extended to the dispersion of active and passive pollutants. The results of a novel field study in the City of Birmingham will be presented.

  14. An experimental analysis of canopy flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio; Fransson, Jens H. M.; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2011-12-01

    An analysis of forest canopy flows with a wind tunnel model at high Reynolds number is presented and discussed. Measured mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles agree with observations made in real canopies with no sensible Reynolds number dependence, adding confidence to the results obtained with the present setup. The analysis of power density spectra of the three velocity components and of the shear stress co-spectra is reported with new coordinate scalings able to improve the collapse of the spectra compared to standard normalizations. This scaling is mostly based on the respective integral time scale and a simple fit is proposed to estimate such a quantity in real canopies. From the analysis of joint probability density functions, three different regions have been localized where a change in the coherent structure behavior is supposed to take place, similarly to what happens in rough wall turbulent boundary layers.

  15. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. Shift of fleshy fruited species along elevation: temperature, canopy coverage, phylogeny and origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shunli; Katz, Ofir; Fang, Weiwei; Li, Danfeng; Sang, Weiguo; Liu, Canran

    2017-01-13

    Plant communities differ in their fruit type spectra, especially in the proportions of fleshy and non-fleshy fruit types. However, which abiotic and biotic factors drive this variability along elevation gradient and what drives the evolution of fruit type diversity still are puzzling. We analyzed the variations in proportions and richness of fleshy-fruited species and their correlations to various abiotic and biotic variables along elevation gradients in three mountains in the Beijing region, northeast China. Fleshy-fruited species, which are characterized by high fruit water contents, were found in great proportion and richness at relatively low elevations, where soil water content is low compared to high elevations. High temperatures in low elevations increase water availability for plants. Plants that grow in the shaded low-elevation thick-canopy forests are less exposed to evapotranspiration and thus possess water surpluses that can be invested in fleshy fruits. Such an investment in fleshy fruits is beneficial for these species because it makes the fruits more attractive to frugivores that act as seed dispersers in the close-canopied environments, where dispersion by wind is less effective. A hypothesis is proposed that plant internal water surpluses are the prerequisite conditions that permit evolution of fleshy fruits to occur.

  17. [Standardization of technical methods for apple fluorescence canopy spectral detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi-Cun; Zhao, Geng-Xing; Lei, Tong; Wang, Ling; Dong, Fang; Wang, Jing-An

    2010-06-01

    Aiming at spectral detection of apple fluorescence canopy, the present paper carried out spectral detection tests under different weather conditions, different detection times, and different detection heights and angles to apple canopy in the two years of 2008 and 2009, so as to analyze impacts of these factors on apple canopy spectral characteristics and explore standardized spectral detection methods for apple fluorescence canopy. The results indicated the regularity in spectral reflectance of apple fluorescence canopy to a certain degree under different conditions, especially in the 760-1 350 nm near-infrared bands. The authors found that canopy spectral reflectance declined along with the decrease in sunshine and it is appropriate to detect canopy spectrum in sunny days with few clouds. In addition, spectral reflectance tended to be stable when the wind scale was below grade 2. The discrepancy of canopy spectra is small during the time period from 10:00 to 15:00 of a day compared to that of other times. For maintaining stable spectral curves, the height of detector to apple canopy needed to be adjusted to cover the whole canopy within the field of view according to detection angle of the detector. The vertical or approximately vertical detection was the best for canopy spectral reflectance acquisition. The standardization of technical methods of spectral detection for apple fluorescence canopy was proposed accordingly, which provided theoretical references for spectral detection and information extraction of apple tree canopy.

  18. Mean and Turbulent Flow Statistics in a Trellised Agricultural Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan E.; Stoll, Rob; Mahaffee, Walter F.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2017-10-01

    Flow physics is investigated in a two-dimensional trellised agricultural canopy to examine that architecture's unique signature on turbulent transport. Analysis of meteorological data from an Oregon vineyard demonstrates that the canopy strongly influences the flow by channelling the mean flow into the vine-row direction regardless of the above-canopy wind direction. Additionally, other flow statistics in the canopy sub-layer show a dependance on the difference between the above-canopy wind direction and the vine-row direction. This includes an increase in the canopy displacement height and a decrease in the canopy-top shear length scale as the above-canopy flow rotates from row-parallel towards row-orthogonal. Distinct wind-direction-based variations are also observed in the components of the stress tensor, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and the energy spectra. Although spectral results suggest that sonic anemometry is insufficient for resolving all of the important scales of motion within the canopy, the energy spectra peaks still exhibit dependencies on the canopy and the wind direction. These variations demonstrate that the trellised-canopy's effect on the flow during periods when the flow is row-aligned is similar to that seen by sparse canopies, and during periods when the flow is row-orthogonal, the effect is similar to that seen by dense canopies.

  19. Influence of Color Education and Training on Shade Matching Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Ivan; Stankovic, Sasa; Paravina, Rade D

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of education and training on quality of tooth color matching. Dental students (N = 174), matched the color of eight shade tabs in a viewing booth, using VITA Linearguide 3D-Master shade guide. The experimental group had color education and training between the before and after session. The control group did not have any additional information in between two sessions. Color differences between the task tabs and selected tabs were calculated using CIE formulas. The score for the best match (smallest color difference) was 10 points, the 2nd best match 9 points, down to 1 point for the 10th best match. Means and standard deviations were calculated. Differences were analyzed using the Student t-test. Shade matching scores in the experimental group were significantly better after education and training (p < 0.001), with a mean score before and after shade matching sessions of 7.06 (1.19) and 8.43 (0.92), respectively. The percentage of students in the experimental group that selected one of three best matches increased 24.3%. The control group exhibited no significant improvement in the after session. Within the limitations of the study, education and training improved students' shade matching skills. While the vast majority of dental restorations and practically all restorations in the esthetic zone are tooth colored, the profession as a whole is far from perfect when it comes to accurate shade matching. Education and training can improve shade matching ability: enhanced esthetics of dental restorations, increased patient satisfaction, and a reduced number of color corrections are some of the notable benefits and rewards. (J Esthet Restor Dent 00:000-000, 2016) J Esthet Restor Dent 28:287-294, 2016). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Operational Draft Regional Guidebook for the Functional Assessment of High-Gradient Headwater Streams and Low-Gradient Perennial Streams in Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    animal communities, including droughts and catastrophic storms, competition, disease, browsing pressure, shade tolerance , community succession, and...reference domain commonly range from 0.05 to 0.8 cfs (0.001 to 0.02 cms). During drought periods, perennial streams sometimes exhibit low to no flow...wildlife and are affected by canopy shading, with shade- tolerant species germinating below a full canopy, and early successional species dominating

  1. Simplified Method for Modeling the Impact of Arbitrary Partial Shading Conditions on PV Array Performance: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris

    2015-09-15

    It is often difficult to model the effects of partial shading conditions on PV array performance, as shade losses are nonlinear and depend heavily on a system's particular configuration. This work describes and implements a simple method for modeling shade loss: a database of shade impact results (loss percentages), generated using a validated, detailed simulation tool and encompassing a wide variety of shading scenarios. The database is intended to predict shading losses in crystalline silicon PV arrays and is accessed using basic inputs generally available in any PV simulation tool. Performance predictions using the database are within 1-2% of measured data for several partially shaded PV systems, and within 1% of those predicted by the full, detailed simulation tool on an annual basis. The shade loss database shows potential to considerably improve performance prediction for partially shaded PV systems.

  2. West Coast Canopy-Forming Kelp, 1989-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — These data include the general extents of canopy-forming kelp surveys from 1989 to 2014 and a compilation of existing data sets delineating canopy-forming kelp beds...

  3. West Coast Canopy-Forming Kelp, 1989-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data include the general extents of canopy-forming kelp surveys from 1989 to 2014 and a compilation of existing data sets delineating canopy-forming kelp beds...

  4. 100-Meter Resolution Tree Canopy of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains tree canopy data for Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection and at a resolution of 100 meters. The tree canopy data were derived...

  5. Seedling Canopy Reflectance Spectra, 1992-1993 (ACCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The reflectance spectra of Douglas-fir and bigleaf maple seedling canopies were measured. Canopies varied in fertilizer treatment and leaf area density...

  6. Tooth shade measurements under standard and nonstandard illumination and their agreement with skin color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dwairi, Ziad; Shaweesh, Ashraf; Kamkarfar, Sohrab; Kamkarfar, Shahrzad; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lynch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between skin color (shade) and tooth shade under standard and nonstandard illumination sources. Four hundred Jordanian participants (200 males, 200 females, 20 to 50 years of age) were studied. Skin colors were assessed and categorized using the L'Oreal and Revlon foundation shade guides (light, medium, dark). The Vita Pan Classical Shade Guide (VPCSG; Vident) and digital Vita EasyShade Intraoral Dental Spectrophotometer (VESIDS; Vident) were used to select shades in the middle thirds of maxillary central incisors; tooth shades were classified into four categories (highest, high, medium, low). Significant gender differences were observed for skin colors (P = .000) and tooth shade guide systems (P = .001 and .050 for VPCSG and VESIDS, respectively). The observed agreement was 100% and 93% for skin and tooth shade guides, respectively. The corresponding kappa statistic values were 1.00 and 0.79, respectively (substantial agreement, P < .001). The observed agreement between skin color and tooth shades (VPCSG and VESIDS) was approximately 50%. The digital tooth shade guide system can be a satisfactory substitute for classical tooth shade guides and clinical shade matching. There was only moderate agreement between skin color and tooth shade.

  7. ASSESSING THE CANOPY INTEGRITY USING CANOPY DIGITAL IMAGES IN SEMIDECIDUOUS FOREST FRAGMENT IN SÃO CARLOS - SP- BRAZIL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Yamada

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well-known that conducting experimental research aiming the characterization of canopy structure of forests can be a difficult and costly task and, generally, requires an expert to extract, in loco, relevant information. Aiming at easing studies related to canopy structures, several techniques have been proposed in the literature and, among them, various are based on canopy digital image analysis. The research work described in this paper empirically compares two techniques that measure the integrity of the canopy structure of a forest fragment; one of them is based on central parts of canopy cover images and, the other, on canopy closure images. For the experiments, 22 central parts of canopy cover images and 22 canopy closure images were used. The images were captured along two transects: T1 (located in the conserved area and T2 (located in the naturally disturbance area. The canopy digital images were computationally processed and analyzed using the MATLAB platform for the canopy cover images and the Gap Light Analyzer (GLA, for the canopy closure images. The results obtained using these two techniques showed that canopy cover images and, among the employed algorithms, the Jseg, characterize the canopy integrity best. It is worth mentioning that part of the analysis can be automatically conducted, as a quick and precise process, with low material costs involved.

  8. Inversion of vegetation canopy reflectance models for estimating agronomic variables. I - Problem definition and initial results using the Suits model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, N.; Strebel, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    An important but relatively uninvestigated problem in remote sensing is the inversion of vegetative canopy reflectance models to obtain agrophysical parameters, given measured reflectances. The problem is here formally defined and its solution outlined. Numerical nonlinear optimization techniques are used to implement this inversion to obtain the leaf area index using Suits' canopy reflectance model. The results for a variety of cases indicate that this can be done successfully using infrared reflectances at different views or azimuth angles or a combination thereof. The other parameters of the model must be known, although reasonable measurement errors can be tolerated without seriously degrading the accuracy of the inversion. The application of the technique to ground based remote-sensing experiments is potentially useful, but is limited to the degree to which the canopy reflectance model can accurately predict observed reflectances.

  9. Accuracy of Three Shade-matching Devices in Replicating the Shade of Metal Ceramic Restorations: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhanpal, Shruti; Neelima, Menon S

    2016-12-01

    In restorative dentistry, the clinician commonly encounters the challenge of replicating the color of natural teeth due to the subjectivity of perceptual evaluation. Recent advances in photography and computing have resulted in the widespread use of the digital camera for color imaging. These instruments can be used effectively for shade matching and communication to yield predictable results. The study sample consisted of 20 freshly extracted noncarious premolars. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* values of the tooth were obtained through a spectrophotometer, digital camera, and digital camera with a polarizer. Shade selection was carried out using VITA 3D Master and calculating the Euclidian distance. The fabricated metal ceramic crowns were then evaluated to check the shade replication by comparing the CIE L*a*b* values of the crowns with the reference shade tab images. The three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and comparative analysis using Bonferroni test reveals that the difference in the mean L*a* values between spectrophotometer and polarization dental imaging modality (PDIM) was insignificant. The difference in the mean L*a*b* of spectrophotometer and digital camera was statistically significant. The mean ΔE for metal ceramic crowns and shade tabs was 4.2 that was greater than the clinically acceptable level (3.2). A statistically significant correlation was found to exist between the spectrophotometer and PDIM for all CIE L*, a*, and b* color coordinates. The present study was undertaken to assess the shade-matching ability of three shade-matching devices, such as spectrophotometer, digital camera, and PDIM, in the accuracy of replication of metal ceramic restorations.

  10. Adaptive comfort model for tree-shaded outdoors in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Reuy-Lung [Department of Architecture, National United University, 1 Lienda, Miaoli 360 (China); Lin, Tzu-Ping [Department of Leisure Planning, National Formosa University, 64 Wen-hua Road, Huwei, Yunlin 632 (China); Cheng, Ming-Jen; Lo, Jen-Hao [Department of Architecture, Feng Chia University, 100 Wen-hwa Road, Taichung 407 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Tree-shaded outdoors can reduce the heat effect by ameliorating the microclimate and enhancing the human thermal comfort outdoors; for this reason, they are main places for rest, recreation and social activity in Taiwan's cities. Field comfort surveys of 3839 interviewees were conducted in tree-shaded spaces throughout a year. The aims were to obtain a better understanding of human thermal comfort response outdoors and to propose an adaptive comfort model for tree-shaded spaces. A comfort zone, centering on neutral operative temperature which is an empirically derived linear function of mean monthly outdoor temperature, of 6 C for 90% acceptability and 8 C for 80% acceptability was suggested for tree-shaded spaces from surveyed data, adding that a non-linear function of the temperature difference between actual operative temperature and neutral operative temperature was established that aims to predict the percentage of heat or cold discomfort at a particular outdoor thermal condition. An application of the established adaptive comfort model on an actual tree-shaded space was demonstrated to show its practicality in long-term evaluation of a particular thermal environment. (author)

  11. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  12. One-dimensional color order system for dental shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W J; Groh, C L; Boenke, K M

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to re-arrange the master Bioform shade guide into a long-range one-dimensional color system based upon color difference. Although most shade guides may show local order when arranged according to hue, long-range order has not been established. However, shade guide arrangement according to a logical color order would be an advantage to the user. The first step in determining the color order was to measure the color of the shade guide teeth. A methodology was developed for measuring the color by use of a reflectance spectrophotometer. The precision of measurement was determined to be equal to CIE L*a*b* delta E of 0.5. Spectra were obtained and converted into CIE L*a*b* and Munsell notation. The measured colors of the Bioform shades ranged from a Munsell hue of 0.9 Y to 3.5 Y; a value of 6.6 to 7.8; and a chroma of 1.9 to 4.1. The teeth were then arranged visually from light to dark. The correlation coefficient between the visual ranking and color difference was 0.95. There was an inverse correlation between visual ranking and Munsell value, with a correlation coefficient of 0.90. Therefore, the sequence according to color difference provided the better agreement with visual perception.

  13. Analysis of the U.S. forest tolerance patterns depending on current and future temperature and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean Lienard; John Harrison; Nikolay. Strigul

    2015-01-01

    Forested ecosystems are shaped by climate, soil and biotic interactions, resulting in constrained spatial distribution of species and biomes. Tolerance traits of species determine their fundamental ecological niche, while biotic interactions narrow tree distributions to the realized niche. In particular, shade, drought and waterlogging tolerances have been well-...

  14. Modeling percent tree canopy cover: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston; Gretchen G. Moisen; Barry T. Wilson; Mark V. Finco; Warren B. Cohen; C. Kenneth Brewer

    2012-01-01

    Tree canopy cover is a fundamental component of the landscape, and the amount of cover influences fire behavior, air pollution mitigation, and carbon storage. As such, efforts to empirically model percent tree canopy cover across the United States are a critical area of research. The 2001 national-scale canopy cover modeling and mapping effort was completed in 2006,...

  15. Canopy dynamics of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The canopy dynamics (i.e. the formation and closure of canopy gaps) of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana are described. The formation of canopy gaps is investigated. The difficulties with gap size measurements are studied, and causes and consequences of treefalls and branchfalls are

  16. Analysis of algorithms for predicting canopy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katharine L. Gray; Elizabeth Reinhardt

    2003-01-01

    We compared observed canopy fuel characteristics with those predicted by existing biomass algorithms. We specifically examined the accuracy of the biomass equations developed by Brown (1978. We used destructively sampled data obtained at 5 different study areas. We compared predicted and observed quantities of foliage and crown biomass for individual trees in our study...

  17. Canopy Photosynthesis: From Basics to Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikosaka, Kouki; Niinemets, Ülo; Anten, N.P.R.

    2016-01-01

    A plant canopy, a collection of leaves, is an ecosystem-level unit of photosynthesis that assimilates carbon dioxide and exchanges other gases and energy with the atmosphere in a manner highly sensitive to ambient conditions including atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor concentrations, light

  18. Differential effect of whole-ear shading after heading on the physiology, biochemistry and yield index of stay-green and non-stay-green wheat genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    Full Text Available Two winter wheat cultivars (the functional stay-green CN12 and non-stay-green CN19 were used to investigate the effects of ear-shading on grain yield and to elucidate the differential mechanisms of different cultivars. The photosynthetic parameters, chlorophyll fluorescence, antioxidant enzyme activities, and chlorophyll contents were measured 0, 15 and 30 days after heading (DAH under both shaded and non-shaded conditions. The final grain-yield index was also measured. Shading had a smaller effect on the net photosynthetic rate (Pn, intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci, stomatal conductance (Gs, maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm and coefficient of non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (qN but a greater effect on both superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities in CN12 than it did in CN19. Shading slightly altered the timeframe of leaf senescence in CN12 and may have accelerated leaf senescence in CN19. Moreover, shading had only a small effect on the weight of grains per spike (WGS in CN12 compared with CN19, mainly resulting from the number of grains per spike (NGS rather than the 1000-grain weight (SGW. In conclusion, the flag leaves of functional stay-green wheat could serve as potential "buffers" and/or "compensators" for ear photosynthesis, which is actively regulated by the antioxidant enzyme system and prevents yield loss. Thus, a functional stay-green genotype could be more tolerant to environmental stress than a non-stay-green genotype.

  19. Self-shading correction for oceanographic upwelling radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Robert; Downes, Trijntje; Mobley, Cutris

    2004-10-04

    We present the derivation of an analytical model for the self-shading error of an oceanographic upwelling radiometer. The radiometer is assumed to be cylindrical and can either be a profiling instrument or include a wider cylindrical buoy for floating at the sea surface. The model treats both optically shallow and optically deep water conditions and can be applied any distance off the seafloor. We evaluate the model by comparing its results to those from Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical model performs well over a large range of environmental conditions and provides a significant improvement to previous analytical models. The model is intended for investigators who need to apply self-shading corrections to radiometer data but who do not have the ability to compute shading corrections with Monte Carlo simulations. The model also can provide guidance for instrument design and cruise planning.

  20. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF AÇAÍ PLANTS UNDER SHADE GRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELEANDRO CANDIDO DAPONT

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to evaluate the effect of different levels of shading on açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart. plants development, an experiment was conducted at the nursery of Floresta, Rio Branco, AC. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with six treatments and four replications of 25 plants, set as full sunlight and 18%, 35%, 50%, 70%, and 80% shading. The evaluation occurred 125 days after transplantation and the variables were stem diameter, root length, length of the aerial part, total length, dry matter of root, dry matter of aerial part, and total dry matter. With exception of root length, there was significant difference between treatments for all variables. The production of açai plants should be performed using 40% shading.

  1. Costly tolerance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-08

    Jul 8, 2016 ... It shows how this decision is related to the broader context of early twentieth century political life in the Netherlands. (the 'Pacification of 1917'), and it concludes with some thoughts on the costliness of true tolerance. Costly tolerance. Read online: Scan this QR code with your smart phone or mobile device.

  2. FULLY AUTOMATED GIS-BASED INDIVIDUAL TREE CROWN DELINEATION BASED ON CURVATURE VALUES FROM A LIDAR DERIVED CANOPY HEIGHT MODEL IN A CONIFEROUS PLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. L. Argamosa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of high resolution canopy height model (CHM from LiDAR makes it possible to delineate individual tree crown by means of a fully-automated method using the CHM’s curvature through its slope. The local maxima are obtained by taking the maximum raster value in a 3 m x 3 m cell. These values are assumed as tree tops and therefore considered as individual trees. Based on the assumptions, thiessen polygons were generated to serve as buffers for the canopy extent. The negative profile curvature is then measured from the slope of the CHM. The results show that the aggregated points from a negative profile curvature raster provide the most realistic crown shape. The absence of field data regarding tree crown dimensions require accurate visual assessment after the appended delineated tree crown polygon was superimposed to the hill shaded CHM.

  3. Shade-lux simulation model for the evaluation of energy savings in buildings provided with external non homogeneous shading devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, P. [CIRPS, Centro Interuniv. de Ricerca per i Paesi in Via di Sviluppo, Roma (Italy); Maccari, A. [ENEA, Ente Nazionale per l' Energia e l' Ambiente, Roma (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    During the hot season, an important amount of energy is necessary to guarantee good internal conditions in tertiary buildings, especially in those used during the daytime and provided with large glazed surfaces exposed to the sun. In order to reduce such amount of energy consumption specific shading devices are required, in particular in buildings located in the Mediterranean area where the solar radiation values are very high. The main purpose of this work is to develop a simulation model that allows to evaluate the energy performances of a building equipped with external non-homogeneous shading devices, traditional or innovative glass surfaces, and internal curtains (complex building envelope transparent systems, BETS) taking also into account the lighting load necessary to guarantee an adequate level of illuminance. In a widely diffused computer code two new routines have been added in order to evaluate the shading factor of the above-mentioned shading devices and the internal daylighting performance. Several runs of the modified program were carried out considering three different sizes of shading devices, with two values of reflectance coefficient, in horizontal position located a south facade with 33%, 50% and 65% of glass surface in three different Italian locations: Milan, Rome and Palermo. The results show that significant energy savings, up to about 40% in terms of primary energy and a diminution of up to 45% of the cooling system power, can be obtained. (au)

  4. Comparison of Shade Match Compatibility between Vitapan Classical and 3D Master Shade Guide Systems by Dental Students in Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Negahdari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dentists perform color-match process during indirect and direct restorations. Color research has shown that shade guides do not always match the color of natural teeth. Moreover, visual evaluation of dental colors has been found to be inconsistent and unreliable. In fact, it has always been important when using different shade guides. Our purpose in this study was to compare shade selection using two shade guide systems of Vitapan Classical and 3D Master by dental students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and methods: In this analytical, cross-sectional descriptive study, 20 male and 20 female senior dental students with a little clinical experience in working with shade guides were selected. Each student used two shade guides (Vitapan Classical and 3D Master separately for shade matching. Shade selection was randomly repeated one week later by the same protocol. T-test was used to compare repeatability of color matching (α=0.05. Comparison of the repeatability percentage was done with t-test. Results: Comparison of repeatability percentages of shade matching irrespective of gender showed that percentage of repeatability of shade match in 3D Master system was significantly high (P=0.00. In addition comparison of repeatability means of shade match with different shade guide systems on the basis of gender showed no significant differences (P=0.68. Conclusion: In general, the repeatability percentages of shade matching in 3D Master system was high and shade matching in females with this system was not different than males.   Key words: Color vision; indirect restorations; dental students

  5. Shading Performance on Terraced House Facades in Putrajaya, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmad Sanusi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates shading performance on house facades of selected three terraced houses in Putrajaya, Malaysia as the case studies. Terraced house type is selected for the case study because it is the most popular house type built in this country to house an increase of the urban population. Its total number built in urban area increases from 27% of the total dwellings in 1980 to 40% in 1990, and to slightly more than 60 per cent in 2000. The Case Study A, B, and C are atypical style of terraced house facade designs built in Putrajaya. These postmodern designs exhibit a range of complex geometric elements blending of colonial and traditional elements with colorful styles on the house facade. In this study, the time at which the sun path perpendicular to the house facade will be used to gain the results of shading performances when the house facades have their maximum exposure to the direct sunlight. The house facade was divided into two main parts which are opaque and glazing surface elements. The amount of shading area on the opaque and glazing surface was simulated using the SunTool program. In conclusion, the Case Study C had the highest average percentage of the shading area, which is 64.43%, followed by the Case Study A 60.41% and Case Study B 56.29%. These results showed that the facade designs had excellent horizontal shading elements with roof overhangs for high angle sunlight but they had weak vertical shading elements due to a lack of considerations of louvered elements to block low angle sunlight.

  6. Canopy arthropod responses to experimental canopy opening and debris deposition in a tropical rainforest subject to hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy D. Schowalter; Michael R. Willig; Steven J. Presley

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed responses of canopy arthropods on seven representative early and late successional overstory and understory tree species to a canopy trimming experiment designed to separate effects of canopy opening and debris pulse (resulting from hurricane disturbance) in a tropical rainforest ecosystem at the Luquillo Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (...

  7. In vitro model to evaluate reliability and accuracy of a dental shade-matching instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Pusateri, Seungyee; Brewer, Jane D; Dunford, Robert G; Wee, Alvin G

    2007-11-01

    There are several electronic shade-matching instruments available for clinical use; unfortunately, there are limited acceptable in vitro models to evaluate their reliability and accuracy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of a dental clinical shade-matching instrument. Using the shade-matching instrument (ShadeScan), color measurements were made of 3 commercial shade guides (VITA Classical, VITA 3D-Master, and Chromascop). Shade tabs were selected and placed in the middle of a gingival matrix (Shofu Gummy), with tabs of the same nominal shade from additional shade guides placed on both sides. Measurements were made of the central region of the shade tab inside a black box. For the reliability assessment, each shade tab from each of the 3 shade guide types was measured 10 times. For the accuracy assessment, each shade tab from 10 guides of each of the 3 types evaluated was measured once. Reliability, accuracy, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each shade tab. Differences were determined by 1-way ANOVA followed by the Bonferroni multiple comparison procedure. Reliability of ShadeScan was as follows: VITA Classical = 95.0%, VITA 3D-Master = 91.2%, and Chromascop = 76.5%. Accuracy of ShadeScan was as follows: VITA Classical = 65.0%, VITA 3D-Master = 54.2%, Chromascop = 84.5%. This in vitro study showed a varying degree of reliability and accuracy for ShadeScan, depending on the type of shade guide system used.

  8. Heat stress in cows at pasture and benefit of shade in a temperate climate region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veissier, Isabelle; Van laer, Eva; Palme, Rupert; Moons, Christel P. H.; Ampe, Bart; Sonck, Bart; Andanson, Stéphane; Tuyttens, Frank A. M.

    2017-11-01

    Under temperate climates, cattle are often at pasture in summer and are not necessarily provided with shade. We aimed at evaluating in a temperate region (Belgium) to what extent cattle may suffer from heat stress (measured through body temperature, respiration rate and panting score, cortisol or its metabolites in milk, and feces on hot days) and at assessing the potential benefits of shade. During the summer of 2012, 20 cows were kept on pasture without access to shade. During the summer of 2011, ten cows had access to shade (young trees with shade cloth hung between them), whereas ten cows had no access. Climatic conditions were quantified by the Heat Load Index (HLI). In animals without access to shade respiration rates, panting scores, rectal temperatures, and milk cortisol concentrations increased as HLI increased in both 2011 and 2012. Fecal cortisol metabolites varied with HLI in 2011 only. When cattle had access to shade, their use of shade increased as the HLI increased. This effect was more pronounced during the last part of the summer, possibly due to better acquaintance with the shade construction. In this case, shade use increased to 65% at the highest HLI (79). Shade tempered the effects on respiration, rectal temperature, and fecal cortisol metabolites. Milk cortisol was not influenced by HLI for cows using shade for > 10% of the day. Therefore, even in temperate areas, cattle may suffer from heat when they are at pasture in summer and providing shade can reduce such stress.

  9. A mathematical model of shading rows of plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tar, K.; Makra, L.; Loki, J. [L. Kossuth University, Debrecen (Hungary)

    1998-04-01

    This paper reviews a previous analysis on the shading of buildings and applies the same principles to applications in agriculture, e.g. the shading of rows of plants. The new model is applicable to vertical parallel rows of plants, such as the cordon-trained grapevine, aligned in any direction and on either horizontal or inclined slopes. At any particular plantation, information for optimal planting procedures could be determined. The plants could make a much greater use of solar energy compared with conventional procedures, with enhanced quality and quantity. (author)

  10. The perception of shape from shading in a new light

    OpenAIRE

    Proulx, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    How do humans see three-dimensional shape based on two-dimensional shading? Much research has assumed that a ‘light from above’ bias solves the ambiguity of shape from shading. Counter to the ‘light from above’ bias, studies of Bayesian priors have found that such a bias can be swayed by other light cues. Despite the persuasive power of the Bayesian models, many new studies and books cite the original ‘light from above’ findings. Here I present a version of the Bayesian result that can be exp...

  11. Building capacity for providing canopy cover and canopy height at FIA plot locations using high-resolution imagery and leaf-off LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Riemann; Jarlath O' Neil-Dunne; Greg C. Liknes

    2012-01-01

    Tree canopy cover and canopy height information are essential for estimating volume, biomass, and carbon; defining forest cover; and characterizing wildlife habitat. The amount of tree canopy cover also influences water quality and quantity in both rural and urban settings. Tree canopy cover and canopy height are currently collected at FIA plots either in the field or...

  12. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Hawaii, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  13. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  14. Trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding: a comparison of shade- and sun-adapted species in a subtropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    Species in high-rainfall regions have two major alternative approaches to quickly drain off water, i.e., increasing leaf inclination angles relative to the horizontal plane, or developing long leaf drip tips. We hypothesized that shade-adapted species will have more pronounced leaf drip tips but not greater inclination angles (which can reduce the ability to intercept light) compared to sun-adapted species and that length of leaf drip tips will be negatively correlated with photosynthetic capacity [characterized by light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (Amax), associated light compensation points (LCP), and light saturation points (LSP)]. We tested this hypothesis by measuring morphological and physiological traits that are associated with light-interception and water shedding for seven shade-adapted shrub species, ten sun-adapted understory shrub species, and 15 sun-adapted tree species in a subtropical Chinese rainforest, where mean annual precipitation is around 1,600 mm. Shade-adapted understory species had lower LMA, Amax, LSP, and LCP compared to understory or canopy sun-adapted species; their leaf and twig inclination angles were significantly smaller and leaf drip tips were significantly longer than those in sun-adapted species. This suggests that shade-adapted understory species tend to develop pronounced leaf drip tips but not large leaf inclination angles to shed water. The length of leaf drip tips was negatively correlated with leaf inclination angles and photosynthetic capacity. These relationships were consistent between ordinary regression and phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses. Our study illustrates the trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding and indicates that length of leaf drip tips can be used as an indicator of adaptation to shady conditions and overall photosynthetic performance of shrub species in subtropical rainforests.

  15. Canopy-level stomatal narrowing in adult Fagus sylvatica under O3 stress - means of preventing enhanced O3 uptake under high O3 exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyssek, R; Baumgarten, M; Hummel, U; Häberle, K-H; Kitao, M; Wieser, G

    2015-01-01

    Spatio-temporally consistent O(3) doses are demonstrated in adult Fagus sylvatica from the Kranzberg Forest free-air fumigation experiment, covering cross-canopy and whole-seasonal scopes through sap flow measurement. Given O(3)-driven closure of stomata, we hypothesized enhanced whole-tree level O(3) influx to be prevented under enhanced O(3) exposure. Although foliage transpiration rate was lowered under twice-ambient O(3) around noon by 30% along with canopy conductance, the hypothesis was falsified, as O(3) influx was raised by 25%. Nevertheless, the twice-ambient/ambient ratio of O(3) uptake was smaller by about 20% than that of O(3) exposure, suggesting stomatal limitation of uptake. The O(3) response was traceable from leaves across branches to the canopy, where peak transpiration rates resembled those of shade rather than sun branches. Rainy/overcast-day and nightly O(3) uptake is quantified and discussed. Whole-seasonal canopy-level validation of modelled with sap flow-derived O(3) flux becomes available in assessing O(3) risk for forest trees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of the United States, in an Albers...

  17. Differences in tooth shade value according to age, gender and skin color: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraganta, Sumanth K; Savadi, Ravindra C; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Z

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the differences in tooth shade value according to age, gender and skin color among a sample of the local population in Bengaluru, India. The study comprised 100 subjects belonging to both gender between the age groups of 16 years to 55 years. Tooth shade values of permanent maxillary left or right central incisors were recorded using the Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide. Skin color was matched using the Radiance compact makeup shades as a guide. Chi-square statistical test demonstrated that younger subjects have lighter tooth shade values. No statistically significant differences were recorded in tooth shade value according to gender or skin color. Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that tooth shade value is significantly influenced by age. Gender and skin color appear not to have a significant relation to tooth shade value.

  18. 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Hawaii, with relief shading added to accentuate...

  19. 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of the United States, with relief shading...

  20. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America 200509 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America map layer shows depth ranges using colors, with relief enhanced by shading. The image was derived from the National...

  1. Multifunctional shade-tree management in tropical agroforestry landscapes — a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teja Tscharntke; Yann Clough; Shonil A. Bhagwat; Damayanti Buchori; Heiko Faust; Dietrich Hertel; Dirk Hölscher; Jana Juhrbandt; Michael Kessler; Ivette Perfecto; Christoph Scherber; Götz Schroth; Edzo Veldkamp; Thomas C. Wanger

    2011-01-01

    .... Adaptation strategies to environmental change include maintenance of shade trees in tropical agroforestry, but conversion of shaded to unshaded systems is common practice to increase short-term yield. 2...

  2. Difference in illuminant-dependent color changes of shade guide tabs by the shade designation relative to three illuminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-12-01

    To determine the difference in illuminant-dependent color changes of shade guide tabs of Vita Lumin (VITA), Chromascop (CHRO) and Vita 3D-Master (3D-M) shade guides by the shade designation in each shade guide. Color of 16 tabs of VITA, 20 tabs of CHRO and 29 tabs of 3D-M was measured according to the CIELAB color scale relative to the CIE standard illuminant D65, A and F2. Color differences (deltaE*ab) between the A1 tab and other VITA tabs, between the 110 tab and other CHRO tabs and between the 0M1 tab and other 3D-M tabs relative to the three illuminants were calculated, and the ratios of deltaE*ab values relative to the different illuminants [deltaE*ab(A)/deltaE*ab(D65), deltaE*ab(F2)/deltaE*ab(D65) and deltaE*ab(F2)/deltaE*ab(A)] were calculated. Ratios of the hue angle shifts of each shade tab by the change of illuminant over the corresponding value of the Al, the 110 or the 0M1 tab were also calculated. Differences in the ratios of color difference and hue angle shift were analyzed with a repeated measures, two-way analysis of variance (alpha = 0.05). Ratios of deltaE*ab values by the illuminant were 0.90-1.17, 0.95-1.07 and 0.99-1.06 for the VITA, the CHRO and the 3D-M shade guide, respectively. Ratios of the hue angle shifts by the illuminant were from -1.6 to 1.8 for the VITA, from -7.3 to 1.2 for the CHRO and from -1.2 to 3.1 for the 3D-M. Changes in color and hue angle of shade tabs were significantly different by the shade tab designation when illuminant was changed (P < 0.01).

  3. Canopy foliar nitrogen retrieved from airborne hyperspectral imagery by correcting for canopy structure effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Heiden, Uta; Heurich, Marco; Latifi, Hooman; Hearne, John

    2017-02-01

    A statistical relationship between canopy mass-based foliar nitrogen concentration (%N) and canopy bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) has been repeatedly demonstrated. However, the interaction between leaf properties and canopy structure confounds the estimation of foliar nitrogen. The canopy scattering coefficient (the ratio of BRF and the directional area scattering factor, DASF) has recently been suggested for estimating %N as it suppresses the canopy structural effects on BRF. However, estimation of %N using the scattering coefficient has not yet been investigated for longer spectral wavelengths (>855 nm). We retrieved the canopy scattering coefficient for wavelengths between 400 and 2500 nm from airborne hyperspectral imagery, and then applied a continuous wavelet analysis (CWA) to the scattering coefficient in order to estimate %N. Predictions of %N were also made using partial least squares regression (PLSR). We found that %N can be accurately retrieved using CWA (R2 = 0.65, RMSE = 0.33) when four wavelet features are combined, with CWA yielding a more accurate estimation than PLSR (R2 = 0.47, RMSE = 0.41). We also found that the wavelet features most sensitive to %N variation in the visible region relate to chlorophyll absorption, while wavelet features in the shortwave infrared regions relate to protein and dry matter absorption. Our results confirm that %N can be retrieved using the scattering coefficient after correcting for canopy structural effect. With the aid of high-fidelity airborne or upcoming space-borne hyperspectral imagery, large-scale foliar nitrogen maps can be generated to improve the modeling of ecosystem processes as well as ecosystem-climate feedbacks.

  4. Chemical and physical environmental conditions underneath mat- and canopy-forming macroalgae, and their effects on understorey corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Hauri

    Full Text Available Disturbed coral reefs are often dominated by dense mat- or canopy-forming assemblages of macroalgae. This study investigated how such dense macroalgal assemblages change the chemical and physical microenvironment for understorey corals, and how the altered environmental conditions affect the physiological performance of corals. Field measurements were conducted on macroalgal-dominated inshore reefs in the Great Barrier Reef in quadrats with macroalgal biomass ranging from 235 to 1029 g DW m(-2 dry weight. Underneath mat-forming assemblages, the mean concentration of dissolved oxygen was reduced by 26% and irradiance by 96% compared with conditions above the mat, while concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and soluble reactive phosphorous increased by 26% and 267%, respectively. The difference was significant but less pronounced under canopy-forming assemblages. Dissolved oxygen declined and dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity increased with increasing algal biomass underneath mat-forming but not under canopy-forming assemblages. The responses of corals to conditions similar to those found underneath algal assemblages were investigated in an aquarium experiment. Coral nubbins of the species Acropora millepora showed reduced photosynthetic yields and increased RNA/DNA ratios when exposed to conditions simulating those underneath assemblages (pre-incubating seawater with macroalgae, and shading. The magnitude of these stress responses increased with increasing proportion of pre-incubated algal water. Our study shows that mat-forming and, to a lesser extent, canopy-forming macroalgal assemblages alter the physical and chemical microenvironment sufficiently to directly and detrimentally affect the metabolism of corals, potentially impeding reef recovery from algal to coral-dominated states after disturbance. Macroalgal dominance on coral reefs therefore simultaneously represents a consequence and cause of coral reef degradation.

  5. Models of the interactive effects of rising ozone, carbon dioxide and temperature on canopy carbon dioxide exchange and isoprene emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. J.

    This thesis presents new process-based models to predict the response of vegetation to interactive effects of concurrently changing environmental variables. The combination of new process-based models with the biochemical mechanistic model equations of photosynthesis and simple canopy models, allow the prediction of responses of isoprene emission rates, wheat leaf CO2 assimilation, and wheat productivity to various scenarios of climate and atmospheric change, consistent with changes predicted by the 'business as usual' scenario, IS92a. Isoprene, a biogenic hydrocarbon emitted by many tree species, plays a key role in atmospheric chemistry and is a major precursor to phytotoxic ozone. As isoprene emission is highly temperature sensitive, the findings of the most recent research into isoprene synthesis and emission were used to construct a process-based model, to simulate the effects of environmental change on rates of isoprene emission from leaves. This model was subsequently scaled up to the canopy level, using a simple sunlit/shaded canopy model, and leaf energy budget equations. A second new process-based model, based on published data, was constructed to simulate the effects of acute ozone exposure on wheat leaf photosynthesis, and was also subsequently scaled up to the canopy level. In addition, the model of acute ozone effects was adapted to predict the effects of chronic ozone exposure on wheat photosynthesis, and scaled-up to predict the interactive effects of elevated (CO2] and (O3] on wheat productivity. Predictions are presented and discussed. The research illustrates the need for process-based models to predict the interactive effects of concurrently changing environmental factors on vegetation, in order to quantify the feedback effects under future atmospheric and climate conditions.

  6. In vivo spectroradiometric evaluation of colour matching errors among five shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Yu, H; Wang, Y N

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the colour errors of visual shade selection by five different shade guides. The maxillary left central incisors of sixty participants were visually evaluated by two groups of prosthodontists, with different clinical experience. The shade selection results were recorded and the most selected tab was determined as the resultant shade for each tooth. If totally different opinions were obtained, consensus was needed to determine the resultant shade among the observers. The colour distributions (L*, a* and b*) of each tooth and shade tab were measured using a spectroradiometer. The coverage errors (CEs) of each shade guide and colour differences (DeltaE values) between a tooth and the selected shade tabs were calculated. Two-way anova and Tukey's post hoc analysis were used to evaluate the differences of CE and DeltaE values among shade guides and clinical experience (alpha = 0.05). Coverage errors and DeltaE values in all of the five shade guide systems were all beyond the clinical threshold of 3.3 units. The consensus led to a better colour matching than that of the single decision group in Vitapan 3D-Master and Shofu NCC shade guides. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found among DeltaE values of the shade guide system and clinical experience. In conclusion, all five of the shade guide systems used did not achieve clinically compatible shade matching. However, the Vitapan 3D Master shade guide system resulted in the lowest CEs and DeltaE values. Consensus could be helpful in enhancing the aesthetic results using Vitapan 3D Master and Shofu NCC shade guides.

  7. Crafting tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Antje; Freitag, Markus; Rapp, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing changes in social structures, orientation, and value systems confront us with the growing necessity to address and understand transforming patterns of tolerance as well as specific aspects, such as social tolerance. Based on hierarchical analyses of the latest World Values Survey (2005–08...... results show that specific institutional qualities, which reduce status anxiety, such as inclusiveness, universality, and fairness, prevail over traditional socio-economic, societal, cultural, and democratic explanations.......–08) and national statistics for 28 countries, we assess both individual and contextual aspects that influence an individual's perception of different social groupings. Using a social tolerance index that captures personal attitudes toward these groupings, we present an institutional theory of social tolerance. Our...

  8. Spectral quality of the shading and spacing on alpinia cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseane Rodrigues de Souza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intensity and spectral quality of the radiation can be manipulated with the use of neutral or color shading screens in growing plants, and it can promote physiological and morphological changes. Therefore, the purpose was evaluating the effects of different shading levels, screens spectral quality, and spacing in the development of cv. Jungle King and cv. Jungle Queen gingers. Rhizomes were planted in 5 cultivation environments (full sun, black screen 50%, black screen 30%, blue screen 50% and red screen 50% shading and 2 spacing (0.8 x 1.0 m and 0.8 x 1.5 m. The experimental design was completely randomized in a factorial 5x2x2x7, with 5 environments of cultivation, 2 cultivars, 2 spacing between plants and 7 times of evaluation (55, 120, 200, 255, 285, 335 e 370 days after planting (DAP. The evaluations were shooting index, number of shoots per plant, shoot height and number of leaves per shoot. Shooting of cv. Jungle Queen was earlier compared to cv. Jungle King. Spacing did not influence in the initial development of plants. Screens with 50% shading, in blue or red colors, enhanced alpinia development.

  9. [The influence of toothguide training box on shade matching veracity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-ming; Xu, Tong-kai; Liu, Feng; Shi, Xiao-rui; Feng, Hai-lan

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of toothguide training box(TTB) on shade matching veracity, and compare the differences of influence on shade matching veracity of tabs of shadeguide and on that of tabs out of shadeguide. 31 graduated students who had 1 to 5-year clinical experience without color blindness were trained by TTB once a week for 3 weeks. Elapsed time and scores from the training system were recorded each time. And everyone was tested by 29 tabs of Vita 3D-Master shadeguide and 7 tabs out of Vita 3D-Master shadeguide before the first training as the base line and tested again after the last training as the test after training. SPSS 10.0 software package was used for analysis. The variances of scores and elapsed time were analyzed by ANOVA, and the differences of veracity between tabs of shadeguide and that of tabs out of shadeguide by Wilcoxon signed ranks test. The scores of the tests were rising via training. There was significant difference (P0.01). TTB can improve the shade matching ability of prosthodontists, but has limited influence on the shade matching ability of tabs out of shadeguide.

  10. MODELLING AND CONTROL OF PARTIALLY SHADED PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Seet Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The photovoltaic (PV array controlled by Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT method for optimum PV power generation, particularly when the PV array is under partially shaded condition is presented in this paper. The system modelling is carried out in MATLAB-SIMULINK where the PV array is formed by five series connected identical PV modules. Under uniform solar irradiance conditions, the PV module and the PV array present nonlinear P-V characteristic but the maximum power point (MPP can be easily identified. However, when the PV array is under shaded conditions, the P-V characteristic becomes more complex with the present of multiple MPP. While the PV array operated at local MPP, the generated power is limited. Thus, the investigation on MPPT approach is carried out to maximize the PV generated power even when the PV array is under partially shaded conditions (PSC. Fuzzy logic is adopted into the conventional MPPT to form fuzzy logic based MPPT (FMPPT for better performance. The developed MPPT and FMPPT are compared, particularly the performances on the transient response and the steady state response when the array is under various shaded conditions. FMPPT shows better performance where the simulation results demonstrate FMPPT is able to facilitate the PV array to reach the MPP faster while it helps the PV array to produce a more stable output power.

  11. The use of shaded fuelbreaks in landscape fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    James K. Agee; Bernie Bahro; Mark A. Finney; Philip N. Omi; David B. Sapsis; Carl N. Skinner; Jan W. van Wagtendonk; C. Phillip Weatherspoon

    2000-01-01

    Shaded fuelbreaks and larger landscape fuel treatments, such as prescribed fire, are receiving renewed interest as forest protection strategies in the western United States. The effectiveness of fuelbreaks remains a subject of debate because of differing fuelbreak objectives, prescriptions for creation and maintenance, and their placement in landscapes with differing...

  12. Evaluating Accuracy of the Sunnova Pro Platform Shade Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-01-11

    Sunnova's new solar energy design platform, Sunnova Pro, automatically generates a 3D model of a building and surrounding shading objects. The product is designed to automate the process of engineering a system, sizing batteries and preparing sales proposals.

  13. Adaptive heating, ventilation and solar shading for dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alders, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Calculation of various strategies for the heating of, and the prevention of overheating in, a Dutch standard dwelling that includes (automated) adaptive ventilation systems and solar shading to maintain indoor temperatures at acceptably comfortable temperatures informs this analysis of the costs,

  14. Effects of shading and covering material application for delaying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the results of this study, the highest gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) severity was obtained in the control (uncovered and unshaded) treatment and the lowest disease severity was observed in lifepack treatment with or without shading. Since gray mold disease of grape was the main factor affecting harvest date of the ...

  15. Effect of shading and fertilisation on the development of container ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of shading and fertilisation on the development of container-grown Nothofagus glauca seedlings, a threatened species from central Chile. Rómulo Santelices, Sergio Espinoza, Antonio Cabrera Ariza, Karen Peña-Rojas, Sergio R Donoso ...

  16. Reliability of shade selection using an intraoral spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Siegbert; Yajima, Nao-Daniel; Wolkewitz, Martin; Strub, Jorge R

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of human tooth shade selection using a digital spectrophotometer. Variability among examiners and illumination conditions were tested for possible influence on measurement reproducibility. Fifteen intact anterior teeth of 15 subjects were evaluated for their shade using a digital spectrophotometer (Crystaleye, Olympus, Tokyo, Japan) by two examiners under the same light conditions representing a dental laboratory situation. Each examiner performed the measurement ten times on the labial surface of each tooth containing three evaluation sides (cervical, body, incisal). Commission International on Illumination color space values for L* (lightness), a* (red/green), and b* (yellow/blue) were obtained from each evaluated side. Examiner 2 repeated the measurements of the same subjects under different light conditions (i.e., a dental unit with a chairside lamp). To describe measurement precision, the mean color difference from the mean metric was used. The computed confidence interval (CI) value 5.228 (4.6598-5.8615) reflected (represented) the validity of the measurements. Least square mean analysis of the values obtained by examiners 1 and 2 or under different illumination conditions revealed no statistically significant differences (CI = 95%). Within the limits of the present study, the accuracy and reproducibility of dental shade selection using the tested spectrophotometer with respect to examiner and illumination conditions reflected the reliability of this device. This study suggests that the tested spectrophotometer can be recommended for the clinical application of shade selection.

  17. Effect of Color Shading Procedures and Cyclic Loading on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    5 days ago ... Effect of Color Shading Procedures and Cyclic Loading on the Biaxial. Flexural Strength of Zirconia. I Tuncel, I Turp, A Usumez masking liner material, which is applied before layering the veneer ceramic.[2] Current studies has reported that coloring procedures affect the structure of the zirconia framework.

  18. The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, E.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834459; Lopes, S.M.; Geijsen, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194303403; Macklon, N.S.; Roelen, B.A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/109291859

    2011-01-01

    The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells Abstract BACKGROUND Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from a variety of sources such as from the inner cell mass of preimplantation embryos, from primordial germ cells, from teratocarcinomas and from male germ cells. The recent

  19. Matching Shades of Forest Environment to sustain Crude Fibre and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five different types of shades were employed as experimental treatments using the Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). The natural forest condition served as a control. Samples of the edible parts from the domesticated and wild Vegetables were harvested for laboratory analysis for calcium, zinc, iron and crude ...

  20. Influence of shade systems on spatial distribution and infestation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    designing appropriate sampling techniques and effective Integrated Pest. Management (IPM) strategies (Chong .... under umbrella tree shade (Table 6). Discussion. Understanding spatial distribution of X. compactus ..... infestation and population dynamics before any authoritative conclusion is drawn. In our study, it is most ...

  1. Design of a Parachute Canopy Instrumentation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahin, Wahab M.; Daum, Jared S.; Holley, James J.; Litteken, Douglas A.; Vandewalle, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the current technology available to design and develop a reliable and compact instrumentation platform for parachute system data collection and command actuation. Wireless communication with a parachute canopy will be an advancement to the state of the art of parachute design, development, and testing. Embedded instrumentation of the parachute canopy will provide reefing line tension, skirt position data, parachute health monitoring, and other telemetry, further validating computer models and giving engineering insight into parachute dynamics for both Earth and Mars entry that is currently unavailable. This will allow for more robust designs which are more optimally designed in terms of structural loading, less susceptible to adverse dynamics, and may eventually pave the way to currently unattainable advanced concepts of operations. The development of this technology has dual use potential for a variety of other applications including inflatable habitats, aerodynamic decelerators, heat shields, and other high stress environments.

  2. Om tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Begrebet tolerance og dets betydninger diskuteres med henblik på en tydeliggørelse af begrebets forbindelse med stat, religion, ytringsfrihed, skeptisk erkendelsesteori, antropologi og pædagogik.......Begrebet tolerance og dets betydninger diskuteres med henblik på en tydeliggørelse af begrebets forbindelse med stat, religion, ytringsfrihed, skeptisk erkendelsesteori, antropologi og pædagogik....

  3. Effect of shade on various parameters of Friesian cows in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of a shade structure on the feed intake, water intake, milk production and milk composition of Dutch-type. Friesian cows in a temperate climate was determined over three summer seasons. The shade structure reduced. (P < 0.01) radiation as wzrs indicated by lower black globe temperatures. Feed intake of shade ...

  4. [Coverage errors of five shade guide systems to vital natural teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Tan, Jian-guo; Liu, Ming-yue; Zhou, Jian-feng; Liu, Xiao-qiang

    2013-08-01

    To compare the coverage errors (CE) of five different shade guides in anterio vital natural teeth of selected people. Anterior vital natural teeth were measured with Crystaleye spectrophotometer, color coordinates of the teeth and five shade guides A (VITA Classical), B (VITA 3D-Master), C (Chromascop), D (Shofu Vintage Halo NCC) and E (Noritake)were analyzed with the supporting software. The CE of the five shade guide systems to natural teeth were evaluated in cervical, body and incisal regions, and difference in CE among shade guides was determined. In the cervical region, shade guide A had the maximal CE value (3.09 ± 0.97) and shade guide D had the minimal CE value (1.62 ± 0.75).In the body region, CE of shade guide B (1.65 ± 0.64) and shade guide D (1.52 ± 0.74) were lower than those of shade guides A (2.04 ± 0.80), C (2.04 ± 0.90) and E (2.02 ± 0.84) (P < 0.05).In the incisal part, all CE were below 2.00, and again shade guide A had the maximal CE value (1.81 ± 0.86) and shade guide D had the minimal CE value (1.28 ± 0.55). Within the limitation of the study, shade guide D had better color coverage of natural teeth in cervical, body and incisal regions.

  5. Effect of different moisture and shade regimes on the growth of D x P ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was collected on leaf number per plant, plant height, butt circumference and leaf area as well as dry weight of plant parts and total dry matter. There were significant effects due to shade and shade x moisture interactions on seedling growth. Seedlings under 50% shade (50% full sunlight) in combination with low ...

  6. Effect of shade on various parameters of Friesian cows in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of a shade structure on some physiological parameters of lactating Dutch-type Friesian cows wurs determined over three consecutive summer periods. Plasma cortisol concentration of no-shade cows was significantly. (P < 0.05) higher than that of shade cows during the 1985/86 experimentalperiod as well as the ...

  7. Shading correction assisted iterative cone-beam CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunlin; Wu, Pengwei; Gong, Shutao; Wang, Jing; Lyu, Qihui; Tang, Xiangyang; Niu, Tianye

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in total variation (TV) technology enable accurate CT image reconstruction from highly under-sampled and noisy projection data. The standard iterative reconstruction algorithms, which work well in conventional CT imaging, fail to perform as expected in cone beam CT (CBCT) applications, wherein the non-ideal physics issues, including scatter and beam hardening, are more severe. These physics issues result in large areas of shading artifacts and cause deterioration to the piecewise constant property assumed in reconstructed images. To overcome this obstacle, we incorporate a shading correction scheme into low-dose CBCT reconstruction and propose a clinically acceptable and stable three-dimensional iterative reconstruction method that is referred to as the shading correction assisted iterative reconstruction. In the proposed method, we modify the TV regularization term by adding a shading compensation image to the reconstructed image to compensate for the shading artifacts while leaving the data fidelity term intact. This compensation image is generated empirically, using image segmentation and low-pass filtering, and updated in the iterative process whenever necessary. When the compensation image is determined, the objective function is minimized using the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm accelerated on a graphic processing unit. The proposed method is evaluated using CBCT projection data of the Catphan© 600 phantom and two pelvis patients. Compared with the iterative reconstruction without shading correction, the proposed method reduces the overall CT number error from around 200 HU to be around 25 HU and increases the spatial uniformity by a factor of 20 percent, given the same number of sparsely sampled projections. A clinically acceptable and stable iterative reconstruction algorithm for CBCT is proposed in this paper. Differing from the existing algorithms, this algorithm incorporates a shading correction scheme into the low

  8. Improved Windshield and Canopy Protection Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    canopy shots, i.e., 8" from the beam, 12" from the forward arch. The Impact resulted in a penetration with a football -shaped plug blown Inward...i7;«MpiWW.,i«iS,i»f.«.^^^ CVJ Cte / teä <%1 ^ u- o ro O in H UJ o to o L HH Hh o «^ o = —I ro O \\ N__ o a. CM X UJ

  9. The wave-driven current in coastal canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahpour, Maryam; Hambleton, Magnus; Ghisalberti, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Wave-driven flows over canopies of aquatic vegetation (such as seagrass) are characterized by the generation of a strong, shoreward mean current near the top of the canopy. This shoreward drift, which is observed to be up to 75% of the RMS above-canopy orbital velocity, can have a significant impact on residence times within coastal canopies. There have been limited observations of this current and an accurate formulation of its magnitude is still lacking. Accordingly, this study aims to develop a practical relationship to describe the strength of this current as a function of both wave and canopy characteristics. A simple model for the Lagrangian drift velocity indicates that the magnitude of the wave-driven current increases with the above-canopy oscillatory velocity, the vertical orbital excursion at the top of the canopy, and the canopy density. An extensive laboratory study, using both rigid and (dynamically scaled) flexible model vegetation, was carried out to evaluate the proposed model. Experimental results reveal a strong agreement between predicted and measured current velocities over a wide and realistic range of canopy and wave conditions. The validity of this model is also confirmed through available field measurements. Characterization of this wave-induced mean current will allow an enhanced capacity for predicting residence time, and thus key ecological processes, in coastal canopies.

  10. Canopy soil bacterial communities altered by severing host tree limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody R. Dangerfield

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trees of temperate rainforests host a large biomass of epiphytic plants, which are associated with soils formed in the forest canopy. Falling of epiphytic material results in the transfer of carbon and nutrients from the canopy to the forest floor. This study provides the first characterization of bacterial communities in canopy soils enabled by high-depth environmental sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Canopy soil included many of the same major taxonomic groups of Bacteria that are also found in ground soil, but canopy bacterial communities were lower in diversity and contained different operational taxonomic units. A field experiment was conducted with epiphytic material from six Acer macrophyllum trees in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA to document changes in the bacterial communities of soils associated with epiphytic material that falls to the forest floor. Bacterial diversity and composition of canopy soil was highly similar, but not identical, to adjacent ground soil two years after transfer to the forest floor, indicating that canopy bacteria are almost, but not completely, replaced by ground soil bacteria. Furthermore, soil associated with epiphytic material on branches that were severed from the host tree and suspended in the canopy contained altered bacterial communities that were distinct from those in canopy material moved to the forest floor. Therefore, the unique nature of canopy soil bacteria is determined in part by the host tree and not only by the physical environmental conditions associated with the canopy. Connection to the living tree appears to be a key feature of the canopy habitat. These results represent an initial survey of bacterial diversity of the canopy and provide a foundation upon which future studies can more fully investigate the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of these communities.

  11. [Effects of shading light quality at seedling stage on the photosynthesis and growth of ginger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Hua; Xu, Kun

    2008-03-01

    With different color plastic films as shading materials, this paper studied the effects of shading light quality at seedling stage on the growth and photosynthesis of ginger. The results showed that shading with green or blue film induced the greatest chlorophyll content in ginger leaves, followed by shading with white film, and red film. In parallel, the photosynthetic rate under green film-shading was the highest, being 14.9 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) in the 4th leaves, which was 5.7%, 10.4%, and 18.3% higher than that under white, red, and blue film-shading, respectively. After removing the films at vigorous growth stage, the photosynthetic rate became larger, and its change pattern in different shading treatments was similar to that at seedling stage. No significant differences in the chlorophyll content of young leaves were observed among the shading treatments, except the low chlorophyll content under red film-shading. In contrast, the chlorophyll content in low position leaves under blue and red film-shading was lower than that under green and white film-shading. In the whole growth period, the plants under blue film-shading were higher in height and with thinner stem and lesser shoot, compared with those shaded with other color films. The fresh mass of root, stem, leaf, and rhizome decreased in the order of green, white, red, and blue film-shading, and the yields at harvesting stage were 57,000, 53,709, 51,487, and 48,712 kg x hm(-2), respectively, illustrating that shading with green film at seedling stage could increase the leaf photosynthesis, plant growth, and yield of ginger.

  12. Algorithm for Extracting Digital Terrain Models under Forest Canopy from Airborne LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almasi S. Maguya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracting digital elevationmodels (DTMs from LiDAR data under forest canopy is a challenging task. This is because the forest canopy tends to block a portion of the LiDAR pulses from reaching the ground, hence introducing gaps in the data. This paper presents an algorithm for DTM extraction from LiDAR data under forest canopy. The algorithm copes with the challenge of low data density by generating a series of coarse DTMs by using the few ground points available and using trend surfaces to interpolate missing elevation values in the vicinity of the available points. This process generates a cloud of ground points from which the final DTM is generated. The algorithm has been compared to two other algorithms proposed in the literature in three different test sites with varying degrees of difficulty. Results show that the algorithm presented in this paper is more tolerant to low data density compared to the other two algorithms. The results further show that with decreasing point density, the differences between the three algorithms dramatically increased from about 0.5m to over 10m.

  13. Plasticity in the diet of an insectivorous Characin from a coastal stream of south-east Brazil: effects of riparian canopy cover in the diet and prey selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Barreiro Mazzoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Riparian zones are intimately linked to aquatic ecosystems and affect a number of processes including the maintenance of many fishes species that feed directly on insect prey of both allo and autochtonous origin. Mimagoniates microlepis is a Glandulocaudinae species whose diet is broadly based on unsects. Registers mentioned that Mimagoniates species are generally opportunistic foragers, consuming prey approximately in proportion to what is available in the environment. Coastal streams from Mata Atlântica in the east cost of South America has been suffering drastic losses of natural cover because of forest cutting to supply the growing demands for food, development of agricultural fields, intensive cultivation of sugar cane and soya beans. In the present study we aimed to access how much the availability of insect prey changes along the stream course of a coastal stream from Mata Atlântica (southeast Brazil. We addressed if changes in the availability of prey insects are reflected in the diet of Mimagoniates populations occurring in different sites along the stream. We sampled prey availability and fishes at five sites with different degrees of canopy coverture (shaded vs. non shaded sites. We found that prey availability changes according to physical environmental variables (coverture, water velocity and substratum. Although adaptable to prey availability, relative importance of different insect groups changed in the diet of individuals according to sampling site, M. microlepis was not registered in sites without canopy coverture and allochthonous insect prey.

  14. A model of canopy photosynthesis incorporating protein distribution through the canopy and its acclimation to light, temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ian R.; Thornley, John H. M.; Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The distribution of photosynthetic enzymes, or nitrogen, through the canopy affects canopy photosynthesis, as well as plant quality and nitrogen demand. Most canopy photosynthesis models assume an exponential distribution of nitrogen, or protein, through the canopy, although this is rarely consistent with experimental observation. Previous optimization schemes to derive the nitrogen distribution through the canopy generally focus on the distribution of a fixed amount of total nitrogen, which fails to account for the variation in both the actual quantity of nitrogen in response to environmental conditions and the interaction of photosynthesis and respiration at similar levels of complexity. Model A model of canopy photosynthesis is presented for C3 and C4 canopies that considers a balanced approach between photosynthesis and respiration as well as plant carbon partitioning. Protein distribution is related to irradiance in the canopy by a flexible equation for which the exponential distribution is a special case. The model is designed to be simple to parameterize for crop, pasture and ecosystem studies. The amount and distribution of protein that maximizes canopy net photosynthesis is calculated. Key Results The optimum protein distribution is not exponential, but is quite linear near the top of the canopy, which is consistent with experimental observations. The overall concentration within the canopy is dependent on environmental conditions, including the distribution of direct and diffuse components of irradiance. Conclusions The widely used exponential distribution of nitrogen or protein through the canopy is generally inappropriate. The model derives the optimum distribution with characteristics that are consistent with observation, so overcoming limitations of using the exponential distribution. Although canopies may not always operate at an optimum, optimization analysis provides valuable insight into plant acclimation to environmental

  15. Roles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Allen, Dale J.; Zhang, Da-Lin; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Landry, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effects can strengthen heat waves and air pollution episodes. In this study, the dampening impact of urban trees on the UHI during an extreme heat wave in the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area is examined by incorporating trees, soil, and grass into the coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model and an urban canopy model (WRF-UCM). By parameterizing the effects of these natural surfaces alongside roadways and buildings, the modified WRF-UCM is used to investigate how urban trees, soil, and grass dampen the UHI. The modified model was run with 50% tree cover over urban roads and a 10% decrease in the width of urban streets to make space for soil and grass alongside the roads and buildings. Results show that, averaged over all urban areas, the added vegetation decreases surface air temperature in urban street canyons by 4.1 K and road-surface and building-wall temperatures by 15.4 and 8.9 K, respectively, as a result of tree shading and evapotranspiration. These temperature changes propagate downwind and alter the temperature gradient associated with the Chesapeake Bay breeze and, therefore, alter the strength of the bay breeze. The impact of building height on the UHI shows that decreasing commercial building heights by 8 m and residential building heights by 2.5 m results in up to 0.4-K higher daytime surface and near-surface air temperatures because of less building shading and up to 1.2-K lower nighttime temperatures because of less longwave radiative trapping in urban street canyons.

  16. Typology of building shading elements on Jalan Sudirman corridor in Pekanbaru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, G.; Aldy, P.

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, temperature in Pekanbaru was between 22.60°C and 34.6°C with humidity 79.14 percent. This condition has increase the concern of energy utilization to building comfort. Buildings have the biggest energy consuming due to the use of air conditioner in Pekanbaru. One effort to reduced energy is shading devices application. Application of air conditioner need huge energy, replaced natural circulation with architecture elements to reduced building thermal. This research study about system and building shading devices types that influence building thermal in Pekanbaru so that knowing characteristics and elements form. This study aims to determine and identify of systems and building elements types in Pekanbaru, which the element forms to conquer in climate condition. Qualitative method with rationalistic-paradigm has used to identify typology of building shading devices on Jalan Sudirman corridor. The research orientation on typology theory, thermal theory, and building shading device to identification of building shading device types on Jalan Sudirman corridor. Based on the survey result, there are 2 type of building shading devices on Jalan Sudirman Pekanbaru which is based on forms and quantity of shading. The types are building shading devices based on shading quantity and building shading devices based on shading forms.

  17. Evaluation of different shades to improve dairy cattle well-being in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtorta, S. E.; Leva, Perla E.; Gallardo, Miriam R.

    Two tree shades (TS1 and TS2) and an artificial shade structure (AS) were evaluated using black globe temperatures (BGTs) to assess their effectiveness in reducing heat load. The artificial structure consisted of a black woven polypropylene cloth providing 80% shade, mounted on 2.5-m-high eucalyptus posts. The work was carried out at Rafaela Experimental Station, Argentina, during the summer (January and February) 1994. BGTs and floor temperatures were measured in concrete floor holding pens with and without artifical shade. The results showed no difference between TS1, TS2 and AS, their average BGTs being 30.2 (SD 0.58), 29.0 (SD 0.70) and 30.2 (SD 0.74)°C, respectively. BGTs under all three shades were significantly lower (Pcows were recorded twice a week. Rectal temperatures were significantly higher for non-shaded cows (P<0.01), mean RT being 40.1 (SD 0.65)°C vs 39.3 (SD 0.42)°C for the shaded animals. Corresponding RRs were 78.9 (SD 18.0) and 60.7 (SD 10.6) (P<0.05). It was concluded that: (1) tree and artificial shades produced similar effects, (2) shading the holding pen with an 80% shading cloth was effective in reducing heat load and floor temperatures, and (3) access to shade in our pasture-based system improved animal well-being.

  18. Building Applications, Opportunities and Challenges of Active Shading Systems: A State-of-the-Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joud Al Dakheel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Active shading systems in buildings have emerged as a high performing shading solution that selectively and optimally controls daylight and heat gains. Active shading systems are increasingly used in buildings, due to their ability to mainly improve the building environment, reduce energy consumption and in some cases generate energy. They may be categorized into three classes: smart glazing, kinetic shading and integrated renewable energy shading. This paper reviews the current status of the different types in terms of design principle and working mechanism of the systems, performance, control strategies and building applications. Challenges, limitations and future opportunities of the systems are then discussed. The review highlights that despite its high initial cost, the electrochromic (EC glazing is the most applied smart glazing due to the extensive use of glass in buildings under all climatic conditions. In terms of external shadings, the rotating shading type is the predominantly used one in buildings due to its low initial cost. Algae façades and folding shading systems are still emerging types, with high initial and maintenance costs and requiring specialist installers. The algae façade systems and PV integrated shading systems are a promising solution due to their dual benefits of providing shading and generating electricity. Active shading systems were found to save 12 to 50% of the building cooling electricity consumption.

  19. The influence of canopy density on willow leaf rust (Melampsora epitea) severity in willow short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toome, M.; Heinsoo, K.; Holm, B.; Luik, A. [Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1A, Tartu 51014 (Estonia)

    2010-08-15

    Willow short rotation coppice is used as a renewable energy source and also as a vegetation filter for purifying wastewater. Wastewater irrigation might change microclimatic conditions and increase the canopy density in plantations, which might decrease production due to leaf rust (Melampsora epitea). The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of the canopy density on rust abundance on willows. For that, we counted rust pustules on leaves of five different willow clones from dense and sparse areas in both the wastewater irrigated and control part of the plantation. The results demonstrated clear differences between clones; clone '81090' was very susceptible, '78183' susceptible, '78021' fairly tolerant and 'Tora' rust resistant. Clone 'Gudrun', which was previously reported resistant, had severe rust damages in Estonia. In the case of clones '78183' and '78021' there were significantly more rust pustules per leaf unit area at areas with denser canopy, which confirmed that higher plant density could result in biomass losses caused by leaf rust. No differences, however, were detected between dense and sparse areas of hybrid clone 'Gudrun', most probably because in this particular case leaves from upper canopy layer were used. There was a tendency detected that clones with a higher number of shoots per plant had more rust damages on their leaves, however, the correlation was not statistically confirmed. In conclusion, the impact of canopy density on rust abundance is clone-specific and significant in the case of clones on which infection starts from the lower part of the canopy. (author)

  20. Fruit shading enhances peel color, carotenes accumulation and chromoplast differentiation in red grapefruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lado, Joanna; Cronje, Paul; Alquézar, Berta; Page, Anton; Manzi, Matías; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Stead, Anthony D; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Rodrigo, María Jesús

    2015-08-01

    The distinctive color of red grapefruits is due to lycopene, an unusual carotene in citrus. It has been observed that red 'Star Ruby' (SR) grapefruits grown inside the tree canopy develop a more intense red coloration than those exposed to higher light intensities. To investigate the effect of light on SR peel pigmentation, fruit were bagged or exposed to normal photoperiodic conditions, and changes in carotenoids, expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes and plastid ultrastructure in the peel were analyzed. Light avoidance accelerated chlorophyll breakdown and induced carotenoid accumulation, rendering fruits with an intense coloration. Remarkably, lycopene levels in the peel of shaded fruits were 49-fold higher than in light-exposed fruit while concentrations of downstream metabolites were notably reduced, suggesting a bottleneck at the lycopene cyclization in the biosynthetic pathway. Paradoxically, this increment in carotenoids in covered fruit was not mirrored by changes in mRNA levels of carotenogenic genes, which were mostly up-regulated by light. In addition, covered fruits experienced profound changes in chromoplast differentiation, and the relative expression of genes related to chromoplast development was enhanced. Ultrastructural analysis of plastids revealed an acceleration of chloroplasts to chromoplast transition in the peel of covered fruits concomitantly with development of lycopene crystals and plastoglobuli. In this sense, an accelerated differentiation of chromoplasts may provide biosynthetic capacity and a sink for carotenoids without involving major changes in transcript levels of carotenogenic genes. Light signals seem to regulate carotenoid accumulation at the molecular and structural level by influencing both biosynthetic capacity and sink strength. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  1. Comparison of visual shade determination and an intra-oral dental colourimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, B; Karaagaclioglu, L

    2008-10-01

    The choice of correct tooth shade for the fabrication of a restoration remains a challenge, even for experienced clinicians. The aim of this research was to evaluate and compare the precision of two different shade determination methods in terms of repeatability. Maxillary right central incisor of 10 patients was evaluated visually with the use of Vitapan Classical shade guide by five observers and instrumentally with the Vitapan classical shade guide values of ShadeEye NCC intra-oral colourimeter three times consecutively. The in vivo repeatability of methods were analysed with the spectrophotometric L*, a*, b* values of the shade guide (Vitapan Classical). Within the limitations of this study, the repeatability of instrumental (intra-oral dental colourimeter) and visual shade determinations were acceptable.

  2. Radiation Distribution Within a Canopy Profile Calculated by a Multiple-Layer Canopy Scattering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, R. J.; Zhao, W.

    2004-05-01

    Remote sensing technology has tremendous potential for use in natural resource studies, agriculture, water and land use management because of the spatial information contained in remote sensing images and because of the ease and/or frequency of acquiring vast amounts of surface information. However, the quantitative application of remotely sensed data is restricted by several problems. One of them is that the entities a remote sensor views are not single targets. For example, measurement show that the skin temperature of many crops can exhibit more than a 10° C difference between the leaves at the bottom and those at the top of the canopy, in addition to the usually large difference between leaves and soil substrate. Directional radiometric surface temperatures measured from above a crop represent neither the skin temperature of the crop nor the surface temperature of the soil substrate but a complex aggregate of all elements viewed. When a remote sensing device views a vegetated surface from different view angles, different combinations of canopy and soil elements at different temperatures will be seen, producing different values of "remotely sensed surface temperature." As the first step in a series of models to be developed to simulate energy balance, sensible and latent heat fluxes, and temperature profiles within a vegetation canopy, a multiple-layer canopy scattering model to estimate short wave radiation distribution within a wheat canopy was developed. This model incorporates processes of radiation penetration through gaps between leaves, and radiation absorption, reflection and transmission in leaf layers. It is able to simulate the multiple scattering processes that occur among different canopy layers, and determine the vertical distributions of upwelling, downwelling, and reflected short wave radiation within the canopy, and at the soil surface. One of the primary advantages of this model, in contrast to other models, is that the multiple scattering

  3. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; F. M. Bréon; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; MOORS, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning, that is removing trees at a certain time during the forest rotation, on summertime canopy albedo. The effects of different forest species (pine, beech, oak) and four thinning strategies (light to int...

  4. CANOPY STRUCTURE AND DEPOSITION EFFICIENCY OF VINEYARD SPRAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Gianfranco Pergher; Raffaella Petris

    2007-01-01

    A field study was performed to analyse how deposition efficiency from an axial-fan sprayer was affected by the canopy structure of vines trained to the High Cordon, Low Cordon and Casarsa systems, at beginning of flowering and beginning of berry touch growth stages. An empirical calibration method, providing a dose rate adjustment roughly proportional to canopy height, was used. The canopy structure was assessed using the Point Quadrat method, and determining the leaf area index (LAI) and the...

  5. The impact of translucent fabric shades and control strategies on energy savings and visual quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankanapon, Pimonmart

    Translucent fabric shades provide opportunities for building occupants to control sunlight penetration for heat reduction, thermal comfort, and visual quality. Regulating shades affects building energy and can potentially reduce the size of mechanical cooling systems. Shades are not normally included in energy model studies during the design process, even though shades potential impact energy use. This is because the occupants normally leave shades closed a large fraction of the time, but models are generally performed with no shades. Automatic shade control is now available, so it is necessary to understand the impact of shades on visual quality and their energy saving potential in order to optimize their overall performance. There are very limited studies that have address shades and their integrated performance on energy consumption and visual quality. Most of these do not reflected modern shade types and their application. The goals of this study are: First, to determine the impact of shades on total, heating, cooling and lighting energy savings with different design and operation parameters. Second, to study and develop different automatic shade control strategies to promote and optimize energy savings and visual quality. A simulation-based approach using EnergyPlus in a parametric study provide better understanding energy savings under different shade conditions. The parametric runs addressed various building parameters such as geometry, orientation, site climate, glazing/shade properties, and shade control strategies with integrated lighting control. The impact of shades was determined for total building and space heating, cooling and lighting energy savings. The effect of shades on visual quality was studied using EnergyPlus, AGI32 and DAYSIM for several indices such as daylight glare index (DGI), work plane illuminance, luminance ratios and view. Different shade control strategies and integrated lighting control were considered with two translucent fabric

  6. Shade tolerance and suitability of tree species for planting in rubber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rapid increase in rubber monoculture in Xishuangbanna has resulted in extensive damage to its local ecosystem. To decrease the negative effects, the concept of the ecological-economic rubber plantation (EERP) system was proposed. The EERP entails intercropping rubber plants with other economically significant ...

  7. Resprouting as a persistence strategy of tropical forest trees: relations with carbohydrate storage and shade tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, L.; Kitajima, K.; Mercado, P.; Chubina, J.; Melgar, I.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2010-01-01

    Resprouting is an important persistence strategy for woody species and represents a dominant pathway of regeneration in many plant communities with potentially large consequences for vegetation dynamics, community composition and species coexistence. Most of our knowledge on resprouting strategies

  8. Spectroscopic Remote Sensing of Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Forest Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Asner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC are products of photosynthesis, and leaf NSC concentration may be a prognostic indicator of climate-change tolerance in woody plants. However, measurement of leaf NSC is prohibitively labor intensive, especially in tropical forests, where foliage is difficult to access and where NSC concentrations vary enormously by species and across environments. Imaging spectroscopy may allow quantitative mapping of leaf NSC, but this possibility remains unproven. We tested the accuracy of NSC remote sensing at leaf, canopy and stand levels using visible-to-shortwave infrared (VSWIR spectroscopy with partial least squares regression (PLSR techniques. Leaf-level analyses demonstrated the high precision (R2 = 0.69–0.73 and accuracy (%RMSE = 13%–14% of NSC estimates in 6136 live samples taken from 4222 forest canopy species worldwide. The leaf spectral data were combined with a radiative transfer model to simulate the role of canopy structural variability, which led to a reduction in the precision and accuracy of leaf NSC estimation (R2 = 0.56; %RMSE = 16%. Application of the approach to 79 one-hectare plots in Amazonia using the Carnegie Airborne Observatory VSWIR spectrometer indicated the good precision and accuracy of leaf NSC estimates at the forest stand level (R2 = 0.49; %RMSE = 9.1%. Spectral analyses indicated strong contributions of the shortwave-IR (1300–2500 nm region to leaf NSC determination at all scales. We conclude that leaf NSC can be remotely sensed, opening doors to monitoring forest canopy physiological responses to environmental stress and climate change.

  9. Influence of shade systems on spatial distribution and infestation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    captured more adult Platypus quercivorus beetles in sticky screen traps placed at lower than upper sections in and around forest gaps. This could probably be partially due to the fact that branches in lower portion of canopy are usually more mature than those in upper portion; possessing less plant defenses which can.

  10. Color stability of shade guides after autoclave sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Max; Sartori, Neimar; Monteiro, Sylvio; Baratieri, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of 120 autoclave sterilization cycles on the color stability of two commercial shade guides (Vita Classical and Vita System 3D-Master). The specimens were evaluated by spectrophotometer before and after the sterilization cycles. The color was described using the three-dimensional CIELab system. The statistical analysis was performed in three chromaticity coordinates, before and after sterilization cycles, using the paired samples t test. All specimens became darker after autoclave sterilization cycles. However, specimens of Vita Classical became redder, while those of the Vita System 3D-Master became more yellow. Repeated cycles of autoclave sterilization caused statistically significant changes in the color coordinates of the two shade guides. However, these differences are considered clinically acceptable.

  11. Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates pesticides used to protect crops and sets limits on the amount of pesticide remaining in or on foods in the U.S. The limits on pesticides on foods are called tolerances in the U.S. (maximum residue limits (MRLs) in many other countries).

  12. Towards Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper; Jurjen Iedema; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2013-01-01

    Across Europe, public attitudes towards lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals range from broad tolerance to widespread rejection. Attitudes towards homosexuality are more than mere individual opinions, but form part of the social and political structures which foster or hinder the equality

  13. Repressive Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Jarlbæk

    2017-01-01

    to an administrative culture of repressive tolerance of organised interests: authorities listen but only reacts in a very limited sense. This bears in it the risk of jeopardising the knowledge transfer from societal actors to administrative ditto thus harming the consultation institutions’ potential for strengthening...

  14. Tolerance Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Fred S.

    The author cites work on visual perception which indicates that in order to study perception it is necessary to replace such classical geometrical notions as betweeness, straightness, perpendicularity, and parallelism with more general concepts. The term tolerance geometry is used for any geometry when primitive notions are obtained from the…

  15. Canopy interception variability in changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicz, Péter; Herceg, András; Kisfaludi, Balázs; Csáki, Péter; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Tree canopies play a rather important role in forest hydrology. They intercept significant amounts of precipitation and evaporate back into the atmosphere during and after precipitation event. This process determines the net intake of forest soils and so important factor of hydrological processes in forested catchments. Average amount of interception loss is determined by the storage capacity of tree canopies and the rainfall distribution. Canopy storage capacity depends on several factors. It shows strong correlation with the leaf area index (LAI). Some equations are available to quantify this dependence. LAI shows significant variability both spatial and temporal scale. There are several methods to derive LAI from remote sensed data which helps to follow changes of it. In this study MODIS sensor based LAI time series are used to estimate changes of the storage capacity. Rainfall distribution derived from the FORESEE database which is developed for climate change related impact studies in the Carpathian Basin. It contains observation based precipitation data for the past and uses bias correction method for the climate projections. In this study a site based estimation is outworked for the Sopron Hills area. Sopron Hills is located at the eastern foothills of the Alps in Hungary. The study site, namely Hidegvíz Valley experimental catchment, is located in the central valley of the Sopron Hills. Long-term interception measurements are available in several forest sites in Hidegvíz Valley. With the combination of the ground based observations, MODIS LAI datasets a simple function is developed to describe the average yearly variations in canopy storage. Interception measurements and the CREMAP evapotranspiration data help to calibrate a simple interception loss equation based on Merriam's work. Based on these equation and the FORESEE bias corrected precipitation data an estimation is outworked for better understanding of the feedback of forest crown on hydrological

  16. Influence of canopy seasonal changes on turbulence parameterization within the roughness sublayer over an orchard canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapkalijevski, M.; Moene, A.F.; Ouwersloot, Huug; Patton, E.G.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this observational study, the role of tree phenology on the atmospheric turbulence parameterization over 10-m-tall and relatively sparse deciduous vegetation is quantified. Observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment are analyzed to establish the

  17. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules

  18. Quality and Quantity Evaluations of Shade Grown Forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. P. Ladyman; M. S. Kerley; R. L. Kallenbach; H. E. Garrett; J. W. Van Sambeek; N. E. Navarrete-Tindall

    2003-01-01

    Seven legumes were grown during the summer-fall of 2000, at the Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center (39? 01 ' N, 92? 46' W) near New Franklin, MO. The forages were grown in 7.5L white pots placed on light-colored gravel either under full sunlight, 45% sunlight, or 20% sunlight created by a shade cloth over a rectangular frame. Drip irrigation was...

  19. Bromeliads production in greenhouses associated to different shading screens

    OpenAIRE

    Holcman,Ester; Sentelhas, Paulo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Bromeliads production in greenhouses is highly influenced by microclimate, which affects plants growth and development. Based on that, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of shading screens of different colors on microclimatic variables and Aechmea fasciata bromeliad growth in a greenhouse covered by transparent low-density polyethylene. The experiment had five treatments, with screens of different colors, inside a plastic greenhouse: thermo-reflective (T1); control without screen (T2)...

  20. Tree canopy temperature response under experimental warming and drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, S. N.; Garrity, S. R.; Cai, M.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Tree mortality associated with rising temperatures and drought has been observed in numerous locations across the globe. Simulated global climate change experiments, such as increased air temperature and reduced precipitation, can help us understand tree response to altered climate regimes and identify key physiological mechanisms involved in tree stress response. We collected canopy-level leaf temperature measurements from several piñon (Pinus edulis) and one-seed juniper (juniperus monosperma) subjected to experimental warming, drought, combined warming and drought treatments, and control conditions in a field-based experiment in northern New Mexico beginning June 2012. We examined leaf temperature responses to the treatments by using continuous measurements from infrared thermocouples located above the tree canopy. We found that leaf temperatures were approximately 5 degrees warmer in heated chambers compared to leaf temperatures of trees outside chambers. Comparisons within each treatment demonstrated that, on average, piñon had higher absolute differences between leaf temperature and air temperature values compared to juniper trees. Stomatal conductance, measured with a leaf porometer showed that within each treatment, juniper had higher stomatal conductance relative to piñon, and that heated trees had lower stomatal conductance relative to non-heated trees. These differences may be attributable to the fact that piñon trees are isohydric, meaning that they have a lower tolerance to water stress. To date, we have not observed a significant drought effect on leaf temperature, however, this is likely due to the short duration of the drought treatment to date. We expect that as the experiment progresses, a drought effect will emerge. One of the key questions that we hope to answer as data continues to be collected is how tree physiology responds to drought, heat, and the interaction between both variables. Although this case study is being conducted in

  1. [Effect of clinical experience on the shade matching accuracy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Gao, Qing-ping; Zhang, Xiao-yu; Yang, Bao-gui; Chen, Zhi-ying; Lu, Shou-yi

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of clinical experience on the shade matching accuracy. Thirty-seven dental students (group A) who had 1 to 2 years of clinical experience and 57 dental students (group B) who didn't have clinical experience took part in this experiment. Participants were divided into two groups (TTB group and TT group) and used the Toothguide Training (TT) and Toothguide Training Box (TTB) respectively. All participants received training session once a week for 3 weeks. Before training and each time after finished training all participants were asked to identify ten unlabeled tabs which had been randomly chosen from Vita 3D-master shadeguide. SPSS 16.0 software package was used for Wilcoxon signed rank test. Before training, the accuracy rate of group A and group B was (65.67±20.4)% and (70.17±17.57)% respectively. After training, the accuracy rate of group A and group B was (78.91±22.82)% and (80.17±17.77)% respectively. No significant difference was found between group A and B, but significant difference was found between before and after training. This study shows clinical experience is not found to be a significant factor to the teeth shade matching. The training can improve the accuracy of shade matching.

  2. The Importance of Microtopography and Nurse Canopy for Successful Restoration Planting of the Slow-Growing Conifer Pilgerodendron uviferum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Bauhus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that, owing to a lack of seed trees, the natural rate of recovery of fire-disturbed bog forests previously dominated by the endemic and endangered conifer Pilgerodendron uviferum (D. Don Florin is extremely slow. Hence, increasing the number of seed trees in the landscape through restoration planting could remove the principal biotic filter, limiting recovery of these forests. Here, we analyzed how the success of restoration plantings may be improved through the choice or manipulation of microsites in P. uviferum forests on Chiloé Island in North Patagonia. For this purpose, we manipulated microtopography in water-logged sites in bogs (mounds, flat terrain, mineral soil and changed canopy conditions (gaps, semi-open, closed canopy in upland sites with better drainage. In bogs, there was no significant effect of microtopography on growth and survival of P. uviferum plantings. However, fluorescence measurements indicated lower stress in seedlings established on mounds. Seedlings in upland areas established beneath a nurse canopy had lower mortality and higher relative shoot growth, foliar nutrients, photosynthetic light use efficiency and chlorophyll fluorescence values than those planted in the open. This indicates that seedlings of the slow growing P. uviferum can tolerate extremely wet conditions, yet suffer from stress when grown in the open. Here, the removal of canopy appeared to have also removed or reduced mycorrhizal networks for seedlings, leading to poorer nutrition and growth. Based on these results, recommendations for restoration plantings in highly degraded P. uviferum forests are presented.

  3. The Effect of Color Training of Dental Students' on Dental Shades Matching Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfouzan, Afnan F; Alqahtani, Hussam M; Tashkandi, Esam A

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effect of color training on the dental shade matching quality of dental students of both gender and to study the need to include lectures and exercises about shade selection in the undergraduate dental curriculum. One hundred and twenty junior dental students from the College of Dentistry at King Saud University participated in the present study and were distributed randomly into four testing groups. They were asked to match the color of four target shade tabs from the VITA Linearguide 3D-MASTER. Group 1 attended a brief lecture and a training exercise about dental shade matching, Group 2 only attended the lecture, and Group 3 only performed the training exercise. Group 4 did not participate in the lecture or the training exercise and served as a control. Exact matching rates were calculated and analyzed to determine the pre- and post-test matching values. Three way repeated measures analysis of variance, paired t test, and independent t-test were used to compare shade matching quality, with a significance level of p < 0.05. There was a significant difference between the pre- and post-test values for the students' dental shade matching qualities for all of the test groups. The effectiveness of the dental shade matching training about color and dental shade matching for improving the students' shade matching quality was proven for both genders. Training can improve shade matching quality of dental students. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:346-351, 2017). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The effect of experience on composite resin shade selection in comparison to a spectrophotometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Recen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the shade matching ability of dentists with different experience levels in comparison to a spectrophotometer. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Participants were selected from the volunteer fourth grade students of Faculty of Dentistry, Ege University (n=100. A fifthyear undergraduate student, a research assistant with 2 years of experience and two professors of restorative dentistry with at least 10 years of experience were included in this study as observers. Ishihara color blindness test was applied to all observers before taking shades. After taking the shades with conventional method by using Vita Classical shade guide, the research assistant took the shades again with SpectroShade Micro device. Agreement on shade matches was evaluated by percentage and compared using Wilcoxon test (p0.05 and the correct match rate of the research assistant was superior to the others. Statistically significant differences were found between the fifth grade student’s shade assignments and the research assistant’s assignments as well as the device’s readings (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that shade matching is a learnable process. In order to do a correct shade match in complicated situations, dentists may refer to spectrophotometric devices.

  5. Color distribution of a shade guide in the value, chroma, and hue scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Soo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2008-07-01

    Shade tabs in a shade guide are matched to teeth in the order of value, hue, and chroma; therefore, information on the distribution of shade tabs is essential for clinical application of a shade guide. However, there is limited information on the color distribution as sorted by these 3 parameters of a recently introduced shade guide. The purposes of this study were to determine the color distributions of tabs from a shade guide in the value (CIE L*), chroma (C*(ab)), and hue scale, and to determine the distribution of step intervals between adjacent tabs by value and chroma. The color of shade tabs (n=29) from a shade guide (Vitapan 3D-Master) was measured to determine the distribution of shade tabs by the value, chroma, hue angle, and CIE a* and b* values. The distribution of the ratios of the value and the chroma of each tab, when compared with the lowest value tab or the lowest chroma tab, was also determined. The data for each color parameter were analyzed by a 3-way ANOVA with the factors of value, chroma, and hue designations of the tabs (alpha=.05). The value, chroma, hue angle, and CIE a* and b* values were influenced by the value, chroma, and hue designations of shade tabs (P3D-Master shade guide was more ordered than previously reported color distributions of other, traditional shade guides. However, the interval in the color parameters between adjacent tabs was not uniform; therefore, shade tabs spaced equally, according to the color parameters, should be studied based on the observer's response data.

  6. Shade material evaluation using a cattle response model and meteorological instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenberg, Roger A.; Brown-Brandl, Tami M.; Nienaber, John A.

    2010-11-01

    Shade structures are often considered as one method of reducing stress in feedlot cattle. Selection of a suitable shade material can be difficult without data that quantify material effectiveness for stress reduction. A summer study was conducted during 2007 using instrumented shade structures in conjunction with meteorological measurements to estimate relative effectiveness of various shade materials. Shade structures were 3.6 m by 6.0 m by 3.0 m high at the peak and 2.0 m high at the sides. Polyethylene shade cloth was used in three of the comparisons and consisted of effective coverings of 100%, 60% with a silver reflective coating, and 60% black material with no reflective coating. Additionally, one of the structures was fitted with a poly snow fence with an effective shade of about 30%. Each shade structure contained a solar radiation meter and a black globe thermometer to measure radiant energy received under the shade material. Additionally, meteorological data were collected as a non-shaded treatment and included temperature, humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation. Data analyses was conducted using a physiological model based on temperature, humidity, solar radiation and wind speed; a second model using black globe temperatures, relative humidity, and wind speed was used as well. Analyses of the data revealed that time spent in the highest stress category was reduced by all shade materials. Moreover, significant differences ( P < 0.05) existed between all shade materials (compared to no-shade) for hourly summaries during peak daylight hours and for `full sun' days.

  7. The fauna and flora of a kelp bed canopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fauna and flora of the canopy of a kelp bed off. Oudekraal, on the Cape Peninsula, is surveyed. Four species of epiphytic algae occur in the kelp canopy, three restricted to. Ecklonia maxima and the fourth to Laminaria pal/ida. Epiphyte biomass is equivalent to 4 - 9% of host standing crop amongst E. maxima, but less ...

  8. Hierarchical Canopy Dynamics of Electrolyte-Doped Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Jespersen, Michael L.

    2013-12-23

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are organic-inorganic hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counterions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and pulsed-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on 18-nm silica NPs with a covalently bound anionic corona, neutralized by amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymers. The NMR relaxation studies show that the nanosecond-scale canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration, and crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. Two canopy populations are observed in the diffusion experiments, demonstrating that one fraction of the canopy is bound to the NP surface on the time scale (milliseconds) of the diffusion experiment and is surrounded by a more mobile layer of canopy that is unable to access the surface due to molecular crowding. The introduction of electrolyte ions (Na+ or Mg2+) screens the canopy-corona electrostatic interactions, resulting in a reduced bulk viscosity and faster canopy exchange. The magnitude of the screening effect depends upon ion concentration and valence, providing a simple route for tuning the macroscopic properties of NIMs. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Synthesis and Experiments of Inherently Balanced Umbrella Canopy Designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, V.; Kiper, G.; Yasir, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows how umbrella canopies and umbrella canopy-like mechanisms can be designed inherently balanced. Inherently balanced means that the center of mass of the moving parts remains stationary at a single point for any position of the mechanism simply because of the specific design of the

  10. Water stress effects on spatially referenced cotton crop canopy properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    rop canopy temperature is known to be affected by water stress. Canopy reflectance can also be impacted as leaf orientation and color respond to the stress. As sensor systems are investigated for real-time management of irrigation and nitrogen, it is essential to understand how the data from the sen...

  11. Soil carbon estimation from eucalyptus grandis using canopy spectra

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mapping soil fertility parameters, such as soil carbon (C), is fundamentally important for forest management and research related to forest growth and climate change. This study seeks to establish the link between Eucalyptus grandis canopy spectra and soil carbon using raw and continuum-removed spectra. Canopy-level ...

  12. Forest canopy BRDF simulation using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Zeng, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is a random statistic method, which has been widely used to simulate the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation canopy in the field of visible remote sensing. The random process between photons and forest canopy was designed using Monte Carlo method.

  13. Crop canopy BRDF simulation and analysis using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Tian, Y.; Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    This author designs the random process between photons and crop canopy. A Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate the Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of crop canopy. Comparing Monte Carlo model to MCRM model, this paper analyzes the variations of different LAD and

  14. Use spectral derivatives for estimating canopy water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing has demonstrated great potential for accurate retrieval of canopy water content (CWC). This CWC is defined by the product of the leaf equivalent water thickness (EWT) and the leaf area index (LAI). In this paper the spectral information provided by the canopy water

  15. Estimating wood volume from canopy area in deciduous woodlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we tested the predictive ability of canopy area in estimating wood volume in deciduous woodlands of Zimbabwe. The study was carried out in four sites of different climatic conditions. We used regression analysis to statistically quantify the prediction of wood volume from canopy area at species and stand level ...

  16. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; Bréon, F.M.; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; Moors, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning,

  17. Cost and Benefit Tradeoffs in Using a Shade Tree for Residential Building Energy Saving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sappinandana Akamphon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming and urban heat islands result in increased cooling energy consumption in buildings. Previous literature shows that planting trees to shade a building can reduce its cooling load. This work proposes a model to determine the cost effectiveness and profitability of planting a shade tree by considering both its potential to reduce cooling energy and its purchase and maintenance cost. A comparison between six selected tree species is used for illustration. Using growth rates, crown sizes, and shading coefficients, cooling energy savings from the tree shades are computed using an industrial-standard building energy simulation program, offset by costs of purchase, planting, and maintenance of these trees. The result shows that most worthwhile tree to plant should have high shading coefficient and moderate crown size to maximize shading while keeping the maintenance costs manageable.

  18. Effects of shading time on quality of matcha and matcha cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Hui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of shading time on the quality of Matcha and the Matcha cake.It showed that shading could help the systhesis of nitrogen compounds such as amino acids,caffeine chlorophyll and protein,but couldn′t favor accumulation of tea polyphenol and polysaccharides.The more shading time was,the more chlorophyll content would be,and the more green of Matcha color would be.After Matcha cake was baked,the green color reduced.The colors of Macha cake are greener with longer shading time.Thus,the length of Shading time has obvious effect on the green tea and the tea cake quality,We can adjust the Matcha cake taste,flavor and color by adding Matcha from different shading time.

  19. Air-Parcel Residence Times Within Forest Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Tobias; Chamecki, Marcelo; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2017-10-01

    We present a theoretical model, based on a simple model of turbulent diffusion and first-order chemical kinetics, to determine air-parcel residence times and the out-of-canopy export of reactive gases emitted within forest canopies under neutral conditions. Theoretical predictions of the air-parcel residence time are compared to values derived from large-eddy simulation for a range of canopy architectures and turbulence levels under neutral stratification. Median air-parcel residence times range from a few sec in the upper canopy to approximately 30 min near the ground and the distribution of residence times is skewed towards longer times in the lower canopy. While the predicted probability density functions from the theoretical model and large-eddy simulation are in good agreement with each other, the theoretical model requires only information on canopy height and eddy diffusivities inside the canopy. The eddy-diffusivity model developed additionally requires the friction velocity at canopy top and a parametrized profile of the standard deviation of vertical velocity. The theoretical model of air-parcel residence times is extended to include first-order chemical reactions over a range of of Damköhler numbers ( Da) characteristic of plant-emitted hydrocarbons. The resulting out-of-canopy export fractions range from near 1 for Da =10^{-3} to less than 0.3 at Da = 10. These results highlight the necessity for dense and tall forests to include the impacts of air-parcel residence times when calculating the out-of-canopy export fraction for reactive trace gases.

  20. Deploying Fourier Coefficients to Unravel Soybean Canopy Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubery, Talukder Z; Shook, Johnathon; Parmley, Kyle; Zhang, Jiaoping; Naik, Hsiang S; Higgins, Race; Sarkar, Soumik; Singh, Arti; Singh, Asheesh K; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Soybean canopy outline is an important trait used to understand light interception ability, canopy closure rates, row spacing response, which in turn affects crop growth and yield, and directly impacts weed species germination and emergence. In this manuscript, we utilize a methodology that constructs geometric measures of the soybean canopy outline from digital images of canopies, allowing visualization of the genetic diversity as well as a rigorous quantification of shape parameters. Our choice of data analysis approach is partially dictated by the need to efficiently store and analyze large datasets, especially in the context of planned high-throughput phenotyping experiments to capture time evolution of canopy outline which will produce very large datasets. Using the Elliptical Fourier Transformation (EFT) and Fourier Descriptors (EFD), canopy outlines of 446 soybean plant introduction (PI) lines from 25 different countries exhibiting a wide variety of maturity, seed weight, and stem termination were investigated in a field experiment planted as a randomized complete block design with up to four replications. Canopy outlines were extracted from digital images, and subsequently chain coded, and expanded into a shape spectrum by obtaining the Fourier coefficients/descriptors. These coefficients successfully reconstruct the canopy outline, and were used to measure traditional morphometric traits. Highest phenotypic diversity was observed for roundness, while solidity showed the lowest diversity across all countries. Some PI lines had extraordinary shape diversity in solidity. For interpretation and visualization of the complexity in shape, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on the EFD. PI lines were grouped in terms of origins, maturity index, seed weight, and stem termination index. No significant pattern or similarity was observed among the groups; although interestingly when genetic marker data was used for the PCA, patterns similar to canopy

  1. Canopy disturbance intervals, early growth rates, and canopy accession trends of oak-dominated old-growth forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Rentch; Ray R., Jr. Hicks

    2003-01-01

    Using a radial growth averaging technique, changes in growth rates of overstory oaks were used to quantify canopy disturbance events at five old-growth sites. On average, at least one canopy disturbance occurred on these sites every 3 years; larger multiple-tree disturbances occurred every 17 years. Although there was some variation by site and by historical period,...

  2. Impacts of differing aerodynamic resistance formulae on modeled energy exchange at the above-canopy/within-canopy/soil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) Model using land surface temperature (LST) requires aerodynamic resistance parameterizations for the flux exchange above the canopy layer, within the canopy air space and at the soil/substrate surface. There are a number of aerodynamic resistance f...

  3. Effects of shade on growth, production and quality of coffee (Coffea arabica) in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Bote, A.D.; Struik, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The research work was conducted to evaluate the effect of shade on growth and production of coffee plants. To achieve this, growth and productivity of coffee plants growing under shade trees were compared with those of coffee plants growing under direct sun light. Different physiological, environmental and quality parameters were assessed for both treatments. Shade trees protected coffee plants against adverse environmental stresses such as high soil temperatures and low relative humidity. Sh...

  4. Evaluation of self shade matching ability of dental students using visual and instrumental means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaleh, Samar; Labban, Manal; AlHariri, Morouj; Tashkandi, Esam

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of dental students to match the shade of their own teeth. Fifty female dental students in the College of Dentistry at King Saud University, who had not received any formal dental training in color science or shade matching procedures, were screened for color deficiencies and selected to participate in the study. Each subject and three clinicians selected independently the closest match for the subjects' own right or left sound maxillary central incisors under controlled viewing conditions, using VITA classical shade guide (VITA Zahnfabrik GmbH, Bad Säckingen, Germany). Each examined central incisor and the 16 samples of VITA classical shade guide were measured with the VITA Easy Shade (VES) spectrophotometer to determine the CIELAB color parameters. The color differences (ΔE) between each examined tooth and the 16 samples of the shade guide were calculated. The minimum ΔE values were compared to ΔE values of the shade obtained by VES, subjects and clinicians. The results showed a significant difference in the accuracy of shade selection between the instrumental and visual means. ΔE value of shade selected by clinicians was significantly lower than those selected by the subjects. It was concluded that, spectrophotometric shade analysis was more accurate compared to human shade assessment. A reliable self-perception of the subjects' own tooth color, may aid in the shade matching procedures. It might lead to increased patients' satisfaction at the finalization of the restorative procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Seven indicators variations for multiple PV array configurations under partial shading and faulty PV conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Dhimish, M; Holmes, V.; Mehrdadi, B; Dales, M; Chong, B; Zhang, L.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to model, compare and analyze the performance of multiple photovoltaic (PV) array configurations under various partial shading and faulty PV conditions. For this purpose, a multiple PV array configurations including series (S), parallel (P), series-parallel (SP), total-cross-tied (TCT) and bridge-linked (BL) are carried out under several partial shading conditions such as, increase or decrease in the partial shading on a row of PV modules and increase or decrease in ...

  6. Assessing the accuracy of computer color matching with a new dental porcelain shade system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Jin; Gil, Mindy; Seliger, Alison; Da Silva, John D; Ishikawa-Nagai, Shigemi

    2014-03-01

    In a previous study, a novel computer color matching system for dental ceramic restoration was developed, and 21 new shades were established. Theoretically, a natural tooth color can be accurately reproduced by combining 2 or 3 ceramic mixtures from the database of 21 new shades. The purpose of this study was to test the use of these shades in conjunction with the computer color matching system to determine their ability to accurately reproduce the body color of 29 shade tabs from a shade guide (VITAPAN 3D-Master). Disks of 21 reference shades were prepared with porcelain (Cerabien CZR) and polished to 1.0 mm thickness. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the reflectance values from 380 to 780 nm for each disk; the scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient were determined. By using the reflectance values and the scattering and absorption coefficients, the computer color matching program generated porcelain prescriptions incorporating proportions from the 21 reference shades to reproduce the shade tabs. Disks were fabricated from the prescriptions, polished to 1.0 mm thickness, then placed over a zirconia core plate and measured with the spectrophotometer. The color differences (ΔE*) between the shade tabs and the corresponding ceramic disks were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed with the 1-sample t test. The ΔE* values between computer color matching specimens and the target shade tabs varied from 0.5 to 1.9, with an average ΔE* of 1.3, which was significantly less than the clinically detectable ΔE* threshold of 1.6 (P<.001). The computer color matching system with the established 21 new shades is accurate and effective for reproducing tooth shades. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Satisfaction of Dental Students, Faculty, and Patients with Tooth Shade-Matching Using a Spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Erin; Metz, Michael J; Harris, Bryan T; Metz, Cynthia J; Chou, Jang-Ching; Morton, Dean; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate dental students' clinical shade-matching outcomes (from subjective use of shade guide) with an objective electronic shade-matching tool (spectrophotometer); to assess patients', students', and supervising faculty members' satisfaction with the clinical shade-matching outcomes; and to assess clinicians' support for use of the spectrophotometer to improve esthetic outcomes. A total of 103 volunteer groups, each consisting of patient, dental student, and supervising faculty member at the University of Louisville, were recruited to participate in the study in 2015. Using the spectrophotometer, clinical shade-matching outcome (ΔEclinical) and laboratory shade-matching outcome (ΔElaboratory) were calculated. Two five-point survey items were used to assess the groups' satisfaction with the clinical shade-matching outcome and support for an objective electronic shade-matching tool in the student clinic. The results showed that both ΔEclinical (6.5±2.4) and ΔElaboratory (4.3±2.0) were outside the clinical acceptability threshold ΔE values of 2.7, when visual shade-matching method (subjective usage of shade guide) was used to fabricate definitive restorations. Characteristics of the patients, dental students, supervising faculty members, and restorations had minimal to no effect on the ΔEclinical The patients, dental students, and supervising faculty members generally had positive opinions about the clinical shade-matching outcome, despite the increased ΔEclinical observed. Overall, clinical shade-matching outcomes in this school need further improvement, but the patients' positive opinions may indicate the need to revisit the acceptability threshold ΔE value of 2.7 in the academic setting.

  8. Experimental study of the effect of fully shading on the Solar PV module performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-chaderchi, Monadhil; Sopain, K.; Alghoul, M. A.; Salameh, T.

    2017-11-01

    Experimental tests were performed to study the effects of shading for different string inside the photovoltaic (PV) panels, power equipped with different number of diodes from the same manufacturer as of solar panel. The IV curve for all cases were recorded to see how the bypass diodes will reduce the effects of shading .The case for 3 by pass diode show the best performance of solar PV module under shading phenomena.

  9. Momentum and scalar transport within a vegetation canopy following atmospheric stability and seasonal canopy changes: the CHATS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dupont

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Momentum and scalar (heat and water vapor transfer between a walnut canopy and the overlying atmosphere are investigated for two seasonal periods (before and after leaf-out, and for five thermal stability regimes (free and forced convection, near-neutral condition, transition to stable, and stable. Quadrant and octant analyses of momentum and scalar fluxes followed by space-time autocorrelations of observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study's (CHATS thirty meter tower help characterize the motions exchanging momentum, heat, and moisture between the canopy layers and aloft.

    During sufficiently windy conditions, i.e. in forced convection, near-neutral and transition to stable regimes, momentum and scalars are generally transported by sweep and ejection motions associated with the well-known canopy-top "shear-driven" coherent eddy structures. During extreme stability conditions (both unstable and stable, the role of these "shear-driven" structures in transporting scalars decreases, inducing notable dissimilarity between momentum and scalar transport.

    In unstable conditions, "shear-driven" coherent structures are progressively replaced by "buo-yantly-driven" structures, known as thermal plumes; which appear very efficient at transporting scalars, especially upward thermal plumes above the canopy. Within the canopy, downward thermal plumes become more efficient at transporting scalars than upward thermal plumes if scalar sources are located in the upper canopy. We explain these features by suggesting that: (i downward plumes within the canopy correspond to large downward plumes coming from above, and (ii upward plumes within the canopy are local small plumes induced by canopy heat sources where passive scalars are first injected if there sources are at the same location as heat sources. Above the canopy, these small upward thermal plumes aggregate to form larger scale upward thermal plumes. Furthermore, scalar

  10. Delayed leaf senescence induces extreme drought tolerance in crop plants

    OpenAIRE

    Rivero, Rosa; Peleg, Zvi; Szczerba, Mark; Tumimbang, Ellen; Jauregui, Rosa N; Liu, Li; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Drought, the most prominent threat to agricultural production worldwide, accelerates leaf senescence, leading to a decrease in canopy size, loss in photosynthesis and reduced yields. On the basis of the assumption that senescence is a type of cell death program that could be inappropriately activated during drought, we hypothesized that it may be possible to enhance drought tolerance by delaying drought-induced leaf senescence through the stress-induced synthesis of cytokinins. We generated m...

  11. Ecophysiological and morphological responses to shade and drought in two contrasting ecotypes of Prunus serotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, M D; Kloeppel, B D; Kubiske, M E

    1992-06-01

    Photosynthesis (A), water relations and stomatal reactivity during drought, and leaf morphology were evaluated on 2-year-old, sun- and shade-grown Prunus serotina Ehrh. seedlings of a mesic Pennsylvania seed source and a more xeric Wisconsin source. Wisconsin plants maintained higher A and leaf conductance (g(wv)) than Pennsylvania plants during the entire drought under sun conditions, and during the mid stages of drought under shade conditions. Compared to shade plants, sun plants of both sources exhibited a more rapid decrease in A or % A(max) with decreasing leaf water potential (Psi). Tissue water relations parameters were generally not significantly different between seed sources. However, osmotic potentials were lower in sun than shade plants under well-watered conditions. Following drought, shade plants, but not sun plants, exhibited significant osmotic adjustment. Sun leaves had greater thickness, specific mass, area and stomatal density and lower guard cell length than shade leaves in one or both sources. Wisconsin sun leaves were seemingly more xerophytic with greater thickness, specific mass, and guard cell length than Pennsylvania sun leaves. No source differences in leaf structure were exhibited in shade plants. Stomatal reactivity to sun-shade cycles was similar between ecotypes. However, well-watered and droughted plants differed in stomatal reactivity within and between multiple sun-shade cycles. The observed ecotypic and phenotypic variations in ecophysiology and morphology are consistent with the ability of Prunus serotina to survive in greatly contrasting environments.

  12. Experiment Research on Shading to Improve the Thermal Environment of Tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different black agricultural shading-nets were erected on two 93 type military cotton tents to improve the thermal environment of tents in this paper. Indoor temperature, RH (relative air humidity and interior wall temperature were tested. The experimental results show that shading-nets a effect on the improvement of thermal environment and 6 needled filters shading-net is better than 3 needled filters shading-net. The conclusion of this paper provides a basis for the improvement of the thermal environment and energy saving design of the tent.

  13. Temperature and water relations for sun and shade leaves of a desert broadleaf, Hyptis emoryi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.K.; Nobel, P.S.

    1977-02-01

    The temperature and water relations of sun versus shade leaves of Hyptis emoryi Torr. were evaluated from field measurements made in late summer. Throughout most of the day sun leaves had higher temperatures and higher resistances to water vapor diffusion, but lower transpiration rates and lower stem water potentials, than did shade leaves. Leaf absorptivity to solar irradiation was less for 1.5-cm-long sun leaves (0.44) than for 4.0-cm shade leaves (0.56). For both leaf types the stomatal resistance increased as the water vapor concentration drop from the leaf to the air increased. Energy balance equations were used together with the measured temperature dependence of photosynthesis to predict the effect of variations in leaf absorptivity, length, and resistance on net photosynthesis. The influence of leaf dimorphism on whole plants was determined by calculating daily photosynthesis and transpiration for plants with various percentages of sun and shade leaves. A hypothetical plant with all sun leaves in the sun had about twice the photosynthesis and half the transpiration ratio as did plants with sun leaves in the shade or shade leaves in the sun or shade. Plants with both sun and shade leaves had the highest predicted photosynthesis per unit ground area. The possible adaptive significance of the seasonal variation in sun and shade leaf percentages observed for individual H. emoryi bushes is discussed in terms of water economy and photosynthesis.

  14. Partial Shade Evaluation of Distributed Power Electronics for Photovoltaic Systems: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C.; Meydbrav, J.; Donovan, M.

    2012-06-01

    Site survey data for several residential installations are provided, showing the extent and frequency of shade throughout the year. This background information is used to design a representative shading test that is conducted on two side-by-side 8-kW photovoltaic (PV) installations. One system is equipped with a standard string inverter, while the other is equipped with microinverters on each solar panel. Partial shade is applied to both systems in a comprehensive range of shading conditions, simulating one of three shade extents. Under light shading conditions, the microinverter system produced the equivalent of 4% annual performance improvement, relative to the string inverter system. Under moderate shading conditions, the microinverter system outperformed the string inverter system by 8%, and under heavy shading the microinverter increased relative performance by 12%. In all three cases, the percentage of performance loss that is recovered by the use of distributed power electronics is 40%-50%. Additionally, it was found that certain shading conditions can lead to additional losses in string inverters due to peak-power tracking errors and voltage limitations.

  15. Soil Bacterial Diversity and Productivity of Coffee - Shade Tree Agro-ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusdi Evizal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee productions should have environmental values such as providing high soil microbial diversity while producinghigh yield. To examine that purposes, two experimental plots were constucted at benchmark site of Conservationand Sustainable Management of Below-Ground Biodiversity (CSM-BGBD, in Sumberjaya Subdistrict, WestLampung, Indonesia, during 2007-2010. Types of coffee agro-ecosystem to be examined were Coffea canephorawith shade trees of Gliricidia sepium, Erythrina sububrams, Michelia champaca, and no shade. Two plots wereconstructed at 5-years-coffee and 15-years-coffee. Diversity of soil bacteria was determined based on DNA fingerprinting of total soil bacteria using Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA method. The results showed that:(1 For mature coffee (15 years old, shade-grown coffee agro-ecosystems had higher soil bacterial diversity thanthose of no shade coffee agro-ecosystem, (2 Shaded coffee agro-ecosystems were able to conserve soil bacterialdiversity better than no-shade coffee agro-ecosystem. Soil organic C and total litter biomass had positive effect onsoil bacterial diversity, (3 Types of agro-ecosystem significantly affected the bean yield of 15 years coffee. Coffeeagro-ecosystems shaded by legume trees had higher yield than those of non-legume shade and no shade coffeeagro-ecosystem, (4 Shannon-Weaver indices of soil bacterial diversity together with weed biomass and N contentof coffee leaf had positive effect on coffee bean yield.

  16. Variations of L*a*b* values among Vitapan Classical Shade Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kenneth A; deRijk, Waldemar G

    2007-01-01

    To measure the variations in L*a*b* values of a group of 25 guides and to assess whether shade guides are indeed interchangeable. The L*a*b* values of individual shade tabs were measured with a LabScan(tm) XE scanning spectrocolorimeter (SSC) with a special attachment for reproducibly positioning shade tabs. Each shade guide (Vitapan Classical, Vident) contained 16 shade tabs. Absolute calibration of the SSC was performed with color tiles traceable to NIST. One shade guide was used to determine the reproducibility of the experimental method by measuring and then removing each shade tab of the standard 10 times. This assessed the variations in observed values induced by the measurement method and the geometry of the specimens. The entire sample consisted of 25 shade guides. The tabs of each of the 25 shade guides were read five times in the SSC, without moving the specimen. Measurements and calculations of E, L*, a*, and b* were performed using Universal Software V4.10 (Hunter Associates Laboratory). The mean, standard deviation, and range were determined of the E, L*, a*, and b* values for each one of the 16 shades in the shade guides. Differences in color are expressed as DeltaE in color science. The standard deviation of E (E(sd)) and the range of E (E(r)) for each of the shades were used as a DeltaE value to assess color differences. For the reproducibility measurements, the shades had values for E(r) varying from 0.08 to 0.69, and E(sd) between 0.02 and 0.22. This established the detection limit for our method for each of the shades. For the group of 25 shade guides, E(r) varied from 0.75 to 3.05, and E(sd) from 0.22 to 0.54. The difference in value of E(r) obtained from the reproducibility test and the E(r) of the group of 25 guides is significant at p < 0.05. The same was found for E(sd). The largest reproducible E(r) observed was 3.05 for shade C1. The differences observed between shade guides are larger than the variations induced by the experimental method

  17. Esthetic restorative material shade changes due to photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hidehiko; Covey, David

    2008-05-01

    This study sought to measure color values (before and after photopolymerization) and variations of A1 shade polymeric dental restorative materials. The L*a*b* values of polymeric dental restorative material disks were measured by a spectrophotometer with the specular component excluded (SCE) geometry under D65 illumination over a standardized white background before and after photopolymerization. Color differences (DeltaE*ab) due to polymerization were calculated using the CIE Lab color-difference formula. DeltaE*ab indicates differences between two colors in the L*a*b* color space. In this system, L*, a*, and b* indicate lightness, red-green, and yellow-blue, respectively. Color differences (DeltaE*ab) were calculated by the equation DeltaE*ab = [(DeltaL*)2 + (Deltaa*)2 + (Deltab*)2]1/2. Eight resin composites, three flowable resin composites (FRCs), and two resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs) were utilized; L*a*b* and DeltaE*ab values of the test groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests. DeltaE*ab values before and after photopolymerization ranged from 3.01-17.76. All RMGI and two FRC materials displayed greater color changes than the resin composites (p < 0.05). Photopolymerization produced measurable increases and decreases in lightness. Yellow-blue (b*) values decreased in all test groups after polymerization, while most red-green (a*) values increased. Color differences between polymerized A1 shade materials ranged from 0.76-25.41 DeltaE*ab. The color difference between the test materials and a widely used tooth shade guide (the Vita Lumin) was averaged at 12.66 DeltaE*ab.

  18. High within-canopy variation in isoprene emission potentials in temperate trees: Implications for predicting canopy-scale isoprene fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, ÜLo; Copolovici, Lucian; Hüve, Katja

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene emission potential (ES) varies in tree canopies, and such variations have potentially major implications for predicting canopy level emissions. So far, quantitative relationships of ES with irradiance are missing, and interspecific variation in ES plasticity and potential effects on canopy level emissions have not been characterized. ES, foliage structural, chemical, and photosynthetic characteristics were studied relative to integrated within-canopy daily quantum flux density (Qint) in temperate deciduous tree species Quercus robur, Populus tremula, Salix alba, and Salix caprea, and canopy isoprene emissions were calculated considering observed variation in ES and under different simplifying assumptions. Strong positive curvilinear relationships between nitrogen and dry mass per unit area, photosynthetic potentials and ES per area with Qint were observed. Structural, chemical, and photosynthetic traits varied 1.5-fold to 4-fold and ES per area 3-fold to 27-fold within the canopy. ES variation reflected accumulation of mesophyll cell layers and greater emission capacity of average cells. Species with largest structural and photosynthetic plasticity had greatest plasticity in ES. Relative to the simulation considering within-canopy variation in ES, the bias from assuming a constant ES varied between -8% and +68%, and it scaled positively with ES plasticity. The bias of big-leaf simulations varied between -22% and -35%, and it scaled negatively with ES plasticity. A generalized canopy response function of ES developed for all species resulted in the lowest bias between -11% and 6% and can be recommended for practical applications. The results highlight huge within-canopy and interspecific variation in ES and demonstrate that ignoring these variations strongly biases canopy emission predictions.

  19. Performance of a daylight-redirecting glass-shading system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelfeld, David; Svendsen, Svend

    2013-01-01

    to the original system. The visual comfort was evaluated by glare analysis and the redirected daylight did not cause an additional discomfort glare. The higher utilization of daylight can save 20% of the lighting energy. The thermal insulation of the fenestration was maintained, with slightly increased solar......This paper evaluates the daylighting performance of a prototype external dynamic shading and daylight-redirecting system, and the main focus is on the performance simulation. The demonstration project was carried out on a building with an open-plan office. Part of the original façade was replaced...

  20. Shades of irony in the anti-language of Amos

    OpenAIRE

    William Domeris

    2016-01-01

    The rhetoric of Amos includes a wonderful mixture of humour and threat, sarcasm and irony, hyperbole and prediction. Holding the fabric of this conversation together is Amos’s place within the prophetic minority – the Yahweh-only party (his anti-society). Making use of sociolinguistics, and particularly the idea of anti-language, I take a closer look at Amos, including his use of overlexicalisation, insider-humour and all the shades of irony one might expect. Typically of a member of an anti-...

  1. Repeated Thermal Stress, Shading, and Directional Selection in the Florida Reef Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert van Woesik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades reef corals have been subjected to an unprecedented frequency and intensity of thermal-stress events, which have led to extensive coral bleaching, disease, and mortality. Over the next century, the climate is predicted to drive sea-surface temperatures to even higher levels, consequently increasing the risk of mass bleaching and disease outbreaks. Yet, there is considerable temporal and spatial variation in coral bleaching and in disease prevalence. Using data collected from 2,398 sites along the Florida reef tract from 2005 to 2015, this study examined the temporal and spatial patterns of coral bleaching and disease in relation to coral-colony size, depth, temperature, and chlorophyll-a concentrations. The results show that coral bleaching was most prevalent during the warmest years in 2014 and 2015, and disease was also most prevalent in 2010, 2014, and 2015. Although the majority of the corals surveyed were found in habitats with low chlorophyll-a concentrations, and high irradiance, these same habitats showed the highest prevalence of coral bleaching and disease outbreaks during thermal-stress events. These results suggest that directional selection in a warming ocean may favor corals able to tolerate inshore, shaded environments with high turbidity and productivity.

  2. Smartphone based hemispherical photography for canopy structure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Cui, Jian; Jiang, Xueqin; Zhang, Jingwen; Yang, Yi; Zheng, Tao

    2018-01-01

    The canopy is the most direct and active interface layer of the interaction between plant and environment, and has important influence on energy exchange, biodiversity, ecosystem matter and climate change. The measurement about canopy structure of plant is an important foundation to analyze the pattern, process and operation mechanism of forest ecosystem. Through the study of canopy structure of plant, solar radiation, ambient wind speed, air temperature and humidity, soil evaporation, soil temperature and other forest environmental climate characteristics can be evaluated. Because of its accuracy and effectiveness, canopy structure measurement based on hemispherical photography has been widely studied. However, the traditional method of canopy structure hemispherical photogrammetry based on SLR camera and fisheye lens. This method is expensive and difficult to be used in some low-cost occasions. In recent years, smartphone technology has been developing rapidly. The smartphone not only has excellent image acquisition ability, but also has the considerable computational processing ability. In addition, the gyroscope and positioning function on the smartphone will also help to measure the structure of the canopy. In this paper, we present a smartphone based hemispherical photography system. The system consists of smart phones, low-cost fisheye lenses and PMMA adapters. We designed an Android based App to obtain the canopy hemisphere images through low-cost fisheye lenses and provide horizontal collimation information. In addition, the App will add the acquisition location tag obtained by GPS and auxiliary positioning method in hemisphere image information after the canopy structure hemisphere image acquisition. The system was tested in the urban forest after it was completed. The test results show that the smartphone based hemispherical photography system can effectively collect the high-resolution canopy structure image of the plant.

  3. Lightness, chroma, and hue distributions of a shade guide as measured by a spectroradiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Yu, Bin; Lim, Ho-Nam

    2010-09-01

    The color attributes of commercially available shade guides have been measured by spectrophotometers (SP), which are designed to measure flat surfaces. However, there is limited information on the color distribution of shade guides as measured by spectroradiometers (SR), which are capable of measuring the color of curved surfaces. The purpose of this study was to determine the distributions of lightness (CIE L*) and chroma (C*(ab)) step intervals between adjacent shade tabs of a shade guide based on the lightness, chroma, and hue attributes measured by an SR. Lightness, chroma, hue angle, and CIE a* and b* values of the shade tabs (n=26) from a shade guide (Vitapan 3D-Master) were measured by an SR under daylight conditions. The distributions of the ratios in lightness and chroma of each tab compared with the lowest lightness tab or the lowest chroma tab were determined. The values for each color parameter were analyzed by a 3-way ANOVA with the factors of lightness, chroma, and hue designations of the shade tabs (alpha=.05). The chroma and CIE a* and b* values were influenced by the lightness, chroma, and hue designations of the shade tabs (P<.001); however, the lightness and hue angle were influenced by the lightness and hue designations, but not by the chroma designation. Distributions for the CIE a* and b* values, in each lightness group, corresponded with the chroma designation. However, the intervals in the lightness and chroma scales between adjacent tabs were not uniform. The intervals in the color parameters between adjacent shade tabs were not uniform based on SR measurements. Therefore, a shade guide in which shade tabs are more equally spaced by the color attributes, based on the values as measured by an SR along with observers' responses with respect to the equality of the intervals, should be devised. Copyright © 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Comparison of shade matching accuracy of tabs of shadeguide and tabs out of shadeguide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Ming; Xu, Tong-Kai; Liu, Feng; Ren, Shu-Xin; Feng, Hai-Lan

    2009-07-01

    To compare the shade matching accuracy between tabs of shade guide and tabs out of shade guide by prosthodontists. Sixty-two graduate students who had 1 to 5 years clinical experience without color blindness were included in this study. Twenty-nine tabs from Vita 3D-Master shadeguide and 7 tabs out of Vita 3D-Master shade guide but from Vita Bleachedguide 3D-Master were taken as the targets of shade matching and observed under the standard light. Subjects' shade matching accuracy on tabs of shadeguide and tabs out of shadeguide was recorded. Frequency of right match was analyzed using Monte Carlo exact probability-test. Wilcoxin test was used to analyze the difference between each group on ranked data of value, chroma and hue. The shade matching accuracy of tabs of shade guide [45.9% (199/434)] was significantly higher than that of tabs out of shade guide [9.0% (39/434)]. There was significant difference between the two kinds of tabs of ranked data of value [0.2 (0.1 - 0.3), 0.4 (0.4 - 0.5)] and chroma [0.2 (0.1 - 0.4), 0.5 (0.4 - 0.6), P < 0.01, but there was no significant difference in hue data [0.3 (0.1 - 0.4), 0.3 (0.1 - 0.4)]. The shade matching ability of prosthodontists on tabs out of shade guide is lower than that on tabs of shadeguide. To fulfill clinical need, more training is necessary.

  5. Effect of Shading on some Important Physiological Traits in Lentil Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Darabi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Light is one of the growth-reducing factors in mixed cropping and agroforestry systems. Therefore, an experimental field was conducted to justiffy the effect of light intensity on two lentil cultivars. It was performed in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Agricultural Research Station of Ilam University during 2012-2013 cropping season. The factors under study consisted of shading in four levels (0 shading, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of shadings and two cultivars lentil (Lens culinaris Medic (Ziba and ILL4400. Results showed that physiologic traits were significantly affected by cultivar × shading intraction. Ziba cultivar had the highest chlorophyll a and b content in 100% shading. Carotenoid content, relative water content and leaf area index also increased with increasing in shading. The highest and lowest carotenoid and relative water contents were observed in 100% shading × ILL4400 cultivar and control treatment × Ziba cultiva, respectively. The highest leaf specific weight observed in control treatment × Ziba cultivar and decreased with increasing shading. Grain yield decreased with increasing shading. The highest and lowest mean grain yield, 2522 kg.ha-1 and 1137 kg.ha-1, were observed in control treatment × Ziba cultivar and 100% shading and ILL4400 cultivar, respectively. Based on the results of this study, Ziba cultivar had the highest leaf area index, relative water content and chlorophyll a in higher shading treatments; hence, it can perform better than ILL4400 in mixed cropping and agroforestry systems where the light is limited factor.

  6. Appearance Differences Between Lots and Brands of Similar Shade Designations of Dental Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Melody N; Johnston, William M

    2017-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate differences in two inherent appearance characteristics between lots of an enamel dental composite resin of the same shade and brand, and to further compare these differences to those of similar shade designation of a different brand of dental composite resins. Appearance analyses proceeded for three different lots of shades A1, B2, and D3 manufactured by one company and for one lot of shade EA1 manufactured by another. Samples were measured on black, white, and gray backings using spectroradiometry. Kubelka-Munk theory was used to determine reflectivity of each lot studied. CIELAB values and color differences between shades and lots were analyzed. Translucency indicators were compared between lots over thicknesses from 0.5 to 3.0 mm. Differences in inherent color between some lots of same shade designations within a brand were found to be above the acceptability threshold. Color difference between an enamel composite resin of shade A1 and a composite resin of shade EA1 was also above the acceptability threshold. Statistically significant differences in the translucency were found between some lots of one shade over the entire range of thicknesses studied. Appearance analyses indicate substantial variation between lots of same shade designations as well as between brands of similar shade designations. Optical principles applied to important clinical appearance attributes are described which characterize inherent appearance attributes and provide aid in the appearance matching process for dental composite resins used in restorative and operative dental procedures. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:E6-E14, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of Cellular Shades in the PNNL Lab Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Joseph M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sullivan, Greg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cort, Katherine A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Metzger, Cheryn E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Merzouk, Massine [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report examines the energy performance of cellular shade window coverings in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The 1500-square-foot homes were identical in construction and baseline performance, which allowed any difference in energy and thermal performance between the baseline home and the experimental home to be attributed to the retrofit technology installed in the experimental home. To assess the performance of high efficiency window attachments in a residential retrofit application, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2015 -2016 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. Hunter Douglas Duette® Architella® Trielle™ opaque honeycomb “cellular” shades were installed over double-pane clear-glass, aluminum-frame primary windows in the experimental home and were compared to identical primary windows with no window coverings and with standard typical white vinyl horizontal blind window coverings in the baseline home.

  8. Estimating canopy cover from standard forest inventory measurements in western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne McIntosh; Andrew Gray; Steven. Garman

    2012-01-01

    Reliable measures of canopy cover are important in the management of public and private forests. However, direct sampling of canopy cover is both labor- and time-intensive. More efficient methods for estimating percent canopy cover could be empirically derived relationships between more readily measured stand attributes and canopy cover or, alternatively, the use of...

  9. Canopy structure effects on the wind at a complex forested site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreault, Louis-Etienne; Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the canopy description in a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method based on key flow results from a complex forested site. The canopy structure in RANS is represented trough the frontal area of canopy elements per unit volume, a variable required as input in canopy...

  10. ForestCrowns: a software tool for analyzing ground-based digital photographs of forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew F. Winn; Sang-Mook Lee; Phillip A. Araman

    2013-01-01

    Canopy coverage is a key variable used to characterize forest structure. In addition, the light transmitted through the canopy is an important ecological indicator of plant and animal habitat and understory climate conditions. A common ground-based method used to document canopy coverage is to take digital photographs from below the canopy. To assist with analyzing...

  11. Freezing and low temperature photoinhibition tolerance in cultivated potato and potato hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. SEPPÄNEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Four Solanum tuberosum L. cultivars (Nicola, Pito, Puikula, Timo and somatic hybrids between freezing tolerant S. commersonii and freezing sensitive S. tuberosum were evaluated for their tolerance to freezing and low temperature photoinhibition. Cellular freezing tolerance was studied using ion leakage tests and the sensitivity of the photosynthetic apparatus to freezing and high light intensity stress by measuring changes in chlorophyll fluorescence (FV/FM and oxygen evolution. Exposure to high light intensities after freezing stress increased frost injury significantly in all genotypes studied. Compared with S. tuberosum cultivars, the hybrids were more tolerant both of freezing and intense light stresses. In field experiments the mechanism of frost injury varied according to the severity of night frosts. During night frosts in 1999, the temperature inside the potato canopy was significantly higher than at ground level, and did not fall below the lethal temperature for potato cultivars (from -2.5 to -3.0°C. As a result, frost injury developed slowly, indicating that damage occurred to the photosynthetic apparatus. However, as the temperature at ground level and inside the canopy fell below -4°C, cellular freezing occurred and the canopy was rapidly destroyed. This suggests that in the field visual frost damage can follow from freezing or non-freezing temperatures accompanied with high light intensity. Therefore, in an attempt to improve low temperature tolerance in potato, it is important to increase tolerance to both freezing and chilling stresses.

  12. The production of Physalis spp. seedlings grown under different-colored shade nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fernandes da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the production of seedlings of Physalis L. species under different-colored shade nets. Four shade nets individually stained white, blue, red and black, all with 50% shading, were used in this study, and an additional  treatment (control was used in which seedlings were grown in full sun. The study examined four species of Physalis, namely, P. peruviana, P. pubescens, P. minima and P. ixocarpa. The experiment followed a randomized block design with three blocks and 25 seeds per plot. The species were sown in styrofoam trays. Germination was monitored daily to calculate the Emergency Velocity Index (EVI and stabilize the overall percentage of emergence. Height, stem diameter, number of leaves, leaf area index and dry mass of seedlings were assessed at 50 days after sowing. The study found that these species react differently to changes in the light spectrum. Seedlings of P. peruviana should be grown under a white or red shade net; of P. pubescens under a white or black shade net; of P. minima under a white, red or black shade net; and of P. ixocarpa under a white shade net. For all species, 50% shade should be used.

  13. Effects of shade on growth, production and quality of coffee (Coffea arabica) in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, A.D.; Struik, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The research work was conducted to evaluate the effect of shade on growth and production of coffee plants. To achieve this, growth and productivity of coffee plants growing under shade trees were compared with those of coffee plants growing under direct sun light. Different physiological,

  14. Effect of shade on various parameters of Friesian cows in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactating cows are particularly sensitive to thermal stress owing to their specialized productive function and to their ... The comfort range for dairy cows varies between -5 and 2I'C. If an animal is subjected ..... Building a shade structure involves a capital investment. During l9M the material cost of the shade structures in the.

  15. Comparison between visual and instrumental methods for natural tooth shade matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimental, Welson; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Tooth shade matching in daily clinical practice is still a cause of discomfort for many professionals due to the subjectivity of the process and the need for advanced training; this discomfort may lead to unsatisfactory results for the clinician and the patient. Instrumental methods were developed to simplify daily color matching procedures and to provide better esthetic outcomes. This study compared the accuracy of shade matching by both visual and instrumental methods to determine whether the instrumental method would significantly improve the process. Visual shade matching was performed by 4 dentists using a classic shade guide; instrumental shade matching was performed with a spectrophotometer by a previously calibrated examiner. Shade matching was conducted in a dental clinic under controlled illumination on the middle third of the right central incisor tooth of 30 subjects. Data were analyzed by Cohen's Kappa inter-rater agreement and by the equality of 2 proportions test (α = 0.05). Results showed statistically significant differences between the groups (76.7 ± 11.1% and 32.4% ± 7.8% for the instrumental and visual methods, respectively). Shade matching by clinicians using the instrumental method presented more agreement, and was more effective than shade matching by clinicians using the visual method.

  16. The effects of shade and shearing date on the production of Merino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    South African Society of Animal Science. The South African Journal of Animal Science is available online at http://www.sasas.co.za/Sajas.html. 164 ..... Staple strength. (N/ktex). Overall mean. Shade treatment. Control. Shade provided. Shearing treatment. Pre-joining. Pre-lambing. Reproduction status. Barren. Lambed and ...

  17. Perceived color shift of a shade guide according to the change of illuminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Yu, Bin; Lim, Jin Ik; Lim, Ho-Nam

    2011-02-01

    The perceived color of shade guide tabs is influenced by different spectral compositions of different light sources, and this can influence color matching. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of perceived shift in color and color coordinates of a shade guide using 3 different light sources: CIE standard illuminant D65 (daylight), A (incandescent lamp), and F9 (fluorescent lamp). CIE color coordinates L*, a*, b*, chroma, and the spectral reflectance of shade tabs in a shade guide (Vitapan 3D-Master) were measured by a spectroradiometer under D65, A, and F9 simulators. Perceived color and color coordinate shifts due to the change of illuminant were determined. The influence of the type of light and shade designation of the 26 tabs on the color coordinates was analyzed by a 2-way ANOVA; correlations in the color coordinates between each corresponding pair under the 3 illuminants were determined (α=.05). All of the color coordinates were influenced by the type of illuminant and shade designation of the shade tabs (P2.6). Lightness decreased and chroma increased when the illuminant was changed from the D65 simulator to the A or F9 simulators. Perceptible shifts in the color of shade guide tabs under different ambient lighting conditions were confirmed by a spectroradiometer; these color shifts were influenced by the type of illuminant used. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-linear effects of drought under shade: reconciling physiological and ecological models in plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmgren, M.; Gomez-Aparicio, L.; Quero, J.L.; Valladares, F.

    2012-01-01

    The combined effects of shade and drought on plant performance and the implications for species interactions are highly debated in plant ecology. Empirical evidence for positive and negative effects of shade on the performance of plants under dry conditions supports two contrasting theoretical

  19. [Research on the designing method of a special shade guide for tooth whitening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingxin

    2015-10-01

    To investigate a method of designing an accurate and scientific shade guide, especially used for judging the effect of tooth whitening, by analyzing the colorimetric values of discolored teeth statistically. One hundred thirty-six pictures of patients who had been receiving the Beyond cold light whitening treatment from February 2009 to July 2014 were analyzed, including 25 tetracycline teeth, 61 mottled-enamel teeth, and 50 yellow teeth. The colorimetric values of discolored teeth were measured. The L* values of shade tabs were calculated by hierarchical clustering of those of discolored teeth. The a* and b* values of shade tabs were the mean of those observed for discolored teeth. Accordingly, different shade guides were designed for each type of discolored teeth, and the effects were evaluated. A statistically significant difference in colorimetric values was found among the three types of discolored teeth. Compared with the Vitapan Classical shade guide, the shade guides designed through the present method were more scientific and accurate in judging the effect of tooth whitening. Moreover, the arrangement of shade tabs was more logical, and the color difference between shade tabs and discolored teeth was smaller. The proposed designing method is theoretically feasible, although its clinical effect has yet to be proven.

  20. The art of being flexible: how to escape from shade, salt, and drought.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.; Testerink, C.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stresses, such as shading of the shoot, drought, and soil salinity, threaten plant growth, yield, and survival. Plants can alleviate the impact of these stresses through various modes of phenotypic plasticity, such as shade avoidance and halotropism. Here, we review the current state

  1. Impact of shade and cocoa plant densities on soil organic carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that cocoa planted at low plant density under shade stores more carbon per unit area of soil than an equivalent area of cocoa planted at high density without shade. It is concluded that cocoa farming could be an effective means to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions in cocoa growing countries. Key words: ...

  2. Effect of shade on various parameters of Friesian cows in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shade cows spent more time (P < 0.05) feeding during the day than no-shade cows, while there was no ... stress. A knowledge of the behaviour and daily activities of dairy cows may be useful mainly in two ways, namely: (i) a change in behaviour may indicate some ..... Eating habits of dairy cows under drylot conditions.

  3. The adaptive evolution of plasticity: phytochrome-mediated shade avoidance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Johanna; Stinchcombe, John R; Heschel, M Shane; Huber, Heidrun

    2003-07-01

    Many plants display a characteristic suite of developmental "shade avoidance" responses, such as stem elongation and accelerated reproduction, to the low ratio of red to far-red wavelengths (R:FR) reflected or transmitted from green vegetation. This R:FR cue of crowding and vegetation shade is perceived by the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. Phytochrome-mediated responses provide an ideal system for investigating the adaptive evolution of phenotypic plasticity in natural environments. The molecular and developmental mechanisms underlying shade avoidance responses are well studied, and testable ecological hypotheses exist for their adaptive significance. Experimental manipulation of phenotypes demonstrates that shade avoidance responses may be adaptive, resulting in phenotypes with high relative fitness in the environments that induce those phenotypes. The adaptive value of shade avoidance depends upon the competitive environment, resource availability, and the reliability of the R:FR cue for predicting the selective environment experienced by an induced phenotype. Comparative studies and a reciprocal transplant experiment with Impatiens capensis provide evidence of adaptive divergence in shade avoidance responses between woodland and clearing habitats, which may result from population differences in the frequency of selection on shade avoidance traits, as well as differences in the reliability of the R:FR cue. Recent rapid progress in elucidating phytochrome signaling pathways in the genetic model Arabidopsis thaliana and other species now provides the opportunity for studying how selection on shade avoidance traits in natural environments acts upon the molecular mechanisms underlying natural phenotypic variation.

  4. Bias in lidar-based canopy gap fraction estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaccari, S.; Leeuwen, van M.; Calders, K.; Coops, N.C.; Herold, M.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf area index and canopy gap fraction (GF) provide important information to forest managers regarding the ecological functioning and productivity of forest resources. Traditional measurements such as those obtained from hemispherical photography (HP) measure solar irradiation, penetrating the

  5. SAFARI 2000 Canopy Structural Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains leaf area index (LAI), leaf inclination angle, and canopy dimension data from study sites along the Kalahari Transect in southwest Botswana....

  6. [Turbulent characteristics in forest canopy under atmospheric neutral condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yi-Wei; Guan, De-Xin; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Pei, Tie-Fan

    2010-02-01

    Based on the micrometeorological data of broad-leaved Korean pine forest in Changbai Mountain in 2003, a second-order closure model was employed to calculate and analyze the turbulent characteristics within and above the canopy of the forest. The calculated mean wind profile was coincident with the measured one. The Reynolds stress within the forest was significantly attenuated. The turbulent strength, velocity flux, and skew were the largest at forest-atmosphere interface, as well the wind shear. With the increase of velocity skew, the turbulent intermittence became more significant, and the downward turbulent eddy within the canopy was limited. Most of the turbulent deeply within the forest canopy was produced by the non-local contributions above the canopy.

  7. An energy balance model for forest canopies: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. M. Goltz; James A. Smith

    1996-01-01

    The use of thermal scanning devices to map underlying terrain surface temperatures has been recognized as a potential tool for estimating evapotranspiration and latent heat flux densities in forest canopies.

  8. Development of a multispectral sensor for crop canopy temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying spatial and temporal variability in plant stress has precision agriculture applications in controlling variable rate irrigation and variable rate nutrient application. One approach to plant stress detection is crop canopy temperature measurement by the use of thermographic or radiometric...

  9. The influence of porcelain layer thickness on the final shade of ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozić, Alma; Kleverlaan, Cornelis Johannes; Meegdes, Marcel; van der Zel, Jef; Feilzer, Albert Joseph

    2003-12-01

    Ceramic restorations should be made of porcelain layers of different opacity, shade, and thickness in order to provide a natural appearance. By means of CAD/CAM layering technology such as CICERO, it is feasible to produce all-ceramic crowns with porcelain layers of predetermined thickness. However, it is not yet known whether changes in thickness of these porcelain layers within the clinically available space can perceivably influence the overall shade of the restoration. The purpose of this study was to determine, quantitatively, the effect of different thickness ratios of opaque porcelain (OP) and translucent porcelain (TP) layers on the overall shade of all-ceramic specimens. The CIELAB values of 5 assembled specimens, each consisting of 2 or 3 discs (CORE 0.70 mm/OP--0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, or 1.00 mm/TP 1.00, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, or 0 mm) were determined with a spectrophotometer for the Vita shades A1, A2, and A3. Distilled water was used to attain optical contact between the layers. Black or white backgrounds were used to assess the influence of the background on the final shade. Color differences (DeltaE) between layered specimens were determined. Correlation between the thickness ratio and the L*, a*, and b* values was calculated by 2-tailed Spearman correlation analysis. The results indicated that small changes in OP/TP thickness ratio can perceivably influence the final shade of the layered specimens (DeltaE>1). Redness a* and yellowness b* increased with the thickness of OP for all shades. Redness a* (P<.01 for all shades) correlated more strongly with thickness than yellowness b* (P<.01 for A1 and A3; P<.05 for A2). The lightness (L*) was shade dependent. The correlation (r) between OP/TP thickness and L* was 0.975 (P<.01) for shade A1, 0.700 (not statistically significant) for shade A2, and 0.900 (P<.05) for shade A3. Small changes in thickness and shade of opaque and translucent porcelain layers can influence the final shade of the layered porcelain

  10. Effects of species selection and management on forest canopy albedo

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Juliane; Berveiller, Daniel; Bréon, François-Marie; Delpierre, Nicolas; Geppert , Gernot; Granier, André; Gunia, Katja; Jans, Wilma; Knohl, Alexander; Kuusk, Andres; Longdoz, Bernard; Moors, Eddy; Mund, Martina; Pinty, Bernard; Rautiainen, Miina

    2013-01-01

    Forest management is considered to be one of the key instruments available to mitigate climate change as it can lead to increased sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, the changes in canopy albedo may neutralise or offset the climate benefits of carbon sequestration. Although there is an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to management, understanding is still fragmented. We make use of a generally applicable approach: we combine a stand-level forest gap model wi...

  11. Convection regime between canopy and air in a greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    Atarassi,Roberto Terumi; Folegatti,Marcos Vinicius; Brasil,René Porfírio Camponez do

    2006-01-01

    The use of covering materials in protected environments modifies the air movement close to the crop canopy compared to external environment, which changes the heat and mass transfer between canopy and air. Several researches have been made in greenhouses to estimate mass and heat flux using dimensionless numbers to characterize the type of convection (forced, free or mixed). The knowledge of which one is dominant allows simplifications and specific approaches. The dominant convection regime b...

  12. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Topographic and Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America 200509 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Topographic and Bathymetric Shaded Relief of North America map layer shows depth and elevation ranges using colors, with relief enhanced by shading. The image...

  13. Apple tree growth, net photosynthesis, dark respiration, and specific leaf weight as affected by continuous and intermittent shade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barden, J.A.

    1977-07-01

    The effects of 80% shade from saran cloth and slats were very similar on young Delicious apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees. Shoot-length increase was suppressed about 10% by shade but leaf area was unaffected. Dry weight increase for shaded trees was about 50% of that for trees in full sun. Sun leaves required about 43.1 klx for light saturation and shade leaves needed only about 19.4 klx. Net photosynthesis (Pn) of shade leaves was about 70% of that of sun leaves at light saturation. Dark respiration (Rd) rates were also higher in sun- than shade-leaves. Specific leaf weight (SLW) of leaves near full expansion at the start of the experiment increased 15% under shade whereas sun-leaf SLW increased 40% during the experiment. For leaves unfolding under the differential light treatments, SLW of shade leaves averaged only 55% of sun leaves. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  14. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of the United States, in an Albers...

  15. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of the Conterminous United States map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of the United States, with relief shading...

  16. A Comprehensive Review and Analysis of Solar Photovoltaic Array Configurations under Partial Shaded Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramaprabha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of partial shading on energy output of different Solar Photovoltaic Array (SPVA configurations and to mitigate the losses faced in Solar Photovoltaic (SPV systems by incorporating bypass diodes. Owing to the practical difficulty of conducting experiments on varied array sizes, a generalized MATLAB M-code has been developed for any required array size, configuration, shading patterns, and number of bypass diodes. The proposed model which also includes the insolation-dependent shunt resistance can provide sufficient degree of precision without increasing the computational effort. All the configurations have been analyzed and comparative study is made for different random shading patterns to determine the configuration less susceptible to power losses under partial shading. Inferences have been drawn by testing several shading scenarios.

  17. The canopy spiders (Araneae of the floodplain forest in Leipzig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The canopy spiders of the floodplain forest in Leipzig have become a focus of ecological studies in recent years. In 2006 we sampled 30 tree canopies in the ‘Burgaue’ nature reserve with pyrethrum knock-down fogging, recording 502 adult spiders belonging to 48 species and 11 families. Based on these data and the results of a previous fogging study, the studied spider community was dominated by forest and forest-edge species with a preference for the shrub and canopy strata as well as by spiders of the web spider feeding guild. The community structure was typical for arboreal spider communities from northern temperate forests but very different from communities in the tropics. Species richness and evenness were similar to the old growth near-primary Białowieża Forest in Poland. The checklist of 96 canopy spider species of the floodplain forest of Leipzig includes 54 additions to the spider fauna of Leipzig and vicinity by recent canopy studies and eight first canopy records for Leipzig from our field work. The theridiid Dipoena torva (Thorell, 1875 was recorded for the first time in Saxony. The floodplain forest of Leipzig sustains a large and species-rich arboreal spider community and is thus a valuable habitat for a large proportion of endangered species (12%.

  18. CANOPY STRUCTURE AND DEPOSITION EFFICIENCY OF VINEYARD SPRAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pergher

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A field study was performed to analyse how deposition efficiency from an axial-fan sprayer was affected by the canopy structure of vines trained to the High Cordon, Low Cordon and Casarsa systems, at beginning of flowering and beginning of berry touch growth stages. An empirical calibration method, providing a dose rate adjustment roughly proportional to canopy height, was used. The canopy structure was assessed using the Point Quadrat method, and determining the leaf area index (LAI and the leaf layer index (LLI. Spray deposits were measured by colorimetry, using a water soluble dye (Tartrazine as a tracer. Correlation between deposits and canopy parameters were analysed and discussed. Foliar deposits per unit leaf area were relatively constant, suggesting that empirical calibration can reduce deposit variability associated with different training systems and growth stages. Total foliar deposition ranged from 33.6% and 82.3% of total spray volume, and increased proportionally with the LLI up to LLI<4. Deposits on bunches significantly decreased with the LLI in the grape zone. The results suggest that sprayer efficiency is improved by a regular, symmetrical canopy, with few leaf layers in the grape zone as in Low Cordon. However, a LLI<3 over the whole canopy and >40% gaps in the foliage both reduced total deposition, and may increase the risk for larger drift losses.

  19. Estimating canopy fuel parameters for Atlantic Coastal Plain forest types.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2007-01-15

    Abstract It is necessary to quantify forest canopy characteristics to assess crown fire hazard, prioritize treatment areas, and design treatments to reduce crown fire potential. A number of fire behavior models such as FARSITE, FIRETEC, and NEXUS require as input four particular canopy fuel parameters: 1) canopy cover, 2) stand height, 3) crown base height, and 4) canopy bulk density. These canopy characteristics must be mapped across the landscape at high spatial resolution to accurately simulate crown fire. Currently no models exist to forecast these four canopy parameters for forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, a region that supports millions of acres of loblolly, longleaf, and slash pine forests as well as pine-broadleaf forests and mixed species broadleaf forests. Many forest cover types are recognized, too many to efficiently model. For expediency, forests of the Savannah River Site are categorized as belonging to 1 of 7 broad forest type groups, based on composition: 1) loblolly pine, 2) longleaf pine, 3) slash pine, 4) pine-hardwood, 5) hardwood-pine, 6) hardwoods, and 7) cypress-tupelo. These 7 broad forest types typify forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain region, from Maryland to Florida.

  20. Single color attribute index for shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Commercial dental resin composites under the same shade designations show color discrepancies by brand. Moreover, three Commission Internationale de l′Eclairage (CIE color coordinates show significant variations by measurement method; therefore, direct comparisons of the color coordinates based on different methods are meaningless. This study aimed to assess a hypothesis that a new color attribute index (CAI, which could reduce the color coordinate variations by measurement method, was applicable for the shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites. The Hypothesis: CAI is applicable in the shade conformity judgment of commercial dental resin composites. Using the CIE color coordinates of shade guide tabs and resin composites, combined color indices such as Wa = CIE aFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 and Wb = CIE bFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 were defined, in which DEFNx01 ab was the color difference with a standard white tile. Ratio of Wa/Wb to that of an arbitrary reference shade (A2 in the same brand and measurement was defined as the CAI. The CAI values were significantly different by the shade designation and showed a logical trend by the shade designation number. The CAI of commercial resin composites and the keyed shade guide tabs showed overlaps. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The CAI might be used to judge the shade conformity of resin composites using the values based on different measurement methods. The application of the CAI, instead of conventional three-color coordinates, could efficiently simplify the shade conformity judgment of commercial resin composites. Although the hypothesis of the present study was partially confirmed, further studies for the practical application of this index are highly recommended.

  1. Assessment of color parameters of composite resin shade guides using digital imaging versus colorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanel, Kivanc; Caglar, Alper; Özcan, Mutlu; Gulsah, Kamran; Bagis, Bora

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the color parameters of resin composite shade guides determined using a colorimeter and digital imaging method. Four composite shade guides, namely: two nanohybrid (Grandio [Voco GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany]; Premise [KerrHawe SA, Bioggio, Switzerland]) and two hybrid (Charisma [Heraeus Kulzer, GmbH & Co. KG, Hanau, Germany]; Filtek Z250 [3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany]) were evaluated. Ten shade tabs were selected (A1, A2, A3, A3,5, A4, B1, B2, B3, C2, C3) from each shade guide. CIE Lab values were obtained using digital imaging and a colorimeter (ShadeEye NCC Dental Chroma Meter, Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan). The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc test. Overall, the mean ΔE values from different composite pairs demonstrated statistically significant differences when evaluated with the colorimeter (p 6.8). For all shade pairs evaluated, the most significant shade mismatches were obtained between Grandio-Filtek Z250 (p = 0.021) and Filtek Z250-Premise (p = 0.01) regarding ΔE mean values, whereas the best shade match was between Grandio-Charisma (p = 0.255) regardless of the measurement method. The best color match (mean ΔE values) was recorded for A1, A2, and A3 shade pairs in both methods. When proper object-camera distance, digital camera settings, and suitable illumination conditions are provided, digital imaging method could be used in the assessment of color parameters. Interchanging use of shade guides from different composite systems should be avoided during color selection. © 2010, COPYRIGHT THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010, WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Developing a custom dental porcelain shade system for computer color matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa-Nagai, Shigemi; Wang, Jian; Seliger, Alison; Lin, Jin; Da Silva, John

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to update the computer color matching method by generating a new ceramic shade system that covers the entire spectrum of natural tooth color and has an efficient design. First, the color map of 176 maxillary natural incisors and two commercially available and commonly used shade guide systems (Vitapan classic and 3D master) were drawn. Then, 15 shades of layered disks (NW-0: neutral white-0, A1, A2, A3, A4, B1, B4, C4, and D4, and six modifiers; white, pink, grey, blue, cervical-1 and cervical-2, Cerabien ZR) were plotted on the tooth color distribution map. Ultimately, 12 target shades were selected around the perimeter of the natural tooth color space, and nine different shades were selected within the cluster. By trial and error informed by known formulations published previously, the formulations of Cerabien ZR porcelain powders necessary to achieve these 21 target shades in thickness of 1.0mm layered on zirconia substrate were then determined and ceramic disks were fabricated. Color distribution L*-C* and a*-b* maps showed that new 21 shade system covers a slightly broader range than the natural tooth distribution, and its distribution is larger than the 3D Master shade's range. In the present study, a 21 custom dental porcelain shade system was developed with a 1.0mm porcelain thickness overlying a zirconia substrate, which can be incorporated into the computer color matching system. This new shade system has homogeneity with 3D Master, and has a slightly wider color distribution than that of natural teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Isotopic characteristics of canopies in simulated leaf assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Heather V.; Patzkowsky, Mark E.; Wing, Scott L.; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2014-11-01

    The geologic history of closed-canopy forests is of great interest to paleoecologists and paleoclimatologists alike. Closed canopies have pronounced effects on local, continental and global rainfall and temperature patterns. Although evidence for canopy closure is difficult to reconstruct from the fossil record, the characteristic isotope gradients of the ;canopy effect; could be preserved in leaves and proxy biomarkers. To assess this, we employed new carbon isotopic data for leaves collected in diverse light environments within a deciduous, temperate forest (Maryland, USA) and for leaves from a perennially closed canopy, moist tropical forest (Bosque Protector San Lorenzo, Panamá). In the tropical forest, leaf carbon isotope values range 10‰, with higher δ13Cleaf values occurring both in upper reaches of the canopy, and with higher light exposure and lower humidity. Leaf fractionation (Δleaf) varied negatively with height and light and positively with humidity. Vertical 13C enrichment in leaves largely reflects changes in Δleaf, and does not trend with δ13C of CO2 within the canopy. At the site in Maryland, leaves express a more modest δ13C range (∼6‰), with a clear trend that follows both light and leaf height. Using a model we simulate leaf assemblage isotope patterns from canopy data binned by elevation. The re-sampling (bootstrap) model determined both the mean and range of carbon isotope values for simulated leaf assemblages ranging in size from 10 to over 1000 leaves. For the tropical forest data, the canopy's isotope range is captured with 50 or more randomly sampled leaves. Thus, with a sufficient number of fossil leaves it is possible to distinguish isotopic gradients in an ancient closed canopy forest from those in an open forest. For very large leaf assemblages, mean isotopic values approximate the δ13C of carbon contributed by leaves to soil and are similar to observed δ13Clitter values at forested sites within Panamá, including the

  4. Landsat - SRTM Shaded Relief Comparison, Los Angeles and Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs), such as those produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), allow user-controlled visualization of the Earth's landforms that is not possible using satellite imagery alone. This three-view comparison shows Los Angeles, Calif., and vicinity, with a Landsat image (only) on the left, a shaded relief rendering of the SRTM DEM on the right, and a merge of the two data sets in the middle. Note that topographic expression in the Landsat image alone is very subtle due to the fairly high sun angle (63 degrees above the horizon) during the satellite overflight in late morning of a mid-Spring day (May 4, 2001). In contrast, computer generated topographic shading of the DEM provides a pure and bold image of topographic expression with a user specified illumination direction. The middle image shows how combining the Landsat and DEM shaded relief can result in a topographically enhanced satellite image in which the information content of both data sets is merged into a single view.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and helps in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U

  5. Assessment of the influence of gender and skin color on the preference of tooth shade in Saudi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Labban

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Gender and skin color influences the perception of teeth shades among general population. Therefore, lighter tooth shades (BL1, BL2 for lighter skin color and comparatively darker tooth shades (BL4, B1, A1 for darker skin individuals should be prescribed as these are perceived as natural among Saudi population.

  6. Modeling radiative transfer in tropical rainforest canopies: sensitivity of simulated albedo to canopy architectural and optical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Sílvia N M; Costa, Marcos H

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of the surface albedo simulated by the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to a set of Amazonian tropical rainforest canopy architectural and optical parameters. The parameters tested in this study are the orientation and reflectance of the leaves of upper and lower canopies in the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The results are evaluated against albedo measurements taken above the K34 site at the INPA (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia) Cuieiras Biological Reserve. The sensitivity analysis indicates a strong response to the upper canopy leaves orientation (χup) and to the reflectivity in the near-infrared spectral band (ρNIR,up), a smaller sensitivity to the reflectivity in the visible spectral band (ρVIS,up) and no sensitivity at all to the lower canopy parameters, which is consistent with the canopy structure. The combination of parameters that minimized the Root Mean Square Error and mean relative error are χup = 0.86, ρVIS,up = 0.062 and ρNIR,up = 0.275. The parameterizations performed resulted in successful simulations of tropical rainforest albedo by IBIS, indicating its potential to simulate the canopy radiative transfer for narrow spectral bands and permitting close comparison with remote sensing products.

  7. Canopy position has a profound effect on soybean seed composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C. Huber

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although soybean seeds appear homogeneous, their composition (protein, oil and mineral concentrations can vary significantly with the canopy position where they were produced. In studies with 10 cultivars grown over a 3-yr period, we found that seeds produced at the top of the canopy have higher concentrations of protein but less oil and lower concentrations of minerals such as Mg, Fe, and Cu compared to seeds produced at the bottom of the canopy. Among cultivars, mean protein concentration (average of different positions correlated positively with mean concentrations of S, Zn and Fe, but not other minerals. Therefore, on a whole plant basis, the uptake and allocation of S, Zn and Fe to seeds correlated with the production and allocation of reduced N to seed protein; however, the reduced N and correlated minerals (S, Zn and Fe showed different patterns of allocation among node positions. For example, while mean concentrations of protein and Fe correlated positively, the two parameters correlated negatively in terms of variation with canopy position. Altering the microenvironment within the soybean canopy by removing neighboring plants at flowering increased protein concentration in particular at lower node positions and thus altered the node-position gradient in protein (and oil without altering the distribution of Mg, Fe and Cu, suggesting different underlying control mechanisms. Metabolomic analysis of developing seeds at different positions in the canopy suggests that availability of free asparagine may be a positive determinant of storage protein accumulation in seeds and may explain the increased protein accumulation in seeds produced at the top of the canopy. Our results establish node-position variation in seed constituents and provide a new experimental system to identify genes controlling key aspects of seed composition. In addition, our results provide an unexpected and simple approach to link agronomic practices to improve human

  8. Boreal forest BVOC exchange: emissions versus in-canopy sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Taipale, Ditte; Rannik, Üllar; Rantala, Pekka; Petteri Rissanen, Matti; Chen, Dean; Boy, Michael

    2017-12-01

    A multilayer gas dry deposition model has been developed and implemented into a one-dimensional chemical transport model SOSAA (model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to calculate the dry deposition velocities for all the gas species included in the chemistry scheme. The new model was used to analyse in-canopy sources and sinks, including gas emissions, chemical production and loss, dry deposition, and turbulent transport of 12 featured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) or groups of BVOCs (e.g. monoterpenes, isoprene+2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), sesquiterpenes, and oxidation products of mono- and sesquiterpenes) in July 2010 at the boreal forest site SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations). According to the significance of modelled monthly-averaged individual source and sink terms inside the canopy, the selected BVOCs were classified into five categories: 1. Most of emitted gases are transported out of the canopy (monoterpenes, isoprene + MBO). 2. Chemical reactions remove a significant portion of emitted gases (sesquiterpenes). 3. Bidirectional fluxes occur since both emission and dry deposition are crucial for the in-canopy concentration tendency (acetaldehyde, methanol, acetone, formaldehyde). 4. Gases removed by deposition inside the canopy are compensated for by the gases transported from above the canopy (acetol, pinic acid, β-caryophyllene's oxidation product BCSOZOH). 5. The chemical production is comparable to the sink by deposition (isoprene's oxidation products ISOP34OOH and ISOP34NO3). Most of the simulated sources and sinks were located above about 0.2 hc (canopy height) for oxidation products and above about 0.4 hc for emitted species except formaldehyde. In addition, soil deposition (including deposition onto understorey vegetation) contributed 11-61 % to the overall in-canopy deposition. The emission sources peaked at about 0.8-0.9 hc, which was higher than 0.6 hc

  9. Modelling basin-wide variations in Amazon forest productivity – Part 1: Model calibration, evaluation and upscaling functions for canopy photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Mercado

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of Amazon rainforest in the global carbon and hydrological cycles, there is a need to parameterize and validate ecosystem gas exchange and vegetation models for this region in order to adequately simulate present and future carbon and water balances. In this study, a sun and shade canopy gas exchange model is calibrated and evaluated at five rainforest sites using eddy correlation measurements of carbon and energy fluxes.

    Results from the model-data evaluation suggest that with adequate parameterisation, photosynthesis models taking into account the separation of diffuse and direct irradiance and the dynamics of sunlit and shaded leaves can accurately represent photosynthesis in these forests. Also, stomatal conductance formulations that only take into account atmospheric demand fail to correctly simulate moisture and CO2 fluxes in forests with a pronounced dry season, particularly during afternoon conditions. Nevertheless, it is also the case that large uncertainties are associated not only with the eddy correlation data, but also with the estimates of ecosystem respiration required for model validation. To accurately simulate Gross Primary Productivity (GPP and energy partitioning the most critical parameters and model processes are the quantum yield of photosynthetic uptake, the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, and simulation of stomatal conductance.

    Using this model-data synergy, we developed scaling functions to provide estimates of canopy photosynthetic parameters for a range of diverse forests across the Amazon region, utilising the best fitted parameter for maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, and foliar nutrients (N and P for all sites.

  10. The influence of the forest canopy on nutrient cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Cindy E

    2002-11-01

    Rates of key soil processes involved in recycling of nutrients in forests are governed by temperature and moisture conditions and by the chemical and physical nature of the litter. The forest canopy influences all of these factors and thus has a large influence on nutrient cycling. The increased availability of nutrients in soil in clearcuts illustrates how the canopy retains nutrients (especially N) on site, both by storing nutrients in foliage and through the steady input of available C in litter. The idea that faster decomposition is responsible for the flush of nitrate in clearcuts has not been supported by experimental evidence. Soil N availability increases in canopy gaps as small as 0.1 ha, so natural disturbances or partial harvesting practices that increase the complexity of the canopy by creating gaps will similarly increase the spatial variability in soil N cycling and availability within the forest. Canopy characteristics affect the amount and composition of leaf litter produced, which largely determines the amount of nutrients to be recycled and the resulting nutrient availability. Although effects of tree species on soil nutrient availability were thought to be brought about largely through differences in the decomposition rate of their foliar litter, recent studies indicate that the effect of tree species can be better predicted from the mass and nutrient content of litter produced, hence total nutrient return, than from litter decay rate. The greater canopy complexity in mixed species forests creates similar heterogeneity in nutritional characteristics of the forest floor. Site differences in slope position, parent material and soil texture lead to variation in species composition and productivity of forests, and thus in the nature and amount of litter produced. Through this positive feedback, the canopy accentuates inherent differences in site fertility.

  11. How neighbor canopy architecture affects target plant performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremmel, D.C.; Bazzaz, F.A. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Plant competition occurs through the negative effects that individual plants have on resource availability to neighboring individuals. Therefore competition experiments need to examine how different species change resource availability to their neighbors, and how different species respond to these changes-allocationally, architecturally, and physiologically-through time. In a greenhouse study we used a model system of annuals to examine how canopies of species having differing morphologies differed in their architectures and light-interception abilities, and how different species performed when grown in these canopies. Abutilon theophrasti, Datura stramonium, and Polygonum pensylvanicum were grown as [open quotes]targets[close quotes]. Plants were grown in pots, with one target plant and four neighbor plants. Detailed measurements of neighbor canopy structure and target plant canopy architecture were made at five harvests. Species with different morphologies showed large differences in canopy structure, particularly when grass and forb species were compared. Setaria, a grass, had a more open canopy than the other species (all forbs), and was a consistently weak competitor. Overall, however, the relative effects of different neighbors on target biomass varied with target species. Target biomass was poorly correlated with neighbor biomass and leaf area, but was highly correlated with a measure of target light-interception ability that took into account both target leaf deployment and neighbor light interception. Despite clear differences among neighbor species in canopy structure and effect on light penetration, the results suggest no broad generalizations about the effects of different species as neighbors. Knowledge of morphological, physiological, and life history characteristics of both the target and neighbor species may be necessary to explain the results of their competition. 53 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Spectrophotometric Study of the Effect of Luting Agents on the Resultant Shade of Ceramic Veneers: An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankar, Ajit Suryakant; Kale, Yogesh; Pustake, Swati; Bijjaragi, Shobha; Pustake, Bhushan

    2015-09-01

    Dentistry has found practically the best available aesthetic answer, is ceramic restoration. There are various factors that contribute to the success of ceramic veneers, like colour of underlying tooth, thickness if ceramics and the type of underlying luting cement. Shade selection and matching remains still challenge, however the shade of luting agent used for cementation of veneers produces a change in resultant shade of veneers. To compare and analyze the spectrophotometric effect of opaque and transparent luting agent on resultant shade of ceramic veneers made of 2L1.5 shade (Vitapan 3D-Masters) and B2 shade (Vitapan Classic). Out of 15 ceramic veneers of 2L1.5 shade (VITAPAN 3D- Master), seven teeth cemented with opaque cement and eight teeth with transparent cement shade of dual cure resin cement (Variolink II(TM)). Out of 10 ceramic veneers of B2 shade (VITAPAN Classic), five teeth were cemented with opaque cement and other five teeth with transparent cement shade of dual cure resin cement (Variolink II(TM)). Spectrophotometric (Macbeth U.S.A.) analysis of all ceramic veneer crowns done with optiview software and readings were recorded in Commission Internationale de I' Eclairge {CIELAB} system and dE value was calculated. Statistical analysis was done by using Paired t-test. Spectrophotometric analysis of all the veneers cemented with opaque luting agent were lighter in shade due to significant change in dL value. Veneers cemented with transparent luting agent were darker in shade due to significant change in the dL value. Opaque luting agent gives lighter shade and transparent luting agent gives darker shade to ceramic veneers fabricated with 2L1.5 and B2 shades.

  13. Demonstration of new ESP-r capability for quantifying the energy savings potential of window shading devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomanowski, B.A.; Kotey, N.A.; Wright, J.L.; Collins, M.R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-06-15

    The peak electricity demand in Ontario is dominated by space cooling of residential and commercial buildings. The appropriate use of window shading devices can reduce cooling energy use and lower the peak cooling load. Solar gain through glazing is the largest and most variable gain in buildings and influences energy consumption and peak cooling loads. This paper demonstrated the new modeling capability within ESP-r for windows with shading devices. The ESP-r model which considers shading options is known as the ASHWAT (ASHRAE Window Attachment) model. Measurements performed at the National Solar Test Facility (NSTF) on a full scale window with various shading attachments were compared to calculated values predicted by the ASHWAT models. The predicted results were in good agreement with measured data. Simulations illustrated the impact of different shading configurations on cooling energy, peak load and thermal comfort. A simulation of an automated external shading system highlighted the role of shading on the energy performance of a solar house design entered into the Solar Decathlon 2009 competition. The external shading design was compared with other options such as a solar protective coatings and indoor shades. Simulations also revealed the impact of shading devices on winter night-time heat loss and thermal comfort. This paper outlined the general procedure for using the shading models within ESP-r. The ASHWAT shading model was developed with emphasis on glazing/shading system generality to allow for specification of any combination of shading/glazing layers. The simulations highlighted the importance of external shading for solar protection of highly glazed facades. They also quantified the impact of glazing facade composition on cooling peak loads, cooling energy and thermal comfort. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Spectrophotometric Study of the Effect of Luting Agents on the Resultant Shade of Ceramic Veneers: An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Yogesh; Pustake, Swati; Bijjaragi, Shobha; Pustake, Bhushan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dentistry has found practically the best available aesthetic answer, is ceramic restoration. There are various factors that contribute to the success of ceramic veneers, like colour of underlying tooth, thickness if ceramics and the type of underlying luting cement. Shade selection and matching remains still challenge, however the shade of luting agent used for cementation of veneers produces a change in resultant shade of veneers. Aim To compare and analyze the spectrophotometric effect of opaque and transparent luting agent on resultant shade of ceramic veneers made of 2L1.5 shade (Vitapan 3D-Masters) and B2 shade (Vitapan Classic). Materials and Methods Out of 15 ceramic veneers of 2L1.5 shade (VITAPAN 3D- Master), seven teeth cemented with opaque cement and eight teeth with transparent cement shade of dual cure resin cement (Variolink IITM). Out of 10 ceramic veneers of B2 shade (VITAPAN Classic), five teeth were cemented with opaque cement and other five teeth with transparent cement shade of dual cure resin cement (Variolink IITM). Spectrophotometric (Macbeth U.S.A.) analysis of all ceramic veneer crowns done with optiview software and readings were recorded in Commission Internationale de I’ Eclairge {CIELAB} system and dE value was calculated. Statistical Analysis Statistical analysis was done by using Paired t-test. Results Spectrophotometric analysis of all the veneers cemented with opaque luting agent were lighter in shade due to significant change in dL value. Veneers cemented with transparent luting agent were darker in shade due to significant change in the dL value. Conclusion Opaque luting agent gives lighter shade and transparent luting agent gives darker shade to ceramic veneers fabricated with 2L1.5 and B2 shades. PMID:26501014

  15. Morphophysiological Behavior and Cambial Activity in Seedlings of Two Amazonian Tree Species under Shade

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    Monyck Jeane dos Santos Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in light intensity can lead to important anatomical and morphophysiological changes in plants. Aiming to increase knowledge about the Amazonian tree species, this study examines the influence of shade on the cambial activity and development of Parkia gigantocarpa Ducke and Schizolobium parahyba var. amazonicum (Huber ex Ducke Barneby seedlings. Seedlings of the two species were grown in a nursery under four shade intensities (treatments: full sun, low, moderate, and high shade (resp., 0%, 23%, 67%, and 73% of shade, or 2000, 1540, 660, and 540 µmol·m−2·s−1 obtained with polyethylene screens. We measured plant height, stem diameter, biomass production, stomatal conductance (gs, transpiration (E, photosynthesis (A, and cambial activity (CA (xylem, cambium, and phloem. Also, we calculated the Dickson Quality Index (DQI. The highest values of biomass production, gs,  E, A, and DQI, were found under full sun, in P. gigantocarpa, and under low shade intensity in S. parahyba. In both species high shade intensity reduced CA. We concluded that the CA and the physiological and morphological attributes work together, explaining the radial growth and increasing seedlings quality, which optimized efficient seedling production under full sun, in P. gigantocarpa, and under low shade intensity in S. parahyba.

  16. Influence of shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage

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    Ender Akan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resin cements have the ability to bond to the tooth structure and to several indirect restorative materials and they are available in different transparency and shades. However, polymerization shrinkage remains to be a problem that leads to gap formation at the margins of restoration, and accordingly microleakage may occur. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the shade of adhesive resin cement on its polymerization shrinkage. Five shades (Group 1: universal; Group 2: brown; Group 3: clear; Group 4: opaque white; Group 5: opaque yellow of a dual-cure composite cement system (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan were studied with 10 specimens of each shade. Volumetric shrinkages of the composite cements of these five shades were evaluated using a video-imaging device (Acu-Vol; Bisco, Inc. by measuring the volumes before and after polymerization. Different shades displayed different volumetric shrinkages. Group 5 (2.62% and Group 2 (3.96% displayed the lowest and highest shrinkage percentages, respectively, with their respective shrinkage values being significantly different from those of the other groups (p < 0.05. The obtained results indicate that the shade of resin cement does affect its degree of polymerization shrinkage.

  17. Initial growth of Bauhinia variegata trees under different colored shade nets and light conditions

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    Renata Bachin Mazzini-Guedes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bauhinia variegata and B. variegata var. candida, commonly known as orchid trees, are small sized trees widely used for urban forestry and landscaping. Adult plants grow under full sun; in Brazil, however, seedlings are generally cultivated in commercial nurseries under natural half-shading. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different colored shade nets and light conditions on the initial growth of B. variegata and B. variegata var. candida. The influence of six light conditions (red net with 50% shading; blue net with 50% shading; black net with 70% shading; black net with 50% shading; black net with 30% shading; and full sun on the initial growth of B. variegata and B. variegata var. candida were evaluated along 160 days, and growth relationships were calculated. Seedlings showed more efficiency on the use of photoassimilated compounds when grown under full sun. Such condition is the most appropriate for seedling production of B. variegata and B. variegata var. candida, contradicting what has been performed in practice.

  18. Are sun- and shade-type anatomy required for the acclimation of Neoregelia cruenta?

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    FERNANDA REINERT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sun and shade plants are often discriminated by a number of sun- and shade-type anatomies. Nonetheless, we propose that among tank-bromeliads, changes in rosette architecture satisfy the requirements for coping with contrasting light levels. The tank-bromeliad Neoregelia cruenta naturally colonises sub-habitats ranging from full exposure to direct sunlight, to shaded environments in sand ridge plains. We quantified anatomical and morphological traits of leaves and rosettes of N. cruenta grown under sun and shade conditions. Cells with undulated lateral walls within the water parenchyma are for the first time described for the family. Under high light, leaf blades were wider, shorter, and yellowish. The rosette diameter of sun plants was less than half that of shade plants. Sun leaves overlapped with neighbouring leaves for most of their length, forming a cylindrical rosette where water accumulates. Shade leaves only overlapped in the centre of the rosette. Most anatomical traits were similar under both growth conditions. Stomata were absent from the base of sun leaves, which is probably explained by limited gas exchange at the base of the tight sun-type rosette. Data suggest that the ability of N. cruenta to acclimate to sun and shade is better explained by changes in rosette architecture than by leaf anatomy.

  19. Adolescents’ use of purpose built shade in secondary schools: cluster randomised controlled trial

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    White, Vanessa; Wakefield, Melanie A; Jamsen, Kris M; White, Victoria; Livingston, Patricia M; English, Dallas R; Simpson, Julie A

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine whether students use or avoid newly shaded areas created by shade sails installed at schools. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial with secondary schools as the unit of randomisation. Setting 51 secondary schools with limited available shade, in Australia, assessed over two spring and summer terms. Participants Students outside at lunch times. Intervention Purpose built shade sails were installed in winter 2005 at full sun study sites to increase available shade for students in the school grounds. Main outcome measure Mean number of students using the primary study sites during weekly observations at lunch time. Results Over the study period the mean change in students using the primary study site from pre-test to post-test was 2.63 (95% confidence interval 0.87 to 4.39) students in intervention schools and −0.03 (−1.16 to 1.09) students in control schools. The difference in mean change between groups was 2.67 (0.65 to 4.68) students (P=0.011). Conclusions Students used rather than avoided newly shaded areas provided by purpose built shade sails at secondary schools in this trial, suggesting a practical means of reducing adolescents’ exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Trial registration Exempt. PMID:19223344

  20. A comparison between wet canopy evaporation estimated by stable isotope ratios of water and canopy interception measured by water balance

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    Murakami, Shigeki; Hattori, Shohei; Uemura, Ryu

    2017-04-01

    Some papers proved that canopy interception is proportional to rainfall not only on a rain event basis but also on an hourly basis (e.g. Murakami, 2006, J. Hydrol.; Saito et al., 2013, J. Hydrol.). However, theoretically, evaporation does not depend on rainfall amount. These results are enigmatic and we need to reevaluate wet canopy evaporation. We measured gross rainfall and net rainfall in a plastic Christmas tree stand with a height of 165 cm placed on a 180-cm square tray as described in Murakami and Toba (2013, Hydrol. Res. Lett.). The measurement was conducted outside under natural rainfall. We also estimated wet canopy evaporation using stable isotope ratios of water. During a rain event, we manually sampled gross and net rainwater on an hourly basis. Evaporation was calculated using the difference between the δ18O (or δ2H) values in gross and net rainfall using isotope fractionation factor. Total gross rainfall in a target rain event in October, 2014, was 28.0 mm and net rainfall (discharge from the tray) was 22.7 mm, i.e. canopy interception was 5.3 mm (18.9% of gross rainfall). The δ18O (or δ2H) value in net rainfall was higher than that in gross rainfall because of fractionation by evaporation on wet canopy surface. Hourly evaporation calculated by the values of δ18O varied from 2% to 24% of gross rainfall, and the weighted average by hourly gross rainfall was 5.2% of gross rainfall. Further, we estimated rainfall interception using a tank model (Yoshida et al., 1993) assuming constant evaporation rate, i.e. 20% of gross rainfall. Total net rainfall calculated by the model was 23.1 mm, i.e. calculated canopy interception was 4.9 mm (17.5% of gross rainfall). Then, keeping the parameters of the model, we simulated net rainfall using hourly surface evaporation obtained by the δ18O values. Calculated net rainfall was 25.6 mm, i.e. wet canopy evaporation was only 2.4 mm (8.6% of gross rainfall). So far, possible explanation of the discrepancy between

  1. Characterization of Canopy Layering in Forested Ecosystems Using Full Waveform Lidar

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    Ralph Dubayah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Canopy structure, the vertical distribution of canopy material, is an important element of forest ecosystem dynamics and habitat preference. Although vertical stratification, or “canopy layering,” is a basic characterization of canopy structure for research and forest management, it is difficult to quantify at landscape scales. In this paper we describe canopy structure and develop methodologies to map forest vertical stratification in a mixed temperate forest using full-waveform lidar. Two definitions—one categorical and one continuous—are used to map canopy layering over Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire with lidar data collected in 2009 by NASA’s Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS. The two resulting canopy layering datasets describe variation of canopy layering throughout the forest and show that layering varies with terrain elevation and canopy height. This information should provide increased understanding of vertical structure variability and aid habitat characterization and other forest management activities.

  2. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

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    Daiana Kelly Lopes HERNANDES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3 layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP, and chroma of low (LT and high (HT translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B and white (W background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  3. Vegetative and productive aspects of organically grown coffee cultivars under shaded and unshaded systems

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    Marta dos Santos Freire Ricci

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Coffea arabica species has its origin in the African understories, there is great resistance on the part of the Brazilian producers for growing this species under agroforestry systems as they fear that shading reduces production. This study aimed at evaluating some vegetative traits and the productivity of organically grown coffee (Coffea arabica L. cultivars under shaded and unshaded systems. Twelve treatments consisting of two cultivation systems (shaded and unshaded and six coffee cultivars were arranged in randomized blocks with four replicates, in a split-plot scheme. Shading was provided by banana (Musa sp. and coral bean plants (Erythrinaverna. Shading delayed fruit maturation. Late maturation cultivars, such as the Icatu and the Obatã, matured early in both cultivation systems, while medium and early maturation cultivars presented late maturation. Cultivation in the shaded system increased the leaf area and the number of lower branches, decreased the number of productive nodes per branch, and increased the distance between the nodes and the number of leaves present in the branches. Cultivation in the unshaded system presented greater number of plants with branch blight in relation to plants grown in the shade. The productivity of the cultivars was not different, at 30.0 processed bags per hectare in the shaded system, and 25.8 processed bags per hectare in the unshaded system. The most productive cultivars in the shaded system were the Tupi, the Obatã, and the Catuaí, while no differences between cultivars were obtained in the unshaded system.

  4. Visual and instrumental shade matching using CIELAB and CIEDE2000 color difference formulas.

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    Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Pérez, María M; Della Bona, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    To compare visual and instrumental shade matching performances using two shade guides and three color difference formulas. One hundred dental students (DS) volunteers (35 males and 65 females) with normal color vision participated in the study. The spectral reflectance of 4 extracted human upper central incisors (UCI) and shade tabs from Vita Classical (VC) and Vita Toothguide 3D-Master (3D) shade guides were measured using a spectroradiometer (SP) under D65 illuminant (diffuse/0° geometry) inside a viewing booth with a gray background. Color coordinates (CIE L*, a*, b*, C* and h°) were calculated according to CIE D65 illuminant and CIE 2° Standard Observer. Color coordinates of UCI were also evaluated using a dental spectrophotometer (EA - Easyshade Advance). DS used VC and 3D to visually select the best shade match for each UCI, under same experimental conditions used for the SP evaluation. Three color difference metrics (CIELAB, CIEDE2000(1:1:1) and CIEDE2000(2:1:1)) were used to calculate the best instrumental shade matching based on minimum color difference. The agreement between visual and instrumental shade matching was greater using SP (25-75%) than EA (0-25%). The percentage of best match for the visual assessment was more consistent using VC (23-55%) than 3D (19-34%). Considering the best performance (using SP and VC), the CIEDE2000(2:1:1) color difference formula showed the best estimate to the visual perception from DS. Within the limitations of this study, combining the use of SP, CIEDE2000(2:1:1) and Vita Classical shade guide most closely represented the visual perception of DS. Instrumental shade determination should be accompanied by experienced human visual assessment. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers.

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    Hernandes, Daiana Kelly Lopes; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Lima, Erick de; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Rodrigues, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  6. Shade of Resin-Based Luting Agents and Final Color of Porcelain Veneers.

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    Perroni, Ana Paula; Amaral, Camila; Kaizer, Marina R; Moraes, Rafael Ratto De; Boscato, Noéli

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different shades of flowable resin composite used as luting agent on the final shade of porcelain veneers of different opacities over A2 and B1 simulated dental substrate. One millimeter monolithic (enamel E1.0 or dentin D1.0) and bilayer (E0.5D0.5) porcelain discs shade A2 were paired with flowable resin composite disks (0.1 mm thick) of different shades (A1, A2, B1, white opaque - WO or IL - translucent), as veneer + luting agent (n = 10). The CIE L*a*b* color coordinates were measured with a spectrophotometer over white and black standard background, as well as over A2 and B1 simulated dental substrates. Translucency of all specimens and the shade matching of the pairs over the A2 and B1 substrates (ΔE* 00 ) were calculated by Translucency Parameter and CIEDE2000 methods. Data were statistically analyzed by 95% confidence interval. Porcelain veneer E1.0 groups were the most translucent, while the pairs veneer + luting agent WO showed the lowest translucency, and A1, A2, B1, and IL yielded little to no differences in translucency of the pairs. The overall best shade matching with A2 substrate was observed for D1.0 veneer + WO luting agent. The opacity of the porcelain veneer paired with luting agents of different shades affected the final appearance of the restorations over distinct simulated tooth substrates. Distinct shades of flowable resin composites used as luting agent might yield clinically visible color differences on porcelain veneers facilitating an excellent shade match with adjacent teeth. (J Esthet Restor Dent 28:295-303, 2016). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERNANDES, Daiana Kelly Lopes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; de LIMA, Erick; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; RODRIGUES, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C* ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable. PMID:27556211

  8. Porcelain thickness and cement shade effects on the colour and translucency of porcelain veneering materials.

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    Kürklü, Duygu; Azer, Shereen S; Yilmaz, Burak; Johnston, William M

    2013-11-01

    Purposes of this in vitro study include evaluating colour changes in combinations of feldspathic porcelain and cement resulting from different thicknesses of porcelain and different shades of composite luting agent, and evaluating relative translucency parameter (RTP) values. Porcelain discs of shade A1 at nominal thicknesses of 0.5 and 1.0mm were bonded to cements of three shades in a factorial design. Colours were calculated for CIE D65 Illuminant and Standard Human Observer on black, grey and white backings. A colour difference (CD) was calculated of each possible pair of different porcelain thickness values for the same cement shade and each possible pair of different cement shades for the same porcelain thickness. RTP was analyzed by ANOVA and selected pairwise comparisons. All mean CDs studied were perceptible and most were at or greater than the clinical acceptability threshold, with the notable exception that the mean CDs and their confidence limits were below the clinical acceptability threshold for a change in porcelain thickness when utilizing the Clear cement shade. Variation in the shade of the resin luting cement will result in CDs which are near or beyond clinical acceptability. A decrease in porcelain thickness did significantly increase RTP when bonded to the resin cement shades studied. Changes in porcelain thickness or cement shade may adversely affect basic aesthetic properties of these materials. Development of methods for analyzing aesthetic effects over greater ranges of thickness for these materials would improve the prognosis for using these materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physiological and behavioral responses of Nellore steers to artificial shading in an intensive production system

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    Diogo Alves da Costa Ferro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of artificial shading on environmental variables and on behavioral responses of Nellore steers in an intensive production system was evaluated in this study. The experiment was conducted in the experimental feedlot of the Department of Animal Science at Universidade Estadual de Goiás, from July to October 2014. Forty-eight male Nellore cattle with an average initial weight of 310 kg were kept in double 24-m2 stalls, in a total of 24 stalls. Of these, six were in the open air; six were covered with black shade netting of 30% light interception; six with black shade netting 50%; and six with black shade netting 80%, providing 6 m2 of shade per stall. Temperature-humidity index (THI and respiratory frequency (RF were assessed twice weekly and behavior was evaluated fortnightly during 12 h, between 06:00 h and 18.00 h. Feeding behavior, rumination, rest, and social activities such as body care and playful and abnormal activities were observed. A significant increase was found in THI and RF as the shading levels decreased, while a significant difference was recorded in rest and in other activities, water intake, and play behavior. Rest time and playful behavior increased significantly, and other activities and water intake decreased with the increase in shading levels. Shading does not change the time spent on feeding behaviors and rumination, or the frequencies of urination, defecation, cleaning other animals, self-cleaning, and social and abnormal types of behavior. The use of black shade netting of 80% light interception provides greater comfort to animals, promoting welfare and quality of life to them.

  10. Potential phytotoxic and shading effects of invasive Fallopia (Polygonaceae taxa on the germination of native dominant species

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    Lenka Moravcová

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Two species of knotweeds (genus Fallopia, Polygonaceae, native to Asia (Fallopia sachalinensis, F. japonica and their hybrid (F. ×bohemica belong to the most noxious plant invaders in Europe and exert a high impact on invaded plant communities that are therefore typically extremely poor in species. The remarkable paucity of invaded communities points to the possible existence of mechanisms suppressing germinating populations of native species in invaded stands. In this pilot study we assessed, under laboratory conditions, whether there are phytotoxic effects of the three Fallopia congeners on seed germination of three target species: two native species commonly growing in habitats that are often invaded by knotweeds (Urtica dioica, Calamagrostis epigejos, and Lepidium sativum, a species commonly used in allelopathic bioassay as a control. Since knotweeds generally form stands with a high cover, we included varying light conditions as an additional factor, to simulate the effects on germination of shading by leaf canopy. The effects of aqueous extracts (2.5, 5.0%, and 0% as a control from dry leaves and rhizomes of the Fallopia congeners on germination of the target species were thus studied under two light regimes, simulating full daylight (white light and light filtered through canopy (green light, and in dark as a control regime. Rhizome extracts did not affect germination. Light treatments yielded inconclusive results, indicating that poor germination and establishment of species in invaded stands is unlikely to be caused by shading alone, but we found a pronounced phytotoxic effect of leaf extracts of Fallopia taxa, more so at 5.0% than 2.5% extract concentration. Fallopia sachalinensis exerted the largest negative effect on the germination of Urtica dioica, F. ×bohemica on that of C.epigejos, and F. japonica had invariably the lowest inhibitory effect. In the field in Central Europe, F. sachalinensis often invades less disturbed, moist

  11. Visual and instrumental evaluation of color match ability of 2 shade guides on a ceramic system.

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    Öngül, Değer; Şermet, Bülent; Balkaya, Mehmet Cudi

    2012-07-01

    There is limited information on the visual and instrumental evaluation of color match between a natural tooth and a ceramic crown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 shade guides on color match, and to evaluate the relationship between color difference (ΔE) values and examiners' assessments of the color match in ceramic crowns. Thirty-three subjects were selected for a ceramic crown restoration of the maxillary central incisor. Two crowns were fabricated with selected shades from Vitapan Classical and Vita Toothguide 3D-Master shade guides for each subject. The color values of maxillary central incisors, selected shade tabs, and corresponding crowns were measured with a spectrophotometer. The ΔE values between the natural teeth and the crowns and between the selected shade tabs and the corresponding crowns were calculated for each subject and compared with the Student's t test (α=.05). In addition, 3 examiners visually evaluated the clinical acceptability of each crown on a scale from 1 to 6. The agreement among the examiners was assessed with the Kappa test. The scores of examiners for both shade guides were analyzed with the Wilcoxon signed rank test (α=.05). The results revealed that the color difference values between the teeth and the crowns fabricated with the selected shades from the Vita Toothguide 3D-Master shade guide were significantly smaller than those of the Vitapan Classical guide (P=.003). Similarly, the color difference values between the selected shade tabs from the Vita Toothguide 3D-Master guide and the corresponding crowns were significantly smaller than those of the Vitapan Classical guide (P=.001). However, the ΔE values obtained for both shade guides were within the clinically acceptable range (ΔE3D-Master shade guide resulted in a closer color match to the natural teeth than those of the Vitapan Classical guide. However, the ΔE values and the examiners' scores were within the clinically acceptable range for

  12. Evaluating factors that affect the shade-matching ability of dentists, dental staff members and laypeople.

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    Capa, Nuray; Malkondu, Ozlem; Kazazoglu, Ender; Calikkocaoglu, Senih

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to evaluate the influence of dentists' and nondentists' experience, age, sex, eye color and use of eyeglasses or contact lenses on tooth shade-matching ability. The authors included 120 participants in this study conducted in Istanbul (periodontists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, orthodontists, endodontists, pediatric dentists, prosthodontists, restorative dentists, general dentists in private practice, dental technicians, dental assistants, dental assistant students and laypeople). The authors assigned participants to one of three groups: group 1 was composed of prosthodontists, restorative dentists and dental technicians; group 2 consisted of other dental specialists and general dentists; and group 3 included dental assistants, dental assistant students and laypeople. The authors asked participants to match the shades of three artificial maxillary right central incisors (Vitapan acrylic teeth [shades 2L1.5, 1M2, 2R1.5], Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany) by using a shade guide system (Vita Toothguide 3D-Master, Vita Zahnfabrik). They calculated shade matching for the three color components (value, hue, chroma) and analyzed the results by using a chi(2) test. The rate of success in matching the shade for IM2 was 53.3 percent for participants in group 1, 30 percent for participants in group 2 and 20 percent for participants in group 3 (P = .017). However, there were no significant differences between the three groups for shades 2L1.5 and 2R1.5. Professional experience (P = .003) and age (P = .027) were associated with shade-matching success for tooth shade 2L1.5 only. The results showed no statistically significant differences with respect to sex, eye color or use of eyeglasses or contact lenses. Dental care professionals who routinely performed restorative procedures matched the shades better than did participants in other groups. Professional experience was associated positively with the outcome, while sex, eye color and

  13. Potential Nitrification and Nitrogen Mineral of Soil in Coffee Agroforestry System with Various Shading Trees

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    Purwanto .

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of shading trees in coffee farms has been well understood to establish suitable condition for the growth of coffee trees, on the other hand their role in nitrogen cycle in coffee farming is not yet well understood. The objectives of this study are to investigate the influence of various legume shading trees on the concentration of soil mineral N (N-NH4 + and N-NO3-, potential nitrification and to study the controlling factors of nitrification under field conditions. This field explorative research was carried out in Sumberjaya, West Lampung. Twelve observation plots covered four land use systems (LUS, i.e. 1 Coffee agroforestry with Gliricidiasepium as shade trees; 2 Coffee agroforestry with Gliricidiaas shade trees and Arachis pintoias cover crops; 3Coffee agroforestry with Paraserianthes falcataria as shade trees; and 4 Mixed/multistrata coffee agroforestry with Gliricidiaand other fruit crops as shade trees. Measurements of soil mineral-N concentration were carried out every three weeks for three months. Results showed that shade tree species in coffee agroforestry significantly affected concentrations of soil NH4 +, NO3- and potential nitrification. Mixed coffee agroforestry had the highest NH4+/N-mineral ratio (7.16% and the lowest potential nitrification (0.13 mg NO2-kg-1 hour -1 compared to other coffee agroforestry systems using single species of leguminous shade trees. Ratio of NH4 + /N-mineral increased 0.8—21% while potential nitrification decreased 55—79% in mixed coffee agroforestry compared to coffee agroforestry with Gliricidia or P. falcatariaas shade trees. Coffee agroforestry with P. falcatariaas shade trees had potential nitrification 53% lower and ratio of NH4 + /N-mineral concentration 20% higher than that with Gliricidia. Coffee agroforestry with P. falcataria as shade trees also had organic C content 17% higher, total N 40% higher, available P 112% higher than that with Gliricidia. The presence of A. pintoiin

  14. Integrated control of sun shades, daylight and artificial light; Integreret regulering af solafskaermning, dagslys og kunstlys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, K.; Christoffersen, J.; Soerensen, Henrik; Jessen, G.

    2011-07-01

    The project established a basis of calculation and a practical basis for optimum choice of solar shading and integrated control strategies for both new buildings and for office, commercial and institutional buildings to be renovated with new calculation models for controlling solar shading integrated in the BSim program. A complete and applicable model for optimum, integrated solar shading control was established, focusing on thermal and visual comfort criteria towards energy consumption for heating, cooling and lighting. A prototype was tested in the daylight laboratory at Danish Building Research Institute-Aalborg University and at University of Southern Denmark. (LN)

  15. Colour parameters and shade correspondence of CAD-CAM ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; Cardona, Juan C; Pérez, María M

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate colour differences between (1) CAD-CAM ceramic systems considering shades A1, A2 and A3 and the corresponding nominal shade of VC (Vita Classical shade guide) and (2) shades A1-A2, A2-A3 and A1, A2 and A3 within the same ceramic system. Samples of shades A1, A2 and A3 were fabricated (n=5) from CAD-CAM ceramic blocks (IPS e.max(®) CAD LT and HT, IPS Empress(®) CAD LT and HT, Paradigm™ C, and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II) and polished to 1.0±0.01mm in thickness. Spectral reflectance and colour coordinates were measured using a spectroradiometer inside a viewing booth using the CIE D65 illuminant and the d/0° geometry. Spectral reflectance curves were compared using VAF coefficient and were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05). Colour coordinates were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test with Bonferroni correction (α=0.001). All colour differences (ΔEab(*) and ΔE00) were analyzed through comparisons with the PT - perceptibility and AT - acceptability thresholds for dental ceramics. ΔE between ceramic systems and its corresponding shade ranged from 6.32 to 13.42 (ΔEab(*)) and 4.48 to 9.30 (ΔE00). ΔE between shades A1-A2, A2-A3 and A1, A2 and A3 ranged, respectively, 1.93-4.82, 1.22-5.59 and 3.63-8.84 (ΔEab(*)); 1.54-3.87, 1.03-3.90 and 2.95-6.51 (ΔE00). Considering the corresponding nominal shade from VC, none of the ceramic systems showed colour differences below the AT. In addition, some ceramic systems showed colour differences below AT (shades A1-A2 and A2-A3) and below PT (shades A2-A3). Careful adjustments should be made to the final shade of CAD-CAM ceramic restorations to reach a clinically acceptable shade match. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Heat loads of transparent construction elements and sun shading systems; Waermelasten transparenter Bauteile und Sonnenschutzsysteme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmler, H.; Binder, B.; Vonbank, R.

    2000-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes a test system installed at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA) in Duebendorf, Switzerland, for the investigation of heat gain by glazing elements often used in modern architecture and the efficiency of shading elements. The two climatically controlled test cells for the measurement of the thermal characteristics of facade elements and shading systems are described and the results of measurements made using various types of glazing and shading systems - including external and internal lamellas, blinds and extendible fabric sunshades - are presented. The results are analysed and interpreted in a comprehensive appendix.

  17. Partial Shading Detection in Solar System Using Single Short Pulse of Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartczak Mateusz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A single photovoltaic panel under uniform illumination has only one global maximum power point, but the same panel in irregularly illuminated conditions can have more maxima on its power-voltage curve. The irregularly illuminated conditions in most cases are results of partial shading. In the work a single short pulse of load is used to extract information about partial shading. This information can be useful and can help to make some improvements in existing MPPT algorithms. In the paper the intrinsic capacitance of a photovoltaic system is used to retrieve occurrence of partial shading.

  18. Use of thermal imaging to determine leaf conductance along a canopy gradient in European beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Stefan; Bögelein, Rebekka; Thomas, Frank M

    2012-03-01

    Using an infrared camera, we measured the leaf temperature across different canopy positions of a 23-m-tall deciduous forest tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) including typical sun and shade leaves as well as intermediate leaf forms, which differed significantly in specific leaf area (SLA). We calculated a temperature index (I(G)) and a crop water stress index (CWSI) using the surface temperatures of wet and dry reference leaves. Additional indices were computed using air temperature plus 5 °C (I(G) + 5, CWSI + 5) as dry references. The minimum temperature of the wet leaf and the maximum temperature of the dry leaf proved to be most suitable as reference values. We correlated the temperature indices with leaf area-related conductance to water vapor (g(L)) using porometry at the leaf level and using xylem sap flow at the branch level. At the leaf and at the branch level, I(G) and CWSI were equally well suited as proxies of g(L), whereas the relationships of I(G) + 5 and CWSI + 5 with g(L) were only weak or even insignificant. At the leaf level, the correlations of I(G) and CWSI with g(L) were significant in all parts of the crown. The slopes of g(L) vs. I(G) and CWSI did not differ significantly among the crown parts; this indicates that they were not influenced by SLA or irradiance. At the branch level, close correlations (r > 0.8) were found between temperature indices and g(L) across the crown. These results demonstrate that satisfactory relationships between temperature indices and g(L) can be established in tall trees even in those canopy parts that are exposed to relatively low levels of irradiance and exhibit relatively low values of g(L).

  19. Emergence time in forest bats: the influence of canopy closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Danilo; Cistrone, Luca; Jones, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    The role of the forest canopy in protecting bats roosting in forest from predators is poorly known. We analysed the effect of canopy closure on emergence time in Barbastella barbastellus in a mountainous area of central Italy. We used radio-tracking to locate roosts and filmed evening emergence. Comparisons were made between roosts in open areas and those in dense forest. Median emergence time and illuminance were correlated. Moreover, from pregnancy to late lactation bats emerged progressively earlier, probably because of the exceptionally high wing loading affecting pregnant bats and the high energy demand of lactation. A significant influence of canopy closure on median emergence time was revealed after adjusting for the effects of light and reproductive state. Bats in open habitat emerged later than those roosting beneath closed canopy. In cluttered habitats, predators relying on vision may find it more difficult to detect and catch bats at light levels which would offer more chances of success when attacking prey in open habitats. Bats in dense forest are less vulnerable to predators and may take advantage of an earlier emergence by prolonging foraging. Although more vulnerable, lactating females roosting at open sites may benefit from warmer roosting conditions. Roosts in dense forest may be preferred under intense predation pressure. Forest management should favour canopy heterogeneity to provide bats with a range of roosting conditions. Our work emphasises the role of a fine-grained spatial scale in the roosting ecology of forest bats.

  20. Performance of an Ultrasonic Ranging Sensor in Apple Tree Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Escolà

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Electronic canopy characterization is an important issue in tree crop management. Ultrasonic and optical sensors are the most used for this purpose. The objective of this work was to assess the performance of an ultrasonic sensor under laboratory and field conditions in order to provide reliable estimations of distance measurements to apple tree canopies. To this purpose, a methodology has been designed to analyze sensor performance in relation to foliage ranging and to interferences with adjacent sensors when working simultaneously. Results show that the average error in distance measurement using the ultrasonic sensor in laboratory conditions is ±0.53 cm. However, the increase of variability in field conditions reduces the accuracy of this kind of sensors when estimating distances to canopies. The average error in such situations is ±5.11 cm. When analyzing interferences of adjacent sensors 30 cm apart, the average error is ±17.46 cm. When sensors are separated 60 cm, the average error is ±9.29 cm. The ultrasonic sensor tested has been proven to be suitable to estimate distances to the canopy in field conditions when sensors are 60 cm apart or more and could, therefore, be used in a system to estimate structural canopy parameters in precision horticulture.