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Sample records for serum soluble triggering

  1. Serum Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 and Procalcitonin Can Reflect Sepsis Severity and Predict Prognosis: A Prospective Cohort Study

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    Zhenyu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the prognostic significance of serum soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1, procalcitonin (PCT, N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP, C-reactive protein (CRP, cytokines, and clinical severity scores in patients with sepsis. Methods. A total of 102 patients with sepsis were divided into survival group (n=60 and nonsurvival group (n=42 based on 28-day mortality. Serum levels of biomarkers and cytokines were measured on days 1, 3, and 5 after admission to an ICU, meanwhile the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were calculated. Results. Serum sTREM-1, PCT, and IL-6 levels of patients in the nonsurvival group were significantly higher than those in the survival group on day 1 (P<0.01. The area under a ROC curve for the prediction of 28 day mortality was 0.792 for PCT, 0.856 for sTREM-1, 0.953 for SOFA score, and 0.923 for APACHE II score. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that serum baseline sTREM-1 PCT levels and SOFA score were the independent predictors of 28-day mortality. Serum PCT, sTREM-1, and IL-6 levels showed a decrease trend over time in the survival group (P<0.05. Serum NT-pro-BNP levels showed the predictive utility from days 3 and 5 (P<0.05. Conclusion. In summary, elevated serum sTREM-1 and PCT levels provide superior prognostic accuracy to other biomarkers. Combination of serum sTREM-1 and PCT levels and SOFA score can offer the best powerful prognostic utility for sepsis mortality.

  2. Serum Soluble Corin is Decreased in Stroke.

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    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Fangfang; Shi, Jijun; Han, Xiujie; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yan; Zhi, Zhongwen; Zhang, Fuding; Shen, Yun; Ma, Juanjuan; Song, Yulin; Hu, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Soluble corin was decreased in coronary heart disease. Given the connections between cardiac dysfunction and stroke, circulating corin might be a candidate marker of stroke risk. However, the association between circulating corin and stroke has not yet been studied in humans. Here, we aimed to examine the association in patients wtith stroke and community-based healthy controls. Four hundred eighty-one patients with ischemic stroke, 116 patients with hemorrhagic stroke, and 2498 healthy controls were studied. Serum soluble corin and some conventional risk factors of stroke were examined. Because circulating corin was reported to be varied between men and women, the association between serum soluble corin and stroke was evaluated in men and women, respectively. Patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke had a significantly lower level of serum soluble corin than healthy controls in men and women (all P values, soluble corin were more likely to have ischemic (odds ratio [OR], 4.90; 95% confidence interval, 2.99-8.03) and hemorrhagic (OR, 17.57; 95% confidence interval, 4.85-63.71) stroke than men in the highest quartile. Women in the lowest quartile of serum soluble corin were also more likely to have ischemic (OR, 3.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-5.44) and hemorrhagic (OR, 8.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.35-31.02) stroke than women in the highest quartile. ORs of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly increased with the decreasing levels of serum soluble corin in men and women (all P values for trend, soluble corin was decreased in patients with stroke compared with healthy controls. Our findings raise the possibility that serum soluble corin may have a pathogenic role in stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Soluble serum Klotho levels in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise Mariager; Pedersen, Susanne Møller; Brasen, Claus Lohman

    2013-01-01

    Klotho concentrations were determined in 120 healthy adults aged 19-66years. Blood samples were collected, and stored sera were assayed for Klotho according to age and gender. In addition several other clinical and laboratory characteristics were determined in the cohort and compared to the levels......OBJECTIVE: Soluble serum Klotho, is a new biomarker linked to chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This study describes the evaluation and comparison of two different immunoassays and establishment of assay specific reference intervals in adults. Design and methods Serum...... of serum Klotho. RESULTS: Serum Klotho levels were significantly higher in time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRF) compared to an ELISA (IBL) and no correlation were found between the assays. No signal was obtained in either assay when the standard curve was switched between the two different...

  4. Serum levels of soluble Fas ligand in patients with silicosis

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    Tomokuni, A; Otsuki, T; Isozaki, Y; Kita, S; Ueki, H; Kusaka, M; Kishimoto, T; Ueki, A

    1999-01-01

    Certain patients with silicosis have been reported to exhibit immunological abnormalities such as the appearance of antinuclear antibodies and the occurrence of autoimmune diseases. Fas ligand (FasL) is a type II membrane protein which induces apoptosis by binding to its membrane receptor, Fas. FasL is converted to a soluble form by a metalloproteinase-like enzyme. We have already found serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels in silicosis patients as well as in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to be significantly higher than those in healthy volunteers. To examine further the role of the Fas/FasL system in silica-induced immunological abnormalities, we investigated serum soluble FasL (sFasL) levels in silicosis patients with no clinical symptoms of autoimmune diseases, using ELISA for sFasL. Although the serum sFasL levels in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those in healthy volunteers and showed a slight positive correlation with serum sFas levels, those in silicosis patients exhibited no significant difference from those in healthy volunteers, and there was no correlation with serum sFas levels. However, sFasL levels were elevated in silicosis patients with slight dyspnoea or normal PCO2 among various clinical parameters of silicosis. It may be speculated that the immunological disturbances presented by the abnormalities of apoptosis-related molecules in silicosis patients do not occur with a similar degree of respiratory involvement. Further studies are required to clarify which kinds of factors are involved in silicosis patients who exhibit immunological abnormalities. PMID:10594565

  5. Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (s-TREM-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (s-TREM-1) from endotracheal aspirates in critically ill patients: A potential marker of the dynamic inflammatory burden of the lower respiratory tract.

  6. Poorly soluble cobalt oxide particles trigger genotoxicity via multiple pathways.

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    Uboldi, Chiara; Orsière, Thierry; Darolles, Carine; Aloin, Valérie; Tassistro, Virginie; George, Isabelle; Malard, Véronique

    2016-02-03

    Poorly soluble cobalt (II, III) oxide particles (Co3O4P) are believed to induce in vitro cytotoxic effects via a Trojan-horse mechanism. Once internalized into lysosomal and acidic intracellular compartments, Co3O4P slowly release a low amount of cobalt ions (Co(2+)) that impair the viability of in vitro cultures. In this study, we focused on the genotoxic potential of Co3O4P by performing a comprehensive investigation of the DNA damage exerted in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that poorly soluble Co3O4P enhanced the formation of micronuclei in binucleated cells. Moreover, by comet assay we showed that Co3O4P induced primary and oxidative DNA damage, and by scoring the formation of γ-H2Ax foci, we demonstrated that Co3O4P also generated double DNA strand breaks. By comparing the effects exerted by poorly soluble Co3O4P with those obtained in the presence of soluble cobalt chloride (CoCl2), we demonstrated that the genotoxic effects of Co3O4P are not simply due to the released Co(2+) but are induced by the particles themselves, as genotoxicity is observed at very low Co3O4P concentrations.

  7. Elevation of serum soluble E-selectin and VCAM-1 in severe asthma

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    Agnes Hamzaoui

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the significance of circulating adhesion molecules associated with leucocyteendothelial cell interactions in asthma, serum levels of soluble E (sE-selectin, soluble P (sP-selectin, soluble L (sL-selectin, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1 were measured in mild, moderate and severe asthma.

  8. High serum soluble CD200 levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

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    Sari, Funda; Gumuslu, Saadet; Cetinkaya, Ramazan; Sarikaya, Metin; Yalcin, Arzu Didem

    2017-04-01

    CD200 is a novel immune-effective molecule, existing in a cell membrane-bound form, as well as in a soluble form in serum, which performs to modulate inflammatory and acquired immune responses. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the development of large renal cysts and progressive loss of renal function. As defects in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells occur in ADPKD, we asked whether serum soluble CD200 might underlie and effect on ADPKD. Serum soluble CD200 levels were measured in 44 patients with ADPKD and 24 healthy volunteers. Concentrations of soluble CD200 in the serum samples were quantified using an ELISA kit. The mean serum soluble CD200 levels were higher in patients with ADPKD than in the control group (71.4±29.2 and 21.4±5.6 pg/mL, psoluble CD200 levels and glomerular filtration rate (r=0.772, psoluble CD200 levels and serum creatinine levels (r=-0.761, psoluble CD200 levels were lower in patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) than in patients with stages 1-2 (psoluble CD200 levels were similar in patients with stages 1-2, 3, and 4 CKD (p>0.05). Our results show that patients with ADPKD have activated soluble CD200 levels which were related to renal function and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 American Federation for Medical Research.

  9. Acid-Triggered Colorimetric Hydrophobic Benzyl Alcohols for Soluble Tag-Assisted Liquid-Phase Synthesis.

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    Okada, Yohei; Wakamatsu, Hiroki; Sugai, Masae; Kauppinen, Esko I; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-04

    Simple screening of acid-triggered reactions of methoxybenzyl alcohols led to the development of a novel colorimetric hydrophobic benzyl alcohol (HBA) tag. HBA tag-3 (14) retained high solubility in less polar solvents and excellent precipitation properties in polar solvents. Our routine procedure for tag-assisted liquid phase peptide synthesis was applied using HBA tag-3 (14), and an effective synthesis of β-sheet breaker peptide iAβ5 (4) was achieved. The tagged peptides showed a vivid blue color under acidic conditions both on TLC plates and in solution, enabling quantitative assay.

  10. Increased serum soluble corin in mid pregnancy is associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

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    Liu, Yan; Hu, Jianwei; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Peipei; Han, Xia; Peng, Hao

    2015-07-01

    The study of soluble corin in the circulation before hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) has been limited. Here we aimed to study serum soluble corin in mid pregnancy in patients with HDP and their age- and gestational weeks-matched controls. Sixty-eight pairs of cases of HDP and controls were studied. Blood samples were obtained in mid pregnancy between 16 and 20 gestational weeks. Serum soluble corin was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. The relationship between serum soluble corin and HDP was examined using conditional logistic regression models. Serum soluble corin in mid pregnancy was increased in cases with HDP compared with controls (median [interquartile range]: 1968 [1644-2332] pg/mL vs. 1700 [1446-2056] pg/mL, p=0.002). Participants were categorized into quartiles of serum soluble corin distributed in controls. Compared with the lowest quartile, participants in the highest quartile had a significantly increased risk for HDP (odds ratio [OR], 4.21; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.31-13.53) after multivariate adjustment. Nevertheless, we did not find a significantly increased risk for participants in the second (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 0.44-7.02) and third (OR, 2.80; 95% CI, 0.70-11.18) quartiles. Then the first three quartiles were merged as a reference group to calculate the OR of HDP for participants in the highest quartile and we found a significantly increased risk for HDP in individuals in the highest quartile (OR, 2.28, 95% CI, 1.02-5.06). Increased serum soluble corin in mid pregnancy was associated with an increased risk for HDP. Our findings suggest that increased serum soluble corin in mid pregnancy could be an indicator for HDP.

  11. SERUM SOLUBLE E CADHERIN LEVEL IN PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅晨薇; 郎景和

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To investigate the serum sE cadherin level in patients with endometriosis and the alterations of that level in healthy control during the menstrual cycle.Methods.Thirty two patients with endometriosis and 30 healthy women were tested for serum sE cadherin levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Results.The serum sE cadherin levels in healthy control did not vary throughout the menstrual cycle,which were lower than those in patients with endometriosis.Conclusions.E cadherin might be involved in endometrial shedding during menstruation in endometriosis patients.The serum sE cadherin assay might be helpful as a serum marker for the diagnosis and management of endometriosis.

  12. The serum concentration of soluble interleukin-2 receptor in patients with Kawasaki disease.

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    Teraura, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Minami, Takaomi; Takeshima, Taro; Shimooki, Osamu; Kajii, Eiji

    2017-03-01

    Kawasaki disease is a febrile disease of childhood that is associated with increased inflammatory cytokines and immunoregulatory abnormalities. While the serum concentrations of soluble IL-2 receptor can change under such pathologies, the relevance of the soluble IL-2 receptor concentration in patients with Kawasaki disease has not been specified. We aimed to summarize the existing studies that reported the soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations in patients with Kawasaki disease. Original articles that were published up to July 2016 were collected using a PubMed/Medline-based search engine. A total of nine articles that reported the serum soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations in acute-phase Kawasaki disease were eligible. All of the articles described a high soluble IL-2 receptor concentration in patients with Kawasaki disease relative to the level of controls or the reference range. Two of five articles on patients with coronary artery aneurysms described a significantly higher soluble IL-2 receptor concentration in patients with coronary artery aneurysms than patients without. Two articles on patients with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy described a significant decrease of the soluble IL-2 receptor concentration after the therapy. Accordingly, the serum soluble IL-2 receptor can be a potent marker of disease activity and therapeutic effects in patients with Kawasaki disease; further studies are thus warranted for its use in the clinical setting.

  13. Soluble Serum CD81 Is Elevated in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C and Correlates with Alanine Aminotransferase Serum Activity

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    Welker, Martin-Walter; Reichert, David; Susser, Simone; Sarrazin, Christoph; Martinez, Yolanda; Herrmann, Eva; Zeuzem, Stefan; Piiper, Albrecht; Kronenberger, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Aim Cellular CD81 is a well characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry factor, while the relevance of soluble exosomal CD81 in HCV pathogenesis is poorly defined. We performed a case-control study to investigate whether soluble CD81 in the exosomal serum fraction is associated with HCV replication and inflammatory activity. Patients and Methods Four cohorts were investigated, patients with chronic hepatitis C (n = 37), patients with chronic HCV infection and persistently normal ALT levels (n = 24), patients with long term sustained virologic response (SVR, n = 7), and healthy volunteers (n = 23). Concentration of soluble CD81 was assessed semi-quantitatively after differential centrifugation ranging from 200 g to 100,000 g in the fifth centrifugation fraction by immunoblotting and densitometry. Results Soluble CD81 was increased in patients with chronic hepatitis C compared to healthy subjects (p = 0.03) and cured patients (p = 0.017). Patients with chronic HCV infection and persistently normal ALT levels and patients with long term SVR had similar soluble CD81 levels as healthy controls (p>0.2). Overall, soluble CD81 levels were associated with ALT levels (r = 0.334, p = 0.016) and severe liver fibrosis (p = 0.027). Conclusion CD81 is increased in the exosomal serum fraction in patients with chronic hepatitis C and appears to be associated with inflammatory activity and severity of fibrosis. PMID:22355327

  14. Differential solubility of curcuminoids in serum and albumin solutions: implications for analytical and therapeutic applications

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    Quitschke Wolfgang W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercially available curcumin preparations contain a mixture of related polyphenols, collectively referred to as curcuminoids. These encompass the primary component curcumin along with its co-purified derivatives demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin. Curcuminoids have numerous biological activities, including inhibition of cancer related cell proliferation and reduction of amyloid plaque formation associated with Alzheimer disease. Unfortunately, the solubility of curcuminoids in aqueous solutions is exceedingly low. This restricts their systemic availability in orally administered formulations and limits their therapeutic potential. Results Methods are described that achieve high concentrations of soluble curcuminoids in serum. Solid curcuminoids were either mixed directly with serum, or they were predissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and added as aliquots to serum. Both methods resulted in high levels of curcuminoid-solubility in mammalian sera from different species. However, adding aliquots of dimethyl sulfoxide-dissolved curcuminoids to serum proved to be more efficient, producing soluble curcuminoid concentrations of at least 3 mM in human serum. The methods also resulted in the differential solubility of individual curcuminoids in serum. The addition of dimethyl sulfoxide-dissolved curcuminoids to serum preferentially solubilized curcumin, whereas adding solid curcuminoids predominantly solubilized bisdemethoxycurcumin. Either method of solubilization was equally effective in inhibiting dose-dependent HeLa cell proliferation in culture. The maximum concentration of curcuminoids achieved in serum was at least 100-fold higher than that required for inhibiting cell proliferation in culture and 1000-fold higher than the concentration that has been reported to prevent amyloid plaque formation associated with Alzheimer disease. Curcuminoids were also highly soluble in solutions of purified albumin, a major component of

  15. Serum Soluble Corin Deficiency Predicts Major Disability within 3 Months after Acute Stroke

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    Zhu, Fangfang; Shi, Jijun; Han, Xiujie; Zhou, Dan; Zhi, Zhongwen; Zhang, Fuding; Shen, Yun; Ma, Juanjuan; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Serum soluble corin has been associated with stroke. However, whether it is associated with stroke prognosis has not yet been studied. Therefore, we aimed to study the association of serum soluble corin with risk of poor outcomes within 3 months after stroke. Methods We followed 522 stroke patients for 3 months to identify major disability, death and vascular events. Serum soluble corin was measured at baseline for all participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of baseline serum soluble corin with outcomes of stroke, adjusting for age, sex, baseline NIHSS score, hours from onset to hospitalization, smoking, drinking, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation, family history of stroke, and stroke subtype. Results Patients with high corin had a significantly lower crude risk for the composite outcome of major disability or death (OR = 0.64, 95%CI: 0.43–0.96) than patients with low corin (the lowest tertile). After adjustment for age and baseline NIHSS score, patients with high corin still had a significantly lower risk for the composite outcome of major disability or death (OR = 0.60, 95%CI: 0.36–0.99). This association became bottom line significant after additionally adjusting for other conventional factors (OR = 0.61, P = 0.058). No association was found between serum soluble corin and other composite outcomes. Conclusion Serum soluble corin deficiency predicted risk for major disability within 3 months after stroke, independent of baseline neurological deficient. Our results may indicate a probable role of corin in stroke prognosis. PMID:27658255

  16. Association between serum soluble corin and hyperglycaemia: a cross-sectional study among Chinese adults.

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    Liu, Yan; Peng, Hao; Zhang, Qiu; Zhang, Peipei; Tian, Yunfan; Chao, Xiangqin; Zhang, Yonghong

    2015-12-23

    Decreased natriuretic peptides are risk factors for diabetes. As a physiological activator of natriuretic peptides, corin may play a role in glucose metabolism. Here, we aimed to test the hypothesis in a general population of China. Cross-sectional study. A population study in Suzhou, China. A total of 2498 participants aged above 30 years were included in the study. The association between serum soluble corin and hyperglycaemia was examined in men and women, using non-conditional logistic regression models, respectively. Serum soluble corin, in men and women, was significantly higher in participants with hyperglycaemia than in those without (all psoluble corin quartiles, in men (p for trend soluble corin, in men (OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.23) and women (OR=1.27, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.61), over the median level, were more likely to have hyperglycaemia compared with the remaining participants, after controlling for confounding factors. Hyperglycaemia was significantly and positively associated with increased serum soluble corin in men and women. Our findings suggest that serum soluble corin may be a risk factor or a biomarker of hyperglycaemia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor and soluble CD8 molecules in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, P B; Soscia, E; Iacovitti, B; Pellicano, M; D'Antonio, A; Provitera, V; Perrella, O

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) and soluble CD8 (sCD8) molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of 18 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and of 16 with noninflammatory neurologic diseases (NIND). All MS patients suffered from an exacerbation of the relapsing-remitting form of the disease within one month before examination. The mean serum levels of sIL-2R and sCD8 in the MS patients were not significantly different from those of NIND patients. Only one patient with MS had detectable sIL-2R in the CSF. CSF sCD8 was detectable in 10 of 18 MS patients and in 1 of 16 NIND patients. Our data indicate that the CSF and serum sIL-2R concentrations do not correlate with the disease activity. Conversely, increased levels of sCD8 only in the CSF of MS patients support the hypothesis of an intrathecal activation of CD8+ cells in MS. We think that CSF sCD8 can be a useful marker for the presence of activated T cells in the central nervous system.

  18. Investigation of the solubility and the potentials for purification of serum amyloid A (SAA) from equine acute phase serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michelle Brønniche; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Jacobsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    for purification of equine SAA based on biochemical properties.Freeze dried equine acute phase serum was dissolved in 70% 2-propanol, 8 M urea, and milli-Q water, respectively. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), size-exclusive chromatography (FPLC-SEC), and preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF) were performed...... in the attempt to purify. Immunostaining of IEF blots were used for isoform-specific detection of SAA in the preparations and purity was assessed by silverstained SDS-PAGE. FINDINGS: SAA was soluble in 70% 2-propanol, 8 M urea and Milli-Q water. SAA was not separated in the lipophilic or ampipathic fractions...... following SFE. SAA was included in a FPLC-SEC-fraction of 237 kDa, despite the molecular weight known to be much smaller, suggesting binding to other serum constituents. SAA precipitated following separation of other serum proteins by preparative IEF. DISCUSSION: No effective purification of SAA...

  19. Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 as a Novel Marker for Abdominal Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaofei; Song, Yucheng; Zhang, Xuedong; Xue, Huanzhou

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the concentration and diagnostic significance of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) in acute abdominal conditions. Plasma specimens were obtained from 68 patients with abdominal sepsis, 60 patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and 60 healthy individuals. The sepsis group was divided into the survival and death groups according to the 28-d outcome. Plasma sTREM-1, procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count were measured. A receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was used to compare the diagnostic values of sTREM-1, PCT, CRP, and WBC count. In addition, the correlation between plasma sTREM-1 and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score in the sepsis group was assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. The plasma concentration of sTREM-1 in the sepsis group was significantly higher than that in the SIRS and healthy groups (both p sepsis vs. SIRS showed that the area under the curve of sTREM-1 (0.82) was greater than that of PCT (0.77), CRP (0.72), and WBC count (0.70). Additionally, in the sepsis group, the plasma sTREM-1 concentration correlated positively with the APACHE II score (r = 0.41; p sepsis.

  20. Diagnostic value of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells in paediatric sepsis: a systematic review.

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    Pontrelli, Giuseppe; De Crescenzo, Franco; Buzzetti, Roberto; Calò Carducci, Francesca; Jenkner, Alessandro; Amodio, Donato; De Luca, Maia; Chiurchiù, Sara; Davies, Elin Haf; Simonetti, Alessandra; Ferretti, Elena; Della Corte, Martina; Gramatica, Luca; Livadiotti, Susanna; Rossi, Paolo

    2016-04-27

    Differential diagnosis between sepsis and non-infectious inflammatory disorders demands improved biomarkers. Soluble Triggering Receptor Expression on Myeloid cells (sTREM-1) is an activating receptor whose role has been studied throughout the last decade. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the accuracy of plasma sTREM-1 levels in the diagnosis of sepsis in children with Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS). A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and ISI Web of Knowledge databases was performed using specific search terms. Studies were included if they assessed the diagnostic accuracy of plasma sTREM-1 for sepsis in paediatric patients with SIRS. Data on sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, area under receiver operating characteristic curve were extracted. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using a checklist based on the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies. Nine studies comprising 961 patients were included, four of which were in newborns, three in children and two in children with febrile neutropenia. Some data from single studies support a role of sTREM-1 as a diagnostic tool in pediatric sepsis, but cannot be considered conclusive, because a quantitative synthesis was not possible, due to heterogeneity in studies design. This systematic review suggests that available data are insufficient to support a role for sTREM in the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric sepsis.

  1. High serum soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Funda; Inci, Ayca; Dolu, Suleyman; Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Cetinkaya, Ramazan; Ersoy, Fettah Fevzi

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to determine fibroblast growth factor-23 and soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. A total of 76 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and 32 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Serum fibroblast growth factor-23 and soluble α-Klotho levels were measured with ELISA kits. Parathyroid hormone, phosphate, calcium, creatinine, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels, urinary protein to creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate were also measured or calculated. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease had significantly higher serum parathyroid hormone (psoluble α-Klotho levels (p=0.001) and lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels (psoluble α-Klotho and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were similar in all five chronic kidney disease stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (p>0.05). Fibroblast growth factor-23 (r=-0.251, p=0.034) and soluble α-Klotho levels (r=-0.251, p=0.034) were found to be negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. This study shows increased fibroblast growth factor-23 levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease which is in harmony with the general trend in patients with chronic kidney disease of other aetiologies, but, unlike them, also a significant increase in serum soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease suggesting an aberrant production or a decreased clearance of α-Klotho molecule. Considering the unique increases in erythropoietin levels due to erythropoietin production in renal cysts, we assume, patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may potentially have different soluble α-Klotho production/clearance characteristics than the patients with other parenchymal renal diseases. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  4. Elevated levels of soluble urokinase receptor in serum from mycobacteria infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Ravn, P; Hoyer-Hansen, G

    2006-01-01

    In search for a serological marker, which may be used to monitor treatment efficacy in patients with extra-pulmonary mycobacterial infections, serum samples were collected prospectively from patients during a 6-months treatment period. The levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator......). suPAR levels were elevated to more than double (median 7.7 ng/ml, range 5.6-25.8) compared to levels previously reported for patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. The serum suPAR levels however remained high during the entire treatment period. This may reflect that significant inflammatory activity...

  5. Liver and serum soluble protein changes and pathomorphology in undernourished mice with acute Schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eridan M. Coutinho

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Body, liver and spleen weights; histopathology of the liver, spleen and intestines; hepatic and serum soluble proteins changes were the parameters studied in undernourished Swiss albino mice experimentally infected with S. mansoni. Non-infected deficient animab had lower liver/body weight and spleen/body weight ratios as compared to the controls (22.60% casein group. Infected mice showed higher values regardless the type of diet. Undernourished infected subgroup showed a persistent exudative periovular reaction in the liver. Soluble hepatic proteins content and serum protein fractions appeared to be lower in the deficient infected mice. A significant difference was detected in the gammaglobulin fraction between infected and non-infected animals fed the control diet with higher values for the former. Our data suggest that the effects of malnutrition, per se, are sometimes more detrimental to the host than those due to Manson 's schistosomiasis.

  6. Triggers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breitbarth, A.; van Riemsdijk, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of 'trigger' is a core concept of Chomsky's Minimalist Program. The idea that certain types of movement are triggered by some property of the target position is at least as old as the notion that the movement of noun phrases to the subject position is triggered by their need to receive

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  9. Efficient approach to enhance drug solubility by particle engineering of bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoder, Mouhamad; Abdelkader, Hamdy; ElShaer, Amr; Karam, Ayman; Najlah, Mohammad; Alany, Raid G

    2016-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a solubility enhancer for indometacin (IND) as a model drug. IND-BSA solid dispersions were prepared by both spray drying and freeze drying techniques using IND:BSA solution (20:1 Molar Ratio (MR)) and IND:BSA suspension (100:1 MR). The solid state of IND in solid dispersions was characterised by SEM, DSC and XRD. The aqueous solubility of IND in the presence of increased amounts of BSA was evaluated. Additionally, IND dissolution and release profiles were evaluated. IND in solid dispersions with BSA showed significantly higher solubility in water than that of the physical mixture of both. Enhancement factors of 24,000 and 100,000 were obtained for the solid dispersion formulated in 20:1 MR and 100:1 MR, respectively. Dissolution studies in-vitro indicated a significant increase in the dissolution rate of IND from solid dispersions compared to that of the free drug, with almost 95% of the drug dissolved in the first 5min. Furthermore, an immediate release of IND from BSA solid dispersions was shown. The potential use of albumin as solubility enhancer for poorly soluble drugs, particularly, for immediate release volume-limited dosage forms is reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Serum Soluble (ProRenin Receptor Levels in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Amari

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor [(PRR] is cleaved by furin to generate soluble (PRR [s(PRR], which reflects the status of the tissue renin-angiotensin system. Hemodialysis patients have advanced atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between serum s(PRR levels and background factors, including indices of atherosclerosis, in hemodialysis patients. Serum s(PRR levels were measured in hemodialysis patients and clearance of s(PRR through the membrane of the dialyzer was examined. Furthermore, relationships between serum s(PRR levels and background factors were assessed. Serum s(PRR levels were significantly higher in hemodialysis patients (30.4 ± 6.1 ng/ml, n = 258 than those in subjects with normal renal function (21.4 ± 6.2 ng/ml, n = 39, P < 0.0001. Clearance of s(PRR and creatinine were 56.9 ± 33.5 and 147.6 ± 9.50 ml/min, respectively. Serum s(PRR levels were significantly higher in those with ankle-brachial index (ABI of < 0.9, an indicator of severe atherosclerosis, than those with ABI of ≥ 0.9 (32.2 ± 5.9 and 30.1 ± 6.2 ng/ml, respectively, P < 0.05. An association between low ABI and high serum s(PRR levels was observed even after correction for age, history of smoking, HbA1c, and LDL-C. Serum s(PRR levels were significantly higher in hemodialysis patients when compared with subjects with normal renal function, although s(PRR is dialyzed to some extent, but to a lesser extent than creatinine. High serum s(PRR levels may be associated with atherosclerosis independent of other risk factors, suggesting that serum s(PRR could be used as a marker for atherosclerotic conditions in hemodialysis patients.

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  12. Serum levels of total IgE and soluble CD23 in bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Di Lorenzo

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare, during the pollen season, serum levels of total IgE and soluble CD23 (sCD23 from patients with allergic bronchial asthma, with those from healthy subjects. Significantly higher levels of total IgE and sCD23 were found in patients with asthma compared to the control group. Both in normal controls and in asthmatic patients, a significant correlation was shown between the levels of these two molecules. In asthmatic patients, significant correlations were found for both total IgE and sCD23, with lung function measured as bronchial responsiveness to inhaled methacholine. These results suggest that in asthmatic patients, in addition to the study of total serum IgE levels, the assessment of sCD23 serum levels may be helpful in the evaluation of disease activity.

  13. Determination of water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins in tears and blood serum of infants and parents by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksari, Maryam; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Ruan, Chunhai; Kennedy, Robert T; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2017-02-01

    Tears serve as a viable diagnostic fluid with advantages including less invasive sample to collect and less complex to prepare for analysis. Several water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins were detected and quantified in human tears and compared with blood serum levels. Samples from 15 family pairs, each pair consisting of a four-month-old infant and one parent were analyzed; vitamin concentrations were compared between tears and blood serum for individual subjects, between infants and parents, and against self-reported dietary intakes. Water-soluble vitamins B1, B2, B3 (nicotinamide), B5, B9 and fat-soluble vitamin E (α-tocopherol) were routinely detected in tears and blood serum while fat-soluble vitamin A (retinol) was detected only in blood serum. Water-soluble vitamin concentrations measured in tears and blood serum of single subjects were comparable, while higher concentrations were measured in infants compared to their parents. Fat-soluble vitamin E concentrations were lower in tears than blood serum with no significant difference between infants and parents. Serum vitamin A concentrations were higher in parents than infants. Population trends were compiled and quantified using a cross correlation factor. Strong positive correlations were found between tear and blood serum concentrations of vitamin E from infants and parents and vitamin B3 concentrations from parents, while slight positive correlations were detected for infants B3 and parents B1 and B2 concentrations. Correlations between infants and parents were found for the concentrations of B1, B2, B3, and E in tears, and the concentrations of B2, A, and E in blood serum. Stronger vitamin concentration correlations were found between infants and parents for the breast-fed infants, while no significant difference was observed between breast-fed and bottle-fed infants. This work is the first to demonstrate simultaneous vitamin A, B, and E detection and to quantify correlations between vitamin

  14. Increased serum concentrations of soluble ST2 are associated with pulmonary complications and mortality in polytraumatized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Thomas; Simader, Elisabeth; Hacker, Philipp; Ankersmit, Hendrik J; Heinz, Thomas; Hajdu, Stefan; Negrin, Lukas L

    2018-01-17

    We sought to evaluate the role of soluble ST2 (suppression of tumorigenicity) serum concentrations in polytraumatized patients and its potential role as biomarker for pulmonary complications. We included severely injured patients (injury severity score≥16) admitted to our level I trauma center and analyzed serum samples obtained on the day of admission and on day 2. Furthermore, patients with isolated thoracic injury and healthy probands were included and served as control groups. Serum samples were analyzed for soluble ST2 concentrations with a commercially available ELISA kit. A total of 130 patients were included in the present study. Five patients with isolated thoracic injury and eight healthy probands were further included. Serum analyses revealed significantly elevated concentrations of soluble ST2 in polytraumatized patients compared to patients suffering from isolated thoracic trauma and healthy probands. In polytraumatized patients who developed pulmonary complications (acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia) and in patients who died, significantly higher serum concentrations of soluble ST2 were found on day 2 (psoluble ST2 on day 2 were of prognostic value to predict pulmonary complications in polytraumatized patients (area under the curve=0.720, 95% confidence interval=0.623-0.816). Concomitant thoracic trauma had no further impact on serum concentrations of soluble ST2. Serum concentrations of soluble ST2 are upregulated following polytrauma. Increased concentrations were associated with worse outcome.

  15. Serum Soluble (Pro)Renin Receptor Levels in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Yoshifumi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Nakajima, Fumitaka; Ando, Takashi; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is cleaved by furin to generate soluble (P)RR [s(P)RR], which reflects the status of the tissue renin-angiotensin system. Hemodialysis patients have advanced atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between serum s(P)RR levels and background factors, including indices of atherosclerosis, in hemodialysis patients. Serum s(P)RR levels were measured in hemodialysis patients and clearance of s(P)RR through the membrane of the dialyzer was examined. Furthermore, relationships between serum s(P)RR levels and background factors were assessed. Serum s(P)RR levels were significantly higher in hemodialysis patients (30.4 ± 6.1 ng/ml, n = 258) than those in subjects with normal renal function (21.4 ± 6.2 ng/ml, n = 39, P ankle-brachial index (ABI) of hemodialysis patients when compared with subjects with normal renal function, although s(P)RR is dialyzed to some extent, but to a lesser extent than creatinine. High serum s(P)RR levels may be associated with atherosclerosis independent of other risk factors, suggesting that serum s(P)RR could be used as a marker for atherosclerotic conditions in hemodialysis patients.

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  18. Relationship of serum soluble CD40 ligand and interleukin-18 levels in patients with cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship of serum soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L and interleukin- 18 (IL-18 levels in patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 70 patients with cerebral infarction treated in our hospital from May 2012 to December 2014 were selected as the cerebral infarction group of the research, 70 cases of healthy volunteers receiving physical examination in Physical Examination Center of our hospital during the same period were included in the health group of the research. Serum was separated to detect sCD40L, IL- 18, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CD11b, CD18, MMP10, ADAM17 and ADAMTS12 contents, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated to detect CD40, CD40L, NLRP3, ASC and Caspase-1 contents. Results: sCD40L, IL-18, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CD11b, CD18, MMP10, ADAM17 and ADAMTS12 contents in serum as well as CD40, CD40L, NLRP3, ASC and Caspase-1 expression levels in peripheral blood of cerebral infarction group were significantly higher than those of health group; the more severe the neurologic impairment in patients with cerebral infarction, the higher the sCD40L and IL-18 contents in serum as well as the CD40, CD40L, NLRP3, ASC and Caspase-1 expression levels in peripheral blood; serum ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CD11b, CD18, MMP10, ADAM17 and ADAMTS-12 contents in cerebral infarction patients with high levels of sCD40L and IL-18 were significantly higher than those in low level group. Conclusions: Increased serum soluble CD40 ligand and interleukin-18 levels are related to the occurrence of cerebral infarction and disease severity.

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  1. Biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate with different morphologies and polymorphs in the presence of bovine serum albumin and soluble starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxi; Chen, Yuping; Huang, Xuechen; Wu, Gang

    2017-10-01

    Calcium carbonate has been synthesized by the reaction of Na2CO3 and CaCl2 in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and soluble starch. Effects of various bovine serum albumin (BSA) and soluble starch on the polymorph and morphology of CaCO3 crystals were investigated. Crystallization of vaterite is favored in the presence of BSA and soluble starch, respectively, while calcite is favored in the presence of a mixture of BSA and soluble starch. The morphologies of CaCO3 particles in the presence of mixture of BSA and soluble starch are mainly rod-like, suggesting that the BSA, soluble and their assemblies play key roles in stabilizing and directing the CaCO3 crystal growth. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  3. Elevated serum levels of soluble CD154 in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeft Andrew S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Cytokines play important roles in mediating inflammation in autoimmunity. Several cytokines are elevated in serum and synovial fluid samples from children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA. Soluble CD154 (sCD154 is elevated in other autoimmune disorders, but has not been characterized in JIA. Our objectives were to determine if sCD154 is elevated in JIA, and to examine correlations between sCD154 and other inflammatory cytokines. Methods Serum from 77 children with JIA and 81 pediatric controls was analyzed for interleukin (IL1β, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL12, IL13, sCD154, interferon-γ (IFNγ, soluble IL2 receptor (sIL2R, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, using the Luminex Multi-Analyte Profiling system. Differences in levels of cytokines between cases and controls were analyzed. Logistic regression was also performed. Results sCD154 was significantly elevated in cases compared to controls (p Conclusion Serum levels of sCD154, IL1β, IL6, IL8, sIL2R and TNFα are elevated in most JIA subtypes, suggesting a major role for sCD154, and these cytokines and cytokine receptors in the pathogenesis of JIA.

  4. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  5. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  7. Detection of serum soluble markers of immune activation in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kogure

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The mutual correlation among soluble CD4 (sCD4, soluble CD8 (sCD8, and soluble CD23 (sCD23 has not yet been studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, although previous studies have demonstrated that certain soluble markers of immune activation are elevated in RA. Thus, we examined this correlation based on the serum levels of sCD4, sCD8 and sCD23, and that of their levels with other serum markers such as immunoglobulin (Ig subtypes (IgG, IgM and IgA, IgM-rheumatoid factor (IgM-RF and C-reactive protein (CRP in 25 RA patients, sCD4 was not elevated, whereas both sCD8 and sCD23 increased in RA patients compared with the healthy controls; a majority of RA patients, in particular, showed a high sCD23 level. The level of sCD23 showed a correlation with that of IgM-RF, but not with those of IgG, IgM, IgA and CRP. Importantly, a high level of sCD23 was not always accompartied with that of sCD8. The independent change between sCD23 and sCD8 levels was also observed in a one-year follow-up study of the two RA patients. These findings indicate that B cells might be generally activated in RA, whereas T-cell activation in variable in each patient with RA, suggesting that sCD23 is a more indicative marker for the immune status of RA patients than sCD8 from the clinical aspects.

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  9. Serum soluble markers in the evaluation of treatment in human visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriefer, A; Barral, A; Carvalho, E M; Barral-Netto, M

    1995-12-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has a fatal course if not properly treated. Recovery from VL is linked to cellular immune response. Unresponsiveness to antimonial therapy reinforces the importance of determining parameters for treatment assessment. We analysed the pre- and post-treatment serum levels of soluble CD4 (sCD4), sCD8, sIL-2R, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and neopterin in groups of VL patients either responsive or not to standard antimonial therapy. Pretreatment serum levels of all markers except for sICAM-1 were significantly higher in VL patients than in healthy subjects from the same area (P antimonial therapy (P = 0.25), but significantly higher in patients responsive to treatment (P = 0.02). The comparison of pre- and post-treatment concentrations showed that all markers, except sCD4 and sICAM-1, presented a significant fall (P antimonial therapy. However, only neopterin presented with levels compatible with those of healthy subjects at the end of treatment (P = 0.30). In refractory patients sICAM-1 presented with post-treatment levels significantly higher than the pretreatment determinations (P = 0.03), while sCD4 experienced a significant drop (P = 0.01). All markers displayed clearly distinct behaviour according to the patient's response to therapy. This makes all soluble molecules studied suitable for use as indicators of antimonial therapy response. Additionally the comparison of pretreatment levels of the markers between responders and refractory patients to antimonial therapy showed that serum concentrations of sIL-2R and sICAM-1 significantly differed among these two groups (P = 0.02 in each case), suggesting that they may be used in future as predictors of antimonial therapy response.

  10. Serum soluble markers in the evaluation of treatment in human visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriefer, A; Barral, A; Carvalho, E M; Barral-Netto, M

    1995-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has a fatal course if not properly treated. Recovery from VL is linked to cellular immune response. Unresponsiveness to antimonial therapy reinforces the importance of determining parameters for treatment assessment. We analysed the pre- and post-treatment serum levels of soluble CD4 (sCD4), sCD8, sIL-2R, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and neopterin in groups of VL patients either responsive or not to standard antimonial therapy. Pretreatment serum levels of all markers except for sICAM-1 were significantly higher in VL patients than in healthy subjects from the same area (P antimonial therapy (P = 0.25), but significantly higher in patients responsive to treatment (P = 0.02). The comparison of pre- and post-treatment concentrations showed that all markers, except sCD4 and sICAM-1, presented a significant fall (P antimonial therapy. However, only neopterin presented with levels compatible with those of healthy subjects at the end of treatment (P = 0.30). In refractory patients sICAM-1 presented with post-treatment levels significantly higher than the pretreatment determinations (P = 0.03), while sCD4 experienced a significant drop (P = 0.01). All markers displayed clearly distinct behaviour according to the patient's response to therapy. This makes all soluble molecules studied suitable for use as indicators of antimonial therapy response. Additionally the comparison of pretreatment levels of the markers between responders and refractory patients to antimonial therapy showed that serum concentrations of sIL-2R and sICAM-1 significantly differed among these two groups (P = 0.02 in each case), suggesting that they may be used in future as predictors of antimonial therapy response. PMID:8536369

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Document Server

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  14. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  16. Use of plasma C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, neutrophils,macrophage migration inhibitory factor, soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 in combination to diagnose infections: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Andersen, Ove; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    department and department of infectious diseases at a university hospital. A multiplex immunoassay measuring soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator (suPAR) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM)-1 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was used in parallel...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  20. Data representing two separate LC-MS methods for detection and quantification of water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins in tears and blood serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khaksari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Two separate liquid chromatography (LC-mass spectrometry (MS methods were developed for determination and quantification of water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins in human tear and blood serum samples. The water-soluble vitamin method was originally developed to detect vitamins B1, B2, B3 (nicotinamide, B5, B6 (pyridoxine, B7, B9 and B12 while the fat-soluble vitamin method detected vitamins A, D3, 25(OHD3, E and K1. These methods were then validated with tear and blood serum samples. In this data in brief article, we provide details on the two LC-MS methods development, methods sensitivity, as well as precision and accuracy for determination of vitamins in human tears and blood serum. These methods were then used to determine the vitamin concentrations in infant and parent samples under a clinical study which were reported in "Determination of Water-Soluble and Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Tears and Blood Serum of Infants and Parents by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry DOI:10.1016/j.exer.2016.12.007 [1]". This article provides more details on comparison of vitamin concentrations in the samples with the ranges reported in the literature along with the medically accepted normal ranges. The details on concentrations below the limits of detection (LOD and limits of quantification (LOQ are also discussed. Vitamin concentrations were also compared and cross-correlated with clinical data and nutritional information. Significant differences and strongly correlated data were reported in [1]. This article provides comprehensive details on the data with slight differences or slight correlations.

  1. Data representing two separate LC-MS methods for detection and quantification of water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins in tears and blood serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksari, Maryam; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Ruan, Chunhai; Kennedy, Robert T; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2017-04-01

    Two separate liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS) methods were developed for determination and quantification of water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins in human tear and blood serum samples. The water-soluble vitamin method was originally developed to detect vitamins B1, B2, B3 (nicotinamide), B5, B6 (pyridoxine), B7, B9 and B12 while the fat-soluble vitamin method detected vitamins A, D3, 25(OH)D3, E and K1. These methods were then validated with tear and blood serum samples. In this data in brief article, we provide details on the two LC-MS methods development, methods sensitivity, as well as precision and accuracy for determination of vitamins in human tears and blood serum. These methods were then used to determine the vitamin concentrations in infant and parent samples under a clinical study which were reported in "Determination of Water-Soluble and Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Tears and Blood Serum of Infants and Parents by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry DOI:10.1016/j.exer.2016.12.007 [1]". This article provides more details on comparison of vitamin concentrations in the samples with the ranges reported in the literature along with the medically accepted normal ranges. The details on concentrations below the limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) are also discussed. Vitamin concentrations were also compared and cross-correlated with clinical data and nutritional information. Significant differences and strongly correlated data were reported in [1]. This article provides comprehensive details on the data with slight differences or slight correlations.

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  3. Does serum lactate combined with soluble endothelial selectins at ICU admission predict sepsis development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Alice G; Mastora, Zafeiria; Jahaj, Edison; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine for serum lactate its specificity and sensitivity in sepsis development prognosis in critically-ill, non-septic patients. Additionally, we evaluated whether sE-selectin or sP-selectin add prognostic value to lactate in sepsis. Using a cohort previously studied in another context, in this retrospective investigation we plotted receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves using sepsis development as the classification variable and serum lactate levels and their linear combinations with soluble sE-selectin and/or sP-selectin levels at intensive care unit (ICU) admission, as prognostic variables. Lactate levels combined with sE- and sP-selectin levels have the best prognostic accuracy showing a sensitivity and specificity of 76% and 84%, respectively, and an area under the curve (AUC) at 0.854 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.775-0.932; p<0.001). In our patient cohort, combining sE- and sP-selectin with serum lactate offers better prognostic value for sepsis development during ICU hospitalization. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of menstrual cycle and oral contraceptive use on serum levels of lipid-soluble antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, Prabhudas R; Magneson, Amy T; Castillo, Monique; Dunne, James; Mikhail, Magdy S

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of menstrual cycle and oral contraceptive use on serum levels of lipid-soluble antioxidants. In this cross-section study, nonfasting blood samples were collected twice from 10 healthy premenopausal women during the follicular phase (between days 8 and 11) and the luteal phase (between days 18 and 22) of their same menstrual cycle. In addition, blood samples from 15 premenopausal women who used oral contraceptive for at least 6 months and 40 women who did not use oral contraceptive were collected randomly at any day of the menstrual cycle. Serum levels of coenzyme Q10, alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and lycopene were determined using high pressure liquid chromatography. Serum coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly lower during the follicular phase compared with the luteal phase of the same menstrual cycle (P < .05). Oral contraceptive use also significantly decreased coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol (P < .001). Other antioxidant levels were comparable. Alterations in coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol levels during the menstrual cycle and in oral contraceptive users should be taken into consideration, concerning the future antioxidant research in premenopausal women. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential role of endogenous and exogenous ovarian hormones on oxidative stress in women.

  5. Multiple Soluble TGF-β Receptors in Addition to Soluble Endoglin Are Elevated in Preeclamptic Serum and They Synergistically Inhibit TGF-β Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Min; Walton, Kelly; Harrison, Craig; Nie, Guiying

    2017-08-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) can be classified into early-onset (34 weeks of gestation) subtypes. Soluble endoglin, an auxiliary receptor for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β ligands, is increased in PE circulation and believed to inhibit TGF-β action by sequestering the ligands. However, soluble endoglin, with a low affinity to TGF-β ligands, has been demonstrated to have little effect by itself on TGF-β action. We examined whether multiple soluble TGF-β receptors are elevated in PE circulation and whether they synergistically block TGF-β signaling. TGF-β receptors were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera collected from preeclamptic pregnancies and gestation-age-matched controls. TGF-β signaling was assessed using an in vitro bioassay and a tube formation assay. TGF-β type I, II, and III receptors were all identified in pregnant serum; all were substantially elevated in early-onset but not late-onset PE. Endoglin was increased in both subtypes. At the greatest concentrations detected in PE, none of these soluble TGF-β receptors alone, including endoglin, inhibited TGF-β signaling. However, when all four soluble receptors were present, signaling of both TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 was substantially reduced. Removal of any one of these soluble receptors alleviated TGF-β1 inhibition; however, removal of soluble TGFβRIII was necessary to relieve TGF-β2 inhibition. Multiple soluble TGF-β receptors are present in pregnant circulation and elevated in early-onset PE; they synergistically inhibit TGF-β signaling, which might be more likely to occur in early-onset than late-onset PE. Reducing soluble TGFβRIII, rather than endoglin, would be more effective in alleviating the inhibition of both TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 signaling in PE.

  6. Soluble HLA-DR serum levels are associated with smoking but not with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolva, Johanna; Paakkanen, Riitta; Jarva, Hanna; Pussinen, Pirkko; Havulinna, Aki S; Salomaa, Veikko; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa

    2017-09-21

    Elevated soluble HLA-DR (sHLA-DR) serum levels have been reported in HLA class II-associated inflammatory disorders. We have previously shown that the HLA class II allele HLA-DRB1*01 may predispose to acute coronary syndromes (ACS). To our knowledge, sHLA-DR serum levels have not been studied in ACS. sHLA-DR serum levels were measured in 477 ACS patients as cases and 475 area- and sex-matched controls by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binary logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression analyses adjusted for clinical parameters were conducted to evaluate the associations of sHLA-DR levels. ACS patients had lower sHLA-DR serum levels compared to controls (OR = 0.837; 95% CI = 0.704-0.994; p = 0.043). After adjustment for smoking status, this association was no longer significant. This was explained by the notion that current smoking was inversely associated with sHLA-DR levels both in cases (OR = 0.592; 95% CI = 0.553-0.908; p = 0.016) and in controls (OR = 0.356; 95% CI = 0.226-0.563; p = 0.000010). A similar effect was not seen with other cardiovascular risk factors. The results indicate, for the first time, that lower sHLA-DR levels are associated with smoking, but not with ACS. This is an important finding because previous studies of sHLA-DR have not accounted for the possible associations between smoking and sHLA-DR levels. Further studies are required to confirm these novel results and explore the mechanisms behind the observed associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Decreased serum level of soluble-leptin-receptor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, K; Ebadi, P; Naeimi, S

    2012-09-01

    There is some evidence suggesting that leptin and its negative regulator, soluble-leptinreceptor (SLR) may be able to influence inflammatory and autoimmune processes. In this study, several variables including socio-demographics, health-related habits, depression score, serum molecules and blood parameters besides the SLR level were evaluated in patients with SLE (SLE-patients) and healthy controls. The patients had significantly lower SLR level and higher depression score than the controls and both of these variables have a significant association with the occurrence of disease in logistic regression model. Moreover, the results of Pearson correlation analysis showed that patients' SLR level was negatively correlated with their weights and BDI scores. For the first time, this study indicated a lower level of SLR in SLE-patients and suggested that lower concentrations of SLR in these patients may be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  8. Levels and clinic significance of serum soluble Fas and soluble Fas ligand in coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, B.J.; Liu, Z.Z.; Ding, X.R.; Zou, J.M. [North China Coal Medical College, Tangshan (China). Department of Clinical Laboratory

    2006-02-15

    Serum levels of sFas and sFasL were determined in 52 patients with silicosis, 57 coal workers' pneumonoconiosis, 46 healthy underground coal workers' (the underground control group) and 40 healthy volunteers working on the ground (the ground control group) with a sandwich ELISA. Compared to the control groups, the serum levels of sFas and sFasL in the patients with silicosis and the coal workers' pneumonoconiosis were significantly higher. Serum levels of sFas and sFasL in the underground control group were higher than those in the ground control group; Serum sFas levels in coal workers' pneumonoconiosis was higher than those in the patients with silicosis. In the patients with silicosis and the coal workers' pneumonoconiosis patients, the serum sFas levels in Phase I patients combined with emphysema and simple Phase II + III patients were higher than those in simple Phase Ipatients. In the patients with silicosis and the coal workers' pneumonoconiosis, serum levels of sFas and sFasL were not significantly altered among different duration of exposure to dusts. There was a slightly positive correlation between sFas and sFasL levels in the coal workers' pneumonoconiosis. In the patients with silicosis and the coal workers' pneumonoconiosis, the serum levelsof sFas and sFasL areassociated with the development of the pneumonoconiosis. The changes of serum sFas levels may indicate the development and progression of the pneumonoconiosis. The detection of the serum sFas level may be used in the differential diagnosis for the silicosis and the coal worker's pneumonoconiosis.

  9. Correlations between hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor levels in children aged 6-59 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajar Diah Tri Kusumastuti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Early detection of iron deficiency is important in young children to prevent iron deficiency anemia, which may cause permanent neurocognitive development disorders. Hemoglobin level is an insensitive tool for detecting iron deficiency without anemia, while serum ferritin levels may be influenced by infection and inflammation. However, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR is a sensitive marker for detecting iron deficiency, yet not widely used in daily practice. Objective To assess for correlations between hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor levels in children aged 6-59 months. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study in the Yogyakarta and Bantul Districts involving 85 children aged 6-59 months who visited integrated health posts (posyandu and who met the inclusion criteria. Subjects were chosen by cluster random sampling. Blood specimens were collected to examine hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and sTfR levels. Results Spearman’s correlation test revealed weak negative correlations between hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels, as well as between hemoglobin and sTfR levels, with coefficient correlations of r = -0.220, (P=0.043 and r = -0.317, (P=0.003, respectively. There was no correlation between serum ferritin and sTfR levels (r = -0.033; P=0.767. Conclusion Hemoglobin levels has weak negative correlations with serum ferritin and sTfR, but serum ferritin does not correlate with sTfR. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:122-6.

  10. DELIVERY OF WATER-SOLUBLE DRUGS USING ACOUSTICALLY-TRIGGERED, PERFLUOROCARBON DOUBLE EMULSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Lee, James A.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Ultrasound can be used to release a therapeutic payload encapsulated within a perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion via acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), a process whereby the PFC phase is vaporized and the agent is released. ADV-generated microbubbles have been previously used to selectively occlude blood vessels in vivo. The coupling of ADV-generated drug delivery and occlusion has therapeutically, synergistic potentials. Methods Micron-sized, water-in-PFC-in-water (W1/PFC/W2) emulsions were prepared in a two-step process using perfluoropentane (PFP) or perfluorohexane (PFH) as the PFC phase. Fluorescein or thrombin was contained in the W1 phase. Results Double emulsions containing fluorescein in the W1 phase displayed a 5.7±1.4 fold and 8.2±1.3 fold increase in fluorescein mass flux, as measured using a Franz diffusion cell, after ADV for the PFP and PFH emulsions, respectively. Thrombin was stably retained in four out of five double emulsions. For three out of five formulations tested, the clotting time of whole blood decreased, in a statistically significant manner (p emulsions exposed to ultrasound compared to emulsions not exposed to ultrasound. Conclusions ADV can be used to spatially and temporally control the delivery of water-soluble compounds formulated in PFC double emulsions. Thrombin release could extend the duration of ADV-generated, microbubble occlusions. PMID:20872050

  11. Liver and serum soluble protein changes and pathomorphology in undernourished mice with acute Schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eridan M. Coutinho

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Body, liver and spleen weights; histopathology of the liver, spleen and intestines; hepatic and serum soluble proteins changes were the parameters studied in undernourished Swiss albino mice experimentally infected with S. mansoni. Non-infected deficient animab had lower liver/body weight and spleen/body weight ratios as compared to the controls (22.60% casein group. Infected mice showed higher values regardless the type of diet. Undernourished infected subgroup showed a persistent exudative periovular reaction in the liver. Soluble hepatic proteins content and serum protein fractions appeared to be lower in the deficient infected mice. A significant difference was detected in the gammaglobulin fraction between infected and non-infected animals fed the control diet with higher values for the former. Our data suggest that the effects of malnutrition, per se, are sometimes more detrimental to the host than those due to Manson 's schistosomiasis.No presente estudo os pesos corporal, hepático e esplénico; a morfologia patológica do fígado, baço e intestinos; e as modificações das proteínas solúveis hepáticas e séricas, foram os parâmetros investigados em camundongos albinos Suíços desnutridos e infectados com S. mansoni. Os animais desnutridos não infectados apresentaram relações fígado/peso corporal e baço! peso corporal com valores menores do que os animais controles (grupo caseina a 22,60%. Camundongos infectados mostraram esses índices mais elevados, independentemente do tipo de dieta. O subgrupo de camundongos desnutridos infectados apresentou, no fígado, reação periovular exsudativa persistente. O conteúdo de proteínas solúveis no fígado e no soro também mostrou-se reduzido nos camundongos infectados desnutridos. Diferença significativa foi detectada quanto às gamaglobulinas, comparando-se animais infectados com não infectados alimentados com a dieta controle II, valores mais altos ocorrendo no grupo dos

  12. Serum concentration of soluble adhesive molecules in patients with different forms of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damnjanović Goran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Vascular cell adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1 and intercellular cell adhesive molecules-1 (ICAM- 1 play an important role in developing and progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of the paper was to compare concentrations of soluble forms of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in patients with different clinical presentations of coronary artery disease (CAD and patients without CAD. Methods. Blood samples were taken from 25 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI, 25 patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP, 25 with stable angina pectoris (SAP and from 15 control patients without CAD, and concentrations of solubile adhesive molecules (VCAM-1, ICAM-1 were determined. Results. Obesity was more prominent in the NAP than in the SAP and the control patients (p < 0.05. There were no significant differences in gender distribution, age, duration of the CAD and body mass index between the groups. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2 were more frequent in the CAD patients than in the controls (p < 0.01. Family history of the CAD was more frequent in the AMI and the UAP group than in the controls (p < 0.05. Serum concentrations of VCAM-1 was similar in the patients with AMI (955.9 ± 117.8 ng/mL, UAP (952.4 ± 139.1 ng/mL and SAP (931 ± 169.8 ng/mL, and significantly higher in these groups compared with the controls (823.4 ± 97.6; p < 0.05, p < 0.05 and p < 0.1 respectively. Serum concentration of ICAM-1 was similar in the patients with AMI (699.2±125.6 ng/mL, UAP (727.6±171.8 ng/mL and SAP (697.5±165.6 ng/mL, and significantly higher in these groups compared with the controls (583.4 ± 86.6; p < 0.1, p < 0.05 and p < 0.1 respectively. Conclusion. Increased concentrations of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, as markers of inflammation, showed the importance of inflammatory processes in development of atherosclerosis and clinical expression of CAD. Measurement of soluble ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 concentrations is a useful indicator of atherosclerosis

  13. Clinical implications of elevated serum soluble CD137 levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinchuan Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Research has focused on identifying specific serum biomarkers to detect vulnerable plaques. These markers serve as diagnostic tools for acute coronary syndrome and assist in identifying high-risk patients. However, the existing data are limited and conflicting. This study tested the hypothesis that CD137 levels identify patients with acute coronary syndrome who are at a heightened risk for recurrent cardiac events. METHODS: The levels of soluble CD137 (sCD137 were measured using ELISA in 180 patients with acute coronary syndrome and 120 patients with acute chest pain. Platelet activation was assessed by flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the prognostic characteristics of sCD137. RESULTS: The levels of sCD137 were elevated in 75 patients with acute coronary syndromes and 20 patients with acute chest pain (>35.0 ng/ml. In patients with acute coronary syndrome, elevated sCD137 levels (>35.0 ng/ml indicated an increased risk for major adverse cardiovascular events (OR =1.93, 95% CI: 1.39-2.54. Elevated serum levels of sCD137 and cTnT were correlated with a significantly increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in both groups after 30 days, six months and nine months of follow-up. The increased sCD137 levels were significantly correlated with the levels of troponin I (r = 0.4799, p<0.001. Importantly, 26 patients with normal cTnI levels had acute coronary syndrome. However, elevated sCD137 levels identified these patients as a being high-risk subgroup (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.25-4.13. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated sCD137 levels indicate an increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Soluble CD137 may be a useful prognostic marker or indicator for adverse events in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

  14. Cytoplasmic replication of Staphylococcus aureus upon phagosomal escape triggered by phenol-soluble modulin α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosz, Magdalena; Kolter, Julia; Paprotka, Kerstin; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Schäfer, Daniel; Chatterjee, Som Subra; Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane; Ohlsen, Knut; Otto, Michael; Rudel, Thomas; Sinha, Bhanu; Fraunholz, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is readily internalized by professional phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils but also by non-professional phagocytes such as epithelial or endothelial cells. Intracellular bacteria have been proposed to play a role in evasion of the innate immune system and may also lead to dissemination within migrating phagocytes. Further, S. aureus efficiently lyses host cells with a battery of cytolytic toxins. Recently, phenol-soluble modulins (PSM) have been identified to comprise a genus-specific family of cytolytic peptides. Of these the PSMα peptides have been implicated in killing polymorphonuclear leucocytes after phagocytosis. We questioned if the peptides were active in destroying endosomal membranes to avoid lysosomal killing of the pathogen and monitored integrity of infected host cell endosomes by measuring the acidity of the intracellular bacterial microenvironment via flow cytometry and by a reporter recruitment technique. Isogenic mutants of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains USA300 LAC, USA400 MW2 as well as the strongly cytolytic methicillin-sensitive strain 6850 were compared with their respective wild type strains. In all three genetic backgrounds, PSMα mutants were unable to escape from phagosomes in non-professional (293, HeLa, EAhy.926) and professional phagocytes (THP-1), whereas mutants in PSMβ and δ-toxin as well as β-toxin, phosphatidyl inositol-dependent phospholipase C and Panton Valentine leucotoxin escaped with efficiencies of the parental strains. S. aureus replicated intracellularly only in presence of a functional PSMα operon thereby illustrating that bacteria grow in the host cell cytoplasm upon phagosomal escape. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Serum Soluble Vascular-Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1 in Patients with Acute and Chronic Liver Diseases

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    Mario Pirisi

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Our ai m was to ascertai n the degree of variation of serum soluble vascular cell adhesion moleculeI (VCAM-1 concentrations according to the nature and the severity of an underl ying liver disease . One-hundred forty sera collected from 123 patients (83 male, 40 female with acute hepatitis (n=14. mi Id chronic Ii ver disease (n=52 or cirrhosis (n=57 of different etiologies as well as from 17 healthy blood donors (8 male, 9 female were studied. Soluble VCAM-I concentration was measured immunoenzymatically. One-way analysis of variance revealed a significant variability of the mean values of soluble VCAM-1 among groups (F=80.02, p <0.000 I. All groups of patients had higher soluble VCAM-I than controls; moreover, patients with acute hepatitis and patients with cirrhosis had higher soluble VCAM-1 levels than patients with mild chronic liver disease (Bonferroni's test. p <0.(1. These results did not change after stratification of patients according to the etiology (viral or toxic of liver disease (two-way analysis of variance: grouping factor diagnosis, F=60.39, p <0.000 I; grouping factor etiology. F= 1.73, p NS. Cholinesterase, total bilirubin, circulating thrombocytes and blood urea nitrogen were the independent predictors of the concentration of soluble VCAM-1. In conclusion, patients with liver disease have high serum soluble VCAM-1, which seems to reflect more the severity of impairment of liver function rather than the etiologic nature of the disease.

  16. Urgent percutaneous coronary intervention leads to a decrease in serum concentrations of soluble CD40 ligand

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    Ratković Nenad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Inflammation as a consequence of vascular injury after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is a pathological substrate of restenosis and of its complications. The aim of the study was to examine perprocedural inflammatory response expressed by soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L and C-reactive protein (CRP in patients treated with PCI and dual antiplatelet therapy. Methods. The experimental group included 52 patients (80.8% men, age 60 ± 9 years with angina pectoris treated by PCI (22 urgent PCI with stent implantation, and dual antiplatelet therapy (tienopiridins and aspirin, according to the current recommendations for the execution of the intervention. The control group consisted of 8 patients (70.5% men, age 59 ± 7 years with angina pectoris, who had undergone coronarography taking aspirin 3 days prior to it. In all the patients 24 hours before and after the PCI concentrations of CRP and sCD40L in the blood were determined. Results. In the experimental group, the concentration of sCD40L was lower as compared to the control (p < 0.02. In 34 (65% patients postprocedural decrease in sCD40L was recorded, in 18 (34.6% of them increase, while in 50 (96% patients there was a rise in CRP. The patients with postprocedural fall in sCD40L hod greater preprocedural concentration of sCD40L (p < 0.001, and less postprocedural concentration of sCD40L (p < 0.001, compared to the group with an increase in sCD40L after the PCI, while CRP levels tients treated with emergency PCI compared to elective patietns had a postprocedural decrease in sCD40L (p = 0.02. Increase in the level of CRP was higher in the group with emergency PCI in relation to elective PCI (p < 0.01. Conclusion. Emergency PCI procedures in the treatment of patients with unstable angina pectoris lead to a postprocedural fall in the serum concentration of sCD40L. Dual antiplate therapy with tienopiridins and aspirin inhibits the release of sCD40L. Regardless a clinical presentation

  17. Comparison of serum soluble edoglin (sEng) level in eary onset preeclampsia, late onset preeclampsia and normal pregnant woman

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    Akbar, Muhammad Ilham Aldika; Herdiyantini, Mita; Aditiawarman, Aditiawarman

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the serum levels of soluble Endoglin (s-Eng) between early onset preeclampsia, late onset preeclampsia and normal pregnant women.Materials and Methods: This was an analytic observational study (Cross-Sectional) performed on 39 pregnant women with early-onset preeclampsia (EO-PE), late-onset preeclampsia (LO-PE), and normal pregnancy. The patients were consecutively chosen in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Airlangga University Hospital and Dr. M. Soewandhi Hospit...

  18. Role of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 for diagnosing ventilator-associated pneumonia after cardiac surgery: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Alessandra K; Carlotti, Ana P C P

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a challenge, particularly after cardiac surgery. The use of biological markers of infection has been suggested to improve the accuracy of VAP diagnosis. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM)-1 in the diagnosis of VAP following cardiac surgery. This was a prospective observational cohort study of children with congenital heart disease admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) after surgery and who remained intubated and mechanically ventilated for at least 24 hours postoperatively. VAP was defined by the 2007 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Blood, modified bronchoalveolar lavage (mBAL) fluid and exhaled ventilator condensate (EVC) were collected daily, starting immediately after surgery until the fifth postoperative day or until extubation for measurement of sTREM-1. Thirty patients were included, 16 with VAP. Demographic variables, Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) and Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 scores, duration of surgery and length of cardiopulmonary bypass were not significantly diferent in patients with and without VAP. However, time on mechanical ventilation and length of stay in the PICU and in the hospital were significantly longer in the VAP group. Serum and mBAL fluid sTREM-1 concentrations were similar in both groups. In the VAP group, 12 of 16 patients had sTREM-1 detected in EVC, whereas it was undetectable in all but two patients in the non-VAP group over the study period (p = 0.0013) (sensitivity 0.75, specificity 0.86, positive predictive value 0.86, negative predictive value 0.75, positive likelihood ratio (LR) 5.25, negative LR 0.29). Measurement of sTREM-1 in EVC may be useful for the diagnosis of VAP after cardiac surgery.

  19. Preoperative serum soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and osteoprotegerin predict postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hailong; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Yanhu; Li, Qingguo; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Chen, Yijiang; Wu, Zhong; Wang, Dongjin

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF), a frequent complication after cardiac surgery, causes morbidity and prolongs hospitalization. A significant association between circulating osteoprotegerin concentration and atrial fibrillation incidence had been identified. Osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) axis may also contribute to the development and progression of AF. Herein we sought to determine whether preoperative serum soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio are associated with the incidence of POAF in cardiac surgery patients. We enrolled 154 patients with preoperative sinus rhythm undergoing isolated cardiac valve surgery. Preoperative venous blood samples were obtained for measurement of serum soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin. The POAF was defined as the characteristic arrhythmia lasting for at least 30 seconds before discharge. Comparison was made between patients without episode of POAF (sinus rhythm group, n=93) and patients experiencing POAF (atrial fibrillation group, n=61). Serum levels of soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio were significantly higher in the atrial fibrillation group than the sinus rhythm group. In multivariate survival regression, C-reactive protein, ejection fraction, left and right atrial diameters, preoperative use of beta-blocker, duration of ventilation, particularly serum soluble RANKL level, and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio independently predicted POAF. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the best threshold values of serum soluble RANKL level and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio for predicting POAF were 3.62 pmol/L and 0.51, respectively. Elevated preoperative serum soluble RANKL level and soluble RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio are independent predictors for POAF in patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery. These findings have important

  20. Soluble tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor levels in serum as markers of anti-viral host reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Nansen, A; Marker, O

    1999-01-01

    The role of soluble receptors for TNF-alpha (sTNF-Rs) as markers of virus-induced host responses was studied by the use of murine model infections. A marked elevation in serum levels of sTNF-R75, but not sTNF-R55, was found 1 day after infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). In mice......TNF-R75 into serum early after VSV infection was independent of T cells, whereas interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta seemed to be a major mediator. In contrast, increased release of sTNF-R75 into serum 8 days post-LCMV infection was mediated via T cells but independently of both CD40 ligand and IFN...

  1. Serum Soluble Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 1 (sFlt-1 Predicts the Severity of Acute Pancreatitis

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    Paulina Dumnicka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organ failure is the most important determinant of the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1 is positively associated with organ failure in sepsis. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of automated sFlt-1 measurements for early prediction of AP severity. Adult patients (66 with AP were recruited, including 46 with mild (MAP, 15 with moderately-severe (MSAP and 5 with severe AP (SAP. Serum and urine samples were collected twice. Serum sFlt-1 was measured with automated electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Serum concentrations of sFlt-1 were significantly higher in patients with MSAP and SAP as compared to MAP. SAP patients had the highest concentrations. At 24 and 48 h, sFlt-1 positively correlated with inflammatory markers (leukocyte count, C-reactive protein, kidney function (creatinine, urea, cystatin C, serum and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine albumin/creatinine ratio, D-dimer and angiopoietin-2. sFlt-1 positively correlated with the bedside index of severity in AP (BISAP score and the duration of hospital stay. Serum sFlt-1 above 139 pg/mL predicted more severe AP (MSAP + SAP. In the early phase of AP, sFlt-1 is positively associated with the severity of AP and predicts organ failure, in particular kidney failure. Serum sFlt-1 may be a practical way to improve early assessment of AP severity.

  2. Serum soluble Fas ligand (sFasL in patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

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    Lech Chyczewski

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal carcinomas have been shown to express Fas ligand (FasL and down-regulate Fas to escape from host immune surveillance. Circulating soluble FasL (sFasL has been suggested to provide protection from Fas-mediated apoptosis. The aim of this study was to assess serum sFasL levels in esophageal cancer. The pretreatment levels of sFasL in the serum of 100 patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer and 41 healthy volunteers were determined by ELISA. Probability of survival was calculated according to the method of Kaplan-Meier. The prognostic influence of high and low level of sFasL was analyzed with the log-rank test. The mean serum level of sFasL in patients with esophageal cancer was significantly higher than that in healthy donors (1.567+/-1.786 vs 0.261+/-0.435, p<0.0001. The levels of serum sFasL were significantly higher in advanced stages (II vs IV p<0.034; III vs IV p<0.041; except II vs III p=0.281, patients with lymph node (N0 vs N1 p<0.0389 or distant (M0 vs. M1 p<0.0388 metastases and significantly lower in patients with well differentiated tumors (G1 vs G2 p<0.0272. The serum levels of soluble FasL were not related to gender, age, tumor size, T-stage, tobacco smoking and history of chronic alcohol intake. The survival difference between pretreatment high and low level of sFasL in surgery and chemio- and/or radiotherapy group was not statistically significant (p=0.525; p=0.840. Our results indicate that elevated serum sFasL levels might be associated with a disease progression in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  3. Enhancement of soluble CD28 levels in the serum of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongwen; Yi, Lixian; Tao, Hong; Huang, Jingfang; Jin, Zhenghong; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Caiyun; Sun, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland mediated by T cells. CD28, a member of costimulatory molecules, plays a pivotal role in regulating T-cell responses. Plasma-soluble CD28 is one form of CD28 in peripheral blood. To investigate the concentrations of soluble CD28 in patients with Graves' disease, we used a sensitive dual monoclonal antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the soluble form of CD28. Our results suggested that mean concentrations of soluble CD28 in plasma of patients with Graves' disease were 1.79 ±1.52 ng/ml, and levels of soluble CD28 in healthy subjects were only 0.83 ±1.35 ng/ml. Concentrations of soluble CD28 detected in patients with Graves' disease were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (p Graves' disease. Therefore, aberrant elevation of plasma-soluble CD28 in patients with Graves' disease may reflect the dysregulation of immune system, and may serve as a useful biomarker in Graves' disease diagnosis.

  4. The value of HCG serum concentrations after trigger in predicting pregnancy and live birth rates in IVF-ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianjun; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Bin; Wang, Junxia; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Ningyuan; Hu, Yali; Sun, Haixiang

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if an association existed between serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) level at 12 h after trigger and IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm (ICSI) treatment outcomes. Women undergoing initial IVF-ICSI and embryo transfer treatment using the long luteal phase gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist protocol between April 2012 and March 2013 for tubal factor were included (n = 699). In the clinical pregnancy group, HCG after trigger was significantly elevated (276.0 ± 5.1 versus 198.5 ± 6.1 mIU/mL; P HCG was 201.2 mIU/ml. Compared with the lower HCG group, the clinical pregnancy rate in the higher HCG group was increased in obese and non-obese patients (77.8% versus 57.3%, P HCG was associated with a better IVF-ICSI treatment outcome (OR 4.39, 95% CI 2.99 to 6.45). Clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher across increasing quartiles of HCG. An elevated level of serum HCG at 12 h after trigger was associated with a better IVF-ICSI outcome. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Serum Concentrations of TNF α and Its Soluble Receptors in Patients with Adrenal Tumors Treated by Surgery

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    Jan Komorowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral blood levels of TNF α and its soluble receptors were studied in 39 patients with malignant and benign adrenal tumors treated by adrenalectomy. The concentrations of TNF α were significantly elevated in patients with malignant tumors of the adrenal cortex and in patients with Conn's syndrome compared to control. In patients with non-functioning adenomas and pheochromocytomas, TNF α levels were similar to those detected in the control. In subjects with myelolipomas, the serum concentration of TNF α was lower compared to the control. After adrenalectomy, the levels of TNF α were decreased in patients with malignant tumors and in patients with Conn's syndrome, non-functioniong adenomas and pheochromocytomas compared to the concentration before surgery. The serum concentrations of soluble receptors of TNF α did not differ among different patient groups and compared to the control. After adrenalectomy, the blood concentrations of TNF α R1 and TNF α R2 were decreased in patients with Conn's syndrome. However, to confirm practicality of the evaluation of TNF α and its soluble receptors in differential diagnosis in patients with adrenal tumors, a larger study group is needed.

  6. Effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy on serum levels of coenzyme Q10 and other lipid-soluble antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, Prabhudas R; Connell, Kathleen; Ramirez, Elizabeth; Inegbenijie, Christian; Gavara, Rachana Y; Ouseph, Jacob A; Mikhail, Magdy S

    2005-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on serum levels of coenzyme Q(10) and other lipid-soluble antioxidants in normal women. Serum levels of coenzyme Q(10), alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, beta-carotene and lycopene in 50 premenopausal women (not using oral contraceptives), 33 healthy postmenopausal and 15 postmenopausal women on HRT ("Prempo"; combination of 0.625 mg conjugated estrogen and 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate) were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lipid profiles were also analyzed. Significantly higher serum coenzyme Q(10) and alpha-tocopherol levels were detected in postmenopausal compared with premenopausal women (P < 0.05, and < 0.001); whereas, in postmenopausal subjects on HRT, we detected a significant decrease in coenzyme Q(10) and gamma-tocopherol levels (P < 0.001, and < 0.05) and increased alpha-tocopherol levels (P < 0.05). Serum levels of beta-carotene, lycopene, LDL, HDL, cholesterol and triglyceride were comparable among the study groups. Coenzyme Q(10) is postulated to be involved in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) because of its bioenergetics role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and its antioxidant properties at the mitochondrial and extramitochondrial levels. The decrease in serum concentrations of coenzyme Q(10), produced by HRT, may promote oxygen free radical-induced membrane damage and may, thus alter cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women. HRT-induced reductions in lipid-soluble antioxidant(s) levels, and its potential consequences on CVD, needs to be further investigated.

  7. Serum soluble receptor of advanced glycation end products and risk of metabolic syndrome in Egyptian obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Moushira; Kamal, Sanaa; Kholousi, Shams; El-Bassyouni, Hala T; Yousef, Walaa; Reyad, Hanaa; Mohamed, Ramy; Basha, Walaa A

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is one of the diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome (MS). It is correlated with insulin resistance (IR) and high vascular risk as well. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play an important role in abnormal metabolic components in obese women. This study aimed to explore the serum levels of sRAGE in Egyptian obese women and compare with healthy non-obese controls and investigate the relationship between serum sRAGE, metabolic parameters, and obesity complications. The soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), anthropometry, metabolic and biochemical biomarkers were measured in 100 obese women and 100 age-matched healthy control non-obese women. The homeostasis model assessment estimate of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) has been determined from serum insulin and glucose values. Serum sRAGE levels were significantly lower in obese cases than controls and inversely correlated with obesity and metabolic parameters. Results of univariate and multivariate analyses for determinants of serum sRAGE levels in obese cases showed that parameters statistically and significantly related were body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), LDL-C, TG, BP, HOMA-IR, ALT and AST. sRAGE is a novel biomarker for metabolic dysfunction in Egyptian obese women and might predict the future cardio-metabolic events.

  8. Soluble serum VCAM-1, whole blood mRNA expression and treatment response in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E R; Søndergaard, H B; Oturai, A B

    2016-01-01

    Background Natalizumab reduces disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Natalizumab binds to the very late antigen-4 and inhibits vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-mediated transmigration of immune cells across the blood-brain-barrier. This is associated with decreased serum concentr......Background Natalizumab reduces disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Natalizumab binds to the very late antigen-4 and inhibits vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-mediated transmigration of immune cells across the blood-brain-barrier. This is associated with decreased serum...... concentrations of soluble (s)VCAM-1 and an altered composition of immune cell-subsets in the blood. Objective We aimed to examine if sVCAM-1 serum concentrations and whole blood mRNA expression levels of immune activation biomarkers is associated with disease activity in natalizumab-treated MS-patients. Methods...... sVCAM-1 serum concentrations and whole blood mRNA expression were measured in blood samples from untreated RRMS-patients and from two independent groups of natalizumab-treated patients. Results sVCAM-1 serum concentrations and whole blood expression of HLX1 and IL1B mRNA were lower, whereas...

  9. Increased serum levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 (sTNFR2 in patients with active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Fontes Bessa

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the serum levels of the cytokine TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 in patients with toxoplasmosis retinochoroidits (TR and controls. 37 patients with TR and 30 subjects with positive serology for toxoplasmosis but without history and signs of uveitis were included in this study. Serum concentrations of TNF-α, sTNFR1, and sTNFR2 were determined by ELISA. Serum concentrations of TNF-α and sTNFR1 were similar in controls (mean ± SD median values; 56.57 ± 141.96 and 504.37 ± 163.87, respectively and TR patients (mean ± SD values, 121.62 ± 217.56 and 511.15 ± 189.30, respectively. Serum concentrations of sTNFR2 were higher in the uveitis group when compared to the control group (respectively, mean ± SD values, 1734.84 ± 379.32 and 1442.75 ± 309.47; p=0.002. There was no association between the serum levels of the molecules and the time of first symptoms, severity of vitreous haze, size or localization of active lesions, levels of visual acuity, and presence of vasculitis. These results suggest that TR is associated with changes in the circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers, but they are not correlated with local/ocular signs.

  10. Increased serum levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 (sTNFR2 in patients with active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Fontes Bessa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the serum levels of the cytokine TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 in patients with toxoplasmosis retinochoroidits (TR and controls. 37 patients with TR and 30 subjects with positive serology for toxoplasmosis but without history and signs of uveitis were included in this study. Serum concentrations of TNF-α, sTNFR1, and sTNFR2 were determined by ELISA. Serum concentrations of TNF-α and sTNFR1 were similar in controls (mean ± SD median values; 56.57 ± 141.96 and 504.37 ± 163.87, respectively and TR patients (mean ± SD values, 121.62 ± 217.56 and 511.15 ± 189.30, respectively. Serum concentrations of sTNFR2 were higher in the uveitis group when compared to the control group (respectively, mean ± SD values, 1734.84 ± 379.32 and 1442.75 ± 309.47; p=0.002. There was no association between the serum levels of the molecules and the time of first symptoms, severity of vitreous haze, size or localization of active lesions, levels of visual acuity, and presence of vasculitis. These results suggest that TR is associated with changes in the circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers, but they are not correlated with local/ocular signs.

  11. Serum soluble CD26 levels: diagnostic efficiency for atopic dermatitis, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and psoriasis in combination with serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagaki, T; Sugaya, M; Suga, H; Morimura, S; Kamata, M; Ohmatsu, H; Fujita, H; Asano, Y; Tada, Y; Kadono, T; Sato, S

    2013-01-01

    CD26 is a multifunctional type II transmembrane glycoprotein, which also exists as a secreted isoform, soluble CD26 (sCD26). The CD26 expression on circulating T cells is decreased in some skin diseases such as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and psoriasis. It remains to be determined whether sCD26 can be used as a marker of skin diseases or not. To investigate utility of sCD26 as a diagnostic marker of skin diseases in combination with thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC). Serum sCD26 levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 130 participants including 32 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD); 45 patients with CTCL; 26 patients with psoriasis; and 27 healthy controls. Serum sCD26 levels in patients with CTCL and psoriasis (162.1 ± 80.2 ng/mL and 125.4 ± 82.1 ng/mL respectively) were significantly lower than those of healthy controls (392.6 ± 198.7 ng/mL; P psoriasis were 65.2-73.7%, 81.4-97.6%, 65.2-94.4%, and 81.4-88.9% respectively. Serum sCD26 levels, combined with serum TARC levels, are helpful in diagnosis of AD, CTCL and psoriasis. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Preparation and value assignment of standard reference material 968e fat-soluble vitamins, carotenoids, and cholesterol in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jeanice B; Duewer, David L; Mugenya, Isaac O; Phinney, Karen W; Sander, Lane C; Sharpless, Katherine E; Sniegoski, Lorna T; Tai, Susan S; Welch, Michael J; Yen, James H

    2012-01-01

    Standard Reference Material 968e Fat-Soluble Vitamins, Carotenoids, and Cholesterol in Human Serum provides certified values for total retinol, γ- and α-tocopherol, total lutein, total zeaxanthin, total β-cryptoxanthin, total β-carotene, 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3), and cholesterol. Reference and information values are also reported for nine additional compounds including total α-cryptoxanthin, trans- and total lycopene, total α-carotene, trans-β-carotene, and coenzyme Q(10). The certified values for the fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids in SRM 968e were based on the agreement of results from the means of two liquid chromatographic methods used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and from the median of results of an interlaboratory comparison exercise among institutions that participate in the NIST Micronutrients Measurement Quality Assurance Program. The assigned values for cholesterol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) in the SRM are the means of results obtained using the NIST reference method based upon gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. SRM 968e is currently one of two available health-related NIST reference materials with concentration values assigned for selected fat-soluble vitamins, carotenoids, and cholesterol in human serum matrix. This SRM is used extensively by laboratories worldwide primarily to validate methods for determining these analytes in human serum and plasma and for assigning values to in-house control materials. The value assignment of the analytes in this SRM will help support measurement accuracy and traceability for laboratories performing health-related measurements in the clinical and nutritional communities.

  13. Clinical Significance of Serum Soluble CD Molecules to Assess Disease Activity in Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speeckaert, Reinhart; Lambert, Jo; van Geel, Nanja

    2016-11-01

    It is difficult to determine disease activity in vitiligo owing to the absence of inflammatory signs, such as erythema or scaling. A biomarker that could confirm active disease and indicate likely future disease progression would therefore be of considerable value. To investigate whether soluble CD27 (sCD27), sCD25, or sCD40L could be valuable biomarkers to determine disease activity in vitiligo and indicate likely future progression. A combined cross-sectional and prospective study was conducted at the department of dermatology at Ghent University Hospital between February 24, 2012, and December 12, 2015. Ninety-three patients with vitiligo were enrolled, including 83 individuals with nonsegmental vitiligo and 10 with segmental vitiligo. Blood sampling was performed, and sCD25, sCD27, and sCD40L were measured in serum. The associations between sCD levels, disease activity, and future progression were investigated. Of the 93 patients included in the study, 51 were women (55%); median (interquartile range) age was 36.5 (26.0-49.8) years. Both sCD27 (21.5 ng/mL [16.1-30.0 ng/mL] vs 18.4 ng/mL [12.5-22.1 ng/mL]; P = .006) and sCD25 (2.6 ng/mL [2.1-3.4 ng/mL] vs 2.2 ng/mL [1.7-2.4 ng/mL]; P = .002) levels were associated with active disease. Moreover, a statistically significant link with disease progression after 3 to 6 months was found for sCD27 (21.7 [17.0-29.1] vs 16.6 [13.5-23.7]; P = .02) but not for sCD25 (2.8 ng/mL [2.2-3.4 ng/mL] vs 2.3 [1.9-2.8 ng/mL]; P = .053). Further in vitro experiments showed a correlation between sCD25 and interferon γ (r = 0.562, P = .005), interleukin 10 (r = 0.453, P = .03), and sCD27 secretion (r = 0.549, P = .007). No associations were found for sCD40L levels. This study demonstrates increased levels of sCD27 and sCD25 in patients with active vitiligo. Moreover, these results provide the first evidence that these markers have a capacity to indicate the probability of future disease

  14. Risk assessment in sepsis: a new prognostication rule by APACHE II score and serum soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Mylona, Vassiliki; Savva, Athina; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Dimopoulou, Ioanna; Mouktaroudi, Maria; Raftogiannis, Maria; Georgitsi, Marianna; Linnér, Anna; Adamis, George; Antonopoulou, Anastasia; Apostolidou, Efterpi; Chrisofos, Michael; Katsenos, Chrisostomos; Koutelidakis, Ioannis; Kotzampassi, Katerina; Koratzanis, George; Koupetori, Marina; Kritselis, Ioannis; Lymberopoulou, Korina; Mandragos, Konstantinos; Marioli, Androniki; Sundén-Cullberg, Jonas; Mega, Anna; Prekates, Athanassios; Routsi, Christina; Gogos, Charalambos; Treutiger, Carl-Johan; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Dimopoulos, George

    2012-08-08

    Early risk assessment is the mainstay of management of patients with sepsis. APACHE II is the gold standard prognostic stratification system. A prediction rule that aimed to improve prognostication by APACHE II with the application of serum suPAR (soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor) is developed. A prospective study cohort enrolled 1914 patients with sepsis including 62.2% with sepsis and 37.8% with severe sepsis/septic shock. Serum suPAR was measured in samples drawn after diagnosis by an enzyme-immunoabsorbent assay; in 367 patients sequential measurements were performed. After ROC analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis a prediction rule for risk was developed. The rule was validated in a double-blind fashion by an independent confirmation cohort of 196 sepsis patients, predominantly severe sepsis/septic shock patients, from Sweden. Serum suPAR remained stable within survivors and non-survivors for 10 days. Regression analysis showed that APACHE II ≥ 17 and suPAR ≥ 12 ng/ml were independently associated with unfavorable outcome. Four strata of risk were identified: i) APACHE II APACHE II APACHE II ≥ 17 and suPAR APACHE II ≥ 17 and suPAR ≥ 12 ng/ml with mortality 51.7%. This prediction rule was confirmed by the Swedish cohort. A novel prediction rule with four levels of risk in sepsis based on APACHE II score and serum suPAR is proposed. Prognostication by this rule is confirmed by an independent cohort.

  15. Association between serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Ichihara

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Serum suPAR was associated with AF, particularly NPAF, as demonstrated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Whether suPAR promotes or maintains AF should be investigated in further studies.

  16. Serum soluble CD163 predicts risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Moestrup, Søren K

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of adipose tissue macrophages with concomitant low-grade inflammation is believed to play a central role in the development of type 2 diabetes. We tested whether a new macrophage-derived biomarker, soluble CD163 (sCD163), identifies at-risk individuals before overt disease ...

  17. Fasting serum soluble CD 163 predicts risk of type 2 diabetes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grade inflammation is believed to play a central role in the evolution of type 2 diabetes. Aim: To assess whether a new macrophage-derived biomarker, soluble CD163, identifies at-risk individuals with metabolic syndrome before overt disease ...

  18. Effective light-triggered contents release from helper lipid-incorporated liposomes co-encapsulating gemcitabine and a water-soluble photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Toshiki; Tagami, Tatsuaki; Tane, Masafumi; Ozeki, Tetsuya

    2018-02-02

    Triggered drug release is a promising strategy for delivering anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues. We found that liposomes co-encapsulating calcein (a water-soluble model drug and fluorescence marker) and talaporfin sodium (TPS, a water-soluble photosensitizer) released the drug upon irradiation with a near-infrared (NIR)-laser. The liposomes were composed of phospholipid (DSPC)/helper lipid (DOPE)/cholesterol/PEG-lipid (PEG 2000 -DSPE) at a molar ratio of 85/10/5/5 and released a large amount of drug (70%<, within 10 min) upon irradiation, but no drug in the absence of NIR-laser irradiation and/or TPS. NIR-laser-triggered drug release was facilitated by the incorporation of DOPE into the liposomes, and the amount of DOPE incorporated affected drug leakage in the absence of NIR-laser-irradiation at 37 °C (body temperature). Drug leakage was tuned by incorporating cholesterol into the liposomes. NIR-laser-triggered drug release from the liposomes was confirmed using the anticancer drug gemcitabine. NIR-laser treatment of liposomes co-encapsulating gemcitabine and TPS provided the maximum cytotoxic effect towards EMT6/P cells. These results suggest that these novel light sensitive liposomes may be useful for drug delivery to cancer cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperature-Triggered Protein Adsorption on Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles in Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkina, Olga; Lang, Thomas; Thiermann, Raphael; Docter, Dominic; Stauber, Roland H; Secker, Christian; Schlaad, Helmut; Weidner, Steffen; Mohr, Benjamin; Maskos, Michael; Bertin, Annabelle

    2015-08-18

    The protein corona, which forms on the nanoparticle's surface in most biological media, determines the nanoparticle's physicochemical characteristics. The formation of the protein corona has a significant impact on the biodistribution and clearance of nanoparticles in vivo. Therefore, the ability to influence the formation of the protein corona is essential to most biomedical applications, including drug delivery and imaging. In this study, we investigate the protein adsorption on nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic radius of 30 nm and a coating of thermoresponsive poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) in serum. Using multiangle dynamic light scattering (DLS) we demonstrate that heating of the nanoparticles above their phase separation temperature induces the formation of agglomerates, with a hydrodynamic radius of 1 μm. In serum, noticeably stronger agglomeration occurs at lower temperatures compared to serum-free conditions. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) revealed a high packing density of agglomerates when serum was not present. In contrast, in the presence of serum, agglomerated nanoparticles were loosely packed, indicating that proteins are intercalated between them. Moreover, an increase in protein content is observed upon heating, confirming that protein adsorption is induced by the alteration of the surface during phase separation. After cooling and switching the surface back, most of the agglomerates were dissolved and the main fraction returned to the original size of approximately 30 nm as shown by asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF-FFF) and DLS. Furthermore, the amounts of adsorbed proteins are similar before and after heating the nanoparticles to above their phase-separation temperature. Overall, our results demonstrate that the thermoresponsivity of the polymer coating enables turning the corona formation on nanoparticles on and off in situ. As the local heating of body areas can be easily done in vivo, the thermoresponsive

  20. Interaction of Water-Soluble CdTe Quantum Dots with Bovine Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) are promising fluorescent markers, but it is very little known about interaction of quantum dots with biological molecules. In this study, interaction of CdTe quantum dots coated with thioglycolic acid (TGA) with bovine serum albumin was investigated. Steady state spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering methods were used. It was explored how bovine serum albumin affects stability and spectral properties of quantum dots in aqueous media. CdTe–TGA quantum dots in aqueous solution appeared to be not stable and precipitated. Interaction with bovine serum albumin significantly enhanced stability and photoluminescence quantum yield of quantum dots and prevented quantum dots from aggregating. PMID:27502633

  1. Association between Serum Soluble CD154 Levels and Mortality in Patients with Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lorente

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: CD154 and its soluble counterpart (sCD154 are proteins of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF family and exhibit proinflamatory and procoagulant properties. Higher circulating sCD154 levels have been found in ischemic stroke patients than in controls. However, the association between circulating sCD154 levels and mortality in ischemic stroke patients has not been reported, and was the focus of this study. Methods: This was a multicenter, observational and prospective study carried out in six Spanish Intensive Care Units. We measured serum sCD154 from 50 patients with severe malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI, defined as Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS lower than 9, at the moment of the severe MMCAI diagnosis and from 50 healthy controls. The end-point of the study was 30-day mortality. Results: We found higher serum sCD154 levels in patients with severe MMCAI than in healthy controls (p < 0.001. We found higher serum sCD154 levels (p < 0.001 in non-surviving (n = 26 than in surviving MMCAI patients (n = 24. Multiple binomial logistic regression analysis showed that serum sCD154 levels >1.41 ng/mmL were associated with 30-day mortality (OR = 10.25; 95% CI = 2.34–44.95; p = 0.002. Conclusions: The new more important finding of our study was that serum sCD154 levels in MMCAI patients were associated with mortality.

  2. Correlation of Serum Soluble Interleukin-7 Receptor and Anti-C1q Antibody in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serum concentrations of soluble interleukin-7 receptor (sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibody have recently been identified as unique serological markers for lupus nephritis (LN in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q in SLE patients. Methods. Sera from 134 patients with SLE and 84 healthy cohorts were tested for levels of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies in terms of ELISA. Correlations of the sIL-7R and anti-C1q autoantibodies were evaluated. Results. The serum concentrations of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were significantly higher in SLE patients and LN patients in comparison with healthy individuals/controls and SLE patients with non-LN, respectively. In addition, both sIL-7R and anti-C1q concentrations were found to significantly correlate with the SLE disease activity as evaluated by SLEDAI scores. Interestingly, the serum sIL-7R concentration was strongly correlated with the level of anti-C1q antibodies (r=0.2871, p=0.0008 but not statistically correlated with other serological markers, including the anti-dsDNA and complements C3 and C4 concentrations in SLE patients. Conclusion. Both serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were strongly associated with disease activity and LN in SLE patients, suggesting that they may be reliable serological markers for identification of SLE patients with active diseases and LN.

  3. Ratio of serum levels of AGEs to soluble form of RAGE is a predictor of endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Fujimura, Noritaka; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Oda, Nozomu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Higashi, Yukihito

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their specific receptor, the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), play an important role in atherosclerosis. Recently, a soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) has been identified in human serum. However, the role of sRAGE in cardiovascular disease is still controversial. There is no information on the association between simultaneous measurements of AGEs and sRAGE and vascular function. In this study, we evaluated the associations between serum levels of AGEs and sRAGE, ratio of AGEs to sRAGE, and vascular function. We measured serum levels of AGEs and sRAGE and assessed vascular function by measurement of flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in 110 subjects who underwent health examinations. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with vascular function. Univariate regression analysis revealed that FMD correlated with age, BMI, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, glucose, smoking pack-years, nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, serum levels of AGEs and sRAGE, and ratio of AGEs to sRAGE. Multivariate analysis revealed that the ratio of AGEs to sRAGE remained an independent predictor of FMD, while serum level of AGEs alone or sRAGE alone was not associated with FMD. These findings suggest that sRAGE may have a counterregulatory mechanism that is activated to counteract the vasotoxic effect of the AGE-RAGE axis. The ratio of AGEs to sRAGE may be a new chemical biomarker of endothelial function. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Use of serum and urinary soluble sFlt-1 and PLGF in the diagnosis of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ping; Xu, Jing; Xie, Bao-Jun; Wang, Qi-Mei

    2017-02-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a disorder of pregnancy marked by hypertension and proteinuria with no known treatment aside from pregnancy termination. The pathogenesis of PE is poorly understood, but is thought to originate in the placenta. We assessed the value of measuring serum and urinary soluble deformylase-like tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (sFlt-1), a known target of placental factors, and placental growth factor (PLGF), a key placental signaling molecule, in the diagnosis of PE. Eighty patients with PE were classified as either exhibiting mild (44 cases) or severe (36 cases) symptoms of PE. Forty normal pregnant women were selected as controls. Serum and urinary PLGF and sFlt-1 levels, along with the ratio of sFlt-1 to PLGF, were compared across groups. Serum and urinary sFlt-1 and sFlt-1/PLGF ratios in severe PE patients were significantly higher than those in the mild PE group, and measurements from mild PE patients were significantly higher than controls (all P values <0.01). The serum and urinary PLGF levels in severe PE patients were significantly lower than mild PE patients, and mild PE patients had significantly lower PLGF levels than controls (all P values <0.01). As expected, serum sFlt-1 and PLGF levels and ratios were highly correlated with urinary sFlt-1 and PLGF levels and ratios. The severity of PE was closely correlated with these measurements, suggesting that they may be useful tools in the diagnosis and evaluation of PE.

  5. Serum levels of Interleukin-33 and its soluble receptor ST2 in asthmatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensaf A. Azazi

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The serum levels of IL-33 and its receptor sST2 were markedly elevated in patients with bronchial asthma and this supports the concept of sST2 and Interleukin-33 as a therapeutic target in asthma.

  6. Serum Hepcidin and Soluble Transferrin Receptor in the Assessment of Iron Metabolism in Children on a Vegetarian Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Klemarczyk, Witold; Mazur, Joanna; Gajewska, Joanna; Rowicka, Grażyna; Strucińska, Małgorzata; Chełchowska, Magdalena

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vegetarian diet on iron metabolism parameters paying special attention to serum hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in 43 prepubertal children (age range 4.5-9.0 years) on vegetarian and in 46 children on omnivorous diets. There were no significant differences according to age, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) between vegetarian and omnivorous children. Vegetarians had similar intake of iron and vitamin B 12 and a significantly higher intake of vitamin C (p vegetarians. Hematologic parameters and serum iron concentrations were within the reference range in both groups of children. Serum transferrin levels were similar in all subjects; however, ferritin concentrations were significantly (p vegetarians than in omnivores. In children on a vegetarian diet, median hepcidin levels were lower (p vegetarians. We did not find significant associations with concentration of sTfR and selected biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary parameters in any of the studied groups of children. As hematologic parameters and iron concentrations in vegetarians and omnivores were comparable and ferritin level was lower in vegetarians, we suggest that inclusion of novel markers, in particular sTfR (not cofounded by inflammation) and hepcidin, can better detect subclinical iron deficiency in children following vegetarian diets.

  7. The Soluble Form of CTLA-4 from Serum of Patients with Autoimmune Diseases Regulates T-Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Simone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4 is a costimulatory receptor transducing a potent inhibitory signal. Increasing evidence showed that CTLA-4 gene is an important susceptibility locus for autoimmune disorders. Alternatively spliced mRNA generates a soluble form, called sCTLA-4. Whereas low levels of sCTLA-4 are detected in normal human serum, increased/high serum levels are observed in several autoimmune diseases. The biological significance of increased sCTLA-4 serum level is not fully clarified yet. It can be envisaged that sCTLA-4 specifically inhibits the early T-cell activation by blocking the interaction of CD80/CD86 with the costimulatory receptor CD28. On the other hand, higher levels of sCTLA-4 could contend the binding of the membrane form of CTLA-4 with CD80/CD86, in later activation phase, causing a reduction of inhibitory signalling. We showed that sCTLA-4 from sera of patients with different autoimmune diseases is able to display functional activities on an in vitro system acting on the proliferation capability and modulating the secretion of cytokines. We observed a dual effect of sCTLA-4: inhibiting the secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-7, and IL-13 and activating the secretion of TGF-β and IL-10. This study underlines the role of sCTLA-4 in modulating the immune response and its relevance in autoimmune disease pathogenesis.

  8. Fungicide methyl thiophanate binding at sub-domain IIA of human serum albumin triggers conformational change and protein damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Alarifi, Saud A; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Mustafa, Jamal; Musarrat, Javed

    2010-07-01

    Fluorescence quenching data on interaction of a fungicide methyl thiophanate (MT) with human serum albumin (HSA) elucidated a primary binding site at sub-domain IIA. Stern-Volmer algorithm and double log plot revealed the binding affinity (K(a)) and capacity (n) of HSA as 1.65 x 10(4)M(-1) and 1.0 (r(2)=0.99), respectively. Cyclic voltammetric and circular dichroism (CD) studies reaffirmed MT-HSA binding and demonstrated reduction in alpha-helical content of HSA. Substantial release of the carbonyl and acid-soluble amino groups from MT treated HSA suggested protein damage. The plausible mechanism of methyl ((+)CH(3)) group transfer from MT to side chain NH group of tryptophan and HSA degradation elucidates the toxicological and clinical implications of this fungicide. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum levels of interleukin-6 type cytokines and soluble interleukin-6 receptor in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Robak

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and two IL-6 family of cytokines (leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF as well as IL-6 soluble receptor (sIL-6R using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in 66 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and 24 healthy controls. We examined a possible association between the serum levels of these peptides and RA activity according to the Mallya and Mace scoring system and Ritchie's index. We also evaluated the correlation between the serum levels of IL-6, LIF, CNTF and sIL-6R and duration of the disease and calculated sIL-6R/IL-6 ratio in RA patients and in the control group. IL-6 and sIL-6R were detectable in all 66 patients with RA and 24 normal individuals. LIF was also found in the serum of all patients with RA and in 16 (66.7% normal individuals. In contrast CNTF was measurable only in 15 (22.7% patients with RA and 24 (33.3% normal individuals. The highest IL-6 and sIL-6R levels were found in the patients with Stages 3 and 4 of RA activity and the lowest in the control group. In contrast there were no statistically significant diferences between the LIF and CNTF levels in RA patients and normal individuals. We found positive correlation between IL-6 and sIL-6R concentrations and Ritchie's index and a lack of such correlation with LIF and CNTF. IL-6 serum level correlated positively with the disease duration, but sIL-6R, LIF and CNTF did not. Serum sIL-6R/IL-6 ratio was significantly lower in RA patients than in healthy controls. In conclusion, an increase in the serum levels of IL-6 and sIL-6R, but not LIF and CNTF concentrations, may be useful markers for RA activity.

  10. Soluble CD163 levels are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, M; Møller, Holger Jon; Tankisi, H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To measure soluble CD163 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of people with Type 2 diabetes, with and without polyneuropathy, and to relate the findings to peripheral nerve function. METHODS: A total of 22 people with Type 2 diabetes and 12 control subjects without diabetes were...... using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Soluble CD163 levels were significantly higher in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum of the participants with Type 2 diabetes compared with the control participants [cerebrospinal fluid: median (range) 107 (70-190) vs 84 (54-115) μg/l, P ... included in this case-control study. Participants with diabetes were divided into those with neuropathy (n = 8) and those without neuropathy (n = 14) based on clinical examination, vibratory perception thresholds and nerve conduction studies. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid soluble CD163 levels were analysed...

  11. First trimester serum levels of the soluble transcobalamin receptor, holo-transcobalamin, and total transcobalamin in relation to preeclampsia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Torring, Niels; Obeid, Rima; Nexo, Ebba

    2016-12-01

    Human placenta expresses CD320, a receptor that ensures the uptake of holo-transcobalamin (holoTC). Soluble CD320 (sCD320) is present in the circulation and its concentration increases during pregnancy. To investigate a possible association of sCD320, holoTC and total transcobalamin (TC) with the risk of subsequent preeclampsia using serum samples from asymptomatic first trimester pregnant women. Moreover, we aimed to establish reference intervals of the aforementioned biomarkers for first trimester pregnant women who remained healthy throughout pregnancy. This study was a retrospective case-control study that we performed on biobank serum samples. Cases (n = 50) and controls (n = 198) (matched for gestational age and date of sample collection) were asymptomatic women in early pregnancy [median (range) gestational age = 10 (8-12) weeks]. Cases developed preeclampsia while the controls remained normotensive throughout pregnancy. We measured the serum concentration of sCD320, holoTC, and total TC by using in-house ELISA methods. First trimester median concentrations of sCD320, holoTC and total TC were not significantly different between cases and controls. The odd ratio for developing preeclampsia based on exposure to low or high levels of sCD320, holoTC or total TC at first trimester was not significant. The reference intervals (2.5-97.5% percentiles (median)) derived from the controls were 50-170 (90) pmol\\L for sCD320, 20-140 (70) pmol\\L for holoTC and 560-1300 (810) pmol\\L for total TC. The risk of preeclampsia is not predicted by first trimester serum concentrations of sCD320, holoTC or total TC. The first trimester reference intervals for the three parameters is reported.

  12. Serum levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is associated with parasitemia in children with acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch, M; Kofoed, Pe; Fischer, Torge

    2004-01-01

    Serum levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) are significantly elevated and of prognostic value in patients suffering from serious infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis. Our objective was to investigate suPAR levels during symptomatic malaria infection and 7...... days after treatment. Children younger than 6 years who presented with fever or other symptoms compatible with malaria were enrolled. Blood films and samples were collected on day 0 and day 7. Twenty-five children were allocated to each of three groups according to the amount of Plasmodium falciparum...... detected in their initial blood film. Children in group 1 had parasite densities in excess of 20 parasites per 200 leucocytes. The median plasma suPAR level was 6.49 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR]: 4.90-7.61) and correlated to parasitemia (Spearman 0.43, P

  13. pH-dependent conversion of liver-membranous alkaline phosphatase to a serum-soluble form by n-butanol extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, A; Kominami, T; Ikehara, Y

    1985-01-16

    Alkaline phosphatase released from rat liver plasma membrane under usual conditions was electrophoretically not identical with a soluble form in serum which was derived from the liver. The liver-membranous alkaline phosphatase, however, was converted to the serum-soluble form when the liver plasma membrane was treated with n-butanol under the acidic conditions lower than pH 6.5. Such pH-dependent conversion of the enzyme was not observed in plasma membrane of rat ascites hepatoma AH-130 cells. The converting activity for alkaline phosphatase was detected not only in plasma membrane but also in lysosomal membrane of rat liver.

  14. Could both vitamin D and geomagnetic activity impact serum levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in young men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleizgys, Andrius; Šapoka, Virginijus

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D might have a role in diminishing endothelial dysfunction (ED). The initial aim was to test the hypothesis of reciprocity between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and levels of soluble endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that could serve as biomarkers of ED. Randomly selected men of age 20-39 were examined at February or March (cold season) and reexamined at August or September (warm season). Some lifestyle and anthropometrical data were recorded. Laboratory measurements, including those for serum levels of soluble CAMs—sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin—were also performed. As some of the results were rather unexpected, indices of geomagnetic activity (GMA), obtained from the online database, were included in further analysis as a confounder. In 2012-2013, 130 men were examined in cold season, and 125 of them were reexamined in warm season. 25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly negatively associated with sVCAM-1 levels ( β = -0.15, p = 0.043 in warm season; β = -0.19, p = 0.007 for changes). Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 from the same seasons were notably different between years and have changed in an opposite manner. Soluble P-selectin levels were higher at warm season in both years. GMA was positively associated with sVCAM-1 ( β = 0.17, p = 0.039 in cold season; β = 0.22, p = 0.002 for changes) and negatively with sICAM-1 ( β = -0.30. p < 0.001 in cold season) levels. Vitamin D might play a role in diminishing sVCAM-1 levels. Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 were associated with the GMA; this implies a need for further research.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and the interaction of some new water-soluble metal Schiff base complexes with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Mozaffar; Asadi, Zahra; Sadi, Somaye Barzegar; Zarei, Leila; Baigi, Fatemeh Moosavi; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-03-25

    Some new water-soluble Schiff base complexes of Na2[M(L)(H2O)n]; (M=Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn) with a new water-soluble Schiff base ligand where L denotes an asymmetric N2O2 Schiff base ligands; N,N'-bis(5-sulfosalicyliden)-3,4-diaminobenzophenone (5-SO3-3,4-salbenz) were synthesized and characterized. The formation constants of the water soluble Schiff base complexes were calculated by Ketelaar's equation. The theoretical molecular structure for the complexes was computed by using the HF method and the 6-311G basis set. The mechanism of binding of Na2[M(L)(H2O)n] with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The results of fluorescence titration showed that the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was quenched by the complexes; which was rationalized in terms of the dynamic quenching mechanism. The values of Stern-Volmer constants, quenching rate constants, binding constants, binding sites and average aggregation number of HSA have been determined. The thermodynamic parameters, were calculated by van't Hoff equation, indicate that the binding is entropy driven and enthalpically disfavored. Based on the Förster theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the efficiency of energy transfer and the distance between the donor (Trp residues) and the acceptor (complex) were obtained. Finally, the growth inhibitory effects of the complexes toward the K562 cancer cell line were measured. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor level at diagnosis predicts transformation in patients with follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umino, Kento; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Ito, Shoko; Mashima, Kiyomi; Minakata, Daisuke; Nakano, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yasufumi; Sugimoto, Miyuki; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Hatano, Kaoru; Okazuka, Kiyoshi; Sato, Kazuya; Oh, Iekuni; Ohmine, Ken; Suzuki, Takahiro; Muroi, Kazuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated 121 patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) and analyzed the association between the soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) level at diagnosis and the cumulative incidence of transformation. By a receiver-operating characteristic analysis, we determined a cutoff value of sIL-2R for transformation at 4360 U/mL to classify patients into two groups. Patients in the high sIL-2R group showed a shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and shorter disease-specific survival (DSS) (p transformation in the high sIL-2R group was higher than that in the low sIL-2R group (40.9% vs. 7.3% at 5 years, p transformation (HR 7.42, 95% CI: 2.75-20.0, p transformation, PFS, and DSS in patients with FL.

  17. Elevated Serum Levels of Soluble CD30 in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients and Its Association with Disease Severity-Related Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfen Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble CD30 (sCD30, a transmembrane glycoprotein that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR superfamily, has been shown to be associated with various pathological conditions. This study was designed to measure the levels of serum sCD30 in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS and to evaluate the relationships between serum sCD30 levels and other disease severity-related indexes, including bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI, ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (ASDAS, and bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI. Our results demonstrated significantly elevated sCD30 levels in AS patients compared to healthy controls (HCs with mean values of 32.0±12.2 and 24.9±8.0 ng/mL, respectively (P**=0.007, suggesting a potential role of sCD30 in the pathogenesis of AS. However, no significant correlations of sCD30 with BASDAI, ASDAS, or BASFI were detected in our study (P>0.05. Therefore, sCD30 cannot be used as a reliable marker for reflecting disease activity and functional ability of AS patients.

  18. Soluble MUC1 and serum MUC1-specific antibodies are potential prognostic biomarkers for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiu, Raluca A; Mantia-Smaldone, Gina; Elishaev, Esther; Chu, Tianjiao; Thaller, Julia; McCabe, Kathryn; Lenzner, Diana; Edwards, Robert P; Vlad, Anda M

    2011-07-01

    MUC1 (CA15-3) and MUC16 (CA125) tumor-associated antigens are upregulated in ovarian cancer and can be detected in patients' sera by standardized tests. We postulated that increased MUC1 and MUC16 antigens augment antibody responses in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients and that the frequency and intensity of these responses can be used as immune biomarkers of treatment response and disease outcome. We measured MUC1 and MUC16 tumor expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC), assessed serum antigenic levels and quantitated circulating antibodies by ELISA in a cohort of 28 ovarian cancer patients with platinum-resistant or platinum-refractory ovarian cancer, and treated with intraperitoneal (IP) interleukin-2 (IL-2). MUC1 and MUC16 were overexpressed in tumor samples and showed differential distribution profiles. Serum MUC1 (CA15-3) measurements were elevated in all patients and significantly correlated with increased risk of death (P = 0.003). MUC1-specific IgM and IgG anitbodies were found in 92 and 50% of cases, respectively. Patients with progressive disease had higher mean anti-MUC1 IgG than responders at both early (P = 0.025) and late (P = 0.022) time points during IP IL-2 treatment. Anti-MUC1 IgM antibodies inversely correlated with overall survival at both early (P = 0.052) and late (P = 0.009) time points. In contrast to MUC1, neither soluble MUC16 nor MUC16-specific antibodies were significantly associated with clinical response or overall survival in this study. Increased serum MUC1 and high anti-MUC1 antibody levels are prognostic for poor clinical response and reduced overall survival in platinum-resistant or platinum-refractory ovarian cancer.

  19. Increased serum levels of anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase and soluble endoglin in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landburg, P.P.; Elsenga, H.; Schnog, J.B.; Duits, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase (sFlt)-1 and soluble endoglin (sEng) have been shown to be of importance in angiogenesis by sequestering and inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor, placenta-like growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta(1) signaling. Given

  20. The Relationship of Serum Soluble Fas Ligand (sFasL) Level with the Extent of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinarslan, Asife; Boyaci, Bulent; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Topal, Salih; Ercin, Ugur; Okyay, Kaan; Bukan, Neslihan; Yalçin, Ridvan; Cengel, Atiye

    2012-03-01

    Fas/Fas ligand system contributes to the programmed cell death induced by myocardial ischemia. We investigated whether serum soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) level is independently related with the severity and extent of angiographically assessed coronary artery disease (CAD). We included 169 patients in this study. Two groups were formed based on the existence of a lesion on coronary angiography. First group included patients with normal coronary arteries (NCA; n = 53). Patients with atherosclerotic lesions were included in the second group (n = 116). We used the coronary vessel score (the number of the coronary arteries with a lesion leading to ≥ 50% luminal obstruction) and the Azar score to determine the extent and the severity of CAD. Standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were used to measure serum sFasL levels. The serum sFasL level was higher in patients with CAD than in patients with NCA (0.52 ± 0.23 mU/mL vs. 0.45 ± 0.18 mU/mL, p = 0.023). The sFasL level correlated with Azar score (r = 0.231, p = 0.003) and with coronary vessel score (r = 0.269, p < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, we found that age (beta: 0.188, p = 0.008), gender (beta: 0.317, p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (DM; beta: 0.195, p = 0.008), and sFasL level (beta: 0.209, p = 0.003) were independently related with Azar score. When we used coronary vessel score as the dependent variable, we found that age (p = 0.020), gender (p < 0.001), DM (p = 0.006), and sFasL level (p = 0.001) were independent predictors. Serum sFasL level is associated with angiographically more severe CAD. Our findings suggest that sFasL level may be a biochemical surrogate of severe coronary atherosclerosis.

  1. Serum soluble MD-1 levels increase with disease progression in autoimmune prone MRL(lpr/lpr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sumiyo; Nagai, Yoshinori; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Kariyone, Ai; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    MD-1 is a secreted protein that forms a complex with radioprotective 105 (RP105) and this complex plays a crucial role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition by B cells. Disease progression is known to improve in RP105-deficient lupus-prone MRL(lpr/lpr) mice. Furthermore, a soluble form of the homologous MD-2 protein is present in the plasma of septic patients and can opsonize gram-negative bacteria in cooperation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. We have now established a flow cytometry-based assay to detect the soluble form of murine MD-1 (sMD-1) and explored potential roles in autoimmunity. The assay was quantitative and validated with sera from MD-1-deficient mice. Interestingly, heat-inactivated murine serum diminished the ability of sMD-1 to bind RP105. The sMD-1 was secreted by bone marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice. Autoimmune prone MRL(lpr/lpr) mice had higher levels of sMD-1 than control MRL(+/+) mice, and levels markedly increased with disease progression. Expression of MD-1 but not MD-2 mRNA increased with age in the liver and kidney of MRL(lpr/lpr) mice. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses revealed that MD-1 was present in infiltrated macrophages within perivascular lesions of the MRL(lpr/lpr) kidney. This correlation suggests that sMD-1 may contribute to pathogenesis in this autoimmune disease model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [The relationship between serum soluble apoptosis marker (sTRAIL) concentration and nutritional parameters in hemodialyzed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwicz-Zielińska, Grazyna; Fedak, Danuta; Kuźniewski, Marek; Pawlica, Dorota; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Solnica, Bogdan; Janda, Katarzyna; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) acts as a soluble cytokine interacting with transmembrane receptors belonging to the TNF-receptor family. TRAIL can activate both apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signals. Lower levels of serum sTRAIL were inversely associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality in CKD population. A strong association between malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis, have been observed in CKD patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between sTRAIL and nutritional markers and adipose tissue metabolism indices in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. The study was performed in group of 76 patients (36 female and 40 male) of average age 60 +/- 12 years on hemodialysis (74.8 +/- 58.0 months). sTRAIL, leptin and adiponectin were determined by ELISA, BMI based on Quetelet formula and serum albumin level using colorimetric bromokrezol green method. The following values of studied parameters were obtained: sTRAIL = 959.6 +/- 204.0 pg/ml, BMI = 24.5 +/- 4.8, leptin = 36.42 +/- 57.94 ng/ml, adiponectin = 17.55 +/- 10.52 microg/ml, leptin/ adiponectin (x10(-3)) = 2.1 +/- 4.5 and albumin = 38.5 +/- 4.5 g/l. sTRAIL correlate negatively with adiponectin and positively with the remaining studied parameters: BMI, albumin, leptin and leptin/adiponectin ratio. The observed interrelations between sTRAIL and nutritional parameters as well as studied adipokines may indicate the modulating role of sTRAIL in metabolic regulation.

  3. Serum neopterin and soluble CD163 as markers of macrophage activation in paracetamol (acetaminophen)-induced human acute liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D G; Lee, P; Pryde, E A; Hayes, P C; Simpson, K J

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage activation is implicated in the pathogenesis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) following paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose (POD). Neopterin is synthesised from macrophages and reflects the intensity of monocyte/macrophage activation. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a marker of alternatively activated M2 macrophages. To examine neopterin and sCD163 levels in a cohort of acute liver injury patients. Consecutive patients (n = 41, (18 (43.9%) male) with acute liver injury were enrolled. Neopterin and sCD163 levels were measured by ELISA. A total of 24/33 (72.7%) POD patients developed hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and therefore acute liver failure. Both neopterin and sCD163 levels were significantly higher in PODs compared with chronic liver disease (neopterin P paracetamol overdose, and reflect the degree of macrophage activation in this condition. Serum neopterin in particular may have value as an early proxy marker of macrophage activation following paracetamol overdose. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Affinity to bovine serum albumin and anticancer activity of some new water-soluble metal Schiff base complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Mozaffar; Asadi, Zahra; Zarei, Leila; Sadi, Somaye Barzegar; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-12-10

    Metal Schiff-base complexes show biological activity but they are usually insoluble in water so four new water-soluble metal Schiff base complexes of Na2[M(5-SO3-1,2-salben]; (5-SO3-1,2-salben denoted N,N'-bis(5-sulphosalicyliden)-1,2-diaminobenzylamine and M=Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn) were synthesized and characterized. The formation constants of the metal complexes were determined by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The interaction of these complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Type of quenching, binding constants, number of binding sites and binding stoichiometries were determined by fluorescence quenching method. The results showed that the mentioned complexes strongly bound to BSA. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrophobic association was the major binding force and that the interaction was entropy driven and enthalpically disfavoured. The displacement experiment showed that these complexes could bind to the subdomain IIA (site I) of albumin. Furthermore the synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues was not apparently changed. Based on the Förster theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the distance between the donor (Trp residues) and the acceptor metal complexes was obtained. The growth inhibitory effect of complexes toward the K562 cancer cell line was measured. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Effect of soluble calcium and lactose on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    The tendency of calcium to promote microfiltration (MF) membrane fouling is well documented, but the role of lactose has not been studied. Milk protein concentrate that is 85% protein on a dry basis (MPC85) contains less calcium and lactose than skim milk. Our objectives were to determine the effects of skim milk soluble calcium and lactose concentrations on the limiting fluxes (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal factors of 0.1-µm ceramic graded permeability membranes. The MF was fed with 3 different milks: skim milk, liquid MPC85 that had been standardized to the protein content of skim milk with reverse osmosis water (MPC), and liquid MPC85 that had been standardized to the protein and lactose contents of skim milk with reverse osmosis water and lactose monohydrate (MPC+L). Retentate and permeate were continuously recycled to the feed tank. The LF for each feed was determined by increasing flux once per hour from 55 kg·m(-2)·h(-1) until flux did not increase with increasing transmembrane pressure. Temperature, pressure drop across the membrane length, and protein concentration in the retentate recirculation loop were maintained at 50°C, 220 kPa, and 8.77 ± 0.2%, respectively. Experiments were replicated 3 times and the Proc GLM procedure of SAS was used for statistical analysis. An increase in LF between skim milk (91 kg·m(-2)·h(-1)) and MPC+L (124 kg·m(-2)·h(-1)) was associated with a reduction in soluble calcium. The LF of MPC+L was lower than the LF of MPC (137 kg·m(-2)·h(-1)) due to the higher viscosity contributed by lactose. Permeates produced from the MPC and MPC+L contained more protein than the skim milk permeate due to the transfer of caseins from the micelles into the reduced-calcium sera of the MPC and MPC+L. A SP removal factor was calculated by dividing true protein in the permeate by SP in the permeate portion of the feed to describe the ease of SP passage through the membrane. No differences in SP removal factors were detected among the

  6. The effect of four weeks restricted diet on serum soluble leptin receptor levels and adipocyte leptin receptor density in normoweight rattus norvegicus strain Wistar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Indra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the five possible mechanisms of leptin resistance in human obesity is the defect in the leptin receptor (Ob-R. Evidence has accumulated that leptin-binding activity in human serum is related to a soluble form of the leptin receptor, and restriction of energy intake resulted a decrease in circulating leptin levels. Aim of this study is to examine the difference of serum soluble leptin receptor level and leptin receptor density in rat adipose tissue of adventitial aorta after four weeks treated with different restricted diets. Soluble leptin receptor level was measured by ELISA and leptin receptor density by using immuno-histochemistry. The soluble leptin receptor in group treated with 40% of normal daily calori diet was found significantly lower than control (p = 0.02. There were no any significant differences among group treated with 40 % of normal daily calori diet, “1 day fast-1day eat”, and ”1day fast-2 days eat” groups, and among 1 day fast-1 day eat”, ”day fast - 2 days eat” and control groups as well. On the other hand, leptin receptor density in adipose tissues was higher in restricted diet group than control. Diet of 40 % normal daily calorie for 4 weeks decreased soluble leptin receptor level, but increased adipocyte leptin receptor density of the adipose tissue of rat adventitial aorta. These changes may be resulted from an up regulation mechanism in relation with homeostatic maintenance. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:145-50 Keywords: restricted diet, leptin receptor, soluble leptin receptor, adipocyte, obesity

  7. The combination of decoy receptor 3 and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 for the diagnosis of nosocomial bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Juan; Shao, Li-Hua; Zhang, Jian; Fu, Shan-Ji; Wang, Gang; Chen, Feng-Zhe; Zheng, Feng; Ma, Rui-Ping; Liu, Hai-Hong; Dong, Xiao-Meng; Ma, Li-Xian

    2015-03-23

    Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment can significantly reduce mortality of nosocomial bacterial meningitis. However, it is a challenge for clinicians to make an accurate and rapid diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. This study aimed at determining whether combined biomarkers can provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. A retrospective study was carried out. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The patients with bacterial meningitis had significantly elevated levels of the above mentioned biomarkers. The two biomarkers were all risk factors with bacterial meningitis. The biomarkers were constructed into a "bioscore". The discriminative performance of the bioscore was better than that of each biomarker, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.842 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.770-0.914; pbacterial meningitis. The combined strategy is of interest and the validation of that improvement needs further studies.

  8. Serum antibody responses of cats to soluble whole cell antigens and isolated fimbriae of feline Porphyromonas salivosa (macacae) and associations with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J M; Love, D N

    2001-04-02

    The whole cell soluble antigens of two strains (NCTC 11632 and VPB 3313) of feline Porphyromonas salivosa (macacae) were analyzed by Western blotting using serum taken from 40 domestic cats with various grades of periodontal disease. Nine strongly immunogenic protein bands (66, 52, 42, 29, 27, 23, 22, 21 and 19kDa) were selected from both strains for further study. Both strains showed a significant association between overall periodontal grade and serum responses to the 66 and 21kDa bands with significant responses across both strains to all other bands except the 52kDa band. Similarly, both strains showed a significant association between the total colony forming units and serum responses to the 66 and 42kDa bands with significant responses across both strains to all other bands except the 19kDa band. When sera from 25 of these cats were tested by Western blotting against the isolated fimbriae of VPB 3313, there was a significant association between the grade of response of cats to the 42kDa fimbrial preparation and (1) the total reactivity of the mouth (the sum of the responses to all individual whole cell antigens), (2) the total colony forming units of P. salivosa (macacae) at the premolar site, and (3) to their responsiveness to the 42kDa band in the soluble whole cell antigen preparations. These findings suggest that P. salivosa (macacae) is a strong immunogen in the mouths of cats and those cats with more severe periodontal disease have a greater serum antibody reactivity to various soluble whole cell antigens, specifically including the fimbriae of this organism, than those with less severe periodontal disease. Overall, the findings suggest that this organism may be a contributor to periodontal disease in cats.

  9. Effect of azithromycin combined with fat-soluble vitamin on serum inflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as lung function in children with mycoplasma pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Guang Yang1

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of azithromycin combined with fat-soluble vitamin on serum inflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as lung function in children with mycoplasma pneumonia. Methods: 56 children with mycoplasma pneumonia admitted in our hospital between May 2012 and May 2016 were collected, the treatment methods and laboratory test results were retrospectively analyzed, and then they were divided into the control group (n=26 who received azithromycin treatment alone and the observation group (n=30 who received fatsoluble vitamin combined with azithromycin treatment. Before treatment and after 1 week of treatment, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; lung function monitor for children was used to detect lung function index levels. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum inflammation index and chemokine contents as well as lung function indexes were not statistically significant between two groups of patients (P>0.05. After treatment, serum inflammation indexes IL-4 and IL-13 contents of observation group were lower than those of control group while IL- 10 and IL-12 contents were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum chemokines MCP-4, MDC and CysLTs contents of observation group were lower than those of control group (P<0.05; lung function indexes V-T, FEV1, PEF and MMEF25%-75% levels of observation group were higher than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Fat-soluble vitamin combined with azithromycin can reduce the systemic inflammatory response and optimize the lung function in children with mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

  10. A soluble form of CTLA-4 is present in serum of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Simone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CTLA-4 can regulate and maintain self-telerance, providing a negative signal limiting immunoresponses. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a clonal disorder of lymphoid progenitors representing the most frequent malignancy of childhood. Here, we show the presence of significantly elevated levels of a soluble form of CTLA-4 in 70% of B-ALL patients. A possible role of this soluble molecule in the pathogenesis of this neoplastic disease can be envisaged.

  11. [Diagnostic value of combining serum soluble ST2 and interleukin-33 for heart failure patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, N S; Zhang, H F; Liu, P M; Lin, Y Q; Huang, T C; Yang, Y; Wang, J F

    2017-03-24

    Objective: Diagnostic efficacy of serum markers is low for heart failure patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-pEF) as compared to heart failure patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction.We sought to explore the diagnostic value of serum levels of soluble ST2 (sST2) combined with interleukin-33 (IL-33) for the diagnosis of HF-pEF in this study. Methods: A total of 376 patients with HF-pEF (HF group), 376 matched-control patients without heart failure who shared similar clinical characteristics (non-HF group) were included in the study.Another 500 healthy individuals were recruited for assessing the normal ranges of IL-33 and sST2.Serum levels of NT-proBNP were measured by chemi-luminescence assay, while IL-33 and sST2 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Serum levels of IL-33 and sST2 were not normally distributed in healthy population.Serum concentrations of IL-33 and sST2 were significantly higher in HF-pEF patients than in patients in non-HF group (median, IL-33: 0.437 μg/L vs. 0.127 μg/L, P pEF was 0.763 (95% CI 0.729-0.795, P pEF was 0.83, with 74.73% sensitivity and 84.57% specificity.The AUC of sST2 for detecting HF-pEF was significantly higher than NT-proBNP in population with high serum IL-33 (AUC: 0.88 vs. 0.83, P pEF diagnosis, especially for patients with high serum IL-33 concentrations.

  12. Association of ophthalmic complications in patients with sulfur mustard induced mild ocular complications and serum soluble adhesion molecules: Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Hassan; Yaraee, Roya; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Soroush, Mohammad-Reza; Pourfarzam, Shahriar; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Babaei, Mahmoud; Moaiedmohseni, Sakine; Naghizadeh, Mohammad-Mehdi; Askari, Nayere; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate possible association between ophthalmic complications in sulfur mustard (SM) exposed patients with mild ocular injuries and serum soluble adhesion molecules. Serum levels of sICAM-1, sL-selectin, sP-selectin and sE-selectin in 367 SM-exposed individuals with or without eye injuries were checked and compared with 128 unexposed controls. All participants underwent ocular examinations. Serum sICAM-1 level in SM exposed with blurred vision, was significantly (p=0.021) higher than in SM exposed with no blurred vision. Serum sL-selectin level was significantly (p=0.024) higher in SM exposed with photophobia than SM exposed with no photophobia. Serum P-selectin level in exposed without any slit lamp findings was significantly (p=0.003) lower than the matched control groups. Similar finding was seen in exposed group without ocular problem compared with the control groups. Serum sE-selectin level in exposed with normal ocular condition except for photophobia and blurred vision was significantly (p<0.05) higher than the matched controls. Serum E-selectin level in exposed with photophobia condition was significantly (p=0.047) higher than the control group with photophobia. In conclusion it seems that the changes in the E- and P-selectins is a regulatory mechanism for inhibition of SM induced ocular problems, although the local levels are more important and further investigations required in more severe ocular problems in SM exposed patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Soluble NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein involved in homophilic interactions that facilitate cell-cell adhesion. In addition to a number of membrane-bound isoforms, NCAM also exists in several soluble isoforms that have been identified in cerebrospinal fluid, blood...... serum, brain tissue, and cell culture media. Soluble NCAM can be produced in a number of ways, such as alternative splicing of the transcript from NCAM1 and enzymatic processing of the extracellular domain at the cell membrane. Soluble NCAM interferes with homophilic NCAM interactions mediated...... by membrane-bound NCAM, thereby reducing NCAM-dependent adhesion, and can modulate neurite outgrowth in vitro-a property that likely is dose-dependent. The biological effects of overexpressing soluble NCAM in transgenic animals include a perturbation of synaptic connectivity and the development of abnormal...

  14. The soluble receptor for vitamin B12 uptake (sCD320) increases during pregnancy and occurs in higher concentration in urine than in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Andreasen, Birgitte H; Kronborg, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (B12) demands binding of the vitamin to transcobalamin (TC) and recognition of TC-B12 (holoTC) by the receptor CD320, a receptor expressed in high quantities on human placenta. We have identified a soluble form of CD320 (sCD320) in serum and here we...... gestational weeks 17-41. sCD320, holoTC, total TC and complex formation between holoTC and sCD320 were measured by in-house ELISA methods, while creatinine was measured on the automatic platform Cobas 6000. Size exclusion chromatography was performed on a Superdex 200 column. RESULTS: Median (range) of serum...

  15. Serum Levels of IL-6 Type Cytokines and Soluble IL-6 Receptors in Active B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and in Cladribine Induced Remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Robak

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and two IL-6 family cytokines-oncostatin M (OSM and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF-in 63 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL and 17 healthy controls using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. Simultaneously, we measured the serum levels of the soluble forms of two subunits of the IL-6 receptor complex-ligand binding glycoprotein 80 (sIL-6R and glycoprotein 130 (sgp130. The cytokines and receptors were evaluated in 25 untreated patients and 38 patients treated with cladribine (2-CdA, as well as in 17 healthy controls. We have correlated the serum levels of these proteins with Rai's clinical stage of the disease, the response to 2-CdA treatment and some hematological parameters. We have also evaluated the correlation of the IL-6 serum level with the concentration of OSM and IL-6 soluble receptors. IL-6 was measurable in 62/63 (98.4%, OSM in 20/25 (80% of untreated and 14/38 (37.8% of the treated patients. sIL-6R and sgp130 were detectable in all 63 patients and LIF in none of the CLL patients. IL-6 serum level in untreated patients was not significantly different as compared to its concentration in the control group (P>0.05. However, in the patients treated with 2-CdA the IL-6 level was significantly lower (P0.05. We have found significant positive correlation between the levels of sIL6R and the lymphocytes count in CLL patients (Ρ=0.423; P<0.001. In addition, sIL-6R and OSM serum concentrations correlated also with CLL Rai stage. In conclusion, the serum level of IL-6, OSM and sIL-6R, but not LIF and sgp130, are useful indicators of CLL activity.

  16. Low Levels of Serum Soluble Receptors for Advanced Glycation End Products, Biomarkers for Disease State: Myth or Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, Kailash

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) interact with the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on the membrane and induce deleterious effects via activation of nuclear factor kappa-B, and increased oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators. AGEs also combine with circulating soluble receptors (endogenous secretory RAGE [esRAGE] and soluble receptor for RAGE [sRAGE]) and sequester RAGE ligands and act as a cytoprotective agent. esRAGE is secreted from the cells and is a spliced variant of RAGE. The sRAGE...

  17. CD8+CD28-lymphocytes in peripheral blood and serum concentrations of soluble interleukin 6 receptor are increased in patients with Graves' orbitopathy and correlate with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Miroslaw; Urbaniak-Kujda, Donata; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Kapelko-Slowik, Katarzyna; Dybko, Jaroslaw; Wolowiec, Dariusz; Jazwiec, Bozena; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    The extrathyroid, orbital manifestation of Graves' disease (GD)--Graves' orbitopathy (GO)--presents a difficult clinical problem. The immunological status of GO patients is still under investigation. The aim of this study was to assess the serum concentration of interleukin 6 (IL-6), soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R), and CD8+CD28- lymphocytes in GO patients and to evaluate if these parameters were associated with disease activity. Thirty-nine patients (29 women and 10 men, aged 24-71, mean 50.18) with newly diagnosed GD were enrolled in the study. Active GO was diagnosed in 20 patients. The control group included 12 healthy individuals. Serum concentrations of IL-6 and sIL-6R were estimated by ELISA. Percentages of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes in peripheral blood were assessed by flow cytometry. Mean serum IL-6 and sIL-6R concentrations were significantly higher in all GD patients and in GO and non-GO patients than in normal controls. In all GD patients and the non-GO group, serum IL-6 and sIL-6R concentrations were significantly reduced after efficient treatment. In GO patients, only serum sIL-6R concentration was significantly lower after efficient treatment. In all GD patients, the mean percentage of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes was significantly lower after efficient treatment. In GO patients, the mean percentage of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes was significantly higher than in the non-GO group or in normals. Moreover, in the GO group, the mean percentage of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes was significantly lower after treatment. Our results have shown that CD8+CD28- lymphocyte percentage in peripheral blood and serum concentration of sIL-6R are increased in GO patients and correlate with disease activity.

  18. The effect of a very high daily plant stanol ester intake on serum lipids, carotenoids, and fat-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gylling, Helena; Hallikainen, Maarit; Nissinen, Markku J; Miettinen, Tatu A

    2010-02-01

    Intake of 2-3 g/d of plant stanols as esters lowers LDL cholesterol level, but there is no information about the efficacy and safety of a respective very high daily intake. We studied the effects of 8.8 g/d of plant stanols as esters on serum lipids and safety variables in subjects with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study the intervention (n=25) and control (n=24) groups consumed spread and drink enriched or not with plant stanol esters for 10 weeks. Plant stanols reduced serum total and LDL cholesterol concentrations by 12.8 and 17.3% from baseline and by 12.0 and 17.1% from controls (Pvitamins A, D, and gamma-tocopherol concentrations, and the ratios of alpha-tocopherol to cholesterol were unchanged. Serum beta-carotene concentrations decreased significantly from baseline and were different from controls even when adjusted for cholesterol. Serum alpha-carotene concentration and alpha-carotene/cholesterol ratio were not different from controls. High intake of plant stanols reduced LDL cholesterol values without any other side effects than reduction of serum beta-carotene concentration. However, the end product, serum vitamin A levels, were unchanged. The results suggest that plant stanol ester intake can be increased to induce a greater cholesterol lowering effect. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-α and its soluble receptors in the serum of teenagers with atherosclerosis risk factors: obesity or obesity combined with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchowicz, Anna; Kniażewska, Maria; Zmudzińska-Kitczak, Joanna; Urban, Katarzyna; Gonciarz-Majda, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Obesity and hypertension are recognised risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis. It has not been proven whether their co-existence increases the synthesis of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and what the levels of soluble receptors of this cytokine (sTNF-R) are. This study is aimed to investigate whether there exists a relationship between TNF-α and sTNF-R concentrations in blood serum with the occurrence of obesity or obesity combined with primary hypertension in teenagers. 68 persons, aged 9-17, including 32 persons with primary obesity (Group I) and 36 with primary obesity combined with primary hypertension (Group II). TNF-α (pg/mL) and sTNF-R (ng/mL) concentrations were determined in serum samples using the ELISA method with sets of reagents manufactured by Bender Med Systems GmbH. No significant differences in TNF-α, sTNF-R, glucose or insulin concentrations were found between Group I and Group II. These concentrations were not correlated with the age and the nutritional status of the patients or with each other in either of the groups. Both obese teenagers and teenagers exhibiting obesity combined with hypertension (as two atherosclerosis risk factors) are characterised by comparable concentrations of TNF-α and its soluble receptors.

  20. High-MET status in non-small cell lung tumors correlates with receptor phosphorylation but not with the serum level of soluble form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copin, Marie-Christine; Lesaffre, Marie; Berbon, Mélanie; Doublet, Louis; Leroy, Catherine; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Porte, Henri; Vicogne, Jérôme; B Cortot, Alexis; Dansin, Eric; Tulasne, David

    2016-11-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase MET is essential to embryonic development and organ regeneration. Its deregulation is associated with tumorigenesis. While MET gene amplification and mutations leading to MET self-activation concern only a few patients, a high MET level has been found in about half of the non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) tested. How this affects MET activation in tumors is unclear. Also uncertain is the prognostic value, in cancer, of a phenomenon well described in cell models: MET shedding, i.e. its cleavage by membrane proteases leading to release of a soluble fragment into the medium. A prospective cohort of 39 NSCLC patients was constituted at diagnosis or soon after. Normal tissues, tumor tissues, and blood samples were obtained. This allowed, for the same patient, synchronous determination of (i) the MET level in the tumor, (ii) receptor phosphorylation, and (iii) the concentration of soluble MET fragment (sMET) in the serum. After confirming the adequacy of an ELISA for measuring the serum level of sMET, we found no correlation between this level and the concentration of MET in tumors, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Nevertheless, all but one tumor displaying a high MET level also displayed receptor phosphorylation, restricted to a small number of tumor cells. Our results thus demonstrate that the serum level of sMET is not indicative of the amount of MET present in the tumor cells and cannot be used as a biomarker for therapeutic purposes. However, MET scoring of tumor biopsies could be a first step prior to determination of MET receptor activation in high-MET tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum soluble Fas ligand and nitric oxide in long-term pulmonary complications induced by sulfur mustard: Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Tooba; Sharifnia, Zarin; Yaraee, Roya; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Kariminia, Amina; Mahlojirad, Maryam; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Jalali-Nodoushan, Mohammad Reza; Ardestani, Sussan K; Soroush, Mohammad R; Amiri, Sara; Hassan, Zuhair M; Ghavami, Saeid; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2009-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) has short- and long-term toxicity against various organs including the respiratory system. However, the basic and molecular mechanisms of SM long-term toxicity have not clearly been defined. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the association of soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) as well as nitric oxide (NO) serum levels with long-term pulmonary complications in a SM exposed population 20 years after SM exposure. In this historical cohort study 372 male SM exposed subjects and 128 age-matched unexposed controls were studied. Clinical evaluation and pulmonary function tests were carried out for all participants and serum concentrations of sFasL and NO measured. According to our results, the serum levels of sFasL and NO were not significantly different between the exposed and control groups. However, the serum levels of sFasL in the exposed group with pulmonary problems were significantly higher than their corresponding in the control group (116.711+/-81.166 vs 86.027+/-30.199 and p=0.028). Furthermore a significant elevation in sFasL levels was found in the exposed subjects with pulmonary problems compared to those exposed participants without pulmonary problems (116.711+/-81.166 vs 90.692+/-57.853 and p=0.004). Based on Global Initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classification analysis a positive correlation was observed between sFasL levels and pulmonary problems. There was also a significant negative correlation between sFasL and the white blood cell (WBC) count in the SM exposed cohort, but not in the control group. No significant association was shown between NO and pulmonary impairment in the SM exposed subjects. Thus, our results indicate that elevated serum levels of sFasL may be associated with progression of pulmonary diseases in the SM exposed subjects.

  2. Dietary supplementation with dried chicory root triggers changes in the blood serum proteins engaged in the clotting process and the innate immune response in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepczynski, A; Herosimczyk, A; Ozgo, M; Skomial, J; Taciak, M; Barszcz, M; Berezecka, N

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the systemic immune and metabolic alterations in the blood serum of growing pigs in response to a dietary supplementation with 4% of dried chicory roots. This was achieved by examining the influence of the experimental diet on serum protein changes especially these related with immunology and lipid metabolism. Serum proteins with the isoelectric point ranging from pH 3.0 to 10.0 were separated using high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. As a result, we found that experimental diet triggered significant changes in 37 protein spots. Of these, 14 were up-regulated, whereas 23 showed down-regulation. Of 37 significantly altered protein spots, 24 were successfully identified, representing 14 distinct gene products. Implementation of the dried chicory roots into the diet of growing pigs caused a significant down-regulation of apolipoprotein C-II complement component C6, C-reactive protein, CD14 antigen, C4b binding protein α and β chains, and fibrinogen. Piglets fed experimental diet had similar IgA, IgG and IgM concentrations, although the level of IgM tended to be lower compared to the control group. It is concluded that diet supplemented with 4% of dried chicory root may exert anti-inflammatory properties and affect lipid metabolism in growing pigs.

  3. Risk Factors Associated with Serum Levels of the Inflammatory Biomarker Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in a General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haupt, Thomas H; Kallemose, Thomas; Ladelund, Steen

    2014-01-01

    .001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum...

  4. Diagnostic value of soluble CD163 serum levels in patients suspected of meningitis: comparison with CRP and procalcitonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Larsen, Klaus; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected of meningi......The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected...... of meningitis on admission to a 27-bed infectious disease department at a Danish university hospital. Biomarker serum levels on admission were measured. Sensitivity and specificity were evaluated at pre-specified cut-off values and overall diagnostic accuracies were compared using receiver......-operating characteristic AUCs (areas under curves). Patients were classified by 2 sets of diagnostic criteria into: A) purulent meningitis, serous meningitis or non-meningitis, and B) systemic bacterial infection, local bacterial infection or non-bacterial disease. An elevated serum level of sCD163 was the most specific...

  5. Lipid-soluble antioxidants and pregnancy: maternal serum levels of coenzyme Q10, alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol in preeclampsia and normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, Prabhudas R; Shaban, Danny W; Martino, Teresa; Mikhail, Magdy S

    2004-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that in preeclampsia, the antioxidant-deficient state may facilitate increased attacks of free radicals, which may result in endothelial cell damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of three lipid-soluble antioxidants, coenzyme Q10, alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol, with preeclampsia and normal pregnancy. Serum levels of all three antioxidants in 42 women with normal pregnancies, 25 with mild preeclampsia and 28 with severe preeclampsia were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. A significant decrease was observed in serum levels of coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol (p < 0.001 for each by the Kruskal-Wallis rank test) in women with preeclampsia compared to levels in normal pregnancy. gamma-Tocopherol levels were comparable among the different groups. Logistic regression analysis revealed significant association between grades of preeclampsia and both serum coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol levels (p = 0.000 and 0.030, respectively). Coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol are potent antioxidants, and the decreased levels of these two antioxidants in preeclampsia may alter the normal redox balance, thereby reducing the ability of antioxidant defenses to protect against free radical damage. This could be a factor in the endothelial cell damage observed in preeclampsia. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Predictive value of soluble haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 serum levels for survival in verified tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T B; Gustafson, P; Kronborg, G

    2005-01-01

    Pre-treatment serum levels of sCD163 were measured in a cohort of 236 suspected tuberculosis (TB) cases from Guinea-Bissau, with a median follow-up period of 3.3 years (range 0-6.4 years). In 113 cases, the diagnosis of TB was verified by positive sputum microscopy and/or culture. Among the verif......Pre-treatment serum levels of sCD163 were measured in a cohort of 236 suspected tuberculosis (TB) cases from Guinea-Bissau, with a median follow-up period of 3.3 years (range 0-6.4 years). In 113 cases, the diagnosis of TB was verified by positive sputum microscopy and/or culture. Among...

  7. First trimester serum levels of the soluble transcobalamin receptor, holo-transcobalamin, and total transcobalamin in relation to preeclampsia risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Torring, Niels; Obeid, Rima

    2016-01-01

    transcobalamin (TC) with the risk of subsequent preeclampsia using serum samples from asymptomatic first trimester pregnant women. Moreover, we aimed to establish reference intervals of the aforementioned biomarkers for first trimester pregnant women who remained healthy throughout pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN...... preeclampsia while the controls remained normotensive throughout pregnancy. We measured the serum concentration of sCD320, holoTC, and total TC by using in-house ELISA methods. RESULTS: First trimester median concentrations of sCD320, holoTC and total TC were not significantly different between cases...... and controls. The odd ratio for developing preeclampsia based on exposure to low or high levels of sCD320, holoTC or total TC at first trimester was not significant. The reference intervals (2.5-97.5% percentiles (median)) derived from the controls were 50-170 (90) pmol\\L for sCD320, 20-140 (70) pmol...

  8. Circulating soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) as diagnostic and prognostic marker in neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Amira A M; Ismail, Eman A; Andrawes, Nevine G; El-Saadany, Marwa A

    2014-02-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is an important receptor involved in the innate inflammatory response and sepsis. We assessed soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1) in 112 septic neonates (63 culture-positive and 49 culture-negative) and 40 healthy controls as a potential early diagnostic and prognostic marker for neonatal sepsis (NS). Studied neonates were evaluated for early- or late-onset sepsis using clinical and laboratory indicators upon admission. sTREM-1 was measured on initial sepsis evaluation and at 48h after antibiotic therapy. For ethical reasons, cord blood samples were collected from control neonates and only samples from neonates that proved to be healthy by clinical examination and laboratory analysis were further analyzed for sTREM-1. Baseline sTREM-1 levels were significantly elevated in culture-proven (1461.1±523pg/mL) and culture-negative sepsis (1194±485pg/mL) compared to controls (162.2±61pg/mL) with no significant difference between both septic groups. Culture-positive or negative septic preterm neonates had significantly higher sTREM-1 compared to full term neonates. sTREM-1 was significantly higher in neonates with early sepsis than late sepsis and was associated with high mortality. sTREM-1 was significantly decreased 48h after antibiotic therapy compared to baseline or levels in neonates with persistently positive cultures. sTREM-1 was positively correlated to white blood cells (WBCs), absolute neutrophil count, immature/total neutrophil (I/T) ratio, C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and sepsis score while negatively correlated to gestational age and weight. hs-CRP and sepsis score were independently related to sTREM-1 in multiregression analysis. sTREM-1 cutoff value of 310pg/mL could be diagnostic for NS with 100% sensitivity and specificity (AUC, 1.0 and 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.696-1.015) while the cutoff value 1100pg/mL was predictive of survival with 100% sensitivity and 97% specificity (AUC, 0.978 and 95% CI, 0

  9. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) and serum soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) in children affected by vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, Anna Maria; Zicari, Alessandra; Nebbioso, Marcella; Mari, Emanuela; Celani, Camilla; Lollobrigida, Valeria; Cesoni Marcelli, Azzurra; Occasi, Francesca; Duse, Marzia

    2014-02-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a chronic disease affecting conjunctiva even though the immunopathogenetic mechanisms underlying this inflammation are unclear. The aim of our study is to investigate serum levels of HMGB1 and circulating sRAGE in children affected by VKC before and after treatment with cyclosporine A (CsA) eye drops and in a group of healthy children. Twenty-four children affected by VKC aged between 5 and 12 yrs of life were enrolled at the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, 'Sapienza' University of Rome. Twenty-four healthy children without atopy, ocular, and systemic disease, cross-matched for sex and age to patients affected by VKC, represented the controls. All children affected by VKC were treated with CsA 1% eye drops for 4 wks, and blood samples were collected before and 2 wks after the end of treatment while the controls underwent to a single blood sample at the time of enrollment. Serum basal levels of HMGB1 and sRAGE were higher in children with VKC when compared with controls while, in patients affected by VKC, no difference was detected between atopic and non-atopic, and between ANA-positive and ANA-negative children. A significant reduction in serum HMGB1 and sRAGE levels was detected after the therapy while CsA serum levels were negative. Our study gives a support to the definition of VKC as a systemic inflammation in which HMGB1 and its soluble receptors could play a role. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Visual colorimetric sensor array for discrimination of antioxidants in serum using MnO2 nanosheets triggered multicolor chromogenic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Deng, Yuequan; He, Yi

    2017-05-15

    Here we report a unique visual colorimetric sensor array for discrimination of antioxidants in serum based on MnO2 nanosheets-3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) multicolor chromogenic system. The absorbance values of the system at 370, 450, and 650nm provide three cross-reactive sensing elements. The presence of antioxidant will inhibit the reaction between TMB and MnO2 nanosheets due to the presence of the competitive reaction of MnO2 nanosheets and antioxidants. Different antioxidants containing uric acid, glutathione, ascorbic acid, cysteine, and melatonin have distinct reducing ability, producing a differential inhibition of MnO2 nanosheets-TMB system, and therefore generating distinct colorimetric response patterns at 370, 450, and 650nm. The obtained patterns for each antioxidant at a concentration of 20μM were successfully discriminated using principal component analysis both in buffer and when spiked into fetal bovine serum (FBS). The identification accuracy of 45 unknown samples was found to be 100%. Remarkably, this sensor assay can visually discriminate antioxidants in diluted FBS with the naked eye. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation between intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging derived metrics and serum soluble CD40 ligand level in an embolic canine stroke model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Wu, Chen Jiang; Lu, Shan Shan; Gao, Qian Qian; Zu, Qing Quan; Liu, Xing Long; Shi, Hai Bin; Liu, Sheng [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the relationship between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging derived quantitative metrics and serum soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) level in an embolic canine stroke model. A middle cerebral artery occlusion model was established in 24 beagle dogs. Experimental dogs were divided into low- and high-sCD40L group according to serum sCD40L level at 4.5 hours after establishing the model. IVIM imaging was scanned at 4.5 hours after model establishment using 10 b values ranging from 0 to 900 s/mm{sup 2}. Quantitative metrics diffusion coefficient (D), pseudodiffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) of ischemic lesions were calculated. Quantitative metrics of ischemic lesions were normalized by contralateral hemisphere using the following formula: normalized D = D{sub stroke} / D{sub contralateral}. Differences in IVIM metrics between the low- and high-sCD40L groups were compared using t test. Pearson's correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship between IVIM metrics and serum sCD40L level. The high-sCD40L group showed significantly lower f and normalized f values than the low-sCD40L group (f, p < 0.001; normalized f, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in D{sup *}, normalized D{sup *}, D, or normalized D value between the two groups (All p > 0.05). Both f and normalized f values were negatively correlated with serum sCD40L level (f, r = −0.789, p < 0.001; normalized f, r = −0.823, p < 0.001). However, serum sCD40L level had no significant correlation with D{sup *}, normalized D{sup *}, D, or normalized D (All p > 0.05). The f value derived from IVIM imaging was negatively correlated with serum sCD40L level. f value might serve as a potential imaging biomarker to assess the formation of microvascular thrombosis in hyperacute period of ischemic stroke.

  12. Alterations in the serum levels of soluble L, P and E-selectin 20 years after sulfur mustard exposure: Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaraee, Roya; Ghazanfari, Tooba; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Mostafaie, Ali; Soroush, Mohammad R; Inai, Kouki; Foroutan, Abbas; Shams, Jalaleddin; Naghizadeh, Mohammad M; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2009-12-01

    The selectins (L, P and E) are carbohydrate-binding membrane glycoproteins acting as adhesion molecules involved in the development of different inflammatory reactions. Various eye, skin and lung diseases are associated with induction of soluble selectins. In this study serum levels of soluble forms of selectins (sL-selectin, sP-selectin and sE-selectin) were evaluated in the sulfur mustard (SM) exposed and the control groups using ELISA method. sL-selectin was significantly lower in the SM exposed group compared to the control group (1131.5+/-16.3 and 1205.7+/-26.9 pg/ml respectively; p=0.021). The serum levels of sP-Selectin was significantly reduced in the SM exposed group in comparison to the control group (149.35+/-2.61 and 170.25+/-5.16 pg/ml respectively; p<0.001). sE-selectin was significantly increased in sera of the exposed group compared to the control group (29.64+/-0.902 and 24.61+/-1.26 pg/ml respectively; p=0.003). sL-selectin positively correlated with the percentage of polymorphonuclear cells and negatively with the percentage of lymphocytes. There was a significant correlation between the count of platelets and sP-selectin in both the control and exposed groups. The change in the pattern of selectins in the SM exposed group in comparison to the control group may indicate suppressed acute inflammatory condition in which new remodeling of cytokine expression play a more crucial role in the immune-regulation.

  13. Serum levels of soluble adhesion molecules in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia and in complete remission suggest endothelial cell activation by myeloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupsa, Tomas; Vanek, Jan; Pavel, Zak; Jebavy, Ladislav; Horacek, Jan M

    2017-03-01

    Despite high-dose multi-agent chemotherapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation, the relapse rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is high. Further, the disease is highly resistent to drugs. We speculated that deeper understanding of AML-endothelial cell interactions might provide new targets for selective modulation of the AML microenvironment and form the basis for novel treatment approaches. In this study, we evaluated levels of endothelium derived soluble adhesion molecules in active disease and in complete remission (CR) and their relationship with inflammatory cytokines. Baseline serum levels of 25 cytokines and 5 soluble adhesion molecules were measured in 84 AML patients using biochip array technology. CR samples were evaluated in 44 patients of this cohort. The control group consisted of 15 healthy blood donors. All analytes were independent of age or disease origin. Some correlations were restricted to active AML, some were ubiquitous and some were found in remission. In active disease, E-selectin (E-SEL) and VCAM-1 correlated with leukocyte count, E-SEL correlated with P-selectin (P-SEL). Platelet count related to IL-7, EGF and VEGF but not to P-SEL. In CR, P-SEL correlated with platelet count and EGF but not with E-SEL. There was no relationship of P-SEL and E-SEL in the control group. Leukemic activity is associated with a different pattern of soluble adhesion molecule levels. Both E-SEL and P-SEL may be derived from endothelial cells. Their levels correlated in active disease. E-SEL correlated with leukocyte count. In CR, P-SEL physiologically correlated with platelet count. The correlation with E-SEL was insignificant and absent in the control group. Our data suggest activation of endothelial cells in the presence of myeloblasts.

  14. Diagnostic value of soluble CD163 serum levels in patients suspected of meningitis: comparison with CRP and procalcitonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Larsen, Klaus; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected of meningi......The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of sCD163 serum levels with CRP and PCT in meningitis and bacterial infection. An observational cohort study was conducted between February 2001 and February 2005. The study population comprised 55 patients suspected...... marker for distinguishing bacterial infection from non-bacterial disease (specificity 0.91; sensitivity 0.47). However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of CRP (AUC =0.91) and PCT (AUC =0.87) were superior (p... infection, the AUC of sCD163 (0.83) did not differ significantly from those of CRP or PCT. All markers had AUCs CRP and PCT had high diagnostic value and were superior as markers of bacterial infection compared to s...

  15. Elevated serum soluble CD200 and CD200R as surrogate markers of bone loss under bed rest conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, O; Hughson, R L; Hart, D A; Clément, G; Frings-Meuthen, P; Linnarsson, D; Paloski, W H; Rittweger, J; Wuyts, F; Zange, J; Gorczynski, R M

    2014-03-01

    CD200 is a transmembrane protein that belongs to the immunoglobulin family of proteins and is ubiquitously expressed on a variety of cell types. Upon interaction with its receptors (CD200Rs) expressed on myeloid-derived cells and T lymphocytes, an immunoregulatory signal is delivered to receptor-expressing cells. Previous studies have implicated a role for CD200:CD200R in the regulation of the expression of mRNA markers of osteoclastogenesis/osteoblastogenesis, following interaction of CD200 (on osteoblast precursors) with CD200R1 (on osteoclast precursors). Signaling of CD200R1 is hypothesized to attenuate osteoclastogenesis. We have investigated whether levels of soluble forms of CD200 and/or CD200R1 (sCD200, sCD200R1) are altered in volunteers undergoing 6° head down tilt bed rest to mimic conditions of microgravity known to be associated with preferential osteoclastogenesis and whether countermeasures, reported to be beneficial in attenuation of bone loss under microgravity conditions, would lead to altered sCD200 and sCD200R1 levels. Our data suggest that, as predicted, sCD200 levels fall under bed rest conditions while sCD200R1 levels rise. In subjects undergoing 30-minute per day continuous centrifugation protocols, as a countermeasure to attenuate changes which may lead to bone loss, these alterations in sCD200 and sCD200R1 levels seen under conditions of bed rest were abolished or attenuated. Our results suggest that measurement of sCD200 and/or sCD200R1 may prove a useful and rapid means of monitoring subjects at risk of bone loss and/or accessing the efficacy of treatment regimes designed to counter bone loss. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Value of soluble urokinase receptor serum levels in the differential diagnosis between idiopathic and secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Alfons; Jatem, Elías; Quiles, M Teresa; Arbós, M Antonia; Ostos, Helena; Valtierra, Naiara; Carnicer, Clara; Salcedo, M Teresa

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the circulating level of the soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) could be useful for distinguishing idiopathic from secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, but the results published are conflicting. In this study, we analyse the intraindividual variability and clinical and anatomopathological variables associated with the suPAR levels and if circulating suPAR levels allow the different forms of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) to be distinguished, i.e., idiopathic forms from secondary FSGS, regardless of the presence of nephrotic syndrome and the activity phase. We studied 35 patients affected by idiopathic FSGS and 48 with secondary FSGS (83 in total). We carried out measurements of circulating suPAR at the time of diagnosis and/or after remission and we analysed correlations between suPAR levels and demographic, clinical and biochemical variables. The ability of suPAR to distinguish between both forms of FSGS was analysed by ROC curves and logistic regression analysis. In both forms of FSGS, suPAR levels were independent of proteinuria and the histopathological subtype of FSGS and they were significantly associated with age and renal function. After adjusting for both variables, suPAR levels were significantly higher in patients with idiopathic FSGS, both in the nephrotic syndrome phase and in partial or complete remission. The most sensitive suPAR level (80%) and the most specific (73%) for discriminating between idiopathic and secondary forms was 3443.6 pg/ml (area below curve [ABC] 0.78 ± 0.083, Pdiagnosis of idiopathic FSGS, but the model was poorly adjusted for low risk categories in which it tended to classify primary forms as secondary forms (χ(2) = 11.2 p=.027). SuPAR levels lack sensitivity for differentiating between idiopathic and secondary FSGS. However, suPAR values greater than 4000 ng/ml are highly specific to primary FSGS, and as such, with a morphological FSGS pattern associated with non

  17. Aspirin-triggered lipoxins override the apoptosis-delaying action of serum amyloid A in human neutrophils: a novel mechanism for resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kebir, Driss; József, Levente; Khreiss, Tarek; Pan, Wanling; Petasis, Nicos A; Serhan, Charles N; Filep, János G

    2007-07-01

    Elevated plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A (SAA) have been used as a marker and predictor of inflammatory diseases. SAA regulates leukocyte activation; however, it is not known whether it also modulates neutrophil apoptosis, which is critical to the optimal expression and resolution of inflammation. Culture of human neutrophils with SAA (0.1-20 microg/ml) markedly prolonged neutrophil longevity by delaying constitutive apoptosis. SAA evoked concurrent activation of the ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways, leading to phosphorylation of BAD at Ser(112) and Ser(136), respectively, and to prevention of collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. These actions were abrogated by pharmacological inhibition of the formyl peptide receptor, ERK or PI3K. Furthermore, aspirin-triggered 15-epi-lipoxin A(4) (15-epi-LXA(4)) and its stable analog 15-epi-16-p-fluorophenoxy-LXA(4), which binds to the same receptor as SAA, effectively overrode the antiapoptosis signal from SAA even when neutrophils were treated with 15-epi-LXA(4) at either 1 or 4 h postculture with SAA. 15-Epi-LXA(4) itself did not affect neutrophil survival and apoptosis. Our results indicate that SAA at clinically relevant concentrations promotes neutrophil survival by suppressing the apoptotic machinery, an effect that can be opposed by 15-epi-LXA(4). The opposing actions of SAA and aspirin-triggered 15-epi-LXA(4) may contribute to the local regulation of exacerbation and resolution of inflammation, respectively.

  18. A SPION-eicosane protective coating for water soluble capsules:Evidence for on-demand drug release triggered by magnetic hyperthermia

    OpenAIRE

    Che Rose, Laili; Bear, Joseph C.; McNaughter, Paul; Southern, Paul; Piggott, R. Ben; Parkin, Ivan P.; Qi, Sheng; Mayes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    An orally-administered system for targeted, on-demand drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly desirable due to the high instances of diseases of that organ system and harsh mechanical and physical conditions any such system has to endure. To that end, we present an iron oxide nanoparticle/wax composite capsule coating using magnetic hyperthermia as a release trigger. The coating is synthesised using a simple dip-coating process from pharmaceutically approved materials using...

  19. Preparation and sonodynamic activities of water-soluble tetra-α-(3-carboxyphenoxyl) zinc(II) phthalocyanine and its bovine serum albumin conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He-Nan; Chen, Hai-Jun; Zheng, Bi-Yuan; Zheng, Yun-Quan; Ke, Mei-Rong; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a new approach for cancer treatment, involving the synergistic effect of ultrasound and certain chemical compounds termed as sonosensitizers. A water-soluble phthalocyanine, namely tetra-α-(3-carboxyphenoxyl) zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPcC4), has been prepared and characterized. The interactions between ZnPcC4 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that there were strong interactions between ZnPcC4 and BSA with a binding constant of 6.83×10(7)M(-1). A non-covalent BSA conjugate of ZnPcC4 (ZnPcC4-BSA) was prepared. Both ZnPcC4 and ZnPcC4-BSA exhibited efficient sonodynamic activities against HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cells. Compared with ZnPcC4, conjugate ZnPcC4-BSA showed a higher sonodynamic activity with an IC50 value of 7.5μM. Upon illumination with ultrasound, ZnPcC4-BSA can induce an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, resulting in cellular apoptosis. The results suggest that the albumin conjugates of zinc(II) phthalocyanines functionalized with carboxyls can serve as promising sonosensitizers for sonodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Serum level of soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha correlates with the clinical course and activity of Wilms' tumour and soft tissue sarcomas in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, E; Balcerska, A; Kuchta, G

    2007-01-01

    Wilms' tumour (WT) and soft tissue sarcomas (SA) in children lack reliable biochemical markers. This study was carried out to determine the clinical significance of serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Ralpha) in the diagnostics and treatment monitoring of children with WT and SA. The study included 48 children: ten with WT, eight with SA and 30 healthy controls. The sIL-2Ralpha levels (ELISA) and rates of elevated sIL-2Ralpha values were estimated prospectively at diagnosis and in complete remission during treatment and after therapy. As the dependence on age was determined, the levels of sIL-2Ralpha were expressed as multiplications of the upper value of the normal range for a particular age ( xN). Median pretreatment levels of sIL-2Ralpha in patients exceeded those of healthy controls (1.79 xN for WT and 1.53 for SA vs. 0.61 for controls; p < 0.001) as did the rates of elevated sIL-2Ralpha values (80% of WTand 87.5% of SA patients vs. 0% of controls). Good response to therapy was paralleled by a significant decline of pretreatment sIL-2Ralpha levels and its elevated rates. Thus, sIL-2Ralpha determination may be of some value in the diagnostics and treatment monitoring of childhood WT and SA.

  1. Effects of using ground redberry juniper and dried distillers grains with solubles in lamb feedlot diets: growth, blood serum, fecal, and wool characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, T R; Lupton, C J; Muir, J P; Adams, R P; Stewart, W C

    2014-03-01

    Effects of using ground redberry juniper and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) in Rambouillet lamb (n = 45) feedlot diets on growth, blood serum, fecal, and wool characteristics were evaluated. In a randomized design study with 2 feeding periods (Period 1 = 64% concentrate diet, 35 d; Period 2 = 85% concentrate diet, 56 d), lambs were individually fed 5 isonitrogenous diets: a control diet (CNTL) that contained oat hay but not DDGS or juniper or DDGS-based diets in which 0 (0JUN), 33 (33JUN), 66 (66JUN), or 100% (100JUN) of the oat hay was replaced by juniper. During Period 1, lambs fed CNTL had greater (P diets. Lamb DMI, ADG, and G:F quadratically increased (P diets. During Period 2, lambs fed CNTL had greater (P diets, but ADG was similar (P > 0.41). Compared to 0JUN, lambs fed CNTL had similar (P = 0.12) G:F and tended to have less G:F (P = 0.07) than lambs fed DDGS-based diets. Among lambs fed DDGS-based diets, DMI was similar (P > 0.19), ADG increased linearly (P = 0.03), and G:F tended to decrease quadratically (P = 0.06) as juniper increased in the diet. Serum IGF-1, serum urea N (SUN), and fecal N were greater (P 0.13) for lambs fed CNTL vs. lambs fed DDGS-based diets (CNTL). Within lambs fed DDGS-based diets, SUN increased quadratically (P = 0.01) and fecal N increased linearly (P = 0.004), which can partially be attributed to increased dietary urea and condensed tannin intake. Most wool characteristics were not affected, but wool growth per kilogram of BW decreased quadratically (P = 0.04) as percentage of juniper increased in the DDGS-based diets. When evaluating the entire 91-d feeding trial, results indicated that replacing all of the ground oat hay with ground juniper leaves and stems in lamb growing and finishing diets is not detrimental to animal performance and that DDGS-based diets can reduce total feedlot costs, as compared to sorghum grain and cottonseed meal-based diets. However, compared to using juniper or oat hay as the sole

  2. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and their soluble receptors (sTNF-α-Rp55 and slL-6R serum levels in systemic lupus erythematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Robak

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a possible association between serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and their soluble receptors (sTNF-α-Rp55 and sIL-6R using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in 55 patients with systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE and 16 healthy controls. We also examined a possible association between the serum levels of these peptides and SLE activity, as well as TNF-α and IL-6 concentrations and the levels of their soluble receptors. The median concentrations of TNF-α, sTNF-α-Rp55 and IL-6 were significantly higher in SLE patients than in normal individuals. In contrast, there was no difference between the serum level of sIL-6R in both groups. We found positive correlations between the serum concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 as well as their soluble receptors and disease activity. There were also correlations between TNF-α and sTNF-α-Rp55 as well as IL-6 and sIL-6R serum levels in SLE patients but there were no such correlations in the normal control group. In conclusion, an increase in the serum levels of TNF-α, sTNF-α-Rp55 and IL-6 may become useful markers for SLE activity. Patients with SLE have sIL-6R serum concentration similar to that as in normal individuals. However, it correlates with disease activity and the level of IL-6.

  3. Apple S-RNase triggers inhibition of tRNA aminoacylation by interacting with a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase in growing self-pollen tubes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Meng, Dong; Gu, Zhaoyu; Yang, Qing; Yuan, Hui; Li, Yang; Chen, Qiuju; Yu, Jie; Liu, Chunsheng; Li, Tianzhong

    2018-02-09

    Apple exhibits S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI), in which S-RNase plays a central role in rejecting self-pollen. It has been proposed that the arrest of pollen growth in SI of Solanaceae plants is a consequence of the degradation of pollen rRNA by S-RNase; however, the underlying mechanism in Rosaceae is still unclear. Here, we used S 2 -RNase as a bait to screen an apple pollen cDNA library and characterized an apple soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (MdPPa) that physically interacted with S-RNases. When treated with self S-RNases, apple pollen tubes showed a marked growth inhibition, as well as a decrease in endogenous soluble pyrophosphatase activity and elevated levels of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). In addition, S-RNase was found to bind to two variable regions of MdPPa, resulting in a noncompetitive inhibition of its activity. Silencing of MdPPa expression led to a reduction in pollen tube growth. Interestingly, tRNA aminoacylation was inhibited in self S-RNase-treated or MdPPa-silenced pollen tubes, resulting in the accumulation of uncharged tRNA. Furthermore, we provide evidence showing that this disturbance of tRNA aminoacylation is independent of RNase activity. We propose an alternative mechanism differing from RNA degradation to explain the cytotoxicity of the S-RNase apple SI process. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. [Influence of zinc administered by total parenteral nutrition on plasmatic zinc levels, on reactive C protein, on serum interleukin-6 and on serum interleukin-6 soluble receptor, in critical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, A M; De Portela, M L; Weisstaub, A; Montemerlo, H; Guidoni, M E; Rusí, F; Zeni, S

    2009-01-01

    To study the interrelationship between serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6), serum Interleukin-6 soluble Receptor (IL-6 sR), C-Reactive Protein (C-RP), plasmatic Zinc levels (PlZn) and their response in relation to Zn administered by TPN, in critical patients. 17 patients, receiving TPN as a consequence of acute pancreatitis (n = 4) or after a major abdominal surgery due to intestinal cancer (n = 7), intestinal fístula (n = 3), intestinal obstruction (n = 2) or intestinal íleus (n = 1) were studied. At the beginning (To) and at the end of the TPN administration (6-21 days) serum IL-6 and IL-6 sR were determined by ELISA; C-RP ultrasensitive (C-RP us) by inmunoturbidimetric method; Zn was determined in TPN and in plasma by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Characteristics of the patients were (mean +/- SD and ranges): age: 60.6 +/- 11.7 (37-77) years; BMI (kg/m(2)): 26.0 +/- 3.4 (19.9-34.0). The results (mean +/- standard deviation and ranges) were: Zn provided by TPN (mg/d): 6.1 +/- 2.0 (range 2.8 to 10.8). Biochemical levels were, at To and Tf, respectively: (mean+/-SD and ranges) were at To y Tf, respectively: Zn Pl (microg/dl): 104 +/- 46 (35-177); 120 +/- 55 (52-229); IL-6 (pg/mL) 93 +/- 74 (10-262); 117 +/- 180 (7-761); IL6sR (pg/mL): 1,012 +/- 322 (589-1855); 1,269 +/- 451 (631-2195); C-RP us (mg/L): 71 +/- 63 (2-196); 65 +/- 43 (0-137). There was no correlation between variations of IL6, IL6sR, C-RP, PlZn levels and the daily amount of Zn administered in the TPN mixtures. Two patients presented a bad evolution; they received 4.2 and 5.2 md/d of Zn and showed an increase of IL6 levels, maintained high levels of IL6sR but C-RP levels decreased. the range of 2.8 to 10.8 mg/d of Zn administered in TPN mixtures did not exacerbate the inflammatory response.

  5. A SPION-eicosane protective coating for water soluble capsules: Evidence for on-demand drug release triggered by magnetic hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Rose, Laili; Bear, Joseph C.; McNaughter, Paul D.; Southern, Paul; Piggott, R. Ben; Parkin, Ivan P.; Qi, Sheng; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2016-02-01

    An orally-administered system for targeted, on-demand drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly desirable due to the high instances of diseases of that organ system and harsh mechanical and physical conditions any such system has to endure. To that end, we present an iron oxide nanoparticle/wax composite capsule coating using magnetic hyperthermia as a release trigger. The coating is synthesised using a simple dip-coating process from pharmaceutically approved materials using a gelatin drug capsule as a template. We show that the coating is impervious to chemical conditions within the GI tract and is completely melted within two minutes when exposed to an RF magnetic field under biologically-relevant conditions. The overall simplicity of action, durability and non-toxic and inexpensive nature of our system demonstrated herein are key for successful drug delivery systems.

  6. Assessment of serum levels of soluble CD40L in Egyptian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Relationship to microalbuminuria and glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L is known to be elevated in different clinical situations including hypercholesterolemia, acute coronary syndromes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, Data about the relationship between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and sCD40L is limited. In addition, the potential role ofsCD40Lin the pathogenesis of vascular complications in children and adolescents with T1DM is to be clarified. Hence, the study aimed at assessment of sCD40L levels in children and adolescents with T1DM and correlation of these levels with glycemic control and microalbuminuria. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional controlled study. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in the Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Assuit University Children Hospital, Assiut, Egypt. It included 70 children and adolescents with T1DM (mean age 14. 76 ± 2.21 years. Cases were further subdivided into 43 cases with normoalbuminuria and 27 cases with microalbuminuria according to presence or absence or microalbuminuria in fresh urine samples. Twentyfive healthy subjects, age- and sex-matched were included as control group (mean age = 13.62 ± 2.11 years. Studied cases were subjected to medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory assessment of fasting blood glucose (FBG, lipid profile, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and sCD40L were performed. Results: Mean HbA1c and sCD40L were significantly higher in diabetic children (n = 70 compared to control (n = 25 (P < 0.001 for each. Mean HbA1c and sCD40L levels were significantly higher in microalbuminuric cases (n = 27 compared to normoalbuminuric cases (n = 43 (P < 0.05 and <0.01, respectively.We also observed a significant positive correlation between sCD40L levels and the age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, and urinary albumin creatinine ratio. Conclusions: The high serum sCD40L levels in children and adolescents with T1DM particularly in those with microalbminuria and its positive correlation with

  7. Nasal eosinophilia and serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 in patients with allergic rhinitis treated with montelukast alone or in combination with desloratadine or levocetirizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciebiada, Maciej; Barylski, Marcin; Gorska Ciebiada, Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Because intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) 1 and recruitment of eosinophils are crucial in supporting allergic inflammation, their down-regulation may bring additional benefits in patients' recovery. We have assessed nasal eosinophilia and serum soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) concentrations in relation to nasal symptoms in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (AR) treated for 6 weeks with either desloratadine, levocetirizine, montelukast alone, or in combination. In this single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, two-arm study, 40 patients with persistent AR were randomized to receive either montelukast and/or levocetirizine or placebo (n = 20) or to receive treatment with montelukast and/or desloratadine or placebo (n = 20). Nasal eosinophilia and concentration of sICAM-1 in peripheral blood were assessed before and on the last day of each treatment period. All active treatments in both arms of the study resulted in the decrease of sICAM-1 and nasal eosinophilia, which correlated with the severity of nasal symptoms. In the montelukast/levocetirizine arm, montelukast decreased nasal eosinophilia more significantly than levocetirizine, whereas in reduction of sICAM-1 all active treatment options were equally effective. However, in the desloratadine/montelukast arm, the resulting improvement of combination therapy of sICAM-1 and the influx of eosinophils was not statistically significant. The improvement of nasal symptoms in patients with AR treated with antihistamines, with or without montelukast, may additionally result from the reduction of sICAM-1 and nasal eosinophilia. Because the combination therapy may bring inconclusive benefits in this area there is a strong need of further studies to find mechanisms that favor combination therapy.

  8. Serum levels of soluble forms of T cell activation antigens CD27 and CD25 in systemic lupus erythematosus in relation with lymphocytes count and disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Swaak (Antonius); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier); V. Huysen (V.); H.G. van den Brink (H.); J.T. Smeenk (J.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSystemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are characterized by a low lymphocyte count, which is considered a specific disease marker and is related to disease activity. The membrane bound molecules CD25 and CD27 are expressed and released in a soluble CD25 (sCD25) and soluble CD27

  9. Soluble L-selectin levels predict survival in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole H; Strøm, Jens

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis.......To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis....

  10. Dynamic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  11. [Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on level of serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and glycated hemoglobin A1c in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tangxia; Zhang, Yanbiao; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Fantao; Wang, Feng

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on clinical periodontal measurements, glycemic control, and level of serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in type 2 diabetes mellitus with chronic periodontitis patients. Patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis were selected and classified into well-controlled group[glycated hemoglobin Ac(GHbA1) or = 7.00%, n = 30, DMCP2 group). Thirty systemically healthy patients with chronic periodontitis were recruited as control group (CP group). All subjects underwent non-surgical periodontal therapy. Plaque index(PLI), sulcus bleeding index(SBI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth(PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), serum sICAM-1 concentration, and the value of fasting plasma glucose(FPG), GHbAc were recorded at baseline, 1 and 3 months after periodontal treatment. The three study groups showed significant improvements for the levels of PD, SBI, PLI, BOP, and serum sICAM-1 concentration at 1 and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P 0.05). At 3 months after periodontal treatment, GHbA1c levels in DMCP2 group significantly decreased by 1.12% (P 0.05). Non-surgical periodontal treatment can siginificantly improve periodontal health status in patients with type 2 diabetes and periodontitis, reduce the level of serum sICAM-1, and can reduce the level of GHbA1c in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients.

  12. Identification of human cytomegalovirus phosphoprotein 65 in C57BL/6 and BXSB mice as a potential trigger of systemic lupus erythematosus related serum markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions:: Our findings indicate that HCMV-pp65 immunization strongly triggers the development and progression of SLE-like disease in both BXSB and C57BL/6 mice, which indicates that the immune responses induced by HCMV-pp65 may be involved in the development of SLE.

  13. Influence of corticosteroid pulse therapy on the serum levels of soluble interleukin 2 receptor, interleukin 6 and interleukin 8 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, H. R.; van Wijk, M. J.; Geertzen, R. G.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the influence of corticosteroid pulse (CP) therapy on soluble interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2R), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 levels in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-five patients with active RA were studied before and after treatment with intravenous CP

  14. Improved early risk stratification of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention using a combination of serum soluble ST2 and NT-proBNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongwook Yu

    Full Text Available Although soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2 in serum is known to be associated with ischemic heart disease and heart failure, data regarding its prognostic impact in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI is limited. We evaluated the prognostic impacts of serum sST2 and other serum biomarkers in STEMI patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI.Consecutive all 323 patients with STEMI that underwent primary PCI were enrolled. Blood tests and samples were obtained in an emergency room. The primary endpoint was 1-year major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs, defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal MI, non-fatal stroke, and ischemia-driven revascularization.Mean age was 59.1±13.1 years (men 84%. MACCE (20 cardiovascular deaths, 7 non-fatal MI, 4 non-fatal stroke, 7 ischemia-driven revascularizations occurred in 38 patients (12%. After adjusting for confounding factors, Cox regression analysis revealed that high serum sST2 (>75.8 ng/mL mean value, adjusted hazard ratio 2.098, 95% CI 1.008-4.367, p = 0.048 and high serum NT-proBNP level (>400 pg/mL, adjusted hazard ratio 2.606, 95% CI 1.086-6.257, p = 0.032 at the time of presentation independently predicted MACCE within a year of primary PCI. Furthermore, when high serum sST2 level was combined with high serum NT-proBNP level, the hazard ratio of MACCE was highest (adjusted hazard ratio 7.93, 95% CI 2.97-20.38, p<0.001.Elevated serum levels of sST2 or NT-proBNP at the time of presentation were found to predict 1-year MACCE independently and elevated serum levels of sST2 plus NT-proBNP were associated with even poorer prognosis in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI.

  15. Heterocomplexes of Mannose-binding Lectin and the Pentraxins PTX3 or Serum Amyloid P Component Trigger Cross-activation of the Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Y. J.; Doni, A.; Skjoedt, M.-o.

    2011-01-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3), serum amyloid P component (SAP), and C-reactive protein belong to the pentraxin family of pattern recognition molecules involved in tissue homeostasis and innate immunity. They interact with C1q from the classical complement pathway. Whether this also occurs via the a...

  16. Serum level of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor is a strong and independent predictor of survival in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, N; Sier, C.F.M.; Ullum, H

    2000-01-01

    -Meier and Cox regression analyses, the serum suPAR levels were correlated to survival with AIDS-related death as the end point. High levels of serum suPAR (greater than median) were associated with poor overall survival, and Kaplan-Meier analysis on patients stratified by suPAR level demonstrated a continuous...... increase in mortality rates with higher suPAR levels. After adjustment for accepted prognostic markers-including Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-defined clinical stages, CD4 counts, viral load, beta2-microglobulin, and age-the prognostic strength of suPAR remained highly significant, indicating...

  17. Solubility Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  18. Target-triggered catalytic hairpin assembly and TdT-catalyzed DNA polymerization for amplified electronic detection of thrombin in human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kai; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2017-01-15

    Specific and sensitive detection of protein biomarkers is of great importance in biomedical and bioanalytical applications. In this work, a dual amplified signal enhancement approach based on the integration of catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated in situ DNA polymerization has been developed for highly sensitive and label-free electrochemical detection of thrombin in human serums. The presence of the target thrombin leads to the unfolding and capture of a significant number of hairpin signal probes with free 3'-OH termini on the sensor electrode. Subsequently, TdT can catalyze the elongation of the signal probes and formation of many G-quadruplex sequence replicates with the presence of dGTP and dATP at a molar ratio of 6:4. These G-quadruplex sequences bind hemin and generate drastically amplified current response for sensitive detection of thrombin in a completely label-free fashion. The sensor shows a linear range of 0.5pM-10.0nM and a detection limit of 0.12pM for thrombin. Moreover, the developed sensor can selectively discriminate the target thrombin against other non-target proteins and can be employed to monitor thrombin in human serum samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Serum Amyloid A Production Is Triggered by Sleep Deprivation in Mice and Humans: Is That the Link between Sleep Loss and Associated Comorbidities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Edson M.; Visniauskas, Bruna; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L.; Chagas, Jair R.; Campa, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) was recently associated with metabolic endotoxemia, obesity and insulin resistance. Concurrently, insufficient sleep adversely affects metabolic health and is an independent predisposing factor for obesity and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated whether sleep loss modulates SAA production. The serum SAA concentration increased in C57BL/6 mice subjected to sleep restriction (SR) for 15 days or to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 72 h. Sleep restriction also induced the upregulation of Saa1.1/Saa2.1 mRNA levels in the liver and Saa3 mRNA levels in adipose tissue. SAA levels returned to the basal range after 24 h in paradoxical sleep rebound (PSR). Metabolic endotoxemia was also a finding in SR. Increased plasma levels of SAA were also observed in healthy human volunteers subjected to two nights of total sleep deprivation (Total SD), returning to basal levels after one night of recovery. The observed increase in SAA levels may be part of the initial biochemical alterations caused by sleep deprivation, with potential to drive deleterious conditions such as metabolic endotoxemia and weight gain. PMID:28335560

  20. Quantitative ELISAs for serum soluble LHCGR and hCG-LHCGR complex: potential diagnostics in first trimester pregnancy screening for stillbirth, Down’s syndrome, preterm delivery and preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Soluble LH/hCG receptor (sLHCGR) released from placental explants and transfected cells can be detected in sera from pregnant women. To determine whether sLHCGR has diagnostic potential, quantitative ELISAs were developed and tested to examine the correlation between pregnancy outcome and levels of serum sLHCGR and hCG-sLHCGR complex. Methods Anti-LHCGR poly- and monoclonal antibodies recognizing defined LHCGR epitopes, commerical anti-hCGbeta antibody, together with recombinant LHCGR and yoked hCGbeta-LHCGR standard calibrators were used to develop two ELISAs. These assays were employed to quantify serum sLHCGR and hCG-sLHCGR at first trimester human pregnancy. Results Two ELISAs were developed and validated. Unlike any known biomarker, sLHCGR and hCG-sLHCGR are unique because Down’s syndrome (DS), preeclampsia and preterm delivery are linked to both low (less than or equal to 5 pmol/mL), and high (equal to or greater than 170 pmol/mL) concentrations. At these cut-off values, serum hCG-sLHCGR together with PAPP-A detected additional DS pregnancies (21%) which were negative by free hCGbeta plus PAPP-A screening procedure. Therefore, sLHCGR/hCG-sLHCGR has an additive effect on the current primary biochemical screening of aneuploid pregnancies. More than 88% of pregnancies destined to end in fetal demise (stillbirth) exhibited very low serum hCG-sLHCGR(less than or equal to 5 pmol/mL) compared to controls (median 16.15 pmol/mL, n = 390). The frequency of high hCG-sLHCGR concentrations (equal to or greater than 170 pmol/mL) in pathological pregnancies was at least 3-6-fold higher than that of the control, suggesting possible modulation of the thyrotropic effect of hCG by sLHCGR. Conclusions Serum sLHCGR/hCG-sLHCGR together with PAPP-A, have significant potential as first trimester screening markers for predicting pathological outcomes in pregnancy. PMID:23245345

  1. Purification, subunit characterization and ultrastructure of three soluble bovine lectins: conglutinin, mannose-binding protein and the pentraxin serum amyloid P-component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Friis, P; Holm Nielsen, E

    1992-01-01

    Conglutinin and mannose-binding protein (MBP) are members of the C-type lectins which are widely present in mammalian plasma. Serum amyloid P-component (SAP) is a member of the pentraxin family with lectin properties. A scheme for the partial purification of all three lectins by carbohydrate...... affinity chromatography and selective elution was developed. The purification was monitored by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and electron microscopy. Binding of the lectins to Sephadex-iC3b, their collagenase sensitivity, and the size and antibody reactivity of their subunits was investigated....... The demonstration, by SDS-PAGE, of 25-kDa subunits, which were unaffected by collagenase treatment but bound to Sephadex-iC3b and antibodies to human SAP, indicated the existence of bovine SAP. Bovine conglutinin (BK) also showed calcium-dependent binding to Sephadex-iC3b, whereas bovine MBP did not. The binding...

  2. Triggering Klystrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  3. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Is Associated with Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Elevated Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ichi Fujita

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR, a biomarker of subclinical levels of inflammation, is significantly correlated with cardiovascular events.We investigated the association between suPAR and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, left ventricular mass index (LVMI, and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP among cardiac inpatients.In total, 242 patients (mean age 71.3 ± 9.8 years; 70 women admitted to the cardiology department were enrolled in the study. suPAR was significantly correlated with LVEF (R = -0.24, P 3236 pg/mL was associated with low LVEF ( 300 pg/mL with an odds ratio of 3.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-12.1 and 5.36 (95% CI, 1.32-21.8, respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, log-transformed estimated glomerular filtration rate (log(eGFR, C-reactive protein, and diuretic use. The association between suPAR and LVMI was not statistically significant. In multivariate receiver operating characteristic analysis, addition of log(suPAR to the combination of age, sex, log(eGFR and CRP incrementally improved the prediction of low LVEF (area under the curve [AUC], 0.827 to 0.852, P = 0.046 and BNP ≥ 300 pg/mL (AUC, 0.869 to 0.906; P = 0.029.suPAR was associated with low LVEF and elevated BNP, but not with left ventricular hypertrophy, independent of CRP, renal function, and diuretic use among cardiac inpatients who were not undergoing chronic hemodialysis.

  4. Serum Soluble Transferrin Receptor Concentrations Are Elevated in Congolese Children with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Variants, but Not Sickle Cell Variants or α-Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Mikaela K; Henderson, Amanda M; Naguib, Karimah; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Devlin, Angela M; Albert, Arianne Y; Bahizire, Esto; Tugirimana, Pierrot L; Akilimali, Pierre Z; Boy, Erick; Green, Tim J; Karakochuk, Crystal D

    2017-09-01

    Background: Anemia is common in Congolese children, and inherited blood disorders may be a contributing cause. The presence of sickle cell variants, X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and α-thalassemia, has been previously reported. G6PD A- deficiency is characterized by the co-inheritance of G6PD 376 and 202 variants and is common in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective: We aimed to measure the associations between inherited blood disorders and hemoglobin, ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in Congolese children. Methods: Venous blood was collected from 744 children aged 6-59 mo from 2 provinces. We measured biomarkers of nutritional and inflammation status and malaria. Pyrosequencing was used to detect sickle cell variants. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect G6PD variants and α-thalassemia deletions. Results: Overall, 11% of children had a sickle cell variant, 19% of boys were G6PD A- hemizygotes, 12% and 10% of girls were G6PD A- hetero- or homozygotes, respectively, and 12% of children had α-thalassemia. Multivariable linear regression models (adjusted for age, province, altitude, malaria, and biomarkers of nutritional and inflammation status) showed that G6PD A- hemizygous boys and G6PD 376 homozygous girls had higher sTfR concentrations [geometric mean ratios (95% CIs): 1.20 (1.03, 1.39) and 1.25 (1.02, 1.53), respectively] than children with no G6PD variants. Hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations were not independently associated with any of the inherited blood disorder genotypes. Conclusions: We found that 2 G6PD variant genotypes were associated with elevated sTfR concentrations, which limits the accuracy of sTfR as a biomarker of iron status in this population. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Water-soluble compounds of lettuce inhibit DNA damage and lipid peroxidation induced by glucose/serum deprivation in N2a cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadpour, Elham; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Sadeghnia, Hamid R

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, increase of lipid peroxidation and resultant DNA damage are associated with pathophysiology of many human diseases such as acute and chronic CNS injuries and diseases, cancer, and also aging. This work was done to investigate whether water fraction from the hydroalcoholic extract of green leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) can protect N2a cells against glucose/serum deprivation (GSD)-induced lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. The cells were cultivated for 12 h in GSD condition in the absence or presence of the lettuce fraction. The total antioxidant ability of the lettuce water fraction was determined using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The intracellular lipid peroxidation was evaluated by malondialdehyde (MDA) level. DNA damage was determined using single cell gel electrophoresis. Using FRAP assay, the antioxidant activity of lettuce water fraction was found to be 574 micromol/g, which is equivalent to 64.1 mg of pure ascorbic acid. Exposure of the cells to GSD condition led to a significant increase of MDA level and DNA fragmentation. Lettuce extract at 400 microg/mL could decrease the elevated intracellular lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The present study demonstrates that lettuce exerts genoprotective effect through inhibition of oxidative stress.

  6. Vorinostat with sustained exposure and high solubility in poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) micelle nanocarriers: characterization and effects on pharmacokinetics in rat serum and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Elham A; Zhao, Yunqi; Meshali, Mahasen M; Remsberg, Connie M; Borg, Thanaa M; Foda, Abdel Monem M; Takemoto, Jody K; Sayre, Casey L; Martinez, Stephanie E; Davies, Neal M; Forrest, M Laird

    2012-10-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, known as vorinostat, is a promising anticancer drug with a unique mode of action; however, it is plagued by low water solubility, low permeability, and suboptimal pharmacokinetics. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) micelles of vorinostat were developed. Vorinostat's pharmacokinetics in rats was investigated after intravenous (i.v.) (10 mg/kg) and oral (p.o.) (50 mg/kg) micellar administrations and compared with a conventional polyethylene glycol 400 solution and methylcellulose suspension. The micelles increased the aqueous solubility of vorinostat from 0.2 to 8.15 ± 0.60 and 10.24 ± 0.92 mg/mL at drug to nanocarrier ratios of 1:10 and 1:15, respectively. Micelles had nanoscopic mean diameters of 75.67 ± 7.57 and 87.33 ± 8.62 nm for 1:10 and 1:15 micelles, respectively, with drug loading capacities of 9.93 ± 0.21% and 6.91 ± 1.19%, and encapsulation efficiencies of 42.74 ± 1.67% and 73.29 ± 4.78%, respectively. The micelles provided sustained exposure and improved pharmacokinetics characterized by a significant increase in serum half-life, area under curve, and mean residence time. The micelles reduced vorinostat clearance particularly after i.v. dosing. Thus, PEG-b-PLA micelles significantly improved the p.o. and i.v. pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of vorinostat, which warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Isolation and characterization from porcine serum of a soluble sulfotransferase responsible for 6-O-sulfation of the galactose residue in 2'-fucosyllactose: implications in the synthesis of the ligand for L-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Q K; Shailubhai, K; Boddupalli, H; Yu, H H; Broschat, K O; Jacob, G S

    1999-07-01

    A soluble sulfotransferase from porcine serum which catalyzes the transfer of sulfate from adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulphate (PAPS) to 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL) was purified 36,333-fold using a combination of conventional and affinity chromatographic steps. The purified enzyme preparation after non-denaturing discontinuous-PAGE exhibited a molecular mass of about 80 kDa by reducing SDS-PAGE. However, when a partially purified enzyme preparation was subjected to gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300, the enzyme activity eluted in the void volume, which indicated that the native enzyme existed as an oligomer. The purified enzyme showed Km values of 9.15 microM for PAPS and 15.38 mM for 2'-FL at the optimum pH value of 7.4. The substrate specificity of the purified enzyme was evaluated with various sugars that are structurally similar to sialyl LewisX (sLeX). Results indicated that 3'-sialyllactose and lactose were efficient acceptors of sulfation, whereas 6'-sialyllactose and 6'-sialyllactosamine were poor substrates for this sulfotransferase. Further, the reaction product analysis revealed that the sulfate substitution, when using 2'-FL as the substrate, was at the C-6 position of the galactose residue. Coincidentally, a similar enzyme activity was also found in porcine lymphoid tissues such as, lymph nodes (peripheral and mesenteric) and spleen. Collectively, these findings suggest that this enzyme might be involved in the synthesis of the ligand for L-selectin.

  8. Serum Levels of Soluble CD26/Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Association with Metabolic Syndrome and Therapy with Antidiabetic Agents in Malaysian Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Radwan H.; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Al-Hamodi, Zaid; Salem, Sameer D.; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2015-01-01

    Background A soluble form of CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (sCD26/DPP-IV) induces DPP-IV enzymatic activity that degrades incretin. We investigated fasting serum levels of sCD26/DPP-IV and active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS), as well as the associations between sCD26/DPP-IV levels, MetS, and antidiabetic therapy. Methods We assessed sCD26/DPP-IV levels, active GLP-1 levels, body mass index (BMI), glucose, insulin, A1c, glucose homeostasis indices, and lipid profiles in 549 Malaysian subjects (including 257 T2DM patients with MetS, 57 T2DM patients without MetS, 71 non-diabetics with MetS, and 164 control subjects without diabetes or metabolic syndrome). Results Fasting serum levels of sCD26/DPP-IV were significantly higher in T2DM patients with and without MetS than in normal subjects. Likewise, sCD26/DPP-IV levels were significantly higher in patients with T2DM and MetS than in non-diabetic patients with MetS. However, active GLP-1 levels were significantly lower in T2DM patients both with and without MetS than in normal subjects. In T2DM subjects, sCD26/DPP-IV levels were associated with significantly higher A1c levels, but were significantly lower in patients using monotherapy with metformin. In addition, no significant differences in sCD26/DPP-IV levels were found between diabetic subjects with and without MetS. Furthermore, sCD26/DPP-IV levels were negatively correlated with active GLP-1 levels in T2DM patients both with and without MetS. In normal subjects, sCD26/DPP-IV levels were associated with increased BMI, cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c) levels. Conclusion Serum sCD26/DPP-IV levels increased in T2DM subjects with and without MetS. Active GLP-1 levels decreased in T2DM patients both with and without MetS. In addition, sCD26/DPP-IV levels were associated with Alc levels and negatively correlated with active GLP-1 levels. Moreover, metformin

  9. Triggering Artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst; Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a general critique of the use of conceptual frameworks in design, illustrated by the well known synchronous/asynchronous, co-located/non-co-located framework. It argues that while frameworks are a necessary and inevitable starting point for design, the business of tailoring...... and adapting them to specific situations need not be ad hoc.Triggering artefacts are a way of systematically challenging both designers' preunderstandings and the conservatism of work practice. Experiences from the Great Belt tunnel and bridge project are used to illustrate howtriggering artefacts change...

  10. Serum sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug allergy - serum sickness; Allergic reaction - serum sickness; Allergy - serum sickness ... symptoms of serum sickness. Certain medicines (such as penicillin, cefaclor, and sulfa) can cause a similar reaction. ...

  11. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoluble vs. soluble fiber; Fiber - soluble vs. insoluble ... There are 2 different types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows ...

  12. Firearm trigger assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  13. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  14. Immunoglobulin response to bluetongue virus soluble antigen in subcutaneous chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajer, I; Jochim, M M; Lauerman, L H

    1977-06-01

    Group-specific antibodies were produced by inoculation of bluetongue virus soluble antigen into polyethylene chambers implanted subcutaneously in 8 rabbits and 2 sheep. For comparison, 5 rabbits and 1 sheep were inoculated intramuscularly with the soluble antigen in Freund's complete adjuvant. Antibodies present in the serum and chamber fluids were detected by the agar gel precipitin or serum-neutralization tests, qualitatively examined by immunoelectrophoresis and immunofluorescence, and quantitated by electroimmunodiffusion.

  15. Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    early warning signs and symptoms are often non- specific, and the routine examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood is sometimes misleading4,5, a rapid and reliable test that accurately predicts sepsis is needed. It would open up an opportunity to initiate antibiotic treatment early and identify children at highest risk ...

  16. Gas solubilities widespread applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, William

    1980-01-01

    Gas Solubilities: Widespread Applications discusses several topics concerning the various applications of gas solubilities. The first chapter of the book reviews Henr's law, while the second chapter covers the effect of temperature on gas solubility. The third chapter discusses the various gases used by Horiuti, and the following chapters evaluate the data on sulfur dioxide, chlorine data, and solubility data for hydrogen sulfide. Chapter 7 concerns itself with solubility of radon, thoron, and actinon. Chapter 8 tackles the solubilities of diborane and the gaseous hydrides of groups IV, V, and

  17. Serum starvation: caveat emptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkmajer, Sergej; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2011-08-01

    Serum starvation is one of the most frequently performed procedures in molecular biology and there are literally thousands of research papers reporting its use. In fact, this method has become so ingrained in certain areas of research that reports often simply state that cells were serum starved without providing any factual details as to how the procedure was carried out. Even so, we quite obviously lack unequivocal terminology, standard protocols, and perhaps most surprisingly, a common conceptual basis when performing serum starvation. Such inconsistencies not only hinder interstudy comparability but can lead to opposing and inconsistent experimental results. Although it is frequently assumed that serum starvation reduces basal activity of cells, available experimental data do not entirely support this notion. To address this important issue, we studied primary human myotubes, rat L6 myotubes and human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells under different serum starvation conditions and followed time-dependent changes in important signaling pathways such as the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, the AMP-activated protein kinase, and the mammalian target of rapamycin. Serum starvation induced a swift and dynamic response, which displayed obvious qualitative and quantitative differences across different cell types and experimental conditions despite certain unifying features. There was no uniform reduction in basal signaling activity. Serum starvation clearly represents a major event that triggers a plethora of divergent responses and has therefore great potential to interfere with the experimental results and affect subsequent conclusions.

  18. Human soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and tumor necrosis factor-α as gingival crevicular fluid and serum markers of inflammation in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singhal, Sandeep; Pradeep, Avani R; Kanoriya, Dharmendra; Garg, Vibhuti

    2016-01-01

    ...; CP patients without T2DM). The serum and GCF levels of human sRAGE and TNF-α were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and correlated with clinical parameters, including probing depth, gingival index and clinical attachment level...

  19. The ALICE trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Krivda, M; Evans, D; Jones, G T; Jovanovic, P; Jusko, A; Králik, I; Lazzeroni, C; Lietava, R; Scott, H; Sándor, L; Tapia Takaki, D; Urbán, J; Villalobos Baillie, O

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE trigger system (TRG) consists of a Central Trigger Processor (CTP) and up to 24 Local Trigger Units (LTU) for each sub-detector. The CTP receives and processes trigger signals from trigger detectors and the outputs from the CTP are 3 levels of hardware triggers: L0, L1 and L2. The 24 sub-detectors are dynamically partitioned in up to 6 independent clusters. The trigger information is propagated through the LTUs to the Front-end electronics (FEE) of each sub-detector via LVDS cables and optical fibres. The trigger information sent from LTU to FEE can be monitored online for possible errors using the newly developed TTCit board. After testing and commissioning of the trigger system itself on the surface, the ALICE trigger electronics has been installed and tested in the experimental cavern with appropriate ALICE experimental software. Testing the Alice trigger system with detectors on the surface and in the experimental cavern in parallel is progressing very well. Currently one setup is used for testi...

  20. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification...... and where cutaneous and mucosal trigger zones are located. Methods Clinical characteristics focusing on trigger factors were collected from 140 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, in a cross-sectional study design. Results Provocation of paroxysmal pain by various trigger manoeuvres was reported by 136...... of the 140 patients. The most frequent manoeuvres were gentle touching of the face (79%) and talking (54%). Trigger zones were predominantly reported in the perioral and nasal region. Conclusion This study confirms that in trigeminal neuralgia, paroxysmal pain is associated with triggers in virtually all...

  1. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  2. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, G. B.; Symons, J. A.; Duff, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations are related to disease activity in atopic eczema. DESIGN--Single cohort longitudinal study with controls. SETTING--Outpatient and general medicine departments in secondary referral centre. PATIENTS--Of 15 patients aged 17-57 with severe atopic eczema, all with acute exacerbations of disease, 13 were admitted to hospital and two treated as outpatients until the skin lesions had resolved or greatly improved. Nineteen controls gave single blood samples. INTERVENTIONS--Daily skin dressing with betamethasone valerate (0.025%) and ichthammol paste and tubular dressings. END POINT--Resolution of or considerable improvement in skin lesions. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations in blood samples taken on admission, at intervals subsequently, and on discharge. Clinical scores of disease activity were also made. Median concentrations on admission were significantly higher (770 U/ml) in the patients than the controls (300 U/ml). Concentrations fell significantly during treatment. In 25 assessments made at different times in 13 patients serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentration correlated significantly (R = 0.73) with clinical disease activity. CONCLUSIONS--Cellular immunopathogenic mechanisms contribute to atopic eczema. Immune activation can be measured in atopic eczema by measurements of soluble interleukin 2 receptor, and this should facilitate assessment of response to treatment. PMID:2568868

  3. Cytokines and soluble adhesion molecules in children and adolescents with a tic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Veneman, Netty G.P.; Bijzet, Johan; Limburg, Pieter C.; Minderaa, Rudolf; Kallenberg, C.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in tic disorders. We screened for immune disturbances by investigating serum levels of cytokines and soluble adhesion molecules in patients with a tic disorder. Methods: Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, soluble IL-2

  4. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  5. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  6. AMY trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yoshihide [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  7. Dry season aerosol iron solubility in tropical northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. L. Winton

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine nitrogen fixation is co-limited by the supply of iron (Fe and phosphorus in large regions of the global ocean. The deposition of soluble aerosol Fe can initiate nitrogen fixation and trigger toxic algal blooms in nitrate-poor tropical waters. We present dry season soluble Fe data from the Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season (SAFIRED campaign in northern Australia that reflects coincident dust and biomass burning sources of soluble aerosol Fe. The mean soluble and total aerosol Fe concentrations were 40 and 500 ng m−3 respectively. Our results show that while biomass burning species may not be a direct source of soluble Fe, biomass burning may substantially enhance the solubility of mineral dust. We observed fractional Fe solubility up to 12 % in mixed aerosols. Thus, Fe in dust may be more soluble in the tropics compared to higher latitudes due to higher concentrations of biomass-burning-derived reactive organic species in the atmosphere. In addition, biomass-burning-derived particles can act as a surface for aerosol Fe to bind during atmospheric transport and subsequently be released to the ocean upon deposition. As the aerosol loading is dominated by biomass burning emissions over the tropical waters in the dry season, additions of biomass-burning-derived soluble Fe could have harmful consequences for initiating nitrogen-fixing toxic algal blooms. Future research is required to quantify biomass-burning-derived particle sources of soluble Fe over tropical waters.

  8. The relationship between embryo quality assessed using routine embryology or time–lapse videography and serum progesterone concentration on the day of ovulatory trigger in in vitro fertilization cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhe Liu

    2015-06-01

    Results: In cycles using conventional culture, serum progesterone per follicle ≥14 mm (median 0.42 nmol/L/follicle, range 0.05-3.50 nmol/L/follicle was a significant negative predictor of live-birth (ROC AUC = 0.395, 95% CI 0.345-0.445; P=0.000 as were progesterone/estradiol ratio (0.442, 0.391-0.494; P=0.027 and progesterone per oocyte (0.374, 0.326-0.421; P=0.000 but not progesterone alone (0.470, 0.419-0.521; P>0.05. Women with an EP/follicle (>0.42 nmol/L/follicle had reduced live birth rates if they were ≥35 yrs (14.4% vs. 24.2%, P0.42 nmol/L/follicle adversely affects embryo implantation in women aged ≥35 years, but not <35 yrs. However, no adverse features were seen in the embryos from these affected cycles in terms of morphological appearance, abnormal patterns of cleavage, or morphokinetic timings.

  9. Applications of Solubility Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, Reginald P. T.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes several applications of the use of solubility data. It is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to show that knowledge of solubility data is required in a variety of technical applications that assist in the design of chemical processes. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

  10. The Solubility of struvite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, H. K.; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann; Blom, A.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of magnesium-amonium-phosphate (struvite) has been studied emloying the radioisotope 32P as tracer. The amount of sample in solution is determined by measuring the Cherenkov radiation due to the beta-particles emitted from this radionuclide. The thermodynamic solubility product...

  11. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  12. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Colver, G. B.; Symons, J A; Duff, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor concentrations are related to disease activity in atopic eczema. DESIGN--Single cohort longitudinal study with controls. SETTING--Outpatient and general medicine departments in secondary referral centre. PATIENTS--Of 15 patients aged 17-57 with severe atopic eczema, all with acute exacerbations of disease, 13 were admitted to hospital and two treated as outpatients until the skin lesions had resolved or greatly improved. Nin...

  13. Water-soluble dietary fibers and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuwissen, Elke; Mensink, Ronald P

    2008-05-23

    One well-established way to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is to lower serum LDL cholesterol levels by reducing saturated fat intake. However, the importance of other dietary approaches, such as increasing the intake of water-soluble dietary fibers is increasingly recognized. Well-controlled intervention studies have now shown that four major water-soluble fiber types-beta-glucan, psyllium, pectin and guar gum-effectively lower serum LDL cholesterol concentrations, without affecting HDL cholesterol or triacylglycerol concentrations. It is estimated that for each additional gram of water-soluble fiber in the diet serum total and LDL cholesterol concentrations decrease by -0.028 mmol/L and -0.029 mmol/L, respectively. Despite large differences in molecular structure, no major differences existed between the different types of water-soluble fiber, suggesting a common underlying mechanism. In this respect, it is most likely that water-soluble fibers lower the (re)absorption of in particular bile acids. As a result hepatic conversion of cholesterol into bile acids increases, which will ultimately lead to increased LDL uptake by the liver. Additionally, epidemiological studies suggest that a diet high in water-soluble fiber is inversely associated with the risk of CVD. These findings underlie current dietary recommendations to increase water-soluble fiber intake.

  14. Soluble oil flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, L.W.; Knight, R.K.

    1976-11-01

    A soluble oil-polymer flooding process used in previously waterflooded reservoirs utilizes oleic, micellar solutions which, when injected as small slugs and driven by polymer thickened water, are capable of displacing all oil and water contacted. During the micellar flood, oil and water are displaced from reservoir rock by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) miscible-type displacement of oil by soluble oil; (2) miscible-type displacement of resident water by injection water and soluble oil; (3) formation of microemulsions by the intermingling of soluble oil and injected water; and (4) reduction of interfacial tension between oil and water phases where both are present. The Higgs Unit, site of a field test of soluble oil flooding, is a small pool in the Jones County Regular field near Abilene, Tex. Field data, special equipment, test evaluation, and field test conclusions are given for this operation.

  15. Fabrication of multifunctional SiO2@GN-serum composites for chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuwei; Bai, Jing; Jia, Xiaodan; Jiang, Xiue; Guo, Zhuo

    2015-01-14

    Recently, the chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy has become a potential method for cancer treatment. Herein, we developed a multifunctional nanomaterial for chemo-photothermal therapeutics based on silica and graphene core/shell structure (SiO2@GN) because of the ability of GN to convert light energy into heat. Serum protein was further modified onto the surface of GN (SiO2@GN-Serum) to improve the solubility and stability of GN-based nanoparticles in physiological conditions. The as-synthesized SiO2@GN-Serum nanoparticles (NPs) have been revealed to have high photothermal conversion efficiency and stability, as well as high storage and release capacity for anticancer drug doxorubicin (SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox). The therapeutic efficacy of SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox has been evaluated in vitro and in vivo for cervical cancer therapy. In vitro cytotoxicity tests demonstrate that SiO2@GN-Serum NPs have excellent biocompatibility. However, SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox NPs show higher cytotoxicity than SiO2@GN-Serum and free Dox under irradiation with NIR laser at 1.0 W/cm(2) for 5 min owing to both SiO2@GN-Serum-mediated photothermal ablation and cytotoxicity of light-triggered Dox release. In mouse models, the tumor growth is significantly inhibited by chem-photothermal effect of SiO2@GN-Serum-Dox. Overall, compared with single chemotherapy or photothermal therapy, the combined treatment demonstrates better therapeutic efficacy. Our results suggest a promising GN-based core/shell nanostructure for biomedical applications.

  16. ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, B A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2011, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 microseconds. Then follow two levels of software-based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections based mainly on the experience during the 2011 LHC run, where the trigger menu needed quick adaptations to the continuous increase of luminosity throughout the year. Examples of trigger e...

  17. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, R

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the next generation proton-proton collider, the LHC. The high rate of interactions and the large number of read-out channels make the trigger system for ATLAS a challenging task. The initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz has to be reduced to about 200 Hz while preserving the physics signals against a large background. ATLAS uses a three-level trigger system, with the first level implemented in custom hardware, while the high level trigger systems are implemented in software on commodity hardware. This note describes the physics motivation, the various selection strategies for different channels as well as the physical implementation of the trigger system.

  18. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the fingers glide easily with the help of pulleys. These pulleys hold the tendons close to the bone. This ... rod (Figure 1). Trigger finger occurs when the pulley becomes too thick, so the tendon cannot glide ...

  19. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  20. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma. Dogs, cats, rodents (including hamsters and guinea pigs) and other warm-blooded mammals can trigger asthma ... Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. Asthma Indoor Air Quality ...

  1. 2017 Tau Trigger Efficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Triggers selecting events with hadronically decaying $\\tau$ leptons ($\\tau_h$) are used in a wide variety of CMS analyses, in particular those targeting processes with a $H \\rightarrow \\tau\\tau$ decay. The performance of the $\\tau_h$ triggers is presented for data collected in 2017, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 41.5\\,fb$^{-1}$ at 13 TeV, and compared with simulation.

  2. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  3. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and turns to gel during ... and nutrient absorption from the stomach and intestine. Soluble fiber is found in foods such as oat ...

  4. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00400931; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-23

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. ...

  5. Topological Trigger Developments

    CERN Multimedia

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected an almost 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%, and its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and uBoost. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. These inclu...

  6. Learning about Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G.; Reyes, Juan G.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative questions are proposed to assess the understanding of solubility and some of its applications. To improve those results, a simple quantitative problem on the precipitation of proteins is proposed.

  7. Protein solubility modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Serial measurement of the circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor and its soluble receptors 1 and 2 for monitoring leprosy patients during multidrug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an infectious and contagious spectral disease accompanied by a series of immunological events triggered by the host response to the aetiologic agent, Mycobacterium leprae . The induction and maintenance of the immune/inflammatory response in leprosy are linked to multiple cell interactions and soluble factors, primarily through the action of cytokines. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 in leprosy patients at different stages of multidrug treatment (MDT in comparison with non-infected individuals and to determine their role as putative biomarkers of the severity of leprosy or the treatment response. ELISA was used to measure the levels of these molecules in 30 healthy controls and 37 leprosy patients at the time of diagnosis and during and after MDT. Our results showed increases in the serum levels of TNF-α and sTNF-R2 in infected individuals in comparison with controls. The levels of TNF-α, but not sTNF-R2, decreased with treatment. The current results corroborate previous reports of elevated serum levels of TNF-α in leprosy and suggest a role for sTNF-R2 in the control of this cytokine during MDT.

  9. Soluble membrane receptors, interleukin 6, procalcitonin and C reactive protein as prognostic markers in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Toro, Juan-Jesús; Márquez-Coello, Mercedes; García-Álvarez, José-María; Martín-Aspas, Andrés; Rivera-Fernández, Ricardo; Sáez de Benito, Ana; Girón-González, José-Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the diagnostic and prognostic value of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell 1 (sTREM-1), soluble cluster of differentiation 14 (sCD14), soluble cluster of differentiation 163 (sCD163), interleukin-6 (IL-6), procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels for patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty patients admitted at the ICU with the diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock were studied. SOFA and APACHE II scores as well as serum biomarkers were measured at days 0, 2 and 5. The influence of these variables on 28-day mortality was analyzed. Twenty healthy individuals served as controls. Baseline serum concentrations of sTREM-1, sCD163, IL-6 and PCT correlated with SOFA score. Only sTREM-1 levels correlated with APACHE II score. The 28-day mortality rate for all patients was 42%. The absence of risk factors for infection, presence of septic shock, baseline values of sCD14 and decrease of PCT and IL-6 from baseline to day 5 were variables associated to mortality in the univariate analysis. The unique independent factor associated to mortality in the multivariate analysis was a decrease of PCT higher than 50% from days 0 to 5. Serum levels of sTREM-1 are correlated with the severity of sepsis. A 50% decrease of PCT was the unique variable associated with survival in the multivariate analysis.

  10. Soluble membrane receptors, interleukin 6, procalcitonin and C reactive protein as prognostic markers in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Jesús Ríos-Toro

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore the diagnostic and prognostic value of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell 1 (sTREM-1, soluble cluster of differentiation 14 (sCD14, soluble cluster of differentiation 163 (sCD163, interleukin-6 (IL-6, procalcitonin (PCT, and C-reactive protein (CRP serum levels for patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in an intensive care unit (ICU.Fifty patients admitted at the ICU with the diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock were studied. SOFA and APACHE II scores as well as serum biomarkers were measured at days 0, 2 and 5. The influence of these variables on 28-day mortality was analyzed. Twenty healthy individuals served as controls.Baseline serum concentrations of sTREM-1, sCD163, IL-6 and PCT correlated with SOFA score. Only sTREM-1 levels correlated with APACHE II score. The 28-day mortality rate for all patients was 42%. The absence of risk factors for infection, presence of septic shock, baseline values of sCD14 and decrease of PCT and IL-6 from baseline to day 5 were variables associated to mortality in the univariate analysis. The unique independent factor associated to mortality in the multivariate analysis was a decrease of PCT higher than 50% from days 0 to 5.Serum levels of sTREM-1 are correlated with the severity of sepsis. A 50% decrease of PCT was the unique variable associated with survival in the multivariate analysis.

  11. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkner, Tina; Sørensen, L P; Nielsen, A R

    2012-01-01

    Soluble CD163 (sCD163) was recently identified as a strong risk marker for developing type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that sCD163 independently associates with insulin resistance.......Soluble CD163 (sCD163) was recently identified as a strong risk marker for developing type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that sCD163 independently associates with insulin resistance....

  12. CMS Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    During its second run of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will deliver a peak instantaneous luminosity that may reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realized by a two-level trigger system the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has been through a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT go through big improvements; in particular, new appr...

  13. The CMS trigger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  14. The CMS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; 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Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, $\\tau$ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  15. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition system for the ATLAS experiment has to reduce the 40 MHz of LHC bunch crossing rate to ~200 Hz of recording rate. This is achieved through a complex distributed system composed by $sim$ 1.000 CPUs, about a third of the expected final size of the system. Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  16. Developmental Trigger Thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Jonathan; Angeles, Jovito

    2016-04-01

    Developmental trigger thumb, although uncommon, can be easily identifiable in the pediatric outpatient visit. Patients often present with their thumb locked in flexion and a firm nodule at the base of the thumb. The thumb is usually passively correctable and nonpainful. It is important to examine the opposite thumb as bilateral trigger thumbs occur at a rate of 25% to 30%. Nonsurgical options have been proposed in the past including watchful waiting, extension exercises, splinting, and steroid injections with mixed results. Surgical intervention is indicated when there is painful triggering or the thumb is not passively correctable. Surgical treatment is an outpatient procedure that involves releasing the thumb flexor tendon from a small fibrous sheath called the A1 pulley. The overall recurrence rate after surgery is 1.4%. Our recommendation is for early referral to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon to evaluate for the need for surgical intervention. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  18. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Schare, Joshua M [Albuquerque, NM; Bunch, Kyle [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  19. Soluble TACI and soluble BCMA as biomarkers in primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Franziska S; Laurent, Sarah A; Huber, Marion; Mulazzani, Matthias; Dreyling, Martin; Ködel, Uwe; Kümpfel, Tania; Straube, Andreas; Meinl, Edgar; von Baumgarten, Louisa

    2017-11-29

    B-cell survival is regulated through interactions of B-cell-activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand with their receptors transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) and B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA). We evaluated the diagnostic potential of soluble TACI (sTACI) and soluble BCMA (sBCMA) in CSF and serum as biomarkers in primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL). CSF (n = 176) and serum samples (n = 105) from patients with clinically or radiologically suspected PCNSL as well as from control patients were collected prospectively. Levels of sTACI and sBCMA were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, in patients with PCNSL, CSF was analyzed during disease course (time of diagnosis, n = 26; relapse, n = 10; remission, n = 14), and in 2 patients long-term longitudinal analysis was performed. Soluble TACI and sBCMA are significantly increased in patients with PCNSL (sTACI, median: 445 pg/mL; sBCMA, median: 760 pg/mL) compared with control patients (sTACI, median: 0 pg/mL; sBCMA, median: 290 pg/mL). At a cutoff value of 68.4 pg/mL, sTACI shows high sensitivity (87.9%) and specificity (88.3%) for the diagnosis of active PCNSL. Soluble BCMA is less sensitive (72.7%) and specific (71.8%) (cutoff: 460 pg/mL). When both markers are combined, specificity increases, however, at the cost of a lower sensitivity. In serum, both sTACI and sBCMA are not increased in PCNSL patients. Both soluble receptors correlate with clinical course and therapy response. Our results suggest that sTACI and sBCMA in the CSF are promising new biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy monitoring in PCNSL. However, our findings need to be validated in an independent cohort.

  20. ALICE High Level Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Alt, T

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a computing farm designed and build for the real-time, online processing of the raw data produced by the ALICE detectors. Events are fully reconstructed from the raw data, analyzed and compressed. The analysis summary together with the compressed data and a trigger decision is sent to the DAQ. In addition the reconstruction of the events allows for on-line monitoring of physical observables and this information is provided to the Data Quality Monitor (DQM). The HLT can process event rates of up to 2 kHz for proton-proton and 200 Hz for Pb-Pb central collisions.

  1. Solubility Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantra, Ratna; Bolea, Eduardo; Bouwmeester, H.; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, C.A.A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, A.K.; Zande, van der M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of different methods that can potentially be used to determine the solubility of nanomaterials. In general, the methods presented can be broadly divided into four categories: separation methods, methods to quantify free ions, methods to quantify total dissolved

  2. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J

    2012-01-01

    CD163 is an endocytic receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes and is expressed solely on macrophages and monocytes. As a result of ectodomain shedding, the extracellular portion of CD163 circulates in blood as a soluble protein (sCD163) at 0.7-3.9 mg/l in healthy individuals. The function...

  3. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  4. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  5. Physics issues on triggering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detector at the international linear collider (ILC) should be able to run 'trig- gerless' which means that all events can be read out and then be analysed with the offline reconstruction program in a trigger farm. The event rates for 'high Q2' events like W-pairs or q¯q are low, about 0.1/train. However, there is a significant.

  6. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Iron chelation therapy in Upper Egyptian transfusion-dependent pediatric homozygous beta-thalassemia major: impact on serum L-carnitine/free fatty acids, osteoprotegerin/the soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand systems, and bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Enas A; Mohamed, Nagwa A; El-Metwally, Tarek H; Kamal, Manal M

    2010-05-01

    Bone disease in beta-thalassemia major (betaTM) remains poorly understood. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand (RANKL) regulates osteoclast formation and function. RANKL activity is balanced by interaction with its receptor (RANK) and binding to osteoprotegerin (OPG). L-Carnitine (LC) enhances osteoblastic activity by furnishing fuel. This study hypothesized that abnormal bone metabolism in betaTM involves imbalanced RANKL/OPG and LC/free fatty acids (FFAs) metabolism. Sixty-nine transfusion-dependent betaTM patients and 15 healthy controls were enrolled. One group of patients (n=34) received desferrioxamine (DFO) and the other (n=35) did not. Serum OPG, soluble RANKL (sRANKL), FFAs, LC [total LC (TC), free LC (FC), and esterified LC (EC)], calcium, and inorganic phosphate were measured by specific immuno and colorimetric assays; bone mineral density was examined by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Patients showed lower levels of OPG, TC, FC, EC and higher levels of sRANKL, sRANKL/OPG ratio, and FFAs than controls. Patients on DFO showed lower levels of OPG, TC, FC and higher levels of sRANKL, sRANKL/OPG ratio, and FFAs than those without chelation. In patients, sRANKL correlated negatively with TC and OPG and FC correlated positively with OPG and negatively with sRANKL, sRANKL/OPG ratio, and FFAs. In conclusion, altered bone metabolism owing to imbalanced osteoclastic bone resorption versus constructive osteoblastic activities in betaTM pediatric patients could be due to abnormal sRANKL-OPG and LC-FFAs systems that were worsened by DFO.

  8. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding

  9. Argon solubility in liquid steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R; Dankert, O; Van Veen, A; Kamperman, AA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to establish the solubility of argon in liquid interstitial-free steel. The solubility appears to be lower than 0.1 at ppb, The results are in line with argon solubilities reported in the literature on liquid iron. Semiempirical theories and calculations based on the

  10. Synthesis of Trigger Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferman, Orna; Vardi, Moshe Y.

    In automated synthesis, we transform a specification into a system that is guaranteed to satisfy the specification. In spite of the rich theory developed for temporal synthesis, little of this theory has been reduced to practice. This is in contrast with model-checking theory, which has led to industrial development and use of formal verification tools. We address this problem here by considering a certain class of PSL properties; this class covers most of the properties used in practice by system designers. We refer to this class as the class of trigger properties.

  11. Structural changes during the unfolding of Bovine serum albumin in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The native form of serum albumin is the most important soluble protein in the body plasma. In order to investigate the structural changes of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) during its unfolding in the presence of urea, a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study was performed. The scattering curves of dilute solutions of BSA ...

  12. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger-Champagne, C; Bosman, M; Brenner, R; Casado, MP; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Demers, S; Farrington, S; Igonkina, O; Kalinowski, A; Kanaya, N; Osuna, C; Pérez, E; Ptacek, E; Reinsch, A; Saavedra, A; Sopczak, A; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Tsuno, S; Vorwerk, V; Watson, A; Xella, S

    2008-01-01

    Moving to the high energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons will become a necessary and very powerful tool, allowing a discovery of physics beyond Standard Model. Many models, among them light SM Higgs and various SUSY models, predict an abundant production of taus with respect to other leptons. The reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, although a very challenging task in hadronic enviroments, allows to increase a signal efficiency by at least of factor 2, and provides an independent control sample to disantangle lepton tau decays from prompt electrons and muons. Thanks to the advanced calorimetry and tracking, the ATLAS experiment has developed tools to efficiently identify hadronic taus at the trigger level. In this presentation we will review the characteristics of taus and the methods to suppress low-multiplicity, low-energy jets contributions as well as we will address the tau trigger chain which provide a rejection rate of 10^5. We will further present plans for commissioning the ATLA...

  14. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  15. Impacts of sample preparation methods on solubility and antilisterial characteristics of essential oil components in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaiqiong; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-02-01

    Essential oil components (EOCs) have limited water solubility and are used at much higher concentrations in complex food matrices than in growth media to inhibit pathogens. However, the correlation between solubility and activity has not been studied. The objective of this work was to characterize the solubility of EOCs in solvents and milk and correlate solubility with antilisterial activity. The solubilities of four EOCs, thymol, carvacrol, eugenol, and trans-cinnamaldehyde, in water was significantly increased in the presence of 5% (vol/vol) ethanol. In milk, the solubility of EOCs was lower than in water, with lower solubility in higher-fat milk. EOCs applied to milk as stock solutions (in 95% aqueous ethanol) enabled quicker dissolution and higher solubility in milk serum than other methods of mixing, such as end to end, and greater reductions of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A after 0 and 24 h. When the EOC concentration detected in milk serum was above the minimum bactericidal concentration, complete inhibition of L. monocytogenes in tryptic soy broth resulted. Therefore, the antilisterial properties in milk could be correlated with the solubility by comparison to the minimum inhibitory or bactericidal concentrations of EOCs. While the EOCs applied using ethanol generally had solubility and activity characteristics superior to those of other mixing methods, ethanol is not used to a great extent in nonfermented foods. Therefore, mixing methods without an organic solvent may be more readily adaptable to enhancing the distribution of EOCs in complex food systems.

  16. Ovarian response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation : What does serum FSH say?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, Simone C.; Van Tilborg, Theodora C.; Hamdine, Ouijdane; Torrance, Helen L.; Eijkemans, Marinus J.C.; Lentjes, Eef G.W.M.; Lambalk, Cornelis B.; Broekmans, Frank J.M.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do serum FSH levels on day of hCG trigger differ between women with a poor, normal or hyper response to a fixed daily dose of 150 IU recombinant FSH (rFSH)? SUMMARY ANSWER There is no consistent relationship between ovarian response and serum FSH levels on day of hCG trigger in a 150

  17. Doping Induced Solubility Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ian Edward

    Polymeric semiconductors are promising class of materials, which combine many of the electrical properties of inorganic semiconductors with the mechanical flexibility and chemical processability of organic materials. Semiconducting polymers can be deposited from solution over large areas at low cost, and may find applications in displays, photovoltaics, and sensor arrays. Unfortunately, these materials are generally mutually soluble with other organics, preventing solution-based deposition of complex patterned structures using standard photolithographic techniques. Here, we present an entirely new method for patterning conductive polymers utilizing a change in polymer solubility upon p-type doping. Many polymer : molecular dopant systems, including the extensively studied system poly-(3-hexylthiophene) : 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (P3HT : F4TCNQ), are rendered insoluble in a wide range solvents by p-type doping at only a few mol%. By sequentially doping and dedoping films, polymer solubility can be switched on an off at will. We find that doped films can be easily prepared in a two-step process, by first coating the polymer (P3HT), then exposing the film to an orthogonal solvent containing the dopant (F4TCNQ). Dedoping is achieved by means of a chemical reaction that deactivates F4TCNQ, allowing it to be removed by an orthogonal solvent in a single step. This process allows for fully quantitative dedoping, in some cases leaving films with an even lower free carrier density than as cast films by removing intrinsic p-type defects. In addition, we have also identified a photochemical reaction between F4TCNQ and solvents such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), which similarly yields a non-doping product. By immersing films in THF and exposing them to light, this reaction allows for direct, optical patterning of P3HT films. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), we demonstrate direct write topographic patterning of arbitrary structures with in

  18. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  19. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  20. The CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  1. The CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  2. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naive inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau trig...

  3. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naïve inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau tri...

  4. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUSHITA, Takashi; CMS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41 fb‑1 with a peak luminosity of 1.5 × 1034 cm‑2s‑1 and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implementation of more algorithms at a time than previously possible, allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the available trigger bandwidth. Algorithms for a trigger menu, including topological requirements on multi-objects, can be realised in the Global Trigger using the newly developed trigger menu specification grammar. Analysis-like trigger algorithms can be represented in an intuitive manner and the algorithms are translated to corresponding VHDL code blocks to build a firmware. The grammar can be extended in future as the needs arise. The experience of implementing trigger menus on the upgraded Global Trigger system will be presented.

  5. Muon triggers in the High Level Trigger of LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2011-01-01

    The muon trigger selections for both levels of the LHCb software trigger (HLT1 and 2) are described and their performance is evaluated using $B^{+} \\to J/\\psi K^{+}$ signals reconstructed in 330 pb$^{-1}$ of data which were collected in the first half 2011.

  6. Trigger and data acquisition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Gaspar, C

    2001-01-01

    Past LEP experiments generate data at 0.5 MByte/s from particle detectors with over a quarter of a million readout channels. The process of reading out the electronic channels, treating them, and storing the date produced by each collision for further analysis by the physicists is called "Data Acquisition". Not all beam crossings produce interesting physics "events", picking the interesting ones is the task of the "Trigger" system. In order to make sure that the data is collected in good conditions the experiment's operation has to be constantly verified. In all, at LEP experiments over 100 000 parameters were monitored, controlled, and synchronized by the "Monotoring and control" system. In the future, LHC experiments will produce as much data in a single day as a LEP detector did in a full year's running with a raw data rate of 10 - 100 MBytes/s and will have to cope with some 800 million proton-proton collisions a second of these collisions only one in 100 million million is interesting for new particle se...

  7. Free proline, soluble sugars and soluble proteins concentration as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the effects of salt stress on free proline, soluble sugars and soluble proteins accumulation were investigated in two sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) cultivars: CP66-346 (salt- tolerant) and CP65-357 (salt-sensitive). Young plants of these cultivars were exposed, in a hydroponic system, to four concentrations of NaCl ...

  8. Upgrade trigger: Biannual performance update

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Couturier, Ben; Esen, Sevda; De Cian, Michel; De Vries, Jacco Andreas; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Grillo, Lucia; Hasse, Christoph; Jones, Christopher Rob; Le Gac, Renaud; Matev, Rosen; Neufeld, Niko; Nikodem, Thomas; Polci, Francesco; Del Buono, Luigi; Quagliani, Renato; Schwemmer, Rainer; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Sascha; Szumlak, Tomasz; Vesterinen, Mika Anton; Wanczyk, Joanna; Williams, Mark Richard James; Yin, Hang; Zacharjasz, Emilia Anna

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the performance of the LHCb Upgrade trigger reconstruction sequence, incorporating changes to the underlying reconstruction algorithms and detector description since the Trigger and Online Upgrade TDR. An updated extrapolation is presented using the most recent example of an Event Filter Farm node.

  9. Photon-triggered nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Hoo-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Park, Jin-Sung; Lee, Jung Min; So, Jae-Pil; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Kwon, Soon-Hong; Barrelet, Carl J.; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Photon-triggered electronic circuits have been a long-standing goal of photonics. Recent demonstrations include either all-optical transistors in which photons control other photons or phototransistors with the gate response tuned or enhanced by photons. However, only a few studies report on devices in which electronic currents are optically switched and amplified without an electrical gate. Here we show photon-triggered nanowire (NW) transistors, photon-triggered NW logic gates and a single NW photodetection system. NWs are synthesized with long crystalline silicon (CSi) segments connected by short porous silicon (PSi) segments. In a fabricated device, the electrical contacts on both ends of the NW are connected to a single PSi segment in the middle. Exposing the PSi segment to light triggers a current in the NW with a high on/off ratio of >8 × 106. A device that contains two PSi segments along the NW can be triggered using two independent optical input signals. Using localized pump lasers, we demonstrate photon-triggered logic gates including AND, OR and NAND gates. A photon-triggered NW transistor of diameter 25 nm with a single 100 nm PSi segment requires less than 300 pW of power. Furthermore, we take advantage of the high photosensitivity and fabricate a submicrometre-resolution photodetection system. Photon-triggered transistors offer a new venue towards multifunctional device applications such as programmable logic elements and ultrasensitive photodetectors.

  10. GnRH agonist triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2013-01-01

    The concept that a bolus of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) can replace human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) as a trigger of final oocyte maturation was introduced several years ago. Recent developments in the area strengthen this premise. GnRHa trigger offers important advantages,...

  11. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  12. The Ksp-Solubility Conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roy W.; Bonicamp, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that there are only a few cases in which solubility and Ksp are related in a simple way. States that illustrations of the solubility product principle for one-to-one salts are adequate for students. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  13. A soluble class I molecule analogous to mouse Q10 in the horse and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, A M; Valas, R B; Maloy, W L; Coligan, J E

    1986-01-01

    Horse serum is shown to contain a soluble class I molecule analogous to the secreted Q10 molecule in the mouse. This molecule has several similarities to the recently described mouse Q10 molecule: it is smaller than membrane-bound equine class I molecules; it occurs in a high molecular mass complex of 200-300 kd in serum; and the serum levels of the equine molecule are similar to that of the Q10 molecule (about 30 micrograms/ml). A soluble molecule is also detected in the sera of species related to the horse; it has in fact been found in all the wild members of the order Perissodactyla so far tested. However, it was not detected in the serum of members of the orders Carnivora, Sirenia, Proboscidea, Artiodactyla, and Primates that were tested, nor in the serum of members of the order Rodentia other than in that of the genus Mus.

  14. Use of "natural" hibernation induction triggers for myocardial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolling, S F; Tramontini, N L; Kilgore, K S; Su, T P; Oeltgen, P R; Harlow, H H

    1997-09-01

    Hypothermic cardioplegia provides adequate myocellular protection, yet stunning and dysfunction remain significant problems. Interestingly, the subcellular changes of hibernation parallel the altered biology of induced cardiac ischemia, but are well tolerated by hibernating mammalian myocardium. Hibernation induction trigger (HIT) from winter-hibernating animal serum induces hibernation in active animals. Hibernation induction trigger is opiate in nature and is similar to the delta 2 opioids. To determine whether HIT could improve myocardial recovery following global ischemia, we gave 37 isolated rabbit hearts either standard cardioplegia or cardioplegia containing summer-active woodchuck, hibernating woodchuck, or black bear HIT serum or a delta 2 opioid, D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin, before 2 hours of global ischemia. Hibernation induction trigger appeared not to have an active mechanism during ischemia, as all hearts had equal recovery. In contrast, when examining for a preischemia mechanism, 23 additional rabbits received 3 days pretreatment with summer-active woodchuck or HIT hibernating woodchuck or black bear serum, or were preperfused with D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin or D-pen2,5-enkephalin, a-delta 1 opioid, again before 2 hours of global ischemia. Postischemic ventricular function, coronary flows, myocardial oxygen consumption, and ultrastructural preservation were all significantly improved with HIT and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin pretreatment. "Natural" HIT protection is superior to standard cardioplegia alone and may have clinical application.

  15. The ATLAS Missing ET trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few months, the ATLAS detector collected 900 GeV LHC collision events which allowed for the study the performance of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system (TDAQ). With the 7 TeV collision data collected recently, the performance studies of the trigger system are critical for a successful physics program. In particular a large spectrum of physics results will rely on the capacity of the ATLAS TDAQ system to collect events based on the estimate of the missing transverse energy (MET) contained in each event. The MET trigger would be, for example, the primary trigger to be used in new physics searches for processes involving new weakly interacting particles, which could account for the astronomically observed dark matter. In addition to discovery perspectives, the MET trigger can also be used in combination with other triggers to control the rate of signatures involving low energy objects. For example, the MET trigger is necessary in order to measure non-boosted W in the tau channel. Finally...

  16. Full-length soluble CD147 promotes MMP-2 expression and is a potential serological marker in detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As a surface glycoprotein, CD147 is capable of stimulating the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) from neighboring fibroblasts. The aim of the present study is to explore the role of soluble CD147 on MMPs secretion from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and to investigate the diagnostic value of serum soluble CD147 in the HCC detection. Methods We identified the form of soluble CD147 in cell culture supernate of HCC cells and serum of patients with HCC, and explored the role of soluble CD147 on MMPs secretion. Serum CD147 levels were detected by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the value of soluble CD147 as a marker in HCC detection was analyzed. Results Full length soluble CD147 was presented in the culture medium of HCC cells and serum of patients with HCC. The extracellular domain of soluble CD147 promoted the expression of CD147 and MMP-2 from HCC cells. Knockdown of CD147 markedly diminished the up-regulation of CD147 and MMP-2 which induced by soluble CD147. Soluble CD147 activated ERK, FAK, and PI3K/Akt pathways, leading to the up-regulation of MMP-2. The level of soluble CD147 in serum of patients with HCC was significantly elevated compared with healthy individuals (P Soluble CD147 levels were found to be associated with HCC tumor size (P = 0.007) and Child-Pugh grade (P = 0.007). Moreover, soluble CD147 showed a better performance in distinguishing HCC compared with alpha-fetoprotein. Conclusions The extracellular domain of soluble CD147 enhances the secretion of MMP-2 from HCC cells, requiring the cooperation of membrane CD147 and activation of ERK, FAK, and PI3K/Akt signaling. The measurement of soluble CD147 may offer a useful approach in diagnosis of HCC. PMID:24996644

  17. ATLAS FTK: Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Amerio, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Andreazza, A; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Bevacqua, V; Bogdan, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Cavaliere, V; Canelli, F; Blazey, G; Cervigni, F; Cheng, Y; Citterio, M; Crescioli, F; Dell’Orso, M; Drake, G; Dunford, M; Giannetti, P; Giorgi, F; Hoff, J; Kapliy, A; Kasten, M; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Lanza, A; Liberali, V; Liu, T; Magalotti, D; McCarn, A; Melachrinos, C; Meroni, C; Negri, A; Neubauer, M; Penning, B; Piendibene, M; Proudfoot, J; Riva, M; Roda, C; Sabatini, F; Sacco, I; Shochet, M; Stabile, A; Tang, F; Tang, J; Tripiccione, R; Tuggle, J; Vercesi, V; Verzocchi, M; Villa, M; Vitillo, R A; Volpi, G; Webster, J; Wu, J; Yorita, K; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    A track reconstruction system for the trigger of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is described. The Fast Tracker is a highly parallel hardware system designed to operate at the Level-1 trigger output rate. It will provide high-quality tracks reconstructed over the entire inner detector by the start of processing in the Level-2 trigger. The system is based on associative memories for pattern recognition and fast FPGA’s for track reconstruction. Its design and expected performance under instantaneous luminosities up to 3 × 10^34/cm^2/s are discussed.

  18. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-06

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar.

  19. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2015-01-01

    -recognition molecule. Using recombinant CL-12 full length or CL-12 extracellular domain, we determined the occurrence of soluble CL-12 shed from in vitro cultured cells. Western blot showed that soluble recombinant CL-12 migrated with a band corresponding to ∼ 120 kDa under reducing conditions, whereas under...... of the terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule....

  20. Water-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were principle in a specific and sensitive method for the determination of free and bound pantothenic acid in a large variety of foods. A French laboratory invited European laboratories to participate in a series of collaborative studies for this method, which will be carried out in 2005/2006. A more sophisticated method was described by Mittermayer et al. They developed an LC-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method for the determination of vitamin B5 in a wide range of fortified food products. Application of the method to various samples showed consistent results with those obtained by microbiology. Vitamin B6.-Method 2004.07, an LC method for the analysis of vitamin B6 in reconstituted infant formula, was published by Mann et al. In contrast with this method, which quantifies vitamin B6 after converting the phosphorylated and free vitamers into pyridoxine, Viñas et al. published an LC method which determines 6 vitamin B6 related compounds, the 3 B6 vitamers, their corresponding phosphorylated esters, and a metabolite. Accuracy was determined using 2 CRMs. Results were within the certified ranges. Vitamin C.-Franke et al. described an extensive

  1. Students' mental models on the solubility and solubility product concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmi, Chusnur; Katmiati, Siti; Wiji, Mulyani, Sri

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to obtain some information regarding profile of students' mental models on the solubility and solubility product concept. A descriptive qualitative method was the method employed in the study. The participants of the study were students XI grade of a senior high school in Bandung. To collect the data, diagnostic test on mental model-prediction, observation, explanation (TDM-POE) instrument was employed in the study. The results of the study revealed that on the concept of precipitation formation of a reaction, 30% of students were not able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction either in submicroscopic or symbolic level although the microscopic have been shown; 26% of students were able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction based on the relation of Qsp and Ksp, but they were not able to explain the interaction of particles that involved in the reaction and to calculate Qsp; 26% of students were able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction based on the relation of Qsp and Ksp, and determine the particles involved, but they did not have the knowledge about the interactions occured and were uncapable of calculating Qsp; and 18% of students were able to explain the precipitation formation of a reaction based on the relation of Qsp and Ksp, and determine the interactions of the particles involved in the reactions but they were not able to calculate Qsp. On the effect of adding common ions and decreasing pH towards the solubility concept, 96% of students were not able to explain the effect of adding common ions and decreasing pH towards the solubility either in submicroscopic or symbolic level although the microscopic have been shown; while 4% of students were only able to explain the effect of adding common ions towards the solubility based on the chemical equilibrium shifts and predict the effect of decreasing pH towards the solubility. However, they were not able to calculate the solubility before and after

  2. Tile Calorimeter Muon Trigger Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Cerqueira, A S; Usai, G L

    2002-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter contributes to the first level trigger with the fast analog signal coming from the trigger summing boards, so-called analog adder. The adders provide two kinds of output: the total energy sum in a trigger tower and the signal from the respective cell of the last radial calorimeter layer, which can be used for identifying muons, thus making the muon first level trigger more robust. This note reviews the adder specifications and laboratory tests, whereas the main focus is put on the data analysis from the testbeam periods in~2001. Several improvements achieved by tuning the read-out are described. Using the testbeam results, the ability to identify muons in the last radial Tilecal layer is discussed. The experimental results obtained at the testbeams are completed with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Trigger points: an anatomical substratum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs...

  4. FERMIGTRIG - Fermi GBM Trigger Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by one or more of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO). Note that there are two Browse catalogs resulting from GBM...

  5. Effects of complement inactivation and IgG depletion on skin reactivity to autologous serum in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolo, U; Kricek, F; Ruf, C; Peserico, A; Amadori, A; Cancian, M

    2000-09-01

    Intradermal injection of autologous serum elicits a wheal-and-flare response in about 60% of patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). This reactivity has been attributed to the presence of IgG autoantibodies directed against IgE or the alpha-chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRIalpha) expressed on basophils and mast cells, leading to the hypothesis that at least some forms of CIU could be sustained by an autoimmune process. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of anti-IgE or anti-FcepsilonRI antibodies and the ability to induce wheal-and-flare responses in CIU sera selected for the capacity to give a positive skin test response. Fifteen patients with CIU and a positive skin test response to autologous serum were injected intradermally with native serum and with serum heated at 56 degrees C for 30 minutes and then adsorbed on Sepharose-protein G to obtain IgG depletion. Serum levels of anti-IgE and anti-FcepsilonRIalpha antibodies were measured by ELISA by using purified IgE and recombinant RIalpha-soluble double-fusion protein RIalpha-human serum albumin-RIalpha, respectively. The histamine-releasing activity of sera was tested by using ELISA with whole human blood from a healthy donor. All patients had positive cutaneous responses to native serum injection. Anti-FcepsilonRIalpha antibodies were present in 14 of 15 native sera, only two of which were able to induce in vitro basophil degranulation. On the contrary, detectable amounts of anti-IgE antibodies were not found in any serum. IgG depletion by protein G resulted in complete (10/14 samples) or considerable (4/14 samples) removal of anti-FcepsilonRIalpha antibodies. The two sera endowed with functional activity lost their capacity to trigger histamine release from basophils after heating and protein G adsorption. Nonetheless, heat-decomplemented/IgG-depleted sera elicited wheal-and-flare reactions comparable with those observed with untreated

  6. Soluble L-selectin levels predict survival in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole H; Strøm, Jens

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis. DESIGN: A prospective study of mortality in patients with sepsis whose serum levels of sL-selectin were measured on admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) and 4 days later. Follow-up data......, and 3 and 12 months after admission. Serum sL-selectin levels were significantly lower in the patients than in the controls. Sepsis nonsurvivors had significantly lower levels than survivors. Efficiency analysis and receiver operation characteristics showed that the ideal cutoff point for s......L-selectin as a test for sepsis survival was 470 ng/ml. The accumulated mortality in patients with subnormal sL-selectin levels on admission was significantly increased. No correlation was found between clinical or paraclinical markers, including SAPS II and sL-selectin, and no relationship to the microbial diagnosis...

  7. Method for estimating solubility parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D. D.; Ingham, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Semiempirical correlations have been developed between solubility parameters and refractive indices for series of model hydrocarbon compounds and organic polymers. Measurement of intermolecular forces is useful for assessment of material compatibility, glass-transition temperature, and transport properties.

  8. Increased levels of soluble CD226 in sera accompanied by decreased membrane CD226 expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhuwei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a cellular membrane triggering receptor, CD226 is involved in the NK cell- or CTL-mediated lysis of tumor cells of different origin, including freshly isolated tumor cells and tumor cell lines. Here, we evaluated soluble CD226 (sCD226 levels in sera, and membrane CD226 (mCD226 expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from cancer patients as well as normal subjects, and demonstrated the possible function and origin of the altered sCD226, which may provide useful information for understanding the mechanisms of tumor escape and for immunodiagnosis and immunotherapy. Results Soluble CD226 levels in serum samples from cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy individuals (P P Conclusion These findings suggest that sCD226 might be shed from cell membranes by certain proteases, and, further, sCD226 may be used as a predictor for monitoring cancer, and more important, a possible immunotherapy target, which may be useful in clinical application.

  9. Decreased expression of serum and microvascular vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in meningococcal sepsis*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Baerveldt, E.M.; Miedema, A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Emonts, M.; Groot, R. de; Prens, E.P.; Vught, A.J. van; Jansen, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skin microvessel expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and serum-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 levels in children with meningococcal sepsis. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Two tertiary academic children hospital PICUs.

  10. Possible triggers for phase transformation in zirconia hip balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sharon S; Green, Douglas D; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Donaldson, Thomas K; Clarke, Ian C

    2008-05-01

    The clinical history of yttria-stabilized, zirconia (Zr) ceramic has been controversial. In the patient, combinations of hydrothermal and mechanical shocks may trigger detrimental changes in Zr balls that have inferior metastability. Transformations from tetragonal to monoclinic phase may be influenced by impingement, dislocation, and disassociation in certain patients. Hydrothermal stability was measured in Zr balls from four vendors by autoclave and mechanical models that included "cup-impingement," "abrasive" wear, and "3rd-body" wear. Standard simulator tests for polyethylene (PE) wear studies combined pristine and previously transformed Zr and were also used to test lubricant effects (Zr/Zr-serum, Zr/Zr-water, Zr/PE-water). For in-vivo comparisons we studied retrieved Zr balls at 1-15 years follow-up by laser interferometry, SEM, EDS, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. We found that severe mechanical shock triggered local surface destruction but little transformation. In contrast, hydrothermal processes revealed 5-13% monoclinic by 7 h, increasing at a rate of 0.56%/h for 22-mm balls and 0.81%/h for 26-mm balls. The all-ceramic Zr/Zr bearings were very sensitive to lubrication mode, showing early catastrophic failure when run in water but surviving 20 million cycles when run with serum lubrication. Wear with Zr/PE combination did not trigger phase changes in water or serum but decreased the monoclinic content measured on previously transformed surfaces. Most retrieved Zr balls showed high transformation (30-85% monoclinic) but some showed no transformation. The ball areas with major monoclinic changes corresponded to PE contact, suggesting that tribological conditions under the cup were the trigger. This indicated that we understand little of the hydrothermal conditions operating under Zr/PE hip joints in-vivo. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  12. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41~fb$^{-1}$ with a peak luminosity of 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS \\mbox{Level-1} trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implemen...

  13. External triggering and triggered targeting strategies for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfei; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2017-06-01

    Drug delivery systems that are externally triggered to release drugs and/or target tissues hold considerable promise for improving the treatment of many diseases by minimizing nonspecific toxicity and enhancing the efficacy of therapy. These drug delivery systems are constructed from materials that are sensitive to a wide range of external stimuli, including light, ultrasound, electrical and magnetic fields, and specific molecules. The responsiveness conferred by these materials allows the release of therapeutics to be triggered on demand and remotely by a physician or patient. In this Review, we describe the rationales for such systems and the types of stimuli that can be deployed, and provide an outlook for the field.

  14. Trigger processing using reconfigurable logic in the CMS calorimeter trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Brooke, J J; Heath, G P; Maddox, A J; Newbold, D; Rabbetts, P D

    2001-01-01

    We present the design of the Global Calorimeter Trigger processor for the CMS detector at LHC. This is a fully pipelined processor system which collects data from all the CMS calorimeters and produces summary information used in forming the Level-1 trigger decision for each event. The design in based on the use of state-of-the-art reconfigurable logic devices (FPGAs) and fast data links. We present the results of device testing using a low-latency pipelined sort algorithm, which demonstrate that an FPGA can be used to perform processing previously foreseen to require custom ASICs. Our design approach results in a powerful, flexible and compact processor system. (0 refs).

  15. A trigger processor for ARGUS

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, H D

    1981-01-01

    The ARGUS detector at the electron-positron storage ring DORIS consists of various particle detectors arranged in cylindrical symmetry in and around an axial magnetic field. A fast secondary trigger processor has been designed to find and count circular tracks in the r- phi -plane of the detector that originate from the interaction point. The processor serves as a filter in the trigger system of the ARGUS detector and is expected to reduce the rate of background triggers by two orders of magnitude. The processor hardware is built in ECL to perform simple operations with very high speed and partly in parallel. The track finding process takes about 9 mu s plus 3 mu s for each encountered track element. Control information is stored in memories that may be loaded via CAMAC from the online computer allowing easy adaption of the processor to different experimental conditions. (1 refs).

  16. Upgrade trigger: Bandwidth strategy proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Conor; Meloni, Simone; Boettcher, Thomas Julian; Whitehead, Mark Peter; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Vesterinen, Mika Anton

    2017-01-01

    This document describes a selection strategy for the upgrade trigger using charm signals as a benchmark. The Upgrade trigger uses a 'Run 2-like' sequence consisting of a first and second stage, in between which the calibration and alignment is performed. The first stage, HLT1, uses an inclusive strategy to select beauty and charm decays, while the second stage uses offline-quality exclusive selections. A novel genetic algorithm-based bandwidth division is performed at the second stage to distribute the output bandwidth among different physics channels, maximising the efficiency for useful physics events. The performance is then studied as a function of the available output bandwidth.

  17. ATLAS FTK Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Iizawa, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Fast TracKer (FTK) will perform global track reconstruction after each Level-1 trigger accept signal to enable the software-based higher level trigger to have early access to tracking information. FTK is a dedicated processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the large level of computing power required for pattern recognition is provided by incorporating standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memory (AM). Motivation and the architecture of the FTK system will be presented, and the status of hardware and simulation will be following.

  18. LHCb Run 2 Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00038235

    2016-01-01

    During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014, LS1), the LHCb detector remained essentially unchanged, while the trigger system has been completely revisited. Upgrades to the LHCb computing infrastructure have allowed for high quality decay information to be calculated by the software trigger making a separate offline event reconstruction unnecessary. Reaching the ultimate precision of the LHCb experiment already in real time as the data arrive has the power to transform the experimental approach to processing large quantities of data

  19. DT Local Trigger performance in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Local Trigger system of the CMS Drift Tube chambers (DT) was checked applying similar methods as in the LHC Run 1 (2012). The main variables shown in this note are the trigger efficiency, the trigger quality and the fraction of trigger ghosts. The performance was found to be comparable or better than in Run 1.

  20. Coevolution of URAT1 and Uricase during Primate Evolution: Implications for Serum Urate Homeostasis and Gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Philip K; Farrar, Jennifer E; Gaucher, Eric A; Miner, Jeffrey N

    2016-09-01

    Uric acid is the highly insoluble end-product of purine metabolism in humans. Serum levels exceeding the solubility threshold can trigger formation of urate crystals resulting in gouty arthritis. Uric acid is primarily excreted through the kidneys with 90% reabsorbed back into the bloodstream through the uric acid transporter URAT1. This reabsorption process is essential for the high serum uric acid levels found in humans. We discovered that URAT1 proteins from humans and baboons have higher affinity for uric acid compared with transporters from rats and mice. This difference in transport kinetics of URAT1 orthologs, along with inability of modern apes to oxidize uric acid due to loss of the uricase enzyme, prompted us to ask whether these events occurred concomitantly during primate evolution. Ancestral URAT1 sequences were computationally inferred and ancient transporters were resurrected and assayed, revealing that affinity for uric acid was increased during the evolution of primates. This molecular fine-tuning occurred between the origins of simians and their diversification into New- and Old-World monkey and ape lineages. Remarkably, it was driven in large-part by only a few amino acid replacements within the transporter. This alteration in primate URAT1 coincided with changes in uricase that greatly diminished the enzymatic activity and took place 27-77 Ma. These results suggest that the modifications to URAT1 transporters were potentially adaptive and that maintaining more constant, high levels of serum uric acid may have provided an advantage to our primate ancestors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Alimentary triggers of hormone dependent breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Y. Lykholat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC consistently holds the leading positions in the structure of morbidity and mortality of the female population. Food containing veterinary hormones is extremely dangerous to human health: estrogens are female sex hormones. Excessive level of estrogen in the body gives rise to diseases of varying severity: in women (especially of older age it may cause breast cancer. The paper investigates the processes of lipid peroxidation and the status of antioxidant protection system in rats of different ages exposed to exogenous estrogens. The purpose of the work is to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidative protection status in rats of different ages exposed to exogenous estrogens for determining the trigger mechanisms for tumor development. Experiments were conducted on female Wistar rats exposed to exogenous estrogen for 45 days. At the beginning of the experiment, age of experimental animals was 3 months in pubertal period and 6 months as mature ones. The control groups consisted of intact animals of appropriate age. To simulate the influence of exogenous estrogen, rats’ food was treated with the Sinestron drug at the rate of 2 mg per kg. The research materials were serum and liver of rats. Objects of the research were indicators of lipid peroxidation activity (content of TBA-active products and antioxidant protection system (reduced glutathione (RG level, glutathione transferase (GT, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GP, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and total antioxidative activity (AOA. Data obtained was treated with standard methods of estimation of variation series. Various degrees of peroxidation intensification depending on the age and organs were determined. Maximum excess of control indexes in the serum was observed and it indicated synthetic estrogen effect of on all major body systems. In prepubertal period females’ liver the reaction of prooxidant system and tension in the antioxidant

  2. Free proline, soluble sugars and soluble proteins concentration as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results provided evidence that soluble sugars could contribute mainly to counteract the negative water potential of the outside medium and that protein synthesis stimulation was implicated in sugarcane salt tolerance. Proline appeared as a symptom in salt-stressed sugarcane plants rather than as an indicator of ...

  3. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  4. Etiology of myofascial trigger points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, C.; Dommerholt, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is described as the sensory, motor, and autonomic symptoms caused by myofascial trigger points (TrPs). Knowing the potential causes of TrPs is important to prevent their development and recurrence, but also to inactivate and eliminate existing TrPs. There is general

  5. The effect of novel probiotic on performance and serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this experiment, effects of two phosphate solublizing bacteria as a novel probiotic on performance factors and serum concentrations of cholesterol and triglyceride were investigated. The experiment included 320 Ross broilers from 1 to 49 days of age. Birds were randomly allocated to 4 treatments, with 4 replicates of 20 ...

  6. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  7. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  8. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  9. AIRWAY RETENTION OF MATERIALS OF DIFFERENT SOLUBILITY FOLLOWING LOCAL INTRABRONCHIAL DEPOSITION IN DOGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used a gamma camera to monitor the retention and clearance of radiolabeled human serum albumin (HSA), a water-soluble material with molecular weight of 66,000 Daltons, and radiolabeled sulfur colloid (SC), an insoluble submicron (0.22 microm) particle, following localized depo...

  10. Changes in fat-soluble vitamin levels after gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rino, Yasushi; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2017-02-01

    Several authors have reported the relationship between gastric cancer risk and vitamins. However, there are few reports on fat-soluble vitamins after gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Fat malabsorption and suppression of food intake after gastrectomy for gastric cancer have been previously documented. Because of fat malabsorption and suppression of food intake, a potential deficiency in fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamins A, D, E, and K, has been readily suggested. In about 20 % of patients, the serum vitamin E levels were decreased. Indeed, vitamin E deficiency is a common complication after gastrectomy. Continuous vitamin E deficiency could develop from neurological symptoms, i.e., peripheral neuropathy, limb or truncal ataxia. The total cholesterol level is associated with the vitamin E levels. However, the serum vitamin A levels were decreased in only 1.8 % of patients. In total gastrectomy cases, the serum vitamin A level may readily decrease. In contrast, 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D deficiency, which is the most active vitamin D metabolite, is rare. Additionally, vitamin K deficiency after gastrectomy has not been reported thus far. Evidence that serum fat-soluble vitamin levels may decrease after gastrectomy for gastric cancer has not been established yet. Future research must explore fat-soluble vitamin deficiency after gastrectomy.

  11. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  12. Involvement of the Soluble Urokinase Receptor in Chondrosarcoma Cell Mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Katia Bifulco; Immacolata Longanesi-Cattani; Maria Teresa Masucci; Annarosaria De Chiara; Flavio Fazioli; Gioconda Di Carluccio; Giuseppe Pirozzi; Michele Gallo; Antonello La Rocca; Gaetano Apice; Gaetano Rocco; Maria Vincenza Carriero

    2011-01-01

    High levels of urokinase receptor (uPAR) in tissue and serum of patients with chondrosarcoma correlate with poor prognosis. First, we analyzed the uPAR levels in tissues and plasma of five patients affected by chondrosarcoma. Interestingly, very high levels of uPAR and its soluble forms (SuPAR) were found on tumor cell surfaces and plasma, respectively, of two patients with lung metastases. Therefore, to investigate the role of SuPAR in chondrosaromas, we generated a primary cell culture...

  13. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  14. On the Solubility and Lipophilicity of Metallacarborane Pharmacophores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rak, J.; Dejlová, B.; Lampová, H.; Kaplánek, R.; Matějíček, P.; Cígler, Petr; Král, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2013), s. 1751-1759 ISSN 1543-8384 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11027; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028; GA AV ČR IAAX00320901 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; Biomedreg Project(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0030 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : metallacarborane * cobalt bis(dicarbollide) * serum albumin * HIV protease * inhibitor * lipophilicity * P-ow * solubility Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.787, year: 2013

  15. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163: A novel biomarker in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nørgaard; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Macrophages play an important role in cancer by suppression of adaptive immunity and promotion of angiogenesis and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages strongly express the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163, which can also be found as a soluble protein in serum and other body...... fluids (soluble CD163, sCD163). In this study, we examined serum sCD163 as a biomarker in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. METHODS: Peripheral blood (n = 104) and bone marrow (n = 17) levels of sCD163 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: At diagnosis, high s......CD163 was associated with higher stage according to the International Staging System (ISS) and with other known prognostic factors in multiple myeloma (creatinine, C-reactive protein, and beta-2 microglobulin). Soluble CD163 decreased upon high-dose treatment, and in a multivariate survival analysis...

  16. Cytoplasmic replication of Staphylococcus aureus upon phagosomal escape triggered by phenol-soluble modulin α

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosz, Magdalena; Kolter, Julia; Paprotka, Kerstin; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Schäfer, Daniel; Chatterjee, Som Subra; Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane; Ohlsen, Knut; Otto, Michael; Rudel, Thomas; Sinha, Bhanu; Fraunholz, Martin

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is readily internalized by professional phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils but also by non-professional phagocytes such as epithelial or endothelial cells. Intracellular bacteria have been proposed to play a role in evasion of

  17. Diagnostic utility of soluble triggering receptor expression on myeloid cells-1 in complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel H.A. Ghoneim

    2013-10-01

    In conclusion: Combination of classical criteria with pleural fluid sTREM-1 could be useful in discrimination between nonpurulent complicated and non complicated parapneumonic pleural effusions and hence early pleural drainage in patients with complicated parapneumonic effusions which may affect disease outcome.

  18. Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor in various blood transfusion components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T

    1999-01-01

    of sVEGF was determined in nonfiltered and prestorage white cell-reduced whole blood (WB), buffy coat-depleted saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol (SAGM) blood, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and buffy coat-derived platelet (BCP) pools obtained from volunteer, healthy blood donors. As a control, total content....... The potential content of VEGF in various blood components for transfusion was evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Soluble VEGF (sVEGF, isotype 165) was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) in serum and plasma samples and in lysed cells from healthy volunteers. Subsequently, total content......: In the healthy volunteers, median total sVEGF content was 97 (range, 20-303) pg per mL in serum and 19 (13-37) pg per mL in plasma (n = 12, p plasma, and 95 (78...

  19. ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has introduced and recently commissioned a completely new hardware sub-system of its first-level trigger: the topological processor (L1Topo). L1Topo consist of two AdvancedTCA blades mounting state-of-the-art FPGA processors, providing high input bandwidth (up to 4 Gb/s) and low latency data processing (200 ns). L1Topo is able to select collision events by applying kinematic and topological requirements on candidate objects (energy clusters, jets, and muons) measured by calorimeters and muon sub-detectors. Results from data recorded using the L1Topo trigger will be presented. These results demonstrate a significantly improved background event rejection, thus allowing for a rate reduction without efficiency loss. This improvement has been shown for several physics processes leading to low-pT leptons, including H->tau tau and J/Psi->mu mu. In addition to describing the L1Topo trigger system, we will discuss the use of an accurate L1Topo simulation as a powerful tool to validate and optimize...

  20. ATLAS FTK: Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Volpi, Guido; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the ATLAS Fast Tracker processor is presented, reporting the design of the system, its expected performance, and the integration status. The next LHC runs, with a significant increase in instantaneous luminosity, will provide a big challenge to the trigger and data acquisition systems of all the experiments. An intensive use of the tracking information at the trigger level will be important to keep high efficiency in interesting events, despite the increase in multiple p-p collisions per bunch crossing (pile-up). In order to increase the use of tracks within the High Level Trigger (HLT), the ATLAS experiment planned the installation of an hardware processor dedicated to tracking: the Fast TracKer (FTK) processor. The FTK is designed to perform full scan track reconstruction at every Level-1 accept. To achieve this goal, the FTK uses a fully parallel architecture, with algorithms designed to exploit the computing power of custom VLSI chips, the Associative Memory, as well as modern FPGAs. The FT...

  1. Muon Trigger for Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyak, M.; Usvyatsov, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Shimmin, C.; Ustyuzhanin, A.

    2017-10-01

    The CRAYFIS experiment proposes to use privately owned mobile phones as a ground detector array for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays. Upon interacting with Earth’s atmosphere, these events produce extensive particle showers which can be detected by cameras on mobile phones. A typical shower contains minimally-ionizing particles such as muons. As these particles interact with CMOS image sensors, they may leave tracks of faintly-activated pixels that are sometimes hard to distinguish from random detector noise. Triggers that rely on the presence of very bright pixels within an image frame are not efficient in this case. We present a trigger algorithm based on Convolutional Neural Networks which selects images containing such tracks and are evaluated in a lazy manner: the response of each successive layer is computed only if activation of the current layer satisfies a continuation criterion. Usage of neural networks increases the sensitivity considerably comparable with image thresholding, while the lazy evaluation allows for execution of the trigger under the limited computational power of mobile phones.

  2. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  3. Systemic and Mucosal Antibody Responses to Soluble and Nanoparticle-Conjugated Antigens Administered Intranasally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E. Howe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are increasingly being used for drug delivery, as well as antigen carriers and immunostimulants for the purpose of developing vaccines. In this work, we examined how intranasal (i.n. priming followed by i.n. or subcutaneous (s.c. boosting immunization affects the humoral immune response to chicken ovalbumin (Ova and Ova conjugated to 20 nm NPs (NP-Ova. We show that i.n. priming with 20 mg of soluble Ova, a dose known to trigger oral tolerance when administered via gastric gavage, induced substantial systemic IgG1 and IgG2c, as well as mucosal antibodies. These responses were further boosted following a s.c. immunization with Ova and complete Freund’s adjuvant (Ova+CFA. In contrast, 100 µg of Ova delivered via NPs induced an IgG1-dominated systemic response, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. Following a secondary s.c. or i.n. immunization with Ova+CFA or NP-Ova, systemic IgG1 titers significantly increased, and serum IgG2c and intestinal antibodies were induced in mice primed nasally with NP-Ova. Only Ova- and NP-Ova-primed mice that were s.c.-boosted exhibited substantial systemic and mucosal titers for up to 6 months after priming, whereas the antibodies of i.n.-boosted mice declined over time. Our results indicate that although the amount of Ova delivered by NPs was 1000-fold less than Ova delivered in soluble form, the antigen-specific antibody responses, both systemic and mucosal, are essentially identical by 6 months following the initial priming immunization. Additionally, both i.n.- and s.c.-boosting strategies for NP-Ova-primed mice were capable of inducing a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal antibodies; however, it is only by using a heterogeneous prime-boost strategy that long-lasting antibody responses were initiated. These results provide valuable insight for future mucosal vaccine development, as well as furthering our understanding of mucosal antibody responses.

  4. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison A. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx, and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media, 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media, and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media. Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ, was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM−1 cm−1. No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture.

  5. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Madison A; Gonzalez, Jesica; Hussain, Anjum; Oldfield, Rachel N; Johnston, Kathryn A; Lopez, Karlo M

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx), and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)) were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media), 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media), and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media). Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ), was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM(-1 )cm(-1). No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture.

  6. Effects of aspirin, prednisolone and indomethacin on nephrotoxic serum nephritis in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Kurokawa, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effects of aspirin, prednisolone, and indomethacin on nephrotoxic serum nephritis in rats was studied. The nephritis was induced by a single intravenous injection of nephrotoxic serum (NTS, rabbit anti-serum against the water-soluble renal antigen of the rat). The injection of NTS induced the heterologous phase of proteinuria (within a day after NTS injection) and then the autologous phase (5 to 7 days after NTS injection). The effect of drugs given before the NTS (i.e. prophylactically...

  7. Levels of soluble Fas/APO-1 in patients with Behçet's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hamzaoui

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify soluble Fas/APO1 (sFas/APO-1 protein in the serum of patients with Behcet's disease (BD in active and inactive stages, compared with patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Soluble Fas/APO-1 was quantified using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Increased serum sFas/APO-1 levels were observed in active BD, compared with inactive BD, RA patients and SLE patients. Increased serum sFas/APO-1 levels were correlated with the presence of neurologic manifestations or pulmonary involvement in active BD. In conclusion, increased levels of sFas/APO-1 occurred frequently and exclusively in active BD patients. Preliminary evidence suggested that elevated levels of sFas/APO-1 are associated with the clinical stage and clinical manifestations in BD.

  8. Performance of the CMS Regional Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Klabbers, P; Dasu, S; Efron, J; Fobes, R; Gorski, T; Grogg, K; Grothe, M; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Weinberg, M

    2009-01-01

    The CMS Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) receives eight-bit energies and a data quality bit from the HCAL and ECAL Trigger Primitive Generators (TPGs). The RCT uses these trigger primitives to find e/γ candidates and calculate regional calorimeter sums that are sent to the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) for sorting and further processing. The RCT hardware consists of one clock distribution crate and 18 double-sided crates containing custom boards, ASICs, and backplanes. The RCT electronics have been completely installed since 2007. The RCT has been integrated into the CMS Level-1 Trigger chain. Regular runs, triggering on cosmic rays, prepare the CMS detector for the restart of the LHC. During this running, the RCT control is handled centrally by CMS Run Control and Monitor System communicating with the Trigger Supervisor. Online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) evaluates the performance of the RCT during these runs. Offline DQM allows more detailed studies, including trigger efficiencies. These and other r...

  9. Novel Proresolving Aspirin-Triggered DHA Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serhan, Charles N; Fredman, Gabrielle; Yang, Rong; Karamnov, Sergey; Belayev, Ludmila S; Bazan, Nicolas G; Zhu, Min; Winkler, Jeremy W; Petasis, Nicos A

    2011-01-01

    .... We report an aspirin-triggered DHA metabolome that biosynthesizes a potent product in inflammatory exudates and human leukocytes, namely aspirin-triggered Neuroprotectin D1/Protectin D1 [AT-(NPD1/PD1...

  10. Water-Soluble Nanodiamond (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    nanodiamond salt that reacts with either alkyl or aryl halides by electron transfer to yield radical anions that dissociate spontaneously into free radicals...sodium in liquid ammonia leads to the nanodiamond salt 1. This material can be reacted with either alkyl or aryl halides to yield a radical anion that...From - To) March 2012 Technical Paper 1 October 2008 – 1 March 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE WATER-SOLUBLE NANODIAMOND (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT

  11. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marciniak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated.

  12. The Trigger System of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Felcini, Marta

    2008-01-01

    We give an overview of the main features of the CMS trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) system. Then, we illustrate the strategies and trigger configurations (trigger tables) developed for the detector calibration and physics program of the CMS experiment, at start-up of LHC operations, as well as their possible evolution with increasing luminosity. Finally, we discuss the expected CPU time performance of the trigger algorithms and the CPU requirements for the event filter farm at start-up.

  13. The ATLAS level-1 Central Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Spiwoks, R; Berge, D; Caracinha, D; Ellis, Nick; Farthouat, P; Gällnö, P; Haas, S; Klofver, P; Krasznahorkay, A; Messina, A; Ohm, C; Pauly, T; Perantoni, M; Pessoa Lima Junior, H; Schuler, G; De Seixas, J M; Wengler, T; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger consists of the Muon-to-Central-Trigger-Processor Interface (MUCTPI), the Central Trigger Processor (CTP), and the Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) partitions of the sub-detectors. The MUCTPI connects the output of the muon trigger system to the CTP. At every bunch crossing it receives information on muon candidates from each of the 208 muon trigger sectors and calculates the total multiplicity for each of six pT thresholds. The CTP combines information from the calorimeter trigger and the MUCTPI and makes the final Level-1 Accept (L1A) decision on the basis of lists of selection criteria (trigger menus). The MUCTPI and the CTP provide trigger summary information to the Level-2 trigger and to the data acquisition (DAQ) for every event selected at the Level-1. They further provide accumulated and, for the CTP, bunch-by-bunch counter data for monitoring of the trigger, detector and beam conditions. The TTC partitions send timing, trigger and control signals from the CTP to the...

  14. A Hardware Track Trigger (FTK) for the ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The design and studies of the performance for the ATLAS hardware Fast TracKer (FTK) are presented. The existing trigger system of the ATLAS experiment is deployed to reduce the event rate from the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz to < 1 KHz for permanent storage at the LHC design luminosity of 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. The LHC has performed exceptionally well and routinely exceeds the design luminosity and from 2015 is due to operate with higher still luminosities. This will place a significant load on the High Level trigger (HLT) system, both due to the need for more sophisticated algorithms to reject background, and from the larger data volumes that will need to be processed. The Fast TracKer is a custom electronics system that will operate at the full Level-1 accepted rate of 100 KHz and provide high quality tracks at the beginning of processing in the HLT. This will be performing by track reconstruction using hardware with massive parallelism using associative memories (AM) and FPGAs. The availability of the full...

  15. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Nicole [Division of Molecular Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Roentgenring 11, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany); Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus [Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Wajant, Harald, E-mail: harald.wajant@mail.uni-wuerzburg.de [Division of Molecular Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Roentgenring 11, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  16. LHCb Level-0 Trigger Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sarti, Alessio

    2006-01-01

    The calorimeter and muon systems are essential components to provide a trigger for the LHCb experiment. The calorimeter system comprises a scintillating pad detector and pre-shower, followed by electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. The calorimeter system allows photons, electrons and hadrons to be identified, and their energy to be measured. The muon system consists of five measuring stations equipped with Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and triple-Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, separated by iron filters. It allows the muons identification and transverse momentum measurement. The status of the two systems and their expected performance is presented.

  17. Heat-induced alterations in cashew allergen solubility and IgE binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Mattison

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cashew nuts are an increasingly common cause of food allergy. We compare the soluble protein profile of cashew nuts following heating. SDS-PAGE indicate that heating can alter the solubility of cashew nut proteins. The 11S legumin, Ana o 2, dominates the soluble protein content in ready to eat and mildly heated cashew nuts. However, we found that in dark-roasted cashew nuts, the soluble protein profile shifts and the 2S albumin Ana o 3 composes up to 40% of the soluble protein. Analysis of trypsin-treated extracts by LC/MS/MS indicate changes in the relative number and intensity of peptides. The relative cumulative intensity of the 5 most commonly observed Ana o 1 and 2 peptides are altered by heating, while those of the 5 most commonly observed Ana o 3 peptides remaine relatively constant. ELISA experiments indicate that there is a decrease in rabbit IgG and human serum IgE binding to soluble cashew proteins following heating. Our findings indicate that heating can alter the solubility of cashew allergens, resulting in altered IgE binding. Our results support the use of both Ana o 2 and Ana o 3 as potential cashew allergen diagnostic targets.

  18. Configuration of the ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Elsing, M; Armstrong, S; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, A; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Brandt, S; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; Corso-Radu, A; Di Mattia, A; Díaz-Gómez, M; Dos Anjos, A; Drohan, J; Ellis, Nick; Epp, B; Etienne, F; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Ghete, V M; González, S; Grothe, M; Kaczmarska, A; Karr, K M; Khomich, A; Konstantinidis, N P; Krasny, W; Li, W; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Ma, H; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Morettini, P; Moyse, E; Nairz, A; Negri, A; Nikitin, N V; Nisati, A; Padilla, C; Parodi, F; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rajagopalan, S; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; De Seixas, J M; Shears, T G; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Smizanska, M; Soluk, R A; Stanescu, C; Tapprogge, Stefan; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V; Watson, A; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, G; CHEP 2003 Computing in High Energy Physics

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a conceptual overview is given of the software foreseen to configure the ATLAS trigger system. Two functional software prototypes have been developed to configure the ATLAS Level-1 emulation and the High-Level Trigger software. Emphasis has been put so far on following a consistent approach between the two trigger systems and on addressing their requirements, taking into account the specific use-case of the `Region-of-Interest' mechanism for the ATLAS Level-2 trigger. In the future the configuration of the two systems will be combined to ensure a consistent selection configuration for the entire ATLAS trigger system.

  19. Determination of soluble ICAM-1 and TNFalphaR in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum levels in a population of Brazilian patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis Determinação dos níveis de ICAM-1 e TNFalfaR solúvel no líquido cefalorraqueano e soro numa população de pacientes brasileiros com esclerose múltipla forma surto-remissão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soniza Vieira Alves-Leon

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines and adhesion molecules have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. In this study we analyzed intrathecal (CSF and serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 and TNFalphaR (60kD from 20 patients with clinically definite MS during acute relapse or stable disease. Comparing to control groups of healthy individuals and patients with intervertebral herniated disc, MS patients showed increased levels (pCitocinas e moléculas de adesão estão implicadas na patogênese da esclerose múltipla (EM, uma doença inflamatória crônica do sistema nervoso central. Neste estudo, nós determinamos os níveis solúveis da molécula de adesão intercelular (sICAM-1 e TNFalfaR (60kD no soro e líquido cefalorraqueano (LCR de 20 pacientes com EM clinicamente definida durante surto ou remissão. Os pacientes com EM apresentaram, em comparação com os grupos controle formados por indivíduos sadios e com hérnia de disco intervertebral submetidos a mielografia, níveis significativamente (p< 0.001 elevados de sICAM-1 e TNFalfaR tanto no soro como no LCR. Independente do estágio da doença, nenhuma diferença significativa foi encontrada entre os pacientes durante o surto (657±124.9 ng/ml ou na remissão (627±36.2 ng/ml. Um aumento consistente dos níveis de TNFalfaR no soro e LCR, apontam para a existência de processo inflamatório continuado no tecido cerebral dos pacientes com EM, a despeito da ausência de sinais clínicos de doença em atividade.

  20. Metabolic triggered inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Hunter, D; Xu, J; Ding, C

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic joint disorder with a multifactorial etiology including genetic and environmental factors. Metabolic triggered inflammation, induced by nutrient overload and metabolic surplus, consists of components such as obesity, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, abnormal metabolites, acute phase proteins, vitamin D deficiency, and deregulated microRNAs that may play a role in OA pathophysiology. Obesity-related metabolic factors, especially adipokines, contribute to OA development by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and degradative enzymes, leading to cartilage matrix impairment and subchondral bone remodeling. Ectopic metabolite deposition and low-grade systemic inflammation can contribute to a toxic internal environment that exacerbates OA. Complement components highly expressed in osteoarthritic joints have also been proposed as causative factors. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with obesity and is implicated to be associated with cartilage loss in OA. Metabolic microRNAs may explain the inflammatory link between obesity and OA. Therapies targeting metabolic-triggered inflammation and its components are anticipated to have potential for the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The UA1 trigger processor

    CERN Document Server

    Grayer, G H

    1981-01-01

    Experiment UA1 is a large multipurpose spectrometer at the CERN proton-antiproton collider. The principal trigger is formed on the basis of the energy deposition in calorimeters. A trigger decision taken in under 2.4 microseconds can avoid dead-time losses due to the bunched nature of the beam. To achieve this fast 8-bit charge to digital converters have been built followed by two identical digital processors tailored to the experiment. The outputs of groups of the 2440 photomultipliers in the calorimeters are summed to form a total of 288 input channels to the ADCs. A look-up table in RAM is used to convert the digitised photomultiplier signals to energy in one processor, and to transverse energy in the other. Each processor forms four sums from a chosen combination of input channels, and also counts the number of clusters with electromagnetic or hadronic energy above pre-determined levels. Up to twelve combinations of these conditions, together with external information, may be combined in coincidence or in...

  2. The Database Driven ATLAS Trigger Configuration System

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trigger selection configuration system of the ATLAS low- and high-level trigger (HLT) and the upgrades it received in preparation for LHC Run 2. The ATLAS trigger configuration system is responsible for applying the physics selection parameters for the online data taking at both trigger levels and the proper connection of the trigger lines across those levels. Here the low-level trigger consists of the already existing central trigger (CT) and the new Level-1 Topological trigger (L1Topo), which has been added for Run 2. In detail the tasks of the configuration system during the online data taking are Application of the selection criteria, e.g. energy cuts, minimum multiplicities, trigger object correlation, at the three trigger components L1Topo, CT, and HLT On-the-fly, e.g. rate-dependent, generation and application of prescale factors to the CT and HLT to adjust the trigger rates to the data taking conditions, such as falling luminosity or rate spikes in the detector readout ...

  3. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be ...

  4. Decreased levels of soluble Toll-like Receptor 2 in patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Tehrani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, reports have indicated a role for the membrane form of Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2 in asthma pathogenesis. In this study we examined soluble TLR2 levels in serum and sputum of asthmatic and healthy subjects. Methods: Serum and sputum samples were obtained from 33 asthmatic and 19 healthy subjects. The asthmatics were classified into four groups according to the Global Initiative for Asthma. A sandwich ELISA was developed to measure soluble TLR2 (sTLR2 in serum and sputum. TLR2 mRNA expression was determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR of all sputum samples. Results: The mean sTLR2 levels from serum and sputum of asthmatics were significantly lower than those from healthy subjects. Moreover, sTLR2 concentration decreased concomitantly with asthma severity. The differences observed, however, were not statistically significant. TLR2/GAPDH mRNA of sputum leukocytes was also significantly lower in asthmatics than in healthy subjects. Conclusion: This study demonstrated for the first time thatsTLR2 levels are lower in serum and sputum samples from asthmatic than from healthy subjects, and this could be an indicator of TLR2 expression. We also found that sTLR2 concentration in serum decreased concomitantly with an increase of asthma severity clinical score.

  5. Hadronic triggers and trigger object-level analysis at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zaripovas, Donatas Ramilas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic signatures are critical to the high energy physics analysis program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and are broadly used for both Standard Model measurements and searches for new physics. These signatures include generic quark and gluon jets, as well as jets originating from b-quarks or the decay of massive particles (such as electroweak bosons or top quarks). Additionally missing transverse momentum from non-interacting particles provides an interesting probe in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Developing trigger selections that target these events is a huge challenge at the LHC due to the enormous event rates associated with these signatures. This challenge is exacerbated by the amount of pile-up activity, which continues to grow. In order to address these challenges, several new techniques have been developed during the past year in order to significantly improve the potential of the 2017 dataset and overcome the limiting factors, such as storage and computing requirements...

  6. Hadronic Triggers and trigger-object level analysis at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zaripovas, Donatas Ramilas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic signatures are critical to the high energy physics analysis program, and are broadly used for both Standard Model measurements and searches for new physics. These signatures include generic quark and gluon jets, as well as jets originating from b-quarks or the decay of massive particles (such as electroweak bosons or top quarks). Additionally missing transverse momentum from non-interacting particles provides an interesting probe in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Developing trigger selections that target these events is a huge challenge at the LHC due to the enormous rates associated with these signatures. This challenge is exacerbated by the amount of pile-up activity, which continues to grow. In order to address these challenges, several new techniques have been developed during the past year in order to significantly improve the potential of the 2017 dataset and overcome the limiting factors to more deeply probing for new physics, such as storage and computing requirements f...

  7. Characterization of B7H6, an endogenous ligand for the NK cell activating receptor NKp30, reveals the identity of two different soluble isoforms during normal human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Franco, Jorge; Hernandez-Gutierrez, Rodolfo; Bueno-Topete, Miriam Ruth; Haramati, Jesse; Navarro-Hernandez, Rosa Elena; Escarra-Senmarti, Marta; Vega-Magaña, Natali; Del Toro-Arreola, Alicia; Pereira-Suarez, Ana Laura; Del Toro-Arreola, Susana

    2018-01-01

    B7H6, an endogenous ligand expressed on tumor cell surfaces, triggers NKp30-mediated activation of human NK cells. In contrast, the release of soluble B7H6 has been proposed as a novel mechanism by which tumors might evade NK cell-mediated recognition. Since NK cells are critical for the maintenance of early pregnancy, it is not illogical that soluble B7H6 might also be an important factor in directing NK cell activity during normal pregnancy. Thus, this study was focused on the characterization of soluble B7H6 during the development of normal pregnancy. Serum samples were obtained from healthy pregnant women who were experiencing their second pregnancies (n=36). Additionally, 17 of these pregnant participants were longitudinally studied for the presence of B7H6 during their second and third trimesters. Age-matched healthy non-pregnant women served as controls (n=30). The presence of soluble B7H6 was revealed by Western blotting. A further characterization was performed using an immunoproteomic approach based on 2DE-Western blotting combined with MALDI-MS. The results show that sera from all pregnant women were characterized by the presence of two novel isoforms of B7H6, both with lower MW than the reported of 51kDa. These isoforms were either a heavy (∼37kDa) or a light isoform (∼30kDa) and were mutually exclusive. N-glycosylation did not completely explain the different molecular weights exhibited by the two isoforms, as was demonstrated by enzymatic deglycosylation with PNGase F. The confirmation of the identity and molecular mass of each isoform indicates that B7H6, while maintaining the C- and N-termini, is most likely released during pregnancy by a mechanism distinct from proteolytic cleavage. We found that both isoforms, but mainly the heavier B7H6, were released via exosomes; and that the lighter isoform was also released in an exosome-free manner that was not observed in the heavy isoform samples. In conclusion, we find that soluble B7H6 is

  8. Serum pneumoproteins in firefighters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Frans; Krop, Esmeralda; Burger, Nena; Kerstjens, Huib; Heederik, Dick

    Serum Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) were measured in a cross-sectional study in 402 firefighters. For the population as a whole, no associations were detected between serum pneumoproteins and smoke exposure. SP-A levels were increased in symptomatic subjects

  9. The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Stockton, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 trigger system is responsible for reducing the anticipated LHC collision rate from 40 MHz to less than 100 kHz. The custom-built electronics of the ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger receives inputs from the ATLAS Level-1 Triggers and the LHC. The Level-1 calorimeter triggers are based on coarse detector information to identify high-ET jets, electrons/photons and hadrons, along with missing and total energy. In addition there are dedicated muon and forward detectors, providing triggers for different energy thresholds. The Level-1 Central Trigger combines these trigger inputs to form a Level-1 accept. This, along with trigger summary information, is then passed onto the higher levels of the trigger. From the LHC itself the Level-1 Central Trigger passes the bunch clock to all ATLAS sub-detectors. We present how the rigger information, along with dead-time rates, are monitored and logged by the online system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. Also presented are ...

  10. Wired and Wireless Camera Triggering with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2017-10-01

    Synchronous triggering is an important task that allows simultaneous data capture from multiple cameras. Accurate synchronization enables 3D measurements of moving objects or from a moving platform. In this paper, we describe one wired and four wireless variations of Arduino-based low-cost remote trigger systems designed to provide a synchronous trigger signal for industrial cameras. Our wireless systems utilize 315 MHz or 434 MHz frequencies with noise filtering capacitors. In order to validate the synchronization accuracy, we developed a prototype of a rotating trigger detection system (named RoTriDeS). This system is suitable to detect the triggering accuracy of global shutter cameras. As a result, the wired system indicated an 8.91 μs mean triggering time difference between two cameras. Corresponding mean values for the four wireless triggering systems varied between 7.92 and 9.42 μs. Presented values include both camera-based and trigger-based desynchronization. Arduino-based triggering systems appeared to be feasible, and they have the potential to be extended to more complicated triggering systems.

  11. Solubility of haloether anesthetics in human and animal blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao H N; Brosnan, Robert J; Fukushima, Fabíola B; Hodges, Joanne; Liu, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Anesthetic blood solubility predicts pharmacokinetics for inhaled agents and is essential for determination of blood anesthetic concentrations from end-tidal gas concentrations using Henry's Law. Though used to model anesthetic effects in humans, there are limited interspecies solubility comparisons that include modern haloethers. This study aimed to measure hematocrit-adjusted blood:gas anesthetic partition coefficients (λ B:G) for desflurane, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and methoxyflurane in humans and animals. Whole blood was collected from 20 rats, 8 horses, and 4 each of cats, cattle, humans, dogs, goats, pigs, rabbits, and sheep. Plasma or cell volume was removed to adjust all samples to a packed cell volume of 40%. A single-agent calibration gas headspace was added to blood in a glass syringe and was mixed and equilibrated at 37°C for 2 h. Agent concentrations in the calibration gas and syringe headspace were measured using gas chromatography. Anesthetic solubility in saline, citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine, and olive oil were similarly measured. Except for goats, all animal species had at least one λ B:G measurement that differed significantly from humans. For each agent, λ B:G positively correlated with serum triglyceride concentrations, but this only explained 25% of interspecies variability. Desflurane was significantly less soluble in blood than sevoflurane in some species (e.g., humans) but not in others (e.g., rabbits). Anesthetic partition coefficients differ significantly between humans and most animals for haloether anesthetics. Because of their similar λ B:G values, goats may be a better animal model for inhaled anesthetic pharmacokinetics in people.

  12. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  13. The significance of soluble transferrin receptors in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijanić Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years, determination of soluble transferrin receptor levels has been emerging as a test that can reliably indicate iron deficiency in various states, and that is non-invasive and easy to use. The aim of this study was: to determine reference values of soluble transferrin receptor concentrations in serums in our population, to examine the reliability of this method in the diagnosis of anemia due to iron deficiency and associated iron deficiency in anemia accompanying malignant hemopathies, and to identify possible limitations of the test in certain conditions.

  14. A biomarker panel (Bioscore incorporating monocytic surface and soluble TREM-1 has high discriminative value for ventilator-associated pneumonia: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal Grover

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP increases mortality in critical illness. However, clinical diagnostic uncertainty persists. We hypothesised that measuring cell-surface and soluble inflammatory markers, incorporating Triggering Receptor Expressed by Myeloid cells (TREM-1, would improve diagnostic accuracy.A single centre prospective observational study, set in a University Hospital medical-surgical intensive Care unit, recruited 91 patients into 3 groups: 27 patients with VAP, 33 ventilated controls without evidence of pulmonary sepsis (non-VAP, and 31 non-ventilated controls (NVC, without clinical infection, attending for bronchoscopy. Paired samples of Bronchiolo-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF and blood from each subject were analysed for putative biomarkers of infection: Cellular (TREM-1, CD11b and CD62L and soluble (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, sTREM-1, Procalcitonin. Expression of cellular markers on monocytes and neutrophils were measured by flow cytometry. Soluble inflammatory markers were determined by ELISA. A biomarker panel ('Bioscore', was constructed, tested and validated, using Fisher's discriminant function analysis, to assess its value in distinguishing VAP from non VAP.The expression of TREM-1 on monocytes (mTREM-1 and neutrophils (nTREM-1 and concentrations of IL-1β, IL-8, and sTREM-1 in BALF were significantly higher in VAP compared with non-VAP and NVC (p<0.001. The BALF/blood mTREM-1 was significantly higher in VAP patients compared to non-VAP and NVC (0.8 v 0.4 v 0.3 p<0.001. A seven marker Bioscore (BALF/blood ratio mTREM-1 and mCD11b, BALF sTREM-1, IL-8 and IL-1β, and serum CRP and IL-6 correctly identified 88.9% of VAP cases and 100% of non-VAP cases.A 7-marker bioscore, incorporating cellular and soluble TREM-1, accurately discriminates VAP from non-pulmonary infection.

  15. Effects of Viscum album extract therapy in patients with cancer: relation with interleukin-6, soluble interleukin-6 receptor, and soluble gp130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Eva

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the effects of Viscum album (VA) extract therapy on interleukin (IL)-12, IL-16, IL-6, soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R), and soluble gp130 (sgp130) in patients with cancer. VA extract as immunomodulator is used as treatment either following or in combination with chemo/radiotherapy. Previously we showed that serum levels of IL-12 and IL-16 were significantly elevated during tumor progression in 72 patients. The serum values of IL-6 were not significantly altered, however sIL-6R and sgp130 also increased significantly. In this study the serum levels of the five parameters were measured during VA extract therapy in 46 of these 72 tumor patients and compared to the values before VA extract treatment. The levels of the serum parameters IL-12, IL-16, IL-6, sIL-6R, sgp130 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Private cancer hospital in Arlesheim, Switzerland. Eighty percent (80%) of the tumor patients survived longer than 1 year (11 patients in stage I + II without, 8 patients after chemotherapy/radiotherapy, 10 patients in stage III + IV without, 8 patients after chemotherapy). Clinically and with laboratory investigations there was no progression in these patients. VA extract therapy did not affect serum values of IL-12 or IL-16. However both the number of patients with increased levels of IL-6, sIL-6R, and sgp130 and also the serum values decreased significantly during the treatment, (between p cancer with rapid progression who died within 3 months, the serum values of IL-6 increased significantly (p < 0.05), whereas the other investigated parameters did not change. The results show that measurements of IL-6, sIL-6R, and sgp130 could be important for establishing the clinical condition and evaluating treatment in tumor patients.

  16. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  17. Therapeutic effects of soluble dietary fiber consumption on type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunye; Zeng, Yuan; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Hongting; Liu, Jun; Fan, Rong; Zhu, Wenyi; Yuan, Lijia; Qin, Yu; Chen, Shihui; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Ying; Wan, Jing; Mi, Mantian; Wang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Soluble dietary fiber (DF) reduces the risk of developing diabetes and may have therapeutic effects in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The present study aimed to investigate the effect of soluble DF on metabolic control in patients with DM2. A total of 117 patients with DM2 between the ages of 40 and 70 were assessed. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups, and administered extra soluble DF (10 or 20 g/day), or to a control group (0 g/day) for one month. Blood glucose, serum insulin and connecting peptide (C-peptide) levels, and the insulin resistance index, as determined using the homeostatic model assessment method, were measured during fasting and up to 2-h postprandially prior to and following one month of treatment. Other measurements included serum levels of glycated albumin (GA), blood lipid profiles, and an analysis of the blood pressure, body weight and waist/hip ratio of all patients. Following intervention, the levels of 2-h blood glucose, fasting insulin and lipoprotein(a), and the insulin resistance index, were significantly improved in all groups. Furthermore, the fasting blood glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting C-peptide, 2-h C-peptide, GA and triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly improved in the soluble DF groups. The 20 g/day soluble DF group exhibited significantly improved fasting blood glucose and low-density lipoprotein levels, as well as a significantly improved insulin resistance index. In addition, 10 and 20 g/day soluble DF significantly improved the waist and hip circumferences and levels of TGs and apolipoprotein A. The results of the present study suggested that increased and regular consumption of soluble DF led to significant improvements in blood glucose levels, insulin resistance and metabolic profiles, without improving the secretory function of the islets of Langerhans, over a short-term intervention period in patients with DM2.

  18. Triggers of oral lichen planus flares and the potential role of trigger avoidance in disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah X; Blasiak, Rachel; Kim, Edwin; Padilla, Ricardo; Culton, Donna A

    2017-09-01

    Many patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) report triggers of flares, some of which overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, including oral allergy syndrome and oral contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of commonly reported triggers of OLP flares, their overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, and the potential role of trigger avoidance as a management strategy. Questionnaire-based survey of 51 patients with biopsy-proven lichen planus with oral involvement seen in an academic dermatology specialty clinic and/or oral pathology clinic between June 2014 and June 2015. Of the participants, 94% identified at least one trigger of their OLP flares. Approximately half of the participants (51%) reported at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral allergy syndrome, and 63% identified at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral contact dermatitis. Emotional stress was the most commonly reported trigger (77%). Regarding avoidance, 79% of the study participants reported avoiding their known triggers in daily life. Of those who actively avoided triggers, 89% reported an improvement in symptoms and 70% reported a decrease in the frequency of flares. Trigger identification and avoidance can play a potentially effective role in the management of OLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  20. A sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor for the determination of beta-amyloid oligomer by inhibiting the peptide-triggered in situ assembly of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yun; Feng, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Lipeng; Hou, Jiating; Han, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Zhencheng

    2017-01-01

    Soluble beta-amyloid (Aβ) oligomer is believed to be the most important toxic species in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Thus, it is critical to develop a simple method for the selective detection of Aβ oligomer with low cost and high sensitivity. In this paper, we report an electrochemical method for the detection of Aβ oligomer with a peptide as the bioreceptor and silver nanoparticle (AgNP) aggregates as the redox reporters. This strategy is based on the conversion of AgNP-based colorimetric assay into electrochemical analysis. Specifically, the peptide immobilized on the electrode surface and presented in solution triggered together the in situ formation of AgNP aggregates, which produced a well-defined electrochemical signal. However, the specific binding of Aβ oligomer to the immobilized peptide prevented the in situ assembly of AgNPs. As a result, a poor electrochemical signal was observed. The detection limit of the method was found to be 6 pM. Furthermore, the amenability of this method for the analysis of Aβ oligomer in serum and artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) samples was demonstrated.

  1. Trigger selections for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M; Brodzicka, J; Fitzpatrick, C; Gligorov, V V; Ilten, P; Vesterinen, M

    2014-01-01

    A study of selections for an all-software trigger to be implemented in the LHCb upgrade is presented. It is demonstrated that the strategy of using both inclusive and exclusive selections will work in the upgrade running conditions. The unique capabilities of the all-software trigger are also demonstrated. Finally, the scope and composition of the LHCb physics program are studied in the context of various trigger output rate scenarios.

  2. Serum thiamine level during the initiation term of hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Ono

    2012-06-01

    Although water-soluble vitamins such as thiamine are lost during dialysis session, serum thiamine level tended to restore spontaneously during the hospitalization (25.47±10.07 vs. 27.44±11.37, pre HD value, p=0.09. A three months-follow up measurement after initiation of HD, which is now in progress (so far n=3, revealed increase of serum thiamine level in all patients (35.33±7.37 ng/ml. It may reflect the improvement of nutritional status after the initiation of HD, and suggests the loss of thiamine by HD procedure can be covered.

  3. Dye solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide fluid is an alternative solvent for the water of the traditional dyeing. The solubility of dyestuff affects greatly the dyeing process. A theoretical model for predicting the dye solubility is proposed and verified experimentally. The paper concludes that the pressure has a greater impact on the dyestuff solubility than temperature, and an optimal dyeing condition is suggested for the highest distribution coefficient of dyestuff.

  4. Data analysis at Level-1 Trigger level

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmann, Johannes; Aradi, Gregor; Bergauer, Herbert; Jeitler, Manfred; Wulz, Claudia; Apanasevich, Leonard; Winer, Brian; Puigh, Darren Michael

    2017-01-01

    With ever increasing luminosity at the LHC, optimum online data selection is getting more and more important. While in the case of some experiments (LHCb and ALICE) this task is being completely transferred to computer farms, the others - ATLAS and CMS - will not be able to do this in the medium-term future for technological, detector-related reasons. Therefore, these experiments pursue the complementary approach of migrating more and more of the offline and High-Level Trigger intelligence into the trigger electronics. This paper illustrates how the Level-1 Trigger of the CMS experiment and in particular its concluding stage, the Global Trigger, take up this challenge.

  5. The ATLAS Muon and Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Dell'Asta, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    [Muon] The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) deploys a three-levels processing scheme for the trigger system. The level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level-2 (L2) trigger followed by an event filter (EF) for a staged trigger approach. It has access to the data of the precision muon detectors and other detector elements to refine the muon hypothesis. Trigger-specific algorithms were developed and are used for the L2 to increase processing speed for instance by making use of look-up tables and simpler algorithms, while the EF muon triggers mostly benefit from offline reconstruction software to obtain most precise determination of the track parameters. There are two algorithms with different approaches, namely inside-out and outside-in...

  6. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO{sub 2}(cr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat [Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC, Yachats, OR (United States); Kitamura, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO{sub 2}(cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg{sup -1}. These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO{sub 2}(am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO{sub 2}(am) converts to HfO{sub 2}(cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO{sub 2}(cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO{sub 2}(lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO{sub 2}(cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log{sub 10} K{sup 0} values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(lcr)[HfO{sub 2}(lcr) + 2H{sub 2}O ↔ Hf{sup 4+} + 4OH{sup -}]. The log{sub 10} of the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  7. Determinants of concentrations of N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and their associations with risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Guoqing; Chen, Liang; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Mannisto, Satu; White, Donna L; Albanes, Demetrius; Jiao, Li

    2014-01-01

    The soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) is shown to mitigate pro-inflammatory effects triggered by ligation of RAGE with N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML)-AGE or other ligands. We examined the associations among host, lifestyle, and genetic determinants of CML-AGE or sRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prospective ATBC Study. We obtained baseline exposure information, data on serological and genetic biomarkers from 141 patients with pancreatic cancer and 141 subcohort controls. Stepwise linear and logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that CML-AGE concentrations were independently inversely correlated with the minor allele of rs640742 of DDOST, physical activity, alcohol consumption, diastolic blood pressure (BP), and positively correlated with heart rate, serum sRAGE and HDL concentrations (P associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (any T compared with CC: multivariate OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.38-0.98). We identified host metabolic profile, lifestyle and genetic factors that explained approximately 50% of variability of CML-AGE or sRAGE in Finnish men smokers. The association between RAGE SNPs and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation.

  8. GnRH agonist trigger for the induction of oocyte maturation in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Lawrence; Benadiva, Claudio; Humaidan, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger is effective in the induction of oocyte maturation and prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome during IVF treatment. This trigger concept, however, results in early corpora lutea demise and consequently luteal phase dysfunction and impaired endometrial receptivity. The aim of this strenghths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis was to summarize the progress made over the past 15 years to optimize ongoing pregnancy rates after GnRHa trigger. The advantages and potential drawbacks of this type of triggering are reviewed. The current approach to the management of GnRHa trigger in autologous cycles is based on the peak serum oestradiol level or follicle number and aims at a fresh embryo transfer or a segmentation approach with elective cryopreservation policy. We recommend intensive luteal support with transdermal oestradiol and intramuscular progesterone alone if peak serum oestradiol is 4000 or more pg/ml after GnRHa trigger or dual trigger with GnRHa and HCG 1000 IU if peak serum oestradiol is less than 4000 pg/mL. On the contrary, we recommend HCG 1500 IU 35 h after GnRHa trigger if there are less than 25 follicles, or freeze all oocytes or embryos if there are over 25 follicles. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra L. Fox; Xina Xie; Greg Bala

    2004-11-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones to enhance oil recovery (EOR). Polymer technology relies mainly on the use of polyacrylamides cross-linked by a hazardous metal or organic. Contemporary polymer plugging has investigated the stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to produce polymers (Jenneman et. al., 2000) and the use of biocatalysts to trigger gelling (Bailey et. al., 2000). The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium species ATCC # 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. Microbial polymers are of interest due to their potential cost savings, compared to conventional use of synthetic chemical polymers. Numerous microorganisms are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. One microbiological polymer of interest is curdlan, â - (1, 3) glucan, which has demonstrated gelling properties by a reduction in pH. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability.

  10. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emi Akamatsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches.

  11. Intrasaccadic perception triggers pupillary constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Mathôt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly believed that vision is impaired during saccadic eye movements. However, here we report that some visual stimuli are clearly visible during saccades, and trigger a constriction of the eye’s pupil. Participants viewed sinusoid gratings that changed polarity 150 times per second (every 6.67 ms. At this rate of flicker, the gratings were perceived as homogeneous surfaces while participants fixated. However, the flickering gratings contained ambiguous motion: rightward and leftward motion for vertical gratings; upward and downward motion for horizontal gratings. When participants made a saccade perpendicular to the gratings’ orientation (e.g., a leftward saccade for a vertical grating, the eye’s peak velocity matched the gratings’ motion. As a result, the retinal image was approximately stable for a brief moment during the saccade, and this gave rise to an intrasaccadic percept: A normally invisible stimulus became visible when eye velocity was maximal. Our results confirm and extend previous studies by demonstrating intrasaccadic perception using a reflexive measure (pupillometry that does not rely on subjective report. Our results further show that intrasaccadic perception affects all stages of visual processing, from the pupillary response to visual awareness.

  12. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  13. The menacing phantom: what pulls the trigger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita J; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Nicholls, Michael E R; Gibson, Stephen J; Chou, Michael; Bradshaw, John L

    2011-08-01

    Phantom phenomena are frequent following amputation, but how this often painful experience is modified or triggered by spontaneous events or sensations often puzzles amputees and clinicians alike. We explored triggers of phantom phenomena in a heterogeneous sample of 264 upper and lower limb adult amputees with phantom sensations. Participants completed a structured questionnaire to determine the prevalence and nature of the triggers of phantom phenomena. The four categories of triggers identified include: (a) a quarter of participants experiencing psychological, emotional or autonomic triggers; (b) half experiencing behavioral triggers, "forgetting" the limb's absence and attempting to use the phantom; (c) one-fifth experiencing weather-induced triggers; and (d) one-third experiencing sensations referred from parts of the body. Upper limb amputees; and were more likely to experience weather-induced phantom phenomena than lower limb amputees; and upper and lower limb amputees were equally likely to experience referred sensations from the genitals, contradicting the homuncular remapping hypothesis. Traumatic amputees were more likely to report emotional triggers. Further, while those with emotional triggers exhibited poorer acceptance of the limitations of amputation, they were more likely to employ adaptive coping mechanisms. Finally, habitual "forgetting" behaviors were most common soon after amputation, whereas other more adaptive schemata (e.g., self-defense) were equally likely to be performed at any time following amputation. Various likely inter-related mechanisms are discussed in relation to phantom triggers. Ultimately, optimizing stump and neuroma management, as well as restoring function of central networks for pain, limb movement, and amputation-related memories, should help manage spontaneously triggered phantom phenomena. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. All rights reserved.

  14. Circulating soluble adhesion molecules in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, J; Mirapeix, E; Arrizabalaga, P; Rodriguez, R; Ascaso, C; Abellana, R; Font, J; Darnell, A

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate whether changes in concentrations of soluble (s) E-selectin, sP-selectin, sL-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1) reflect disease activity in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis and whether serum levels of these adhesion molecules are related to the degree of renal failure in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). A sandwich ELISA was used to measure these soluble adhesion molecules in (i) sera from 20 patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (10 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and 10 patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)), obtained at the time of diagnosis and during the remission period; (ii) sera from 40 patients with CRF not undergoing haemodialysis. At the time of diagnosis, serum levels of sE-selectin, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 (88+/-42 ng/ml, 437+/-184 ng/ml, 1720+/-1174 ng/ml respectively) were significantly higher in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis than in healthy controls (P<0.0001, P=0.002 and P=0.001 respectively). Serum sP-selectin values did not differ from those obtained in normal donors. In contrast, sL-selectin levels (940+/-349 ng/ml) were significantly lower in patients than those recorded in healthy controls (P<0.0001). A significant decrease in concentrations of sE-selectin, sP-selectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1 was observed between active and remission phases (P<0.0001, P=0.002, P=0.001 and P=0.001 respectively). No significant differences were observed in sL-selectin levels between active and remission phases. sL-selectin concentrations (802+/-306 ng/ml) during the remission phase remained lower than those observed in healthy controls (P<0.0001). No correlation was observed between serum creatinine and sE-selectin, sP-selectin, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 in patients of the CRF group. A slight negative correlation was established between creatinine and sL-selectin concentration. Increased serum levels of s

  15. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 97. Solubility of Higher Acetylenes and Triple Bonded Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzecz, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Solubility of Ethyne in Liquids was published in 2001 as Vol. 76 of the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. The current work extends the coverage to the solubility in liquids of higher gaseous and liquid acetylenes and to derivatives that contain a triple carbon-carbon bond. Predictive methods for estimating solubilities in water are summarised and usually give values to within an order of magnitude. The literature has been surveyed to the end of 2010.

  16. Solubility of acetaminophen in polyethylene glycol 400 + water mixtures according to the extended hildebrand solubility approach

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar Ahumada; Daniel Delgado; Fleming Martínez

    2014-01-01

    The Extended Hildebrand Solubility Approach(EHSA) was applied in the presentwork to evaluate the solubility of theanalgesic drug acetaminophen (paracetamol)in polyethylene glycol 400 + watermixtures at 298.15 K. An acceptablecorrelative capacity of EHSA was foundusing a regular polynomial model in orderfour (overall deviation below 0.7%),when the W interaction parameter is relatedto the solubility parameter of themixtures. Thus, the deviations obtainedin the estimated solubility with respect ...

  17. Indomethacin solubility in propylene glycol + water mixtures according to the extended hildebrand solubility approach

    OpenAIRE

    Holguín, Andrés R.; Delgado, Daniel R.; Martínez, Fleming

    2012-01-01

    In this work the Extended Hildebrand Solubility Approach (EHSA) was applied to evaluate the solubility of the analgesic drug indomethacin in propylene glycol + water mixtures at 298.15 K. An acceptable correlative capacity of EHSA was found using a regular polynomial model in order four (overall deviation lower than 2.2 %), when the W interaction parameter is related to the solubility parameter of the mixtures. Nevertheless, the deviations obtained in the estimated solubility with respect to ...

  18. Soluble histone H2AX is induced by DNA replication stress and sensitizes cells to undergo apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duensing Stefan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin-associated histone H2AX is a key regulator of the cellular responses to DNA damage. However, non-nucleosomal functions of histone H2AX are poorly characterized. We have recently shown that soluble H2AX can trigger apoptosis but the mechanisms leading to non-chromatin-associated H2AX are unclear. Here, we tested whether stalling of DNA replication, a common event in cancer cells and the underlying mechanism of various chemotherapeutic agents, can trigger increased soluble H2AX. Results Transient overexpression of H2AX was found to lead to a detectable fraction of soluble H2AX and was associated with increased apoptosis. This effect was enhanced by the induction of DNA replication stress using the DNA polymerase α inhibitor aphidicolin. Cells manipulated to stably express H2AX did not contain soluble H2AX, however, short-term treatment with aphidicolin (1 h resulted in detectable amounts of H2AX in the soluble nuclear fraction and enhanced apoptosis. Similarly, soluble endogenous H2AX was detected under these conditions. We found that excessive soluble H2AX causes chromatin aggregation and inhibition of ongoing gene transcription as evidenced by the redistribution and/or loss of active RNA polymerase II as well as the transcriptional co-activators CBP and p300. Conclusion Taken together, these results show that DNA replication stress rapidly leads to increased soluble H2AX and that non-chromatin-associated H2AX can sensitize cells to undergo apoptosis. Our findings encourage further studies to explore H2AX and the cellular pathways that control its expression as anti-cancer drug targets.

  19. In Vitro Phosphorus Solubility Test of Different Sources of Phosphorus

    OpenAIRE

    Hifizah, A

    2011-01-01

    The solubility of P from different P supplements was measured with in vitro procedures, using three different tests, which were water solubility, citric acid solubility and acid (0.1M HCl) solubility. Water solubility and citrate solubility were common tests used by the fertiliser industry and acid solubility was a new test developed to mimic conditions within the digestive tract. There were five samples used: Lomon MDCP, Duchess RP, Kynofos, meat meal and MSOP. A separate test was done with ...

  20. Triggered Templated Assembly of Protein Polymersomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.; Wolf, de F.A.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Stuart, M.A.C.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Trigger the block: Stable biocompatible protein polymersomes can be generated by a triggered templated self-assembly route (see picture). Pluronic L121 vesicles (red core with blue corona) take up a biosynthetic triblock copolymer CSXSXC into their unilamellar shell. In response to changes in pH

  1. Supine Breast MRI Using Respiratory Triggering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Natasja N. Y.; ter Beek, Leon C.; Loo, Claudette E.; Winter-Warnars, Gonneke; Lange, Charlotte A. H.; van Loveren, Marjolein; Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate if navigator-echo respiratory-triggered magnetic resonance acquisition can acquire supine high-quality breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Supine respiratory-triggered magnetic resonance imaging (Trig-MRI) was compared to supine non-Trig-MRI to evaluate

  2. The LVL2 trigger goes online

    CERN Multimedia

    David Berge

    On Friday, the 9th of February, the ATLAS TDAQ community reached an important milestone. In a successful integration test, cosmic-ray muons were recorded with parts of the muon spectrometer, the central-trigger system and a second-level trigger algorithm. This was actually the first time that a full trigger slice all the way from the first-level trigger muon chambers up to event building after event selection by the second-level trigger ran online with cosmic rays. The ATLAS trigger and data acquisition system has a three-tier structure that is designed to cope with the enormous demands of proton-proton collisions at a bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, with a typical event size of 1-2 MB. The online event selection has to reduce the incoming rate by a factor of roughly 200,000 to 200 Hz, a rate digestible by the archival-storage and offline-processing facilities. ATLAS has a mixed system: the first-level trigger (LVL1) is in hardware, while the other two consecutive levels, the second-level trigger (LVL2)...

  3. The ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00371751; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHC will collide protons in the ATLAS detector with increasing luminosity through 2016, placing stringent operational and physical requirements to the ATLAS trigger system in order to reduce the 40 MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1 kHz, while not rejecting interesting physics events. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger system with an output rate of 100 kHz and decision latency smaller than 2.5 μs. It consists of a calorimeter trigger, muon trigger and a central trigger processor. During the LHC shutdown after the Run 1 finished in 2013, the Level-1 trigger system was upgraded including hardware, firmware and software updates. In particular, new electronics modules were introduced in the real-time data processing path: the Topological Processor System (L1Topo). It consists of a single AdvancedCTA shelf equipped with two Level-1 topological processor blades. They receive real-time information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon triggers, which...

  4. Do episodes of anger trigger myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, J; Hallqvist, J; Diderichsen, Finn

    1999-01-01

    Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility.......Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility....

  5. Intelligent trigger processor for the crystal box

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, G H; Cooper, M D; Hart, G W; Hoffman, C M; Hogan, G E; Hughes, E B; Matis, H S; Rolfe, J; Sandberg, V D; Williams, R A; Wilson, S; Zeman, H

    1981-01-01

    A large solid angle angular modular NaI(Tl) detector with 432 phototubes and 88 trigger scintillators is being used to search simultaneously for three lepton flavor-changing decays of the muon. A beam of up to 10/sup 6/ muons stopping per second with a 6% duty factor would yield up to 1000 triggers per second from random triple coincidences. A reduction of the trigger rate to 10 Hz is required from a hardwired primary trigger processor. Further reduction to <1 Hz is achieved by a microprocessor-based secondary trigger processor. The primary trigger hardware imposes voter coincidence logic, stringent timing requirements, and a non-adjacency requirement in the trigger scintillators defined by hardwired circuits. Sophisticated geometric requirements are imposed by a PROM-based matrix logic, and energy and vector-momentum cuts are imposed by a hardwired processor using LSI flash ADC's and digital arithmetic logic. The secondary trigger employs four satellite microprocessors to do a sparse data scan, multiplex ...

  6. The Run-2 ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Savanna Marie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been successfully collecting collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. In Run-2, the LHC will operate at centre-of-mass energies of 13 and 14 TeV resulting in roughly five times higher trigger rates. We will briefly review the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented during the shutdown, allowing us to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving our efficiency to select relevant physics processes. This includes changes to the L1 calorimeter and muon trigger systems, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event filter farm. At hand of a few examples, we will show the ...

  7. Trigger factors for familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample.......The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample....

  8. Soluble Human Leukocyte Antigen-G in the Bronchoalveolar Lavage of Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, Dayana; Pérez, Mario; Borges, Lérida; Bianchi, Guillermo; Cova, José-Angel

    2016-08-01

    The main function of the HLA-G molecule in its membrane-bound and soluble forms is to inhibit the immune response by acting on CD4+ T cells, cytotoxic T cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and annual incidence is high in both women and men. Some studies have reported an increase of HLA-G serum levels in lung cancer, probably generated by tumor cells escaping the antitumor immune response. In this study the concentration of soluble HLA-G in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with primary and metastatic lung cancer was measured to determine its relation with tumor histological type and overall patient status according to the Karnofsky scale. Thirty-one lung cancer patients were included. A tumor biopsy was obtained by bronchoscopy and the tumor type was determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. BAL samples were obtained to measure soluble HLA-G concentrations in an ELISA sandwich assay. The average value of soluble HLA-G was 49.04ng/mL. No correlation between soluble HLA-G levels and age, gender or smoking was observed. A highly significant difference was observed in the levels of soluble HLA-G in BAL from patients with different histological types of lung cancer, especially in metastatic tumors. The Karnofsky index showed a significant and inverse correlation with soluble HLA-G levels in BAL. Soluble HLA-G protein is significantly associated with metastatic tumors and patients with lower Karnofsky index and may be useful as a prognostic marker in lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Simple measurements for prediction of drug release from polymer matrices - Solubility parameters and intrinsic viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus G; Skov, Anders; Baldursdottir, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study describes how protein release from polymer matrices correlate with simple measurements on the intrinsic viscosity of the polymer solutions used for casting the matrices and calculations of the solubility parameters of polymers and solvents used. METHOD: Matrices of poly......(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were cast with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model drug using different solvents (acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol and water). The amount of released protein from the different matrices was correlated with the Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters of the solvents, and the intrinsic...... from PLGA matrices varied depending on the solvent used for casting. The maximum amount of released BSA decreased with higher intrinsic viscosity, and increased with solubility parameter difference between the solvent and polymer used. The solvent used also had an effect on the matrix microstructure...

  10. Event triggered architectures versus timed triggered architectures for real-time control systems

    OpenAIRE

    Doina Zmaranda; Gianina Gabor

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the system engineering of safety-critical real-time systems making a comparison between event-triggered and timed triggered architectures. Main advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are investigated in the context of utilization for real-time control systems development. Finally, an example of implementation based on the time-triggered architecture is presented.

  11. Amyloid-β and tau: the trigger and bullet in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, George S

    2014-04-01

    The defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD) include conspicuous changes in both brain histology and behavior. The AD brain is characterized microscopically by the combined presence of 2 classes of abnormal structures, extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, both of which comprise highly insoluble, densely packed filaments. The soluble building blocks of these structures are amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides for plaques and tau for tangles. Amyloid-β peptides are proteolytic fragments of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein, whereas tau is a brain-specific, axon-enriched microtubule-associated protein. The behavioral symptoms of AD correlate with the accumulation of plaques and tangles, and they are a direct consequence of the damage and destruction of synapses that mediate memory and cognition. Synapse loss can be caused by the failure of live neurons to maintain functional axons and dendrites or by neuron death. During the past dozen years, a steadily accumulating body of evidence has indicated that soluble forms of Aβ and tau work together, independently of their accumulation into plaques and tangles, to drive healthy neurons into the diseased state and that hallmark toxic properties of Aβ require tau. For instance, acute neuron death, delayed neuron death following ectopic cell cycle reentry, and synaptic dysfunction are triggered by soluble, extracellular Aβ species and depend on soluble, cytoplasmic tau. Therefore, Aβ is upstream of tau in AD pathogenesis and triggers the conversion of tau from a normal to a toxic state, but there is also evidence that toxic tau enhances Aβ toxicity via a feedback loop. Because soluble toxic aggregates of both Aβ and tau can self-propagate and spread throughout the brain by prionlike mechanisms, successful therapeutic intervention for AD would benefit from detecting these species before plaques, tangles, and cognitive impairment become evident and from interfering with the destructive

  12. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects.

  13. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  14. Solubility Study of Curatives in Various Rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, R.; Talma, Auke; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The previous works on solubility of curatives in rubbers were mainly carried out in natural rubber. Not too much information available on dissimilar rubbers and this is important because most of the compounds today are blends of dissimilar rubbers. Although solubility can be expected to certain

  15. Enhancement of Solubility and Bioavailability of Candesartan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To enhance the otherwise poor solubility and bioavailability of candesartan cilexetil (CDS). Methods: This study involved enhancing drug solubility by various solid dispersion (SD) methods. The drug: carrier ratio was as follows: for urea (1:2, 1:4 and 1:6; for polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG, 1:2 and 1:4, 1:8); and ...

  16. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and risk of liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Moy, Kristin A.; Jiao, Li; Freedman, Neal D.; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Sinha, Rashmi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2013-01-01

    Binding of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to their receptor (RAGE) increases oxidative stress and inflammation, and may be involved in liver injury and subsequent carcinogenesis. Soluble RAGE (sRAGE) may neutralize the effects mediated by AGEs/RAGE complex. Epidemiologic studies examining sRAGE or AGEs in association with liver cancer are lacking. We examined the associations between prediagnostic serum concentrations of sRAGE or Nε-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML)-AGE and hepatocellular ...

  17. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  18. The LHCb Trigger: Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is a single arm spectrometer covering the pseudo-rapidity range between 1.9 and 4.9, and has been optimised to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. The present two stage trigger system is able to select charm and beauty decay products with high efficiency due the highly inclusive approach of triggering on partially reconstructed decays and the use of a novel multivariate classifier at the second stage. The trigger can select both leptonic and purely hadronic decays. The performance of the trigger is determined from the data itself without having to rely on Monte-Carlo simulation and is presented. LHCb has recently submitted their upgrade LOI, which mainly aims at profiting from much larger luminosities by moving towards a single fully software based trigger. The upgrade strategy and expected performance are presented.

  19. Synchronous ten trigger finger: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Yildiran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trigger finger is a disorder that presents with a blocking feeling and pain during finger movements. This condition more commonly occurs in the 2nd finger with involvement of multiple digits being extremely rare. There are very few known cases in which trigger finger was developed in all ten fingers. Here, an unusual case of ten-digit finger trigger is presented. A 44-year-old female housewife visited our clinic with painful blocking feeling in her hand. Her examination was compatible with trigger finger. Her hands were operated on in different sessions and A1 pulleys of all fingers were released. After the operations, blocking feeling and pain during flexion disappeared and normal range of motion was obtained. On the occasion of this very rare case, the etiology and approach for multiple trigger fingers is discussed. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 84-87

  20. Application of Vector Triggering Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Ibrahim, S. R.; Brincker, Rune

    1997-01-01

    result is a Random Decrement function from each measurement. In traditional Random Decrement estimation the triggering condition is a scalar condition, which should only be fulfilled in a single measurement. In vector triggering Random Decrement the triggering condition is a vector condition....... The advantage of this new approach should be a reduction in estimation time without a significant loss of accuracy, since the vector triggering conditions ensure cross information between the measurements in the Random Decrement functions. The different problems with this technique is highlighted in two......This paper deals with applications of the vector triggering Random Decrement technique. This technique is new and developed with the aim of minimizing estimation time and identification errors. The theory behind the technique is discussed in an accompanying paper. The results presented...

  1. Application of Vector Triggering Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Ibrahim, S. R.; Brincker, Rune

    result is a Random Decrement function from each measurement. In traditional Random Decrement estimation the triggering condition is a scalar condition, which should only be fulfilled in a single measurement. In vector triggering Random Decrement the triggering condition is a vector condition....... The advantage of this new approach should be a reduction in estimation time without a significant loss of accuracy, since the vector triggering conditions ensure cross information between the measurements in the Random Decrement functions. The different problems with this technique is highlighted in two......This paper deals with applications of the vector triggering Random Decrement technique. This technique is new and developed with the aim of minimizing estimation time and identification errors. The theory behind the technique is discussed in an accompanying paper. The results presented...

  2. Nitrogen Effect on Water-Soluble Polysaccharide Accumulation in Streblonema sp. (Ectocarpales, Phaeophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skriptsova, Anna V

    2017-08-01

    The water-soluble polysaccharides of brown algae attract the increasing attention of researchers as an important class of polymeric materials of biotechnological interest. The sole source for production of these polysaccharides has been large brown seaweeds such as members of Laminariales and Fucales. A new source of water-soluble polysaccharides is suggested here: it is a filamentous brown alga Streblonema sp., which can be cultivated under controlled conditions in photobioreactors that allow obtaining algal biomass with reproducible content and quality of polysaccharides. The accumulation of water-soluble polysaccharides can be stimulated by macronutrient limitation. In response to nitrogen deficiency, Streblonema sp. accumulated water-soluble polysaccharides (WSPs) rich in laminaran. WSP accumulation started after 3-4 days following nitrate depletion and reached a plateau at around day 7. Polysaccharide accumulation was related to cellular nitrogen content. The critical internal N level that triggered the onset of polysaccharide accumulation was 2.3% dry weight (DW); at a cellular N concentration less than 1.4% DW, the polysaccharide synthesis stopped. Upon nitrate re-supply, mobilization of WSP occurred after 3 days. These results suggest that a two-stage cultivation process could be used to obtain large algal biomass with high water-soluble polysaccharide production: a first cultivation stage using nitrate-supplemented medium to accumulate algal biomass followed by a second cultivation stage in a nitrate-free medium for 3 to 7 days to enhance polysaccharide content in the alga.

  3. Biodegradable fibre scaffolds incorporating water-soluble drugs and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Meng, J; Simonet, M; Stingelin, N; Peijs, T; Sukhorukov, G B

    2015-07-01

    A new type of biodegradable drug-loaded fibre scaffold has been successfully produced for the benefit of water-soluble drugs and proteins. Model drug loaded calcium carbonate (CaCO3) microparticles incorporated into poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) fibres were manufactured by co-precipitation of CaCO3 and the drug molecules, followed by electrospinning of a suspension of such drug-loaded microparticles in a PLGA solution. Rhodamine 6G and bovine serum albumin were used as model drugs for our release study, representing small bioactive molecules and protein, respectively. A bead and string structure of fibres was achieved. The drug release was investigated with different drug loadings and in different pH release mediums. Results showed that a slow and sustained drug release was achieved in 40 days and the CaCO3 microparticles used as the second barrier restrained the initial burst release.

  4. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wy Ching Ng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific and adaptive (specific components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV. Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease.

  5. Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor in various blood transfusion components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion may reduce survival after curative surgery for solid tumors. This may be related to extracellular content of cancer growth factors present in transfusion components. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent stimulator of angiogenesis in solid tumors....... The potential content of VEGF in various blood components for transfusion was evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Soluble VEGF (sVEGF, isotype 165) was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) in serum and plasma samples and in lysed cells from healthy volunteers. Subsequently, total content......-reduced PRP. The sVEGF accumulated significantly in WB, SAGM blood, and BCP pools, depending on the storage time. CONCLUSION: The sVEGF (isotype 165) appears to be present in various blood transfusion components, depending on storage time....

  6. Water-soluble conductive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1989-01-01

    Polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  7. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Bayarri-Olmos, Rafael; Romani, Luigina; Garred, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Soluble defense collagens including the collectins play important roles in innate immunity. Recently, a new member of the collectin family named collectin-12 (CL-12 or CL-P1) has been identified. CL-12 is highly expressed in umbilical cord vascular endothelial cells as a transmembrane receptor and may recognize certain bacteria and fungi, leading to opsonophagocytosis. However, based on its structural and functional similarities with soluble collectins, we hypothesized the existence of a fluid-phase analog of CL-12 released from cells, which may function as a soluble pattern-recognition molecule. Using recombinant CL-12 full length or CL-12 extracellular domain, we determined the occurrence of soluble CL-12 shed from in vitro cultured cells. Western blot showed that soluble recombinant CL-12 migrated with a band corresponding to ∼ 120 kDa under reducing conditions, whereas under nonreducing conditions it presented multimeric assembly forms. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of human umbilical cord plasma enabled identification of a natural soluble form of CL-12 having an electrophoretic mobility pattern close to that of shed soluble recombinant CL-12. Soluble CL-12 could recognize Aspergillus fumigatus partially through the carbohydrate-recognition domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This led to activation of the alternative pathway of complement exclusively via association with properdin on A. fumigatus as validated by detection of C3b deposition and formation of the terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Designing signal-enriched triggers for boosted jets.

    CERN Document Server

    Toumazou, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Triggers designed to favour the selection of hadronically decaying massive particles have been studied. Both triggers using solely ET and mass cuts (similar to new 2017 triggers) and triggers exploiting polarization information have been studied. The mass cut triggers show substantial gains in rate reduction, while the benefits of polarization triggers are less obvious. The final conclusion is that it is more useful to identify and trigger on generic boosted decays, irrespective of the polarization of the decaying particle

  9. Glycoprotein 130 polymorphism predicts soluble glycoprotein 130 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonnerth, Anna; Katsaros, Katharina M; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Speidl, Walter S; Kaun, Christoph; Thaler, Kylie; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann; Maurer, Gerald; Seljeflot, Ingebjorg; Arnesen, Harald; Weiss, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key cytokine in inflammatory diseases. It exerts its biological function via binding to a homodimer of its signal transducer glycoprotein 130 (gp130). Soluble gp130 (sgp130) is the natural inhibitor of IL-6 trans-signalling. The aim of this study was to test a possible influence of the gp130 genotype on sgp130 serum levels. In two separate populations, subjects were genotyped for the gp130 polymorphism G148C. Sgp130, IL-6 and soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) levels were measured. The OSLO population consisted of 546 male subjects at high risk for CAD. The VIENNA population consisted of 299 male subjects with angiographically proven CAD. In the OSLO population, 124 (22.7%) subjects were hetero- or homozygote for the rare C allele. Individuals carrying the polymorphism had significantly higher levels of sgp130. In a multivariate linear regression model this association remained significant (adjusted p=0.001). In the VIENNA population, 48 (16.1%) subjects were hetero- or homozygote for the rare C allele. Consistent with the former study, sgp130 levels were significantly higher in carriers of the polymorphism compared to wildtype carriers (adjusted p=0.038). In the VIENNA population, sgp130 levels were significantly higher in diabetic patients. In the OSLO population, sgp130 was higher in patients with increased body mass index and in smokers (p<0.05). Sgp130 serum levels are significantly higher in subjects carrying the gp130 polymorphism G148C compared to wildtype carriers. This finding proposes a possible genetical influence on sgp130 levels which may alter individual coping mechanisms in inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. GnRHa trigger for final oocyte maturation: is HCG trigger history?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Alsbjerg, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    gonadotrophin (HCG) trigger. Early trials showed a severe luteal phase insufficiency after GnRHa trigger despite the application of standard luteal phase support protocols. Subsequent research has led to modifications of the luteal phase support, resulting in reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after...... HCG trigger in normal- and high-responders. GnRHa trigger facilitates a tailored approach to subsequent luteal phase support, taking into account the ovarian response to stimulation. In the future, GnRHa is likely to be used for trigger in all women co-treated with GnRH antagonists....

  11. Profiling of cytokines, chemokines and other soluble proteins as a potential biomarker in colorectal cancer and polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johdi, Nor Adzimah; Mazlan, Luqman; Sagap, Ismail; Jamal, Rahman

    2017-11-01

    Soluble proteins including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors are small proteins that mediate and regulate immunity. They involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancers. The concentration of these proteins in biological fluids (serum or plasma) and tissues in diseases may suggest pathway activation that leads to inflammatory response or disease progression. Therefore, these soluble proteins may be useful as a tool for screening, diagnosis classification between stages of disease or surveillance for therapy. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and bioassay have been used as a gold standard in cytokine level measurements in clinical practice. However, these methods allow only single cytokine detection at a time and ineffective for screening purposes. Hence, the innovation of multiplexing technology allows measurement of many these soluble proteins simultaneously, thus allowing rapid, cost effective and better efficiency by using a minute amount of sample. In this study, we explored the profiles of key inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and other soluble proteins from the serum derived from colorectal carcinoma (CRC, n=20), colorectal polyps (P, n=20) and healthy volunteers (N, n=20) using multiplexed bead-based immunoassays. We aimed to evaluate if the levels of these soluble proteins can classify these groups of populations and explore the possible application of the soluble proteins as biomarkers in early stage screening and/or surveillance. We observed significant high IL-4, MIP-1β, FasL and TGF-β1 levels but lower levels for RANTES in P-derived serum as compared to N-derived serum. Significant high IL-8, VEGF, MIP-1β, Eotaxin and G-CSF observed in CRC-derived serum when compared to N-derived serum. Between CRC- and P-derived serum, significantly higher levels of IL-8, Eotaxin and G-CSF but lower levels for TGF-β1 were detected in CRC-derived serum. These preliminary results were obtained from small sample size and could be

  12. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be used to obtain comparative solubility measurements and, in some cases, estimations of solubility in buffer alone. Protein precipitants fall into three broad classes: salts, long-chain polymers, and organic solvents. Here, we compare the use of representatives from two classes of precipitants, ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol 8000, by measuring the solubility of seven proteins. We find that increased negative surface charge correlates strongly with increased protein solubility and may be due to strong binding of water by the acidic amino acids. We also find that the solubility results obtained for the two different precipitants agree closely with each other, suggesting that the two precipitants probe similar properties that are relevant to solubility in buffer alone. PMID:22768947

  13. Climatic triggers for peatland initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul J.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Valdes, Paul J.; Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Gregoire, Lauren J.; Smith, Mark W.; Tarasov, Lev; Haywood, Alan M.; Bacon, Karen L.

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are carbon-dense wetlands characterised by waterlogged, organic-rich soils. Modern-day peatlands have formed mainly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and despite covering only 3 % of the Earth's land surface are thought to store more than a third of all global soil carbon in the form of poorly decomposed plant detritus. Concern exists that this globally important carbon store may be vulnerable to near-future warming and changes in precipitation patterns, although the links between peatland development and climate are contested. The climatic and other environmental conditions that facilitate the initiation of peat are particularly poorly understood. We present the results of a novel, global study into the climate space of peat initiation since the LGM. We compiled a catalogue of radiocarbon dates of peat initiation from 942 sites that span a range of latitudes and biomes. We used the locations and ages of these peatlands to interrogate downscaled climate hindcasts at 500-yr intervals from a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model, HadCM3. This powerful combination of modelling and observational data provides a globally-consistent, temporally-extensive estimate of the climate spaces of peat initiation. In particular, it allows us to identify local and regional climatic changes that may have acted as triggers for peat formation. Peatlands in mid- and high-latitudes of both hemispheres, particularly in maritime locations, developed shortly after local increases in the time integral of growing season temperatures, and were seemingly not influenced by rainfall regime. Peat initiation at such sites appears to have been stimulated by temperature-driven increases in plant productivity in cold, postglacial landscapes, and was not water limited. The exception is the large peatland complex of the Western Siberian Lowlands, which was not glaciated during the last glacial period, and which appears to have been prompted instead by a strong

  14. The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Stockton, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 trigger system is responsible for reducing the anticipated LHC collision rate from 40 MHz to less than 100 kHz. This Level-1 selection identifies, jet, tau/hadron, electron/photon and muon candidates, with additional triggers for missing and total energy. These inputs are used by the Level-1 Central Trigger to form a Level-1 Accept decision. This decision, along with summary information, is then passed into the higher levels of the trigger system and sub-detectors, which also receive the clock from the Level-1 Central trigger. The performance of the Central Trigger during the first collisions will be shown. This includes details of how the trigger information, along with dead-time rates, are monitored and logged by the online system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. Also presented are the software tools used to efficiently display the relevant information in the control room in a way useful for shifters and experts.

  15. The ATLAS high level trigger steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, N.; Bold, T.; Eifert, T.; Fischer, G.; George, S.; Haller, J.; Hoecker, A.; Masik, J.; Nedden, M. Z.; Reale, V. P.; Risler, C.; Schiavi, C.; Stelzer, J.; Wu, X.

    2008-07-01

    The High Level Trigger (HLT) of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider receives events which pass the LVL1 trigger at ~75 kHz and has to reduce the rate to ~200 Hz while retaining the most interesting physics. It is a software trigger and performs the reduction in two stages: the LVL2 trigger and the Event Filter (EF). At the heart of the HLT is the Steering software. To minimise processing time and data transfers it implements the novel event selection strategies of seeded, step-wise reconstruction and early rejection. The HLT is seeded by regions of interest identified at LVL1. These and the static configuration determine which algorithms are run to reconstruct event data and test the validity of trigger signatures. The decision to reject the event or continue is based on the valid signatures, taking into account pre-scale and pass-through. After the EF, event classification tags are assigned for streaming purposes. Several new features for commissioning and operation have been added: comprehensive monitoring is now built in to the framework; for validation and debugging, reconstructed data can be written out; the steering is integrated with the new configuration (presented separately), and topological and global triggers have been added. This paper will present details of the final design and its implementation, the principles behind it, and the requirements and constraints it is subject to. The experience gained from technical runs with realistic trigger menus will be described.

  16. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  17. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  18. Upgrade of the CMS Global Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jeitler, Manfred; Rabady, Dinyar; Sakulin, Hannes; Stahl, Achim

    2015-01-01

    The increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity for Run-II of the Large Hadron Collider poses new challenges for the trigger systems of the experiments. To keep triggering with a similar performance as in Run-I, the CMS muon trigger is currently being upgraded. The new algorithms will provide higher resolution, especially for the muon transverse momentum and will make use of isolation criteria that combine calorimeter with muon information already in the level-1 trigger. The demands of the new algorithms can only be met by upgrading the level-1 trigger system to new powerful FPGAs with high bandwidth I/O. The processing boards will be based on the new μTCA standard. We report on the planned algorithms for the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT) which sorts and removes duplicates from boundaries of the muon trigger sub-systems. Furthermore, it determines how isolated the muon candidates are based on calorimetric energy deposits. The μGMT will be implemented using a processing board that features a larg...

  19. Triggered tremor sweet spots in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    To better understand what controls fault slip along plate boundaries, we have exploited the abundance of seismic and geodetic data available from the richly varied tectonic environments composing Alaska. A search for tremor triggered by 11 large earthquakes throughout all of seismically monitored Alaska reveals two tremor “sweet spots”—regions where large-amplitude seismic waves repeatedly triggered tremor between 2006 and 2012. The two sweet spots locate in very different tectonic environments—one just trenchward and between the Aleutian islands of Unalaska and Akutan and the other in central mainland Alaska. The Unalaska/Akutan spot corroborates previous evidence that the region is ripe for tremor, perhaps because it is located where plate-interface frictional properties transition between stick-slip and stably sliding in both the dip direction and laterally. The mainland sweet spot coincides with a region of complex and uncertain plate interactions, and where no slow slip events or major crustal faults have been noted previously. Analyses showed that larger triggering wave amplitudes, and perhaps lower frequencies (probability of triggering tremor. However, neither the maximum amplitude in the time domain or in a particular frequency band, nor the geometric relationship of the wavefield to the tremor source faults alone ensures a high probability of triggering. Triggered tremor at the two sweet spots also does not occur during slow slip events visually detectable in GPS data, although slow slip below the detection threshold may have facilitated tremor triggering.

  20. The ATLAS Trigger Performance and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, B A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2012, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 microseconds. Then follow two levels of software-based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections based mainly on the experience during the 2011-2012 LHC run, where the trigger menu needed quick adaptations to the continuous increase of luminosity. Examples of trigger efficiencies and...

  1. Low Soluble Syndecan-1 Precedes Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandley, Robin E; Althouse, Andrew; Jeyabalan, Arundhathi; Bregand-White, Julia M; McGonigal, Stacy; Myerski, Ashley C; Gallaher, Marcia; Powers, Robert W; Hubel, Carl A

    2016-01-01

    Syndecan-1 (Sdc1; CD138) is a major transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the extracellular, luminal surface of epithelial cells and syncytiotrophoblast, thus comprising a major component of the glycocalyx of these cells. The "soluble" (shed) form of Sdc1 has paracrine and autocrine functions and is normally produced in a regulated fashion. We compared plasma soluble Sdc1 concentrations, in relation to placental Sdc1 expression, in uncomplicated (control) and preeclamptic pregnancies. We evaluated soluble Sdc1 across uncomplicated pregnancy, and between preeclamptic, gestational hypertensive and control patients at mid-pregnancy (20 weeks) and 3rd trimester by ELISA. Placental expression level of Sdc1 was compared between groups in relation to pre-delivery plasma soluble Sdc1. Participants were recruited from Magee-Womens Hospital. In uncomplicated pregnancy, plasma soluble Sdc1 rose significantly in the 1st trimester, and reached an approximate 50-fold increase at term compared to post pregnancy levels. Soluble Sdc1 was lower at mid-pregnancy in women who later developed preeclampsia (PSoluble Sdc1 and Sdc1 immunostaining scores were inversely associated with systolic blood pressures, and positively correlated with infant birth weight percentile. Soluble Sdc1 is significantly lower before the clinical onset of preeclampsia, with reduced expression of Sdc1 in the delivered placenta, suggesting a role for glycocalyx disturbance in preeclampsia pathophysiology.

  2. Introduction to myofascial trigger points in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Rick

    2014-06-01

    In dogs, muscles make up 44%-57% of total body weight and can serve as source of both pain and dysfunction when myofascial trigger points are present. However, rarely is muscle mentioned as a generator of pain in dogs, and even less mentioned is muscle dysfunction. The veterinary practitioner with interest in pain management, rehabilitation, orthopedics, and sports medicine must be familiar with the characteristics, etiology, and precipitating factors of myofascial trigger points. Additionally, the development of examination and treatment skill is needed to effectively manage myofascial trigger points in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Revisiting Pneumatic Nail Gun Trigger Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, James; Lowe, Brian; Lipscomb, Hester; Hudock, Stephen; Dement, John; Evanoff, Bradley; Fullen, Mark; Gillen, Matt; Kaskutas, Vicki; Nolan, James; Patterson, Dennis; Platner, James; Pompeii, Lisa; Schoenfisch, Ashley

    2015-03-01

    Use of a pneumatic nail gun with a sequential actuation trigger (SAT) significantly diminishes the risk for acute traumatic injury compared to use of a contact actuation trigger (CAT) nail gun. A theoretically-based increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders from use of a SAT nail gun, relative to CAT, appears unlikely and remains unproven. Based on current knowledge, the use of CAT nail guns cannot be justified as a safe alternative to SAT nail guns. This letter provides a perspective of ergonomists and occupational safety researchers recommending the use of the sequential actuation trigger for all nail gun tasks in the construction industry.

  4. Trigger tracking for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Dungs, K

    2014-01-01

    This poster presents a trigger system for the upgraded LHCb detector, scheduled to begin operation in 2020. The proposed trigger system is implemented entirely in software. We show that track reconstruction of a similar quality to that available in the offline algorithms can be performed on the full inelastic pp-collision rate. A track finding efficiency of 98.8% relative to offline can be achieved for good trigger tracks. The CPU time required for this reconstruction is less than 60% of the available budget.

  5. The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to allow alignment, calibration and physics analysis to be performed in real time. An increased CPU capacity and improvements in the software have allowed lifetime unbiased selections of beauty and charm decays in the high level trigger. Thanks to offline quality event reconstruction already available online, physics analyses can be performed directly on this information and for the majority of charm physics selections a reduced event format can be written out. Beauty hadron decays are more efficiently triggered by re-optimised inclusive selections, and the HLT2 output event rate is increased by a factor of three.

  6. Mechanochemical triggers for self-healing polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickenboth, Charles Robert

    Including self-healing and self-toughening elements into structural polymer systems are one of several approaches for extending the lifetimes of materials and preventing catastrophic failure. As an alternative strategy to reduce the extent of damage necessary to initiate healing, a molecular-based approach is sought in which a chemical unit initiates toughening and healing before crack growth begins. We envision that this type of trigger would be coupled directly to the mechanical load stored within a failing polymer. Several mechanochemical triggers were designed and studied, including azo-based triggers, enediyne-based triggers and benzocyclobutene-based triggers. It was found that flow-induced mechanical forces, induced by ultrasound, were able to accelerate the homolytic extrusion of nitrogen from azo triggers by a factor of 105 at 9°C. The degradation leads to site-specific cleavage of polymers containing the trigger, resulting in one type of end group and degradation products of low polydispersity. Mechanochemical triggers based on enediynes were designed, computationally studied and synthesized. It was found computationally that the level of stress activation is highly sensitive the shape of the trigger, as well as the substituent pattern. These triggers were incorporated into PMMA polymer microspheres, and their reactivity under thermal and mechanical conditions was studied. No conclusions were able to be drawn on the stress-sensitivity of enediyne-based mechanochemical triggers, due to the absence of an efficient means of detecting reactivity. Mechanochemical triggers based on the electrocyclic ring opening of both trans and cis substituted benzocyclobutenes was studied. The products of mechanically-accelerated ring opening were studied by trapping experiments. Ultrasound induces ring opening at 10°C, whereas thermal activation only took place at temperatures over 105°C. It was found that the substitution pattern around the four-membered ring influenced

  7. TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 1 is a Major Target of Soluble TWEAK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona Arana, José Antonio; Seher, Axel; Neumann, Manfred; Lang, Isabell; Siegmund, Daniela; Wajant, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), in contrast to membrane TWEAK and TNF, is only a weak activator of the classical NFκB pathway. We observed that soluble TWEAK was regularly more potent than TNF with respect to the induction of TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1), a NFκB-controlled signaling protein involved in the regulation of inflammatory signaling pathways. TNF-induced TRAF1 expression was efficiently blocked by inhibition of the classical NFκB pathway using the IKK2 inhibitor, TPCA1. In contrast, in some cell lines, TWEAK-induced TRAF1 production was only partly inhibited by TPCA1. The NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924, however, which inhibits classical and alternative NFκB signaling, blocked TNF- and TWEAK-induced TRAF1 expression. This suggests that TRAF1 induction by soluble TWEAK is based on the cooperative activity of the two NFκB signaling pathways. We have previously shown that oligomerization of soluble TWEAK results in ligand complexes with membrane TWEAK-like activity. Oligomerization of soluble TWEAK showed no effect on the dose response of TRAF1 induction, but potentiated the ability of soluble TWEAK to trigger production of the classical NFκB-regulated cytokine IL8. Transfectants expressing soluble TWEAK and membrane TWEAK showed similar induction of TRAF1 while only the membrane TWEAK expressing cells robustly stimulated IL8 production. These data indicate that soluble TWEAK may efficiently induce a distinct subset of the membrane TWEAK-targeted genes and argue again for a crucial role of classical NFκB pathway-independent signaling in TWEAK-induced TRAF1 expression. Other TWEAK targets, which can be equally well induced by soluble and membrane TWEAK, remain to be identified and the relevance of the ability of soluble TWEAK to induce such a distinct subset of membrane TWEAK-targeted genes for TWEAK biology will have to be clarified in future studies. PMID:24600451

  8. Sliding scale HCG trigger yields equivalent pregnancy outcomes and reduces ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: Analysis of 10,427 IVF-ICSI cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnala, Vinay; Melnick, Alexis; Irani, Mohamad; Reichman, David; Schattman, Glenn; Davis, Owen; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate pregnancy outcomes and the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) using a sliding scale hCG protocol to trigger oocyte maturity and establish a threshold level of serum b-hCG associated with optimal oocyte maturity. Retrospective cohort. Academic medical center. Fresh IVF cycles from 9/2004-12/2011. 10,427 fresh IVF-ICSI cycles met inclusion criteria. hCG was administered according to E2 level at trigger: 10,000IU vs. 5,000IU vs. 4,000IU vs. 3,300IU vs. dual trigger (2mg leuprolide acetate + 1,500IU hCG). Serum absorption of hCG was assessed according to dose and BMI. Oocyte maturity was analyzed according to post-trigger serum b-hCG. Fertilization, clinical pregnancy, live birth and OHSS rates were examined by hCG trigger dose. Post-trigger serum b-hCG 20-30, 30-40, and 40-50 mIU/mL was associated with reduced oocyte maturity as compared b-hCG >50 (67.8% vs. 71.4% vs. 73.3% vs. 78.9%, respectively, PhCG 20-50 mIU/mL was associated with a 40.1% reduction in live birth (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.41-0.87). No differences in IVF outcomes per retrieval were seen for varying doses of hCG or dual trigger when controlling for patient age. The incidence of moderate to severe OHSS was 0.13% (n = 14) and severe OHSS was 0.03% (n = 4) of cycles. Moderate stimulation with sliding scale hCG at trigger and fresh transfer is associated with low rates of OHSS and favorable pregnancy rates. Doses as low as 3,300IU alone or dual trigger with 1,500IU are sufficient to facilitate oocyte maturity.

  9. ELEVATED LEVELS OF SOLUBLE ST2 PROTEIN IN DENGUE VIRUS INFECTED PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Aniuska; Warke, Rajas V.; de Bosch, Norma; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Levels of the soluble form of the interleukin-1 receptor like 1 protein (IL-1RL-1 / ST2) are elevated in the serum of patients with diseases characterized by an inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of soluble ST2 (sST2) in dengue infected patients during the course of the disease. Twenty four patients with confirmed dengue infection, classified as dengue fever, and eleven patients with other febrile illness (OFI) were evaluated. Levels of sST2 in serum and laboratory variables usually altered during dengue infections were measured. Dengue infected patients had higher serum sST2 levels than OFI at the end of the febrile stage and at defervescence (p=0.0088 and p=0.0004 respectively). Patients with secondary dengue infections had higher serum sST2 levels compared with patients with primary dengue infections (p=0.047 at last day of fever and p=0.030 at defervescence). Furthermore, in dengue infected patients, we found a significant negative correlation of sST2 with platelet and WBC counts, and positive correlation with thrombin time and transaminases activity. We suggest that sST2 could be a potential marker of dengue infection, could be associated with severity or could play a role in the immune response in secondary dengue virus infection. PMID:18226917

  10. Water-triggered self-assembly polycondensation for the one-pot synthesis of cyclomatrix polyphosphazene nanoparticles from amino acid ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhangjun; Chen, Shuangshuang; Lu, Xuemin; Lu, Qinghua

    2015-05-14

    Water-triggered self-assembly polycondensation was proposed for preparation of cyclomatrix polyphosphazene nanoparticles from amino acid esters, and a critical solubility parameter was found to determine whether the nanoparticles were formed. Based on this rule, we also investigated the control of the size of its nanoparticles.

  11. Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Peng, Zhigang; Hill, David P.; Aiken, Chastity

    2011-01-01

    The passage of radiating seismic waves generates transient stresses in the Earth's crust that can trigger slip on faults far away from the original earthquake source. The triggered fault slip is detectable in the form of earthquakes and seismic tremor. However, the significance of these triggered events remains controversial, in part because they often occur with some delay, long after the triggering stress has passed. Here we scrutinize the location and timing of tremor on the San Andreas fault between 2001 and 2010 in relation to distant earthquakes. We observe tremor on the San Andreas fault that is initiated by passing seismic waves, yet migrates along the fault at a much slower velocity than the radiating seismic waves. We suggest that the migrating tremor records triggered slow slip of the San Andreas fault as a propagating creep event. We find that the triggered tremor and fault creep can be initiated by distant earthquakes as small as magnitude 5.4 and can persist for several days after the seismic waves have passed. Our observations of prolonged tremor activity provide a clear example of the delayed dynamic triggering of seismic events. Fault creep has been shown to trigger earthquakes, and we therefore suggest that the dynamic triggering of prolonged fault creep could provide a mechanism for the delayed triggering of earthquakes. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. The Trigger Processor and Trigger Processor Algorithms for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Lazovich, Tomo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW) is an upgrade to the ATLAS muon endcap detectors that will be installed during the next long shutdown of the LHC. Comprising both MicroMegas (MMs) and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGCs), this system will drastically improve the performance of the muon system in a high cavern background environment. The NSW trigger, in particular, will significantly reduce the rate of fake triggers coming from track segments in the endcap not originating from the interaction point. We will present an overview of the trigger, the proposed sTGC and MM trigger algorithms, and the hardware implementation of the trigger. In particular, we will discuss both the heart of the trigger, an ATCA system with FPGA-based trigger processors (using the same hardware platform for both MM and sTGC triggers), as well as the full trigger electronics chain, including dedicated cards for transmission of data via GBT optical links. Finally, we will detail the challenges of ensuring that the trigger electronics can ...

  13. Tracking at High Level Trigger in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2014-01-01

    A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. With the computing power available during the 2012 data taking the maximum reconstruction time at HLT was about 200 ms per event, at the nominal L1T rate of 100 kHz. Track reconstruction algorithms are widely used in the HLT, for the reconstruction of the physics objects as well as in the identification of b-jets and lepton iso...

  14. The dangers of being trigger-happy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, J. E.; Haworth, T. J.; Bressert, E.

    2015-06-01

    We examine the evidence offered for triggered star formation against the backdrop provided by recent numerical simulations of feedback from massive stars at or below giant molecular cloud sizescales. We compile a catalogue of 67 observational papers, mostly published over the last decade, and examine the signposts most commonly used to infer the presence of triggered star formation. We then determine how well these signposts perform in a recent suite of hydrodynamic simulations of star formation including feedback from O-type stars performed by Dale et al. We find that none of the observational markers improve the chances of correctly identifying a given star as triggered by more than factors of 2 at most. This limits the fidelity of these techniques in interpreting star formation histories. We therefore urge caution in interpreting observations of star formation near feedback-driven structures in terms of triggering.

  15. Frontal Cortex Mediates Unconsciously Triggered Inhibitory Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Gaal, Simon; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Scholte, H. Steven; Lamme, Victor A. F

    2008-01-01

    ... with the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Behaviorally, unconscious No-Go signals sometimes triggered response inhibition to the level of complete response termination and yielded a slow down in the speed of responses that were not...

  16. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-01

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  17. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-11

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  18. High-Power Triggered Gas Switches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giri, David

    1999-01-01

    .... There are several reasons to build triggered versions of the basic high-voltage spark gap. They include synchronization with an external event, timed-array antenna for steering directed energy systems etc...

  19. Trigger factors in migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, A W; Kirchmann, M; Olesen, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify trigger factors in migraine with aura (MA). A total of 629 MA patients representative of the Danish population were sent a questionnaire listing 16 trigger factors thought to be relevant as well as space for free text. Distinction was made between...... attacks with or without aura within each patient. The questionnaire was returned by 522 patients of whom 347 had current MA attacks. In total 80% with current attacks (278/347) indicated that at least one factor triggered their migraine, and 67% (187/278) in this group indicated that they were aware...... of at least one factor often or always giving rise to an attack of MA. Forty-one per cent (113/278) had co-occurring attacks of migraine without aura (MO). Stress (following stress), bright light, intense emotional influences, stress (during stress) and sleeping too much or too little were the trigger factors...

  20. Pulling the trigger on LHC electronics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The conditions at CERN's Large Hadron Collider pose severe challenges for the designers and builders of front-end, trigger and data acquisition electronics. A recent workshop reviewed the encouraging progress so far and discussed what remains to be done. The LHC experiments have addressed level one trigger systems with a variety of high-speed hardware. The CMS Calorimeter Level One Regional Trigger uses 160 MHz logic boards plugged into the front and back of a custom backplane, which provides point-to-point links between the cards. Much of the processing in this system is performed by five types of 160 MHz digital applications-specific integrated circuits designed using Vitesse submicron high-integration gallium arsenide gate array technology. The LHC experiments make extensive use of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These offer programmable reconfigurable logic, which has the flexibility that trigger designers need to be able to alter algorithms so that they can follow the physics and detector perform...

  1. Management of myofascial trigger point pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldry, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Successful management of myofascial trigger point (MTrP) pain depends on the practitioner finding all of the MTrPs from which the pain is emanating, and then deactivating them by one of several currently used methods...

  2. Simple measurements for prediction of drug release from polymer matrices - Solubility parameters and intrinsic viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Claus G; Skov, Anders; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Rades, Thomas; Jorgensen, Lene; Medlicott, Natalie J

    2015-05-01

    This study describes how protein release from polymer matrices correlate with simple measurements on the intrinsic viscosity of the polymer solutions used for casting the matrices and calculations of the solubility parameters of polymers and solvents used. Matrices of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were cast with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model drug using different solvents (acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol and water). The amount of released protein from the different matrices was correlated with the Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters of the solvents, and the intrinsic viscosity of the polymer solutions. Matrix microstructure was investigated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM). Polycaprolactone (PCL) matrices were used in a similar way to support the results for PLGA matrices. The maximum amount of BSA released and the release profile from PLGA matrices varied depending on the solvent used for casting. The maximum amount of released BSA decreased with higher intrinsic viscosity, and increased with solubility parameter difference between the solvent and polymer used. The solvent used also had an effect on the matrix microstructure as determined by TEM and SEM. Similar results were obtained for the PCL polymer systems. The smaller the difference in the solubility parameter between the polymer and the solvent used for casting a polymer matrix, the lower will be the maximum protein release. This is because of the presence of smaller pore sizes in the cast matrix if a solvent with a solubility parameter close to the one of the polymer is used. Likewise, the intrinsic viscosity of the polymer solution increases as solubility parameter differences decrease, thus, simple measurements of intrinsic viscosity and solubility parameter difference, allow the prediction of protein release profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The CMS trigger in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2017-01-01

    In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has undergone a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT went through big improvements; in particula...

  4. Algorithms for the ATLAS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, S R; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, A; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Brandt, S; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; Corso-Radu, A; Di Mattia, A; Gomez, M D; Dos Anjos, A; Drohan, J; Ellis, Nick; Elsing, M; Epp, B; Etienne, F; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Ghete, V M; González, S; Grothe, M; Kaczmarska, A; Karr, K; Khomich, A; Konstantinidis, N P; Krasny, W; Li, W; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Morettini, P; Moyse, E; Nairz, A; Negri, A; Nikitin, N V; Nisati, A; Padilla, C; Parodi, F; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Segura, E; Seixas, J M; Shears, T G; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Smizanska, M; Soluk, R A; Stanescu, C; Tapprogge, Stefan; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V; Watson, A T; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, H

    2004-01-01

    Following rigorous software design and analysis methods, an object-based architecture has been developed to derive the second- and third-level trigger decisions for the future ATLAS detector at the LHC. The functional components within this system responsible for generating elements of the trigger decisions are algorithms running within the software architecture. Relevant aspects of the architecture are reviewed along with concrete examples of specific algorithms and their performance in "vertical" slices of various physics selection strategies.

  5. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Evans, D.; Johnes, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Pospíšil, Jan; Baillie, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, MAR (2016), C03051 ISSN 1748-0221. [Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics (TWEPP). Lisbon, 28.09.2015-02.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Trigger concepts and systems * Trigger algorithms * digital electronics circuits Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  6. Soluble CD163 as a marker of macrophage activity in newly diagnosed patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Stilund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soluble CD163 (sCD163 is a macrophage specific protein known to be up-regulated in serum from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. OBJECTIVE: To investigate sCD163 in serum and CSF (cerebrospinal fluid from patients undergoing MS diagnostic work-up and analyse its potential as a diagnostic biomarker. METHODS: After a full MS diagnostic work-up, including collection of paired samples of CSF and serum, 183 patients were evaluated for inclusion in this study. Patients were divided into groups based on their diagnosis. Patients with normal clinical and paraclinical findings were grouped as symptomatic controls. Serum and CSF levels of sCD163 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. RESULTS: sCD163 could be measured in all serum and CSF samples. A high sCD163 CSF/serum ratio in relation to molecular weight was found, strongly indicating local production in the CNS. Median levels of sCD163 were significantly decreased in serum and significantly elevated in CSF in patients with relapsing-remitting, and primary-progressive MS. There were, however, some overlaps of the measures between groups. In a receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis sCD163 CSF/serum ratio had an area under the curve of 0.72. CONCLUSION: The sCD163 CSF/serum ratio was significantly increased in patients with MS and may reflect macrophage activation in MS lesions. These results suggest that primary progressive MS also is driven by inflammation in which the innate immune system plays a pivotal role.

  7. alpha isoforms of soluble and membrane-linked folate-binding protein in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoier-Madsen, M.; Holm, J.; Hansen, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    supported the hypothesis that serum FBP (29 kDa) mainly originates from neutrophils. The presence of FBP/FR alpha isoforms were established for the first time in human blood using antibodies specifically directed against human milk FBP alpha. The alpha isoforms identified on erythrocyte membranes......, and in granulocytes and serum, only constituted an almost undetectable fraction of the functional FBP The FBP alpha in neutrophil granulocytes was identified as a cytoplasmic component by indirect immunofluorescence. Gel filtration of serum revealed a peak of FBP alpha (>120 kDa), which could represent receptor...... fragments from decomposed erythrocytes and granulocytes. The soluble FBPs may exert bacteriostatic effects and protect folates in plasma from biological degradation, whereas FRs on the surface of blood cells could be involved in intracellular folate uptake or serve as signal proteins. The latter receptors...

  8. Serum Free Light Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... coverstory.aspx. Accessed August 2010. (© 1995–2010). Unit Code 84190: Immunoglobulin Free Light Chains, Serum. Mayo Clinic, ...

  9. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Octahedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    and thermal and electrical insulation enhancers. The inorganic core is both mechanically robust, resistant to oxidation, and thermally stable, and...Choi, P.; Kavassalis, T. A.; Rudin, A. Estimation of Hansen Solubility Parameters for (Hydroxyethyl)- Cellulose and (Hydroxypropyl) Cellulose through

  10. Drug solubility classification in the bovine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M N; Apley, M D

    2012-04-01

    Currently, the basis for solubility test conditions and the corresponding solubility criteria is derived from the tremendous wealth of information developed to support human pharmaceutical product development and regulation. However, there are several critical differences between the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants and monogastric species that can affect the conditions and criteria to be applied to the classification of drug solubility in cattle. These include the pH of the stomach, the volume of the stomach, the types of oral formulations, and the definition of 'highest dose'. These points are discussed below and alternative perspectives for consideration with regard to possible modification of solubility criteria for ruminants are presented. © Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The ATLAS Trigger Commissioning with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abolins, M; Adragna, P; Aielli, G; Aleksandrov, E; Aleksandrov, I; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Amorim, A; Anderson, K; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Antonelli, S; Aracena, I; Ask, S; Asquith, L; Avolio, G; Backlund, S; Badescu, E; Bahat Treidel, O; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Barria, P; Bartoldus, R; Batreanu, S; Bauss, B; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Bell, P; Bell, W H; Bellagamba, L; Bellomo, M; Ben Ami, S; Bendel, M; Benhammou, Ya; Benslama, K; Berge, D; Berger, N; Berry, T; Bianco, M; Biglietti, M; Blair, R R; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Brawn, I P; Brelier, B; Bressler, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Buda, S; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Buttar, C; Camarri, P; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Caprini, M; Caracinha, D; Cardarelli, R; Carlino, G; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Chiodini, G; Ciapetti, G; Cimino, D; Ciobotaru, M; Clements, D; Coccaro, A; Coluccia, M R; Conde-Muíño, P; Constantin, S; Conventi, F; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, M J; Coura Torres, R; Cranfield, R; Cranmer, K; Crone, G; Curtis, C J; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; Dawson, I; Dawson, J; De Almeida Simoes, J; De Cecco, S; De Pedis, D; De Santo, A; DeAsmundis, R; DellaPietra, M; DellaVolpe, D; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Girolamo, A; Dionisi, C; Djilkibaev, R; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dogaru, M; Dotti, A; Dova, M; Drake, G; Dufour, M -A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E F; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Ermoline, Y; Eschrich, I; Etzion, E; Facius, K; Falciano, S; Farthouat, P; Faulkner, P J W F; Feng, E; Ferland, J; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Fischer, G; Fonseca-Martin, T; Francis, D; Fukunaga, C; Föhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gee, C N P; George, S; Geweniger, C; Giagu, S; Gillman, A R; Giusti, P; Goncalo, R; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gowdy, S; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Green, B; Galllno, P; Haas, S; Haberichter, W; Hadavand, H; Haeberli, C; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hasegawa, Y; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Head, S; Hellman, S; Hidvegi, A; Hillier, S J; Höcker, A; Hrynóva, T; Hughes-Jones, R; Huston, J; Iacobucci, G; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikeno, M; Inada, M; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Izzo, V; Jain, V; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Joos, M; Kadosaka, T; Kajomovitz, E; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kazarov, A; Kehoe, R; Khoriauli, G; Kieft, G; Kilvington, G; Kirk, J; Kiyamura, H; Klofver, P; Klous, S; Kluge, E E; Kobayashi, T; Kolos, S; Kono, T; Konstantinidis, N; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Krasznahorkay, A; Kubota, T; Kugel, A; Kuhn, D; Kurashige, H; Kurasige, H; Kuwabara, T; Kwee, R; Landon, M; Lankford, A; LeCompte, T; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Ledroit, F; Lehmann-Miotto, G; Lei, X; Lellouch, D; Lendermann, V; Levinson, L; Leyton, M; Li, S; Liberti, B; Lifshitz, R; Lim, H; Lohse, T; Losada, M; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lupu, N; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Mapelli, L; Marchese, F; Martin, B; Martin, B T; Martínez, A; Marzano, F; Masik, J; McMahon, T; McPherson, R; Medinnis, M; Meessen, C; Meier, K; Meirosu, C; Messina, A; Migliaccio, A; Mikenberg, G; Mincer, A; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Mönig, K; Monticelli, F; Moraes, A; Moreno, D; Morettini, P; Murillo Garcia, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Némethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Nisati, A; Niwa, T; Nomachi, M; Nomoto, H; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Ochi, A; Ohm, C; Okumura, Y; Omachi, C; Osculati, B; Oshita, H; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Pauly, T; Pectu, M; Perantoni, M; Perera, V; Perera, V J O; Pérez, E; Pérez-Réale, V; Perrino, R; Pessoa Lima Junior, H; Petersen, J; Petrolo, E; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pinto, F; Pinzon, G; Polini, A; Pope, B; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Primavera, M; Qian, W; Radescu, V; Rajagopalan, S; Renkel, P; Rescigno, M; Rieke, S; Risler, C; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Roda, C; Rodríguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Roich, A; Romeo, G; Rosati, S; Ryabov, Yu; Ryan, P; Rühr, F; Sakamoto, H; Salamon, A; Salvatore, D; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Santonico, R; Sasaki, O; Scannicchio, D; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J L; Schmitt, K; Scholtes, I; Schooltz, D; Schuler, G; Schultz-Coulon, H -C; Schäfer, U; Scott, W; Segura, E; Sekhniaidze, G; Shimbo, N; Sidoti, A; Silva, L; Silverstein, S; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S; Sloper, J E; Smizanska, M; Solfaroli, E; Soloviev, I; Soluk, R; Spagnolo, S; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, J; Stradling, A; Strom, D; Strong, J; Su, D; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Szymocha, T; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tanaka, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thomas, J P; Tokoshuku, K; Tomoto, M; Torrence, E; Touchard, F; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tripiana, M; Usai, G; Vachon, B; Vandelli, W; Vari, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Vermeulen, J; Von Der Schmitt, J; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wilkens, H; Winklmeier, F; Woerling, E E; Wu, S -L; Wu, X; Xella, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamazaki, Y; Yasu, Y; Yu, M; Zanello, L; Zema, F; Zhang, J; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; De Seixas, J M; Dos Anjos, A; Zur Nedden, M; Ozcan, E; Ünel, G; International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. At the design luminosity there are roughly 23 collisions per bunch crossing. ATLAS has designed a three-level trigger system to select potentially interesting events. The first-level trigger, implemented in custom-built electronics, reduces the incoming rate to less than 100 kHz with a total latency of less than 2.5$\\mu$s. The next two trigger levels run in software on commercial PC farms. They reduce the output rate to 100-200 Hz. In preparation for collision data-taking which is scheduled to commence in May 2008, several cosmic-ray commissioning runs have been performed. Among the first sub-detectors available for commissioning runs are parts of the barrel muon detector including the RPC detectors that are used in the first-level trigger. Data have been taken with a full slice of the muon trigger and readout chain, from the detectors in one sector of the RPC system, to the second-level trigger algorit...

  13. The LHCb trigger and data acquisition system

    CERN Document Server

    Dufey, J P; Harris, F; Harvey, J; Jost, B; Mato, P; Müller, E

    2000-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is the most recently approved of the 4 experiments under construction at CERNs LHC accelerator. It is a special purpose experiment designed to precisely measure the CP violation parameters in the B-B system. Triggering poses special problems since the interesting events containing B-mesons are immersed in a large background of inelastic p-p reactions. We therefore decided to implement a 4 level triggering scheme. The LHCb Data Acquisition (DAQ) system will have to cope with an average trigger rate of ~40 kHz, after two levels of hardware triggers, and an average event size of ~100 kB. Thus an event-building network which can sustain an average bandwidth of 4 GB/s is required. A powerful software trigger farm will have to be installed to reduce the rate from the 40 kHz to ~100 Hz of events written to permanent storage. In this paper we outline the general architecture of the Trigger and DAQ system and the readout protocols we plan to implement. First results of simulations of the behavior o...

  14. The LHCb trigger system: performance and outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Langenbruch, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour at the LHC. The LHCb trigger system plays a key role in selecting signal events and rejecting background. The bulk of the LHCb trigger is implemented in software and deployed on a farm of 29,000 processor cores. This system, called the high level trigger, is responsible for reducing the event rate from 1 MHz, at which the LHCb detector can be read out, to 5 kHz, which can be written to disk. With its flexible design, the LHCb trigger can quickly adapt to changing running conditions and has performed far beyond its design in terms of signal efficiencies. The trigger system showcases a number of pioneering concepts, among them the use of multivariate classifiers to identify b -hadrons and the buffering of events to local disks and their processing at a later time, when the LHC is not producing collisions. The design of the trigger system, its performance during 2011 and 2012 and planned improvements for data taking in 2015 and beyond are discussed

  15. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  16. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostino, Lorenzo; et al.

    2009-08-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  17. Progress on the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Eric Eisenhandler

    The Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo) has recently passed a number of major hurdles. The various electronic modules that make up the trigger are either in full production or are about to be, and preparations in the ATLAS pit are well advanced. L1Calo has three main subsystems. The PreProcessor converts analogue calorimeter signals to digital, associates the rather broad trigger pulses with the correct proton-proton bunch crossing, and does a final calibration in transverse energy before sending digital data streams to the two algorithmic trigger processors. The Cluster Processor identifies and counts electrons, photons and taus, and the Jet/Energy-sum Processor looks for jets and also sums missing and total transverse energy. Readout drivers allow the performance of the trigger to be monitored online and offline, and also send region-of-interest information to the Level-2 Trigger. The PreProcessor (Heidelberg) is the L1Calo subsystem with the largest number of electronic modules (124), and most of its fu...

  18. The ATLAS trigger performance and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2012, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV at record breaking luminosities. The three level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch crossing rate of up to 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5,$mu$s. Then follow two levels of software based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets, and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. The high trigger efficiencies illustrate that we have achieved a very good level of understanding of both the detector and trigger performance and successfully selected suitable streamed data samples for analysis.

  19. The ATLAS Trigger Performance and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2012, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV at record breaking luminosities. The three‐level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch‐crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 μs. Then follow two levels of software‐based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets, and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections during the 2011-2012 run. We also discuss the trigger evolution and redesign put in place to cope with the continuously rising luminosity and in particular t...

  20. Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger starts firing

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephen Hillier

    2007-01-01

    L1Calo is one of the major components of ATLAS First Level trigger, along with the Muon Trigger and Central Trigger Processor. It forms all of the first-level calorimeter-based triggers, including electron, jet, tau and missing ET. The final system consists of over 250 custom designed 9U VME boards, most containing a dense array of FPGAs or ASICs. It is subdivided into a PreProcessor, which digitises the incoming trigger signals from the Liquid Argon and Tile calorimeters, and two separate processor systems, which perform the physics algorithms. All of these are highly flexible, allowing the possibility to adapt to beam conditions and luminosity. All parts of the system are read out through Read-Out Drivers, which provide monitoring data and Region of Interest (RoI) information for the Level-2 trigger. Production of the modules is now essentially complete, and enough modules exist to populate the full scale system in USA15. Installation is proceeding rapidly - approximately 90% of the final modules are insta...

  1. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Agostino, Lorenzo; Beccati, Barbara; Behrens, Ulf; Berryhil, Jeffrey; Biery, Kurt; Bose, Tulika; Brett, Angela; Branson, James; Cano, Eric; Cheung, Harry; Ciganek, Marek; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa, Jose Antonio; Dahmes, Bryan; Deldicque, Christian; Dusinberre, Elizabeth; Erhan, Samim; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino, Robert; Gutleber, Johannes; Hatton, Derek; Laurens, Jean-Francois; Loizides, Constantin; Ma, Frank; Meijers, Frans; Meschi, Emilio; Meyer, Andreas; Mommsen, Remigius K; Moser, Roland; O'Dell, Vivian; Oh, Alexander; Orsini, Luciano; Patras, Vaios; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Racz, Attila; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schieferdeckerd, Philipp; Schwick, Christoph; Serrano Margaleff, Josep Francesc; Shpakov, Dennis; Simon, Sean; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sungho Yoon, Andre; Wittich, Peter; Zanetti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  2. Level-1 Jets and Sums Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the first long shutdown, the LHC has restarted at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The LHC is expected to achieve an instantaneous luminosity larger than $10^{34} \\rm{cm}^{-2} \\rm{s}^{-1}$ and an average number of pile-up interactions of at least 40. The CMS Level-1 trigger architecture has undergone a full upgrade in order to maintain and improve the trigger performance under these new conditions. It will allow CMS to keep the trigger rate under control and to avoid a significant increase in trigger thresholds that would have a negative impact on the CMS physics programme. First studies of the performance of the calorimeter trigger upgrade for jets and energy sums are shown. Details of the algorithms and commissioning may be found in CMS-DP-2015-051 and the CMS Technical Design Report for the Level-1 Trigger upgrade: CERN-LHCC-2013-011, CMS-TDR-12 (2013)

  3. Low Soluble Syndecan-1 Precedes Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin E Gandley

    Full Text Available Syndecan-1 (Sdc1; CD138 is a major transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the extracellular, luminal surface of epithelial cells and syncytiotrophoblast, thus comprising a major component of the glycocalyx of these cells. The "soluble" (shed form of Sdc1 has paracrine and autocrine functions and is normally produced in a regulated fashion. We compared plasma soluble Sdc1 concentrations, in relation to placental Sdc1 expression, in uncomplicated (control and preeclamptic pregnancies.We evaluated soluble Sdc1 across uncomplicated pregnancy, and between preeclamptic, gestational hypertensive and control patients at mid-pregnancy (20 weeks and 3rd trimester by ELISA. Placental expression level of Sdc1 was compared between groups in relation to pre-delivery plasma soluble Sdc1. Participants were recruited from Magee-Womens Hospital.In uncomplicated pregnancy, plasma soluble Sdc1 rose significantly in the 1st trimester, and reached an approximate 50-fold increase at term compared to post pregnancy levels. Soluble Sdc1 was lower at mid-pregnancy in women who later developed preeclampsia (P<0.05, but not gestational hypertension, compared to controls, and remained lower at late pregnancy in preeclampsia (P<0.01 compared to controls. Sdc1 was prominently expressed on syncytiotrophoblast of microvilli. Syncytiotrophoblast Sdc1 immunostaining intensities, and mRNA content in villous homogenates, were lower in preeclampsia vs. controls (P<0.05. Soluble Sdc1 and Sdc1 immunostaining scores were inversely associated with systolic blood pressures, and positively correlated with infant birth weight percentile.Soluble Sdc1 is significantly lower before the clinical onset of preeclampsia, with reduced expression of Sdc1 in the delivered placenta, suggesting a role for glycocalyx disturbance in preeclampsia pathophysiology.

  4. Solubility Products of M(II) - Carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grauer, Rolf; Berner, Urs [ed.

    1999-01-01

    Many solubility data for M(II) carbonates commonly compiled in tables are contradictory and sometimes obviously wrong. The quality of such data has been evaluated based on the original publications and reliable solubility constants have been selected for the carbonates of Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb with the help of cross-comparisons. (author) translated from a PSI internal report written in German in 1994 (TM-44-94-05). 5 figs., 1 tab., 68 refs.

  5. Modeling dissolution of sparingly soluble multisized powders

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Luís Pereira de; Simões, Sérgio; Brito, Paulo; Portugal, António; Figueiredo, Margarida

    1997-01-01

    The dissolution of powder drugs, besides being a topic of utmost importance, especially for the sparingly soluble ones, is far from being well-explained. The purpose of the present study is, on the one hand, to obtain experimental dissolution profiles and, on the other hand, to analyze and process the data for dissolution modeling. Three different size fractions of a widely used sparingly soluble drug - ibuprofen - were fully characterized with regard to its particle size distribution, specif...

  6. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  7. Design studies for the Double Chooz trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucoanes, Andi Sebastian

    2009-07-24

    The main characteristic of the neutrino mixing effect is assumed to be the coupling between the flavor and the mass eigenstates. Three mixing angles ({theta}{sub 12}, {theta}{sub 23}, {theta}{sub 13}) are describing the magnitude of this effect. Still unknown, {theta}{sub 13} is considered very small, based on the measurement done by the CHOOZ experiment. A leading experiment will be Double Chooz, placed in the Ardennes region, on the same site as used by CHOOZ. The Double Chooz goal is the exploration of {proportional_to}80% from the currently allowed {theta}{sub 13} region, by searching the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos. Double Chooz will use two similar detectors, located at different distances from the reactor cores: a near one at {proportional_to}150 m where no oscillations are expected and a far one at 1.05 km distance, close to the first minimum of the survival probability function. The measurement foresees a precise comparison of neutrino rates and spectra between both detectors. The detection mechanism is based on the inverse {beta}-decay. The Double Chooz detectors have been designed to minimize the rate of random background. In a simplified view, two optically separated regions are considered. The target, filled with Gd-doped liquid scintillator, is the main antineutrino interaction volume. Surrounding the target, the inner veto region aims to tag the cosmogenic muon background which hits the detector. Both regions are viewed by photomultipliers. The Double Chooz trigger system has to be highly efficient for antineutrino events as well as for several types of background. The trigger analyzes discriminated signals from the central region and the inner veto photomultipliers. The trigger logic is fully programmable and can combine the input signals. The trigger conditions are based on the total energy released in event and on the PMT groups multiplicity. For redundancy, two independent trigger boards will be used for the central region, each of

  8. Value of soluble CD30 in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábrega, E; Unzueta, M G; Cobo, M; Casafont, F; Amado, J A; Romero, F P

    2007-09-01

    CD30 is a membrane glycoprotein that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. It is expressed on activated T cells. After activation of CD30(+) T cells, a soluble form of CD30 (sCD30) released into the bloodstream, can be measured in the serum. The aim of our study was to investigate the time course of serum levels of sCD30 during hepatic allograft rejection. Serum levels of sCD30 were determined in 30 healthy subjects and 50 hepatic transplant recipients. These patients were divided into two groups: group I, 35 patients without rejection; and group II, 15 patients with acute rejection. Samples were collected on day 1 and 7 after transplantation and on the day of liver biopsy. The concentrations of sCD30 were similar in the rejection (40.4 +/- 16.5 U/mL) and nonrejection groups (43.0 +/- 18.2 U/mL) on postoperative day 1. We observed a significant increase in sCD30 levels in the rejection group on postoperative day 7 (76.3 +/- 61.8 U/mL vs 46.8 +/- 20.5 U/mL; P = .01). The difference increased when a diagnosis of acute rejection had been established: namely 133.0 +/- 113.5 U/mL versus 40.1 +/- 22.0 U/mL; (P = .001). These levels were also significantly higher during the entire postoperative period in all the patients, with or without rejection, than those observed in healthy controls (26.6 +/- 5.3 U/mL; P = .005). The release of circulating sCD30 is a prominent feature coinciding with the first episode of hepatic allograft rejection. So, monitoring of sCD30 levels may be useful for the early diagnosis of an acute rejection episode.

  9. How Soluble GARP Enhances TGFβ Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Fridrich

    Full Text Available GARP (glycoprotein A repetitions predominant is a cell surface receptor on regulatory T-lymphocytes, platelets, hepatic stellate cells and certain cancer cells. Its described function is the binding and accommodation of latent TGFβ (transforming growth factor, before the activation and release of the mature cytokine. For regulatory T cells it was shown that a knockdown of GARP or a treatment with blocking antibodies dramatically decreases their immune suppressive capacity. This confirms a fundamental role of GARP in the basic function of regulatory T cells. Prerequisites postulated for physiological GARP function include membrane anchorage of GARP, disulfide bridges between the propeptide of TGFβ and GARP and connection of this propeptide to αvβ6 or αvβ8 integrins of target cells during mechanical TGFβ release. Other studies indicate the existence of soluble GARP complexes and a functionality of soluble GARP alone. In order to clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we expressed and purified recombinant TGFβ and a soluble variant of GARP. Surprisingly, soluble GARP and TGFβ formed stable non-covalent complexes in addition to disulfide-coupled complexes, depending on the redox conditions of the microenvironment. We also show that soluble GARP alone and the two variants of complexes mediate different levels of TGFβ activity. TGFβ activation is enhanced by the non-covalent GARP-TGFβ complex already at low (nanomolar concentrations, at which GARP alone does not show any effect. This supports the idea of soluble GARP acting as immune modulator in vivo.

  10. Chromatographic determination of solubilities in superheated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Neil; Clifford, Anthony A; Bartle, Keith D; Myers, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Superheated water (SHW) is an effective solvent for the extraction of a variety of environmental pollutants, but knowledge of the solubilities in water at elevated temperatures necessary to maximise the efficiency of the process is often lacking. Ambient temperature aqueous solubilities have been measured by reverse-phase HPLC from correlations with retention factors, k, but for poorly soluble organics the eluent must contain a proportion of organic modifier followed by extrapolation to pure water. The use of SHW as mobile phase allows direct determination of aqueous solubility from measurement of k on a modified HPLC system in which the eluent is cooled before detection to improve baseline stability. Alumina-bonded octadecylsilane columns were found to be more stable in SHW chromatography than their silica-bonded counterparts. To validate the procedure, measurements of k were made between 100 and 200°C for toluene and correlated with literature solubilities; the solubilities at 170°C of a number of related aromatics were then determined from their k-values.

  11. Soluble CD80 Protein Delays Tumor Growth and Promotes Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Lucas A; Long, Tiha M; Atkinson, Ryan; Clements, Virginia; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Tumor cells use various immune-suppressive strategies to overcome antitumor immunity. One such method is tumor expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1), which triggers apoptotic death or anergy upon binding programmed death-1 (PD-1) on T cells. Our previous in vitro cellular studies with human and mouse PD-L1+ tumor cells demonstrated that a soluble form of the costimulatory molecule CD80 prevented PD-L1-mediated immune suppression and restored T-cell activation by binding PD-L1 and blocking interaction with PD-1. We now report that in vivo treatment of established syngeneic PD-L1+ CT26 colon carcinoma and B16F10 melanoma tumors with CD80-Fc delays tumor growth and promotes tumor-infiltrating T cells. Studies with PD-1-/- and CD28-/- mice demonstrate that soluble CD80 acts in vivo by simultaneously neutralizing PD-1 suppression and activating through CD28. We also report that soluble CD80 mediates its effects by activating transcription factors EGR1-4, NF-κB, and MAPK, downstream signaling components of the CD28 and T-cell receptor pathways. Soluble CD80 binds to CTLA-4 on activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, increasing quantities of CTLA-4 antagonist antibodies do not increase T-cell activation. These results indicate that soluble CD80 does not suppress T-cell function through CTLA-4 and suggest that CTLA-4 acts as a decoy receptor for CD80, rather than functioning as a suppressive signaling receptor. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that soluble CD80 has therapeutic efficacy in vivo in mouse tumor systems and that its effects are due to its ability to inhibit PD-1-mediated suppression while concurrently activating T cells through CD28. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(1); 59-68. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Cocrystal Transition Points: Role of Cocrystal Solubility, Drug Solubility, and Solubilizing Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipert, Maya P; Rodríguez-Hornedo, Naír

    2015-10-05

    In this manuscript we bring together concepts that are relevant to the solubilization and thermodynamic stability of cocrystals in the presence of drug solubilizing agents. Simple equations are derived that allow calculation of cocrystal solubilization and transition point solubility. Analysis of 10 cocrystals in 6 different solubilizing agents shows that cocrystal solubilization is quantitatively predicted from drug solubilization. Drug solubilizing agents such as surfactants and lipid-based media are also shown to induce cocrystal transition points, where drug and cocrystal solubilities are equal, and above which the cocrystal solubility advantage over drug is eliminated. We have discovered that cocrystal solubility at the transition point (S*) is independent of solubilizing agent, and can be predicted from knowledge of only the aqueous solubilities of drug and cocrystal. For 1:1 cocrystals, S* = (Scocrystal,aq)(2)/Sdrug,aq. S* is a key indicator of cocrystal thermodynamic stability and establishes the upper solubility limit below which cocrystal is more soluble than the constituent drug. These findings have important implications to tailor cocrystal solubility and stability in pharmaceutical formulations from commonly available drug solubility descriptors.

  13. Serum lipid responses to psyllium fiber: differences between pre- and post-menopausal, hypercholesterolemic women

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo Jennifer; Ganji Vijay

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women and men. Psyllium, a soluble fiber has been known to reduce serum lipids. In this pilot study, we evaluated whether menopausal status would affect the serum lipid responses to psyllium fiber in women. Methods Eleven post-menopausal and eight pre-menopausal women with serum total cholesterol >200 mg/dL were included in the study. Subjects consumed their habitual diet and 15 g psyllium/d for 6 weeks. Psyllium was ...

  14. Dynamics of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange in the human airways: 1. A model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsu, M E; Babb, A L; Ralph, D D; Hlastala, M P

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide a means for analysis of heat, water, and soluble gas exchange with the airways during tidal ventilation, a one dimensional theoretical model describing heat and water exchange in the respiratory airways has been extended to include soluble gas exchange with the airway mucosa and water exchange with the mucous layer lining the airways. Not only do heat, water, and gas exchange occur simultaneously, but they also interact. Heating and cooling of the airway surface and mucous lining affects both evaporative water and soluble gas exchange. Water evaporation provides a major source of heat exchange. The model-predicted mean airway temperature profiles agree well with literature data for both oral and nasal breathing validating that part of the model. With model parameters giving the best fit to experimental data, the model shows: (a) substantial heat recovery in the upper airways, (b) minimal respiratory heat and water loss, and (c) low average mucous temperatures and maximal increases in mucous thickness. For resting breathing of room air, heat and water conservation appear to be more important than conditioning efficiency. End-tidal expired partial pressures of very soluble gases eliminated by the lungs are predicted to be lower than the alveolar partial pressures due to the absorption of the expired gases by the airway mucosa. The model may be usable for design of experiments to examine mechanisms associated with the local hydration and dehydration dynamics of the mucosal surface, control of bronchial perfusion, triggering of asthma, mucociliary clearance and deposition of inhaled pollutant gases.

  15. Temperature-Triggered Protein Adsorption on Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles in Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshkina, O.; Lang, T.; Thiermann, R.; Docter, D.; Stauber, R.H.; Secker, C.; Schlaad, H.; Weidner, S.; Mohr, B.; Maskos, M.; Bertin, A.

    2015-01-01

    The protein corona, which forms on the nanoparticle's surface in most biological media, determines the nanoparticle's physicochemical characteristics. The formation of the protein corona has a significant impact on the biodistribution and clearance of nanoparticles in vivo. Therefore, the ability to

  16. Redefining solubility parameters: the partial solvation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-03-21

    The present work reconsiders a classical and universally accepted concept of physical chemistry, the solubility parameter. Based on the insight derived from modern quantum chemical calculations, a new definition of solubility parameter is proposed, which overcomes some of the inherent restrictions of the original definition and expands its range of applications. The original single solubility parameter is replaced by four partial solvation parameters reflecting the dispersion, the polar, the acidic and the basic character of the chemical compounds as expressed either in their pure state or in mixtures. Simple rules are adopted for the definition and calculation of these four parameters and their values are tabulated for a variety of common substances. In contrast, however, to the well known Hansen solubility parameters, their design and evaluation does not rely exclusively on the basic rule of "similarity matching" for solubility but it makes also use of the other basic rule of compatibility, namely, the rule of "complementarity matching". This complementarity matching becomes particularly operational with the sound definition of the acidic and basic components of the solvation parameter based on the third σ-moments of the screening charge distributions of the quantum mechanics-based COSMO-RS theory. The new definitions are made in a simple and straightforward manner, thus, preserving the strength and appeal of solubility parameter stemming from its simplicity. The new predictive method has been applied to a variety of solubility data for systems of pharmaceuticals and polymers. The results from quantum mechanics calculations are critically compared with the results from Abraham's acid/base descriptors.

  17. Association of serum osteoprotegerin with vascular calcification in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Atsushi; Murata, Miho; Asano, Tomoko; Ikoma, Aki; Sasaki, Masami; Saito, Tomoyuki; Otani, Taeko; Jinbo, Sachimi; Ikeda, Nahoko; Kawakami, Masanobu; Ishikawa, San-e

    2013-01-09

    Osteoprotegerin is a member of the tumor necrosis factor-related family and inhibits RANK stimulation of osteoclast formation as a soluble decoy receptor. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship of serum osteoprotegerin with vascular calcification in patients with type 2 diabetes. The subjects were 124 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, including 88 males and 36 females with a mean (± SD) age of 65.6 ± 8.2 years old. Serum levels of osteoprotegerin, osteocalcin, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and adiponectin were measured by ELISA. Vascular calcification in the cervical artery was examined by ultrasound sonography. The subjects were divided into 4 quartiles depending on serum osteoprotegerin levels. Vascular calcification was significantly higher in the 4th quartile and significantly lower in the 1st quartile of serum osteoprotegerin levels, compared to other quartiles. There were no differences in serum osteoprotegerin and vascular calcification among patients with different stages of diabetic nephropathy, but serum FGF23 levels were elevated in those with stage 4 diabetic nephropathy. Simple regression analysis showed that serum osteoprotegerin levels had significant positive correlations with age, systolic blood pressure and serum adiponectin levels, and significant negative correlations with BMI and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. These findings suggest that elevated serum osteoprotegerin may be involved in vascular calcification independently of progression of diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Rate Predictions and Trigger/DAQ Resource Monitoring in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, D M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Since starting in 2010, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has pro- duced collisions at an ever increasing rate. The ATLAS experiment successfully records the collision data with high eciency and excel- lent data quality. Events are selected using a three-level trigger system, where each level makes a more re ned selection. The level-1 trigger (L1) consists of a custom-designed hardware trigger which seeds two higher software based trigger levels. Over 300 triggers compose a trig- ger menu which selects physics signatures such as electrons, muons, particle jets, etc. Each trigger consumes computing resources of the ATLAS trigger system and oine storage. The LHC instantaneous luminosity conditions, desired physics goals of the collaboration, and the limits of the trigger infrastructure determine the composition of the ATLAS trigger menu. We describe a trigger monitoring frame- work for computing the costs of individual trigger algorithms such as data request rates and CPU consumption. This framework has been used...

  19. Ultrasound influence on the solubility of solid dispersions prepared for a poorly soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Simone Vieira; Colombo, Fábio Belotti; de Freitas, Luis Alexandre Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Solid dispersions have been successfully used to enhance the solubility of several poorly water soluble drugs. Solid dispersions are produced by melting hydrophilic carriers and mixing in the poorly water soluble drug. Supersaturation is obtained by quickly cooling the mixture until it solidifies, thereby entrapping the drug. The effects of using ultrasound to homogenize the molten carrier and drug mixture were studied. In particular, the increase in drug solubility for the resulting solid dispersions was analyzed. Piroxicam, which has very low water solubility, was used as a model drug. A full factorial design was used to analyze how sonication parameters affected the solubility and in vitro release of the drug. The results show that the use of ultrasound can significantly increase the solubility and dissolution rate of the piroxicam solid dispersion. Pure piroxicam presented a solubility of 13.3 μg/mL. A maximum fourfold increase in solubility, reaching 53.8 μg/mL, was observed for a solid dispersion sonicated at 19 kHz for 10 min and 475 W. The in vitro dissolution rate test showed the sonicated solid dispersion reached a maximum rate of 18%/min, a sixfold increase over the piroxicam rate of 2.9%/min. Further solid state characterization by thermal, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analyses also showed that the sonication process, in the described conditions, did not adversely alter the drug or significantly change its polymorphic form. Ultrasound is therefore an interesting technique to homogenize drug/carrier mixtures with the objective of increasing the solubility of drugs with poor water solubility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DZERO Level 3 DAQ/Trigger Closeout

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Tevatron Collider, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, delivered its last 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions on September 30th, 2011. The DZERO experiment continues to take cosmic data for final alignment for several more months . Since Run 2 started, in March 2001, all DZERO data has been collected by the DZERO Level 3 Trigger/DAQ System. The system is a modern, networked, commodity hardware trigger and data acquisition system based around a large central switch with about 60 front ends and 200 trigger computers. DZERO front end crates are VME based. Single Board Computer interfaces between detector data on VME and the network transport for the DAQ system. Event flow is controlled by the Routing Master which can steer events to clusters of farm nodes based on the low level trigger bits that fired. The farm nodes are multi-core commodity computer boxes, without special hardware, that run isolated software to make the final Level 3 trigger decision. Passed events are transferred to th...

  1. Tracking at High Level Trigger in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabili- ties of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capability. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a stream- lined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable out- put rate, and the selection efficiency. With the computing power available during the 2012 data taking the maximum reconstruction time at HLT was about 200 ms per event, at the nominal L1T rate of 100 kHz. Track reconstruction algorithms are widely used in the HLT, for the reconstruction of the physics objects as well as in the identification of b-jets and ...

  2. The LHCb level 1 vertex trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Koratzinos, M

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. The Level 1 Vertex trigger of LHCb has certain features that make it unique amongst the LHC experiment trigger schemes: The problem it addresses is a reduction factor of 25 for minimum bias events while retaining good efficiency for signal B events. The best way to achieve such reduction factors is to rely on the most striking property of those B events, the long decay time of the B particles. The trigger therefore has to reconstruct the event around the interaction region and tag signal events using topological criteria. An accurate vertex detector is one of the key components of LHCb and a natural choice for providing the data for such a triggering scheme. The algorithm for the reconstruction of the event is complicated and not readily parallelisable in its totality. We are therefore proposing an architecture that resembles a high-level trigger architecture, where the event building function is performed by a switch network and each event is processed by a single processor, part of ...

  3. CMS Triggers for the LHC Startup

    CERN Document Server

    Nhan Nguyen, Chi

    2009-01-01

    The LHC will collide proton beams at a bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. At the design luminosity of $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ each crossing results in an average of about 20 inelastic pp events. The CMS trigger system is designed to reduce the input rate to about 100 Hz. This task is carried out in two steps, namely the Level-1 (L1) and the High-Level trigger (HLT). The L1 trigger is built of customized fast electronics and is designed to reduce the rate to 100 kHz. The HLT is implemented in a filter farm running on hundreds of CPUs and is designed to reduce the rate by another factor of ~1000. It combines the traditional L2 and L3 trigger components in a novel way and allows the coherent tuning of the HLT algorithms to accommodate multiple physics channels. We will discuss the strategies for optimizing triggers covering the experiment`s early physics program.

  4. Tools for Trigger Rate Monitoring at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Geoffrey; Wightman, Andrew Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2017, we expect the LHC to deliver an instantaneous luminosity of roughly $2.0 \\times 10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ to the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, with about 60 simultaneous proton-proton collisions (pileup) per event. In these challenging conditions, it is important to be able to intelligently monitor the rate at which data are being collected (the trigger rate). It is not enough to simply look at the trigger rate; it is equally important to compare the trigger rate with expectations. We present a set of software tools that have been developed to accomplish this. The tools include a real-time component - a script that monitors the rates of individual triggers during data-taking, and activates an alarm if rates deviate significantly from expectation. Fits are made to previously collected data and extrapolated to higher pileup. The behavior of triggers as a function of pileup is then monitored as data are collected - plots are automatically produced on an hourly basis and uploaded to a web area...

  5. Software Validation Infrastructure for the ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Adorisio, C; Beauchemin, P; Bell, P; Biglietti, M; Coccaro, A; Damazio, D; Ehrenfeld, W; Faulkner, P; George, S; Giagu, S; Goncalo, R; Hamilton, A; Jones, G; Kirk, J; Kwee, R; Lane, J; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Masik, J; Mincer, A; Monticelli, F; Omachi, C; Oyarzun, A; Panikashvili, N; Potter, C; Quinonez, F; Reinsch, A; Robinson, M; Rodríguez, D; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sidoti, A; Sinev, N; Strom, D; Sutton, M; Ventura, A; Winklmeier, F; Zhao, L

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system is responsible for selecting the interesting collision events delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS trigger will need to achieve a ~10^-7 rejection factor against random proton-proton collisions, and still be able to efficiently select interesting events. After a first processing level based on hardware, the final event selection is based on custom software running on two CPU farms, containing around two thousand multi-core machines. This is known as the high-level trigger. Running the trigger online during long periods demands very high quality software. It must be fast, performant, and essentially bug-free. With more than 100 contributors and around 250 different packages, a thorough validation of the HLT software is essential. This relies on a variety of unit and integration tests as well as on software metrics, and uses both in-house and open source software. This presentation presents the existing infrastructure used for validating the high-level trigger softwar...

  6. Graphical processors for HEP trigger systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammendola, R. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Biagioni, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Chiozzi, S.; Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Di Lorenzo, S. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Fantechi, R. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fiorini, M. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Università di Ferrara, Via Ludovico Ariosto 35, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Frezza, O. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Lamanna, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Piandani, R. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Pontisso, L., E-mail: luca.pontisso@cern.ch [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Rossetti, D. [NVIDIA Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Simula, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Sozzi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, L. Bruno Pontecorvo, 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    General-purpose computing on GPUs is emerging as a new paradigm in several fields of science, although so far applications have been tailored to employ GPUs as accelerators in offline computations. With the steady decrease of GPU latencies and the increase in link and memory throughputs, time is ripe for real-time applications using GPUs in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems. We will discuss the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for synchronous low level trigger systems, focusing on tests performed on the trigger of the CERN NA62 experiment. Latencies of all components need analysing, networking being the most critical. To keep it under control, we envisioned NaNet, an FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) enabling GPUDirect connection. Moreover, we discuss how specific trigger algorithms can be parallelised and thus benefit from a GPU implementation, in terms of increased execution speed. Such improvements are particularly relevant for the foreseen LHC luminosity upgrade where highly selective algorithms will be crucial to maintain sustainable trigger rates with very high pileup.

  7. Validation of ATLAS L1 Topological Triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Praderio, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The Topological trigger (L1Topo) is a new component of the ATLAS L1 (Level-1) trigger. Its purpose is that of reducing the otherwise too high rate of data collection from the LHC by rejecting those events considered “uninteresting” (meaning that they have already been studied). This event rate reduction is achieved by applying topological requirements to the physical objects present in each event. It is very important to make sure that this trigger does not reject any “interesting” event. Therefore we need to verify its correct functioning. The goal of this summer student project is to study the response of two L1Topo algorithms (concerning ∆R and invariant mass). To do so I will compare the trigger decisions produced by the L1Topo hardware with the ones produced by the “official” L1Topo simulation. This way I will be able to identify events that could be incorrectly rejected. Simultaneously I will produce an emulation of these triggers that will help me understand the cause of disagreements bet...

  8. Upgrades of the