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Sample records for serial ct mri

  1. MRI of head trauma. Serial changes and comparison with CT

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    Fukuda, Osamu; Sato, Shuji; Suzuki, Takashi; Endo, Shunro; Takaku, Akira.

    1988-08-01

    Sequential changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated in comparison with computed tomography (CT) in 31 cases of head trauma. Twenty-one of them were of acute head trauma; the first MRI study was performed within 48 hours after the accident. Forty-two intracranial lesions were observed in these cases on MRI. The other 10 cases were of chronic subdural hematoma, two cases of which had bilateral lesions. Fourteen lesions of acute head trauma and two lesions of chronic subdural hematoma were detected only by MRI. MRI was superior to CT for the detection of small contusions and thin extra-axial collections, especially those which were located near the bony structures. The abnormal lesions were visualized in MRI during a longer period than in CT. Because the signal intensity of a hematoma changed sequentially, the detection of brain edema was easier than that of a subarachnoid and parenchimal hemorrhage. Judging from this experience, it seems that careful attention should be taken in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic lesions. However, MRI was poor in tissue characterization because of the too-high tissue sensitivity. T/sub 2/-weight SE imaging was essentially sensitive and useful in the early stage.

  2. Serial CT and MRI of ischaemic cerebral infarcts: frequency and clinical impact of haemorrhagic transformation

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    Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Dept. of Radiology/Neuroradiology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany); Droste, D.W. [Dept. of Neurology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany)

    2000-04-01

    The frequency, predisposing factors and clinical consequences of haemorrhagic infarcts and damaged blood-brain barrier as shown by contrast enhancement (CE) in ischaemic cerebral infarcts are controversial. We prospectively compared the sensitivity of CT and MRI to haemorrhagic transformation (HT) and CE. We also wished to investigate the clinical significance of HT and factors possibly associated with it. We studied 36 patients with acute ischaemic infarcts in the middle cerebral artery territory during the first 2 weeks after the ictus. After CT and rating of the neurological deficit on admission, serial examinations with clinical neuromonitoring, contrast-enhanced CT and MRI were done on the same day. The occurrence and severity of HT were correlated with CE, stroke mechanism, infarct size, development of neurological deficits and antithrombotic treatment. The frequency of HT detected by MRI was 80 %. CE usually preceded HT or was seen simultaneously. MRI had a higher sensitivity than CT to HT and CE. Severity of HT was positively correlated with infarct size (P < 0.01). HT had no influence on patient's neurological status. Neither the type of antithrombotic treatment nor the stroke mechanism was associated with the severity of HT. No parenchymal haemorrhage occurred. (orig.)

  3. Serial CT scans and MRI scans of Tay-Sachs disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoizumi, Hideo; Miyao, Masutomo; Ichihashi, Koh; Sawa, Rituko; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Osamu; Yanagisawa, Masayoshi; Kamoshita, Shigehiko.

    1986-01-01

    Serial X-ray CT and MRI were performed on 2 cases of Tay-Sachs disease. Case 1 : a 3-year-10-month-old girl. Her developmental milestones were normal until the age of 6 months. At the age of 10 months, hypotonia and unduly sensitiveness to sounds were noticed. She had cherry red spots in both fundi, and the serum hexosaminidase A activity was low. Significant clinical features during the next 3 years included regression of developmental milestones to the level of one month, and myoclonic and generalised seizures. After 3 years she showed megalencephaly, unstable body temperature, and respiratory disorders. Case 2 : a 2-year-6-month-old boy. His developmental milestones were normal until the age of 5 months. Then he manifested hyperreaction to noises and further developments ceased. He started to deteriorate from the age of 1 year and 2 months, and had no head control at the age of 1 year and 6 months. Cherry red spots were detected and the serum hexsosaminidase A activity was low, too. X-ray CT at the early stage of cases 1 and 2 showed mild cerebral atrophy and high density areas in bilateral thalami and basal ganglia. At the late stage of Case 1, high density areas appeared in occipital and frontal white matters. MRI in both patients were strikingly similar. In their grey matters, linear light areas were demonstrated on IR images. Their white matters showed extensive dark (long T 1 ) areas on IR images, and extensive light (long T 2 ) areas on SE images. Bilateral thalami and basal ganglia were light on IR images and dark on SE images. The findings of MRI in our patients seemed to correlate well with pathological and biochemical changes in their brains. (author)

  4. A comparison of serial MRI with X-ray CT in a patient with Reye-like syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Masanori; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Yukuo; Fujisawa, Shinichi; Sudo, Masakatsu; Hayakawa, Katsumi

    1988-01-01

    Serial MRI and X-ray CT scans were performed on a one-year 7-month old girl with Reye-like syndrome. X-ray CT scan revealed marked hemispheric brain edema in the acute stage and moderate ventricular dilatation with diffuse low density area and cortical atrophy in the chronic stage. MRI performed in the chronic stage showed marked progressive changes. Linear high intensity areas were demonstrated on T 2 weighted MRI performed 21 days after the onset. These high intensity areas increased gradually and 60 days after the onset these high intensity areas spread to the grey matter. These high intensity changes seemed to be correspond to cortical necrosis, and those in the white matter to gliosis or degeneration of myelin. (author)

  5. Serial CT scannings in herpes simplex encephalitis

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    Fukushima, M.; Sawada, T.; Kuriyama, Y.; Kinugawa, H.; Yamaguchi, T. (National Cardivascular Center, Osaka (Japan))

    1981-10-01

    Two patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were studied by serial CT scannings. Case 1, a 60-year-old woman, was admitted to National Cardiovascular Center because of headache, fever, and attacks of Jacksonian seizure. Case 2, a 54-year-old man, was admitted because of fever, consciousness disturbance and right hemiparesis. Pleocytosis (mainly lymphocytes) and elevation of protein content in cerebrospinal fluid were observed in both cases. Both patients presented ''das apallische Syndrom'' one month after admission. The diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was confirmed by typical clinical courses and by greater than fourfold rises in serum antibody titer for herpes simplex virus as well as that in cerebrospinal fluid in case 1. Characteristic CT findings observed in these two cases were summarized as follows: Within a week after the onset, no obvious abnormalities could be detected on CT scans (Case 1). Two weeks after the onset, a large low-density area appeared in the left temporal lobe and in the contralateral insular cortex with midline shift toward the right side (Case 2). One month later, an ill-defined linear and ring-like high-density area (Case 1), or a well-defined high-density area (Case 2), that was enhanced after contrast administration, was observed in the large low-density area in the temporal lobe. These findings were considered as characteristic for hemorrhagic encephalitis. These high-density areas disappeared two months later, however, widespread and intensified low-density areas still remained. In both cases, the basal ganglia and thalamus were completely spared on CT scans. From these observations, it can be concluded that serial CT scannings are quite useful for diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis.

  6. Serial CT scannings in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Masashi; Sawada, Tohru; Kuriyama, Yoshihiro; Kinugawa, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    1981-01-01

    Two patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were studied by serial CT scannings. Case 1, a 60-year-old woman, was admitted to National Cardiovascular Center because of headache, fever, and attacks of Jacksonian seizure. Case 2, a 54-year-old man, was admitted because of fever, consciousness disturbance and right hemipare sis. Pleocytosis (mainly lymphocytes) and elevation of protein content in cerebrospinal fluid were observed in both cases. Both patients presented ''das apallische Syndrom'' one month after admission. The diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was confirmed by typical clinical courses and by greater than fourfold rises in serum antibody titer for herpes simplex virus as well as that in cerebrospinal fluid in case 1. Characteristic CT findings observed in these two cases were summarized as follows: Within a week after the onset, no obvious abnormalities could be detected on CT scans (Case 1). Two weeks after the onset, a large low-density area appeared in the left temporal lobe and in the contralateral insular cortex with midline shift toward the right side (Case 2). One month later, an ill-defined linear and ring-like high-density area (Case 1), or a well-defined high-density area (Case 2), that was enhanced after contrast administration, was observed in the large low-density area in the temporal lobe. These findings were considered as characteristic for hemorrhagic encephalitis. These high-density areas disappeared two months later, however, widespread and intensified low-density areas still remained. In both cases, the basal ganglia and thalamus were completely spared on CT scans. From these observations, it can be concluded that serial CT scannings are quite useful for diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis. (author)

  7. Correlating tumor metabolic progression index measured by serial FDG PET-CT, apparent diffusion coefficient measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood genomics to patient’s outcome in advanced colorectal cancer: the CORIOLAN study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleporte, Amelie; Charette, Nicolas; Machiels, Godelieve; Piccart, Martine; Flamen, Patrick; Hendlisz, Alain; Paesmans, Marianne; Garcia, Camilo; Vandeputte, Caroline; Lemort, Marc; Engelholm, Jean-Luc; Hoerner, Frederic; Aftimos, Philippe; Awada, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) may present various behaviours that define different courses of tumor evolution. There is presently no available tool designed to assess tumor aggressiveness, despite the fact that this is considered to have a major impact on patient outcome. CORIOLAN is a single-arm prospective interventional non-therapeutic study aiming mainly to assess the natural tumor metabolic progression index (TMPI) measured by serial FDG PET-CT without any intercurrent antitumor therapy as a prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in patients with mCRC. Secondary objectives of the study aim to test the TMPI as a prognostic marker for progression-free survival (PFS), to assess the prognostic value of baseline tumor FDG uptake on PFS and OS, to compare TMPI to classical clinico-biological assessment of prognosis, and to test the prognostic value on OS and PFS of MRI-based apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and variation of vADC using voxel-based diffusion maps. Additionally, this study intends to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that correlate with progression of tumors and the OS of patients with mCRC. Consequently, this analysis will provide information about the signaling pathways that determine the natural and therapy-free course of the disease. Finally, it would be of great interest to investigate whether in a population of patients with mCRC, for which at present no known effective therapy is available, tumor aggressiveness is related to elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and to patient outcome. Tumor aggressiveness is one of the major determinants of patient outcome in advanced disease. Despite its importance, supported by findings reported in the literature of extreme outcomes for patients with mCRC treated with chemotherapy, no objective tool allows clinicians to base treatment decisions on this factor. The CORIOLAN study will characterize TMPI using FDG-PET-based metabolic imaging of patients with chemorefractory m

  8. Serial MRI studies using gadolinium DTPA in active multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.H.; Johnson, G.; Barnes, D.; Rudge, P.; McDonald, W.I.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that blood brain barrier (BBB) impairment is a necessary early event in the pathogenesis of the multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. To evaluate such an hypothesis in vivo would require: (1) serial imaging studies using a modality with high sensitivity for detecting plaques; (2) a contrast enhancing agent which demonstrates BBB impairment. A serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was undertaken of a group of MS patients using the contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA. As it has been suggested that T 1 and T 2 relaxation times are longer in acute than chronic MS lesions, these were also measured. 3 refs.; 1 figure

  9. Serial volumetric registration of pulmonary CT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, José Silvestre; Silva, Augusto; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2008-03-01

    Detailed morphological analysis of pulmonary structures and tissue, provided by modern CT scanners, is of utmost importance as in the case of oncological applications both for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. In this case, a patient may go through several tomographic studies throughout a period of time originating volumetric sets of image data that must be appropriately registered in order to track suspicious radiological findings. The structures or regions of interest may change their position or shape in CT exams acquired at different moments, due to postural, physiologic or pathologic changes, so, the exams should be registered before any follow-up information can be extracted. Postural mismatching throughout time is practically impossible to avoid being particularly evident when imaging is performed at the limiting spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a method for intra-patient registration of pulmonary CT studies, to assist in the management of the oncological pathology. Our method takes advantage of prior segmentation work. In the first step, the pulmonary segmentation is performed where trachea and main bronchi are identified. Then, the registration method proceeds with a longitudinal alignment based on morphological features of the lungs, such as the position of the carina, the pulmonary areas, the centers of mass and the pulmonary trans-axial principal axis. The final step corresponds to the trans-axial registration of the corresponding pulmonary masked regions. This is accomplished by a pairwise sectional registration process driven by an iterative search of the affine transformation parameters leading to optimal similarity metrics. Results with several cases of intra-patient, intra-modality registration, up to 7 time points, show that this method provides accurate registration which is needed for quantitative tracking of lesions and the development of image fusion strategies that may effectively assist the follow-up process.

  10. CT and MRI of hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahir, J.G.; Toms, A.P.; Marshall, T.J.; Wimhurst, J.; Nolan, J.

    2007-01-01

    Plain films are the initial imaging method of choice for evaluation of hip arthroplasty. Recent advances in technology and imaging techniques have largely overcome the problems of beam hardening in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic susceptibility artefact in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT and MRI have now become useful imaging techniques in the assessment of hip arthroplasty

  11. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi; Valls, Laia; Vilanova, Joan C.; Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis; Rovira, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  12. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

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    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  13. CT and MRI normal findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.

    1998-01-01

    This book gives answers to questions frequently heard especially from trainees and doctors not specialising in the field of radiology: Is that a normal finding? How do I decide? What are the objective criteria? The information presented is three-fold. The normal findings of the usual CT and MRI examinations are shown with high-quality pictures serving as a reference, with inscribed important additional information on measures, angles and other criteria describing the normal conditions. These criteria are further explained and evaluated in accompanying texts which also teach the systematic approach for individual picture analysis, and include a check list of major aspects, as a didactic guide for learning. The book is primarily intended for students, radiographers, radiology trainees and doctors from other medical fields, but radiology specialists will also find useful details of help in special cases. (orig./CB) [de

  14. Serial CT scans and Menkes' kinky hair disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Eizo; Kameyama, Junji; Yoshimitsu, Hajime; Mori, Mikio; Tanaka, Mutsuo; Yoshimitsu, Kazunori.

    1988-01-01

    Menkes' kinky hair disease is a sex-linked recessive disorder of copper metabolism, characterized by progressive psychomotor deterioration, seizures, and peculiar hair structure. We examined serial CT scans of patients with this disease. A 2,210-g male infant was delivered after an uneventful gestation of 36 weeks. His one-minute Apgar score was 9. His uncle had died at 1 year of age. His first cousin was also diagnosed as having Menkes' kinky hair disease when our patient was 2 years old. Shortly after birth he had mild respiratory distress. At 5 days of age, he developed setting-sun signs. The first CT scan, at 10 days of age, revealed mild posterior fossa hemorrhages. At 3 months of age, myoclonic seizures began, and the CT scan revealed subdural effusion and mild brain atrophy. The seizures were controllable by using phenobarbital, valproic acid, and nitrazepam. He did not follow light or a fixate, but the fundi were normal. He was diffusely hypotonic. At 9 months of age, the seizures became uncontrollable. The CT scans at 15 and 31 months of age showed subdural hemorrhage and/or brain atrophy. At 15 months of age, the serum copper level was 42 μ g/dl, while the serum ceruloplasmin level was 3.2 mg/dl. He exhibited severe developmental failure. At 4 years of age, he died. (author)

  15. Serial CT scans and Menkes' kinky hair disease

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    Nakada, Eizo; Kameyama, Junji; Yoshimitsu, Hajime; Mori, Mikio; Tanaka, Mutsuo; Yoshimitsu, Kazunori.

    1988-02-01

    Menkes' kinky hair disease is a sex-linked recessive disorder of copper metabolism, characterized by progressive psychomotor deterioration, seizures, and peculiar hair structure. We examined serial CT scans of patients with this disease. A 2,210-g male infant was delivered after an uneventful gestation of 36 weeks. His one-minute Apgar score was 9. His uncle had died at 1 year of age. His first cousin was also diagnosed as having Menkes' kinky hair disease when our patient was 2 years old. Shortly after birth he had mild respiratory distress. At 5 days of age, he developed setting-sun signs. The first CT scan, at 10 days of age, revealed mild posterior fossa hemorrhages. At 3 months of age, myoclonic seizures began, and the CT scan revealed subdural effusion and mild brain atrophy. The seizures were controllable by using phenobarbital, valproic acid, and nitrazepam. He did not follow light or a fixate, but the fundi were normal. He was diffusely hypotonic. At 9 months of age, the seizures became uncontrollable. The CT scans at 15 and 31 months of age showed subdural hemorrhage and/or brain atrophy. At 15 months of age, the serum copper level was 42 ..mu.. g/dl, while the serum ceruloplasmin level was 3.2 mg/dl. He exhibited severe developmental failure. At 4 years of age, he died.

  16. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: serial MRI

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    Siskas, N.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Ioannidis, I.; Charitandi, A.; Dimitriadis, A.S. [Radiology Department, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotele University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2003-05-01

    High-signal cortical lesions are observed on T1-weighted images in cases of brain infarct. Histological examination has demonstrated these to be ''cortical laminar necrosis'', without haemorrhage or calcification. We report serial MRI in this condition in 12 patients with brain infarcts. We looked at high-signal lesions on T1-weighted images, chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-signal cortical lesions began to appear about 2 weeks after the ictus, were prominent at 1 - 2 months, then became less evident, but occasionally remained for up to 1.5 years. They gave high signal or were isointense on T2-weighted images and did not give low signal at any stage. Contrast enhancement of these lesions was prominent at 1 - 2 months, and less apparent from 3 months, but was seen up to 5 months. (orig.)

  17. CT and MRI of the epigastrium - is the MRI competitive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B. von

    1993-01-01

    The conclusion drawn in this article is: - CT will continue to rank first as a method for diagnostic evaluation of the entire abdomen. - MRI now offers advantages over CT for diagnostic identification of focal liver lesions, both with regard to detection as such and to a differential diagnosis of liver tumors. - CT continues to be the modality of first choice for diagnostic evaluation of acute pancreatitis. - CT offers advantages for the diagnostic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract (as e.g. in case of complications in the course of inflammatory intestinal affection). - Interventional measures such as biopsies or abscess drainage will still be best controlled by CT, and MRI is not likely to become a really competitive method for such tasks in the foreseeable future. (orig.) [de

  18. CT and MRI diagnosis of nasopharyneal angiofibroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoya; Liang Biling

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the CT and MRI manifestations of nasopharyneal angiofibroma. Methods: 21 cases of nasopharyneal angiofibroma are retrospectively analyzed according to the location, size, margin, density or signal of the tumor and the changes of surrounding bones. Results: The CT and MRI showed a nasopharyneal mass with well-defined margin, uniform density or signal and remarkably enhanced. The sphenomaxillary fossa was enlarged and the posterior wall of maxillary sinus was, compressed and displaced without bone destruction. The surrounding bone appeared to be compressed, molded, absorbed or destroyed. Conclusion: CT examination can usually provide diagnostic information, but the combination of CT and MRI can be better contributed to the diagnosis, location and stage classification of nasopharyneal angiofbroma. (authors)

  19. CT and MRI of vertebral haemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braitinger, S.; Weigert, F.; Held, P.; Obletter, N.; Breit, A.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective comparative study of CT and MRI was carried out involving 38 vertebral haemangiomas; this revealed a typical signal pattern on MRI from benign lesions. It consists of a hyper-intense signal from the bone marrow affecting the T 1 /T 2 sequences; this may be focal or involve the entire vertebral body. These characteristic signals were compared with CT images of the spine. The areas of bone that produce the high intensity signals on MRI appear on CT as spongey patterns with hypertrophic trabeculae surrounding mostly areas with negative absorption values. An analysis of the changes in the spongiosa has revealed three clearly defined types. The signals derived from haemangiomas extending beyond the bone have an intensity of normal spongiosa; this corresponds with an absence of fat, as demonstrated by CT. Extra-osseous components have low intensity T 1 signals that increase in T 2 sequences. (orig.) [de

  20. CT and MRI diagnosis of renal oncocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Shoujun; Wang Wenjia; Pan Shaohui; Gao Ji; Du Pengfei; Lu Fengxi; Wang Xiaohong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the CT and MRI diagnostic value of renal oncocytoma and to improve the recognition of renal oncocytoma. Methods: Two cases of renal oncocytoma confirmed by pathology were retrospectively analyzed and related papers were reviewed. Results: Two cases were located in renal cortex, with smooth and sharp border, extruding outside of the kidneys. CT showed solid masses with lower density in center area as 'star'. On MRI T 1 WI and T 2 WI they also showed solid masses with low T 1 and high T 2 signal inensity in center area as 'star'. After contrast enhancement, the masses represented moderate enhancement and the central part did not show enhancement. Conclusion: Renal oncocytoma is a kind of rare nephroma provided with some characteristics in CT and MRI. (authors)

  1. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma; Aydin, Kubilay; Aktuglu, Cigdem

    2004-01-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  2. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma [Department of Paediatrics, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Aydin, Kubilay [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Camlikyolu, B. mehmetpasa sokak yavuz apt. No:10/10, Etiler, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktuglu, Cigdem [Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  3. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won; Cho, Hyeun Cha

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory

  4. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeun Cha [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory.

  5. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  6. Paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, K.W.; Greess, H.; Baum, U.; Dobritz, M.; Lenz, M.

    2000-01-01

    Neoplastic disease of the nose, paranasal sinuses, the nasopharynx and the parapharyngeal space requires thorough assessment of location and extent in order to plan appropriate treatment. CT allows the deep soft tissue planes to be evaluated and provides a complement to the physical examination. It is especially helpful in regions involving thin bony structures (paranasal sinuses, orbita); here CT performs better than MRI. MRI possesses many advantages over other imaging modalities caused by its excellent tissue contrast. In evaluating regions involving predominantly soft tissue structures (ec nasopharynx and parapharyngeal space) MRI is superior to CT. The possibility to obtain strictly consecutive volume data sets with spiral CT or 3D MRI offer excellent perspectives to visualize the data via 2D or 3D postprocessing. Because head and neck tumors reside in a complex area, having a 3D model of the anatomical features may assist in the delineation of pathology. Data sets may be transferred directly into computer systems and thus be used in computer assisted surgery

  7. Paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx CT and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, K W; Greess, H; Baum, U; Dobritz, M; Lenz, M

    2000-03-01

    Neoplastic disease of the nose, paranasal sinuses, the nasopharynx and the parapharyngeal space requires thorough assessment of location and extent in order to plan appropriate treatment. CT allows the deep soft tissue planes to be evaluated and provides a complement to the physical examination. It is especially helpful in regions involving thin bony structures (paranasal sinuses, orbita); here CT performs better than MRI. MRI possesses many advantages over other imaging modalities caused by its excellent tissue contrast. In evaluating regions involving predominantly soft tissue structures (ec nasopharynx and parapharyngeal space) MRI is superior to CT. The possibility to obtain strictly consecutive volume data sets with spiral CT or 3D MRI offer excellent perspectives to visualize the data via 2D or 3D postprocessing. Because head and neck tumors reside in a complex area, having a 3D model of the anatomical features may assist in the delineation of pathology. Data sets may be transferred directly into computer systems and thus be used in computer assisted surgery.

  8. Practical textbook of cardiac CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae-Hwan (ed.) [ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Guide to the interpretation of cardiac CT and MRI for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Emphasis on applications in a wide range of real clinical situations. Numerous informative illustrations. Summarizing sections permitting rapid retrieval of information. QR codes allowing access to references, additional figures, and motion pictures from the internet. This up-to-date textbook comprehensively reviews all aspects of cardiac CT and MRI and demonstrates the value of these techniques in clinical practice. A wide range of applications are considered, including imaging of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, coronary revascularization, ischemic heart disease, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and pericardial disease. The numerous high-quality images illustrate how to interpret cardiac CT and MRI correctly for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Helpful summarizing sections in every chapter will facilitate rapid retrieval of information. This book will be of great value to radiologists and cardiologists seeking a reliable guide to the optimal use of cardiac CT and MRI in real clinical situations.

  9. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaid, A.H. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Dietemann, J.L. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Klinkert, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Kastler, B. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Gangi, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Jacquet, G. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France)); Cattin, F. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France))

    1994-05-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  10. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaid, A.H.; Dietemann, J.L.; Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M.; Klinkert, A.; Kastler, B.; Gangi, A.; Jacquet, G.; Cattin, F.

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  11. Laryngeal amyloidosis with laryngocele: MRI and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, A.; Ceylan, N.; Cetin, A.; Demirci, A.

    1998-01-01

    A case of laryngeal amyloidosis associated with a laryngocele is reported. Preoperative CT showed diffuse thickening of the epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds and false vocal cords with well-defined calcific foci. MRI revealed contrast enhancement and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  12. Practical textbook of cardiac CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tae-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Guide to the interpretation of cardiac CT and MRI for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Emphasis on applications in a wide range of real clinical situations. Numerous informative illustrations. Summarizing sections permitting rapid retrieval of information. QR codes allowing access to references, additional figures, and motion pictures from the internet. This up-to-date textbook comprehensively reviews all aspects of cardiac CT and MRI and demonstrates the value of these techniques in clinical practice. A wide range of applications are considered, including imaging of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, coronary revascularization, ischemic heart disease, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and pericardial disease. The numerous high-quality images illustrate how to interpret cardiac CT and MRI correctly for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Helpful summarizing sections in every chapter will facilitate rapid retrieval of information. This book will be of great value to radiologists and cardiologists seeking a reliable guide to the optimal use of cardiac CT and MRI in real clinical situations.

  13. Localized Castleman's disease: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuhua; Yang Guangzhao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT and MRI findings of localized Castleman's disease (LCD). Methods: The CT (n=7) and MRI (n=2) appearance of LCD (n=7) confirmed by pathology and operation were retrospectively analyzed. Results Hyaline-vascular type(n=6) and plasma cell type (n=1) were confirmed by pathology in LCD (n=7). They were located in middle mediastinum (n=2), hilum pulmonis (n=l), posterior mediastinum (n=3), retro-peritoneum (n=1). Hyaline-vascular type focuses in CT scanning were manifested as round shape soft tissue masses, with homogeneous density, integrity envelope, distinct margin, and chaperonage arborizing and spot calcification. Marked persistent enhancement was apparent on contrast CT. MRI findings of hyaline-vascular type (n=2) was slightly isointense or hyperintense on T 1 WI, homogeneous hyperintense on T 2 WI, similar enhancement with CT after contrast. Plasma cell type focus were unhomogeneous density with abnormity necrosis, media and unhomogeneous enhancement after contrast. Conclusion: Marked persistent enhancement of LCD would be helpful to diagnosis and differential diagnosis in Castleman's disease. (authors)

  14. Serial cranial ultrasonography or early MRI for detecting preterm brain injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Raets, Marlou M A; Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Govaert, Paul; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Reiss, Irwin K M; Smit, Liesbeth S; Lequin, Maarten H; Dudink, Jeroen

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate detection ability and feasibility of serial cranial ultrasonography (CUS) and early MRI in preterm brain injury. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Level III neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: 307 infants, born below 29 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Serial CUS

  15. Does registration of serial MRI improve diagnosis of dementia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, Josephine; Kennedy, Jonathan; Barker, Suzie; Lehmann, Manja; Nordstrom, R.C.; Smith, Joseph R.; Rossor, Martin N.; Fox, Nick C.; Mitchell, L.A.; Bastos-Leite, Antonio J.; Frost, Chris; Garde, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to assess the value of a second MR scan in the radiological diagnosis of dementia. One hundred twenty subjects with clinical follow-up of at least 1 year with two scans were selected from a cognitive disorders clinic. Scans were reviewed as a single first scan (method A), two unregistered scans presented side-by-side (method B) and a registered pair (method C). Scans were presented to two neuroradiologists and a clinician together with approximate scan interval (if applicable) and age. Raters decided on a main and subtype diagnosis. There was no evidence that differences between methods (expressed as relative odds of a correct response) differed between reviewers (p = 0.17 for degenerative condition or not, p = 0.5 for main diagnosis, p = 0.16 for subtype). Accordingly, results were pooled over reviewers. For distinguishing normal/non-progressors from degenerative conditions, the proportions correctly diagnosed were higher with methods B and C than with A (p = 0.001, both tests). The difference between method B and C was not statistically significant (p = 0.18). For main diagnosis, the proportion of correct diagnoses were highest with method C for all three reviewers; however, this was not statistically significant comparing with method A (p = 0.23) or with method B (p = 0.16). For subtype diagnosis, there was some evidence that method C was better than method A (p = 0.01) and B (p = 0.048). Serial MRI and registration may improve visual diagnosis in dementia. (orig.)

  16. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    OpenAIRE

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advan...

  17. Lead arthropathy: radiographic, CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Joao Luiz; Lopes Rocha, Arthemizio Antonio; Veloso Ayrimoraes Soares, Mayra; Lopes Viana, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Lead arthropathy is a well-known complication of gunshot injuries with retained intra-articular bullets. Although several previous reports have discussed the radiological findings of this entity, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings have never been described before in this setting. In this paper the authors review the imaging findings of 11 patients with lead arthropathy (1 of whom had clinical signs of lead poisoning as well), all of them studied by means of radiographs. In addition, non-enhanced CT scans were obtained in 3 patients and gadolinium-enhanced MRI in 1. Classic findings of intra-articular speckled lead deposits (occasionally with a ''lead arthrogram'' appearance), joint space narrowing and preserved bone density were found at radiographs in the great majority of cases. Furthermore, extension of intra-articular lead to adjacent tendon sheaths was observed in almost half of the patients, an observation rarely reported in the literature. CT scans and MRI, in their turn, were superior with regard to soft tissue abnormalities, accurately depicting joint effusion and the thickened synovium with lead particles embedded in it. Post-gadolinium MRI had the advantage of showing the enhancement pattern of the inflamed synovium and associated bone marrow edema pattern. Although it is not possible to establish the role of axial imaging in lead arthropathy from the small number of cases studied, this initial experience shows that both methods hold promise in this setting and may be useful, at least in selected cases. (orig.)

  18. CT and MRI diagnosis of intracranial chondroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuejun; Sui Qinglan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and study the features of intracranial chondroma on CT and MRI imaging. Methods: CT and MRI findings of ten cases of intracranial chondroma proved by surgery and pathology from 1994. 1 to 2004.9 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among 10 cases, 4 cases were located at the skull base, 4 cases at convexity, 1 case at the region of falx cerebri, and 1 case within the brain parenchyma. CT scans showed obvious calcification and clear border of the tumors in 10 cases, mixed attenuation in 9 eases, and adjacent bone invasion in 5 cases. 4 cases of MRI scans showed hypointense signal on T 1 and T 2 -weighted images in calcified element of the tumor, intermediate to hypointense signal intensity on T 1 -weighted image, and hyperintense signal intensity on T 2 -weighted image in parenchyma of the tumor. 4 cases of CT scans showed slightly enhancement. Conclusion: Intracranial chondroma are often originated from synchondrosis of the skull base, convexity of brain and region of falx cerebri. Obvious calcification may be seen in most cases. Slightly enhancement and marked delayed contrast enhancement were characteristic. The accurate diagnosis still depends on pathology. (authors)

  19. Imaging of abdominal tumours: CT or MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Oeystein E.

    2009-01-01

    The scope of this review is to discuss a theoretical approach to imaging policy, particularly in the perspective of radiation risk reduction. Decisions are ideally driven by empirical evidence about efficacy and risk, e.g., in classical hierarchical efficacy model. As a result of the paucity of empirical evidence (inevitable because of rapid technological development), a pragmatic model is needed. This should avoid overemphasis of factors that currently seem to hamper change, namely personal preference, local expertise, infrastructure, availability. Extrapolation of current general knowledge about CT and MRI demonstrates how a pragmatic approach can be applied in the real world with intermediate goals such as (1) channeling patients from CT to MRI, and (2) reducing CT-delivered radiation. Increased utilisation of MRI in body imaging requires optimisation of scan protocols and equipment, and, being a very operator-dependent modality, the active involvement of the radiologist. In CT dose reduction the main challenge is to benchmark the minimum radiation-dose requirement, and therefore the minimum required image quality that is diagnostically acceptable. As this will ultimately depend on pre-test likelihoods in institutional populations, it is difficult to issue general guidance, and local assessment remains a cornerstone in this effort. (orig.)

  20. CT and MRI characteristics of vertebral tuberculosis (34 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wenbing; Liao Qinghou; Wu Shiqiang; Huang Tao; Deng Yufang; Liu Jianming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore CT and MRI characteristics of vertebral tuberculosis. Methods: 34 patients with vertebral tuberculosis proved by clinic or pathology were analyzed retrospectively. Of these patients, 20 were performed with CT examination and 24 with MRI, 10 with both CT and MRI. The results were compared mutually. Results: The CT features of vertebral tuberculosis were bone destruction, paraspinal abscess, spinal canal involvement. The MRI features of vertebral tuberculosis were bone destruction, intervertebral disc destruction, paraspinal abscess, spinal canal involvement, sub-ligamental spread. Conclusion: Vertebral tuberculosis showed multiple characteristics on CT and MRI. CT is useful in showing sequester and calcification, and MRI is useful in showing sub-ligamental spread, epidural and spinal cord involvement. Combining CT with and MRI is helpful for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of vertebral tuberculosis. (authors)

  1. Cranial CT and MRI in malignant phenylketonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudinchet, F.; Maeder, P.; Meuli, R.A. (CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology); Deonna, T.; Mathieu, J.M. (CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Pediatrics)

    1992-06-01

    Malignant phenylketonuria is a rare disease caused by a deficiency in dihydropteridine-reductase which induce a hyperphenylalaninemia and a defiency of neurotransmitters such as 3,4, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and 5 hydroxytriphtophan. The case of a patient with malignant phenylketonuria (PKU) who underwent both CT and MR Imaging is reported. CT demonstrated the characteristic calcifications of the basal ganglia. MRI demonstrated areas of hypersignal on T1 and images in the basal ganglia, subcortical frontal and occipital white matter and cortex probably corresponding to clacifications. The MR findings are not specific but could be useful in monitoring the diet and neurotransmitter substitution therapy. (orig.).

  2. Cranial CT and MRI in malignant phenylketonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudinchet, F.; Maeder, P.; Meuli, R.A.; Deonna, T.; Mathieu, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Malignant phenylketonuria is a rare disease caused by a deficiency in dihydropteridine-reductase which induce a hyperphenylalaninemia and a defiency of neurotransmitters such as 3,4, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and 5 hydroxytriphtophan. The case of a patient with malignant phenylketonuria (PKU) who underwent both CT and MR Imaging is reported. CT demonstrated the characteristic calcifications of the basal ganglia. MRI demonstrated areas of hypersignal on T1 and images in the basal ganglia, subcortical frontal and occipital white matter and cortex probably corresponding to clacifications. The MR findings are not specific but could be useful in monitoring the diet and neurotransmitter substitution therapy. (orig.)

  3. MRI and CT contrast media extravasation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmatzadeh Behzadi, Ashkan; Farooq, Zerwa; Newhouse, Jeffery H.; Prince, Martin R.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: This systematic review combines data from multiple papers on contrast media extravasation to identify factors contributing to increased extravasation risk. Methods: Data were extracted from 17 papers reporting 2191 extravasations in 1,104,872 patients (0.2%) undergoing computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Extravasation rates were 0.045% for gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) and nearly 6-fold higher, 0.26% for iodinated contrast agents. Factors associated with increased contrast media extravasations included: older age, female gender, using an existing intravenous (IV) instead of placing a new IV in radiology, in-patient status, use of automated power injection, high injection rates, catheter location, and failing to warm up the more viscous contrast media to body temperature. Conclusion: Contrast media extravasation is infrequent but nearly 6 times less frequent with GBCA for MRI compared with iodinated contrast used in CT. PMID:29489663

  4. CT and MRI in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanfermann, H.; Heindel, W.; Schroeder, R.; Lackner, K.

    1994-01-01

    Radiological findings and course of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in 14 patients (1 woman, 13 men; 13 HIV seropositive, 1 chronic lymphatic leukaemia) were analysed retrospectively and correlated with clinical symptoms. A total of 21 CT and 16 MRI studies were evaluated. CT scans and MR images of 9 patients, which had been obtained in less than two weeks, could be compared to each other. MRI was superior to CT: 6 lesions with a diameter of 1 cm and below were not detected on CT scans, in 5 patients the extent of lesions was underestimated. Cortical involvement, mass effect or signs of atrophy were missing. Only 1 of 65 lesions showed a tiny enhancement after Gd injection. Due to the pattern and spread of lesions, which showed a close correlation to the neurologic symptoms, three different types of PML are suggested: 1. Initial precentral demyelinisation with contralateral hemiparesis (n=8); 2. lesions in temporo-occipital locations with visual disturbances (n=2); 3. predominantly bilateral lesions of cerebellar white matter with ataxia (n=4). (orig.) [de

  5. Medulloblastoma in children: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortori-Donati, P.; Fondelli, M.P.; Rossi, A.; Cama, A.; Caputo, L.; Andreussi, L.; Garre, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine whether medulloblastoma (MB) shows specific neuroradiological features which may be employed in differential diagnosis from other common posterior cranial fossa tumours in childhood. Preoperative MRI was performed on 20 children with MB, and preoperative CT in 17 of them. All underwent surgery and histopathological diagnosis. There was a constant relationship between high density on CT and low signal on T1-weighted images. Signal behaviour on T2-weighted images and the degree of contrast enhancement were more variable. Most tumours arose in the midline, from the cerebellar vermis, involving the fourth ventricle, but hemisphere and extra-axial neoplasms were also seen. The combination of high density on CT and low signal on T1-weighted images is highly suggestive of MB and may assist preoperative differential diagnosis from other posterior cranial fossa tumours. (orig.). With 9 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Serial high resolution CT in non-specific interstitial pneumonia: prognostic value of the initial pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Screaton, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: nicholas.screaton@papworth.nhs.uk; Hiorns, M.P. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Lee, K.S. [Samsung Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea); Franquet, T. [Hospital de Saint Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Johkoh, T. [Department of Medical Physics and Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fujimoto, K. [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Ichikado, K. [First Department of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Kumamoto (Japan); Colby, T.V. [Department of Laboratory Medicine/Pathology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Mueller, N.L. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the relationship between initial CT pattern and serial changes in CT findings and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serial high resolution (HR) CTs and PFTs were retrospectively analyzed in 38 cases of histologically proven NSIP, including 4 with cellular NSIP, 13 with mixed cellular and fibrotic NSIP, and 21 with fibrotic NSIP. The presence and extent of various CT findings were assessed. A fibrosis index (defined as the ratio of the extent of a reticular/honeycomb pattern to the overall extent of abnormal parenchyma) was derived. RESULTS: The predominant CT pattern was reticular/honeycomb in 27 (84%) cases and ground-glass/consolidation in 6 (16%) cases. Between scans, mean disease extent reduced by 5.2%. Disease extent reduced by >10% in 13 (34%) and increased by >10% in 6 (16%) patients. Histopathological subtype of NSIP did not correlate with individual CT pattern, predominant pattern, fibrosis index or serial change in disease extent on CT or PFTs. Response on follow-up CT was associated with fibrosis index, predominant pattern and extent of consolidation on initial CT. CONCLUSION: In NSIP disease, progression on CT correlates with the predominant CT pattern, fibrosis index, and extent of consolidation but not with histopathological subtype. An inflammatory (ground-glass/consolidation) predominant pattern is associated with better outcome in terms of disease extent on HRCT.

  7. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in thalassemia: CT and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitouridis, J.; Stamos, S.; Hassapopoulou, E.; Tsitouridis, K.; Nikolopoulos, P.

    1999-01-01

    We present a comparative CT and MRI study of the paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in 32 thalassemic patients. The patients were classified into four groups according to the MRI and CT imaging findings. Active recent extramedullary paraspinal hematopoietic masses show soft tissue behavior in both CT and MRI. Older inactive masses reveal iron deposition or fatty replacement. Combined imaging findings of paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis revealed the phase of its evolution and the correct diagnosis

  8. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in thalassemia: CT and MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitouridis, J.; Stamos, S.; Hassapopoulou, E.; Tsitouridis, K.; Nikolopoulos, P

    1999-04-01

    We present a comparative CT and MRI study of the paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in 32 thalassemic patients. The patients were classified into four groups according to the MRI and CT imaging findings. Active recent extramedullary paraspinal hematopoietic masses show soft tissue behavior in both CT and MRI. Older inactive masses reveal iron deposition or fatty replacement. Combined imaging findings of paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis revealed the phase of its evolution and the correct diagnosis.

  9. Juvenile spondylolysis: a comparative analysis of CT, SPECT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.S.D.; Grainger, A.J.; Hide, I.G.; Papastefanou, S.; Greenough, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate whether MRI correlates with CT and SPECT imaging for the diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis, and to determine whether MRI can be used as an exclusive image modality. Juveniles and young adults with a history of extension low back pain were evaluated by MRI, CT and SPECT imaging. All images were reviewed blindly. Correlative analyses included CT vs MRI for morphological grading and SPECT vs MRI for functional grading. Finally, an overall grading system compared MRI vs CT and SPECT combined. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa statistic. Seventy-two patients (mean age 16 years) were recruited. Forty pars defects were identified in 22 patients (31%), of which 25 were chronic non-union, five acute complete defects and ten acute incomplete fractures. Kappa scores demonstrated a high level of agreement for all comparative analyses. MRI vs SPECT (kappa: 0.794), MRI vs CT (kappa: 0.829) and MRI vs CT/SPECT (kappa: 0.786). The main causes of discrepancy were between MRI and SPECT for the diagnosis of stress reaction in the absence of overt fracture, and distinguishing incomplete fractures from intact pars or complete defects. MRI can be used as an effective and reliable first-line image modality for diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis. However, localised CT is recommended as a supplementary examination in selected cases as a baseline for assessment of healing and for evaluation of indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  10. Juvenile spondylolysis: a comparative analysis of CT, SPECT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R.S.D. [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Hide, I.G. [Freeman Hospital, Department of Radiology, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Papastefanou, S. [James Cook University Hospital, Department Radiology, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Greenough, C.G. [James Cook University Hospital, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate whether MRI correlates with CT and SPECT imaging for the diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis, and to determine whether MRI can be used as an exclusive image modality. Juveniles and young adults with a history of extension low back pain were evaluated by MRI, CT and SPECT imaging. All images were reviewed blindly. Correlative analyses included CT vs MRI for morphological grading and SPECT vs MRI for functional grading. Finally, an overall grading system compared MRI vs CT and SPECT combined. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa statistic. Seventy-two patients (mean age 16 years) were recruited. Forty pars defects were identified in 22 patients (31%), of which 25 were chronic non-union, five acute complete defects and ten acute incomplete fractures. Kappa scores demonstrated a high level of agreement for all comparative analyses. MRI vs SPECT (kappa: 0.794), MRI vs CT (kappa: 0.829) and MRI vs CT/SPECT (kappa: 0.786). The main causes of discrepancy were between MRI and SPECT for the diagnosis of stress reaction in the absence of overt fracture, and distinguishing incomplete fractures from intact pars or complete defects. MRI can be used as an effective and reliable first-line image modality for diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis. However, localised CT is recommended as a supplementary examination in selected cases as a baseline for assessment of healing and for evaluation of indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  11. Late Adverse Events after Enhanced and Unenhanced MRI and CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, Manal; Rømsing, Janne; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2014-01-01

    Prospective evaluation of frequency of late and very late adverse events in patients undergoing enhanced or unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). The imaging procedure was performed according to the protocols of the department. All patients were contacted three...... of LAEs was significantly higher in the enhanced MRI (38%) and CT (27%) groups than unenhanced MRI (20%) and CT (16%) groups. The frequency of nausea, dizziness, abdominal pain and diarrhoea was significantly higher in the enhanced MRI group than in the MRI control group, while taste sensation...

  12. MRI and CT of the female pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Forstner, R. (eds.) [Salzburger Landeskliniken, Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniv., Salzburg (Austria). Universitaetsinst. fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2007-07-01

    MRI and CT exquisitely depict the anatomy of the female pelvis and offer fascinating diagnostic possibilities in women with pelvic disorders. This volume provides a comprehensive account of the use of these cross-sectional imaging techniques to identify and characterize developmental anomalies and acquired diseases of the female genital tract. Both benign and malignant diseases are considered in depth, and detailed attention is also paid to normal anatomical findings and variants. Further individual chapters focus on the patient with pelvic pain and the use of MRI for pelvimetry during pregnancy and the evaluation of fertility. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the most recent diagnostic and technical advances, and the text is complemented by many detailed and informative illustrations. All of the authors are acknowledged experts in diagnostic imaging of the female pelvis, and the volume will prove an invaluable aid to everyone with an interest in this field. (orig.)

  13. MRI and CT of the female pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Forstner, R.

    2007-01-01

    MRI and CT exquisitely depict the anatomy of the female pelvis and offer fascinating diagnostic possibilities in women with pelvic disorders. This volume provides a comprehensive account of the use of these cross-sectional imaging techniques to identify and characterize developmental anomalies and acquired diseases of the female genital tract. Both benign and malignant diseases are considered in depth, and detailed attention is also paid to normal anatomical findings and variants. Further individual chapters focus on the patient with pelvic pain and the use of MRI for pelvimetry during pregnancy and the evaluation of fertility. Throughout, emphasis is placed on the most recent diagnostic and technical advances, and the text is complemented by many detailed and informative illustrations. All of the authors are acknowledged experts in diagnostic imaging of the female pelvis, and the volume will prove an invaluable aid to everyone with an interest in this field. (orig.)

  14. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, P.; Rousset-Jablonski, C.; Alifano, M.; Mansuet-Lupo, A.; Buy, J.-N.; Revel, M.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis is considered to be rare, but is the most frequent form of extra-abdominopelvic endometriosis. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome affects women of reproductive age. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical findings, which can include catamenial pneumothorax and haemothorax, non-catamenial endometriosis-related pneumothorax, catamenial haemoptysis, lung nodules, and isolated catamenial chest pain. Symptoms are typically cyclical and recurrent, with a right-sided predominance. Computed tomography (CT) is the first-line imaging method, but is poorly specific; therefore, its main role is to rule out other pulmonary diseases. However, in women with a typical clinical history, some key CT findings may help to confirm this often under-diagnosed syndrome. MRI can also assist with the diagnosis, by showing signal changes typical of haemorrhage within diaphragmatic or pleural lesions

  15. Peritoneal mesothelioma: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puvaneswary, M.; Chen, S.; Proietto, T.

    2002-01-01

    Two patients with histologically proven diagnosis of peritoneal mesothelioma are presented. Both patients had CT scans of the abdomen. The second patient was also examined with MRI. Although imaging findings are striking, they are non-specific and diagnosing peritoneal mesothelioma in the absence of pleural calcification or pleural plaque on chest radiograph or CT is difficult. However, it is possible to suggest the correct diagnosis in a patient with the presence of non-calcified omental and peritoneal infiltration or masses without liver secondaries or lymphadenopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging with its multi-planar capabilities is a highly sensitive non-invasive modality in the evaluation of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma and can demonstrate the exact site and clarify whether the mass is arising from the peritoneal surface or within a visceral organ. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Functional MRI and CT biomarkers in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, J.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom); Payne, G.S.; DeSouza, N.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from MRI or CT describe functional properties of tumours and normal tissues. They are finding increasing numbers of applications in diagnosis, monitoring of response to treatment and assessment of progression or recurrence. Imaging biomarkers also provide scope for assessment of heterogeneity within and between lesions. A wide variety of functional parameters have been investigated for use as biomarkers in oncology. Some imaging techniques are used routinely in clinical applications while others are currently restricted to clinical trials or preclinical studies. Apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer ratio and native T{sub 1} relaxation time provide information about structure and organization of tissues. Vascular properties may be described using parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, transverse relaxation rate (R{sub 2}*), vessel size index and relative blood volume, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be used to probe the metabolic profile of tumours. This review describes the mechanisms of contrast underpinning each technique and the technical requirements for robust and reproducible imaging. The current status of each biomarker is described in terms of its validation, qualification and clinical applications, followed by a discussion of the current limitations and future perspectives. (orig.)

  17. Rare manifestation of echinococcus cysticus presented in CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrazidlo, W.; Rieber, A.; Schneider, S.; Brambs, H.J.; Friedel, P.; Heidelberg Univ.

    1989-01-01

    A case of primary spinal echinococcus with bone destruction is presented and the findings in CT and MR imaging are discussed. Although CT and MRI are complementary studies for the diagnosis of the spinal echinococcosis, MRI is the study of choice for prolonged follow-up of complicated cases. (orig.) [de

  18. Visualisation of animal anatomy using MRI and CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael

    imaging (MRI) and CT. Various species (tarantula, horseshoe crab, carp, haddock, lungfish, axolotl) were subjected to multi-slice MRI and CT protocols to produce 2D images of body slices, followed by volume rendering producing 3D digital models of animal anatomy with applications for visualising specific...

  19. MRI and CT in alveolar echinococcosis of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duewell, S.; Marincek, B.; Schulthess, G.K. von; Ammann, R.; Zurich Univ.

    1990-01-01

    To compare the value of MRI and CT in evaluating hepatic alveolar echinococcosis a study was conducted on 30 patients. The liver was initially affected in all patients. At the time of examination, 15 patients had undergone partial liver resection. MRI showed no advantage over CT in demonstrating an echinococcal mass lesion. MRI was superior in identifying concomitant pathological changes of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic venous system due to the intrinsic contrast of vascular structures. However, CT was superior in identifying calcifications, an important attribute of the disease. MRI should only be used in imaging alveolar echinococcosis of the liver if diagnostic questions remain open after CT, in particular questions concerning venous pathology. MRI may also be used to replace CT in patients with a contraindication to urographic contrast material. (orig.) [de

  20. Comparison of CT and MRI features in sinusitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Fan, Y.F.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To correlate the features of inflammatory changes in the paranasal sinuses on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT). Methods and patients: One hundred and fourteen patients with histologically proven nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were staged with both CT and MRI. All CT and MRI images of patients with mucosal thickening but no tumour involvement of the sinuses were retrospectively analysed. Results: There were inflammatory changes in 36 maxillary, 21 sphenoid and 16 ethmoid sinuses. These changes include mucosal thickening, retention cysts, retained secretions, inspissated secretions and dystrophic calcification. MRI is superior to CT in separating thickened mucosa, retained secretions and retentions cysts. Conclusion: It is important to appreciate CT changes of sinusitis and the corresponding spectrum of MRI features. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. CT and MRI findings in cerebral hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, U.; Parlak, M.; Kilic, E.; Sivri, Z.; Sadikoglu, M.Y.; Tuncel, E.

    1995-01-01

    CT is the primary modality for the diagnosis. Two forms of cerebral hydatid cysts have been reported on the basis of CT appearances: unilocular and multilocular. Demonstration of the cyst wall is important for the diagnosis. MRI is superior to CT for demonstrating the cyst capsule and perifocal oedema. We retrospectively reveiwed the CT and MRI findings of 6 surgically proven cases of cerebral hydatid cyst and compared the two modalities on the basis of their demonstration of findings helpful in the diagnosis, such as the capsule and perifocal oedema. In 1 case CT showed the capsule. In 2 cases MRI showed a hypointense capsule around the cyst on T2-weighted images. While CT is the modality of choice, in clinical practice MRI is superior for demonstrating the cyst capsule, which is a helpful finding in the diagnosis and can be used in inconclusive cases. (orig.)

  2. Serial CT Findings of Paragonimus Infested Dogs and the Micro-CT Findings of the Worm Cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyun Ju; Hong, Sung Tae; Shen, Cheng Hua; Chung, Doo Hyun; Son, Kyu Ri; Chang, Jung Min; Eo, Hong

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the serial CT findings of Paragonimus westermani infected dogs and the microscopic structures of the worm cysts using Micro-CT. This study was approved by the committee on animal research at our institution. Fifteen dogs infected with P. westermani underwent serial contrast-enhanced CT scans at pre-infection, after 10 days of infection, and monthly thereafter until six months for determining the radiologic-pathologic correlation. Three dogs (one dog each time) were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. After fixation of the lungs, both multi-detector CT and Micro-CT were performed for examining the worm cysts. The initial findings were pleural effusion and/or subpleural groundglass opacities or linear opacities at day 10. At day 30, subpleural and peribronchial nodules appeared with hydropneumothorax and abdominal or chest wall air bubbles. Cavitary change and bronchial dilatation began to be seen on CT scan at day 30 and this was mostly seen together with mediastinal lymphadenopathy at day 60. Thereafter, subpleural ground-glass opacities and nodules with or without cavitary changes were persistently observed until day 180. After cavitary change of the nodules, the migratory features of the subpleural or peribronchial nodules were seen on all the serial CT scans. Micro-CT showed that the cyst wall contained dilated interconnected tubular structures, which had communications with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. The CT findings of paragonimiasis depend on the migratory stage of the worms. The worm cyst can have numerous interconnected tubular channels within its own wall and these channels have connections with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus

  3. Cerebral lymphoma - CT and MRI diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovska, T.; Yanakiev, A.; Zashev, I.

    2012-01-01

    Lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) is a disease of the lymphatic system where the central neural system is affected in very rare cases. According to different authors the frequency of cases with lymphoma where the neural system is affected varies between 0, 2 % and 0, 5 %, and the primary cerebral lymphoma accounts for about 1-2% of ail brain neoplasms. The intracranial form of iymphoma is usually a late onset of the disease with serious and potentially fatal complications for the patient. These complications usually appear several years after diagnosing the disease, but the cerebral lymphoma may occur even in patients who are in remission which is the case with our patient. We present you a case with a 38 -year-old female, who was hospitalized in the Neuro ward with the following complaints -loss of speech for a few minutes, dizziness, weakness, tingling in her right leg as well as shuffling. This patient was diagnosed with histological B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 8 years ago. CT and MRI were carried out on that patient. Despite both clinical and radiographic suspicions for intracranial forms of lymphoma, the patient was still difficult to diagnose. A definitive diagnosis was given after a surgery and histological examination, i.e. non-Hodgkin's lymphoma - large B-cell lymphoma. This case is of interest because of its rare intracranial localization of the lymphoma. The knowledge of CT and MRI images of the intracranial form of lymphoma may help diagnosing, but images should be interpreted together with the clinical and paraclinical results Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) is a disease of the lymphatic system where the central neural system is affected in very rare cases. According to different authors the frequency of cases with lymphoma where the neural system is affected varies between 0, 2 % and 0, 5 %, and the primary cerebral lymphoma accounts for about 1-2% of ail brain neoplasms. The intracranial form of iymphoma is usually a late onset of the disease

  4. Serial MRI in a case of familial hemiplegic migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butteriss, D.J.A.; Birchall, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Regional Neurosciences Centre Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, NE4 6BE, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Ramesh, V. [Department of Paediatric Neurology, Regional Neurosciences Centre Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, NE4 6BE, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2003-05-01

    We report MRI findings in a patient with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with repeated episodes of hemiparesis. FHM is caused by a penetrant autosomal dominant genetic mutation; several mutations have been genotyped, involving brain-expressed ion channels. We found cerebral oedema, dilatation of intracerebral vessels and decreased water diffusion contralateral to the hemiparesis, not respecting vascular territories, with subsequent complete resolution of both clinical and imaging abnormalities. These results are thought to be consistent with an underlying primary neuronal pathology with secondary vascular effects, as opposed to the traditional, primarily vascular, model of migraine aetiology. (orig.)

  5. The history, economics, and politics of CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evens, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the historical medical background in which computed tomography (CT) has been introduced. Early investigations in CT are discussed. The clinical development of both CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The economics and efficacy of both techniques is discussed and compared

  6. Laminectomy-induced arachnoradiculitis: a postoperative serial MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, H [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama (Japan); Tsuji, H [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama (Japan); Kanamori, M [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama (Japan); Kawaguchi, Y [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama (Japan); Yudoh, K [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama (Japan); Futatsuya, R [Departments of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    Time-related changes of laminectomy-induced cauda equina adhesions were investigated by MRI in ten patients with degenerative spinal disease who underwent posterior surgery to the lumbar spine; seven had disc herniations and three spinal stenosis. Axial MRI was performed before and 3, 7, 21 and 42 days after surgery. Cauda equina adhesions were most severe at the laminectomised levels L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S1 (n = 16); partial adhesions were found in 9 of 16 levels at 6 weeks after surgery. At the L3-4 or L5-S1 levels (n = 14), the area of laminar exposure without laminectomy, the cauda equina adhesions continued 1 week after surgery, but thereafter resolved; only partial adhesions were seen at 5 of 14 levels 6 weeks after surgery. Shrinkage of the arachnoid sac was also found at the level of the laminectomy, but it re-expanded 3 weeks after surgery in all cases. Cauda equina adhesions and shrinkage of the sac were correlated closely with laminectomy, with or without discectomy, suggesting that an inflammatory process of deep wound healing may be involved in the mechanism of a laminectomy-induced arachnoradiculitis which may be correlated with postoperative leg symptoms. (orig.). With 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Laminectomy-induced arachnoradiculitis: a postoperative serial MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, H.; Tsuji, H.; Kanamori, M.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Yudoh, K.; Futatsuya, R.

    1995-01-01

    Time-related changes of laminectomy-induced cauda equina adhesions were investigated by MRI in ten patients with degenerative spinal disease who underwent posterior surgery to the lumbar spine; seven had disc herniations and three spinal stenosis. Axial MRI was performed before and 3, 7, 21 and 42 days after surgery. Cauda equina adhesions were most severe at the laminectomised levels L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S1 (n = 16); partial adhesions were found in 9 of 16 levels at 6 weeks after surgery. At the L3-4 or L5-S1 levels (n = 14), the area of laminar exposure without laminectomy, the cauda equina adhesions continued 1 week after surgery, but thereafter resolved; only partial adhesions were seen at 5 of 14 levels 6 weeks after surgery. Shrinkage of the arachnoid sac was also found at the level of the laminectomy, but it re-expanded 3 weeks after surgery in all cases. Cauda equina adhesions and shrinkage of the sac were correlated closely with laminectomy, with or without discectomy, suggesting that an inflammatory process of deep wound healing may be involved in the mechanism of a laminectomy-induced arachnoradiculitis which may be correlated with postoperative leg symptoms. (orig.). With 7 figs., 1 tab

  8. Elastofibroma Dorsi: CT and MRI appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, Claudio J.; Costamagna, Cecilia L.; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, Roberto L.; Milatich, Viviana

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the findings of fibroelastomas by CT and MR imaging. Material and Methods: We studied 7 female patients, aged 60 to 75 years. All patients presented a unilateral soft tissue mass in the periscapular region (4 left sided and 3 right sided); one patient developed a contralateral lesion one year later. Four patients had pain and underwent surgical excision of the lesions; 2 patients underwent percutaneous biopsy and the last patient is under clinical and imaging follow-up. Results: The lesions had a tomographic density to muscle, but with the presence of hypodense bands corresponding to adipose tissue. After the administration of IV contrast (5 cases) density remained similar to that of muscle. By MR, in the T1 sequence, the lesions were isointense to muscle and had hyperintense linear areas corresponding to adipose tissue bands. In the FSE T2 sequences, the lesions appeared mildly hyperintense. After the administration of IV gadolinium, the T1 sequence with fat suppression showed marked enhancement of the tumors. There was no involvement of neighboring bony or muscle structures. Conclusion: CT and MRI are useful methods for the detection of periscapular fibroelastomas. (author)

  9. MRI versus CT in the diagnosis of Nelson's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasperlik-Zaluska, A.; Walecki, J.; Brzezinski, J.; Jeske, W.; Migdalska, B.; Bonicki, W.; Brzezinska, A.; Makowska, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the utility of MRI and CT in the diagnosis of Nelson's syndrome, i. e. pituitary tumours in patients bilaterally adrenalectomized for Cushing's disease. Thirteen patients, followed up for 5-29 years after adrenalectomy, were studied. In 6 of them CT and MRI revealed no changes in the pituitary gland. In the remaining 7 patients only three CT scans were suggestive of a pituitary adenoma. MRI studies with administration of gadodiamide confirmed the CT diagnosis of Nelson's tumour in 3 patients and disclosed microadenomas in a further 4 patients. Neurosurgical treatment in 4 patients confirmed the MRI findings. Additionally CT and MRI examinations were performed in 5 patients suspected of a recurrent Nelson's tumour 3-11 years after neurosurgery. MRI visualized recurrent adenomas in 3 patients that were not well seen by CT scans. In our experience MRI was more effective than CT in the diagnosis of Nelson's syndrome. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Invisible fat on CT: making it visible by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Emre; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Presence of fat in a lesion significantly narrows the differential diagnosis. Small quantities of macroscopic fat and intracellular fat are invisible on computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal any fatty change in a lesion and can also differentiate macroscopic fat from intracellular and intravoxel fat. Hypodensity on CT may be a sign of invisible fat and MRI can help to diagnose even minute amounts of fat in liver, pancreas, adrenal, musculoskeletal, and omental pseudolesions and lesions. This article will review the superiority of MRI over CT in demonstrating fat in abdominal lesions.

  11. Serial changes of humor comprehension for four-frame comic Manga: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Mariko; Yaoi, Ken; Minamoto, Takehiro; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2014-07-25

    Serial changes of humor comprehension evoked by a well organized four-frame comic Manga were investigated by fMRI in each step of humor comprehension. The neural substrates underlying the amusing effects in response to funny and mixed order manga were compared. In accordance with the time course of the four frames, fMRI activations changed serially. Beginning with the second frame (development scene), activation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) was observed, followed by activations in the temporal and frontal areas during viewing of the third frame (turn scene). For the fourth frame (punch line), strong increased activations were confirmed in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and cerebellum. Interestingly, distinguishable activation differences in the cerebellum between funny and non-funny conditions were also found for the fourth frame. These findings suggest that humor comprehension evokes activation that initiates in the TPJ and expands to the MPFC and cerebellum at the convergence level.

  12. CT and MRI normal findings; CT- und MRT-Normalbefunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E. [Caritas-Krankenhaus, Dillingen (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    This book gives answers to questions frequently heard especially from trainees and doctors not specialising in the field of radiology: Is that a normal finding? How do I decide? What are the objective criteria? The information presented is three-fold. The normal findings of the usual CT and MRI examinations are shwon with high-quality pictures serving as a reference, with inscribed important additional information on measures, angles and other criteria describing the normal conditions. These criteria are further explained and evaluated in accompanying texts which also teach the systematic approach for individual picture analysis, and include a check list of major aspects, as a didactic guide for learning. The book is primarily intended for students, radiographers, radiology trainees and doctors from other medical fields, but radiology specialists will also find useful details of help in special cases. (orig./CB) [German] Normalbefunde sind die haeufigsten Befunde ueberhaupt. Also kein Problem? Doch. Besonders Radiologen in der Ausbildung und Aerzte aus anderen Fachgebieten stellen sich immer wieder die entscheidende Frage: Ist das normal? Woran kann ich das erkennen? Wie kann ich das objektivieren? Dieses Buch leistet dreierlei: 1. Es zeigt klassische Normalbefunde der gaengigen CT- und MRT-Untersuchungen in hoher Abbildungsqualitaet als Referenz. Direkt in die Aufnahmen eingezeichnet sind wichtige Daten: Masse, Winkel und andere Kriterien des Normalen. Sie werden im Text nochmals zusammengefasst, erklaert und bewertet. 2. Es lehrt die Systematik der Bildbetrachtung - wie schaue ich mir ein Bild an, welche Strukturen betrachte ich in welcher Reihenfolge und worauf muss ich dabei besonders achten? Dies alles in Form einer uebersichtlichen Checkliste zu jeder Aufnahme. 3. Es gibt eine Befundformulierung vor, die sich wiederum an dem Schema der Bildanalyse orientiert, alle Kriterien des Normalen definiert und dadurch auch ein wichtiges didaktisches Element darstellt

  13. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Aulich, A. [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Reifenberger, G. [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kiwit, J.C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[{sup 123}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  14. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J.; Aulich, A.; Reifenberger, G.; Kiwit, J.C.W.; Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D.

    2000-01-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[ 123 I]iodo-α-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  15. Visual analysis of serial T2-weighted MRI in multiple sclerosis: intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molyneux, P.D.; Miller, D.H.; Filippi, M.; Yousry, T.A.; Radue, E.W.; Ader, H.J.; Barkhof, F.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of consensus formation and training on the agreement between observers in scoring the number of new and enlarging multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions on serial T2-weighted MRI studies. The baseline and month 9 MRI studies of 16 patients with a range of MRI activity were used (dual-echo conventional spin-echo sequence, TR 2000, TE 34 and 90 ms, 5 mm contiguous slices, in-plane resolution 1 mm). First, the serial studies were visually analysed for the presence of new and enlarging lesions, on two occasions, by five experienced observers, without adopting any consensus strategy and in isolation. Next, the observers met to identify the common sources of inconsistencies in reporting between observers and formulate consensus rules. Finally, a further independent reading session was performed on the same MRI dataset, this time applying the consensus rules. Agreement between observers was assessed using kappa scores. Without the consensus rules, interobserver kappa scores for the first and second reading sessions for new lesions were only 0.51 and 0.39 respectively; agreement for enlarging lesions was even worse. The mean intraobserver kappa score for new lesions was higher at 0.72, reflecting the fact that the observers were consistently applying their individual assessment strategies. Application of the consensus rules did not lead to a significant improvement in inter observer kappas; the kappa scores adopting the guidelines were 0.46 and 0.21 for new and enlarging lesions respectively. Consensus guidelines thus did not improve the reproducibility of visual analysis of serial T2-weighted MRI, and the level of agreement between observers remained only moderate. Suboptimal repositioning is likely to be a major source of residual variability and this suggests a future role for image registration strategies; until then, a single observer, or pair of observers working in consensus, should be used in MS studies. (orig.)

  16. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chu, Sung Nam; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Hyon De

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis

  17. Cranial CT and MRI in diseases with DNA repair defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Kendall, B.E.; Kingsley, D.

    1992-01-01

    The CT and MRI appearances of 5 patients with Cockayne's syndrome, 5 with ataxia telangiectasia and 1 with Fanconi's anaemia are reported. These conditions, together with Bloom's syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum are regarded as disorders of DNA repair. Characteristic CT and MRI features of Cockayne's syndrome include generalised atrophy, calcification in basal ganglia and dentate nuclei and white matter low density. Neuroradiological findings in the other DNA repair disorders are nonspecific. (orig.)

  18. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chu, Sung Nam; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis.

  19. Ultrasound, CT and MRI of ruptured and disseminated hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Department of Radiology)

    Three cases of echinococcus granulosus with rupture of hydatid cysts and widespread abdominal, pelvic of pleural dissemination are described. Ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed recognition of ruptured hydatid cysts. This assisted to come to an appropriate therapy and exclusion or confirmation of hydatid cysts elsewhere in the body. Ultrasound, CT and MRI are also important for follow-up, evaluation of therapeutic response and/or early diagnosis of recurrence. (author). 22 refs.; 3 figs.

  20. Ultrasound, CT and MRI of ruptured and disseminated hydatid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinner, W.N. von

    1990-01-01

    Three cases of echinococcus granulosus with rupture of hydatid cysts and widespread abdominal, pelvic of pleural dissemination are described. Ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed recognition of ruptured hydatid cysts. This assisted to come to an appropriate therapy and exclusion or confirmation of hydatid cysts elsewhere in the body. Ultrasound, CT and MRI are also important for follow-up, evaluation of therapeutic response and/or early diagnosis of recurrence. (author). 22 refs.; 3 figs

  1. MRI, CT and TRUS imaging of seminal vesicle metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, P.; Blomqvist, L.; Norming, U.

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of a testicular germ-cell metastasis in the seminal vesicle. Diagnostic imaging with transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), CT, and MRI was performed. This case emphasizes the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with pathology in the pelvic region. (orig.)

  2. A comparison of the value of MRI and CT in patients with Nelson syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersjes, W.; Allmendinger, S.; Christ, F.; Stiebler, H.; Bockisch, A.; Klingmueller, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hypophyses of 13 patients with Nelson syndrome following bilateral adrenalectomy were examined by MRI and CT. Diffuse enlargement of the hypophysis was demonstrated in 8 patients by CT and in 9 by MRI. Compared with CT, MRI provides better demonstration of tumour development, such as abnormal convexity of the cranial margin of the hypophysis (MRI 4/13, CT 1/13), displacement of the infundibulum (MRI 4/13, CT 0/13) or optic chiasm (MRI 2/13, CT 0/13). MRI also provides diagnostically important differentiation between scar tissue and recurrence of tumour following hypophysectomy (MRI 1/3, CT 0/3) and more accurate demonstration of infiltration of the cavernous sinus (MRI 4/13, CT 2/13). CT is superior only in showing the floor of the sella. MRI is the method of choice for imaging in cases of Nelson syndrome. (orig.) [de

  3. Microcomputer-based image processing system for CT/MRI scans II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, J.C.K.; Yu, P.K.N.; Cheng, A.Y.S.; Ho, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that a microcomputer-based image processing system is used to digitize and process serial sections of CT/MRI scan and reconstruct three-dimensional images of brain structures and brain lesions. The images grabbed also serve as templates and different vital regions with different risk values are also traced out for 3D reconstruction. A knowledge-based system employing rule-based programming has been built to help identifying brain lesions and to help planning trajectory for operations. The volumes of the lesions are also automatically determined. Such system is very useful for medical skills archival, tumor size monitoring, survival and outcome forecasting, and consistent neurosurgical planning

  4. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.)

  5. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  6. Adrenal cavernous hemangioma: MRI, CT, and US appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marotti, M.; Sucic, Z.; Krolo, I.; Dimanovski, J.; Klaric, R.; Ferencic, Z.; Karapanda, N.; Babic, N.; Pavlekovic, K.

    1997-01-01

    Two cases of rare adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are reported, one imaged with conventional X-ray techniques, US, CT, and MRI, and the other with US and CT. The CT technique clearly demonstrated calcifications and the internal structure of the lesions in both cases and peripheral rim enhancement on the postcontrast scan in one patient. Although MRI demonstrated accurately the complex nature of the lesion, the inability to visualize the calcified areas do not allow to make a specific histologic diagnosis. (orig.). With 8 figs

  7. Multidetector CT and MRI in diseases of the GI tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruel, J.M.; Gallix, B.

    2003-01-01

    With the introduction of spiral scanning then multidetector technologies, the accuracy for diagnosing digestive tract diseases with CT has been highly improved, and CT is used more and more in the evaluation of patients with suspected gastrointestinal disorders. CT is able to demonstrate both the intramural and the extra-mural components of the disease, and has a major role in the preoperative staging and the follow-up Improvements of CT protocols, such as CT-enteroclysis, or multiplanar 2D and 3D post-processing, including now techniques for 'virtual endoscopy', lead to discuss new indications in which CT could now compete with conventional X-rays series and video-endoscopy. This precise study of the digestive wall, the peri-digestive fat, the digestive tract blood supply, may be performed by MRI, under the condition of access to high level machines and standardized protocols. MR-enteroclysis and MR-virtual colonoscopy could be performed with much lower risk for the patient, in terms of radiation dose or contrast adverse effects. Endo-luminal coils should give to MR an ultra-high resolution for analysing the different layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Learning objectives: to review how to perform CT and MRI protocols for digestive tract imaging, to recognize the CT arid MR patterns of the main digestive tract diseases, to discuss the value, limits and role of CT and MR in digestive tract diseases, to discuss the potential role of CT and MR new technological developments for digestive tract imaging in the upcoming future Conclusion: CT is nowadays a modality of choice for digestive imaging. Improvements in technologies and indications, the necessary discussion of the risks and benefits for the patient should let the radiologists consider MRI in gastrointestinal disorders as an important part of the routine activity in clinical MRI. (authors)

  8. Serial automated quantitative CT analysis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Functional correlations and comparison with changes in visual CT scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Joseph; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Kokosi, Maria; Wells, Athol U.; Egashira, Ryoko; Brun, Anne Laure; Nair, Arjun; Walsh, Simon L.F.; Karwoski, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    To determine whether computer-based CT quantitation of change can improve on visual change quantification of parenchymal features in IPF. Sixty-six IPF patients with serial CT imaging (6-24 months apart) had CT features scored visually and with a computer software tool: ground glass opacity, reticulation and honeycombing (all three variables summed as interstitial lung disease extent [ILD]) and emphysema. Pulmonary vessel volume (PVV) was estimated by computer only. Relationships between changes in CT features and forced vital capacity (FVC) were examined using univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses. On univariate analysis, changes in computer variables demonstrated stronger linkages to FVC change than changes in visual scores (CALIPER ILD:R 2 =0.53, p<0.0001; Visual ILD:R 2 =0.16, p=0.001). PVV increase correlated most strongly with relative FVC change (R 2 =0.57). When PVV constituents (vessel size and location) were examined, an increase in middle zone vessels linked most strongly to FVC decline (R 2 =0.57) and was independent of baseline disease severity (characterised by CT fibrosis extent, FVC, or DLco). An increase in PVV, specifically an increase in middle zone lung vessels, was the strongest CT determinant of FVC decline in IPF and was independent of baseline disease severity. (orig.)

  9. Serial automated quantitative CT analysis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Functional correlations and comparison with changes in visual CT scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Joseph; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan [Mayo Clinic Rochester, Division of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Kokosi, Maria; Wells, Athol U. [Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Egashira, Ryoko [Saga Daigaku, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan); Brun, Anne Laure [Whittington Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Nair, Arjun [Guys and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Walsh, Simon L.F. [Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Karwoski, Ronald [Mayo Clinic Rochester, Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2018-03-15

    To determine whether computer-based CT quantitation of change can improve on visual change quantification of parenchymal features in IPF. Sixty-six IPF patients with serial CT imaging (6-24 months apart) had CT features scored visually and with a computer software tool: ground glass opacity, reticulation and honeycombing (all three variables summed as interstitial lung disease extent [ILD]) and emphysema. Pulmonary vessel volume (PVV) was estimated by computer only. Relationships between changes in CT features and forced vital capacity (FVC) were examined using univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses. On univariate analysis, changes in computer variables demonstrated stronger linkages to FVC change than changes in visual scores (CALIPER ILD:R{sup 2}=0.53, p<0.0001; Visual ILD:R{sup 2}=0.16, p=0.001). PVV increase correlated most strongly with relative FVC change (R{sup 2}=0.57). When PVV constituents (vessel size and location) were examined, an increase in middle zone vessels linked most strongly to FVC decline (R{sup 2}=0.57) and was independent of baseline disease severity (characterised by CT fibrosis extent, FVC, or DLco). An increase in PVV, specifically an increase in middle zone lung vessels, was the strongest CT determinant of FVC decline in IPF and was independent of baseline disease severity. (orig.)

  10. A MRI-CT prostate registration using sparse representation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Jani, Ashesh B.; Rossi, Peter J.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a new MRI-CT prostate registration using patch-based deformation prediction framework to improve MRI-guided prostate radiotherapy by incorporating multiparametric MRI into planning CT images. Methods: The main contribution is to estimate the deformation between prostate MRI and CT images in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. We assume that two image patches should follow the same deformation if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. Specifically, there are two stages in our proposed framework, i.e., the training stage and the application stage. In the training stage, each prostate MR images are carefully registered to the corresponding CT images and all training MR and CT images are carefully registered to a selected CT template. Thus, we obtain the dense deformation field for each training MR and CT image. In the application stage, for registering a new subject MR image with the same subject CT image, we first select a small number of key points at the distinctive regions of this subject CT image. Then, for each key point in the subject CT image, we extract the image patch, centered at the underlying key point. Then, we adaptively construct the coupled dictionary for the underlying point where each atom in the dictionary consists of image patches and the respective deformations obtained from training pair-wise MRI-CT images. Next, the subject image patch can be sparsely represented by a linear combination of training image patches in the dictionary, where we apply the same sparse coefficients to the respective deformations in the dictionary to predict the deformation for the subject MR image patch. After we repeat the same procedure for each subject CT key point, we use B-splines to interpolate a dense deformation field, which is used as the initialization to allow the registration algorithm estimating the remaining small segment of deformations from MRI to CT image. Results: Our MRI-CT registration

  11. Serial CT scans of cerebral hypoxia due to prolonged status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiwai, Shigeo; Matsumura, Yasumasa; Tamaoka, Koichi; Fukuda, Teruo; Miyamoto, Takeshi (Kobe Central Municipal Hospital, Kobe (Japan))

    1983-04-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) scans of 5 infants with status epilepticus were reviewed. Four out of the 5 infants fortunately had CT scans before status epilepticus because of a convulsion. There was a diffuse and mild low density in the hemisphere, with small ventricles and tight sulci (brain swelling) at 1 to 2 days after ictus. Thereafter, a diffuse low density became apparent except for the cerebellum, the brain stem, the thalamus, and the basal ganglia. Two to 4 weeks after ictus, a localized, mottled low density was demonstrated on the cerebral mantle and atrophic changes became progressively clear. In 3 cases, no abnormal enhancement was elicited on contrast CT scans performed between 5 to 16 days after status epilepticus. We discussed the possible pathophysiological aspects of the brain damage due to ''prolonged status epilepticus.''

  12. Serial CT scans of cerebral hypoxia due to prolonged status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiwai, Shigeo; Matsumura, Yasumasa; Tamaoka, Koichi; Fukuda, Teruo; Miyamoto, Takeshi [Kobe Central Municipal Hospital, Kobe (Japan)

    1983-04-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) scans of 5 infants with status epilepticus were reviewed. Four out of the 5 infants fortunately had CT scans before status epilepticus because of a convulsion. There was a diffuse and mild low density in the hemisphere, with small ventricles and tight sulci (brain swelling) at 1 to 2 days after ictus. Thereafter, a diffuse low density became apparent except for the cerebellum, the brain stem, the thalamus, and the basal ganglia. Two to 4 weeks after ictus, a localized, mottled low density was demonstrated on the cerebral mantle and atrophic changes became progressively clear. In 3 cases, no abnormal enhancement was elicited on contrast CT scans performed between 5 to 16 days after status epilepticus. We discussed the possible pathophysiological aspects of the brain damage due to ''prolonged status epilepticus.''

  13. Serial CT scans of cerebral hypoxia due to prolonged status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiwai, Shigeo; Matsumura, Yasumasa; Tamaoka, Koichi; Fukuda, Teruo; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    1983-01-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) scans of 5 infants with status epilepticus were reviewed. Four out of the 5 infants fortunately had CT scans before status epilepticus because of a convulsion. There was a diffuse and mild low density in the hemisphere, with small ventricles and tight sulci (brain swelling) at 1 to 2 days after ictus. Thereafter, a diffuse low density became apparent except for the cerebellum, the brain stem, the thalamus, and the basal ganglia. Two to 4 weeks after ictus, a localized, mottled low density was demonstrated on the cerebral mantle and atrophic changes became progressively clear. In 3 cases, no abnormal enhancement was elicited on contrast CT scans performed between 5 to 16 days after status epilepticus. We discussed the possible pathophysiological aspects of the brain damage due to ''prolonged status epilepticus.'' (author)

  14. CT and MRI diagnosis of tubo-ovarian masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Minghui; Zhang Wanshi; Wang Dong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of CT and MRI in tubo-ovarian masses. Methods: CT scan was performed in 67 patients with tubo-ovarian masses confirmed by pathology. 19 of them underwent MRI. Results: (1) 20 primary malignant ovarian tumors showed cystic,solid or cystic-solid masses; papillary projections on cystic wall; pelvic organs and pelvic wall invasion. Chocolate cysts with malignant degeneration exhibited small nodules on thickened cystic wall on CT and MRI. T 1 WI was better for revealing the lesions. (2) Of 11 cases of metastasis to tubo-ovary, 4 showed peritoneal linear enhancement. (3) There were 9 cystadenomas and 2 adenofibromas, one of the cystadenomas contained fat, two adenofibromas were similar to uterus in density on CT while showing lower signal intensity on MRI (both T 1 WI and T 2 WI). (4) Three cases of thecoma exhibited cystic or solid masses, solid thecomas revealed granular enhancement. (5) Teratomas were most specific, one of them was associated with thecoma. (6) Tubo-ovarian abscesses and tuberculosis depicted cystic or cystic-solid masses. (7) Two cases of tubal pregnancy showed inhomogeneous soft tissue masses, the lower density areas in the centers were clot and organized tissues confirmed by pathology. Conclusion: (1) CT and MRI had higher sensitivity but lower specificity for tubo-ovarian masses, the diagnosis should be combined with clinical history and patients' age. (2) Tumors of two different types may coexist and sometimes fat may be present in tumors other than teratoma

  15. CT and MRI diagnosis of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shike; Zhang Yalin; Xu Derong; Zou Gaowei; Chen Dan; He Sujun; Zhou Lichao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT and MRI features of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and investigate the diagnostic value. Methods: 21 cases with traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage diagnosed by clinic, CT and MRI in our hospital were collected in this study Plain CT scan were immediately performed in 21 cases after injury, plain MR scan were performed in 1 to 3 days. 12 cases of them underwent diffusion weighted imagine (DWI). The CT and MRI findings were retrospectively summarized. Results: 8 cases were found with simple traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage. Complexity of basal ganglia hemorrhage occurred in 13 cases, 6 cases combined with subdural hemorrhage, 3 cases with epidural hematoma, 2 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, 6 cases with brain contusion and laceration in other locations, 4 cases with skull fracture. 26 lesions of basal ganglia hematoma were showed in 21 cases, 14 lesions of pallidum hemorrhage in 11 cases confirmed by MR could not be distinguished from calcification at the fast CT scan. 5 more lesions of brain contusion and laceration and 4 more lesions of brain white matter laceration were found by MR. Conclusion: CT in combination with MRI can diagnose traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and its complications early, comprehensively and accurately, which plays an important role in the clinical therapy selection and prognosis evaluation. (authors)

  16. Serial MRI findings of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Yoshitaka; Henmi, Tatsuhiko; Sakamoto, Rintaro; Hiasa, Masahiko [Health Insurance Naruto Hospital, Tokushima (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The prognosis of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine was studied by serial MRI findings. This study covered 80 vertebrae in 69 patients treated conservatively and followed-up for more than six months (23 males and 46 females, average age 70 yrs). Group A, characterized by poor diagnostic imaging, consisted of patients who had both severely collapsed vertebra which was progressive in the lateral roentgenogram and delayed improvement in MRI signal intensities. Group B, consisting of poor clinical prognosis, comprised patients with persistent back pain. The predictive factors for Group A were found to be T{sub 1}-low finding over the entire vertebra within one month after injury and fractures of Th{sub 12} or L{sub 1} vertebra. Areas of T{sub 1}-low and T{sub 2}-low intensity adjacent to the vertebral disc presented no improvement in signal intensity and often caused persistent back pain. (author)

  17. Serial MRI findings of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Yoshitaka; Henmi, Tatsuhiko; Sakamoto, Rintaro; Hiasa, Masahiko

    1998-01-01

    The prognosis of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine was studied by serial MRI findings. This study covered 80 vertebrae in 69 patients treated conservatively and followed-up for more than six months (23 males and 46 females, average age 70 yrs). Group A, characterized by poor diagnostic imaging, consisted of patients who had both severely collapsed vertebra which was progressive in the lateral roentgenogram and delayed improvement in MRI signal intensities. Group B, consisting of poor clinical prognosis, comprised patients with persistent back pain. The predictive factors for Group A were found to be T 1 -low finding over the entire vertebra within one month after injury and fractures of Th 12 or L 1 vertebra. Areas of T 1 -low and T 2 -low intensity adjacent to the vertebral disc presented no improvement in signal intensity and often caused persistent back pain. (author)

  18. Muscle atrophy and metal-on-metal hip implants: a serial MRI study of 74 hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Reshid; Khoo, Michael; Cook, Erica; Guppy, Andrew; Hua, Jia; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2015-06-01

    Muscle atrophy is seen in patients with metal-on-metal (MOM) hip implants, probably because of inflammatory destruction of the musculo-tendon junction. However, like pseudotumors, it is unclear when atrophy occurs and whether it progresses with time. Our objective was to determine whether muscle atrophy associated with MOM hip implants progresses with time. We retrospectively reviewed 74 hips in 56 patients (32 of them women) using serial MRI. Median age was 59 (23-83) years. The median time post-implantation was 83 (35-142) months, and the median interval between scans was 11 months. Hip muscles were scored using the Pfirrmann system. The mean scores for muscle atrophy were compared between the first and second MRI scans. Blood cobalt and chromium concentrations were determined. The median blood cobalt was 6.84 (0.24-90) ppb and median chromium level was 4.42 (0.20-45) ppb. The median Oxford hip score was 34 (5-48). The change in the gluteus minimus mean atrophy score between first and second MRI was 0.12 (p = 0.002). Mean change in the gluteus medius posterior portion (unaffected by surgical approach) was 0.08 (p = 0.01) and mean change in the inferior portion was 0.10 (p = 0.05). Mean pseudotumor grade increased by 0.18 (p = 0.02). Worsening muscle atrophy and worsening pseudotumor grade occur over a 1-year period in a substantial proportion of patients with MOM hip implants. Serial MRI helps to identify those patients who are at risk of developing worsening soft-tissue pathology. These patients should be considered for revision surgery before irreversible muscle destruction occurs.

  19. Proton MRI appearance of cystic fibrosis: Comparison to CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Schmaehl, Astrid; Fink, Christian; Plathow, Christian; Wiebel, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent inherited disorder leading to premature death in the Caucasian population. As life expectancy is limited by pulmonary complications, repeated imaging [chest X-ray, multislice high-resolution computed tomography (MS-HRCT)] is required in the follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung parenchyma is a promising new diagnostic tool. Its value for imaging lung changes caused by CF compared with CT is demonstrated. MRI performs well when compared with CT, which serves as the gold standard. Its lack in spatial resolution is obvious, but advantages in contrast and functional assessment compensate for this limitation. Thus, MRI is a reasonable alternative for imaging the CF lung and should be introduced as a radiation-free modality for follow-up studies in CF patients. For further evaluation of the impact of MRI, systematic studies comparing MRI and conventional imaging modalities are necessary. Furthermore, the value of the additional functional MRI (fMRI) information has to be studied, and a scoring system for the morphological and functional aspect of MRI has to be established. (orig.)

  20. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the orbit: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.T., E-mail: cjr.yangbentao@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Wang, Y.Z.; Wang, X.Y.; Wang, Z.C. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of orbital mesenchymal chondrosarcomas (MCSs). Materials and methods: Six patients with histology-confirmed MCSs of the orbit were retrospectively reviewed. All six patients underwent CT and MRI. Imaging studies were evaluated for the following: (a) tumour location, (b) configuration, size, and margin, (c) CT attenuation and MRI signal intensity, and (d) secondary manifestations. Additionally, the time-intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI were analysed in five patients. Results: Two MCSs arose in the right orbit and four in the left orbit. Five MCSs were located in the retrobulbar intraconal space and one in the extraconal space. All the lesions displayed a lobulate configuration and had a well-defined margin. The mean maximum diameter was 25.8 mm (range 15-36 mm). On unenhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to grey matter in six patients, with calcifications in five. Two patients showed inhomogeneous, moderate enhancement on enhanced CT. Six MCSs appeared isointense on T1-weighted imaging and heterogeneously isointense on T2-weighted imaging. The lesions showed significantly heterogeneous contrast enhancement. Five patients had DCE MRI and the TICs showed a rapidly enhancing and rapid washout pattern (type III). The following features were also detected: compression of the extra-ocular muscle (six patients, 100%); displacement of the optic nerve (five patients, 83.3%); and encasing globe (three patients, 50%). Conclusions: A well-defined, lobulate orbital mass with calcification on CT and, marked heterogeneous enhancement and type III TIC on MRI are highly suspicious of orbital MCSs.

  1. Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Sakurai, Kota; Nakano, Masahiro; Maeda, Sunaho; Kajita, Kimihiro R.T.; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 ± 6.17 cc (mean ± SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 ± 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported

  2. Hyperplastic callus formation in osteogenesis imperfecta: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieker, O.; Kreitner, K.F.; Karbowski, A.

    1998-01-01

    Hyperplastic callus formation is a noteworthy condition in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta because it often mimicks osteosarcoma on radiography. The findings of CT and MRI in hyperplastic callus formation have not been reported. In the presented case, MRI demonstrated contrast enhancement and edema of the surrounding soft tisssue, consistent with benign as well as malignant disease. Computed tomography showed a calcified rim of the lesion which may be a useful feature to rule out osteosarcoma in this condition. (orig.)

  3. Leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.T.; Wang, Z.C.; Xian, J.F.; Hao, D.P.; Chen, Q.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity. Materials and methods: Six patients with histology-proven leiomyomas in the sinonasal cavity were retrospectively reviewed. All six patients underwent CT and three patients also underwent MRI. The following imaging features were reviewed: size, margin, CT attenuation, MRI signal intensity, and lesion extent. In addition, the time-intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were analysed in two patients. Results: All leiomyomas had well-defined margins. The mean size was 36 mm (range 20-51 mm). On unenhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to cerebral grey matter in four (67%) and slightly hypodense in two (33%) patients. Leiomyomas appeared isointense On T1-weighted imaging (WI) and slightly hyperintense on T2WI in three patients. The lesions showed moderate contrast enhancement. Two patients underwent DCE MRI, and the TIC showed a rapidly enhancing and slow washout pattern. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were 1.66 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and 1.78 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for the two lesions, respectively. Conclusions: Well-defined, homogeneous, expansile masses without bony erosion are typical features of leiomyoma. Althrough rare, this entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign tumours in this region.

  4. Leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.T., E-mail: cjr.yangbentao@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Wang, Z.C.; Xian, J.F.; Hao, D.P.; Chen, Q.H. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China)

    2009-12-15

    Aim: To determine the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of leiomyoma of the sinonasal cavity. Materials and methods: Six patients with histology-proven leiomyomas in the sinonasal cavity were retrospectively reviewed. All six patients underwent CT and three patients also underwent MRI. The following imaging features were reviewed: size, margin, CT attenuation, MRI signal intensity, and lesion extent. In addition, the time-intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were analysed in two patients. Results: All leiomyomas had well-defined margins. The mean size was 36 mm (range 20-51 mm). On unenhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to cerebral grey matter in four (67%) and slightly hypodense in two (33%) patients. Leiomyomas appeared isointense On T1-weighted imaging (WI) and slightly hyperintense on T2WI in three patients. The lesions showed moderate contrast enhancement. Two patients underwent DCE MRI, and the TIC showed a rapidly enhancing and slow washout pattern. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were 1.66 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and 1.78 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for the two lesions, respectively. Conclusions: Well-defined, homogeneous, expansile masses without bony erosion are typical features of leiomyoma. Althrough rare, this entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign tumours in this region.

  5. Cranial CT and MRI in diseases with DNA repair defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Kendall, B.E.; Kingsley, D. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-04-01

    The CT and MRI appearances of 5 patients with Cockayne's syndrome, 5 with ataxia telangiectasia and 1 with Fanconi's anaemia are reported. These conditions, together with Bloom's syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum are regarded as disorders of DNA repair. Characteristic CT and MRI features of Cockayne's syndrome include generalised atrophy, calcification in basal ganglia and dentate nuclei and white matter low density. Neuroradiological findings in the other DNA repair disorders are nonspecific. (orig.).

  6. Membranous lipodystrophy: skeletal findings on CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nwawka, O.K.; Schneider, Robert; Mintz, Douglas N. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Bansal, Manjula [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Lane, Joseph [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Membranous lipodystrophy, also known as Nasu-Hakola disease, is a rare hereditary condition with manifestations in the nervous and skeletal systems. The radiographic appearance of skeletal lesions has been well described in the literature. However, CT and MRI findings of lesions in the bone have not been documented to date. This report describes the radiographic, CT, MRI, and histopathologic skeletal findings in a case of membranous lipodystrophy. With corroborative pathologic findings, a diagnosis of membranous lipodystrophy on imaging allows for appropriate clinical management of disease manifestations. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  8. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann, C. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)]|[University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kretschmann, H.J. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.) With 18 figs., 3 tabs., 40 refs.

  9. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, C.; Kretschmann, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.)

  10. Albendazole treatment of cerebral hydatid disease: evaluation of results with CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaitzoglou, I.; Drevelengas, A.; Petridis, A.; Palladas, P.

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of cerebral hydatid disease demonstrated by CT and MRI, treated with albendazole. Follow-up showed complete dissapearance of the cysts with residual focal calcification on CT and presumed gliosis on MRI. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of female pelvic malignancies regarding MRI, CT, and PET/CT. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alt, Celine D.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hallscheidt, Peter; Brocker, Kerstin A.; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof; Arnegger, Florian U.

    2011-01-01

    To compose diagnostic standard operating procedures for both clinical and imaging assessment for vulvar and vaginal cancer, for vaginal sarcoma, and for ovarian cancer. The literature was reviewed for diagnosing the above mentioned malignancies in the female pelvis. Special focus herein lies in tumor representation in MRI, followed by the evaluation of CT and PET/CT for this topic. MRI is a useful additional diagnostic complement but by no means replaces established methods of gynecologic diagnostics and ultrasound. In fact, MRI is only implemented in the guidelines for vulvar cancer. According to the current literature, CT is still the cross-sectional imaging modality of choice for evaluating ovarian cancer. PET/CT appears to have advantages for staging and follow-up in sarcomas and cancers of the ovaries. (orig.)

  12. Diagnosis of Chiari III malformation by second trimester fetal MRI with postnatal MRI and CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alice B.; Glenn, Orit A.; Gupta, Nalin; Otto, Carl

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of Chiari III malformation diagnosed by fetal MRI. Ultrasound (US) performed at a gestational age of 18 weeks demonstrated a posterior skull base cyst. Repeat US at 19 weeks demonstrated neural tissue in the cyst, consistent with an encephalocele. MR imaging at 23 weeks confirmed the presence of an occipital encephalocele, demonstrated additional bony defect in the upper cervical spine, and identified abnormal morphology and position of the brainstem consistent with the diagnosis of Chiari III. Postnatal MRI and CT confirmed the fetal MRI findings and demonstrate the utility of fetal MRI in the early evaluation of songraphically detected posterior fossa abnormalities. (orig.)

  13. Diagnosis of Chiari III malformation by second trimester fetal MRI with postnatal MRI and CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alice B.; Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gupta, Nalin [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurosurgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Otto, Carl [California Pacific Medical Center, Department of Perinatology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    We report a case of Chiari III malformation diagnosed by fetal MRI. Ultrasound (US) performed at a gestational age of 18 weeks demonstrated a posterior skull base cyst. Repeat US at 19 weeks demonstrated neural tissue in the cyst, consistent with an encephalocele. MR imaging at 23 weeks confirmed the presence of an occipital encephalocele, demonstrated additional bony defect in the upper cervical spine, and identified abnormal morphology and position of the brainstem consistent with the diagnosis of Chiari III. Postnatal MRI and CT confirmed the fetal MRI findings and demonstrate the utility of fetal MRI in the early evaluation of songraphically detected posterior fossa abnormalities. (orig.)

  14. Interobserver Delineation variation using CT versus combined CT + MRI in intensity- modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Vaerenbergh, K. van; Vakaet, L.; Bral, S.; Claus, F.; Neve, W.J. de; Meerleer, G.O. de

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to quantify interobserver variation of prostate and seminal vesicle delineations using CT only versus CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. Material and methods: the prostate and seminal vesicles of 13 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma were retrospectively delineated by three radiation oncologists on CT only and on CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. The volumes and margin positions were calculated and intermodality and interobserver variations were assessed for the clinical target volume (CTV), seminal vesicles, prostate and three prostatic subdivisions (apical, middle and basal third). Results: using CT + MRI as compared to CT alone, the mean CTV, prostate and seminal vesicle volumes significantly decreased by 6.54%, 5.21% and 10.47%, respectively. More importantly, their standard deviations significantly decreased by 63.06%, 62.65% and 44.83%, respectively. The highest level of variation was found at the prostatic apex, followed by the prostatic base and seminal vesicles. Conclusion: addition of MRI to CT in consensus reading with a radiologist results in a moderate decrease of the CTV, but an important decrease of the interobserver delineation variation, especially at the prostatic apex. (orig.)

  15. CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal sarcoma: Differentiation from squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Baek, Sora; Park, Min Woo; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Rho, Young Soo [Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) findings for the differentiation of sinonasal sarcoma from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT results in 20 patients with pathologically proven sinonasal sarcoma (n = 7) and SCC (n = 13). Imaging characteristics of tumors, such as the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, local tumor invasion, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were analyzed and compared between sarcoma and SCC. The SUVmax of sarcomas (7.4 ± 2.1) was significantly lower than the SUVmax of the SCCs (14.3 ± 4.5) (p = 0.0013). However, no significant difference in the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, and local tumor invasion was observed between sarcoma and SCC. Although CT and MR imaging features are nonspecific, FDG PET/CT is useful in distinguishing between sinonasal sarcoma and SCC based on the SUVmax value.

  16. CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal sarcoma: Differentiation from squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Baek, Sora; Park, Min Woo; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Rho, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) findings for the differentiation of sinonasal sarcoma from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT results in 20 patients with pathologically proven sinonasal sarcoma (n = 7) and SCC (n = 13). Imaging characteristics of tumors, such as the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, local tumor invasion, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were analyzed and compared between sarcoma and SCC. The SUVmax of sarcomas (7.4 ± 2.1) was significantly lower than the SUVmax of the SCCs (14.3 ± 4.5) (p = 0.0013). However, no significant difference in the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, and local tumor invasion was observed between sarcoma and SCC. Although CT and MR imaging features are nonspecific, FDG PET/CT is useful in distinguishing between sinonasal sarcoma and SCC based on the SUVmax value

  17. CT and MRI findings of Madelung syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changhua; Zeng Yinglang; Zou Donglu; Wu Guihua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the CT and MR findings of Madelung syndrome. Methods: Five cases of Madelung syndrome were collected in our hospital from February 2006 to June 2009, including 3 cases of type Ⅰ Madelung syndrome and 2 cases of type Ⅱ Madelung syndrome. The 5 cases were all examined by CT, meanwhile 1 case by CT enhancement scanning and 2 cases by MR. The clinical characteristics and imaging manifestations were analyzed. Results: CT and MR images in 3 patients of type Ⅰ Madelung syndrome displayed fat accumulation within the subcutaneous tissue of the upper trunk and deep layer tissue of neck. The diffuse masses were located around the neck, upper chest and shoulders, which were called 'horse collar' and 'buffalo hump'. The other 2 cases of type Ⅱ Madelung syndrome displayed fat thickening within the subcutaneous tissue of the proximal extremities, anterior chest wall, showing special appearance of 'vigorous sailor'. All the 5 patients showed fat deposit within the subcutaneous tissue of the anterior rectus abdominis, inguina and fat accumulation within the scrotum. CT showed proliferated fat at the subcutaneous tissue of the involved regions. The CT value of proliferated fat were between - 30 and -70 HU. The proliferated fat tissue all could be displayed on MR T 1 WI, T 2 WI and T 2 WI fat suppression sequence, with typical hypointensity on T 1 WI and hyperintensity on T 2 WI, hypointensity on fat-suppression sequence and fibrous septation presenting among fat tissue. Conclusion: Combination with the history of long-term alcohol abuse, the Madelung syndrome could be diagnosed by CT and MR, which had great value in the surgical planning for identifying the extent of disease. (authors)

  18. CT and MRI diagnosis of posterior fossa atypical ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Bolang; Zhang Ming; Luo Lin; Wang Shijie; Zhu Liping

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the CT and MRI features of posterior fossa atypical ependymoma. Methods: Sixteen cases of posterior fossa atypical ependymoma proved by surgery and pathology had CT and (or) MRI scanning. There were 11 males and 5 females. The age ranged from 17 to 46 (mean, 31.2). Twelve cases ranged from 20 to 40 years old. the main symptoms of all cases were dizziness, unsteady walking and vomiting. Results: The locations of all cases were cerebellum (12 cases), vermis (3 cases) and cerebellopontile angle (1 cases). Fifteen cases were solid with multiple cystic changes and 1 case in the cerebellopontile angle was cystic. The tumor was usually close to the surface of cerebellum with rather extensive connection with dura mater or tentorium. Calcifications were shown in 3 cases. The tumors revealed inhomogeneous density on CT scan and inhomogeneous intensity on MRI. Mild inhomogeneous enhancement was shown in most cases, while intense irregular enhancement in the others. Conclusions: The characteristic findings of the posterior fossa atypical ependymoma ependymoma were cerebellar intraparenchymatous multiple small cystic changes within solid tumor in most cases and inhomogeneous density and intensity on CT and MRI. The differential diagnosis is meningioma, metastasis and acoustic schwannoma

  19. Serial MRI and MRS studies with unusual findings in Rasmussen's encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerkdogan-Soezueer, D.; Oezek, M.M.; Pamir, M.N.; Sav, A.; Dincer, A.

    2000-01-01

    Rasmussen's syndrome is characterized by intractable seizures and progressive neuropsychiatric deterioration secondary to unilateral cortical inflammation and tissue destruction. Diagnosis of Rasmussen's syndrome in the early phase depends mainly on the clinical features. Neuroimaging and histopathologic examinations may not be specific during this period. We report a case of Rasmussen's syndrome followed by serial MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies over a 3- to 16-month period. A healthy 6-year-old boy presented with focal motor seizures. An MRI study demonstrated prominent enlargement and T2 hyperintensity of the left mesial temporal lobe and perisylvian region. This early finding evolved to volume loss and later progressive atrophy of the ipsilateral hemisphere when epilepsia partialis continua occurred. Being aware of those early MRI features in a patient with increasing frequency of focal motor seizures should suggest Rasmussen's syndrome. In addition, we found prominently increased myoinositol concentration in atrophic cortex which might reflect increased gliosis in the late period of the disease. (orig.)

  20. Serial MRI and MRS studies with unusual findings in Rasmussen's encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerkdogan-Soezueer, D. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Marmara University, Istanbul (Turkey); Oezek, M.M.; Pamir, M.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Marmara University, Istanbul (Turkey); Sav, A. [Department of Pathology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Marmara University, Istanbul (Turkey); Dincer, A. [Radyomar MR Center, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2000-06-01

    Rasmussen's syndrome is characterized by intractable seizures and progressive neuropsychiatric deterioration secondary to unilateral cortical inflammation and tissue destruction. Diagnosis of Rasmussen's syndrome in the early phase depends mainly on the clinical features. Neuroimaging and histopathologic examinations may not be specific during this period. We report a case of Rasmussen's syndrome followed by serial MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies over a 3- to 16-month period. A healthy 6-year-old boy presented with focal motor seizures. An MRI study demonstrated prominent enlargement and T2 hyperintensity of the left mesial temporal lobe and perisylvian region. This early finding evolved to volume loss and later progressive atrophy of the ipsilateral hemisphere when epilepsia partialis continua occurred. Being aware of those early MRI features in a patient with increasing frequency of focal motor seizures should suggest Rasmussen's syndrome. In addition, we found prominently increased myoinositol concentration in atrophic cortex which might reflect increased gliosis in the late period of the disease. (orig.)

  1. Rhinoscleroma with orbital extension: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hir, P.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Bigel, P.; Elbigourmie, T.M.; Jacquier, I.; Brunereau, L.; Tubiana, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the MRI features of a rhinoscleroma with orbital extension. This benign bacterial and granulomatous lesion of the paranasal sinuses gave homogeneous low intensity on T2-weighted images and enhanced with gadolinium. It could simulate a malignant sinonasal tumour or a fungal sinusitis; the diagnosis must be considered in patients from endemic areas. (orig.). With 3 figs

  2. CT and MRI techniques for imaging around orthopedic hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Thuy Duong; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Marc-Andre [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Sutter, Reto [Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland). Radiology

    2018-01-15

    Orthopedic hardware impairs image quality in cross-sectional imaging. With an increasing number of orthopedic implants in an aging population, the need to mitigate metal artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly relevant. This review provides an overview of the major artifacts in CT and MRI and state-of-the-art solutions to improve image quality. All steps of image acquisition from device selection, scan preparations and parameters to image post-processing influence the magnitude of metal artifacts. Technological advances like dual-energy CT with the possibility of virtual monochromatic imaging (VMI) and new materials offer opportunities to further reduce artifacts in CT and MRI. Dedicated metal artifact reduction sequences contain algorithms to reduce artifacts and improve imaging of surrounding tissue and are essential tools in orthopedic imaging to detect postoperative complications in early stages.

  3. CT and MRI of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerhouni, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    This book addresses a variety of topics in thoracic imaging, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in thoracic lymphoma; focal and high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of diffuse lung disease; imaging and disorders of the pleura, diaphragm, and mediastinum; and the increasingly important topic of the immunocompromised patient. Eight case studies close out the volume

  4. Heterotopic grey matter: Ct vs. MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosten, N.; Schoerner, W.

    1989-01-01

    Heterotopic grey matter is a rare cause of seizures. While lesions appear suspicious on CT because of equidensity to cortex, MR imaging can establish the diagnosis by demonstrating same signal intensity of heterotopia and grey matter on T 1 - and T 2 -weighted as well as inversion-recovery sequences. (orig.) [de

  5. Serial dynamic CT scan in patients with acute basal ganglia infarctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Node, Yoji; Nakazawa, Shozo; Tsuji, Yukihide.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic computed tomography (CT) was performed on 15 patients (37 to 93 years of age) with acute basal ganglia infarctions, and the perfusion patterns of the infarcted regions on CT were evaluated. The initial dynamic CT was performed within 12 hours after onset, while the serial studies of the dynamic CT were performed on the 3rd and 7th days. The left-over-right ratio in the peak value in the basal ganglia in 15 normal subjects was 1.01 ± 0.03 (mean ± SD), so there were no differences in the peak values of the bilateral basal ganglia. We also examined the left-over-right ratio in the peak value and in the rapid-washout ratio in the basal ganglia in the 15 normal subjects. There was no difference in the peak values of the bilateral basal ganglia. The mean rapid-washout ratio was 0.62 ± 0.11 (mean ± SD). The prognoses of these patients three months after onset were as follows: 8 showed a good recovery, 5 had a moderate disability, and 2 had a severe disability. The perfusions on admission were as follows. 10 were hypoperfusions, 3 were hypo + late perfusions, one was a normoperfusion, and one was a late perfusion. There was a tendency for the rapid-washout ratio decrease more in the hypo + late perfusion group than in the other groups. Twelve patients showed an iso-density, while 3 showed a low density, on admission. The ''low-density'' group showed a decrease in the A/N ratio of the peak value. We performed serial dynamic CT in 11 cases. The group with severe disabilities (2 cases) showed a hypo + late perfusion in the initial CT, one case kept a hypo + late perfusion, and another case changed to a hypoperfusion; also, there was a tendency for there to be a poor improvement in the A/N ratio of the peak value in these two ''severe-disability'' patients. (J.P.N.)

  6. Consistency of parametric registration in serial MRI studies of brain tumor progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Andreas; Buzug, Thorsten M.; Schnabel, Julia A.; Crum, William R.; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hawkes, David J.; Camara-Rey, Oscar; Palm, Christoph; Caseiras, Gisele Brasil; Jaeger, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    The consistency of parametric registration in multi-temporal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies was evaluated. Serial MRI scans of adult patients with a brain tumor (glioma) were aligned by parametric registration. The performance of low-order spatial alignment (6/9/12 degrees of freedom) of different 3D serial MR-weighted images is evaluated. A registration protocol for the alignment of all images to one reference coordinate system at baseline is presented. Registration results were evaluated for both, multimodal intra-timepoint and mono-modal multi-temporal registration. The latter case might present a challenge to automatic intensity-based registration algorithms due to ill-defined correspondences. The performance of our algorithm was assessed by testing the inverse registration consistency. Four different similarity measures were evaluated to assess consistency. Careful visual inspection suggests that images are well aligned, but their consistency may be imperfect. Sub-voxel inconsistency within the brain was found for allsimilarity measures used for parametric multi-temporal registration. T1-weighted images were most reliable for establishing spatial correspondence between different timepoints. The parametric registration algorithm is feasible for use in this application. The sub-voxel resolution mean displacement error of registration transformations demonstrates that the algorithm converges to an almost identical solution for forward and reverse registration. (orig.)

  7. Cochlear pathology: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Manuel; Bruno, Claudio; Martin, Eduardo; Canale, Nancy; De Luca, Laura; Spina, Juan C. h

    2002-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective analysis of 50 patients with perceptive hearing loss. The neuro physiological work-up (evoked potentials, audiometric tests and otoemissions) identified the cochlea as the site of origin of the hearing loss. The imaging studies (high resolution CT and MR, including 3D volumes) showed petrous bone trauma (n=5) infections (bacterial or viral origin) (n=12) otosclerosis (n=8), Paget disease (n=3), and labyrinthine neurinomas (n=2). The other 20 cases showed development-linked disorders (Mitchel's, Mondini, Scheibe, Alexander, and hypoplasia of the cochlear canal). Imaging with CT and MR can identify in detail the structural abnormality affecting the cochlea and occasionally the immediate peri-cochlear region (otic capsule); the affected portion of the cochlea may thus be determined. (author)

  8. Nonlinear registration of serial coronary CT angiography (CCTA) for assessment of changes in atherosclerotic plaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Jonghye; Dey, Damini; Cheng, Victor Y.; Hong, Byung-Woo; Ramesh, Amit; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh; Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S.; Germano, Guido; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a high-resolution three-dimensional imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary arteries in suspected or confirmed coronary artery disease (CAD). Coregistration of serial CCTA scans would allow precise superimposition of images obtained at two different points in time, which could aid in recognition of subtle changes and precise monitoring of coronary plaque progression or regression. To this end, the authors aimed at developing a fully automatic nonlinear volume coregistration for longitudinal CCTA scan pairs. Methods: The algorithm combines global displacement and local deformation using nonlinear volume coregistration with a volume-preserving constraint. Histogram matching of intensities between two serial scans is performed prior to nonlinear coregistration with dense nonparametric local deformation in which sum of squared differences is used as a similarity measure. The approximate segmentation of coronary arteries obtained from commercially available software provides initial anatomical landmarks for the coregistration algorithm that help localize and emphasize the structure of interest. To avoid possible bias caused by incorrect segmentation, the authors convolve the Gaussian kernel with the segmented binary coronary tree mask and define an extended weighted region of interest. A multiresolution approach is employed to represent coarse-to-fine details of both volumes and the energy function is optimized using a gradient descent method. The authors applied the algorithm in ten paired CCTA datasets (20 scans in total) obtained within 10.7±5.7 months from each other on a dual source CT scanner to monitor progression of CAD. Results: Serial CCTA coregistration was successful in 9/10 cases as visually confirmed. The global displacement and local deformation of target registration error obtained from four anatomical landmarks were 2.22±1.15 and 1.56±0.74 mm, respectively, and the inverse consistency error of local

  9. Masticator space lesions: MRI and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Kyun; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Song, Jae Uoo; Jo, In Cheol; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the MR and CT findings of the masticator space lesions in order to identify the differences among the malignant and benign tumors and infectious conditions. MR and CT findings in 46 cases with proven masticator space lesions were reviewed retrospectively. We analysed the involvement of masticator muscles, adjacent spaces, orbit and intracranium, homogeneity, necrosis, cystic changes, growth patterns, calcifications, enhancement patterns, MR signal intensity, and CT attenuation. Among the 29 cases of malignant tumors, seven cases were mandibular tumors including four chondrosarcomas, and 22 cases were extramandibular tumors. Malignant tumors of mandibular origin showed large masses with severe bone destruction and epicenter of mandible. Extramandibular malignant tumors showed the epicenter out of the mandible and less severe bone destruction than mandibular tumors. Among the nine benign tumors, four cases were ameloblastomas which showed the well-defined masses and the expansion of the mandible, and four cases were extramandibular tumors which showed well-marginated extramandibular masses with no bone destruction. Among the eight infectious conditions, five cases were mandibular osteomyelitis with or without abscess formations, and the other three cases were infections from adjacent soft tissue or limited to the soft tissue. By careful observations of growth patterns, involvement of the masticator and adjacent spaces, bone changes, and epicenter of the lesions, one can discriminate a mandibular lesion from an extramandibular lesion. With this approach, it is thought to be easier to suggest a diagnosis among a wide spectrum of masticator lesions

  10. CT and MRI of haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asari, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Katayama, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Itoh, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Tsuchida, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Ohmoto, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    Six patients with haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas were studied by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T with spin-echo pulse sequences. The nature of the tumour and the presence of a haematoma were confirmed by surgery and microscopic examination in all cases. Four neuromas arose from the acoustic nerves and two from the trigeminal. Four of the six patients suffered from sudden onset or rapid worsening of symptoms including headache, vertigo and/or hemifacial motor and sensory disturbances. CT in the acute stage revealed a hyperdense area or a fluid-fluid level (FFL). The hyperdense area disappeared on CT repeated in the chronic stage. On MRI in subacute and chronic stages the haemorrhage showed hyperintensity on both T1 and T2 weighting in five cases examined between 16 and 46 days after the onset, and isointensity on T1 weighting and an FFL on T2 weighting in one case examined 12 days after the onset of symptoms. A well-defined low intensity rim indicating prior haemorrhage was observed on T2-weighted images in three cases. MRI was more effectie than CT in detecting haemorrhage into the tumours and in staging it. (orig.)

  11. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, René F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI db ). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T max ) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI db . Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm). Patient

  12. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaart, René F., E-mail: r.f.verhaart@erasmusmc.nl; Paulides, Margarethus M. [Hyperthermia Unit, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC - Cancer Institute, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3008 AE (Netherlands); Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F. [Biomedical Imaging Group of Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50/60, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands); Verduijn, Gerda M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC - Cancer Institute, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3008 AE (Netherlands); Lugt, Aad van der [Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50/60, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  13. CT and MRI findings in patients with neuroinfections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekarska, A.; Zboinska, J.; Piekarski, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although in most patients a diagnosis of neuroinfection is not based on the results of brain imaging, there is a trend to perform MRI or CT on any patient in whom such infection is suspected. However, in selected cases, especially in patients with brain abscess or with herpetic encephalitis, brain CT and/or MRI are essential for diagnosis. Therefore we decided to analyze the results of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brains of patients with neuroinfections and to assess the usefulness of these imaging methods in clinical practice. Brain imaging (CT and/or MRI) was performed in 106 cases (62 purulent and 44 aseptic ingoencephalitis patients). The results were analyzed in subgroups of patients with different etiology of neuroinfection. In 40 of the 58 patients (68.9%) with purulent meningoencephalitis on whom computed tomography was made, the image revealed the pathology. In the remaining 18 cases (31.1%) the results were normal. In all 4 patients on whom only MRI was done, the results were abnormal (4/4, 100%). Among the 41 patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis on whom computed tomography was done, the pathology was found in 11 (26.8%). Of the 20 patients who underwent brain MRI, the pathology was depicted in 12 (12/20, 60.0%). In 4 of the 24 patients (16.7%) with aseptic meningoencephalitis on whom only computed tomography was done, the results were abnormal. In 2 of the 3 patients (66.7%) on whom MRI was done as the only radiological examination, the results were abnormal. The pathology was found on the radiograms of 11 of the 17 patients (64.7%) in whom both imaging methods were used. In the remaining 6 of these 17 cases (6/17, 35.3%) neither CT nor MRI revealed any abnormality. Altogether, of the 44 patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis in whom brain imaging was performed, pathology was depicted in 17 (38.7%). 1. The high percentage of abnormal CT and MR images in patients with meningoencephalitis warrants the use of brain

  14. Serial prenatal and postnatal MRI of dystroglycanopathy in a patient with familial B3GALNT2 mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Mai-Lan; Glenn, Orit A.; Sherr, Eliott H.; Strober, Jonathan B.

    2017-01-01

    The dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of conditions, with mutations in B3GALNT2 described in association with congenital muscular dystrophy. The serial prenatal MRI findings in this disorder have not been well described. We present sequential prenatal and postnatal MRI findings in a boy with compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2, as well as the MRI findings of his two siblings with similar mutations. These findings provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis and neurodevelopment of congenital muscular dystrophy. (orig.)

  15. Serial prenatal and postnatal MRI of dystroglycanopathy in a patient with familial B3GALNT2 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Mai-Lan [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sherr, Eliott H. [University of California, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); Strober, Jonathan B. [University of California, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of conditions, with mutations in B3GALNT2 described in association with congenital muscular dystrophy. The serial prenatal MRI findings in this disorder have not been well described. We present sequential prenatal and postnatal MRI findings in a boy with compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2, as well as the MRI findings of his two siblings with similar mutations. These findings provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis and neurodevelopment of congenital muscular dystrophy. (orig.)

  16. Hyperplastic callus formation in osteogenesis imperfecta: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, O.; Kreitner, K.F. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany); Karbowski, A. [Orthopaedische Abtl., Krankenhaus der Augustinerinnen, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Hyperplastic callus formation is a noteworthy condition in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta because it often mimicks osteosarcoma on radiography. The findings of CT and MRI in hyperplastic callus formation have not been reported. In the presented case, MRI demonstrated contrast enhancement and edema of the surrounding soft tisssue, consistent with benign as well as malignant disease. Computed tomography showed a calcified rim of the lesion which may be a useful feature to rule out osteosarcoma in this condition. (orig.) With 2 figs., 18 refs.

  17. CT and MRI diagnosis of acute hepatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rengui; Fumio Yamamoto; Pu Yonglin; Gao Yujie.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate and compare MR and CT in diagnosis of acute traumatic hepatic laceration, ten patients with acute hepatic rupture underwent CT scan and/or MRI in the first 24 hours after injury. The injury was graded as mild ( 50% of one lobe). In the first 24 hours after injury, 33.3% (3/9) and 28.6%(2/7) of the hepatic injury demonstrated isodensity and isointensity on plain CT scan and T 1 -weighted images. All the lesions (100%) were clearly identified as marked hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted images. On T 2 WI, T 1 WI and non-contrast CT, 100%, 57.1% and 55.6% of the acute hepatic injuries could be graded respectively. Delayed complications occurred in four patients with deep hepatic injury about 1 to 3 weeks after injury. T 2 -weighted MR imaging is more sensitive and useful for detection of the type and severity of acute hepatic rupture. Follow-up MRI or CT within the first few weeks after injury is needed in patients with deep hepatic injury for detection of delayed complications

  18. Computed tomography of neurodegenerative disease in childhood. Serial CT findings and their diagnostic values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Kenkichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Hojo, Hiroatsu

    1984-12-01

    Serial computed tomographic scans were performed on seven children with neurodegenerative disorders. In two cases of white-matter diseases (Krabbe's disease and metachromatic leukodystrophy), diffuse, low-density lesions of white matter were visible in the early stage of the diseases. In one case of adrenoleukodystrophy, regional low-density lesions of the white matter around the posterior horns and peculiar high-density strip lesions were visible in the early stage. In two cases of storage-type gray-matter diseases (Tay-Sachs' and infantile Gaucher's disease), there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but diffuse cortical atrophies in the late stage. In one case of Leigh's disease, there were small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and multiple low-density lesions of the gray matter in the early stage. In one case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and diffuse cerebral atrophies in the late stage. Diagnostic values were recognized dominantly in two cases of adrenoleukodystrophy and Leigh's disease. In the other cases, however, serial CT scans were useful in the diagnostic process. (author).

  19. Incidental pancreatic cysts: natural history and diagnostic accuracy of a limited serial pancreatic cyst MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Escal, Laure; Guiu, Boris [Saint Eloi University Hospital, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Reinhold, Caroline; Chong, Jaron [McGill University, Department of Abdominal Imaging, MUHC, Montreal (Canada); Mercier, Gregoire; Molinari, Nicolas [CHU Montpellier, Department of Biostatistics, Montpellier (France); Fabre, Jean Michel [CHU Montpellier, Department of Surgery, Saint Eloi University Hospital, Montpellier (France)

    2014-05-15

    To examine the natural history of incidentally detected pancreatic cysts and whether a simplified MRI protocol without gadolinium is adequate for lesion follow-up. Over a 10-year period, 301-patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts underwent follow-up (45 months ± 30). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol included axial, coronal T2-weighted images, MR cholangiopancreatographic and fat suppressed T1-weighted sequences before and after gadolinium. Three radiologists independently reviewed the initial MRI, the follow-up studies using first only unenhanced images, then secondly gadolinium-enhanced-sequences. Lesion changes during follow-up were recorded and the added value of gadolinium-enhanced sequences was determined by classifying the lesions into risk categories. Three hundred and one patients (1,174 cysts) constituted the study population. Only 35/301 patients (12 %) showed significant lesion change on follow-up. Using multivariate analysis the only independent factor of lesion growth (OR = 2.4; 95 % CI, 1.7-3.3; P < 0.001) and mural nodule development (OR = 1.9; 95 % CI, 1.1-3.4, P = 0.03) during follow-up was initial lesion size. No patient with a lesion initial size less than 2 cm developed cancer during follow-up. Intra-observer agreement with and without gadolinium enhancement ranged from 0.86 to 0.97. After consensus review of discordant cases, gadolinium-enhanced sequences demonstrated no added value. Most incidental pancreatic cystic lesions did not demonstrate change during follow-up. The addition of gadolinium-enhanced-sequences had no added-value for risk assignment on serial follow-up. (orig.)

  20. MRI and CT contrast media extravasation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmatzadeh Behzadi, Ashkan; Farooq, Zerwa; Newhouse, Jeffery H; Prince, Martin R

    2018-03-01

    This systematic review combines data from multiple papers on contrast media extravasation to identify factors contributing to increased extravasation risk. Data were extracted from 17 papers reporting 2191 extravasations in 1,104,872 patients (0.2%) undergoing computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Extravasation rates were 0.045% for gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) and nearly 6-fold higher, 0.26% for iodinated contrast agents. Factors associated with increased contrast media extravasations included: older age, female gender, using an existing intravenous (IV) instead of placing a new IV in radiology, in-patient status, use of automated power injection, high injection rates, catheter location, and failing to warm up the more viscous contrast media to body temperature. Contrast media extravasation is infrequent but nearly 6 times less frequent with GBCA for MRI compared with iodinated contrast used in CT.

  1. MRI and CT findings of adult Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Tetsuhito; Koshino, Yoshifumi; Omori, Masao

    1993-01-01

    Cranial CT and MRI were performed in 29 adult patients with Down's syndrome aged from 20 to 46 years to examine early aging. Morphological changes with aging, such as brain atrophy and ventricular enlargement, were generally sparse; however, calculi of the basal nucleus and lesions of deep-seated white matter were significantly increased with aging. The pallidum and putamen were shown as low intensity signals on T2-weighted images in many of patients in their fourties, suggesting their involvement in the occurrence of dyskinesia and parkinsonism symptoms that are likely to occur in the elderly. Localized changes, as shown on CT and MRI, may reflect abnormally early occurrence of aging, which precedes morphological changes such as brain atrophy. (N.K.)

  2. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: a comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, René F; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M; van der Lugt, Aad; van Walsum, Theo; Veenland, Jifke F; Paulides, Margarethus M

    2014-12-01

    In current clinical practice, head and neck (H&N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors' study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H&N HTP. CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H&N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRIdb). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H&N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (Tmax) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRIdb. In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm). Patient models based on CT (Tmax: 38.0 °C) and CT and MRI

  3. Learning in clinical practice: findings from CT, MRI and PACS

    OpenAIRE

    Sinozic, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores learning in clinical practice in the cases of CT, MRI and PACS in\\ud UK hospitals. It asks the questions of how and why certain evolutionary features of\\ud technology condition learning and change in medical contexts.\\ud Using an evolutionary perspective of cognitive and social aspects of technological\\ud change, this thesis explores the relationships between technology and organisational\\ud learning processes of intuition, interpretation, integration and institutionalisa...

  4. CT and MRI findings of 4th ventricular tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taek Geun; Ro, Hee Jeong; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Han Jin; Chung, Myung Hee; Choi, Kyu Ho; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to evaluate characteristic features of 4th ventricular tumors in CT and MRI. Pathologically proved 9 patients with 4th ventricular tumor were examined by CT and/or MRI. 4th ventricular tumors were ependymoma(4 cases), medulloblastoma(2 case), choroid plexus papilloma(2 cases), and oligodendroglioma(1 cases). Include in our study were only those mass lesions that were located at surgery predominantly within 4th ventricle with or without ventricular expansion. The origin of 4th ventricular tumor was the roof (ependymoma 3 cases, medulloblastoma 2 cases), the floor (ependymoma 1 cases), and the undetermined(remaining 3 case). On MRI, all tumors were hypointense except ependymoma (3 cases) showing isointensity on T1WI. All tumors were hypointense on PDWI and T2WI. On Gd-DTPA enhanced T1WI, strong enhancement was seen in all but ependymoma(1 cases) which showed mild enhancement. On CT, as compared with MR images, various density on precontrast and postcontrast images were seen. Calcification was seen in choroid plexus papilloma(1 caes) and oligodendroglioma(1 cases). Hydrocephalus is seen in all cases except ependymoma(2 cases) and oligodendroglioma(1 case). Hemorrhage within tumor was present only in ependymoma(2 cases). Cystic change or necrosis of tumor was seen in ependymoma(3 cases), choroid plexus papilloma(1 case), and oligodendroglioma(1 case). Peritumoral edema was seen in medulloblastoma(1 case). Extension through the foramen Luschka and the Megendie was seen in ependymoma (2 cases), choroid plexus(2 cases), and medulloblastoma (1 case). Seeing along the CSF pathway was seen only in ependymoma(2 case). The results od our study may suggest that specific diagnosis of 4th ventricular tumor can be suggested preoperatively by analysing the origin in 4th ventricle, difference of CT density or MRI signal intensity, presence of extension or seeding through cerebrospinal fluid of the lesion

  5. Serial CT Findings of Resolving Extramedullary Hematopoiesis as Unilateral Posterior Mediastinal Mass after Splenectomy in Hereditary Spherocytosis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Mi Yeon; Lee, Ju Won; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2012-01-01

    Intrathoracic extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a rare condition of the hereditary spherocytosis. EMH usually regresses or disappears after treatment; such as splenectomy in the case of spherocytosis. We report a case of hereditary spherocytosis. It is presented with an unilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal mass. After splenectomy, it revealed shrinkage and fatty replacement on serial CT scans.

  6. Serial CT Findings of Resolving Extramedullary Hematopoiesis as Unilateral Posterior Mediastinal Mass after Splenectomy in Hereditary Spherocytosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Mi Yeon; Lee, Ju Won; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Intrathoracic extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a rare condition of the hereditary spherocytosis. EMH usually regresses or disappears after treatment; such as splenectomy in the case of spherocytosis. We report a case of hereditary spherocytosis. It is presented with an unilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal mass. After splenectomy, it revealed shrinkage and fatty replacement on serial CT scans.

  7. Coronary imaging techniques with emphasis on CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Latrabe, Valerie; Corneloup, Olivier; Cochet, Hubert; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery imaging in children is challenging, with high demands both on temporal and spatial resolution due to high heart rates and smaller anatomy. Although invasive conventional coronary angiography remains the benchmark technique, over the past 10 years, CT and MRI have emerged in the field of coronary imaging. The choice of hardware is important. For CT, the minimum requirement is a 64-channel scanner. The temporal resolution of the scanner is most important for optimising image quality and minimising radiation dose. Manufacturers have developed several modes of electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering to facilitate dose reduction. Recent technical advances have opened new possibilities in MRI coronary imaging. As a non-ionising radiation technique, MRI is of great interest in paediatric imaging. It is currently recommended in centres with appropriate expertise for the screening of patients with suspected congenital coronary anomalies. However, MRI is still not feasible in infants. This review describes and discusses the technical requirements and the pros and cons of all three techniques. (orig.)

  8. Uncommon adrenal masses: CT and MRI features with histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yingkun; Yang Zhigang; Li Yuan; Deng Yuping; Ma Ensen; Min Pengqiu; Zhang Xiaochun

    2007-01-01

    Adrenal glands are common sites of diseases. With dramatically increased use of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, more and more uncommon adrenal masses have been detected incidentally at abdominal examinations performed for other purposes. In this article, uncommon adrenal masses are classified as cystic masses (endothelial cysts, epithelial cysts, parasitic cysts, and pseudocysts), solid masses (ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma, extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP), neurilemmoma, and lymphoma), fat-containing masses (myelolipoma, teratoma), and infectious masses (tuberculoma), and the imaging features of these uncommon masses are demonstrated. Although most of these lesions do not have specific imaging features, some fat-containing masses and cystic lesions present with characteristic appearances, such as myelolipoma, teratoma, and hydatid. Combination with histopathologic characteristic of these uncommon masses of adrenal gland, radiological features of these lesions on CT and MR imaging can be accurately understood with more confidences. Moreover, CT and MRI are highly accurate in localization of uncommon adrenal masses, and useful to guide surgical treatments

  9. CT and MRI appearances of methotrexate leucoencephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilks, M.J.; Tie, M.L.K.; Pozza, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    Methotrexate is a well recognised cause of diffuse symmetrical leucoencephalopathy. The widespread use of the drug in chemotherapeutic regimes necessitates awareness of this complication. A case report and a brief literature review is presented. A 20-year-old single woman presented to the Emergency Department with a 6-week history of general malaise, lower back pain and a petechial rash. From investigations including blood picture and bone marrow trephine, the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was made. Three cycles of induction chemotherapy were administered consisting of intravenous cytarabine and hydrocortisone and intrathecal methotrexate. Shortly after the third cycle of induction chemotherapy (6 weeks following diagnosis, 2 days following the last dose of intrathecal methotrexate) she presented with an acute neurological episode consisting of muteness and somnolence. Physical examination showed generalised flaccidity to all muscle groups and generalised loss of reflexes. There were no consistent cranial neuropathies and the patient was not neutropenic. Computed tomography of the brain showed extensive symmetric white matter hypodensity extending throughout the corona radiata and deep white matter tracts especially the external capsules. There was no abnormal enhancement with non-ionic contrast administration or evidence of grey matter involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging was subsequently performed, the fluid attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) and T2-weighted image (T2WI) demonstrated marked white matter hyperintensity; the involvement was more extensive than demonstrated on the CT with additional involvement of the subcortical and cerebellar white matter, the basal ganglia and cortex of the mesial temporal and inferior frontal lobes. Gadolinium was not administered. A follow up study after 4 weeks of steroid and folinic acid therapy showed complete resolution of the white matter hyperintensity on the T2WI and FLAIR sequences

  10. Disease progression in usual interstitial pneumonia compared with desquamative interstitial pneumonia. Assessment with serial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, T.E.; Primack, S.L.; Kang, E.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To determine the outcome of areas of ground-glass attenuation and assess disease progression on serial high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans of patients with biopsy specimen-proved usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP). Materials and methods. Twelve patients with biopsy specimen-proved UIP and 11 patients with biopsy specimen-proved DIP who had initial and follow-up HRCT scans (median interval, 10 months) were reviewed. Eleven patients with UIP and 11 with DIP received treatment between the initial and follow-up CT scans. The scans were evaluated for the presence and extent of ground-glass attenuation, irregular linear opacities and honeycombing, and overall extent of parenchymal involvement. Results. On initial CT scans, all 12 patients with UIP had areas of ground-glass attenuation (mean±SD extent, 30±16%) and irregular lines (mean±SD extent, 17±7%) and 10 patients had honeycombing (mean±SD extent, 10±6%). All 11 patients with DIP had areas of ground-glass attenuation on initial HRCT scans (mean±SD extent, 51±26%), 5 patients had irregular linear opacities (mean±SD extent, 5±5%), and 1 patient had honeycombing. Nine of the 12 patients with UIP showed increase in the extent of ground-glass attenuation (n=6) or progression to irregular lines (n=2) or honeycombing (n=4) on follow-up as compared with only 2 patients with DIP who showed progression to irregular lines (n=1) or honeycombing (n=1) (p 2 test). Conclusion. In patients with UIP, areas of ground-glass attenuation usually increase in extent or progress to fibrosis despite treatment. Areas of ground-glass attenuation in most patients with DIP remain stable or improve with treatment. (authors)

  11. Comparison of air space measurement imaged by CT, small-animal CT, and hyperpolarized Xe MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Aniseh; White, Steven; Santyr, Giles; Cunningham, Ian

    2005-04-01

    Lung disease is the third leading cause of death in the western world. Lung air volume measurements are thought to be early indicators of lung disease and markers in pharmaceutical research. The purpose of this work is to develop a lung phantom for assessing and comparing the quantitative accuracy of hyperpolarized xenon 129 magnetic resonance imaging (HP 129Xe MRI), conventional computed tomography (HRCT), and highresolution small-animal CTCT) in measuring lung gas volumes. We developed a lung phantom consisting of solid cellulose acetate spheres (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm diameter) uniformly packed in circulated air or HP 129Xe gas. Air volume is estimated based on simple thresholding algorithm. Truth is calculated from the sphere diameters and validated using μCT. While this phantom is not anthropomorphic, it enables us to directly measure air space volume and compare these imaging methods as a function of sphere diameter for the first time. HP 129Xe MRI requires partial volume analysis to distinguish regions with and without 129Xe gas and results are within %5 of truth but settling of the heavy 129Xe gas complicates this analysis. Conventional CT demonstrated partial-volume artifacts for the 1mm spheres. μCT gives the most accurate air-volume results. Conventional CT and HP 129Xe MRI give similar results although non-uniform densities of 129Xe require more sophisticated algorithms than simple thresholding. The threshold required to give the true air volume in both HRCT and μCT, varies with sphere diameters calling into question the validity of thresholding method.

  12. Characteristic CT and MRI findings of intracranial chondroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Fuhong; Qiu, Shijun; Liu, Zhenyin; Lv, Xiaofei; Feng, Xia; Xiong, Wei; An, Jie; Chen, Jing; Yang, Weicong; Wen, Chuhong [Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: qiushijun006@163.com; Jiang, Jianwei; Chang, Jun [Department of Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China)

    2012-12-15

    Background. Intracranial chondromas are rare benign tumors. To date, few data are available on their neuroradiological features. Purpose. To describe a series of patients with intracranial chondroma and to analyze and discuss the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that may distinguish chondromas from other intracranial neoplasms. Material and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and medical imaging data of six patients who had pathologically confirmed intracranial chondromas in our two institutions between July 2006 and September 2011. Both CT and MRI scanning were performed in all six cases. Results. Five tumors were located at the skull base and one originated from the falx. CT images revealed well-demarcated, irregular lobulated and variable density masses with obvious calci?cation (6/6), no or slight enhancement, without peritumoral edema, and frequently accompanied by erosion and destruction of surrounding bone (5/6). Tumor parenchyma appeared heterogeneously hypointense on T1WI, and hyperintense or mixed hyperintense and hypointense on T2WI, while the calcification appeared hypointense on T1WI and T2WI in five cases, demonstrating significant inhomogeneous enhancement on postcontrast MRI, which revealed the typical 'punica granatum seeds' sign. Only one case showed homogeneous low signal intensity on T1WI and high signal intensity on T2WI, and relatively uniform obvious enhancement on postcontrast scans. Conclusion. These characteristic CT and MR findings, combined with the location of the lesions and the history of a long duration of clinical symptoms, may prove helpful in differentiating intracranial chondromas from other more common tumors.

  13. Characteristic CT and MRI findings of intracranial chondroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Fuhong; Qiu, Shijun; Liu, Zhenyin; Lv, Xiaofei; Feng, Xia; Xiong, Wei; An, Jie; Chen, Jing; Yang, Weicong; Wen, Chuhong; Jiang, Jianwei; Chang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background. Intracranial chondromas are rare benign tumors. To date, few data are available on their neuroradiological features. Purpose. To describe a series of patients with intracranial chondroma and to analyze and discuss the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that may distinguish chondromas from other intracranial neoplasms. Material and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and medical imaging data of six patients who had pathologically confirmed intracranial chondromas in our two institutions between July 2006 and September 2011. Both CT and MRI scanning were performed in all six cases. Results. Five tumors were located at the skull base and one originated from the falx. CT images revealed well-demarcated, irregular lobulated and variable density masses with obvious calci?cation (6/6), no or slight enhancement, without peritumoral edema, and frequently accompanied by erosion and destruction of surrounding bone (5/6). Tumor parenchyma appeared heterogeneously hypointense on T1WI, and hyperintense or mixed hyperintense and hypointense on T2WI, while the calcification appeared hypointense on T1WI and T2WI in five cases, demonstrating significant inhomogeneous enhancement on postcontrast MRI, which revealed the typical 'punica granatum seeds' sign. Only one case showed homogeneous low signal intensity on T1WI and high signal intensity on T2WI, and relatively uniform obvious enhancement on postcontrast scans. Conclusion. These characteristic CT and MR findings, combined with the location of the lesions and the history of a long duration of clinical symptoms, may prove helpful in differentiating intracranial chondromas from other more common tumors

  14. Serial micro-CT assessment of the therapeutic effects of rosiglitazone in a bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Jung; Jin, Gong Yong; Bok, Se Mi; Han, Young Min; Lee, Young Sun; Jung, Myung Ja; Kwon, Keun Sang [Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Institute for Medical Sciences, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the therapeutic effects of rosiglitazone with serial micro-CT findings before and after rosiglitazone administration in a lung fibrosis mouse model induced with bleomycin. We instilled the bleomycin solution directly into the trachea in twenty mice (female, C57BL/6 mice). After the instillation with bleomycin, mice were closely observed for 3 weeks and then all mice were scanned using micro-CT without sacrifice. At 3 weeks, the mice were treated with rosiglitazone on days 21 to 27 if they had abnormal CT findings (n = 9, 45%). For the mice treated with rosiglitazone, we performed micro-CT with mouse sacrifice 2 weeks after the rosiglitazone treatment completion. We assessed the abnormal CT findings (ground glass attenuation, consolidation, bronchiectasis, reticular opacity, and honeycombing) using a five-point scale at 3 and 6 weeks using Wilcoxon-signed ranked test. The micro-CT findings were correlated with the histopathologic results. One out of nine (11.1%) mice improved completely. In terms of consolidation, all mice (100%) showed marked decrease from 3.1 ± 1.4 at 3 weeks to 0.9 ± 0.9 at 6 weeks (p = 0.006). At 6 weeks, mild bronchiectasis (n = 6, 66.7%), mild reticular opacity (n 7, 77.8%) and mild honeycomb patterns (n = 3, 33.3%) appeared. A serial micro-CT enables the evaluation of drug effects in a lung fibrosis mouse model.

  15. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Radiology, Rome (Italy); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Spronk, Sandra [Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Fraioli, Francesco [University College London (UCL), Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Quattrucci, Serena [University of Rome Sapienza, Pediatrics, Rome (Italy); Assael, M.B. [Azienda Ospedaliera di Verona, Verona CF Center, Verona (Italy); Pomerri, Fabio [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  16. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo; Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni; Spronk, Sandra; Ros, Mirco; Fraioli, Francesco; Quattrucci, Serena; Assael, M.B.; Pomerri, Fabio; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  17. Utility of MRI for cervical spine clearance in blunt trauma patients after a negative CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ajay; Durand, David; Wu, Xiao; Geng, Bertie; Abbed, Khalid; Nunez, Diego B; Sanelli, Pina

    2018-07-01

    To determine the utility of cervical spine MRI in blunt trauma evaluation for instability after a negative non-contrast cervical spine CT. A review of medical records identified all adult patients with blunt trauma who underwent CT cervical spine followed by MRI within 48 h over a 33-month period. Utility of subsequent MRI was assessed in terms of findings and impact on outcome. A total of 1,271 patients with blunt cervical spine trauma underwent both cervical spine CT and MRI within 48 h; 1,080 patients were included in the study analysis. Sixty-six percent of patients with a CT cervical spine study had a negative study. Of these, the subsequent cervical spine MRI had positive findings in 20.9%; 92.6% had stable ligamentous or osseous injuries, 6.0% had unstable injuries and 1.3% had potentially unstable injuries. For unstable injury, the NPV for CT was 98.5%. In all 712 patients undergoing both CT and MRI, only 1.5% had unstable injuries, and only 0.42% had significant change in management. MRI for blunt trauma evaluation remains not infrequent at our institution. MRI may have utility only in certain patients with persistent abnormal neurological examination. • MRI has limited utility after negative cervical CT in blunt trauma. • MRI is frequently positive for non-specific soft-tissue injury. • Unstable injury missed on CT is infrequent.

  18. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Michiaki; Kameoka, Shingo; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Izumi, Kiminari; Miyazaki, Kaname; Hamano, Kyoichi; Kouno, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    To clarify the usefulness and limitations of CT and MRI in preoperative assessment of the wall invasion of rectal cancer, we compared the results of CT and MRI with the histopathological findings, classifying tumors by the region and site in 34 patients with rectal cancer. Subjects were patients preoperatively examined by MRI and CT. Overall, the percent of cases with the extent of invasion accurately assessed by MRI was 88.2%, and that by CT was 64.7%. In all instances of wrong assessment, the extent of invasion was overestimated. The accurate assessment rate was significantly higher for MRI than for CT. After classification by the region, the accurate assessment rate at Rs was low as 50% for both MRI and CT because slices were not perpendicular to the tumor. The accurate assessment rate was 100% for MRI and 82% for CT at Ra, and respectively 94% and 59% at Rb. The majority of tumors at Ra or Rb centering on the lateral wall of the rectum were accurately assessed either by MRI or CT. With tumors at Ra or Rb (particularly Rb) centering on the anterior or posterior wall, CT frequently failed to identify the extent of invasion accurately, so that MRI seemed more suitable for these tumors. (author)

  19. CT and MRI imaging of the brain in MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Wojciech; Zarzycki, Artur; Krzyształowski, Adam; Walecka, Anna

    2013-07-01

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes) is a rare, multisystem disorder which belongs to a group of mitochondrial metabolic diseases. As other diseases in this group, it is inherited in the maternal line. In this report, we discussed a case of a 10-year-old girl with clinical and radiological picture of MELAS syndrome. We would like to describe characteristic radiological features of MELAS syndrome in CT, MRI and MR spectroscopy of the brain and differential diagnosis. The rarity of this disorder and the complexity of its clinical presentation make MELAS patients among the most difficult to diagnose. Brain imaging studies require a wide differential diagnosis, primarily to distinguish between MELAS and ischemic stroke. Particularly helpful are the MRI and MR spectroscopy techniques.

  20. CT and MRI imaging of the brain in MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauli, Wojciech; Zarzycki, Artur; Krzyształowski, Adam; Walecka, Anna

    2013-01-01

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes) is a rare, multisystem disorder which belongs to a group of mitochondrial metabolic diseases. As other diseases in this group, it is inherited in the maternal line. In this report, we discussed a case of a 10-year-old girl with clinical and radiological picture of MELAS syndrome. We would like to describe characteristic radiological features of MELAS syndrome in CT, MRI and MR spectroscopy of the brain and differential diagnosis. The rarity of this disorder and the complexity of its clinical presentation make MELAS patients among the most difficult to diagnose. Brain imaging studies require a wide differential diagnosis, primarily to distinguish between MELAS and ischemic stroke. Particularly helpful are the MRI and MR spectroscopy techniques

  1. Iatrogenic intraspinal epidermoid tumor: Myelo-CT and MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visciani, A.; Balestrini, M.R.; Solero, C.L.; Savoiardo, M.

    1989-07-01

    An 11-year-old boy, treated for acute lymphatic leukemia at the age of 2 with intrathecal injections of Methotrexate, presented with a two year history of pain and signs of lumbo-sacral lesion. MRI, myelography and myelo-CT demonstrated an intradural L4-L5 epidermoid tumor which was removed. Iatrogenic implantation of epithelial cells at the age of two with lumbar punctures is most likely. Decline in incidence of lumbar iatrogenic epidermoid cysts, now an exceedingly rare event, is probably related to improved needles for lumbar punctures. (orig.).

  2. Budd-Chiari syndrome: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Kai; Li Lingsun

    2008-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon but often fatal disorder resulting from obstruction of hepatic venous outflow tract at the level of the hepatic veins, the inferior vena cava. The CT and MRI characteristics of Budd-Chiari syndrome are reviewed in this article especially for displaying the exact site and extent of the obstruction. In addition to this direct sign, the indirect findings of venous obstruction such as the presence of intra-and extrahepatic collateral veins, caudate lobe enlargement, inhomogeneous liver enhancement, and regenerative nodules can also be demonstrated. Awareness of these findings is important for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. (authors)

  3. Iatrogenic intraspinal epidermoid tumor: Myelo-CT and MRI diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visciani, A.; Balestrini, M.R.; Solero, C.L.; Savoiardo, M.

    1989-01-01

    An 11-year-old boy, treated for acute lymphatic leukemia at the age of 2 with intrathecal injections of Methotrexate, presented with a two year history of pain and signs of lumbo-sacral lesion. MRI, myelography and myelo-CT demonstrated an intradural L4-L5 epidermoid tumor which was removed. Iatrogenic implantation of epithelial cells at the age of two with lumbar punctures is most likely. Decline in incidence of lumbar iatrogenic epidermoid cysts, now an exceedingly rare event, is probably related to improved needles for lumbar punctures. (orig.)

  4. Cystic lymphangioma of the spleen: US-CT-MRI correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezzi, M.; Spinelli, A.; Pierleoni, M.; Andreoli, G.M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    A case of a surgically confirmed cystic lymphangioma of the spleen is presented. Preoperative imaging consisted of US, contrast-enhanced CT and MRI, all showing a multiloculated lesion with small cystic cavities divided by thin septa, corresponding to dilated lymphatic spaces. Preoperative studies correlated well with the pathologic findings. Cystic lymphangioma of the spleen is a very rare condition and is usually solitary and asymptomatic. Large lymphangiomas may be an indication for splenectomy, since the risk of rupture is high even from minor abdominal trauma. Preoperative diagnosis may be achieved with correlated noninvasive imaging. (orig.)

  5. Reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, N.; Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Saiful Huq, M.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) plays a crucial role in the management of invasive cervix cancer from stage I to IV. Intracavitary techniques are based on afterloading devices, with different types of applicators. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better assessment of gross tumour volume (GTV) and definition and delineation of target volume (CTV) compared to traditional approaches. To evaluate reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in 3D CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in Brachytherapy

  6. Sheep head frame validation for CT and MRI studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marco trovatelli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   Introductions Aim of EDEN 2020 project’s Milestone 5 is the development of a steerable catheter for CED system in glioblastoma therapy. The VET group is involved in realization and validation of the proper animal model. Materials and methods In this part of the study two fresh sheep’s head from the local slaughter were used. The heads were located into an ad hoc Frame system based on anatomical measures and CT images, producted by Renishaw plc partner in this project. The frame was adapted and every components were checked for the ex vivo validation tests. CT imaging was taken in Lodi at Università degli studi di Milano, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, with CT scanner and MRI imaging was taken in La Cittadina, Cremona Results System validation was approved by the ex vivo trial. The frame system doesn’t compromise the imaging acquisition in MRI and CT systems. Every system components are functional to their aims. Discussion The Frame system is adapted to the sheep head. It is composed by elements able to lock the head during the imaging acquisition. Frame system is characterized by a support base helpings the animals to keep the head straight forward during imaging time, under general anesthesia. The design of these device support the airways anatomy, avoiding damaging or obstruction of airflows during anesthesia period. The role of elements like mouth bar and ovine head pins is to lock the head in a stable position during imaging acquisition; fixing is guaranteed by V shape head pins, that are arranged against the zygomatic arches. Lateral compression forces to the cranium, and the V shape pins avoid the vertical shifting of the head and any kind of rotations. (fig. 1

  7. Pulmonary nodule registration in serial CT scans based on rib anatomy and nodule template matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Jiazheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, H.-P.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Zhou, C.; Cascade, Philip N.; Bogot, Naama; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Wu, Y.-T.; Wei, J.

    2007-01-01

    An automated method is being developed in order to identify corresponding nodules in serial thoracic CT scans for interval change analysis. The method uses the rib centerlines as the reference for initial nodule registration. A spatially adaptive rib segmentation method first locates the regions where the ribs join the spine, which define the starting locations for rib tracking. Each rib is tracked and locally segmented by expectation-maximization. The ribs are automatically labeled, and the centerlines are estimated using skeletonization. For a given nodule in the source scan, the closest three ribs are identified. A three-dimensional (3D) rigid affine transformation guided by simplex optimization aligns the centerlines of each of the three rib pairs in the source and target CT volumes. Automatically defined control points along the centerlines of the three ribs in the source scan and the registered ribs in the target scan are used to guide an initial registration using a second 3D rigid affine transformation. A search volume of interest (VOI) is then located in the target scan. Nodule candidate locations within the search VOI are identified as regions with high Hessian responses. The initial registration is refined by searching for the maximum cross-correlation between the nodule template from the source scan and the candidate locations. The method was evaluated on 48 CT scans from 20 patients. Experienced radiologists identified 101 pairs of corresponding nodules. Three metrics were used for performance evaluation. The first metric was the Euclidean distance between the nodule centers identified by the radiologist and the computer registration, the second metric was a volume overlap measure between the nodule VOIs identified by the radiologist and the computer registration, and the third metric was the hit rate, which measures the fraction of nodules whose centroid computed by the computer registration in the target scan falls within the VOI identified by the

  8. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ge; Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Kalra, Mannudeep; Murugan, Venkatesh; Vannier, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine

  9. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ge, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu; Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang [Biomedical Imaging Center/Cluster, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Kalra, Mannudeep; Murugan, Venkatesh [Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Vannier, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  10. Serial quantitative CT evaluation for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) using Gaussian Histogram Normalized Correlation (GHNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Tae; Ogura, Takashi; Nishimura, Junichi; Asakura, Akira; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Yazawa, Takuya; Inoue, Tomio

    2006-01-01

    We assessed serial changes in high-resolution CT findings quantitatively using originally developed software Gaussian Histogram Normalized Correlation (GHNC) in 15 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Mean follow-up period was 1.4 years. The volume of honeycombing increased with 0.8±0.9%TLC (predicted Total lung capacity) per year, the normal lung volume reduced by 4.1±7.3%TLC per year. GHNC is useful for the quantitative evaluation. (author)

  11. CT and MRI in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. CT und MRT der progressiven multifokalen Leukenzephalopathie (PML)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanfermann, H. (Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Heindel, W. (Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Schroeder, R. (Neuropathologie des Inst. fuer Pathologie, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Lackner, K. (Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Koeln Univ. (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Radiological findings and course of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in 14 patients (1 woman, 13 men; 13 HIV seropositive, 1 chronic lymphatic leukaemia) were analysed retrospectively and correlated with clinical symptoms. A total of 21 CT and 16 MRI studies were evaluated. CT scans and MR images of 9 patients, which had been obtained in less than two weeks, could be compared to each other. MRI was superior to CT: 6 lesions with a diameter of 1 cm and below were not detected on CT scans, in 5 patients the extent of lesions was underestimated. Cortical involvement, mass effect or signs of atrophy were missing. Only 1 of 65 lesions showed a tiny enhancement after Gd injection. Due to the pattern and spread of lesions, which showed a close correlation to the neurologic symptoms, three different types of PML are suggested: 1. Initial precentral demyelinisation with contralateral hemiparesis (n=8); 2. lesions in temporo-occipital locations with visual disturbances (n=2); 3. predominantly bilateral lesions of cerebellar white matter with ataxia (n=4). (orig.)

  12. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Miller-Jaster, Kirsten; Luna, Brian; Dey, Bappaditya; Bishai, William R; Jonsson, Colleen B; Jain, Sanjay; Mollura, Daniel J

    2013-07-23

    Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In order to better understand and treat them, an accurate evaluation using multi-modal imaging techniques for anatomical and functional characterizations is needed. For non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), there have been many engineering improvements that have significantly enhanced the resolution and contrast of the images, but there are still insufficient computational algorithms available for researchers to use when accurately quantifying imaging data from anatomical structures and functional biological processes. Since the development of such tools may potentially translate basic research into the clinic, this study focuses on the development of a quantitative and qualitative image analysis platform that provides a computational radiology perspective for pulmonary infections in small animal models. Specifically, we designed (a) a fast and robust automated and semi-automated image analysis platform and a quantification tool that can facilitate accurate diagnostic measurements of pulmonary lesions as well as volumetric measurements of anatomical structures, and incorporated (b) an image registration pipeline to our proposed framework for volumetric comparison of serial scans. This is an important investigational tool for small animal infectious disease models that can help advance researchers' understanding of infectious diseases. We tested the utility of our proposed methodology by using sequentially acquired CT and PET images of rabbit, ferret, and mouse models with respiratory infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), H1N1 flu virus, and an aerosolized respiratory pathogen (necrotic TB) for a total of 92, 44, and 24 scans for the respective studies with half of the scans from CT and the other half from PET. Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care approvals were

  13. Retroperitoneal Castleman's disease: US, CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, Claudio; Boretti, Juan J.; Villavicencio, Roberto; Oxilia, Hector; Costamagna, Cecilia; Ferrer, Jaime; Secchi, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To describe de imaging features of this unusual localization of Castleman's disease. Materials and methods: Two patients (man: 62 years old, woman: 27 years old) with epigastric abdominal pain were studied. The physical examination was negative in the woman while in the other case a peri umbilical tumor was observed. The laboratory and the tumor markers were negative. Both patients had a history of appendectomy. US, TC and MRI were performed. After surgery the pathological examination included stain techniques with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's techniques and PAS. Results: Retroperitoneal Castleman's disease in peri pancreatic localization (extremely rare). The US showed slight hypoechoic homogeneous lesions with clear rims. CT without contrast revealed isodense lesions and one of them presented a small calcification, the e.v. contrast CT showed a clear homogeneous reinforcement. MRI demonstrated hypointense lesions on T1, hyperintense on T2, and after the administration of gadolinium these lesions showed a marked reinforcement on the arterial phase, which persisted on the late venous phase. The differential diagnosis with pancreatic tumoral pathology was difficult. The pathological examination revealed a lymphoid angio follicular hyperplasia of hyaline vascular type. Conclusion: Retroperitoneal Castlelman's disease is a rare entity. The different imaging methods did not provide an accurate diagnosis of this entity since there are no pathognomonic features. The pathological examination was required to define the diagnosis in both reported cases. (author)

  14. Brain CT and MRI findings in fat embolism syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shin; Hayashi, Takaki; Ri, Kyoshichi

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate brain CT and MRI findings in fat embolism syndrome (FES), we retrospectively analyzed images from 5 patients with FES during the acute and subacute stages. Brain CT examinations demonstrated brain edema in 2 patients and transient spotty low density lesions in 2 patients. Three patients showed no abnormalities. Brain MRI, however, showed brain abnormalities in all patients during the acute stages. These were revealed as spotty high signal intensity lesions on T2WI, and some showed low intensity on T1WI. These spotty lesions were considered to reflect edematous fluid occurring as a result of the unique pathophysiological condition of FES. While the spotty high signal intensity lesions on T2WI were distributed in the cerebrum, cerebellum, brain stem, thalamus, basal ganglia, internal capsule and corpus callosum, cerebral and cerebellar spotty lesions were characteristically located along the boundary zones of the major vascular territories. This characteristic location might be induced by a hypoxic brain condition in FES because the numerous fat globules present in this condition can block entire brain capillaries. This characteristic signal location on T2WI is a useful indicator for differentiating FES from the primary intra-axial brain injury in patients with multifocal trauma. (author)

  15. Population based ranking of frameless CT-MRI registration methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opposits, Gabor; Kis, Sandor A.; Tron, Lajos; Emri, Miklos [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Berenyi, Ervin [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biomedical Laboratory and Imaging Science; Takacs, Endre [Rotating Gamma Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Dobai, Jozsef G.; Bognar, Laszlo [Debrecen Univ., Medical Center (Hungary). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Szuecs, Bernadett [ScanoMed Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    Clinical practice often requires simultaneous information obtained by two different imaging modalities. Registration algorithms are commonly used for this purpose. Automated procedures are very helpful in cases when the same kind of registration has to be performed on images of a high number of subjects. Radiotherapists would prefer to use the best automated method to assist therapy planning, however there are not accepted procedures for ranking the different registration algorithms. We were interested in developing a method to measure the population level performance of CT-MRI registration algorithms by a parameter of values in the [0,1] interval. Pairs of CT and MRI images were collected from 1051 subjects. Results of an automated registration were corrected manually until a radiologist and a neurosurgeon expert both accepted the result as good. This way 1051 registered MRI images were produced by the same pair of experts to be used as gold standards for the evaluation of the performance of other registration algorithms. Pearson correlation coefficient, mutual information, normalized mutual information, Kullback-Leibler divergence, L{sub 1} norm and square L{sub 2} norm (dis)similarity measures were tested for sensitivity to indicate the extent of (dis)similarity of a pair of individual mismatched images. The square Hellinger distance proved suitable to grade the performance of registration algorithms at population level providing the developers with a valuable tool to rank algorithms. The developed procedure provides an objective method to find the registration algorithm performing the best on the population level out of newly constructed or available preselected ones.

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: diagnosis with CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangbin; Zhao Bin; Yang Zhenzhen; Shi Hao; Chiu, L.C.; Shan Ruiqin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Methods: Eight women with PRES (6 pregnant women, 1 case after chemotherapy, and 1 patient with hypertension)were enrolled in our study. All of them had MR imaging (T 1 WI, T 2 WI, FLAIR, DWI), and five cases underwent post-contrast T 1 WI and three dimensional contrast enhanced MR angiography (3D CEMRA). Two cases also had CT scan. Results: MRV in all 8 patients showed no evidence of stenosis, dilation, or thrombosis in cranial veins and sinuses. MRI demonstrated multiple lesions located in bilateral parieto-occipital lobes (8 cases), bilateral basal ganglia (2 cases), and bilateral frontal lobes (4 cases). The lesions were prominent within white matter, some of them involved gray matter (3 cases). Lesions appeared as hyperintense signals on FLAIR and T 2 -weighted images, isointense or mildly hypointense signals on T 1 -weighted images, normal or decreased intensity on DWI, and isointensity or hyperintensity on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Post-contrast T 1 WI showed mild reversible enhancement and 3D CEMRA displayed numerous reversible 'grape-like' enhancements in terminal arterial branches along the middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA). Follow-up scan showed decreased abnormal signals. Conclusion: Lesions of PRES are usually located in parieto-occipital lobes, especially in white matter, but they can also be seen in frontal lobes and basal ganglia bilaterally. Post-contrast T 1 WI and 3D enhanced MRA can provide useful information in the manifestation of reversible enhancement. MRI has advantages to display lesion in PRES. (authors)

  17. CT and MRI findings of a spinal arachnoid cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Sadashima, Hiromichi

    1986-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman developed progressive difficulty in walking and urination over one year and 9 months. Her past history included a hystero-oophorectomy because of ''infection;'' the operation had been done under lumbar anesthesia. At the time of admission to our hospital, her legs were markedly spastic, with increased knee and ankle jerks as well as bilateral Babinski signs. Sensation to pain was slightly decreased bilaterally at and below Th4. Myelography through a suboccipital tap and CT myelography demonstrated a block of the CSF space at Th6. The spinal cord was displaced and became thin at and below Th1, secondary to an enlarged CSF space. Horizontal MRI demonstrated similar findings; however, sagittal MRI showed that the cord had been displaced and had collapsed; in addition, an abnormally enlarged CSF space indicated a subdural arachnoid cyst. MRI has thus been shown to be a very useful tool in the diagnosis of a spinal arachnoid cyst as well as other spinal-cord diseases. (author)

  18. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keum Won [Pohang Medical Center, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hae Kwan [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis.

  19. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keum Won; Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Cheong, Hae Kwan

    2001-01-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis

  20. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Postema, Floor A. M.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Majoie, Charles B.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers

  1. Albendazole treatment of cerebral hydatid disease: evaluation of results with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaitzoglou, I.; Drevelengas, A.; Petridis, A.; Palladas, P. [Department of Radiology, ``G. Papanikolaou`` General Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of cerebral hydatid disease demonstrated by CT and MRI, treated with albendazole. Follow-up showed complete dissapearance of the cysts with residual focal calcification on CT and presumed gliosis on MRI. (orig.) With 3 figs., 17 refs.

  2. CT and MRI evaluation of orbital tumors: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrini, Marcelo; Docampo, Jorge; Martinez, Manuel; Bruno, Claudio; Morales, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To show our experience in the evaluation of orbital masses on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To describe their most important findings and epidemiological features found on literature review, related to their differential diagnosis. Materials and methods: During a 48-months period of time, 26 patients (13 male, 13 female; age range, 3 to 75 years) with orbital tumors were evaluated. Seventeen patients underwent MR scans, 8 underwent CT scans, and one underwent both imaging methods. It was employed 0,5 and 1 Tesla MR scanners, and axial-helical CT scanners. Results: Benign lesions were found on 7 patients (cavernous hemangioma [n=2], meningioma [n=1], epidermoid cyst [n=1], dermoid cyst [n=1], lipoma [n=1], orbital vein deformity [n=1]). It was found lesions with undetermined behavior (optical nerve glioma [n=2]), and malignant ones were found on 17 patients (metastatic lesions [n=5], non- Hodgkin's lymphoma [n=3], hemangiopericytoma [n=2], retinoblastoma [n=2], rhabdomyosarcoma [n=2], melanoma [n=1], and lacrimal adenocarcinoma [n=1]). Conclusion: In our experience, 65.4% was malignant tumors (orbital metastasis was the most common; 19.2%). More than one-quarter was benign tumor, where cavernous hemangioma was the most frequent. (author) [es

  3. Ependymomas of the posterior cranial fossa: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortori-Donati, P.; Fondelli, M.P.; Cama, A.; Garre, M.L.; Rossi, A.; Andreussi, L.

    1995-01-01

    We studied nine children with posterior cranial fossa ependymomas to identify specific neuroradiological features. Patients were studied preoperatively with CT and MRI; T1-, T2- and proton-density (PD)-weighted images were obtained. All children underwent surgery and a definite histopathological diagnosis was made. All the tumours grew into the fourth ventricle and caused dilatation of its upper part, which resembled a cap. All but one were separated from the vermis by a cleavage plane. In eight cases there was desmoplastic development through the foramina of the fourth ventricle, and five were heterogeneous due to necrosis and cystic change; one had a haemorrhagic area. In most cases the solid portion was isointense with grey matter on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on PD weighting, and isointense on T2-weighted images. On CT the tumour was isodense in six cases and calcification was detected in four. The presence of both desmoplastic development and a tumour/vermis cleavage plane in a posterior cranial fossa tumour isodense on CT is highly suggestive of ependymoma. (orig.)

  4. Neurovascular compression of cranial nerves: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Llanos, Julio; Sinner, Ricardo; Nagel, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The compression of a nervous structure by an aberrant vessel may be asymptomatic or produce an important symptoms, in these cases CT and MRI show relevant information. Materials and Methods: Between January 1998 and March 2001, we studied 27 patients: 8 with trigeminal neuralgia, 7 with hemi facial spasm, 4 vertigo and tinnitus, 2 hemianopsia, 1 with neuralgia of the amygdalin fossa, 1 with bitonal voice, 1 with tongue deviation with fascicular movements, 2 essential hypertension and 1 with severe headache. All of them had a neurologic evaluation from 2 specialists and 2 neuro radiologists interpreted the results. Results: The CT and RMI images with special sequences allowed to prove the compression of the entry segments of the V, VII, IX, X and XII cranial nerves, of the optic chiasma and the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla oblongata in close relation with the vasopressor centre. Also they demonstrate a rare vessel in the Silvio aqueduct avoiding the normal flow of the CSF. Of the total of patients that were studied, 37% had surgical confirmation. Conclusion: CT and RMI are sensitive and specific methods for the detection of vascular compressions of nervous structures. (author)

  5. Usefulness of MRI compared with CT for diagnosis of mesenteric lymphoma in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, D.; Fujita, M.; Yasuda, S.; Taniguchi, A.; Miura, H.; Hasegawa, D.; Orima, H.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of MRI and compared it with CT for diagnosis of mesenceric lymphoma in a dog. The results in the plain CT. dynamic CT and plain MR (TIWI and t2W1) images suggested that the mass was a large single nodular lesion with abundant blood perfusion. On enhanced MRI(T1WI) , the mass was depicted as a tumor with adhesion to the gut wall, Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the mass was consistent with the findings on enhanced MRI. We think that MRI might be a useful imaging tool for diagnosis of canine mesenteric lymphoma

  6. Usefulness of MRI compared with CT for diagnosis of mesenteric lymphoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Daiji; Fujita, Michio; Yasuda, Shuichi; Taniguchi, Akiko; Miura, Harumi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Orima, Hiromitsu

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of MRI and compared it with CT for diagnosis of mesenteric lymphoma in a dog. The results in the plain CT, dynamic CT and plain MR (T1WI and T2WI) images suggested that the mass was a large single nodular lesion with abundant blood perfusion. On enhanced MRI(T1WI) , the mass was depicted as a tumor with adhesion to the gut wall. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the mass was consistent with the findings on enhanced MRI. We think that MRI might be a useful imaging tool for diagnosis of canine mesenteric lymphoma.

  7. Diagnosis of intracranial mixed tumor with CT and MRI (report of 7 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Changqun; Zhou Huaiwei; Xue Hongli; Zhang Yuzhong; Hu Lianyuan

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To recognize the images of intracranial mixed tumor. Materials and methods: Seven cases were studied with CT and MRI. All were proved by pathology, including mixed tumor of meningioma with glioblastoma 2 cases, meningioma with pituitary tumor 2 cases, glioblastoma multiform with angioblastoma 1 cases, cholesteatoma with melanoma 1 case, and pituitary tumor with meningioma 1 case. The authors analysed the CT and MRI manifestations of intracranial mixed tumor retrospectively. Results: The CT and MRI manifestations of intracranial mixed tumor were exactly like meningioma, glioma, and hypophysoma, etc, therefore it was usually misdiagnosed the common tumor. Four cases intracranial mixed tumor displayed two kinds of characteristic CT and MRI manifestation on the same region of the same tumor in contrast with the clinic and pathologic change. Conclusion: There were no characteristic CT and MRI manifestations; the diagnosis should be made in combination with clinical information

  8. Benign and malignant skull-involved lesions: discriminative value of conventional CT and MRI combined with diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhanhai; Xiao, Zebin; Zheng, Yingyan; Huang, Hongjie; Yang, Libin; Cao, Dairong

    2018-01-01

    Background Little is known about the value of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in distinguishing malignant from benign skull-involved lesions. Purpose To evaluate the discriminative value of DWI combined with conventional CT and MRI for differentiating between benign and malignant skull-involved lesions. Material and Methods CT and MRI findings of 58 patients with pathologically proven skull-involved lesions (43 benign and 15 malignant) were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional CT and MRI characteristics and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the two groups were evaluated and compared. Multivariate logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to assess the differential performance of each parameter separately and together. Results The presence of cortical defects or break-through and ill-defined margins were associated with malignant skull-involved lesions (both P benign and malignant skull-involved lesions. Conclusion The combination of CT, MRI, and DWI can help to differentiate malignant from benign skull-involved lesions. CT + MRI + DWI offers optimal sensitivity, while DWI offers optimal specificity.

  9. Tracer kinetic modelling of tumour angiogenesis based on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, Gunnar [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Abteilung fuer medizinischen und beruflichen Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Griebel, Juergen [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Technical developments in both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have helped to reduce scan times and expedited the development of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques. Since the temporal change of the image signal following the administration of a diffusible, extracellular contrast agent (CA) is related to the local blood supply and the extravasation of the CA into the interstitial space, DCE imaging can be used to assess tissue microvasculature and microcirculation. It is the aim of this review to summarize the biophysical and tracer kinetic principles underlying this emerging imaging technique offering great potential for non-invasive characterization of tumour angiogenesis. In the first part, the relevant contrast mechanisms are presented that form the basis to relate signal variations measured by serial CT and MRI to local tissue concentrations of the administered CA. In the second part, the concepts most widely used for tracer kinetic modelling of concentration-time courses derived from measured DCE image data sets are described in a consistent and unified manner to highlight their particular structure and assumptions as well as the relationships among them. Finally, the concepts presented are exemplified by the analysis of representative DCE data as well as discussed with respect to present and future applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Depending on the specific protocol used for the acquisition of DCE image data and the particular model applied for tracer kinetic analysis of the derived concentration-time courses, different aspects of tumour angiogenesis can be quantified in terms of well-defined physiological tissue parameters. DCE imaging offers promising prospects for improved tumour diagnosis, individualization of cancer treatment as well as the evaluation of novel therapeutic concepts in preclinical and early-stage clinical trials. (orig.)

  10. The role of MRI and CT of the brain in first episodes of psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandanpour, N.; Hoggard, N.; Connolly, D.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether imaging is associated with early detection of the organic causes of the first episode of psychosis (FEP). Materials and methods: Individuals with FEP but no neurological signs referred to a tertiary centre for cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) were reviewed retrospectively. Two groups were evaluated with either CT or MRI; the two groups were independent and no individual underwent both CT and MRI. Results: One hundred and twelve consecutive cerebral MRI and 204 consecutive CT examinations were identified. Three (2.7%) individuals had brain lesions [brain tumour and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy] potentially accountable for the psychosis at MRI. Seventy patients (62.5%) had incidental brain lesions, such as cerebral atrophy, small vessel ischaemic changes, unruptured Circle of Willis aneurysm, cavernoma, and arachnoid cysts at MRI. Three patients (1.5%) had focal brain lesions (primary or secondary tumours) potentially accountable for the psychosis at CT. One hundred and thirty-three patients (65.2%) had incidental brain lesions unrelated to the psychosis on CT scan. There was no significant difference between MRI and CT imaging in detecting organic disease potentially responsible for FEP (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Routine MRI or CT imaging of the brain is unlikely to reveal disease leading to a significant change in management. MRI was comparable with CT in terms of diagnosis of both pathological and incidental cerebral lesions. Therefore, routine brain structural imaging of FEP in patients without focal neurology may not be routinely required and if imaging is requested then CT may function equally as well as MRI as the first-line investigation

  11. Comparison of AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in the detection of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Hiromichi; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Hirose, Takashi; Karizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Amino, Saburou

    1994-01-01

    We performed AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in 12 cases of hepatic lesions. Nine of these were hepatocellular carcinomas. Two cases were metastatic liver tumors (the primary lesion was gastric in one and the other was gallbladder cancer). One case was suspected to be adenomatous hyperplasia. Thirty-two lesions were detected in T2-weighted SE images before AMI-25 administration, while 46 lesions were detected in AMI-25 enhanced MRI images. In particular, AMI-25 enhanced MRI was superior to plain MRI in lesions less than 10 mm in size. A total of 48 lesions were detected in helical dynamic CT. Although AMI-25 enhanced MRI almost equaled helical dynamic CT in the detection of liver tumors, helical dynamic CT was slightly superior to AMI-25 enhanced MRI in the detection of subphrenic lesions. It was possible to know the hemodynamics in each hepatic lesion by helical dynamic CT. AMI-25 enhanced MRI was useful to know the inclusion of reticuloendothelial system, and that yielded different diagnoses in adenomatous hyperplasia and well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Helical dynamic CT was useful for qualitative diagnosis. Both AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT contributed to the detection of liver tumor and qualitative diagnosis. (author)

  12. Eosinophilic Otitis Media: CT and MRI Findings and Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Won Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Cho, Kyung Ja; Baek, Jung Hwan [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a relatively rare, intractable, middle ear disease with extremely viscous mucoid effusion containing eosinophils. EOM is associated with adult bronchial asthma and nasal allergies. Conventional treatments for otitis media with effusion (OME) or for chronic otitis media (COM), like tympanoplasty or mastoidectomy, when performed for the treatment of EOM, can induce severe complications such as deafness. Therefore, it should be differentiated from the usual type of OME or COM. To our knowledge, the clinical and imaging findings of EOM of temporal bone are not well-known to radiologists. We report here the CT and MRI findings of two EOM cases and review the clinical and histopathologic findings of this recently described disease entity.

  13. Eosinophilic Otitis Media: CT and MRI Findings and Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Won Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Cho, Kyung Ja; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a relatively rare, intractable, middle ear disease with extremely viscous mucoid effusion containing eosinophils. EOM is associated with adult bronchial asthma and nasal allergies. Conventional treatments for otitis media with effusion (OME) or for chronic otitis media (COM), like tympanoplasty or mastoidectomy, when performed for the treatment of EOM, can induce severe complications such as deafness. Therefore, it should be differentiated from the usual type of OME or COM. To our knowledge, the clinical and imaging findings of EOM of temporal bone are not well-known to radiologists. We report here the CT and MRI findings of two EOM cases and review the clinical and histopathologic findings of this recently described disease entity.

  14. Multidetector CT and MRI findings in periportal space pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara 06100 (Turkey)]. E-mail: musturayk@yahoo.com; Haliloglu, Mithat [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara 06100 (Turkey); Akpinar, Erhan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara 06100 (Turkey); Akata, Deniz [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara 06100 (Turkey); Ozmen, Mustafa [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara 06100 (Turkey); Ariyurek, Macit [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara 06100 (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara 06100 (Turkey)

    2007-01-15

    Periportal region is an anatomic space around portal vein comprising hepatic artery, bile duct, nerves, lymphatics and a potential space. Periportal pathologies may involve any of these structures diffusely or focally with characteristic radiologic findings. Radiologic findings can be helpful in differential diagnosis of pathologies of periportal structures including periportal cavernomatous transformation, hepatic artery aneurysm, biliary diseases, neurofibromatosis, lymphoma, langerhans' cell histiocytosis, periportal fatty infiltration and other causes of periportal halo in adult and pediatric patients. Lobar/segmental intrahepatic involvement can be seen in neurofibromatosis, cavernomatous transformation, fatty infiltration and periportal edema. In this review, we discuss CT and MRI findings of periportal pathologies which can be in the form of diffuse or segmental/lobar involvement.

  15. Adult cerebellar medulloblastoma: CT and MRI findings in eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Bertoldi, Guilherme A. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Radiologia Diagnostica]. E-mail: arnolfo.carvalho@avalon.sul.com.br; Gasparetto, Emerson L. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Secao de Radiologia Diagnostica; Ono, Sergio E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Gomes, Andre F. [Diagnostico Avancado Por Imagem (DAPI), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2003-06-01

    Medulloblastoma is a brain tumor of neuro epithelial origin, which represents 15 to 30% of all pediatric brain tumors, and less than 1% of CNS adult neoplasms. We report the imaging findings of 8 adult patients with medulloblastoma. The mean age was 35 years, ranging from 20 to 65 years, and the male:female rate was 3:5. The tumors were predominantly lateral (63%), hyperdense on CT scans (83%), and on the MRI, hypointense on T1 (100%) and hyperintense on T2 (80%) weighted images. It was seen intratumoral necrosis and cysts in six cases and calcifications in three. Hydrocephalus was observed in 5 cases and brain stem invasion in four. The imaging findings of medulloblastomas in adults are different of those in child, and also nonspecific. Although these tumors are uncommon in adults, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses in the posterior fossa of this age group. (author)

  16. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginat, Daniel T. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Robson, Caroline D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  17. Adult cerebellar medulloblastoma: CT and MRI findings in eight cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Neto Arnolfo de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a brain tumor of neuroepithelial origin, which represents 15 to 30% of all pediatric brain tumors, and less than 1% of CNS adult neoplasms. We report the imaging findings of 8 adult patients with medulloblastoma. The mean age was 35 years, ranging from 20 to 65 years, and the male:female rate was 3:5. The tumors were predominantly lateral (63%, hyperdense on CT scans (83%, and on the MRI, hypointense on T1 (100% and hyperintense on T2 (80% weighted images. It was seen intratumoral necrosis and cysts in six cases and calcifications in three. Hydrocephalus was observed in 5 cases and brain stem invasion in four. The imaging findings of medulloblastomas in adults are different of those in child, and also nonspecific. Although these tumors are uncommon in adults, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses in the posterior fossa of this age group.

  18. Adult cerebellar medulloblastoma: CT and MRI findings in eight cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Bertoldi, Guilherme A.

    2003-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a brain tumor of neuro epithelial origin, which represents 15 to 30% of all pediatric brain tumors, and less than 1% of CNS adult neoplasms. We report the imaging findings of 8 adult patients with medulloblastoma. The mean age was 35 years, ranging from 20 to 65 years, and the male:female rate was 3:5. The tumors were predominantly lateral (63%), hyperdense on CT scans (83%), and on the MRI, hypointense on T1 (100%) and hyperintense on T2 (80%) weighted images. It was seen intratumoral necrosis and cysts in six cases and calcifications in three. Hydrocephalus was observed in 5 cases and brain stem invasion in four. The imaging findings of medulloblastomas in adults are different of those in child, and also nonspecific. Although these tumors are uncommon in adults, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses in the posterior fossa of this age group. (author)

  19. Adrenal pseudomasses due to varices: angiographic-CT-MRI-pathologic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.; Williams, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Periadrenal and adrenal portosystemic collaterals are a recently reported cause of adrenal pseudotumor on computed tomography (CT). Nine patients with this left adrenal pseudotumor illustrate its typical position and appearance on CT, angiography, CT-angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anatomic basis for variceal adrenal pseudotumors is the left inferior phrenic vein, which passes immediately anterior to the left adrenal gland and which serves as a collateral pathway from splenic to left renal vein in portal hypertension. Thus, unlike previously described adrenal pseudotumors, these venous collaterals are not anatomically distinguishable from the adrenal gland on CT. Bolus dynamic CT is usually diagnostic, but in equivocal cases, MRI may prove useful

  20. Adrenal pseudomasses due to varices: angiographic-CT-MRI-pathologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, T.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M. Williams, D.M.

    1985-08-01

    Periadrenal and adrenal portosystemic collaterals are a recently reported cause of adrenal pseudotumor on computed tomography (CT). Nine patients with this left adrenal pseudotumor illustrate its typical position and appearance on CT, angiography, CT-angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anatomic basis for variceal adrenal pseudotumors is the left inferior phrenic vein, which passes immediately anterior to the left adrenal gland and which serves as a collateral pathway from splenic to left renal vein in portal hypertension. Thus, unlike previously described adrenal pseudotumors, these venous collaterals are not anatomically distinguishable from the adrenal gland on CT. Bolus dynamic CT is usually diagnostic, but in equivocal cases, MRI may prove useful.

  1. CT and MRI features in bipolaris fungal sinusitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aribandi, M.; Bazan III, C.

    2007-01-01

    Bipolaris is an increasingly recognized cause of fungal sinusitis. Reports of imaging features are sparse. Our purpose was to review the imaging features in patients with Bipolaris fungal sinusitis. A review of our data showed seven patients with culture-proven Bipolaris fungal sinusitis. Computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses in all the patients and MRI in five patients were analysed for the location, nature, extent of the disease and density/ signal characteristics on CT/MRI. The sphenoid and posterior ethmoid sinuses were most often involved (six of seven), followed by the anterior ethmoid sinus (five of seven), frontal sinus (four of seven) and maxillary sinus (three of seven) involvement. Five of seven cases had bilateral disease. Secretions were seen to fill the sinus and were expansile in nature in six of seven cases. Bony erosion was noted in all the patients. Air-fluid levels and bony sclerosis were rarely seen. Computed tomography showed central hyperdensity in all the cases. In the corresponding MR images (n = 5), the sinus contents appeared hyperintense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2-weighted images. Extension into the nasal cavity was found in six of seven cases. Five of seven cases had intracranial (extradural) spread. Intraorbital extension was seen in three of seven cases, with associated optic nerve compression in two. All the patients responded to surgical debridement, and systemic antifungal therapy was not required. Bipolaris fungal sinusitis typically presents with an allergic fungal sinusitis picture with expansile sinus opacification and bony erosions. There is central hyperdensity on CT scan, which appears hyperintense on T1-weighted and hypointense on T2-weighted MR images

  2. Intracerebral lymphoma with two patients. CT and MRI diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanakiev, A.; Popovska, T.; Zasheva, I.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) is a disease of the lymphatic system where the central neural system is affected in very rare cases. According to different authors the frequency of cases with lymphoma where the neural system is affected varies between 0.2% and 0.5%, and the primary cerebral lymphoma accounts for about 1-2% of all brain neoplasms. The intracranial form of lymphoma is usually a late onset of the disease with serious and potentially fatal complications for the patient. These complications usually appear several years after diagnosing the disease, but the cerebral lymphoma may occur even in patients who are in remission, which is actually the case with our patients. We present you two cases - a 38-year-old female and a 48-year-old male, who were hospitalized in Neuro ward with the following complaints: loss of speech for a few minutes, dizziness, weakness, tingling and shuffling of one of the legs. Those patients were diagnosed with histological B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma, several years ago. CT and MRI were carried out on the patients. Despite both clinical and radiographic suspicions for intracranial forms of lymphoma, the patients were still difficult to diagnose. A definitive diagnosis was given after a surgery and histological examination, i.e. non- Hodgkin's lymphoma - large B-cell lymphomas, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. These cases are of interest because of their rare intracranial localization of the lymphoma. The knowledge of CT and MRI images with the intracranial form of lymphoma may help diagnosing, but images should be interpreted together with the clinical and paraclinical results

  3. What do patients know about ultrasound, CT and MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesson, Rosemary A.; McKenzie, Graham A.; Mathers, Sandra A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the level of patient knowledge of ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); to describe patient information-seeking behaviour before attendance; and to assess patients' understanding of the main aspects of scanning examinations. DESIGN: Survey of people attending for ultrasound, CT and MRI using a questionnaire, including 12 statements on simple aspects of procedures, to be indicated as true or false. SETTING: Radiology department of an acute teaching hospital NHS Trust in the north-east of Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 500 out-patient, non-emergency first time attenders for ultrasound (300), computed tomography (150), and magnetic resonance imaging (50). RESULTS: An 82% response rate to the questionnaire was achieved. Less than half the patients (48.9%, 182/372) indicated they knew the type of investigation they had been referred for. When responses were compared with referral letters, 64% (238/372) were incongruent. Few participants hadsought information (32%, 120/372), but of those who had the main source was family and friends (72%, 86/120). Seven participants searched the Internet. Eighty-two percent (308/372) of participants reported having been given an explanation of why an investigation was necessary. The majority of participants (67.8%, 251/372) expected to receive their results within 2 weeks. The mean score on the 12 true/false knowledge statements was 3.8, and 17% (65/372) answered 'Don't know' to all the statements. One person answered all questions correctly. CONCLUSIONS: Patients were not well informed regarding these investigations. This has significant implications for information-giving strategies and informed consent. Chesson, R.A. et al. (2002)

  4. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Radiology, 06018, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2007-12-15

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica. We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. isc herniation in the lumbar spine is a well-known etiology of back pains and sciatica, but whenever disc herniation of the lumbar spine is excluded by the employed imaging modalities, then the pelvis should be examined for other possible etiologies of nerve compression. We describe here a patient, who was complaining of sciatica, with no abnormal findings in her lumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The cause of her sciatica was found to be associated with a pelvic hydatid cyst compressing the lumbosacral nerve plexus. In conclusion, if no pathology is evident for the lumbar discal structures, in connection with the cause of sciatica and lumbar back pains, then the pelvis should also be examined for the possible etiologies of compression of the lumbosacral nerve plexus. Whenever a multiseptated cyst is come across in a patient of an endemic origin with a positive history for hydatid disease like surgery, indicating recurrence, hydatid cyst is the most likely diagnosis.

  5. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica. We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. isc herniation in the lumbar spine is a well-known etiology of back pains and sciatica, but whenever disc herniation of the lumbar spine is excluded by the employed imaging modalities, then the pelvis should be examined for other possible etiologies of nerve compression. We describe here a patient, who was complaining of sciatica, with no abnormal findings in her lumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The cause of her sciatica was found to be associated with a pelvic hydatid cyst compressing the lumbosacral nerve plexus. In conclusion, if no pathology is evident for the lumbar discal structures, in connection with the cause of sciatica and lumbar back pains, then the pelvis should also be examined for the possible etiologies of compression of the lumbosacral nerve plexus. Whenever a multiseptated cyst is come across in a patient of an endemic origin with a positive history for hydatid disease like surgery, indicating recurrence, hydatid cyst is the most likely diagnosis

  6. Intracranial hemorrhage: principles of CT and MRI interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizel, P.M.; Makkat, S.; Miert, E. van; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage represents a frequent challenge for the practicing radiologist. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a synoptic overview of the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, using text, tables, and figures to illustrate time-dependent changes. We examine the underlying physical, biological, and biochemical factors of evolving hematoma and correlate them with the aspect on cross-sectional imaging techniques. On CT scanning, the appearance of intracranial blood is determined by density changes which occur over time, reflecting clot formation, clot retraction, clot lysis and, eventually, tissue loss. However, MRI has become the technique of choice for assessing the age of an intracranial hemorrhage. On MRI the signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage is much more complex and is influenced by multiple variables including: (a) age, location, and size of the lesion; (b) technical factors (e.g., sequence type and parameters, field strength); and (c) biological factors (e.g., pO2, arterial vs venous origin, tissue pH, protein concentration, presence of a blood-brain barrier, condition of the patient). We discuss the intrinsic magnetic properties of sequential hemoglobin degradation products. The differences in evolution between extra- and intracerebral hemorrhages are addressed and illustrated. (orig.)

  7. Automated temporal tracking and segmentation of lymphoma on serial CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jiajing; Greenspan, Hayit; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: It is challenging to reproducibly measure and compare cancer lesions on numerous follow-up studies; the process is time-consuming and error-prone. In this paper, we show a method to automatically and reproducibly identify and segment abnormal lymph nodes in serial computed tomography (CT) exams. Methods: Our method leverages initial identification of enlarged (abnormal) lymph nodes in the baseline scan. We then identify an approximate region for the node in the follow-up scans using nonrigid image registration. The baseline scan is also used to locate regions of normal, non-nodal tissue surrounding the lymph node and to map them onto the follow-up scans, in order to reduce the search space to locate the lymph node on the follow-up scans. Adaptive region-growing and clustering algorithms are then used to obtain the final contours for segmentation. We applied our method to 24 distinct enlarged lymph nodes at multiple time points from 14 patients. The scan at the earlier time point was used as the baseline scan to be used in evaluating the follow-up scan, resulting in 70 total test cases (e.g., a series of scans obtained at 4 time points results in 3 test cases). For each of the 70 cases, a ''reference standard'' was obtained by manual segmentation by a radiologist. Assessment according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) using our method agreed with RECIST assessments made using the reference standard segmentations in all test cases, and by calculating node overlap ratio and Hausdorff distance between the computer and radiologist-generated contours. Results: Compared to the reference standard, our method made the correct RECIST assessment for all 70 cases. The average overlap ratio was 80.7 {+-} 9.7% s.d., and the average Hausdorff distance was 3.2 {+-} 1.8 mm s.d. The concordance correlation between automated and manual segmentations was 0.978 (95% confidence interval 0.962, 0.984). The 100% agreement in our sample

  8. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Ramelli, G. [Department of Pediatrics, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    1998-02-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  9. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G.; Ramelli, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.)

  10. Semicircular canal dehiscence: comparison of T2-weighted turbo spin-echo MRI and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krombach, G.A.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W.; DiMartino, E.; Prescher, A.; Kinzel, S.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the value of MRI for delineation of dehiscence of the superior or posterior semicircular canal, as compared with CT, the current standard study for this entity. We reviewed heavily T2-weighted fast spin-echo images and high-resolution CT of the temporal bones of 185 patients independently semicircular canal dehiscence and its extent. In 30 patients (19 men, 11 women) we identified dehiscence of the bone over the superior and/or posterior semicircular canal on MRI. In 27 of these cases CT also showed circumscribed bone defects. In one patient dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal was initially overlooked on MRI, but seen on CT. MRI imaging thus had a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 98%. Knowledge of the appearances of this entity on MRI may contribute to early diagnosis in patients with vertigo due to semicircular canal dehiscence. (orig.)

  11. Semicircular canal dehiscence: comparison of T2-weighted turbo spin-echo MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krombach, G.A.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); DiMartino, E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Prescher, A. [Department of Anatomy, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Kinzel, S. [Department of Experimental Veterinary Medicine, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    We assessed the value of MRI for delineation of dehiscence of the superior or posterior semicircular canal, as compared with CT, the current standard study for this entity. We reviewed heavily T2-weighted fast spin-echo images and high-resolution CT of the temporal bones of 185 patients independently semicircular canal dehiscence and its extent. In 30 patients (19 men, 11 women) we identified dehiscence of the bone over the superior and/or posterior semicircular canal on MRI. In 27 of these cases CT also showed circumscribed bone defects. In one patient dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal was initially overlooked on MRI, but seen on CT. MRI imaging thus had a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 98%. Knowledge of the appearances of this entity on MRI may contribute to early diagnosis in patients with vertigo due to semicircular canal dehiscence. (orig.)

  12. Proton MRI in the evaluation of pulmonary sarcoidosis: Comparison to chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Little, Brent P.; Forssen, Anna V.; Yong, Jin; Nambu, Atsushi; Kazlouski, Demitry; Puderbach, Michael; Biederer, Juergen; Lynch, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of proton MRI of the lung in sarcoidosis patients and the agreement between the imaging appearance of pulmonary sarcoidosis on MRI and CT. Materials and methods: Chest CT scans and dedicated pulmonary MRI scans (including HASTE, VIBE, and TrueFISP sequences) were performed within 90 days of each other in 29 patients. The scans were scored for gross parenchymal opacification, reticulation, nodules, and masses using a 3-point lobar scale. Total and subset scores for corresponding MRI and CT scans were compared using the Spearman correlation test, Bland–Altman plots, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa analysis. MRI scores were compared to CT by lobe and disease category, using percentage agreement, Spearman rank correlation, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa. Results: The mean (±s.d.) time between MRI and CT scans was 33 ± 32 days. There was substantial correlation and agreement between total disease scoring on MRI and CT with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.774 (p < 0.0001) and a Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.646. Correlation and agreement were highest for gross parenchymal opacification (0.695, 0.528) and reticulation (0.609, 0.445), and lowest in the setting of nodules (0.501, 0.305). Agreement testing was not performed for mass scores due to low prevalence. Upper lobe scoring on MRI and CT demonstrated greater agreement compared to the lower lobes (average difference in Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.112). Conclusion: There is substantial correlation and agreement between MRI and CT in the scoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, though MRI evaluation in the upper lobes may be more accurate than in the lower lobes

  13. Comparative study on developmental stages of the clavicle by postmortem MRI and CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara Tangmose; Lynnerup, Niels; Jensen, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The developmental stages of the clavicles are important for forensic age estimation purposes in adolescents. This study compares the 4-stage system to evaluate the ossification of the medial end of the clavicle as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography...... (CT). As several forensic institutes routinely perform CT scans, the large amount of available data may serve as reference sample for MRI in specific cases. Material and methods: This prospective study included an MRI and CT scan of 47 autopsy cases performed prior to medico-legal autopsy (age range...

  14. MRI, CT, and sonography in the preoperative evaluation of primary tumor extension in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layer, G.; Steudel, A.; Schild, H.H.; Schmitteckert, H.; Tuengerthal, S.; Schirren, J.; Kaick, G. van

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the diagnostic value of the imaging modalities computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thoracic sonography in the preoperative staging of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Results: The accuracy rates for CT were 85%, 98%, 83%, 73%, 71%, and 83%. MRI had an accuracy of 71%, 92%, 71%, 83%, 71%, and 96%, the thoracic ultrasound examinations of 76%, 63%, 51%, 60%, 71% and 89%. Conclusions: According to these results CT remains the method of choice in the preoperative assessment of T-stage of malignant pleural mesothelioma. MRI is of nearly the same value, but is not a must. Sonography may be supplementary method for operation planning. (orig./AJ) [de

  15. The effect of steroid treatment on intracranial malignant lymphoma and its serial CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Ito, Kazunori; Mikami, Junichi; Ueda, Mikiya; Sato, Hiroyuki

    1984-01-01

    We treated 2 cases of intracranial malignant lymphoma presumably originating in the cerebellum and 1 case of intracranial malignant lymphoma presumably originating in the corpus callosum and ventricular ependium, by means of the administration of steroids. There resulted a marked shrinkage of the tumor shadow on CT. Though massive steroids are known to diminish the tumor shadow in CT images, steroids in ordinary doses induce such a shrinkage only rarely. The preoperative diagnosis of intracranial malignant lymphoma, therefore, seemed feasible if, besides plain CT, enhanced CT, and AG findings, the effect of steroid treatment on the CT image was taken into consideration. (author)

  16. SU-F-BRF-10: Deformable MRI to CT Validation Employing Same Day Planning MRI for Surrogate Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, K; Stoyanova, R; Johnson, P; Dogan, N; Pollack, A [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Piper, J; Javorek, A [MIM Software, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare rigid and deformable registrations of the prostate in the multi-modality setting (diagnostic-MRI to planning-CT) by utilizing a planning-MRI as a surrogate. The surrogate allows for the direct quantitative analysis which can be difficult in the multi-modality domain where intensity mapping differs. Methods: For ten subjects, T2 fast-spin-echo images were acquired at two different time points, the first several weeks prior to planning (diagnostic-MRI) and the second on the same day in which the planning CT was collected (planning-MRI). Significant effort in patient positioning and bowel/bladder preparation was undertaken to minimize distortion of the prostate in all datasets. The diagnostic-MRI was deformed to the planning-CT utilizing a commercially available deformable registration algorithm synthesized from local registrations. The deformed MRI was then rigidly aligned to the planning MRI which was used as the surrogate for the planning-CT. Agreement between the two MRI datasets was scored using intensity based metrics including Pearson correlation and normalized mutual information, NMI. A local analysis was performed by looking only within the prostate, proximal seminal vesicles, penile bulb and combined areas. A similar method was used to assess a rigid registration between the diagnostic-MRI and planning-CT. Results: Utilizing the NMI, the deformable registrations were superior to the rigid registrations in 9 of 10 cases demonstrating a 15.94% improvement (p-value < 0.001) within the combined area. The Pearson correlation showed similar results with the deformable registration superior in the same number of cases and demonstrating a 6.97% improvement (p-value <0.011). Conclusion: Validating deformable multi-modality registrations using spatial intensity based metrics is difficult due to the inherent differences in intensity mapping. This population provides an ideal testing ground for MRI to CT deformable registrations by obviating the need

  17. MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration therapy. A cost comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H.; Froeling, V.; Roettgen, R.; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F. [Charite University Medicine Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Bretschneider, T. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Hartwig, T.; Disch, A.C. [Charite University Medicine Berlin (Germany). Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the costs of MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration for the minimally invasive treatment of radicular neck pain. Materials and Methods: Between September 2009 and April 2012, 22 patients (9 men, 13 women; mean age: 48.2 years) underwent MRI-guided (1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips) single-site periradicular cervical nerve root infiltration with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide. A further 64 patients (34 men, 30 women; mean age: 50.3 years) were treated under CT fluoroscopic guidance (Somatom Definition 64, Siemens). The mean overall costs were calculated as the sum of the prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, maintenance, and energy costs), personnel costs and expenditure for disposables that were identified for MRI- and CT-guided procedures. Additionally, the cost of ultrasound guidance was calculated. Results: The mean intervention time was 24.9 min. (range: 12-36 min.) for MRI-guided infiltration and 19.7 min. (range: 5-54 min.) for CT-guided infiltration. The average total costs per patient were EUR 240 for MRI-guided interventions and EUR 124 for CT-guided interventions. These were (MRI/CT guidance) EUR 150/60 for equipment use, EUR 46/40 for personnel, and EUR 44/25 for disposables. The mean overall cost of ultrasound guidance was EUR 76. Conclusion: Cervical nerve root infiltration using MRI guidance is still about twice as expensive as infiltration using CT guidance. However, since it does not involve radiation exposure for patients and personnel, MRI-guided nerve root infiltration may become a promising alternative to the CT-guided procedure, especially since a further price decrease is expected for MRI devices and MR-compatible disposables. In contrast, ultrasound remains the less expensive method for nerve root infiltration guidance. (orig.)

  18. MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration therapy. A cost comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, M.H.; Froeling, V.; Roettgen, R.; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F.; Bretschneider, T.; Hartwig, T.; Disch, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the costs of MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration for the minimally invasive treatment of radicular neck pain. Materials and Methods: Between September 2009 and April 2012, 22 patients (9 men, 13 women; mean age: 48.2 years) underwent MRI-guided (1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips) single-site periradicular cervical nerve root infiltration with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide. A further 64 patients (34 men, 30 women; mean age: 50.3 years) were treated under CT fluoroscopic guidance (Somatom Definition 64, Siemens). The mean overall costs were calculated as the sum of the prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, maintenance, and energy costs), personnel costs and expenditure for disposables that were identified for MRI- and CT-guided procedures. Additionally, the cost of ultrasound guidance was calculated. Results: The mean intervention time was 24.9 min. (range: 12-36 min.) for MRI-guided infiltration and 19.7 min. (range: 5-54 min.) for CT-guided infiltration. The average total costs per patient were EUR 240 for MRI-guided interventions and EUR 124 for CT-guided interventions. These were (MRI/CT guidance) EUR 150/60 for equipment use, EUR 46/40 for personnel, and EUR 44/25 for disposables. The mean overall cost of ultrasound guidance was EUR 76. Conclusion: Cervical nerve root infiltration using MRI guidance is still about twice as expensive as infiltration using CT guidance. However, since it does not involve radiation exposure for patients and personnel, MRI-guided nerve root infiltration may become a promising alternative to the CT-guided procedure, especially since a further price decrease is expected for MRI devices and MR-compatible disposables. In contrast, ultrasound remains the less expensive method for nerve root infiltration guidance. (orig.)

  19. The comparative study of CT and MRI on femoral head necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yunliang; Liu Xianghua; Wu Shiqiang; Zeng Kangnian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the imaging features of CT and MRI in the femoral head necrosis as well as their pathological basis. Methods: 18 cases (30 hips) with femoral head necrosis proved by follow-up studies or pathology were analyzed, including 3 cases of pathological data. Results: The blurred high-density sclerotic line on CT in 28 hips were corresponded to 'line-like signs' on MRI, whereas, the other two hips without blurred high-density sclerosis line appeared 'line-like signs' on MRI. The normal area surrounded by the high-density line on CT in 26 hips were corresponded to fat-like signal area in 12 hips and mixed signal area in 14 hips on MRI. The other 4 hips with blurred bony trabeculum surrounded by the high-density line on CT showed mixed signal intensity on MRI. Conclusion: The high-density sclerotic line on CT corresponds to 'line-like sign' on MRI, which was considered as reactive interface between necrotic and viable region, was a specific signs to diagnose FHN. Compared with CT, MRI can accurately reflect pathological process during different repaired stages. (authors)

  20. PET/MRI and PET/CT in advanced gynaecological tumours: initial experience and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Freiwald-Chilla, Bianka [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Hauser, Nik [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Gynaecology, Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and PET/CT for staging and re-staging advanced gynaecological cancer patients as well as identify the potential benefits of each method in such a population. Twenty-six patients with suspicious or proven advanced gynaecological cancer (12 ovarian, seven cervical, one vulvar and four endometrial tumours, one uterine metastasis, and one primary peritoneal cancer) underwent whole-body imaging with a sequential trimodality PET/CT/MR system. Images were analysed regarding primary tumour detection and delineation, loco-regional lymph node staging, and abdominal/extra-abdominal distant metastasis detection (last only by PET/CT). Eighteen (69.2 %) patients underwent PET/MRI for primary staging and eight patients (30.8 %) for re-staging their gynaecological malignancies. For primary tumour delineation, PET/MRI accuracy was statistically superior to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Among the different types of cancer, PET/MRI presented better tumour delineation mainly for cervical (6/7) and endometrial (2/3) cancers. PET/MRI for local evaluation as well as PET/CT for extra-abdominal metastases had therapeutic consequences in three and one patients, respectively. PET/CT detected 12 extra-abdominal distant metastases in 26 patients. PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT for primary tumour delineation. No differences were found in detection of regional lymph node involvement and abdominal metastases detection. (orig.)

  1. Cranial x-ray CT and MRI in congenital muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Hirosei; Konishi, Toshihiko; Konagaya, Masaaki; Mano, Yukio; Takayanagi, Tetsuya

    1988-01-01

    The involvements of central nervous system in those cases of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), especially in Fukuyama type CMD, have been observed both radiologically and pathologically. The recent development of MRI made it easier to detect fine structural changes in brain matter than the X-ray CT. Then, we tried to evaluate the central nervous system abnormalities of six cases of CMD by both X-ray CT and MRI. In one case, X-ray CT revealed diffuse hypodensity of cerebral white matter, and MRI showed high intensity on long spin-echo image and low intensity on inversion-recovery image. In another case, X-ray CT showed no abnormal findings, but long spin-echo image revealed two high intensity spots in cerebral white matter. In other four cases, brain atrophy was demonstrated by X-ray CT and/or MRI, one case of these patients had bilateral congenital arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa and hypogenesis of temporal lobes. Although we could not demonstrate polymicrogyria and agyria in all cases by MRI, white matter changes and structural changes were revealed more clearly than X-ray CT. The combination of X-ray CT and MRI seems to make a noteworthy contribution to estimate the central nervous system abnormalities in CMD. (author)

  2. CT and MRI matching for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasch, C; Keus, R; Touw, A; Lebesque, J; Van Herk, M [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of matched CT and MRI information on target delineation in radiotherapy planning for head and neck tumors. MRI images of eight patients with head and neck cancer in supine position, not necessarily obtained in radiotherapy treatment position were matched to the CT scans made in radiotherapy position using automatic three-dimensional chamfer-matching of bony structures. Four independent observers delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in CT scans and axial and sagittal MR scans. The GTV`s were compared, overlapping volumes and non-overlapping volumes between the different datasets and observers were determined. In all patients a good match of CT and MRI information was accomplished in the head region. The combined information provided a better visualisation of the GTV, oedema and normal tissues compared with CT or MRI alone. Determination of overlapping and non-overlapping volumes proved to be a valuable tool to measure uncertainties in the determination of the GTV. CT-MRI matching in patients with head and neck tumors is feasible and makes a more accurate irradiation with higher tumor doses and less normal tissue complications possible. Remaining uncertainties in the determination of the GTV can be quantified using the combined information of MRI and CT.

  3. Comparison of CT and MRI in patients with tibial plateau fracture: can CT findings predict ligament tear or meniscal injury?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mui, Leonora W.; Engelsohn, Eliyahu; Umans, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    (1) To determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of ligament tear and avulsion in patients with tibial plateau fracture. (2) To evaluate whether the presence or severity of fracture gap and articular depression can predict meniscal injury. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist retrospectively reviewed knee CT and MRI examinations of 41 consecutive patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with tibial plateau fractures. Fracture gap, articular depression, ligament tear and footprint avulsions were assessed on CT examinations. The MRI studies were examined for osseous and soft tissue injuries, including meniscal tear, meniscal displacement, ligament tear, and ligament avulsion. CT demonstrated torn ligaments with 80% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Only 2% of ligaments deemed intact on careful CT evaluation had partial or complete tears on MRI. Although the degree of fracture gap and articular depression was significantly greater in patients with meniscal injury compared with those without meniscal injury, ROC analysis demonstrated no clear threshold for gap or depression that yielded a combination of high sensitivity and specificity. In the acute setting, CT offers high sensitivity and specificity for depicting osseous avulsions, as well as high negative predictive value for excluding ligament injury. However, MRI remains necessary for the preoperative detection of meniscal injury. (orig.)

  4. Simulation of spatiotemporal CT data sets using a 4D MRI-based lung motion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Mirko; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Handels, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Four-dimensional CT imaging is widely used to account for motion-related effects during radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients. However, 4D CT often contains motion artifacts, cannot be used to measure motion variability, and leads to higher dose exposure. In this article, we propose using 4D MRI to acquire motion information for the radiotherapy planning process. From the 4D MRI images, we derive a time-continuous model of the average patient-specific respiratory motion, which is then applied to simulate 4D CT data based on a static 3D CT. The idea of the motion model is to represent the average lung motion over a respiratory cycle by cyclic B-spline curves. The model generation consists of motion field estimation in the 4D MRI data by nonlinear registration, assigning respiratory phases to the motion fields, and applying a B-spline approximation on a voxel-by-voxel basis to describe the average voxel motion over a breathing cycle. To simulate a patient-specific 4D CT based on a static CT of the patient, a multi-modal registration strategy is introduced to transfer the motion model from MRI to the static CT coordinates. Differences between model-based estimated and measured motion vectors are on average 1.39 mm for amplitude-based binning of the 4D MRI data of three patients. In addition, the MRI-to-CT registration strategy is shown to be suitable for the model transformation. The application of our 4D MRI-based motion model for simulating 4D CT images provides advantages over standard 4D CT (less motion artifacts, radiation-free). This makes it interesting for radiotherapy planning.

  5. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  6. MRI of atlantoaxial subluxation; Correlating with plain X-ray films and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikawa, Yuko; Nishi, Naoko; Saitoh, Yoko; Akimura, Rumiko; Sasaki, Taisuke; Yodono, Hiraku; Takekawa, Shoichi; Harata, Seikou; Sannohe, Akio (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-04-01

    Twenty-three patients with atlantoaxial subluxation (14 with rheumatoid arthritis, one each with rheumatoid arthritis and Arnold-Chiari malformation, os odontoideum, Klippel-Feil syndrome, trauma, and 5 with unknown causes) were evaluated with MRI. We used 0.5 T MRI unit (RESONA; Yokogawa Medical Systems, Japan) and 1.5 T MRI unit (SMT 150; Shimazu, Japan) with head or flexible coils. We compared the usefulness of MRI with those of plain X-ray films and CT regarding several points. MRI provided better image of the soft tissue mass around the odontoid process, compression of cord or subarachnoid space than plain X-ray films and CT. Atlanto-odontoid distance on MRI is nearer to that on plain X-ray films than CT. MRI is useful in analyzing the anatomic details such as transverse ligament, alar ligament, tectorial membrane and thickened synovium. Both MRI and CT provided detailed bony changes. High correlation was observed between MRI grading of cord compression and the degree of myelopathy. (author).

  7. Chronic spinal subdural haematoma associated with intracranial subdural haematoma: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillich, M.; Kammerhuber, F.; Reittner, P.; Szolar, D.H.; Leber, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic spinal subdural haematoma is a uncommon. We describe the CT and MRI appearances of chronic spinal and intracranial subdural haematomas following minor trauma. The aetiology, pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  8. MRI and CT features of hyperplastic callus in osteogenesis imperfecta tarda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrocky, I.; Seidl, G.; Grill, F.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the MRI and CT findings of hyperplastic callus formation simulating a tumour of pelvis in patient with osteogenesis imperfecta tarda. Possible differential diagnoses and the impact of different imaging techniques on the correct diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  9. CT and MRI demonstration of cerebral edema in preeclampsia: a report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versluis, P.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Ouden, M. den [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hasaart, T.H.M. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes two cases with transient blindness and temporary CT and MRI abnormalities, occurring, however, in preeclampsia instead of eclampsia. Factors involved in the clinical and imaging presentation are discussed. (orig./MG)

  10. CT and MRI demonstration of cerebral edema in preeclampsia: a report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versluis, P.J.; Ouden, M. den; Wilmink, J.T.; Hasaart, T.H.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes two cases with transient blindness and temporary CT and MRI abnormalities, occurring, however, in preeclampsia instead of eclampsia. Factors involved in the clinical and imaging presentation are discussed. (orig./MG)

  11. CT and MRI 'ring sign' may be due to demyelination: diagnostic pitfall.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    We report a case of acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in which both CT and MRI showed multiple ring-enhancing lesions suggestive of abscesses or brain tumour. This is a relatively rare phenomenon.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diffuse liver diseases. Comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Ebara, Masaaki; Ohto, Masao

    1987-06-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) was performed in 74 patients with chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, Budd-Chiari syndrome, extrahepatic protal vein occlusion, Wilson disease and hemochromatosis. We measured relaxation time of the liver and the spleen in these patients and compared MRI with CT in the diagnostic capability. MRI was superior to plain CT in the detection of collateral vessels in liver cirrhosis and extrahepatic protal vein occlusion. MRI could also demonstrate the occluded part of the inferior vena cava in Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, MRI was almost the same as CT in the visualization of the hepatic configuration in liver cirrhosis. In liver cirrhosis, T1 values of the liver and the spleen were longer than those in normal controls, and T1 values of the liver were correlated with ICG R-15. Hepatic T1 values in Budd-Chiari syndrome were longer than those in normal controls.

  13. Web-based video monitoring of CT and MRI procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Dahlbom, Magdalena; Kho, Hwa T.; Valentino, Daniel J.; McCoy, J. Michael

    2000-05-01

    A web-based video transmission of images from CT and MRI consoles was implemented in an Intranet environment for real- time monitoring of ongoing procedures. Images captured from the consoles are compressed to video resolution and broadcasted through a web server. When called upon, the attending radiologists can view these live images on any computer within the secured Intranet network. With adequate compression, these images can be displayed simultaneously in different locations at a rate of 2 to 5 images/sec through standard LAN. The quality of the images being insufficient for diagnostic purposes, our users survey showed that they were suitable for supervising a procedure, positioning the imaging slices and for routine quality checking before completion of a study. The system was implemented at UCLA to monitor 9 CTs and 6 MRIs distributed in 4 buildings. This system significantly improved the radiologists productivity by saving precious time spent in trips between reading rooms and examination rooms. It also improved patient throughput by reducing the waiting time for the radiologists to come to check a study before moving the patient from the scanner.

  14. Medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity: US, CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Uliasz, M.; Roszkowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastoma accounts for up to 25% of all paediatric CNS tumours. According to WHO classification (2007) medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN) is a separate rare entity associated with younger age and better prognosis. A 9-month-old girl was admitted and examined because of macrocephaly and disturbed psychomotor development. Transfontanel ultrasound revealed dilated ventricular system and hyperechoic mass in the posterior cranial fossa. Computed tomography showed hyperdense mass in the cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass with gyriform pattern and strong contrast enhancement after gadolinium administration. Differential diagnosis included dysplastic heterotopic cortex, Lhermitte-Duclos disease, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT), and medulloblastoma (MB). The patient was operated on. Medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN) was finally diagnosed. The authors present and discuss three other cases of this rare entity.Transfontanel sonografic examination is capable of detection of the posterior fossa tumour as a cause of hydrocephalus and macrocephaly. The mass in a child's posterior cranial fossa that is hyperdense on unenhanced CT and gyriform, nodular, and markedly enhancing on MRI may strongly suggest medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN). (authors)

  15. (CT, MRI, USG) radiological diagnostics of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwikla, J.; Furmanek, M.; Walecki, J.; Sankowski, A.; Pawlowska-Detko, A.

    2007-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) consists of a heterogeneneous group of neoplasma, that are able to express cell membrane neuroamine uptake mechanisms and/or specific receptors, which can be used in the localization and treatment of these tumours. Conventionally NETs may present with a wide variety of functional or nonfuctional endocrinesyndromes and may be familial and have other associated tumors, also they have different histology and prognosis. They originate from endocrine glands such as the pituitary, the parathyroids, and the neuroendocrine) adrenal, as well as endocrine islets within glandular tissue (thyroid or pancreatic) and cells dispersed between exocrine cells, such as endocrine cells of the digestive system (gastroenteropancreatic GEP-NET0 and respiratory tracts. GEp-NET are the the most common including more 70% of all NETs. Imaging modalities and assessment of specific tumors markers offers high sensitivity in establishing the diagnosis and can also have pronostic significance. One of most important single imaging techniques in terms of initial identification and staging o GET-NET are CT and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS). Other investigation like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic (EUS) are used for the precise localization of GEP-NET. Another techniques including functional approach 123 I MIBG (meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy) and FDG PET.Important using of imaging approach is monitoring of response on treatment. (author)

  16. Usual interstitial pneumonia and non-specific interstitial pneumonia: serial thin-section CT findings correlated with pulmonary function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeon Joo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Man Pyo; Chung Myung Jin; Han, Joung Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Mueller, Nestor L. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Colby, Thomas V. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale (United States); Kim, Seon Woo [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    We wanted to demonstrate and compare the serial high-resolution CTs (HRCT) and the pulmonary function test (PFT) findings of the usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and the non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). The serial HRCT scans and the PFT results were retrospectively analysed and compared for 35 patients having UIP without significant honeycombing (UIP-w/o hc, < 5% of honeycombing at CT), 35 patients having UIP with honeycombing (UIP-w/i hc, {>=} 5% of honeycombing), and 25 patients with NSIP. The mortality rates were also compared. Follow-up CT scans were available in 75 patients (29 UIP-w/o hc patients, 22 UIP-w/i hc patients and 24 NSIP patients) and the follow-up periods ranged from 150 to 2,370 days. The initial and follow-up PFT data were available for 71 patients. On the initial CT, significant differences were present between the UIP-w/i hc patients and both the UIP-w/o hc patients and the NSIP patients in the overall extent, ground-glass opacity (GGO) away from the reticulation, reticulation and honeycombing (all {rho} < 0.05). Improvement was noticed in five (17%) of 29 UIP-w/o hc patients, none of 22 UIP-w/i hc patients, and 9 (37%) of 24 NSIP patients; deterioration was noted in six (21%) UIP-w/o hc patients, two (9%) UIP-w/i hc patients and three (13%) NSIP patients ({rho} 0.044 between UIP-w/o and UIP-w/i hc; {rho} = 0.637 between UIP-w/o hc and NSIP; {rho} = 0.007 between UIP-w/i hc and NSIP). The serial changes of the pulmonary function in the NSIP patients were different from those noted for the UIP-w/i hc and UIP-w/o hc patients ({rho} = 0.440 between UIP-w/o and UIP-w/i hc; {rho} = 0.022 between UIP-w/o hc and NSIP; {rho} =0.003 between UIP-w/i hc and NSIP). Five (14%) of the 35 patients with UIP-w/o hc, 16 (46%) of the 35 patients with UIP-w/i hc and three (12%) of the 25 patients with NSIP died ({rho} = 0.002, comparison for the three groups). On CT, NSIP and UIP-w/o hc patients have similar patterns of parenchymal abnormalities and

  17. A STUDY ON PERITUMORAL BRAIN EDEMA AROUND MENINGIOMAS BY MRI AND CONTRAST CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; KAMMAN, RL; WILMINK, JT; MOOYAART, EL

    1994-01-01

    In the present study upon 9 meningiomas, the volume of peritumoral brain edema was calculated by integration of the cross-sectional edematous areas on serial MRI slices. It was zero in 3 cases and ranged from 11 to 176.4 ml in the other cases. There was disruption of the cortex in all cases, ranging

  18. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitton, I. [European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Department of Radiology, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris (France); Cornelissen, S. A. P. [Image Sciences Institute, UMC, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Peeters, S. T. H. [UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgique (Belgium); Hoebers, F. J. P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Development Biology Maastricht, 6229 ET Maastricht (Netherlands); Kaanders, J. H. A. M. [UMC St-Radboud, Department of Radiotherapy, Geert Grooteplein 32, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, P. J. C. M. [ERASMUS University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology,Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  19. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa, E-mail: t.sieswerda@amc.nl [Section of Forensic Pediatrics, Department of Forensic Medicine, Netherlands Forensic Institute, PO Box 24044, 2490 AA The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Postema, Floor A.M., E-mail: f.a.postema@amc.nl [Faculty of Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbaan, Dagmar, E-mail: d.verbaan@amc.nl [Department of Neurosurgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Majoie, Charles B., E-mail: c.b.majoie@amc.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van, E-mail: r.r.vanrijn@amc.nl [Section of Forensic Pediatrics, Department of Forensic Medicine, Netherlands Forensic Institute, PO Box 24044, 2490 AA The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. Methods: We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers independently screened the articles, assessed methodological quality and performed data extraction. Medians with interquartile ranges were calculated. Differences were tested with a Mann–Whitney U or Kruskal–Wallis H test. Results: We included 22 studies describing 973 SDHs on CT and 4 studies describing 83 SDHs on MRI. Data from 17 studies (413 SDHs) could be pooled. There were significant differences between time intervals for the different densities on CT (p < 0.001). Time interval differed significantly between children and adults for iso- and hypodensity (p = 0.000) and hyperdensity (p = 0.046). Time interval did not differ significantly between abused and non-abused children. On MRI, time intervals for different signal intensities on T1 and T2 did not differ significantly (p = 0.108 and p = 0.194, respectively). Conclusions: Most time intervals of the different appearances of SDHs on CT and MRI are broad and overlapping. Therefore CT or MRI findings cannot be used to accurately date SDHs.

  20. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Postema, Floor A.M.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Majoie, Charles B.; Rijn, Rick R. van

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. Methods: We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers independently screened the articles, assessed methodological quality and performed data extraction. Medians with interquartile ranges were calculated. Differences were tested with a Mann–Whitney U or Kruskal–Wallis H test. Results: We included 22 studies describing 973 SDHs on CT and 4 studies describing 83 SDHs on MRI. Data from 17 studies (413 SDHs) could be pooled. There were significant differences between time intervals for the different densities on CT (p < 0.001). Time interval differed significantly between children and adults for iso- and hypodensity (p = 0.000) and hyperdensity (p = 0.046). Time interval did not differ significantly between abused and non-abused children. On MRI, time intervals for different signal intensities on T1 and T2 did not differ significantly (p = 0.108 and p = 0.194, respectively). Conclusions: Most time intervals of the different appearances of SDHs on CT and MRI are broad and overlapping. Therefore CT or MRI findings cannot be used to accurately date SDHs

  1. Alveolar Echinococcosis of the Liver: Correlative Color Doppler US, CT, and MRI Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cokun, A.; Oeztuerk, M.; Karahan, O.I.; Erdogan, N.; Ikin, S.; Guelec, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine and compare the imaging features of hepatic alveolar Echinococcosis using color Doppler US, CT, and MRI. Material and Methods: Abdominal CT and MRI with and without contrast agents and color Doppler US were performed on seven patients with hepatic alveolar Echinococcosis. The lesions were evaluated for location, features of echogenicity, intensity and density, calcification, and vascular, hilar, and perihepatic involvement. The diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in all patients. Results: Six patients had solitary lesions, and one displayed multiple lesions. The lesions were generally seen as heterogeneous and hyper- or hypoechoic when imaged with color Doppler US, hypodense with CT, and hypointense with MRI, in comparison with the liver parenchyma. Calcification, central necrosis, and small peripheral cysts were observed in six, seven, and four patients, respectively. Vascular flow or contrast enhancement was not observed in any of the cases. A look at the respective advantages of each method reveals that calcification was best rendered visible via CT, small peripheral cysts with T2-weighted MRI, central necrosis with CT and MRI, and perihepatic invasion with multiplanar MRI. Vascular involvement was revealed by all methods. Conclusion: Color Doppler US, CT, and MR imaging function extremely well as complementary methods in the diagnosis of HAE. Color Doppler US should be performed in these patients owing to its ability to efficiently detect the disease. Knowledge of imaging characteristics makes it possible to radiologically ascertain an early diagnosis

  2. Comparison of MRI, CT, TCD and SPECT in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qun; Lu Bingxun; Yuan Huijuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the characteristics of MRI, CT, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor. Methods: Seventeen patients were investigated. MRI or CT was scanned in 17 patients, SPECT in 9 patients' and TCD in 11 patients. Results: MRI or CT: Brain MRI and CT revealed extensive symmetric white matter involvement of bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres and the brainstem. The lesions, which showed no contrast enhancement, were hypodense on CT and hypointense on T 1 -weighted and hyperintense on T 2 -weighted MRI. SPECT: The regional cerebral blood flows (rCBF) of white matter involvement on bilateral cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres was reduced obviously. The rCBF of temporal lobes, parietal lobes, occipital lobes, cerebellar hemispheres, and basal ganglion was reduced in varying degrees. TCD: The systolic peak became sharpened, and end-diastolic flow velocity and mean flow velocity were reduced obviously and pulsatile index was increased markedly in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor. Conclusion: The characteristic manifestations of MRI and CT imaging may be regarded as the main foundation of diagnosing spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor; SPECT and TCD can help comprehend the changes of hemodynamics of cerebral vessels and the degree of cerebral ischemia in patients with spongiform leukoencephalopathy after inhaling heroin vapor

  3. Plasma exchange combined with azathioprine in multiple sclerosis using serial gadolinium-enhanced MRI to monitor disease activity: a randomized single-masked cross-over pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.S.; Wanscher, B; Szpirt, W

    1996-01-01

    the whole trial, and three patients discontinued the trial, two during the run-in period of azathioprine treatment and one at the introduction of PE. The primary efficacy variables were the number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions and the occurrence of new enhancing lesions on serial MRI performed every 3...... in the two periods. Although the total MS lesion load on MRI was significantly lower (p beneficial effect of PE or encourage a subsequent large...

  4. Wandering carotid arteries: Reciprocating change between normal and retropharyngeal positions on serial CT studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Baba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Positional change in the retropharyngeal carotid artery, a rare phenomenon over time, is even rarer in previous reports, and it is important to be aware of this before any neck surgical procedure. A woman in her 50s underwent an anterior maxillectomy for upper gingival cancer, without neck dissection. The patient had medical histories of diabetes mellitus and liver dysfunction, with unremarkable family histories. Serial neck contrast-enhanced computed tomography for detecting locoregional recurrence had been performed as a follow-up during 4 years. A radiological course of moving carotid arteries in serial computed tomography studies showed reciprocating positional changes (wandering between normal and retropharyngeal regions. There was no locoregional recurrence of the gingival cancer. This is the first case to describe a so-rare presentation of wandering carotid arteries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of a wandering carotid artery to avoid potentially fatal complications.

  5. Investigation of the growth patterns of non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas using volumetric assessments on serial MRI investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Pieterse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benign non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFMA often cause mass effect on the optic chiasm necessitating transsphenoidal surgery to prevent blindness.However, surgery is complicated and there is a high tumour recurrence rate. Currently, very little is known about the natural (and residual post-surgical growth patterns of these NFMA. Conflicting data describe decreased growth to exponential growth over various time periods.Due to lack of information on growth dynamics of these NFMA, suitable follow-up imaging protocols have not been described to date. Objective: To determine if NFMA grow or stay quiescent over a time period using serial MRI investigations and a stereo logical method to determine tumour volume. In addition, to evaluate if NFMA adhere to a certain growth pattern or grow at random. Method: Thirteen patients with NFMA had serial MRI investigations over a 73-month period at the Universitas Academic Hospital. Six of the selected patients had undergone previous surgery, while seven patients had received no medical or surgical intervention. By using astereological method, tumour volumes were calculated and plotted over time to demonstrate growth curves. The data were then fitted to tumour growth models already described in literature in order to obtain the best fit by calculating the r2 value. Results: Positive tumour growth was demonstrated in all cases. Tumour growth patterns of nine patients best fitted the exponential growth curve while the growth patterns of three patients best fitted the logistic growth curve. The remaining patient demonstrated a linear growth pattern. Conclusion: A specific growth model best described tumour growth observed in non-surgical and surgical cases. If follow-up imaging confirms positive growth, future growth can be predicted by extrapolation. This information can then be used to determine the relevant follow-up-imaging interval in each individual patient.

  6. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  7. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Edmund, Jens M.

    2016-01-01

    . The authors benchmark the method against a baseline pCT strategy where all voxels inside the body contour are assigned a water-equivalent bulk density. Furthermore, the authors implement a parallelized approximate patch search strategy to speed up the pCT generation time to a more clinically relevant level....... The data consisted of CT and T 1-weighted MRI scans of 10 prostate patients. pCTs were generated using an approximate patch search algorithm in a leave-one-out fashion and compared with the CT using frequently described metrics such as the voxel-wise mean absolute error (MAEvox) and the deviation in water...... showed that a patch-based method based on affine registrations and T 1-weighted MRI could generate accurate pCTs of the pelvis. The main source of differences between pCT and CT was positional changes of air pockets and body outline....

  8. Diagnosing and staging of cystic echinococcosis: how do CT and MRI perform in comparison to ultrasound?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Stojkovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Imaging plays the key role in diagnosing and staging of CE. The description of CE-specific imaging features and the WHO CE cyst classification is based on ultrasound. The reproducibility of the ultrasound-defined features of CE cysts is variable in MR- and CT-imaging. This is of particular importance for cysts that are not accessible by US and because of the increasing availability and overuse of CT and MR imaging. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Retrospective analysis of patients with abdominal CE cysts of an interdisciplinary CE clinic who had CT and/or MRI scans performed additionally to US imaging. All images were read and interpreted by the same senior radiologist experienced in the diagnosis of CE. US, CT and MR images were staged according to the WHO classification criteria. The agreement beyond chance was quantified by kappa coefficients (κ. 107 patients with 187 CE cysts met the inclusion criteria. All cysts were assessed by US, 138 by CT, and 125 by MRI. The level of agreement beyond chance of the individual CE stages 1-4 was clearly lower for CT, with κ ranging from 0.62 to 0.72, compared to MRI with values of κ between 0.83 and 1.0. For CE5 cysts CT (κ = 0.95 performed better than MRI (κ = 0.65. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound remains the corner stone of diagnosis, staging and follow up of CE cysts. MRI reproduces the ultrasound-defined features of CE better than CT. If US cannot be performed due to cyst location or patient-specific reasons MRI with heavily T2-weighted series is preferable to CT.

  9. CT, MRI and MRA of cerebrovascular malformations (report of 16 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Qingguo; Hu Chunhong; Guo Liang; Ding Yi

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of CT, MRI and MRA in cerebrovascular malformations. Methods: 16 cases of cerebrovascular malformations were confirmed by angiography and pathology, including 12 cases of arteriovenous malformations, 4 cases of cavernous angiomas. All of these cases were performed with CT, MRI non-contrast scan and 3D-TOF MRA. Results: CT appearances of AVM were mixed density with hypo-density, iso-density or hyper-density. Some had calcification or acute hemorrhage. MRI scan showed the dilated and tortuous nidus of AVMs on T 1 WI and T 2 WI. The appearances of hemorrhage were variable. Feeding arteries and draining veins were showed clearly on MRA. The typical sign of cavernous angiomas was mixed signals with hypointensity ring on MRI, while MRA could not provide much information. Conclusions: CT, MRI and MRA had different value in diagnosis of cerebrovascular malformations. CT combined with MRI and MRA could sharply improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and aid in the comprehensive evaluation of cerebrovascular malformations

  10. Comparison of CT and MRI artefacts from coils and vascular plugs used for portal vein embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.geisel@charite.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Gebauer, Bernhard [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Malinowski, Maciej; Stockmann, Martin [Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the degree of artefacts in CT and MRI scans caused by coils and vascular plugs used for portal vein embolization (PVE). Materials and methods: All patients who underwent PVE between July 2011 and December 2012 and received either plug or coil embolization additional to particle embolization were retrospectively analyzed. Artefacts causes by embolization materials were measured in CT and MRI scans following PVE. Results: The sum of the artefact diameters caused from coils was significantly higher in CT (188.3 ± 26.1 mm) than in MRI T1 (50.5 ± 6.5 mm) or T2 imaging (39.5 ± 9.7 mm) (P < 0.05). In MRI, the diameter in T1 and T2 sequences did not differ significantly (P = 0.977). The sum of the artefact diameters from vascular plugs in MRI T1 sequences (62.5 ± 8.7 mm) was significantly higher than in CT (46.6 ± 4.8 mm; P < 0.05) and MRI T2 sequences (52.8 ± 3.8 mm; P < 0.05). Conclusion: PVE with particles and vascular plug causes significantly fewer artefacts than PVE with particles and coils on CT scans following embolization, which can be important in the event of vascular complications or in follow-up scans, should the patient become unresectable.

  11. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2015-01-01

    scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T1-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods...... based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results:The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric......Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan...

  12. Indeterminate findings on oncologic PET/CT: What difference dose PET/MRI make?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraum, Tyler J.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; McConathy, Jonathan; Dehdashti, Farokh [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) has become the standard of care for the initial staging and subsequent treatment response assessment of many different malignancies. Despite this success, PET/CT is often supplemented by MRI to improve assessment of local tumor invasion and to facilitate detection of lesions in organs with high background FDG uptake. Consequently, PET/MRI has the potential to expand the clinical value of PET examinations by increasing reader certainty and reducing the need for subsequent imaging. This study evaluates the ability of FDG-PET/MRI to clarify findings initially deemed indeterminate on clinical FDG-PET/CT studies. A total of 190 oncology patients underwent whole-body PET/CT, immediately followed by PET/MRI utilizing the same FDG administration. Each PET/CT was interpreted by our institution's nuclear medicine service as a standard-of-care clinical examination. Review of these PET/CT reports identified 31 patients (16 %) with indeterminate findings. Two readers evaluated all 31 PET/CT studies, followed by the corresponding PET/MRI studies. A consensus was reached for each case, and changes in interpretation directly resulting from PET/MRI review were recorded. Interpretations were then correlated with follow-up imaging, pathology results, and other diagnostic studies. In 18 of 31 cases with indeterminate findings on PET/CT, PET/MRI resulted in a more definitive interpretation by facilitating the differentiation of infection/inflammation from malignancy (15/18), the accurate localization of FDG-avid lesions (2/18), and the characterization of incidental non-FDG-avid solid organ lesions (1/18). Explanations for improved reader certainty with PET/MRI included the superior soft tissue contrast of MRI and the ability to assess cellular density with diffusion-weighted imaging. The majority (12/18) of such cases had an appropriate standard of reference; in all 12 cases

  13. Indeterminate findings on oncologic PET/CT: What difference dose PET/MRI make?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraum, Tyler J.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; McConathy, Jonathan; Dehdashti, Farokh

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 2-deoxy-2-["1"8F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) has become the standard of care for the initial staging and subsequent treatment response assessment of many different malignancies. Despite this success, PET/CT is often supplemented by MRI to improve assessment of local tumor invasion and to facilitate detection of lesions in organs with high background FDG uptake. Consequently, PET/MRI has the potential to expand the clinical value of PET examinations by increasing reader certainty and reducing the need for subsequent imaging. This study evaluates the ability of FDG-PET/MRI to clarify findings initially deemed indeterminate on clinical FDG-PET/CT studies. A total of 190 oncology patients underwent whole-body PET/CT, immediately followed by PET/MRI utilizing the same FDG administration. Each PET/CT was interpreted by our institution's nuclear medicine service as a standard-of-care clinical examination. Review of these PET/CT reports identified 31 patients (16 %) with indeterminate findings. Two readers evaluated all 31 PET/CT studies, followed by the corresponding PET/MRI studies. A consensus was reached for each case, and changes in interpretation directly resulting from PET/MRI review were recorded. Interpretations were then correlated with follow-up imaging, pathology results, and other diagnostic studies. In 18 of 31 cases with indeterminate findings on PET/CT, PET/MRI resulted in a more definitive interpretation by facilitating the differentiation of infection/inflammation from malignancy (15/18), the accurate localization of FDG-avid lesions (2/18), and the characterization of incidental non-FDG-avid solid organ lesions (1/18). Explanations for improved reader certainty with PET/MRI included the superior soft tissue contrast of MRI and the ability to assess cellular density with diffusion-weighted imaging. The majority (12/18) of such cases had an appropriate standard of reference; in all 12 cases, the

  14. Automated segmentation of ventricles from serial brain MRI for the quantification of volumetric changes associated with communicating hydrocephalus in patients with brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pura, John A.; Hamilton, Allison M.; Vargish, Geoffrey A.; Butman, John A.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2011-03-01

    Accurate ventricle volume estimates could improve the understanding and diagnosis of postoperative communicating hydrocephalus. For this category of patients, associated changes in ventricle volume can be difficult to identify, particularly over short time intervals. We present an automated segmentation algorithm that evaluates ventricle size from serial brain MRI examination. The technique combines serial T1- weighted images to increase SNR and segments the means image to generate a ventricle template. After pre-processing, the segmentation is initiated by a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm to find the seeds used in a combination of fast marching methods and geodesic active contours. Finally, the ventricle template is propagated onto the serial data via non-linear registration. Serial volume estimates were obtained in an automated robust and accurate manner from difficult data.

  15. A tool for validating MRI-guided strategies: a digital breathing CT/MRI phantom of the abdominal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Summers, Paul; Gianoli, Chiara; Bellomi, Massimo; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as the elected image modality for organ motion quantification and management in image-guided radiotherapy. However, the lack of validation tools is an open issue for image guidance in the abdominal and thoracic organs affected by organ motion due to respiration. We therefore present an abdominal four-dimensional (4D) CT/MRI digital phantom, including the estimation of MR tissue parameters, simulation of dedicated abdominal MR sequences, modeling of radiofrequency coil response and noise, followed by k-space sampling and image reconstruction. The phantom allows the realistic simulation of images generated by MR pulse sequences with control of scan and tissue parameters, combined with co-registered CT images. In order to demonstrate the potential of the phantom in a clinical scenario, we describe the validation of a virtual T1-weighted 4D MRI strategy. Specifically, the motion extracted from a T2-weighted 4D MRI is used to warp a T1-weighted breath-hold acquisition, with the aim of overcoming trade-offs that limit T1-weighted acquisitions. Such an application shows the applicability of the digital CT/MRI phantom as a validation tool, which should be especially useful for cases unsuited to obtain real imaging data.

  16. Serial MRI of vestibular schwannoma presenting transient enlargement associated with intratumoral hemorrhage following radiosurgery. Two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Kazuo; Goto, Hiromi; Isaki, Kenji; Sato, Sonomi

    2010-01-01

    Two cases of vestibular schwannoma showing transient enlargement with hemorrhage that was recognized on T2 or T2*-weighted MR image are reported. Case 1: A 72-year-old woman had a recurrent cystic lesion after resection and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). After retreatment by gamma knife radiosurgery, the cystic component further expanded with a fluid-fluid level, and T2 or T2*-weighted image showed markedly-low signal in the parenchymal component. Chronic hemorrhage from the cyst wall injured by irradiation is probably related to expansion of the cyst. Case 2: A 59-year-old woman received SRS. Serial MRI scans demonstrated a lesion continually expanding with homogeneous contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images. At 64 months after treatment, a central portion with high blood flow surrounded by a markedly-low intensity component of apparent hemorrhage on T2*-weighted MRI was identified. The lesion decreased in size after 73 months. Hemorrhage might occur from the neogenetic angioma-like tissue induced by irradiation effect in the tumor. Based on these observations, microvasculopathy associated with irradiation is a probable mechanism that induces bleeding in vestibular schwannoma following radiosurgery. (author)

  17. Comparing three-dimensional serial optical coherence tomography histology to MRI imaging in the entire mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    An automated serial histology setup combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with vibratome sectioning was used to image eight wild type mouse brains. The datasets resulted in thousands of volumetric tiles resolved at a voxel size of (4.9×4.9×6.5) μm3 stitched back together to give a three-dimensional map of the brain from which a template OCT brain was obtained. To assess deformation caused by tissue sectioning, reconstruction algorithms, and fixation, OCT datasets were compared to both in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging. The OCT brain template yielded a highly detailed map of the brain structure, with a high contrast in white matter fiber bundles and was highly resemblant to the in vivo MRI template. Brain labeling using the Allen brain framework showed little variation in regional brain volume among imaging modalities with no statistical differences. The high correspondence between the OCT template brain and its in vivo counterpart demonstrates the potential of whole brain histology to validate in vivo imaging.

  18. Serial brain MRI findings in CNS involvement of familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung Soo; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Suh, Jeong Soo; Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hong, Ki Sook; Kim, Hak Jin

    2002-01-01

    Familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a fatal early childhood disorder characterized by multiorgan lymphohistiocytic infiltration and active hemophagocytosis. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is not uncommon and is characterized by rapidly progressive tissue damage affecting both the gray and white matter. We encountered a case of familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with CNS involvement. Initial T2-weighted MRI of the brain demonstrated high signal intensity in the right thalamus, though after chemotherapy, which led to the relief of neurologic symptoms, this disappeared. After four months. however, the patient's neurologic symptoms recurred, and follow-up T2-weighted MR images showed high signal intensity in the thalami, basal ganglia, and cerebral and cerebellar white matter. Brain MRI is a useful imaging modality for the evaluation of CNS involvement and monitoring the response to treatment

  19. Clinical neuroanatomy - cranial MRI and CT. 4. rev. and enl. ed.; Klinische Neuroanatomie - kranielle MRT und CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanfermann, Heinrich; Raab, Peter [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (MHH) (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Kretschmann, Hans-Joachim; Weinrich, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    The book on clinical neuroanatomy - cranial MRI and CT covers the following issues: layered imaging diagnostics and reference structures; frontal layer, sagittal layers, transverse layers, brainstem, skull topography and the intracranial spaces and structures, facial skull topography, head-neck topography; neurofunctional systems, neurotransmitter and neuromodulators, surveillance material and techniques.

  20. Differential diagnosis of truly suprasellar space-occupying masses: synopsis of clinical findings, CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reul, J.; Weis, J.; Spetzger, U.; Isensee, C.; Thron, A.

    1995-01-01

    This review demonstrates the features of truly suprasellar masses in modern imaging based on the clinical, CT, and MRI findings of 42 patients with suprasellar masses in correlation to the histologic findings. The radiologic examinations were evaluated retrospectively to determine if diagnosis can be made based on specific imaging patterns. The most frequent clinical findings of space-occupying suprasellar masses were visual disturbances, diabetes insipidus, and symptoms and signs of occlusive hydrocephalus. There were no clinical features specific for any of the observed masses. Craniopharyngiomas were the most frequent tumors. They appeared in two different forms, as cystic and as solid enhancing masses. The cystic tumors could not be differentiated from cystic hamartomas or cystic gliomas by CT or MRI. The solid craniopharyngiomas were similar to meningiomas and hamartomas. In craniopharyngiomas of adults calcifications were not common. In CT and especially in MRI gliomas were characterized by the diffuse infiltration of the adjacent brain tissue or optic nerve. Except for meningiomas, all lesions were highly variable in appearance, making a reliable characterization by CT and MRI difficult in many cases. However, administration of contrast media in some cases resulted in a better tumor delineation. Compared with unenhanced MRI the enhanced scans did not increase diagnostic efficacy for neoplasms, but were helpful in the differentiation from inflammatory diseases. The MRI technique was superior to CT in demonstrating the anatomic relationships, thus facilitating evaluation of origin and extent of the lesions. The CT technique, of course, was more reliable in the detection of calcifications. Both CT and MRI are not tissue-specific, however, and suprasellar tumors as well as many other neoplasms cannot be classified using only one of these imaging techniques. (orig.)

  1. Enhancement pattern of small hepatic hemangioma: findings on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung In; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae

    1999-01-01

    To compare the enhancement characteristics of small hemangiomas seen on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. Thirteen patients with 20 hepatic hemangiomas less than 25mm in diameter underwent both multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. All lesions were assigned to one of three classified into 3 categories according to the enhancement pattern seen on multiphase spiral CT : typical delayed pooling, atypical early enhancement, or continuous low attenuation. The enhancement patterns seen on spiral CT and on dynamic MRI were correlated. On CT scans, ten lesions (50%) showed delayed pooling. Six (30%) showed early arterial enhancement and four (20%) showed continuous low attenuation. On delayed-phase MRI, all lesions showed delayed high signal intensity compared to adjacent liver parenchyma. Four of six lesions with early enhancement on CT showed peripheral globular enhancement on early arterial-phase MRI. On multiphase spiral CT scans, small hemangiomas can show variable atypical enhancement features. In this situation, contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI is helpful for the diagnosis of hemangiomas

  2. Patient satisfaction with coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, myocardial perfusion MRI, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging and conventional coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feger, S.; Rief, M.; Zimmermann, E.; Richter, F.; Roehle, R. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Schoenenberger, E. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department of Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate patient acceptance of noninvasive imaging tests for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), including single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI), stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coronary CT angiography (CTA) in combination with CT myocardial stress perfusion (CTP), and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Intraindividual comparison of perception of 48 patients from the CORE320 multicentre multinational study who underwent rest and stress SPECT-MPI with a technetium-based tracer, combined CTA and CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine), MRI, and CCA. The analysis was performed by using a validated questionnaire. Patients had significantly more concern prior to CCA than before CTA/CTP (p < 0.001). CTA/CTP was also rated as more comfortable than SPECT-MPI (p = 0.001). Overall satisfaction with CT was superior to that of MRI (p = 0.007). More patients preferred CT (46 %; p < 0.001) as a future diagnostic test. Regarding combined CTA/CTP, CTP was characterised by higher pain levels and an increased frequency of angina pectoris during the examination (p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a higher degree of pain during SPECT-MPI with adenosine stress compared to physical exercise (p = 0.016). All noninvasive cardiac imaging tests are well accepted by patients, with CT being the preferred examination. (orig.)

  3. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts

  4. CT of the musculoskeletal system: What is left is the days of MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, A.T.H.; Marshall, T.J.; Bearcroft, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a central role in the modern imaging of musculoskeletal disorders, due to its ability to produce multiplanar images and characterise soft tissues accurately. However, computed tomography (CT) still has an important role to play, not merely as an alternative to MRI, but as being the preferred imaging investigation in some situations. This article briefly reviews the history of CT technology, the technical factors involved and a number of current applications, as well as looking at future areas where CT may be employed. The advent of ever-increasing numbers of rows of detectors has opened up more possible uses for CT technology. However, diagnostic images may be obtained from CT systems with four rows of detectors or more, and their ability to produce near isotropic voxels and therefore multiplanar reformats. (orig.)

  5. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Daniel, E-mail: dana@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Van Leemput, Koen [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Edmund, Jens M. [Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy based only on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), knowledge about tissue electron densities must be derived from the MRI. This can be achieved by converting the MRI scan to the so-called pseudo-computed tomography (pCT). An obstacle is that the voxel intensities in conventional MRI scans are not uniquely related to electron density. The authors previously demonstrated that a patch-based method could produce accurate pCTs of the brain using conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans. The method was driven mainly by local patch similarities and relied on simple affine registrations between an atlas database of the co-registered MRI/CT scan pairs and the MRI scan to be converted. In this study, the authors investigate the applicability of the patch-based approach in the pelvis. This region is challenging for a method based on local similarities due to the greater inter-patient variation. The authors benchmark the method against a baseline pCT strategy where all voxels inside the body contour are assigned a water-equivalent bulk density. Furthermore, the authors implement a parallelized approximate patch search strategy to speed up the pCT generation time to a more clinically relevant level. Methods: The data consisted of CT and T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans of 10 prostate patients. pCTs were generated using an approximate patch search algorithm in a leave-one-out fashion and compared with the CT using frequently described metrics such as the voxel-wise mean absolute error (MAE{sub vox}) and the deviation in water-equivalent path lengths. Furthermore, the dosimetric accuracy was tested for a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan using dose–volume histogram (DVH) point deviations and γ-index analysis. Results: The patch-based approach had an average MAE{sub vox} of 54 HU; median deviations of less than 0.4% in relevant DVH points and a γ-index pass rate of 0.97 using a 1%/1 mm criterion. The patch-based approach showed a significantly better

  6. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful

  7. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful.

  8. Robust inverse-consistent affine CT-MR registration in MRI-assisted and MRI-alone prostate radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest-Hénault, David; Dowson, Nicholas; Greer, Peter B; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    CT-MR registration is a critical component of many radiation oncology protocols. In prostate external beam radiation therapy, it allows the propagation of MR-derived contours to reference CT images at the planning stage, and it enables dose mapping during dosimetry studies. The use of carefully registered CT-MR atlases allows the estimation of patient specific electron density maps from MRI scans, enabling MRI-alone radiation therapy planning and treatment adaptation. In all cases, the precision and accuracy achieved by registration influences the quality of the entire process. Most current registration algorithms do not robustly generalize and lack inverse-consistency, increasing the risk of human error and acting as a source of bias in studies where information is propagated in a particular direction, e.g. CT to MR or vice versa. In MRI-based treatment planning where both CT and MR scans serve as spatial references, inverse-consistency is critical, if under-acknowledged. A robust, inverse-consistent, rigid/affine registration algorithm that is well suited to CT-MR alignment in prostate radiation therapy is presented. The presented method is based on a robust block-matching optimization process that utilises a half-way space definition to maintain inverse-consistency. Inverse-consistency substantially reduces the influence of the order of input images, simplifying analysis, and increasing robustness. An open source implementation is available online at http://aehrc.github.io/Mirorr/. Experimental results on a challenging 35 CT-MR pelvis dataset demonstrate that the proposed method is more accurate than other popular registration packages and is at least as accurate as the state of the art, while being more robust and having an order of magnitude higher inverse-consistency than competing approaches. The presented results demonstrate that the proposed registration algorithm is readily applicable to prostate radiation therapy planning. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  9. Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome caused by herbal medicine: CT and MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua; Lou, Hai Yan [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Yi Xiang J. [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xu, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Min Ming [Dept. of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-04-15

    To describe the CT and MRI features of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS) caused by herbal medicine Gynura segetum. The CT and MRI features of 16 consecutive Gynura segetum induced HSOS cases (12 men, 4 women) were analyzed. Eight patients had CT; three patients had MRI, and the remaining five patients had both CT and MRI examinations. Based on their clinical presentations and outcomes, the patients were classified into three categories: mild, moderate, and severe. The severity of the disease was also evaluated radiologically based on the abnormal hepatic patchy enhancement in post-contrast CT or MRI images. Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and main right hepatic vein narrowing or occlusion were present in all 16 cases. Hepatomegaly and gallbladder wall thickening were present in 14 cases (87.5%, 14/16). Periportal high intensity on T2-weighted images was present in 6 cases (75%, 6/8). Normal liver parenchymal enhancement surrounding the main hepatic vein forming a clover-like sign was observed in 4 cases (25%, 4/16). The extent of patchy liver enhancement was statistically associated with clinical severity classification (kappa = 0.565). Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and the main hepatic veins narrowing were the most frequent signs of herbal medicine induced HSOS. The grade of abnormal patchy liver enhancement was associated with the clinical severity.

  10. Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome caused by herbal medicine: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hua; Lou, Hai Yan; Wang, Yi Xiang J.; Xu, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Min Ming

    2014-01-01

    To describe the CT and MRI features of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS) caused by herbal medicine Gynura segetum. The CT and MRI features of 16 consecutive Gynura segetum induced HSOS cases (12 men, 4 women) were analyzed. Eight patients had CT; three patients had MRI, and the remaining five patients had both CT and MRI examinations. Based on their clinical presentations and outcomes, the patients were classified into three categories: mild, moderate, and severe. The severity of the disease was also evaluated radiologically based on the abnormal hepatic patchy enhancement in post-contrast CT or MRI images. Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and main right hepatic vein narrowing or occlusion were present in all 16 cases. Hepatomegaly and gallbladder wall thickening were present in 14 cases (87.5%, 14/16). Periportal high intensity on T2-weighted images was present in 6 cases (75%, 6/8). Normal liver parenchymal enhancement surrounding the main hepatic vein forming a clover-like sign was observed in 4 cases (25%, 4/16). The extent of patchy liver enhancement was statistically associated with clinical severity classification (kappa = 0.565). Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and the main hepatic veins narrowing were the most frequent signs of herbal medicine induced HSOS. The grade of abnormal patchy liver enhancement was associated with the clinical severity.

  11. CT and MRI analysis of central nervous system Rosai-Dorfman disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiatang; Lang Senyang; Pu Chuanqiang; Zhu Ruyuan; Wang Dianjun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT and MRI imaging features of central nervous system Rosai-Dorfman disease and to enhance knowledge and differential diagnostic ability for central nervous system Rosai-Doffman disease. Methods: The CT and MRI imaging appearances in 4 cases of pathologically proven Rosai-Dorfman disease were retrospectively evaluated and the literature of central nervous system Rosai- Dorfman disease were reviewed. Results: Two cases had cranial CT scans, 4 cases had cranial MRI scans. On CT scans, cerebral edema was demonstrated in one case and the other case was normal. MRI scans showed the lesions were solitary in saddle area in 3 cases, and multiple in anterior cranial fossa in 1 case. The lesions exhibited iso- to hypointensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI images. Following intravenous injection of contrast medium, ring-like enhancement was seen in 2 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case. Nodular enhancement was seen in the case of multiple lesions in the anterior cranial fossa. All lesions were dural-based. Conclusions: In patients with fever, headache, elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and a polyclonal increase in γ-globulins, the possibility of central nervous system Rosai-Dorfman disease should be considered when single or multiple dural-based mass lesions, especially in sellar region, were identified by CT and MRI. (authors)

  12. Neuroradiological findings in primary progressive aphasia: CT, MRI and cerebral perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinnatamby, R.; Antoun, N.A.; Freer, C.E.L.; Miles, K.A.; Hodges, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is defined as progressive decline in language for 2 or more years with preservation of activities of daily living and general cognitive functions. Whereas the clinical features of this syndrome have been well documented, the neuroradiological findings have not been studied systematically. We studied 13 patients with PPA retrospectively: 10 underwent CT, 12 MRI and 12 cerebral perfusion studies using 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT. CT and MR images were scored for focal atrophy by two independent assessors. Initial qualitative assessment of SPECT images was confirmed by quantitative analysis. CY was normal in 5 patients. Focal atrophy, affecting predominantly the left temporal lobe, was seen in 4 of 10 patients on CT, and 10 of 12 on MRI. Atrophy was localised primarily to the superior and middle temporal gyri on MRI. All 12 patients who underwent SPECT had unilateral temporal lobe perfusion defects, in 2 patients of whom MRI was normal. CT is relatively insensitive to focal abnormalities in PPA; MRI and SPECT are the imaging modalities of choice. MRI allows accurate, specific localisation of atrophy with the temporal neocortex. SPECT may reveal a functional decrease in cerebral perfusion prior to establishment of structural change. (orig.)

  13. Neuroradiological findings in primary progressive aphasia: CT, MRI and cerebral perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnatamby, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Antoun, N.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Freer, C.E.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Miles, K.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hodges, J.R. [Dept. of Neurology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is defined as progressive decline in language for 2 or more years with preservation of activities of daily living and general cognitive functions. Whereas the clinical features of this syndrome have been well documented, the neuroradiological findings have not been studied systematically. We studied 13 patients with PPA retrospectively: 10 underwent CT, 12 MRI and 12 cerebral perfusion studies using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT. CT and MR images were scored for focal atrophy by two independent assessors. Initial qualitative assessment of SPECT images was confirmed by quantitative analysis. CY was normal in 5 patients. Focal atrophy, affecting predominantly the left temporal lobe, was seen in 4 of 10 patients on CT, and 10 of 12 on MRI. Atrophy was localised primarily to the superior and middle temporal gyri on MRI. All 12 patients who underwent SPECT had unilateral temporal lobe perfusion defects, in 2 patients of whom MRI was normal. CT is relatively insensitive to focal abnormalities in PPA; MRI and SPECT are the imaging modalities of choice. MRI allows accurate, specific localisation of atrophy with the temporal neocortex. SPECT may reveal a functional decrease in cerebral perfusion prior to establishment of structural change. (orig.)

  14. Three-dimensional contrasted visualization of pancreas in rats using clinical MRI and CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ting; Coudyzer, Walter; Peeters, Ronald; Liu, Yewei; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Yu, Jie; Jiang, Yansheng; Dymarkowski, Steven; Huang, Gang; Chen, Feng; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to visualize the pancreas in post-mortem rats with local contrast medium infusion by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using clinical imagers. A total of 16 Sprague Dawley rats of about 300 g were used for the pancreas visualization. Following the baseline imaging, a mixed contrast medium dye called GadoIodo-EB containing optimized concentrations of Gd-DOTA, iomeprol and Evens blue was infused into the distally obstructed common bile duct (CBD) for post-contrast imaging with 3.0 T MRI and 128-slice CT scanners. Images were post-processed with the MeVisLab software package. MRI findings were co-registered with CT scans and validated with histomorphology, with relative contrast ratios quantified. Without contrast enhancement, the pancreas was indiscernible. After infusion of GadoIodo-EB solution, only the pancreatic region became outstandingly visible, as shown by 3D rendering MRI and CT and proven by colored dissection and histological examinations. The measured volume of the pancreas averaged 1.12 ± 0.04 cm(3) after standardization. Relative contrast ratios were 93.28 ± 34.61% and 26.45 ± 5.29% for MRI and CT respectively. We have developed a multifunctional contrast medium dye to help clearly visualize and delineate rat pancreas in situ using clinical MRI and CT scanners. The topographic landmarks thus created with 3D demonstration may help to provide guidelines for the next in vivo pancreatic MRI research in rodents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Quantitative Rapid Assessment of Leukoaraiosis in CT : Comparison to Gold Standard MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Uta; Sporns, Peter Bernhard; Schmidt, Rene; Niederstadt, Thomas; Minnerup, Jens; Bier, Georg; Knecht, Stefan; Kemmling, André

    2017-10-20

    The severity of white matter lesions (WML) is a risk factor of hemorrhage and predictor of clinical outcome after ischemic stroke; however, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reliable quantification for this surrogate marker is limited for computed tomography (CT), the leading stroke imaging technique. We aimed to present and evaluate a CT-based automated rater-independent method for quantification of microangiopathic white matter changes. Patients with suspected minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke scale, NIHSS < 4) were screened for the analysis of non-contrast computerized tomography (NCCT) at admission and compared to follow-up MRI. The MRI-based WML volume and visual Fazekas scores were assessed as the gold standard reference. We employed a recently published probabilistic brain segmentation algorithm for CT images to determine the tissue-specific density of WM space. All voxel-wise densities were quantified in WM space and weighted according to partial probabilistic WM content. The resulting mean weighted density of WM space in NCCT, the surrogate of WML, was correlated with reference to MRI-based WML parameters. The process of CT-based tissue-specific segmentation was reliable in 79 cases with varying severity of microangiopathy. Voxel-wise weighted density within WM spaces showed a noticeable correlation (r = -0.65) with MRI-based WML volume. Particularly in patients with moderate or severe lesion load according to the visual Fazekas score the algorithm provided reliable prediction of MRI-based WML volume. Automated observer-independent quantification of voxel-wise WM density in CT significantly correlates with microangiopathic WM disease in gold standard MRI. This rapid surrogate of white matter lesion load in CT may support objective WML assessment and therapeutic decision-making during acute stroke triage.

  16. Stereotactic imaging for radiotherapy: accuracy of CT, MRI, PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, Christian P; Hipp, Peter; Henze, Marcus; Echner, Gernot; Hoess, Angelika; Schad, Lothar; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2003-01-01

    CT, MRI, PET and SPECT provide complementary information for treatment planning in stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic correlation of these images requires commissioning tests to confirm the localization accuracy of each modality. A phantom was developed to measure the accuracy of stereotactic localization for CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. To this end, the stereotactically measured coordinates of structures within the phantom were compared with their mechanically defined coordinates. For MRI, PET and SPECT, measurements were performed using two different devices. For MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging sequences were applied. For each measurement, the mean radial deviation in space between the stereotactically measured and mechanically defined position of target points was determined. For CT, the mean radial deviation was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. For MRI, the mean deviations ranged between 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and 1.4 ± 0.5 mm, depending on the MRI device and the imaging sequence. For PET, mean deviations of 1.1 ± 0.5 mm and 2.4 ± 0.3 mm were obtained. The mean deviations for SPECT were 1.6 ± 0.5 mm and 2.0 ± 0.6 mm. The phantom is well suited to determine the accuracy of stereotactic localization with CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. The obtained accuracy is well below the physical resolution for CT, PET and SPECT, and of comparable magnitude for MRI. Since the localization accuracy may be device dependent, results obtained at one device cannot be generalized to others

  17. Case Report: CT and MRI findings in Lhermitte- Duclos disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... lesion of uncertain origin. It is linked to an autosomal- dominant phakomatosis known as Cowden's disease in 40% of patients. The MRI features of LDD are almost unique and can be considered diagnostic. We report on a patient who presented with the typical MRI features of the above disease, and discuss the imaging ...

  18. Zero-Echo-Time and Dixon Deep Pseudo-CT (ZeDD CT): Direct Generation of Pseudo-CT Images for Pelvic PET/MRI Attenuation Correction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks with Multiparametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leynes, Andrew P; Yang, Jaewon; Wiesinger, Florian; Kaushik, Sandeep S; Shanbhag, Dattesh D; Seo, Youngho; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-05-01

    Accurate quantification of uptake on PET images depends on accurate attenuation correction in reconstruction. Current MR-based attenuation correction methods for body PET use a fat and water map derived from a 2-echo Dixon MRI sequence in which bone is neglected. Ultrashort-echo-time or zero-echo-time (ZTE) pulse sequences can capture bone information. We propose the use of patient-specific multiparametric MRI consisting of Dixon MRI and proton-density-weighted ZTE MRI to directly synthesize pseudo-CT images with a deep learning model: we call this method ZTE and Dixon deep pseudo-CT (ZeDD CT). Methods: Twenty-six patients were scanned using an integrated 3-T time-of-flight PET/MRI system. Helical CT images of the patients were acquired separately. A deep convolutional neural network was trained to transform ZTE and Dixon MR images into pseudo-CT images. Ten patients were used for model training, and 16 patients were used for evaluation. Bone and soft-tissue lesions were identified, and the SUV max was measured. The root-mean-squared error (RMSE) was used to compare the MR-based attenuation correction with the ground-truth CT attenuation correction. Results: In total, 30 bone lesions and 60 soft-tissue lesions were evaluated. The RMSE in PET quantification was reduced by a factor of 4 for bone lesions (10.24% for Dixon PET and 2.68% for ZeDD PET) and by a factor of 1.5 for soft-tissue lesions (6.24% for Dixon PET and 4.07% for ZeDD PET). Conclusion: ZeDD CT produces natural-looking and quantitatively accurate pseudo-CT images and reduces error in pelvic PET/MRI attenuation correction compared with standard methods. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  20. Preclinical Multimodal Molecular Imaging Using 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI in a Phase I Study of a Knee Osteoarthritis in In Vivo Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Menendez DVM, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use a multimodal molecular imaging approach to serially assess regional metabolic changes in the knee in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT canine model of osteoarthritis (OA. Five canine underwent ACLT in one knee and the contralateral knee served as uninjured control. Prior, 3, 6, and 12 weeks post-ACLT, the dogs underwent 18F-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The MRI was coregistered with the PET/CT, and 3-dimensional regions of interest (ROIs were traced manually and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax were evaluated. 18F-fluoro-d-glucose SUVmax in the ACLT knee ROIs was significantly higher compared to the uninjured contralateral knees at 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Higher 18F-FDG uptake observed in ACLT knees compared to the uninjured knees reflects greater metabolic changes in the injured knees over time. Knee 18F-FDG uptake in an in vivo ACLT canine model using combined PET/CT and MRI demonstrated to be highly sensitive in the detection of metabolic alterations in osseous and nonosteochondral structures comprising the knee joint. 18F-fluoro-d-glucose appeared to be a capable potential imaging biomarker for early human knee OA diagnosis, prognosis, and management.

  1. CT and MRI of the liver: when, what, why?; CT und MRT der Leber: wann, was, warum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Attenberger, U.I. [Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The detection and differential diagnostic clarification of liver pathologies play an important role in almost all medical disciplines. Because of its superior soft tissue contrast, the availability of liver-specific contrast agents and functional techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for the diagnostics of focal and diffuse liver pathologies. In addition to its superior detection and differentiation capabilities, MRI can provide prognostic information and enable early assessment of the therapy response for malignant liver lesions using functional techniques, especially diffusion imaging. Computed tomography (CT) is the imaging method of choice for the detection of traumatic liver injury. Despite the increasing availability of functional techniques in CT, MRI remains the overall modality of choice in liver imaging. (orig.) [German] Die Detektion und die differenzialdiagnostische Abklaerung von Leberpathologien spielen in nahezu allen medizinischen Disziplinen eine bedeutende Rolle. Ihre Vorteile in Hinblick auf Weichteilkontrast, die Verfuegbarkeit leberspezifischer Kontrastmittel und funktionelle Techniken machen die MRT zum bildgebenden Verfahren der Wahl fuer die gezielte Abklaerung fokaler oder diffuser Leberpathologien. Neben hoeheren Detektionsraten und besseren Differenzierungsmoeglichkeiten stehen in der MRT funktionelle Techniken - insbesondere die Diffusionsbildgebung - zur Verfuegung, die eine Prognoseabschaetzung und die fruehe Beurteilung von Therapieansprechen bei malignen Leberlaesionen erlauben. Die CT ist bei der Detektion traumatischer Leberverletzungen Bildgebungsverfahren der Wahl; trotz der auch in der CT zunehmend verfuegbaren funktionellen Techniken bleibt die MRT in der Leberbildgebung weiterhin ueberlegen. (orig.)

  2. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ru; Qian Liting; Wang Shicun; Liu Wei; Luo Wenguang; Zhang Hongbo; Li Guanghu; Hu Zhigang; Liu Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas. Methods: Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation. Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT images of these patients. The GTVs based on the two methods were compared. Results: There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT (P=0.917), and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P=0.600). The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients, with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%. GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P=0.709); the biggest difference was 27.66 cm 3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm 3 on MRI. Conclusions: The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different. The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar, and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI, which suggests that 11 C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV. (authors)

  3. Brain CT and MRI findings of a long-term case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoshiba, Kazunori; Ota, Kohei; Komatsuzaki, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Itsuro; Maruyama, Shoichi

    1987-11-01

    Our study involved a long-term case (ten years) of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The case began with a 23 year-old experiencing visual deterioration. During the course of his illness, amnesia, autism and abnormal behavior were observed without any myoclonus. On the electroencephalogram, periodic synclonous discharge was shown in the early stage of his illness and subsequently disappeared. The brain CT and the MRI disclosed diffuse lesions in both cortical and subcortical areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The location and spread of lesions were more clearly revealed by the MRI than the brain CT. These findings suggest that the MRI is more useful than the brain CT in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  4. Brain CT and MRI findings of a long-term case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoshiba, Kazunori; Ota, Kohei; Komatsuzaki, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Itsuro; Maruyama, Shoichi

    1987-01-01

    Our study involved a long-term case (ten years) of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The case began with a 23 year-old experiencing visual deterioration. During the course of his illness, amnesia, autism and abnormal behavior were observed without any myoclonus. On the electroencephalogram, periodic synclonous discharge was shown in the early stage of his illness and subsequently disappeared. The brain CT and the MRI disclosed diffuse lesions in both cortical and subcortical areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The location and spread of lesions were more clearly revealed by the MRI than the brain CT. These findings suggest that the MRI is more useful than the brain CT in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. (author)

  5. A follow-up study by CT and MRI in 3 cases of Japanese encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, H.; Murakami, T.; Murai, I.; Kida, H.; Sato, Y.; Kojima, K.; Abe, T.; Okudera, T.

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study by CT and MRI in 3 cases of Japanese encephalitis (JE) was performed. Neurologically dementia, forced laughing, tetraplegia and parkinsonism were observed as sequelae. In the CT and MR scans about 3 years after the onset of JE, low-density areas (LDAs) or abnormal signal intensities had remained in the thalamus and basal ganglia. The abnormalities were also found in the brain stem. When the main lesions shown by CT and MRI were compared with those of the acute stage, T2-weighted MRI clearly revealed multiple small areas with high signal intensities, although the ones at the acute stage had showed diffuse abnormal signals. These findings may be useful in helping to identity a long time after the onset. (orig.)

  6. Renal angiomyolipoma without visible fat. Can we make the diagnosis using CT and MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Robert S.; McInnes, Matthew D.F.; Schieda, Nicola [The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Flood, Trevor A. [The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Lavallee, Luke T. [The University of Ottawa, Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2018-02-15

    Renal angiomyolipomas without visible fat (AML.wovf) are benign masses that are incidentally discovered mainly in women. AML.wovf are typically homogeneously hyperdense on unenhanced CT without calcification or haemorrhage. Unenhanced CT pixel analysis is not useful for diagnosis. AML.wovf are characteristically homogeneously hypointense on T2-weighted (T2W)-MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Despite early reports, only a minority of AML.wovf show signal intensity drop on chemical-shift MRI due to microscopic fat. AML.wovf most commonly show avid early enhancement with washout kinetics at contrast-enhanced CT and MRI. The combination of homogeneously low T2W and/or ADC signal intensity with avid early enhancement and washout is highly accurate for diagnosis of AML.wovf. (orig.)

  7. Comparison between air CT and MRI in the detection of small acoustic neurinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Aiko; Seto, Hikaru; Kakishita, Masao

    1989-02-01

    Air CT proved useful in yielding images of acoustic tumors as an air filling defect in 11 (24%) of 46 patients. Six of the 11 tumors were small ones of less than 1 cm in diameter. Air CT was also able to exclude an intracanalicular tumor in 29 patients (63%). MRI was performed for comparison in eight patients (nine tumors) already diagnosed by air CT as having an acoustic tumor. MRI detected eight (89%) of nine tumors. A false negative result on MRI was obtained only in one intracanalicular tumor (4.3 mm in size). This was considered to be attributable to limitations of spatial resolution including the wide slice thickness. A protocol for radiological investigation and management of patients whose clinical symptoms and/or audiovestibular examination are highly indicative of acoustic tumor is proposed and discussed. (author).

  8. Comparison between air CT and MRI in the detection of small acoustic neurinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Aiko; Seto, Hikaru; Kakishita, Masao

    1989-01-01

    Air CT proved useful in yielding images of acoustic tumors as an air filling defect in 11 (24%) of 46 patients. Six of the 11 tumors were small ones of less than 1 cm in diameter. Air CT was also able to exclude an intracanalicular tumor in 29 patients (63%). MRI was performed for comparison in eight patients (nine tumors) already diagnosed by air CT as having an acoustic tumor. MRI detected eight (89%) of nine tumors. A false negative result on MRI was obtained only in one intracanalicular tumor (4.3 mm in size). This was considered to be attributable to limitations of spatial resolution including the wide slice thickness. A protocol for radiological investigation and management of patients whose clinical symptoms and/or audiovestibular examination are highly indicative of acoustic tumor is proposed and discussed. (author)

  9. Automated lung nodule classification following automated nodule detection on CT: A serial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armato, Samuel G. III; Altman, Michael B.; Wilkie, Joel; Sone, Shusuke; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio; Roy, Arunabha S.

    2003-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of an automated classifier applied to the task of differentiating malignant and benign lung nodules in low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans acquired as part of a lung cancer screening program. The nodules classified in this manner were initially identified by our automated lung nodule detection method, so that the output of automated lung nodule detection was used as input to automated lung nodule classification. This study begins to narrow the distinction between the 'detection task' and the 'classification task'. Automated lung nodule detection is based on two- and three-dimensional analyses of the CT image data. Gray-level-thresholding techniques are used to identify initial lung nodule candidates, for which morphological and gray-level features are computed. A rule-based approach is applied to reduce the number of nodule candidates that correspond to non-nodules, and the features of remaining candidates are merged through linear discriminant analysis to obtain final detection results. Automated lung nodule classification merges the features of the lung nodule candidates identified by the detection algorithm that correspond to actual nodules through another linear discriminant classifier to distinguish between malignant and benign nodules. The automated classification method was applied to the computerized detection results obtained from a database of 393 low-dose thoracic CT scans containing 470 confirmed lung nodules (69 malignant and 401 benign nodules). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the ability of the classifier to differentiate between nodule candidates that correspond to malignant nodules and nodule candidates that correspond to benign lesions. The area under the ROC curve for this classification task attained a value of 0.79 during a leave-one-out evaluation

  10. The registration accuracy analysis of different CT-MRI imaging fusion method in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Shao Qian; Zhang Zicheng; Chen Jinhu; Chen Zhaoqiu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To find an effective CT-MRI image fusion protocol in brain tumor by analyzing the registration accuracy of different methods. Methods: The simulation CT scan and MRI T 1 WI imaging of 10 brain tumor patients obtained with same position were registered by Tris-Axes landmark ,Tris-Axes landmark + manual adjustment, mutual information and mutual information + manual adjustment method. The clinical tumor volume (CTV) were contoured on both CT and MRI images respectively. The accuracy of image fusion was assessed by the mean distance of five bone markers (d 1-5 ), central position of CTV (d CTV ) the percentage of CTV overlap (P CT-MRI ) between CT and MRI images. The difference between different methods was analyzed by Freedman M non-parameter test. Results: The difference of the means d1-5 between the Tris-Axes landmark,Tris-Axes landmark plus manual adjustment,mutual information and mutual information plus manual adjustment methods were 0.28 cm ±0.12 cm, 0.15 cm ±0.02 cm, 0.25 cm± 0.19 cm, 0.10 cm ± 0.06 cm, (M = 14.41, P = 0.002). the means d CTV were 0.59 cm ± 0.28 cm, 0.60 cm± 0.32 cm, 0.58 cm ± 0.39 cm, 0.42 cm± 0.30 cm (M = 9.72, P = 0.021), the means P CT-MRI were 0.69% ±0.18%, 0.68% ±0.16%, 0.66% ±0.17%, 0.74% ±0.14% (M =14.82, P=0.002), respectively. Conclusions: Mutual information plus manual adjustment registration method was the preferable fusion method for brain tumor patients. (authors)

  11. Carpal angles as measured on CT and MRI: can we simply translate radiographic measurements?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Stephanie; Ghumman, Simranjit S.; Moser, Thomas P. [Hopital Notre-Dame (CHUM), Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ladouceur, Martin [Research Center CHUM, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the reliability of carpal angles measured on CT and MRI compared to radiography and assess if these measurements are interchangeable. Our institutional ethic research committee approved this study. For this retrospective study, two independent observers measured the scapholunate (SL), capitolunate (CL), radiolunate (RL), and radioscaphoid (RS) angles on 21 sets of exams, with each set including a radiograph, CT, and MRI of the same wrist. Inter- and intra-observer agreements were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Linear mixed models and two-way contingency tables were used to determine if the angles measured on cross-sectional modalities were significantly different from those obtained on radiography. Inter-observer agreement was strong (ICC >0.8) for all angles, except for the RL angle measured on MRI (ICC 0.68). Intra-observer agreement was also strong for all angles, except for the CL angle measured on CT (ICC 0.66). SL angles measured on CT and MRI were not statistically different from those measured on radiographs (p = 0.37 and 0.36, respectively), unlike CL, RL, and RS angles (p < 0.05). Accuracy between modalities varied between 76 and 86 % for the SL angle and ranged between 43 and 76 % for the other angles. CL, RL, and RS angles showed large intermodality variability. Therefore, their measurements on CT or MRI could potentially lead to miscategorization. Conversely, our data showing no significant difference between modalities, SL angle could be measured on CT and MRI to assess wrist instability with a lower risk of error. (orig.)

  12. CT, MRI and MRS of Epstein-Barr virus infection: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecil, K.M.; Jones, B.V.; Hedlund, G.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Williams, S. [Dept. of Neurology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2000-08-01

    We report MRI and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in a 12-month-old girl with Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis. CT and MRI showed focal lesions in the basal ganglia. MRS of the lesions showed decreased N-acetyl aspartate and elevation of some amino acids, indicating an infectious rather than ischemic etiology. This case illustrates the use of MRS to narrow differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. CT, MRI and MRS of Epstein-Barr virus infection: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecil, K.M.; Jones, B.V.; Hedlund, G.L.; Williams, S.

    2000-01-01

    We report MRI and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in a 12-month-old girl with Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis. CT and MRI showed focal lesions in the basal ganglia. MRS of the lesions showed decreased N-acetyl aspartate and elevation of some amino acids, indicating an infectious rather than ischemic etiology. This case illustrates the use of MRS to narrow differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Detection of an occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid fistula by CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, B.; Brors, D.; Draf, W.; Goedecke, A.; Prescher, A.

    1998-01-01

    We describe an unusual occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula to the sphenoid sinus demonstrated by MRI. CT was performed because of a posterior cerebral infarct caused by cardiac arrhythmia. Axial sections showed fluid in the sphenoid sinus. High-resolution scans revealed a bony defect 3 mm in diameter of the posterior wall of the sphenoid sinus, and MRI showed a transclival CSF fistula. This occult lesion was confirmed by surgery and duraplasty was successfully performed via an endonasal approach. (orig.)

  15. Focal Amyloidosis of the Orbit Presenting as a Mass: MRI and CT Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yerli, Hasan; Aydin, Erdinc; Avci, Suat; Haberal, Nihan; Oto, Sibel

    2011-01-01

    Focal orbital amyloidosis is a rare entity and little is known about its magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. In this case report, imaging features of a case of focal orbital amyloidosis presenting as a mass have been documented together with its histopathological findings. On MRI, a well-defined mass was seen as isointense with rectus muscle on T1-weighted images and heterogeneously hypointense on T2-weighted images. Punctuate calcifications were observed on the computerized tomography (CT) examination

  16. X-ray, CT and MRI findings of synovial tuberculosis in joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jinghong; Tao Meili; You Zhuangzhi; Yu Huazhi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the X-ray, CT and MRI findings of synovial tuberculosis, and to evaluate the role of MRI in diagnosing synovial tuberculosis. Methods: Fourteen cases of synovial tuberculosis comfirmed by operation and pathology were retrospectively analyzed and summarized. All patients were examined by MRI and X-ray, and CT scans were performed in 3 cases. Results: X-ray showed joint swelling (8 cases), articular space narrowing (7 cases), marginal joint erosions (4 cases), and periarticular osteoporosis (9 cases). The joint swelling was detected on CT in all 3 cases, and bony erosion and speckled sequestra were seen in 2 cases. MRI in all of patients showed joint swelling and synovial proliferation in different drgees, demonstrated as heterogeneously low signal on T 1 WI and slight high signal (7 cases) and obvious high signal (6 cases) on T 2 WI, and diffuse synovial proliferation was demonstrated as massive and nodular signal in 8 cases. Joint effusion was present in 7 cases as low signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI. Osseous erosion lesions were seen in 7 cases, and intra-articular cartilage thinned, partly or mostly disappeared in 11 cases. Periarticular bone marrow edema was found in 7 cases. Conclusion: MRI was superior to X-ray and CT in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of synovial tuberculosis. (authors)

  17. CT and MRI features of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas with pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, M.-Y.; Pan, K.-T.; Chu, S.-Y.; Hung, C.-F.; Wu, R.-C.; Tseng, J.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To document the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas and to correlate them with pathological findings to determine the unique imaging manifestations of this rare subtype tumour of the pancreas. Materials and methods: From January 1986 to August 2008, six patients (five men and one woman, mean age 61.3 years) with histologically proven acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas underwent CT (n = 6) and MRI (n = 4) examinations. The imaging features of each tumour were documented and compared with pathological findings. Results: The tumours were distributed in the head (n = 4), body (n = 1), and tail (n = 1) of the pancreas. Four masses (67%) were uniformly or partially well-defined with thin, enhancing capsules. Central cystic components were found in five tumours (83%). Two tumours (33%) exhibited intratumoural haemorrhage, and one tumour (17%) had amorphous intratumoural calcification. In both CT and MRI, the tumours enhanced less than the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. The signal intensity on MRI was predominantly T1 hypointense and T2 iso- to hyperintense. Conclusion: Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas has distinct imaging features, and both CT and MRI are useful and complementary imaging methods.

  18. Ultrasound, CT and MRI Appearances of a Rare Symptomatic Laryngeal Chondrometaplasia: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Hok Yuen, Edmond Yuen; Abdullah, Victor James; Ping Lee, Yolanda Yim; Ahuja, Anil Tejbhan

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic laryngeal chondrometaplasia is rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are only few case reports on laryngeal chondrometaplasia. The imaging appearance of this uncommon disease is even more rarely described. There are only two case reports describing its appearances in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound (US) features have not been reported so far. This case report is to show the US, CT and MRI features of this disease entity to stress the role of imaging in this disease

  19. 18FFDG PET in evaluating malignancies compared with CT, MRI and pathology in 58 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.

    2000-01-01

    This article discussed the practical application of 18 F-FDG PET imaging techniques to depict, state, or define recurrences for five important malignancies: lung cancer, colorectal and head-and-neck cancer, intracranial malignant glioma and primary or secondary hepatic malignant diseases. And comparisons of 18 F-FDG PET with CT, MRI imaging were addressed specifically. We reviewed our initial experience with 48 malignant and ten non-malignant cases. Among malignant group, 36 cases were confirmed by operation or biopsy, Other ten non-malignant diseases, including brain infarction, post-radiotherapy necrosis or scar and lung abscesses were followed with CT or MRI at least 6 months. All patients received intravenous administration of 18 F-FDG 10-15 mCi, followed by a 40 minutes uptake phase, and subsequent imaged using a Siemens ECAT 931 whole-body scanner with resolution of 4 mm FWHM in the center of the field of view. Filtered back projection reconstruction was used to display attenuated or non-attenuated corrected images. The result of 18 F-FDG PET was retrospectively evaluated to assess the degree of uptake of 18 F-FDG PET in the tumor tissues and compared with CT, MRI and pathology. CT and MRI exam were taken before or after PET study in two weeks. 18 F-FDG PET scans showed a significantly increased FDG metabolism in 47 malignant lesions, The tumor / normal tissue FDG uptake rate were 4.16 ±2.11. In 47 cases with neoplasm, 18 F-FDG PET findings were constant with or further confirmed the CT or MRI diagnosis in 35/47 (74.5%) and 12/47 (253%) cases. Another one small intracranial metastasis ( 18 F-FDG PET imaging in oncology has demonstrated powerful advantage in characterizing tumor lesions, differentiating recurrent disease from treatment effects, staging tumors, evaluating the extent of disease, and monitoring therapy. But 18 F-FDG PET still cant replace CT or MRI in malignance diagnosis. It will be used to approach and hopefully answer the difficult diagnosis

  20. Fluctuations in eGFR in relation to unenhanced and enhanced MRI and CT outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, Manal; Rømsing, Janne; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study fluctuations in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in relation to contrast medium (CM) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) compared to control groups in outpatients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: eGFR was determined right before the imaging......-induced nephropathy (CIN) requirement when the definition s-creatinine ≥44μmol/l (0.5mg/dl) was used. CONCLUSIONS: eGFR in outpatients undergoing MRI or CT did vary independently of whether the patient received contrast or not. The findings probably reflect the natural variations in s-creatinine levels. This should...

  1. Comparison of Ct and MRI in the study of the pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juliani, G.; Avataneo, T.; Potenzoni, F.; Sorrentino, T

    1989-01-01

    Normal CT and MR anatomy was studied in two series (53 and 25 cases respectively) of young volunteers of both sexes, asymptomatic and certainly without lesions of the pituitary gland. 115 other pathological cases (73 hyperprolactinemias, 8 acromegalies, 15 Cushing syndromes, 2 hyperthyroidisms, 17 non-secreting adenomas) were examined using both CT and MRI. Both an accurate review of the relative literature and the results of our own series prove that MR is superior to CT in diagnosing pituitary microadenomas (3.2% not diagnosed with MRI and 25.8% not diagnosed with CT), in the follow-up of prolactinomas subjected to medical therapy and in the study of extrasellar involvement of pituitery adenomas, particularly with regard to the demonstration of compression of the optic chiasma

  2. Quantification of neonatal lung parenchymal density via ultrashort echo time MRI with comparison to CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higano, Nara S; Fleck, Robert J; Spielberg, David R; Walkup, Laura L; Hahn, Andrew D; Thomen, Robert P; Merhar, Stephanie L; Kingma, Paul S; Tkach, Jean A; Fain, Sean B; Woods, Jason C

    2017-10-01

    To demonstrate that ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can achieve computed tomography (CT)-like quantification of lung parenchyma in free-breathing, non-sedated neonates. Because infant CTs are used sparingly, parenchymal disease evaluation via UTE MRI has potential for translational impact. Two neonatal control cohorts without suspected pulmonary morbidities underwent either a research UTE MRI (n = 5; 1.5T) or a clinically-ordered CT (n = 9). Whole-lung means and anterior-posterior gradients of UTE-measured image intensity (arbitrary units, au, normalized to muscle) and CT-measured density (g/cm 3 ) were compared (Mann-Whitney U-test). Separately, a diseased neonatal cohort (n = 5) with various pulmonary morbidities underwent both UTE MRI and CT. UTE intensity and CT density were compared with Spearman correlations within ∼33 anatomically matched regions of interest (ROIs) in each diseased subject, spanning low- to high-density tissues. Radiological classifications were evaluated in all ROIs, with mean UTE intensities and CT densities compared in each classification. In control subjects, whole-lung UTE intensities (0.51 ± 0.04 au) were similar to CT densities (0.44 ± 0.09 g/cm 3 ) (P = 0.062), as were UTE (0.021 ± 0.020 au/cm) and CT (0.034 ± 0.024 [g/cm 3 ]/cm) anterior-posterior gradients (P = 0.351). In diseased subjects' ROIs, significant correlations were observed between UTE and CT (P ≤0.007 in each case). Relative differences between UTE and CT were small in all classifications (4-25%). These results demonstrate a strong association between UTE image intensity and CT density, both between whole-lung tissue in control patients and regional radiological pathologies in diseased patients. This indicates the potential for UTE MRI to longitudinally evaluate neonatal pulmonary disease and to provide visualization of pathologies similar to CT, without sedation/anesthesia or ionizing radiation

  3. CT and MRI Findings of Soft Tissue Adult Fibrosarcoma in Extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hexiang Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize and evaluate CT and MRI features of extremity soft tissue adult fibrosarcoma. Methods. CT and MRI images from 10 adult patients with pathologically proven fibrosarcomas were retrospectively analyzed with regard to tumor location, size, number, shape, margins, attenuation, signal intensity, and enhancement patterns on MR images. Additionally, the relationships between lesions, deep fascia, and change in adjacent bones were also assessed. Results. Nineteen tumor lesions in 10 patients were selected for this study. Eighteen lesions were lobulated and one was oval in shape. Most cases were located under the deep fascia, including seven cases that had a nodular lump adjacent to the deep fascia and one case that had broken lesion through the deep fascia. On CT, the adult fibrosarcomas mostly showed iso-attenuated soft tissue masses (n=6. On MRI, all the cases (n=9 displayed low signal on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI and heterogeneous low and high intensity signals on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI, with band-like areas of low signal on both T1WI and T2WI. On contrast-enhanced MRI images, three cases showed heterogeneous peripheral enhancement and one case demonstrated a spoke-wheel-like enhancement. Eight cases showed muscle edema signals in the peritumoral muscle and one case involved adjacent bone. Conclusion. CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in diagnosing adult fibrosarcoma. Combined application of CT and MR is recommended for patients with suspected adult fibrosarcoma.

  4. Use of dynamic images in radiology education: Movies of CT and MRI in the anatomy classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Won; Oh, Chang-Seok; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Jang, Dong Su

    2018-04-19

    Radiology education is a key component in many preclinical anatomy courses. However, the reported effectiveness of radiology education within such anatomy classrooms has varied. This study was conducted to determine if a novel educational method using dynamic images of movies of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was effective in radiology education during a preclinical anatomy course, aided by clay modeling, specific hand gestures (digit anatomy), and reports from dissection findings uploaded to the anatomy course website (digital reports). Feedback surveys using a five-point Likert scale were administered to better clarify students' opinions regarding their understanding of CT and MRI of anatomical structures, as well as to determine if such preclinical radiology education was helpful in their clinical studies. After completion of the anatomy course taught with dynamic images of CT and MRI, most students demonstrated an adequate understanding of basic CT and MR images. Additionally, students in later clinical years generally believed that their study of radiologic images during the preclinical anatomy course was helpful for their clinical studies and clerkship rotations. Moreover, student scores on imaging anatomy examinations demonstrated meaningful improvements in performance after using dynamic images from movies of CT and MRI. Anat Sci Educ. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. The evaluation of CT and MRI in the diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zenian; Wang Xiaoyan; Peng Zhenpeng; Lin Jianqin; Zhang Ting

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the manifestations and its pathologic basis of pancreatic tubeiculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy. And evaluate the diagnostic values of CT and MRI. Methods: Two cases of pancreatic tuberculosis and eleven cases of peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy were collected. All cases were conformed by pathology or clinic. Plain scan and enhanced scan with spiral CT were performed in all cases. Plain scan and enhanced scan with MRI were performed in two cases. The CT and MRI features of 13 cases were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Pancreatic tuberculosis showed that the lesion was located mainly at the head of the pancreas and displayed on CT as a low-density mass with marginal or honeycomb enhancement. Peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy was seen in 11 cases, of which ring-like enhancement was seen in seven cases, calcifications in two cases and mixed in two cases. Splenic involvement was found in five cases. Conclusion: Pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy have the main features of low-density mass With marginal or honeycomb enhancement and ting-like enhancement in petipancreatic lymphadenopathy. CT and MRI are feasible methods in diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis and peripancreatic tuberculous lymphadenopathy. (authors)

  6. Mandibular fracture caused by periodontal abscess: Radiological, US, CT and MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, D; Marini, M; Tesei, J; Primicerio, P

    2006-09-01

    Mandibular fracture is a rare but possible outcome of a periodontal abscess. A case of complete fracture of the mandible with abscess infiltrating the surrounding soft tissues is described. The patient reported nor trauma, nor locoregional surgery. Ultrasonography and orthopantomography revealed the fracture of the mandible and the abscess at the masseter muscle. Further preoperative diagnostic examinations included CT and MRI. CT revealed the complete fracture line more clearly; MR the extension of the abscess.

  7. Metastatic liver tumor from cystic ovarian carcinomas. CT and MRI appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Ogata, Ichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Abe, Yasuko; Urata, Joji; Takahashi, Mutsumasa [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-08-01

    The initial and follow-up CT and MRI images of ten patients with hepatic metastases from ovarian tumors were retrospectively analyzed to establish their features and sequential changes in appearance. Ten patients with hepatic metastasis from ovarian tumors received initial and follow-up CT and MRI examinations. Six patients were followed up every two to three weeks before surgical tumor resection. Both CT and MR images were analyzed by two radiologists. A total of fourteen lesions were detected by CT and MRI in 10 patients. All 14 lesions were demonstrated as areas of marked hyperintensity on T2-weighted MRI. Eleven cyst-like tumors were demonstrated as round or oval low density lesions on CT and as areas of hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging. Three lesions were shown as solid masses with slightly low attenuation at the initial CT examination and slightly low or iso-intensity areas on T1-weighted imaging, and these lesions showed early peripheral globular enhancement and delayed enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT and MR imaging. Cystic formation was observed two to three weeks later after initial study in all the 3 solid lesions. Rapid subcapsular effusion, which showed obvious enhancement on delayed Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging, was observed in two patients. The hepatic metastatic tumor from cystic ovarian carcinoma may manifest as a well-defined cystic lesion or as a solid mass, and the solid mass shows delayed enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT and MR imaging. Furthermore, rapid cystic formation and rapid subcapsular extension is frequently seen. (author)

  8. CT and MRI findings of cyclosporine-related encephalopathy and hypertensive encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Houjyou, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    We present the MRI and CT findings of one child with cyclosporine-related encephalopathy, and one child with hypertensive encephalopathy following cyclosporine-related encephalopathy. The imaging findings were shown well on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images. Cyclosporine-related encephalopathy was distributed predominantly in the posterior white matter. Hypertensive encephalopathy showed similar changes of CT attenuation, but with wider distribution. These two disorders seem to have the same pathogenesis. (orig.)

  9. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M. Th; Teixeira, Suzana C.; Pengel, Kenneth E.; Loo, Claudette E.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T. F. D.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT were acquired

  10. Multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings of adult mesoblastic nephroma: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqin Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoblastic nephroma (MN presenting in an adult is extremely rare. The computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of this tumor in adulthood have not been widely reported. We present two additional cases of adult MN and describe the multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings.

  11. An update on the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa; Torigian, Drew A.; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Paydary, Koosha; Salavati, Ali; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J.; Alavi, Abass

    2017-01-01

    This review article summarizes the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer. With regard to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the presence of FDG uptake within the ovary of a postmenopausal woman raises the concern for ovarian cancer. Multiple studies show that FDG PET/CT can detect lymph node and distant metastasis in ovarian cancer with high accuracy and may, therefore, alter the management to obtain better clinical outcomes. Although PET/CT staging is superior for N and M staging of ovarian cancer, its role is limited for T staging. Additionally, FDG PET/CT is of great benefit in evaluating treatment response and has prognostic value in patients with ovarian cancer. FDG PET/CT also has value to detect recurrent disease, particularly in patients with elevated serum CA-125 levels and negative or inconclusive conventional imaging test results. PET/MRI may beneficial for tumor staging because MRI has higher soft tissue contrast and no ionizing radiation exposure compared to CT. Some non-FDG PET radiotracers such as 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT) or 11 C-methionine (MET) have been studied in preclinical and clinical studies as well and may play a role in the evaluation of patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  12. An update on the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Torigian, Drew A.; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Paydary, Koosha; Salavati, Ali; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J.; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    This review article summarizes the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer. With regard to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the presence of FDG uptake within the ovary of a postmenopausal woman raises the concern for ovarian cancer. Multiple studies show that FDG PET/CT can detect lymph node and distant metastasis in ovarian cancer with high accuracy and may, therefore, alter the management to obtain better clinical outcomes. Although PET/CT staging is superior for N and M staging of ovarian cancer, its role is limited for T staging. Additionally, FDG PET/CT is of great benefit in evaluating treatment response and has prognostic value in patients with ovarian cancer. FDG PET/CT also has value to detect recurrent disease, particularly in patients with elevated serum CA-125 levels and negative or inconclusive conventional imaging test results. PET/MRI may beneficial for tumor staging because MRI has higher soft tissue contrast and no ionizing radiation exposure compared to CT. Some non-FDG PET radiotracers such as {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) or {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) have been studied in preclinical and clinical studies as well and may play a role in the evaluation of patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  13. Volumetric Assessment of Swallowing Muscles: A Comparison of CT and MRI Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Kim Barbara; Hanning, Uta; Schmidt, Rene; Muhle, Paul; Wirth, Rainer; Zimmer, Sebastian; Dziewas, Rainer; Suntrup-Krueger, Sonja; Sporns, Peter Bernhard; Heindel, Walter; Schwindt, Wolfram

    2018-05-01

     Recent retrospective studies have proposed a high correlation between atrophy of swallowing muscles, age, severity of dysphagia and aspiration status based on computed tomography (CT). However, ionizing radiation poses an ethical barrier to research in prospective non-patient populations. Hence, there is a need to prove the efficacy of techniques that rely on noninvasive methods and produce high-resolution soft tissue images such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The objective of this study was therefore to compare the segmentation results of swallowing muscles using CT and MRI.  Retrospective study of 21 patients (median age: 46.6; gender: 11 female) who underwent CT and MRI of the head and neck region within a time frame of less than 50 days because of suspected head and neck cancer using contrast agent. CT and MR images were segmented by two blinded readers using Medical Imaging Toolkit (MITK) and both modalities were tested (with the equivalence test) regarding the segmented muscle volumes. Adjustment for multiple testing was performed using the Bonferroni test and the potential time effect of the muscle volumes and the time interval between the modalities was assessed by a spearman correlation. The study was approved by the local ethics committee.  The median volumes for each muscle belly of the digastric muscle derived from CT were 3051 mm 3 (left) and 2969 mm 3 (right), and from MRI they were 3218 mm 3 (left) and 3027 mm 3 (right). The median volume of the geniohyoid muscle was 6580 mm 3 on CT and 6648 mm 3 on MRI. The interrater reliability was high for all segmented muscles. The mean time interval between the CT and MRI examinations was 34 days (IQR 25; 41). The muscle differences of each muscle between the two modalities did not reveal significant correlation to the time interval between the examinations (digastric left r = 0.003 and digastric right r = -0.008; geniohyoid muscle r = 0.075).  CT-based segmentation and

  14. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko

    2001-01-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  15. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2001-02-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  16. MRI and PET/CT of patients with bone metastases from breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grankvist, J.; Fisker, R.; Iyer, V.; Fründ, E.T.; Simonsen, C.; Christensen, T.; Stenbygaard, L.; Ewertz, M.; Larsson, E.-M.

    2012-01-01

    3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was compared with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with suspected bone metastases from breast cancer. A prospective clinical study was performed in 13 female breast cancer patients (mean age 61years; range 45–85 years). The spine was imaged in the sagittal plane with T1-weighted (T1), short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and T2-weighted fat-saturated (T2) sequences. The pelvis was imaged similarly in the coronal plane. Axial DWI was performed from the skull base to the mid-thigh. MRI and PET/CT were performed in all patients at a maximum interval of 10 working days and at least 14 days after chemotherapy. MRI was reviewed by two radiologists, and their consensus on potential metastases in 27 predefined locations was recorded. The predefined locations were the vertebral bodies (24), the left (1) and right (1) pelvic bones, and the sacral bone (1). The PET/CT was reviewed by a radiologists and a nuclear medicine physician. MRI detected 59 of the 60 active metastases found with our gold standard modality PET/CT. T1 had the highest sensitivity (98%) but rather low specificity (77%), but with the addition of STIR and DWI, the specificity increased to 95%. The additional metastases detected with MRI most likely represented postherapeutic residual scars without active tumour. In conclusion, 3.0 Tesla MRI with T1, STIR, and DWI is useful for the clinical evaluation of bone metastases from breast cancer and compares well to PET/CT.

  17. CT and MRI diagnosis of chondrosarcoma in sinonasal and orbital region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bentao; Wang Zhenchang; Xian Junfang; Zhang Zhengyu; Liu Zhonglin; Lan Baosen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT and MRI findings of chondrosarcoma in sinonasal and orbital region so as to promote the diagnostic accuracy. Methods: All 12 cases of chondrosarcoma were verified by pathology. CT and MRI findings were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The lesions occurred in sinonasal cavity in 9 cases and in orbit in 3 cases. Pathologically 8 cases were conventional chondrosarcoma, 2 dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma, and 2 mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. On CT, chondrosarcoma revealed oval shape in 2 cases, lobular shape in 6 cases and irregular shape in 4 cases. The lesion showed stippled, ring, nodular, patchy or amorphous calcification. Postcontrast CT showed mild inhomogeneous enhancement in 3 cases. Chondrosarcoma demonstrated well-defined margin in 9 cases and hazy margin in 3 cases. Sinonasal chondrosarcoma revealed bony destruction in 7 cases. Orbital chondrosarcoma showed bony erosion invading ipsilateral frontal region in one case. On MR T 1 WI, conventional and dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma showed hypointense signal compared to brain in 6 cases and isointense signal in 4 cases. On T 2 WI, the lesions showed heterogeneous hyperintense signal in 8 cases and isointense signal in 2 cases with marked hypointense foci. Postcontrast MR imaging demonstrated mild to moderate inhomogeneous enhancement in these cases, and showed peripheral and septal enhancement in 5 cases of conventional chondrosarcoma, showing variegated appearance in 3 cases and honeycomb-like appearance in 2 cases. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma showed isointense signal on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI, with homogeneous and heterogeneous enhancement in one case, respectively. MRI showed the extent and the associated changes of the lesions more clearly compared to CT. Conclusion: CT is the first modality of choice in the diagnosis of chondrosarcoma in sinonasal and orbital region. The typically peripheral and septal contrast enhancement can also suggest the diagnosis of chondrosarcoma on

  18. Tuberculous adenitis: comparison of CT and MRI findings with histopathological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backer, A.I. de; Mortele, K.J.; Heuvel, E. van den; Vanschoubroeck, I.J.; Kockx, M.M.; Vyvere, M. van de

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the relationship between the various histopathological features and the CT and MRI findings in routinely submitted histopathological specimens for the diagnosis of tuberculous lymphadenopathy. Twelve formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from ten patients who were clinically suspected of having tuberculous lymphadenopathy were evaluated. We assessed the presence of histopathological features including granuloma formation, caseous necrosis, and presence of Langhans-type giant cells, calcifications, fibrosis or normal lymphoid tissue. We performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for mycobacterial DNA and Ziehl-Neelsen staining for acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Findings were compared with those of CT and MRI, including signal intensities on unenhanced MR images, lymph node homogeneity, attenuation values on contrast-enhanced CT and enhancement patterns on MRI. Based on CT and MRI findings, four lymph node types could be defined: (1) homogeneous nodes, visible on both pre- and post-contrast images and corresponding histopathologically to granulation tissue without or with minimal caseation necrosis (n = 2); (2) heterogeneous nodes, showing heterogeneous enhancement patterns with central non-enhancing areas and corresponding to minor or moderate intranodal caseation/liquefaction necrosis (n = 3); (3) nodes showing peripheral rim enhancement and corresponding to moderate or extensive intranodal caseation/liquefaction necrosis (n = 5); (4) heterogeneous nodes showing intranodal hyperdensities on CT and hypointense areas on T1- and T2-weighted images and corresponding to fibrosis and calcifications (n = 2). On CT and MRI, the findings reflect different stages of the tuberculous process. Imaging findings depend on the presence and the degree of granuloma formation, caseation/liquefaction necrosis, fibrosis and calcifications. (orig.)

  19. Anterior atlantodental and posterior atlantodental intervals on plain radiography, multidetector CT, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Dong Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ki Bo; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To determine the normal values of the anterior atlantodental interval (AADI) and posterior atlantodental interval (PADI) on plain radiography, multidetector CT (MDCT) and MRI, as well as the dural sac width and spinal cord diameter at the atlantoaxial joint level on MRI. In total, 60 subjects underwent plain radiography, MRI and MDCT. We obtained values for AADI and PADI on plain radiography, MDCT, and MRI, and for dural sac width and spinal cord diameter on MRI. Two radiologists independently measured each value and a consensus was reached. The average AADI was 1.5 +/- 0.5 mm on plain radiography, 1.4 +/- 0.3 mm on MDCT, and 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm on MRI. The average PADI was 20.6 +/- 2.4 mm on plain radiography, 18.0 +/- 2.1 mm on MDCT, and 17.7 +/- 1.9 mm on MRI. The dural sac width was 13.7 +/- 1.8 mm, and the spinal cord diameter was 7.8 +/- 0.7 mm. Interobserver agreement was 0.701-0.927 and intraobserver agreement was 0.681-0.937. AADI values obtained on MDCT are significantly lower than those obtained on plain radiography or MRI. PADI values obtained on plain radiography are significantly higher than those obtained on MDCT or MRI. The dural sac width is most closely correlated with PADI values on MDCT. PADI seems to be easier to measure, more relevant, and clinically useful than AADI.

  20. Anterior atlantodental and posterior atlantodental intervals on plain radiography, multidetector CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Dong Woo; Yoon, Ki Bo; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2015-01-01

    To determine the normal values of the anterior atlantodental interval (AADI) and posterior atlantodental interval (PADI) on plain radiography, multidetector CT (MDCT) and MRI, as well as the dural sac width and spinal cord diameter at the atlantoaxial joint level on MRI. In total, 60 subjects underwent plain radiography, MRI and MDCT. We obtained values for AADI and PADI on plain radiography, MDCT, and MRI, and for dural sac width and spinal cord diameter on MRI. Two radiologists independently measured each value and a consensus was reached. The average AADI was 1.5 +/- 0.5 mm on plain radiography, 1.4 +/- 0.3 mm on MDCT, and 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm on MRI. The average PADI was 20.6 +/- 2.4 mm on plain radiography, 18.0 +/- 2.1 mm on MDCT, and 17.7 +/- 1.9 mm on MRI. The dural sac width was 13.7 +/- 1.8 mm, and the spinal cord diameter was 7.8 +/- 0.7 mm. Interobserver agreement was 0.701-0.927 and intraobserver agreement was 0.681-0.937. AADI values obtained on MDCT are significantly lower than those obtained on plain radiography or MRI. PADI values obtained on plain radiography are significantly higher than those obtained on MDCT or MRI. The dural sac width is most closely correlated with PADI values on MDCT. PADI seems to be easier to measure, more relevant, and clinically useful than AADI.

  1. Semi-automatic analysis of standard uptake values in serial PET/CT studies in patients with lung cancer and lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ly John

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax between serial PET/CT studies are used to determine disease progression or regression in oncologic patients. To measure these changes manually can be time consuming in a clinical routine. A semi-automatic method for calculation of SUVmax in serial PET/CT studies was developed and compared to a conventional manual method. The semi-automatic method first aligns the serial PET/CT studies based on the CT images. Thereafter, the reader selects an abnormal lesion in one of the PET studies. After this manual step, the program automatically detects the corresponding lesion in the other PET study, segments the two lesions and calculates the SUVmax in both studies as well as the difference between the SUVmax values. The results of the semi-automatic analysis were compared to that of a manual SUVmax analysis using a Philips PET/CT workstation. Three readers did the SUVmax readings in both methods. Sixteen patients with lung cancer or lymphoma who had undergone two PET/CT studies were included. There were a total of 26 lesions. Results Linear regression analysis of changes in SUVmax show that intercepts and slopes are close to the line of identity for all readers (reader 1: intercept = 1.02, R2 = 0.96; reader 2: intercept = 0.97, R2 = 0.98; reader 3: intercept = 0.99, R2 = 0.98. Manual and semi-automatic method agreed in all cases whether SUVmax had increased or decreased between the serial studies. The average time to measure SUVmax changes in two serial PET/CT examinations was four to five times longer for the manual method compared to the semi-automatic method for all readers (reader 1: 53.7 vs. 10.5 s; reader 2: 27.3 vs. 6.9 s; reader 3: 47.5 vs. 9.5 s; p Conclusions Good agreement was shown in assessment of SUVmax changes between manual and semi-automatic method. The semi-automatic analysis was four to five times faster to perform than the manual analysis. These findings show the

  2. CT and MRI findings of chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dongjin; Zhang Weidong; Wu Dingquan; Meng Lishi; Chen Jian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the imaging diagnosis of chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia by describing its CT and MR findings and correlating those findings with the clinical manifestations. Methods: The imaging findings and clinical data from 6 patients with chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia were retrospectively analyzed. All 6 patients had unenhanced CT scans, 1 also had MR imaging examination. Three of 6 patients had follow-up CT scans and 1 of 3 patients had follow-up MR imaging studies. Results: CT studies of all 6 patients showed unilateral or bilateral hyperdense striatum. The putamen was involved in all 6 patients, the caudate nucleus or lateral portion of the globus pallidus were involved in 5 of all 6 patients. All 3 follow-up CT studies depicted a decreased or resolved hyperdensity of the abnormal striatum. T 1 -weighted MR images in 1 patient showed the hyperintense lesions of bilateral lentiform nuclei, T 2 -weighted MR images of the patient showed the hypointense lesions of the corresponding lentiform nuclei, and its follow-up MR images depicted invariable signal intensity of T 1 -weighted and T 2 -weighted images. In all patients, the chorea resolved within 2 to 6 days after treatment of the hyperglycemia. Conclusion: The characteristic imaging findings of chorea associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia can suggest an accurate diagnosis. (authors)

  3. CT and MRI findings of calcified spinal meningiomas: correlation with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hak Jin [Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University School of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea); Lee, In Sook [Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University School of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Choi, Kyung-Un [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Busan (Korea); Lee, Young Hwan [Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea); Yi, Jae Hyuck [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea); Song, Jong Woon [Inje University Pusan Paik Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dongguk University Gyungju Hospital, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Department of Radiology, Gyungju (Korea)

    2010-04-15

    This study was designed to present characteristic CT and MR findings of calcified spinal meningiomas that correlate with pathological findings and to assess the efficacy of CT for the detection of calcifications within a mass in comparison to MRI. Between 1998 and 2009, 10 out of 11 patients who had pathologically confirmed psammomatous meningiomas showed gross calcifications on CT images and were included in this study. On CT scans of the 10 patients, the distribution pattern, morphology and number of calcifications within masses were evaluated. MRI was performed in seven patients and signal intensities of masses were assessed. The pathological results analyzed semi-quantitatively were compared with the density or the size of calcifications within a mass as seen on a CT scan. Seven of 10 masses were located at the thoracic spine level. Eight masses had intradural locations. The other two masses had extradural locations. Four masses were completely calcified based on standard radiographs and CT. Symptoms duration, the size of the mass and size or number of calcifications within a mass had no correlation. The location, size, and distribution pattern of calcifications within masses were variable. On MR images, signal intensity of calcified tumor varied on all imaging sequences. All the masses enhanced after injection of intravenous contrast material. A calcified meningioma should be first suggested when extradural or intradural masses located in the spine contain calcifications regardless of the size or pattern as depicted on CT, especially in the presence of enhancement as seen on MR images. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of CT and MRI for Diagnosis of Suspected Scaphoid Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, Wouter; Doornberg, Job N.; Ring, David; van Dijk, C. Niek; Maas, Mario; Goslings, J. Carel

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is no consensus on the optimum imaging method to use to confirm the diagnosis of true scaphoid fractures among patients with suspected scaphoid fractures. This study tested the null hypothesis that computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have the same

  5. The usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Hideki [Jikei Univ., Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Daisan Hospital; Maekawa, Kihei

    1995-09-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsy. The subjects were 100 epileptic child patients (average age, 13.2{+-}8.2 years) who underwent brain MRI, including 93 patients who also underwent brain CT. Twenty-two abnormal findings were obtained by MRI and 25 by CT. Thirty-nine patients who had complications such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, or the overlapping disorders showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence. No significant correlations existed between the presence or absence of abnormal findings and the disease course after seizures. Patients with symptomatic localization-related epilepsies or cryptogenic and symptomatic generalized epilepsies showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence and unfavorable disease course after seizures. In 10 of 28 patients who showed abnormal findings, the abnormal finding site on images were correlated to the focus site on electroencephalograms. In conclusion, brain MRI and CT are essential in the clinical practice of epilepsy, however, we should notice the limitation of these methods. (Y.S.).

  6. CT and MRI findings of cerebral ischemic lesions in the cortical and perforating arterial system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameyama, Masakuni; Udaka, Fukashi; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kodama, Mitsuo; Urushidani, Makoto; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Taku [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It is clinically useful to divide the location of infarction into the cortical and perforating arterial system. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now make the point of infarction a simple and useful task in daily practice. The diagnostic modality has also demonstrated that risk factors and clinical manifestations are different for infarction in the cortical as opposed to the perforating system. In this paper, we present various aspects of images of cerebral ischemia according to CT and/or MRI findings. With the advance of imaging mechanics, diagnostic capability of CT or/and MRI for cerebral infarction has markedly been improved. We must consider these points on evaluating the previously reported results. In addition, we always consider the pathological background of these image-findings for the precise interpretation of their clinical significance. In some instances, dynamic study such as PET or SPECT is needed for real interpretations of CT and/or MRI images. We paid special reference to lacunar stroke and striatocapsular infarct. In addition, `branch atheromatous disease (Caplan)` was considered, in particular, for their specific clinical significances. Large striatocapsular infarcts frequently show cortical signs and symptoms such as aphasia or agnosia in spite of their subcortical localization. These facts, although have previously been known, should be re-considered for their pathoanatomical mechanism. (author).

  7. CT and MRI findings of cerebral ischemic lesions in the cortical and perforating arterial system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Masakuni; Udaka, Fukashi; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kodama, Mitsuo; Urushidani, Makoto; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Taku

    1995-01-01

    It is clinically useful to divide the location of infarction into the cortical and perforating arterial system. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now make the point of infarction a simple and useful task in daily practice. The diagnostic modality has also demonstrated that risk factors and clinical manifestations are different for infarction in the cortical as opposed to the perforating system. In this paper, we present various aspects of images of cerebral ischemia according to CT and/or MRI findings. With the advance of imaging mechanics, diagnostic capability of CT or/and MRI for cerebral infarction has markedly been improved. We must consider these points on evaluating the previously reported results. In addition, we always consider the pathological background of these image-findings for the precise interpretation of their clinical significance. In some instances, dynamic study such as PET or SPECT is needed for real interpretations of CT and/or MRI images. We paid special reference to lacunar stroke and striatocapsular infarct. In addition, 'branch atheromatous disease (Caplan)' was considered, in particular, for their specific clinical significances. Large striatocapsular infarcts frequently show cortical signs and symptoms such as aphasia or agnosia in spite of their subcortical localization. These facts, although have previously been known, should be re-considered for their pathoanatomical mechanism. (author)

  8. MRI and CT features of hyperplastic callus in osteogenesis imperfecta tarda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrocky, I. [Diagnostic Center Meidling, Vienna (Austria); Seidl, G. [Diagnostic Center Meidling, Vienna (Austria)]|[Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria); Grill, F. [Orthopaedisches Spital Wien Speising, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-05-01

    We describe the MRI and CT findings of hyperplastic callus formation simulating a tumour of pelvis in patient with osteogenesis imperfecta tarda. Possible differential diagnoses and the impact of different imaging techniques on the correct diagnosis are discussed. (orig.) With 3 figs., 5 refs.

  9. Clinical neuroanatomy - cranial MRI and CT. 4. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanfermann, Heinrich; Raab, Peter; Kretschmann, Hans-Joachim; Weinrich, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The book on clinical neuroanatomy - cranial MRI and CT covers the following issues: layered imaging diagnostics and reference structures; frontal layer, sagittal layers, transverse layers, brainstem, skull topography and the intracranial spaces and structures, facial skull topography, head-neck topography; neurofunctional systems, neurotransmitter and neuromodulators, surveillance material and techniques.

  10. Inflicted T12 fracture-dislocation: CT/MRI correlation and mechanistic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Brandon [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Silvera, Michelle [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Newton, Alice [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of General Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Kleinman, Paul K. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-11-15

    We describe the CT and MRI findings of a thoracolumbar neurocentral synchondrosis fracture-dislocation in an abused infant. The morphologic features of this classically described fracture, and the associated cervical and sacral spine injuries displayed on cross-sectional imaging, provide compelling evidence for a mechanism of massive hyperflexion and axial spinal loading. (orig.)

  11. The usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, Hideki; Maekawa, Kihei.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the usefulness of brain MRI and CT in the clinical practice of epilepsy. The subjects were 100 epileptic child patients (average age, 13.2±8.2 years) who underwent brain MRI, including 93 patients who also underwent brain CT. Twenty-two abnormal findings were obtained by MRI and 25 by CT. Thirty-nine patients who had complications such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, or the overlapping disorders showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence. No significant correlations existed between the presence or absence of abnormal findings and the disease course after seizures. Patients with symptomatic localization-related epilepsies or cryptogenic and symptomatic generalized epilepsies showed abnormal findings in a significantly high incidence and unfavorable disease course after seizures. In 10 of 28 patients who showed abnormal findings, the abnormal finding site on images were correlated to the focus site on electroencephalograms. In conclusion, brain MRI and CT are essential in the clinical practice of epilepsy, however, we should notice the limitation of these methods. (Y.S.)

  12. CT and MRI in severe hypophosphataemia with central nervous system involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, U.; Hueppe, T.; Niehaus, L.

    2000-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old woman with extreme hypophosphataemia in whom CT and MRI disclosed bilateral lesions within the basal ganglia, thalamus and occipital lobes. After adequate substitution of phosphate the lesions grossly resolved and the patient recovered. This case is the first to demonstrate that profound changes of serum phosphate may be associated with reversible brain lesions. (orig.)

  13. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and MRI Findings in a Patient With Multiple Meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Calabria, Eros N; Grillea, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-08-01

    A 56-year-old man was referred to our Department for a 2-year story of upper limb tremor, severe headache, and episodes of confusion. Brain F-DOPA PET/CT showed multiple areas of tracer uptake in the two hemispheres of the brain. Subsequent MRI displayed demyelinating foci with high contrast enhancement. Histological specimen confirmed the diagnosis of multiple meningiomas.

  14. MRI versus CT for detecting cartilage invasion in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Inge; Hooft, Lotty; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Pameijer, Frank A.; de Bree, Remco; Stegeman, Inge

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine and compare the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative conventional MRI and conventional CT for detecting cartilage invasion in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, who

  15. Comparison of demons deformable registration-based methods for texture analysis of serial thoracic CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Fei, Xianhan M.; Tuohy, Rachel E.; Armato, Samuel G.

    2013-02-01

    To determine how 19 image texture features may be altered by three image registration methods, "normal" baseline and follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans from 27 patients were analyzed. Nineteen texture feature values were calculated in over 1,000 32x32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) randomly placed in each baseline scan. All three methods used demons registration to map baseline scan ROIs to anatomically matched locations in the corresponding transformed follow-up scan. For the first method, the follow-up scan transformation was subsampled to achieve a voxel size identical to that of the baseline scan. For the second method, the follow-up scan was transformed through affine registration to achieve global alignment with the baseline scan. For the third method, the follow-up scan was directly deformed to the baseline scan using demons deformable registration. Feature values in matched ROIs were compared using Bland- Altman 95% limits of agreement. For each feature, the range spanned by the 95% limits was normalized to the mean feature value to obtain the normalized range of agreement, nRoA. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare nRoA values across features for the three methods. Significance for individual tests was adjusted using the Bonferroni method. nRoA was significantly smaller for affine-registered scans than for the resampled scans (p=0.003), indicating lower feature value variability between baseline and follow-up scan ROIs using this method. For both of these methods, however, nRoA was significantly higher than when feature values were calculated directly on demons-deformed followup scans (p<0.001). Across features and methods, nRoA values remained below 26%.

  16. 'Peripheric' pancreatic cysts: performance of CT scan, MRI and endoscopy according to final pathological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duconseil, P; Turrini, O; Ewald, J; Soussan, J; Sarran, A; Gasmi, M; Moutardier, V; Delpero, J R

    2015-06-01

    To assess the accuracy of pre-operative staging in patients with peripheral pancreatic cystic neoplasms (pPCNs). From 2005 to 2011, 148 patients underwent a pancreatectomy for pPCNs. The pre-operative examination methods of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) were compared for their ability to predict the suggested diagnosis accurately, and the definitive diagnosis was affirmed by pathological examination. A mural nodule was detected in 34 patients (23%): only 1 patient (3%) had an invasive pPCN at the final histological examination. A biopsy was performed in 79 patients (53%) during EUS: in 55 patients (70%), the biopsy could not conclude a diagnosis; the biopsy provided the correct and wrong diagnosis in 19 patients (24%) and 5 patients (6%), respectively. A correct diagnosis was affirmed by CT, EUS and pancreatic MRI in 60 (41%), 103 (74%) and 80 (86%) patients (when comparing EUS and MRI; P = 0.03), respectively. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of CT, EUS and MRI were 70%, 75% and 87%, respectively. Pancreatic MRI appears to be the most appropriate examination to diagnose pPCNs accurately. EUS alone had a poor PPV. Mural nodules in a PCN should not be considered an indisputable sign of pPCN invasiveness. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  17. Differences in MRI findings in cases showing ring-enhancement on a CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwa, Kaichi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Miyasaka, Yoshio; Yada, Kenzoh; Kan, Shinichi; Takagi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    It is sometimes difficult to differentiate between a brain abscess and a tumor, for both show ring-enhancement on a CT scan. The present authors have studied the benefit of MRI for the differential diagnosis of these two lesions. The subjects of this study were 6 cases of brain abscess and 10 cases of brain tumor, all of them showing ring-enhancement on a CT scan. The MRI findings were compared with those of the CT scan taken at almost the same time, especially focussing on the difference in the ring-enhancement. In 5 out of the 6 cases of brain abscess, T 2 -weighted MRI demonstrated a comparatively thin and homogeneous low-intensity, round rim. In the cases of brain tumor, however, none of the cases demonstrated this typical low-intensity, round rim; rather, in them the rim was thick and irregular. The authors can conclude that those MRI findings can serve as important differential diagnostic findings between brain abscess and tumor; also, MRI may be used as a landmark for terminating the administration of antibiotics in cases of brain abscess. (author)

  18. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings of atypical hepatic Echinococcus alveolarisinfestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etlik, Oemer; Arslan, Halil; Harman, Mustafa; Temizoez, Osman; Bay, Ali; Koesem, Mustafa; Dogan, Ekrem

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of liver infestation by Echinococcus alveolaris(EA) is based on serological and radiological findings. In this report, we present a 15-year-old girl with atypical hepatic EA infestation showing central punctate calcifications and contrast enhancement on the portal and late phases of CT and MRI. CT showed a hypodense mass involving more than half of the liver with prominent central calcifications. MRI revealed hypointense signal of the infiltrative mass on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement is a unique finding in hepatic EA infestation that may cause difficulties with diagnosis. MRI may provide invaluable information in the diagnosis of EA infestation of the liver, either by disclosing the infiltrative pattern of infestation without significant effect to vascular structures, or by the signal characteristics. (orig.)

  19. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings of atypical hepatic Echinococcus alveolarisinfestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etlik, Oemer; Arslan, Halil; Harman, Mustafa; Temizoez, Osman [Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Bay, Ali [Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Van (Turkey); Koesem, Mustafa [Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Van (Turkey); Dogan, Ekrem [Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Van (Turkey)

    2005-05-01

    Diagnosis of liver infestation by Echinococcus alveolaris(EA) is based on serological and radiological findings. In this report, we present a 15-year-old girl with atypical hepatic EA infestation showing central punctate calcifications and contrast enhancement on the portal and late phases of CT and MRI. CT showed a hypodense mass involving more than half of the liver with prominent central calcifications. MRI revealed hypointense signal of the infiltrative mass on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement is a unique finding in hepatic EA infestation that may cause difficulties with diagnosis. MRI may provide invaluable information in the diagnosis of EA infestation of the liver, either by disclosing the infiltrative pattern of infestation without significant effect to vascular structures, or by the signal characteristics. (orig.)

  20. Prospective evaluation of 18F-FACBC PET/CT and PET/MRI versus multiparametric MRI in intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer patients (FLUCIPRO trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambor, Ivan; Kuisma, Anna; Kähkönen, Esa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Merisaari, Harri; Eskola, Olli; Teuho, Jarmo; Perez, Ileana Montoya; Pesola, Marko; Aronen, Hannu J; Boström, Peter J; Taimen, Pekka; Minn, Heikki

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate 18 F-FACBC PET/CT, PET/MRI, and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) in detection of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Twenty-six men with histologically confirmed PCa underwent PET/CT immediately after injection of 369 ± 10 MBq 18 F-FACBC (fluciclovine) followed by PET/MRI started 55 ± 7 min from injection. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) were measured for both hybrid PET acquisitions. A separate mpMRI was acquired within a week of the PET scans. Logan plots were used to calculate volume of distribution (V T ). The presence of PCa was estimated in 12 regions with radical prostatectomy findings as ground truth. For each imaging modality, area under the curve (AUC) for detection of PCa was determined to predict diagnostic performance. The clinical trial registration number is NCT02002455. In the visual analysis, 164/312 (53%) regions contained PCa, and 41 tumor foci were identified. PET/CT demonstrated the highest sensitivity at 87% while its specificity was low at 56%. The AUC of both PET/MRI and mpMRI significantly (p PET/CT while no differences were detected between PET/MRI and mpMRI. SUV max and V T of Gleason score (GS) >3 + 4 tumors were significantly (p PET/CT and PET/MRI demonstrated true-positive findings in only 1/7 patients with metastatic lymph nodes. Quantitative 18 F-FACBC imaging significantly correlated with GS but failed to outperform MRI in lesion detection. 18 F-FACBC may assist in targeted biopsies in the setting of hybrid imaging with MRI.

  1. WE-AB-202-07: Ventilation CT: Voxel-Level Comparison with Hyperpolarized Helium-3 & Xenon-129 MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, B; Marshall, H; Hughes, P; Stewart, N; Horn, F; Collier, G; Norquay, G; Hart, K; Swinscoe, J; Hatton, M; Wild, J; Ireland, R [University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the spatial correlation of ventilation surrogates computed from inspiratory and expiratory breath-hold CT with hyperpolarized Helium-3 & Xenon-129 MRI in a cohort of lung cancer patients. Methods: 5 patients underwent expiration & inspiration breath-hold CT. Xenon-129 & {sup 1}H MRI were also acquired at the same inflation state as inspiratory CT. This was followed immediately by acquisition of Helium-3 & {sup 1}H MRI in the same breath and at the same inflation state as inspiratory CT. Expiration CT was deformably registered to inspiration CT for calculation of ventilation CT from voxel-wise differences in Hounsfield units. Inspiration CT and the Xenon-129’s corresponding anatomical {sup 1}H MRI were registered to Helium-3 MRI via the same-breath anatomical {sup 1}H MRI. This enabled direct comparison of CT ventilation with Helium-3 MRI & Xenon-129 MRI for the median values in corresponding regions of interest, ranging from finer to coarser in-plane dimensions of 10 by 10, 20 by 20, 30 by 30 and 40 by 40, located within the lungs as defined by the same-breath {sup 1}H MRI lung mask. Spearman coefficients were used to assess voxel-level correlation. Results: The median Spearman’s coefficients of ventilation CT with Helium-3 & Xenon-129 MRI for ROIs of 10 by 10, 20 by 20, 30 by 30 and 40 by 40 were 0.52, 0.56, 0.60 and 0.68 and 0.40, 0.42, 0.52 and 0.70, respectively. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a method of acquiring CT & hyperpolarized gas MRI (Helium-3 & Xenon-129 MRI) in similar breath-holds to enable direct spatial comparison of ventilation maps. Initial results show moderate correlation between ventilation CT & hyperpolarized gas MRI, improving for coarser regions which could be attributable to the inherent noise in CT intensity, non-ventilatory effects and registration errors at the voxel-level. Thus, it may be more beneficial to quantify ventilation at a more regional level.

  2. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as imaging biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David O; Hooper, Clare E; Searle, Julie; Darby, Michael; White, Paul; Harvey, John E; Braybrooke, Jeremy P; Maskell, Nick A; Masani, Vidan; Lyburn, Iain D

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET with computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to predict prognosis and monitor treatment in malignant pleural mesothelioma. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies carried out as part of the South West Area Mesothelioma Pemetrexed trial were used. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies were carried out before treatment, and after two cycles of chemotherapy, on patients treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin. A total of 73 patients were recruited, of whom 65 had PET/CT and DCE-MRI scans. Baseline measurements from F-FDG PET/CT (maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis) and DCE-MRI (integrated area under the first 90s of the curve and washout slope) were compared with overall survival (OS) using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses, and changes in imaging measurements were compared with disease progression. PET/CT and DCE-MRI measurements were not correlated with each other. Maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis were significantly related to OS with Cox regression analysis and Kaplan-Meir analysis, and DCE-MRI washout curve shape was significantly related to OS. DCE-MRI curve shape can be combined with F-FDG PET/CT to give additional prognostic information. Changes in measurements were not related to progression-free survival. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI give prognostic information in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Neither PET/CT nor DCE-MRI is useful for monitoring disease progression.

  3. Is it possible to make a diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus on MRI/CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ohwaki, Hisayuki; Matsumoto, Atsuhito

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, Japanese guidelines for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) were created to diagnose it more precisely and treat it more effectively. The guidelines suggested the importance of a tight cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space at the high convexity area. We reviewed MRI/CT findings in 38 cases of probable iNPH during Jan. 1998 to Dec. 2003. We noted the tightness in the interhemispheric fissure on axial MRI/CT view. Thirty-three cases were shunt-responsive among 38 cases (shunt effectiveness: 86.8%). MRI/CT findings of iNPH on axial view were classified into typical, almost typical and atypical. Major findings of typical cases showed: 1) ventricular dilatation, 2) tight interhemispheric fissure, 3) dilated Sylvian fissure. Almost all of the typical cases were a little bit questionable on findings for 2) and/or 3). Atypical cases showed an absence of finding 2) or showed aqueductal stenosis. Among 33 the shunt-responding cases, ten cases (30%) were typical, 16 cases (49%) were almost typical and seven cases were atypical. Among the 5 cases of non-responders, they were divided into 2, 2 and 1 cases, respectively. Atypical cases included 2 cases of aqueductal stenosis and 5 cases of open interhemispheric fissure; the latter were difficult to differentiate form brain atrophy. Thus, about 80% of iNPH cases could be diagnosed or highly suspected on axial MRI/CT findings. Although MRI/CT findings were not definitive for making a diagnosis of iNPH, they were highly useful to idenitify patients for a CSF tap test. (author)

  4. CT, MRI, and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumors: Correlation with histopathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weidong; Li Chuanxing; Liu Qingyu; Hu Yingying; Cao Yun; Huang Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and to improve the diagnostic efficacy of these techniques for the detection of such tumor. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of abdominopelvic DSRCT confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Among the 7 patients, 5 patients had undergone CT scanning, 2 of which were also examined with FDG-PET/CT imaging, and 2 had undergone MRI. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced examinations were performed in all patients, and 2 patients had also undergone dynamic CT contrast-enhanced examinations. Image characteristics, such as shape, size, number, edge, attenuation, and intensity of each lesion before and after contrast enhancement were analyzed and compared with the pathomorphology of the tumors. Results: Multiple large masses in the abdominopelvis were detected in 6 cases, and a large mass in the pelvis was detected in 1 case. Six cases showed largest mass in pelvis, and 1 case in mesentery. None of the masses had a definite organ origin. CT showed soft tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense areas. MR T1-weighted images revealed lesions with mild hypointense areas and patchy hypointense areas in 2 cases and lesions with patchy hyperintense areas in 1 case. T2-weighted images showed lesions with mixed isointense and hyperintense areas in 1 case and lesions with mixed hypointense, isointense, and hyperintense areas in another. Contrast-enhanced CT and T1-weighted images showed mildly heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other associated findings included peritoneal seeding (n = 3), peritoneal effusions (n = 3), hepatic metastasis (n = 2), bone metastasis (n = 1), and mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n = 4). FDG-PET/CT showed multiple nodular foci of increased metabolic activity in the abdominopelvic masses, in the hepatic and

  5. Imaging with 124I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J.; Umutlu, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using 124 I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT 2 ) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after 124 I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT 2 acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI 2 ) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI 30 ). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI 2 detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT 2 (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI 30 tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI 2 (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine-positive lesions as either metastasis or thyroid remnant

  6. Imaging with {sup 124}I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, L. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using {sup 124}I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT{sub 2}) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after {sup 124}I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT{sub 2} acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI{sub 2}) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI{sub 30}). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI{sub 2} detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT{sub 2} (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI{sub 30} tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI{sub 2} (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine

  7. The diagnostic value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI in suspected vertebral osteomyelitis - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Scheper, Henk; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Bloem, Johan L; Janssen, Marcel J R; van den Hoven, Leon; Hosman, Allard J F; Visser, Leo G; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. From November 2015 until December 2016, 32 patients with suspected vertebral osteomyelitis were prospectively included. All patients underwent both 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI within 48 h. All images were independently reevaluated by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physicians who were blinded to each others' image interpretation. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI were compared to the clinical diagnosis according to international guidelines. For 18 F-FDG-PET/CT, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis were 100%, 83.3%, 90.9%, and 100%, respectively. For MRI, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 100%, 91.7%, 95.2%, and 100%, respectively. MRI detected more epidural/spinal abscesses. An important advantage of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT is the detection of metastatic infection (16 patients, 50.0%). 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI are both necessary techniques in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. An important advantage of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT is the visualization of metastatic infection, especially in patients with bacteremia. MRI is more sensitive in detection of small epidural abscesses.

  8. SU-E-J-218: Novel Validation Paradigm of MRI to CT Deformation of Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, K [University of Miami School of Medicine - Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); University of Miami School of Medicine - Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Pirozzi, S; Nelson, A; Piper, J; Horvat, M [MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Stoyanova, R; Dogan, N; Pollack, A [University of Miami School of Medicine - Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deformable registration algorithms are inherently difficult to characterize in the multi-modality setting due to a significant differences in the characteristics of the different modalities (CT and MRI) as well as tissue deformations. We present a unique paradigm where this is overcome by utilizing a planning-MRI acquired within an hour of the planning-CT serving as a surrogate for quantifying MRI to CT deformation by eliminating the issues of multi-modality comparisons. Methods: For nine subjects, T2 fast-spin-echo images were acquired at two different time points, the first several weeks prior to planning (diagnostic-MRI) and the second on the same day as the planning-CT (planning-MRI). Significant effort in patient positioning and bowel/bladder preparation was undertaken to minimize distortion of the prostate in all datasets. The diagnostic-MRI was rigidly and deformably aligned to the planning-CT utilizing a commercially available deformable registration algorithm synthesized from local registrations. Additionally, the quality of rigid alignment was ranked by an imaging physicist. The distances between corresponding anatomical landmarks on rigid and deformed registrations (diagnostic-MR to planning-CT) were evaluated. Results: It was discovered that in cases where the rigid registration was of acceptable quality the deformable registration didn’t improve the alignment, this was true of all metrics employed. If the analysis is separated into cases where the rigid alignment was ranked as unacceptable the deformable registration significantly improved the alignment, 4.62mm residual error in landmarks as compared to 5.72mm residual error in rigid alignments with a p-value of 0.0008. Conclusion: This paradigm provides an ideal testing ground for MR to CT deformable registration algorithms by allowing for inter-modality comparisons of multi-modality registrations. Consistent positioning, bowel and bladder preparation may Result in higher quality rigid

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Degenerative Cartilage and Subchondral Bony Lesions in a Preserved Cadaveric Knee: Propagation-Based Phase-Contrast CT Versus Conventional MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola; Horng, Annie

    2018-04-09

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone conditions in a fully preserved cadaveric human knee joint using high-resolution x-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging (PBI) CT and to compare the performance of the new technique with conventional CT and MRI. A cadaveric human knee was examined using an x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm 2 FOV, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm 2 . PBI CT images were reconstructed with both the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Conventional 3-T MRI and CT were also performed. Measurements of cartilage thickness, cartilage lesions, International Cartilage Repair Society scoring, and detection of subchondral bone changes were evaluated. Visual inspection of the specimen akin to arthroscopy was conducted and served as a standard of reference for lesion detection. Loss of cartilage height was visible on PBI CT and MRI. Quantification of cartilage thickness showed a strong correlation between the two modalities. Cartilage lesions appeared darker than the adjacent cartilage on PBI CT. PBI CT showed similar agreement to MRI for depicting cartilage substance defects or lesions compared with the visual inspection. The assessment of subchondral bone cysts showed moderate to strong agreement between PBI CT and CT. In contrast to the standard clinical methods of MRI and CT, PBI CT is able to simultaneously depict cartilage and bony changes at high resolution. Though still an experimental technique, PBI CT is a promising high-resolution imaging method to evaluate comprehensive changes of osteoarthritic disease in a clinical setting.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI Versus CT for the Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Sonja; Pickhardt, Perry J; Riedesel, Erica L; Gill, Kara G; Robbins, Jessica B; Kitchin, Douglas R; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Harringa, John B; Reeder, Scott B; Repplinger, Michael D

    2017-10-01

    Appendicitis is frequently diagnosed in the emergency department, most commonly using CT. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI with that of contrast-enhanced CT for the diagnosis of appendicitis in adolescents when interpreted by abdominal radiologists and pediatric radiologists. Our study included a prospectively enrolled cohort of 48 patients (12-20 years old) with nontraumatic abdominal pain who underwent CT and MRI. Fellowship-trained abdominal and pediatric radiologists reviewed all CT and MRI studies in randomized order, blinded to patient outcome. Likelihood for appendicitis was rated on a 5-point scale (1, definitely not appendicitis; 5, definitely appendicitis) for CT, the unenhanced portion of the MRI, and the entire contrast-enhanced MRI study. ROC curves were generated and AUC compared for each scan type for all six readers and then stratified by radiologist type. Image test characteristics, interrater reliability, and reading times were compared. Sensitivity and specificity were 85.9% (95% CI, 76.2-92.7%) and 93.8% (95% CI, 89.7-96.7%) for unenhanced MRI, 93.6% (95% CI, 85.6-97.9%) and 94.3% (95% CI, 90.2-97%) for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 93.6% (95% CI, 85.6-97.9%) and 94.3% (95% CI, 90.2-97%) for CT. No difference was found in the diagnostic accuracy or interpretation time when comparing abdominal radiologists to pediatric radiologists (CT, 3.0 min vs 2.8 min; contrast-enhanced MRI, 2.4 min vs 1.8 min; unenhanced MRI, 1.5 min vs 2.3 min). Substantial agreement between abdominal and pediatric radiologists was seen for all methods (κ = 0.72-0.83). The diagnostic accuracy of MRI to diagnose appendicitis was very similar to CT. No statistically significant difference in accuracy was observed between imaging modality or radiologist subspecialty.

  11. Early response of patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer. A comparison of PET/CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Huh, Seung-Jae; Nam, Heerim; Ju, Sang-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for early response evaluation of cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Fifty-two patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. The pathologic findings were squamous cell carcinoma in 47 patients and adenocarcinoma in 5 patients. All patients underwent PET/CT and MRI scans before, during and within 1 month after completion of CCRT. The percent change in tumor volume during and after CCRT based on PET/CT and MRI images was compared. There were significant differences (p<0.001) between the initial tumor volume and tumor volume during and after CCRT as measured by both PET/CT and MRI. During CCRT, the percent volume reduction based on PET/CT images was significantly greater than the percent volume reduction calculated from MRI images (p=0.024). However, after the completion of CCRT, no significant differences were found in volume reduction as calculated based on PET/CT versus MRI images (p=0.289). The percent volume reduction of adenocarcinomas was significantly smaller than that of squamous cell carcinomas based on both PET/CT (p=0.041) and MRI images (p<0.001). Significant decreases in tumor volume were observed during and after CCRT in patients with cervical cancer. Tumor volume reduction on PET/CT images was greater than that on MRI images during CCRT. We suggest that early PET/CT as well as MRI scans could be taken during CCRT to evaluate tumor response and allow personalized treatment of cervical cancer. (author)

  12. Ovarian cancer: the clinical role of US, CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togashi, K.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents an overview of ovarian cancer, which addresses the clinical roles of imaging studies, including US, CT, and MR imaging in the course of diagnosis and treatment of this important disease. US is the modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected adnexal masses. Although its accuracy is not sufficient to avert surgery, morphological analysis of adnexal masses with US helps narrow the differential diagnosis, determining the degree of suspicion for malignancy, usually in concert with a serum CA-125 level. Combined morphological and vascular imaging obtained by US appear to further improve the preoperative assessment of adnexal masses. For uncertain or problematic cases, MR imaging helps to distinguish benign from malignant, with an overall accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancy of 93%. The accuracy of MR imaging in the confident diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma, endometrial cysts, and leiomayomas is very high. CT is not indicated for differential diagnosis of adnexal masses because of poor soft tissue discrimination, except for fatty tissue and for calcification, and the disadvantages of irradiation. In the staging of ovarian cancer, CT, US, and MR imaging all have a similarly high accuracy. Although it is difficult to suggest a simple algorithm for evaluating the state of women with adnexal masses, the correct preoperative diagnosis and staging of ovarian cancer with the use of any of these imaging studies will lead to an appropriate referral to a specialist in gynecologic oncology and offer a significant survival advantage for patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of electrode position in deep brain stimulation by image fusion (MRI and CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaure, I.; Lovblad, K.O.; Vargas, M.I. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Pollak, P.; Horvath, J.; Boex, C.; Burkhard, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Geneva (Switzerland); Momjian, S. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Geneva (Switzerland); Remuinan, J. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    Imaging has an essential role in the evaluation of correct positioning of electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Although MRI offers superior anatomic visualization of target sites, there are safety concerns in patients with implanted material; imaging guidelines are inconsistent and vary. The fusion of postoperative CT with preoperative MRI images can be an alternative for the assessment of electrode positioning. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of measurements realized on fused images (acquired without a stereotactic frame) using a manufacturer-provided software. Data from 23 Parkinson's disease patients who underwent bilateral electrode placement for subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS were acquired. Preoperative high-resolution T2-weighted sequences at 3 T, and postoperative CT series were fused using a commercially available software. Electrode tip position was measured on the obtained images in three directions (in relation to the midline, the AC-PC line and an AC-PC line orthogonal, respectively) and assessed in relation to measures realized on postoperative 3D T1 images acquired at 1.5 T. Mean differences between measures carried out on fused images and on postoperative MRI lay between 0.17 and 0.97 mm. Fusion of CT and MRI images provides a safe and fast technique for postoperative assessment of electrode position in DBS. (orig.)

  14. Quantitative 3D ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) MRI and micro-CTCT) evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Daniel [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Du, Jiang; Chung, Christine B. [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Temporomandibular dysfunction involves osteoarthritis of the TMJ, including degeneration and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of novel 3D-UTE MRI versus micro-CTCT) for quantitative evaluation of mandibular condyle morphology. Nine TMJ condyle specimens were harvested from cadavers (2 M, 3 F; age 85 ± 10 years, mean ± SD). 3D-UTE MRI (TR = 50 ms, TE = 0.05 ms, 104-μm isotropic-voxel) was performed using a 3-T MR scanner and μCT (18-μm isotropic-voxel) was also performed. MR datasets were spatially registered with a μCT dataset. Two observers segmented bony contours of the condyles. Fibrocartilage was segmented on the MR dataset. Using a custom program, bone and fibrocartilage surface coordinates, Gaussian curvature, volume of segmented regions, and fibrocartilage thickness were determined for quantitative evaluation of joint morphology. Agreement between techniques (MRI vs. μCT) and observers (MRI vs. MRI) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature, and segmented volume of the bone were determined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Between MRI and μCT, the average deviation of surface coordinates was 0.19 ± 0.15 mm, slightly higher than the spatial resolution of MRI. Average deviation of the Gaussian curvature and volume of segmented regions, from MRI to μCT, was 5.7 ± 6.5 % and 6.6 ± 6.2 %, respectively. ICC coefficients (MRI vs. μCT) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature, and segmented volumes were 0.892, 0.893, and 0.972, respectively. Between observers (MRI vs. MRI), the ICC coefficients were 0.998, 0.999, and 0.997, respectively. Fibrocartilage thickness was 0.55 ± 0.11 mm, as previously described in the literature for grossly normal TMJ samples. 3D-UTE MR quantitative evaluation of TMJ condyle morphology ex-vivo, including surface, curvature, and segmented volume, shows high correlation against μCT and between observers. In addition, UTE MRI allows

  15. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as imaging biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, D. O.; Hooper, C. E.; Searle, J.; Darby, M.; White, P.; Harvey, J. E.; Braybrooke, J. P.; Maskell, N. A.; Masani, V.; Lyburn, I. D.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose\\ud \\ud The purpose of this study was to compare the use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET with computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to predict prognosis and monitor treatment in malignant pleural mesothelioma.\\ud \\ud Patients and methods\\ud \\ud 18F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies carried out as part of the South West Area Mesothelioma Pemetrexed trial were used. 18F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies were carried out before treatment, and after two...

  16. MRI features of myositis ossificans with X-ray and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Xiang; Bai Rongjie; Qu Hui; Cheng Xiaoguang; Li Yuang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the MRI features of myositis ossificans, and to address the correlation with X-ray radiography and CT findings. Methods: X-ray films, CT and MRI of 36 documented cases of myositis ossificans were retrospectively analyzed, and the literatures were reviewed. Results: Of the 36 cases, 4 cases occurred in the elbow joint, 4 in the shoulder joint, 15 in the hip joint, 6 in the tibiofibula, 5 in the femur, 1 in the metatarsal bones, and 1 in the ilium, respectively. Irregular patchy or lamellar high density calcification or ossification could be seen in the soft tissue parenchym on X-ray films and CT scan. Cortical bone integrity was preserved in diaphysis. CT enhanced scan showed that the swollen parenchyma was not enhanced and there was no parenchyma mass. On the early and middle stages, MR T 1 WI and T 2 WI showed slice-shaped low signal in the peripheral parenchyma, but patchy high signal was found around the low signal on T 2 WI. STIR showed mixed high and low signals in the swollen parenchyma with unclear demarcation. The lesions showed low signal on MR T 1 WI and T 2 WI in the late stage, and there was no edema in peripheral parenehyma. MRI enhanced scan found that the swollen parenchyma showed no enhancement in all stages. Conclusions: The imaging features of myositis ossificans have some characteristics. Misdiagnosis could be avoided when the disease was evaluated with the course. (authors)

  17. Quantification of C2 cervical spine rotatory fixation by X-ray, MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradl, Georg [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Universitaet Rostock, Abteilung Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Rostock (Germany); Maier-Bosse, Tamara; Staebler, Axel [Institut fuer Radiologische Diagnostik der Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grobetahadern, Munich (Germany); Penning, Randolph [Institut fuer Rechtsmedizin der Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Atlanto-axial rotatory displacement is known to be a cause of childhood torticollis and may as well be responsible for chronic neck pain after rear-end automobile collisions. The objective was to determine whether quantification of C2 malrotation is possible by plain radiographs in comparison to CT as the golden standard. MR imaging was evaluated as to whether it was of equal value in the detection of bony landmarks. C2 vertebra of five human cadaveric cervical spine specimens, ligamentously intact, were rotated using a Steinmann pin in steps of 5 up to 15 right and 15 left. Plain radiographs, CT and MRI images were taken in each rotational step. Data were analyzed for quantification of C2 rotation by three independent examiners. A rotation of 5 led to a spinous process deviation (SPD) from the midline of 3 mm as measured on an a.p. plain radiograph. A coefficient of rotation was calculated (1.62 mm{sup -1}). Data analyzed by three examiners revealed a small coefficient of variation (0.03). MRI and CT measurements showed comparable results for the quantification of rotation; however, in both techniques the 15 rotation was underestimated. Quantification of upper cervical spine malrotation was possible on plain radiographs using the SPD and a rotation coefficient. MRI and CT were equally successful in the assessment of C2 malrotation. (orig.)

  18. Lumbar apophyseal ring fracture and disc herniation: CT and MRI manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Kang, Heung Sik; Song, Chi Sung

    1991-01-01

    To understand CT and MR findings and, furthermore, the pathophysiology of the lumbar apophyseal ring fracture (LARF) associated with lumbar disc herniation in 31 cases of LARF (CT was performed in 23, MRI in 18, and both CT and MRI in 12), we studied the age and sex distribution of the patients, history of trauma, shape of bony fragment, number of lesions, lesion sites, associated lumbar disc herniations, and evidence of Scheuermann's disease. Twenty-three out of 31 patients were male, 6 were adolescents, 21 were young adults, and 4 were middled-aged. Arcuate or nodular bone fragment and/or bone defects were detected at the posterior margin of L1 in 2, L2 in 1, L3 in 1, L4 in 10, L5 in 20 and S1 in 7 patients. Eight patients showed multiple LARF, and 13 showed multiple lumbar disc herniations. Radiologic evidence of Scheuermann's disease was obvious in 9 patients. Only 6 patients had a history of evident trauma. CT and MRI showed a similar detection rate of bone fragments and defects. We concluded that LARF would be encountered in young male patients with multiple lumbar disc herniations and evidence of Scheuermann's disease

  19. Quantification of C2 cervical spine rotatory fixation by X-ray, MRI and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradl, Georg; Maier-Bosse, Tamara; Staebler, Axel; Penning, Randolph

    2005-01-01

    Atlanto-axial rotatory displacement is known to be a cause of childhood torticollis and may as well be responsible for chronic neck pain after rear-end automobile collisions. The objective was to determine whether quantification of C2 malrotation is possible by plain radiographs in comparison to CT as the golden standard. MR imaging was evaluated as to whether it was of equal value in the detection of bony landmarks. C2 vertebra of five human cadaveric cervical spine specimens, ligamentously intact, were rotated using a Steinmann pin in steps of 5 up to 15 right and 15 left. Plain radiographs, CT and MRI images were taken in each rotational step. Data were analyzed for quantification of C2 rotation by three independent examiners. A rotation of 5 led to a spinous process deviation (SPD) from the midline of 3 mm as measured on an a.p. plain radiograph. A coefficient of rotation was calculated (1.62 mm -1 ). Data analyzed by three examiners revealed a small coefficient of variation (0.03). MRI and CT measurements showed comparable results for the quantification of rotation; however, in both techniques the 15 rotation was underestimated. Quantification of upper cervical spine malrotation was possible on plain radiographs using the SPD and a rotation coefficient. MRI and CT were equally successful in the assessment of C2 malrotation. (orig.)

  20. Clinical experience of titanium cerebral aneurysm clips. Evaluation of artifact of CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninomiya, Takashi; Kato, Yoko; Sano, Hirotoshi

    1996-01-01

    The titanium aneurysm clips manufactured by AESCULAP Company are expected to be useful, not only for clinical applications, but also for reducing artifacts in post-operative CT and MRI. We carried out an investigation of the behavior of the new Yasargil titanium clips in a 1.5T MR imager. The new titanium clips showed considerably smaller clip-induced MR and CT artifacts than phynox and elgiloy clips. No movement of the titanium clips was seen by introducing them to the MR imager. Subsequent to these experimental studies, we applied titanium clips to 25 cerebral aneurysms. Post-operative CT, especially helical scanning CT and MR showed minimal artifacts, leading to the conclusion that the titanium clips are better than the other types of clips for the evaluation of post-operative neuroradiological images. (author)

  1. Contribution of brain imaging techniques: CT-scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasco-Papon, A.; Gourdier, A.L.; Papon, X.; Caron-Poitreau, C.

    1996-01-01

    In light of the current lack of consensus on the benefit of carotid artery surgery to treat asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, the decision to operate on a patient depends on individual evaluation and characterization of risk factors on carotid artery stenosis greater than 70 %. The assessment of such risk factors is based especially on non-invasive brain imaging techniques.Computed tomography scanning (CT-scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enable two types of stenosis to be differentiated, i.e. stenoses which are symptomatic and those that are radiologically proven versus those which are clinically and radiologically silent. CT-scan investigation (with and without injection of iodinated contrast media) still continues to be a common routine test in 1996 whenever a surgical revascularization procedure is planned. The presence of deep lacunar infarcts ipsilateral to the carotid artery stenosis generally evidence the reality of stenosis and thus are useful to the surgeon in establishing whether surgery is indicated. In the absence a consensus on indications for surgical management, the surgeon could use the CT-scan and MRI as medicolegal records which could be compared to a subsequent postoperative CT-scan in case of ischemic complications associated with the surgical procedure. Furthermore, recent cerebral ischemia as evidenced by filling with contrast material, will call for postponing treatment by a few weeks. Although conventional MRI is more contributive than brain CT-scan in terms of sensibility and specificity, its indications are narrower because of its limited availability and cost constraints. But, development of angio-MRI and functional imaging promise that its future is assured and even perhaps as the sole diagnostic method if its indications are expanded to include preoperative angiographic evaluation of atheromatous lesions of supra-aortic trunks. (authors). 37 refs

  2. Current and future diagnostic tools for traumatic brain injury: CT, conventional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, David L; Mac Donald, Christine L; Shimony, Joshua S

    2015-01-01

    Brain imaging plays a key role in the assessment of traumatic brain injury. In this review, we present our perspectives on the use of computed tomography (CT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and newer advanced modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging. Specifically, we address assessment for immediately life-threatening intracranial lesions (noncontrast head CT), assessment of progression of intracranial lesions (noncontrast head CT), documenting intracranial abnormalities for medicolegal reasons (conventional MRI with blood-sensitive sequences), presurgical planning for post-traumatic epilepsy (high spatial resolution conventional MRI), early prognostic decision making (conventional MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging), prognostic assessment for rehabilitative planning (conventional MRI and possibly diffusion tensor imaging in the future), stratification of subjects and pharmacodynamic tracking of targeted therapies in clinical trials (specific MRI sequences or positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, e.g., diffusion tensor imaging for traumatic axonal injury). We would like to emphasize that all of these methods, especially the newer research approaches, require careful radiologic-pathologic validation for optimal interpretation. We have taken this approach in a mouse model of pericontusional traumatic axonal injury. We found that the extent of reduction in the diffusion tensor imaging parameter relative anisotropy directly correlated with the number of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-stained axonal varicosities (r(2)=0.81, p<0.0001, n=20 injured mice). Interestingly, however, the least severe contusional injuries did not result in APP-stained axonal varicosities, but did cause reduction in relative anisotropy. Clearly, both the imaging assessments and the pathologic assessments will require iterative refinement. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of FDG-PET/MRI, FDG-PET/CT, and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Tumor Recurrence in Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Badve, Chaitra; Garg, Vasant; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Rogers, Lisa; Sloan, Andrew; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R; Wolansky, Leo J

    2018-01-01

    To compare the utility of quantitative PET/MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI (pMRI), and PET/CT in differentiating radiation necrosis (RN) from tumor recurrence (TR) in patients with treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The study included 24 patients with GBM treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and temozolomide who presented with progression on imaging follow-up. All patients underwent PET/MRI and pMRI during a single examination. Additionally, 19 of 24 patients underwent PET/CT on the same day. Diagnosis was established by pathology in 17 of 24 and by clinical/radiologic consensus in 7 of 24. For the quantitative PET/MRI and PET/CT analysis, a region of interest (ROI) was drawn around each lesion and within the contralateral white matter. Lesion to contralateral white matter ratios for relative maximum, mean, and median were calculated. For pMRI, lesion ROI was drawn on the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps and histogram metrics were calculated. Diagnostic performance for each metric was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and area under curve (AUC) was calculated. In 24 patients, 28 lesions were identified. For PET/MRI, relative mean ≥ 1.31 resulted in AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100%. For pMRI, CBV max ≥3.32 yielded an AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and NPV measuring 100%. The joint model utilizing r-mean (PET/MRI) and CBV mode (pMRI) resulted in AUC of 1.0. Our study demonstrates that quantitative PET/MRI parameters in combination with DSC pMRI provide the best diagnostic utility in distinguishing RN from TR in treated GBMs. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  4. Detection of an occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid fistula by CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, B.; Brors, D.; Draf, W. [Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Marburg Univ. (Germany); Goedecke, A. [Department of Radiology, Academic Teaching Hospital, Fulda (Germany); Prescher, A. [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, University Medical School, RWTH, Aachen (Germany)

    1998-12-01

    We describe an unusual occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula to the sphenoid sinus demonstrated by MRI. CT was performed because of a posterior cerebral infarct caused by cardiac arrhythmia. Axial sections showed fluid in the sphenoid sinus. High-resolution scans revealed a bony defect 3 mm in diameter of the posterior wall of the sphenoid sinus, and MRI showed a transclival CSF fistula. This occult lesion was confirmed by surgery and duraplasty was successfully performed via an endonasal approach. (orig.) With 3 figs., 19 refs.

  5. Comparison of MRI and PET-CT in detecting the loco-regional recurrence of soft tissue sarcomas during surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hye Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Sun Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Seok [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of MRI and PET-CT for the detection of loco-regional recurrences after soft tissue sarcoma (STS) excision. From Dec 2003 to Aug 2014, 394 patients with STSs, who were included in the electronic patient registry for initial or repeated surgery at our hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 152 patients who underwent regular postoperative follow-ups with both MRI and PET-CT, obtained within a 3 month period of each other. We analyzed differences in the performance of MRI and PET-CT for the diagnosis of loco-regional recurrences using McNemar's test. The receiver-operating characteristic curves and calculations of the area under the curve were used. Twenty patients were found to have a loco-regional recurrence after tumor excision. For MRI and PET-CT, the sensitivities were 90.0 and 95.0 %, and the specificities 97.7 and 95.5 %, respectively, with positive predictive values of 85.7 and 76.0 % and negative predictive values of 98.5 and 99.2 %, respectively. No significant difference was detected between the sensitivities of MRI and PET-CT (p = 0.125). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for PET-CT (0.952) was not significantly greater than that for MRI (0.939; p = 0.6). MRI of the area of interest is recommended for evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical excision of STS. PET-CT was shown to be effective for detection of STS recurrence, and comparable to MRI. However, if PET-CT or MRI findings are inconclusive, the other modality may be helpful in differentiating tumor recurrence from post-therapeutic tissue change. (orig.)

  6. Automated pulmonary lobar ventilation measurements using volume-matched thoracic CT and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, F.; Svenningsen, S.; Bluemke, E.; Rajchl, M.; Yuan, J.; Fenster, A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Objectives: To develop and evaluate an automated registration and segmentation pipeline for regional lobar pulmonary structure-function measurements, using volume-matched thoracic CT and MRI in order to guide therapy. Methods: Ten subjects underwent pulmonary function tests and volume-matched 1H and 3He MRI and thoracic CT during a single 2-hr visit. CT was registered to 1H MRI using an affine method that incorporated block-matching and this was followed by a deformable step using free-form deformation. The resultant deformation field was used to deform the associated CT lobe mask that was generated using commercial software. 3He-1H image registration used the same two-step registration method and 3He ventilation was segmented using hierarchical k-means clustering. Whole lung and lobar 3He ventilation and ventilation defect percent (VDP) were generated by mapping ventilation defects to CT-defined whole lung and lobe volumes. Target CT-3He registration accuracy was evaluated using region- , surface distance- and volume-based metrics. Automated whole lung and lobar VDP was compared with semi-automated and manual results using paired t-tests. Results: The proposed pipeline yielded regional spatial agreement of 88.0+/-0.9% and surface distance error of 3.9+/-0.5 mm. Automated and manual whole lung and lobar ventilation and VDP were not significantly different and they were significantly correlated (r = 0.77, p pulmonary structural-functional maps with high accuracy and robustness, providing an important tool for image-guided pulmonary interventions.

  7. Clinical assessment of CT-MRI image fusion software in localization of the prostate for 3D conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Kazufumi; Lee, W. Robert; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Shaer, Andrew H.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of image fusion software and compare MRI prostate localization with CT localization in patients undergoing 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: After a phantom study was performed to ensure the accuracy of image fusion procedure, 22 prostate cancer patients had CT and MRI studies before the start of radiotherapy. Immobilization casts used during radiation treatment were also used for both imaging studies. After the clinical target volume (CTV) (prostate or prostate + seminal vesicles) was defined on CT, slices from MRI study were reconstructed to match precisely the corresponding CT slices by identifying three common bony landmarks on each study. The CTV was separately defined on the matched MRI slices. Data related to the size and location of the prostate were compared between CT and MRI. The spatial relationship between the tip of urethrogram cone on CT and prostate apex seen on MRI was also scrutinized. Results: The phantom study showed the registration discrepancies between CT and MRI smaller than 1.0 mm in any pair of comparison. The patient study showed mean image registration error of 0.9 (± 0.6) mm. The average prostate volume was 63.0 (± 25.8) cm 3 and 50.9 (± 22.9) cm 3 determined by CT and MRI respectively (Fig. 1). The difference in prostate location with the two studies most commonly differed at the base and at the apex of the prostate (Fig. 2). On transverse MRI, the prostate apex was situated 7.1 (± 4.5) mm dorsal and 15.1 (± 4.0) mm cephalad to the tip of urethrogram cone (Fig. 3). Conclusions: CT-MRI image fusion study made it possible to compare the two modalities directly. MRI localization of the prostate is more accurate than CT, and indicates the distance from cone to apex is 15 mm. In view of excellent treatment results obtained with current CT localization of the prostate, still it may not be wise to reduce target volume to that demonstrated on MRI

  8. CT of second branchial cleft cysts and fistula: comparison with MRI in three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepper, A.M.A. de; Monheim, P.; Degryse, H.R.; Van de Heyning, P.

    1988-01-01

    Second branchial cleft cyst (SBCC) is a relatively common disease. Over a period of 18 months we have evaluated 11 patients with SBCC. Based on CT-findings all SBCC were correctly diagnosed as well in their uncomplicated as in their complicated (infected) presentation. A second branchial cleft fistula evaluated both by fistulography and CT-fistulography illustrates the anatomy of the cervical sinus and the potential topography of SBCC. Three cases were also evaluated by MRI and in two cases T1 calculation of aspirated cyst fluid was performed; preliminary results are reported.

  9. Comparison of CT and diffusion-weighted MRI in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Shuhei; Yamada, Naoaki; Naritomi, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Non-contrast CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) are widely used for assessing patients with acute ischemic stroke including candidates for thrombolytic therapy. Early CT signs, still a gold standard as the diagnostic measure for thrombolysis, are quite subtle and strongly depend on image quality. We evaluated 76 patients (47 male, mean age 71.0 yrs) with ischemic stroke of the anterior cerebral circulation who underwent CT and DWI within 6 hours of onset. The scans were examined separately by two neurologists in a blinded fashion with knowledge of the affected hemisphere. Detection of acute ischemic changes were significantly higher on DWI (72/76, 95%) compared with that on CT (50/76, 66%) (P<0.0001), especially in cases with subcortical lesions (P<0.001). Detection of the lesion with more than 33% of MCA involvement, which should exclude from the thrombolitic therapy, was somewhat higher for DWI (26/26, 100%) compared with CT (22/26, 85%). DWI is more sensitive than CT in the identification of acute ischemic stroke and can visualize major ischemia more easily than CT. Additional studies are required to determine whether these advantages of DWI are clinically relevant in the management of patients with acute stroke. (author)

  10. Regression and statistical shape model based substitute CT generation for MRI alone external beam radiation therapy from standard clinical MRI sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Greer, Peter B.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Henault, David; Mitra, Jhimli; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Dowling, Jason A.

    2017-11-01

    In MR only radiation therapy planning, generation of the tissue specific HU map directly from the MRI would eliminate the need of CT image acquisition and may improve radiation therapy planning. The aim of this work is to generate and validate substitute CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2 weighted MR pelvic scans in prostate radiation therapy dose planning. A Siemens Skyra 3T MRI scanner with laser bridge, flat couch and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole pelvis MRI (1.6 mm 3D isotropic T2w SPACE sequence) was acquired. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Co-registered whole pelvis CT and T2w MRI pairs were used as training images. Advanced tissue specific non-linear regression models to predict HU for the fat, muscle, bladder and air were created from co-registered CT-MRI image pairs. On a test case T2w MRI, the bones and bladder were automatically segmented using a novel statistical shape and appearance model, while other soft tissues were separated using an Expectation-Maximization based clustering model. The CT bone in the training database that was most ‘similar’ to the segmented bone was then transformed with deformable registration to create the sCT component of the test case T2w MRI bone tissue. Predictions for the bone, air and soft tissue from the separate regression models were successively combined to generate a whole pelvis sCT. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same IMRT dose plan was found to be 0.3%+/-0.9% (mean  ±  standard deviation) for 39 patients. The 3D Gamma pass rate was 99.8+/-0.00 (2 mm/2%). The novel hybrid model is computationally efficient, generating an sCT in 20 min from standard T2w images for prostate cancer radiation therapy dose planning and DRR generation.

  11. Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features

  12. Possibility of the conservative management of acute epidural hematoma from the point of views of serial CT scan and the consciousness level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Tamotsu; Okada, Kazunori; Ito, Yoshinori; Miwa, Tetsuro

    1985-01-01

    Nowadays serial computerized tomography is often performed in the diagnosis and care of patients with acute epidural hematoma. In the treatment of acute epidural hematoma, serial computerized tomography has shown dynamic changes in the hematoma, and the careful observation of clinical signs has reduced the number of operative cases. Moreover, some good outcomes of cases of acute epidural hematoma have appeared as a result of conservative management. Since the introduction of computerized tomography, we have treated 79 cases of acute epidural hematoma. The mortality rate has been 12.7 % (10 cases), while there have been 60 good-outcome cases, including 22 non-surgical cases (27.8 %). In an attempt to make clear the possibility of the conservative management of acute epidural hematoma, we made a comparative study of surgical good-outcome cases and conservative good-outcome cases from the points of view of serial computerized tomography and the consciousness level. We reached the following conclusions: The guidelines for the conservative management of acute epidural hematoma are: 1) Glasgow coma scale: more than 14 points, 2) Volume of hematoma on CT: less than 20 ml, as determined by the volume-summation method, 3) No mass sign of hematoma on CT, 4) No or only transient forcal neurological signs, and 5) The above factors (1)-(4) have no tendency to get worse within 6 hours after head trauma. (author)

  13. Tuberous sclerosis: Improvement of diagnosis by CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewes, W.; Henkes, H.; Richter, J.; Kretschmer, A.; Benz, P.; Brill, G.

    1992-01-01

    Ten children and a 22-y old women with tuberous sclerosis were studied. All children were epileptic but only 8 had skin lesions (white spots, adenoma sebaceum), 4 had rhabdomyoma of the heart and 4 children had strocytoma of the retina; only in 4 children was the entire triad of tuberous sclerosis seen. The young woman with a hemorrhage of an angiolipoma of the kidney had no other symptoms of tuberous sclerosis. All patients had pathologic CT and MRT findings; 4 different types of lesion were seen in MRT. In order to elucidate humangenetic aspects and to demonstrate the underlying disease all children with epileptic disorders and also all patients without the full triad of symptoms should be examined by MRT. (orig.) [de

  14. New developments in imaging: Sonography, cine-CT, MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, R.J.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The book can be conveniently subdivided into three sections: the first on magnetic resonance imaging the second on cine-computed tomography and the third on advances in ultrasound (US). The MR imaging section includes two chapters: the first on indications for MR in abdominal disease (a cookbook layout of indications for MR imaging versus CT) and the second on MR imaging of the heart. There are also chapters on MR imaging and US in the pelvis, contrast agent principles, and a chapter on imaging renal tumors. The third section, on US, contains chapters on the liver and gastrointenstinal disease, interventional US sonography during neurosurgery, state-of-the-art echocardiography. Doppler flow imaging, contrast media for sonography, endometrial sonography, and high-resolution US in the first trimester. The final chapter is presented as a scientific paper rather than as a chapter in a book and has no illustrations

  15. Acute neck pain due to tendonitis of the longus colli: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artenian, D.J.; Lipman, J.K.; Scidmore, G.K.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1989-01-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendonitis is an under-recognized cause of acute cervical pain produced by inflammation of the longus colli muscle. Although the clinical presentation may mimic more serious disorders, the diagnosis can be established radiographically by identification of prevertebral soft tissue calcification and swelling. Six patients with typical signs and symptoms of retropharyngeal tendonitis are presented. All were evaluated with plain films, four with CT and one with MRI. The pathognomonic finding of amorphous calcification anterior to C1-2 with associated asymmetric soft tissue swelling was clearly demonstrated by CT. Diffuse swelling of the longus colli muscle was shown as prominent high signal in the prevertebral region by T2 weighted MRI. (orig.)

  16. CT and MRI findings in patients with hyperglycemic encephalopathy : three cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Sun Hee; Choi, Hye Young

    2000-01-01

    We describe the distinctive brain CT and MRI findings seen in the putamen of three patients with hyperglycemia. The chief complaint of these patients was either chorea (n=3D1) or mental change (n=3D2). They showed hyperglycemia, but physical examination and laboratory data revealed no other abnormalities. In all patients, non-enhanced CT scanning revealed high-attenuated lesions in the unilateral putamen. In two of the three patients, brain MRI performed two days after the onset of symptoms showed an abnormally high signal on T1-weighted images and a low signal on T2-weighted images. One patient had a history of diabetes mellitus, and another had acute myocardiac infarction. The third had no specific history. After the correction of hyperglycemia, the patient's symptoms subsided and diabetes mellitus was diagnosed. (author)

  17. CT and MRI findings in patients with hyperglycemic encephalopathy : three cases report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Sun Hee; Choi, Hye Young [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Unviersity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    We describe the distinctive brain CT and MRI findings seen in the putamen of three patients with hyperglycemia. The chief complaint of these patients was either chorea (n=3D1) or mental change (n=3D2). They showed hyperglycemia, but physical examination and laboratory data revealed no other abnormalities. In all patients, non-enhanced CT scanning revealed high-attenuated lesions in the unilateral putamen. In two of the three patients, brain MRI performed two days after the onset of symptoms showed an abnormally high signal on T1-weighted images and a low signal on T2-weighted images. One patient had a history of diabetes mellitus, and another had acute myocardiac infarction. The third had no specific history. After the correction of hyperglycemia, the patient's symptoms subsided and diabetes mellitus was diagnosed. (author)

  18. CT and MRI slice separation evaluation by LabView developed software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acri, Giuseppe; Testagrossa, Barbara; Sestito, Angela; Bonanno, Lilla; Vermiglio, Giuseppe

    2018-02-01

    The efficient use of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) equipment necessitates establishing adequate quality-control (QC) procedures. In particular, the accuracy of slice separation, during multislices acquisition, requires scan exploration of phantoms containing test objects. To simplify such procedures, a novel phantom and a computerised LabView-based procedure have been devised, enabling determination the midpoint of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in real time while the distance from the profile midpoint of two progressive images is evaluated and measured. The results were compared with those obtained by processing the same phantom images with commercial software. To validate the proposed methodology the Fisher test was conducted on the resulting data sets. In all cases, there was no statistically significant variation between the commercial procedure and the LabView one, which can be used on any CT and MRI diagnostic devices. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. Mediastinal and heart wall invasion by actinomycosis: CT and MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, C.; Schmutz, G.R.; Benko, A.J.; Kastler, B.

    1994-01-01

    Widespread use of antibiotics facilitates the development of some uncommon chronic infections such as actinomycosis. The clinical and radiographic findings overlap those of other inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. With a review of the literature, we report the CT and MRI findings in a case of thoracic actinomycosis, presenting with right ventricular failure caused by heart involvement. CT was helpful in identifying the mediastinal extent of the disease and in demonstrating the absence of pulmonary involvement. MRI, however, offered complementary information, especially in assessing heart involvement without the need for intravenous contrast media. On T2-weighted images the mediastinal process was noted to be of relatively low signal intensity, possibly indicating its benign nature. The association with heart involvement was suggestive of thoracic actinomycosis. (orig.)

  20. Acute neck pain due to tendonitis of the longus colli: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artenian, D J; Lipman, J K; Scidmore, G K; Brant-Zawadzki, M

    1989-05-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendonitis is an under-recognized cause of acute cervical pain produced by inflammation of the longus colli muscle. Although the clinical presentation may mimic more serious disorders, the diagnosis can be established radiographically by identification of prevertebral soft tissue calcification and swelling. Six patients with typical signs and symptoms of retropharyngeal tendonitis are presented. All were evaluated with plain films, four with CT and one with MRI. The pathognomonic finding of amorphous calcification anterior to C1-2 with associated asymmetric soft tissue swelling was clearly demonstrated by CT. Diffuse swelling of the longus colli muscle was shown as prominent high signal in the prevertebral region by T2 weighted MRI.

  1. Efficacy of PET/CT to exclude leiomyoma in patients with lesions suspicious for uterine sarcoma on MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soshi Kusunoki

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: In patients with MRI findings consistent with either uterine sarcoma or leiomyoma, PET/CT can decrease the false-positive rate by setting an optimal cutoff SUVmax of 7.5. Using this cutoff can avoid unnecessary surgery.

  2. Comparative study of radiography, CT and MRI in the identification of hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhenguo; Zhang Xuezhe; Hu Libin; Wang Guochun; Zhou Huiqiong; Lu Xin; Wang Wu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging findings of hip involvement and to compare the sensitivity of radiography, CT, and MRI in the identification of hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Anteroposterior radiography of the pelvis and MRI of hip were performed in 55 patients with AS. CT scan of hip was performed in 29 of 55 patients. T 1 -weighted, T 2 -weighted, short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and three dimensional balanced turbo field echo with water selective excitation (3D-BTFE-WATS) coronal sequences of hips were obtained in all patients, of which fat-saturated contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted sequence was performed in 24 patients. The imaging data of 55 patients were analyzed. The chi-square test was used to analyze the sensitivity in the identification of hip involvement among radiography, CT, and MRI. Results: Among 110 hips in all 55 patients, abnormal changes were detected in 13 hips by radiography, 85 hips by MRI. The findings of radiography included bone erosions in 13 hips, joint space narrowing in 4 hips,syndesmophytes in 5 hips. MRI revealed bone erosive destruction in 31 hips, joint space narrowing in 4 hips, joint effusion in 80 hips, subchondral bone marrow edema in 32 hips, fat accumulation of bone marrow in 28 hips, enthesitis in 21 hips. Bilateral synovial enhancement was showed in 19 of 24 patients who underwent fat-saturated contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted sequence. Of the 58 hip joints in 29 patients who underwent CT examination, not only did CT show all bone erosions detected by radiography and MRI, but CT revealed bone erosive destruction that were not identified by radiography in 10 hips and by MRI in 1 hip as well. Abnormal changes were detected in 10.3% (6/58)by radiography, 27.6% (16/58) by CT, and 77.6% (45/58) by MRI. The sensitivity of MRI in the identification of hip involvement is higher than that of radiography and CT (χ 2 =53.22 and 29.08, P<0.05). In addition to chronic bone structural changes, MRI

  3. Serial changes and prognostic implications of CT findings in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: comparison with fibrotic idiopathic interstitial pneumonias alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geewon; Kim, Ki Uk; Lee, Ji Won; Suh, Young Ju; Jeong, Yeon Joo

    2017-05-01

    Background Although fibrotic idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) alone and those combined with pulmonary emphysema are naturally progressive diseases, the process of deterioration and outcomes are variable. Purpose To evaluate and compare serial changes of computed tomography (CT) abnormalities and prognostic predictive factors in fibrotic IIPs alone and those combined with pulmonary emphysema. Material and Methods A total of 148 patients with fibrotic IIPs alone (82 patients) and those combined with pulmonary emphysema (66 patients) were enrolled. Semi-quantitative CT analysis was used to assess the extents of CT characteristics which were evaluated on initial and follow-up CT images. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the effects of clinical and CT variables on survival. Results Significant differences were noted between fibrotic scores, as determined using initial CT scans, in the fibrotic IIPs alone (21.22 ± 9.83) and those combined with pulmonary emphysema groups (14.70 ± 7.28) ( P pulmonary emphysema group. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis showed changes in the extent of GGO (hazard ratio, 1.056) and the presence of lung cancer (hazard ratio, 4.631) were predictive factors of poor survivals. Conclusion Although patients with fibrotic IIPs alone and those combined with pulmonary emphysema have similar mortalities, lung cancer was more prevalent in patients with fibrotic IIPs combined with pulmonary emphysema. Furthermore, changes in the extent of GGO and the presence of lung cancer were independent prognostic factors of poor survivals.

  4. Investigation of CT and MRI findings of cranio-orbital communicating lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhenchang; Jiang Dingyao; Xian Junfang; An Yuzhi; Zhang Tianming; Li Bin; Liang Xihong; Yang Bentao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CT and MRI findings of cranio-orbital communicating lesions so as to find out communicating passages and their imaging features. Methods: Fifty-one cases of cranio-orbital communicating lesions confirmed by pathology and follow-up results were studied. CT was performed in all cases and MRI in 45 cases. Post-contrast CT and MRI was completed in 44 cases. Results: There were 31 cases (60.8%) with lesions communicating between the orbital cavity and the cranial cavity through optic canal or superior orbital fissure showing communicating soft tissue mass and enlargement of optic canal or superior orbital fissure. Four cases of optic gliomas involving optic nerve and optic chiasm, three cases with meningiomas of optic nerve sheath, and 2 cases with retinoblastoma involving optic nerve and optic chiasm showed cranio-orbital communicating masses through the optic canal. Cranio-orbital communicating mass with enlargement of superior orbital fissure was found in 22 patients including 5 meningiomas, 4 neurogenic tumors, 1 dermoid cyst, 3 inflammatory pseudotumors, 2 Tolosa-Hunt syndromes and 7 metastases from nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In addition, 20 of 51 cases (39.2%) communicated through perforating blood vessels or bony defect resulted from tumor destruction. Of these lesions, there were 10 metastases showing bone destruction in orbital walls, 5 cases with en plaque meningiomas of sphenoid bone with marked hyperostosis and widespread dural involvement, 1 chondrosarcoma involving frontal lobe and orbit, 3 adenoid cystic carcinomas involving frontal lobe, and 1 malignant meningioma with bone destruction of the superior orbital wall. Conclusion: CT and MRI could definitely demonstrate communicating passages of cranio-orbital communicating lesions and their imaging changes, which could contribute to diagnosis and differential diagnosis and provide valuable information for determining treatment measures and surgical approach

  5. CT AND MRI FEATURES OF CAROTID BODY PARAGANGLIOMAS IN 16 DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Wilfried; Seiler, Gabriela S; Lindl-Bylicki, Britany J; Zwingenberger, Allison L

    2015-01-01

    Carotid body tumors (paragangliomas) arise from chemoreceptors located at the carotid bifurcation. In imaging studies, this neoplasm may be confused with other neck neoplasms such as thyroid carcinoma. The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of confirmed carotid body tumors in a multi-institutional sample of dogs. A total of 16 dogs met inclusion criteria (14 examined using CT and two with MRI). The most common reason for imaging was a palpable cervical mass or respiratory signs (i.e., dyspnea or increased respiratory noises). The most commonly affected breed was Boston terrier (n = 5). Dogs were predominantly male castrated (n = 10) and the median age was 9 years [range 3-14.5]. Most tumors appeared as a large mass centered at the carotid bifurcation, with poor margination in six dogs and discrete margins in ten dogs. Masses were iso- to hypoattenuating to adjacent muscles in CT images and hyperintense to muscles in T1- and T2-weighted MRI. For both CT and MRI, masses typically showed strong and heterogeneous contrast enhancement. There was invasion into the adjacent structures in 9/16 dogs. In six of these nine dogs, the basilar portion of the skull was affected. The external carotid artery was entrapped in seven dogs. There was invasion into the internal jugular vein in three dogs, and into the external jugular, maxillary, and linguo-facial veins in one dog. Imaging characteristics helped explain some clinical presentations such as breathing difficulties, Horner's syndrome, head tilt, or facial nerve paralysis. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  6. ''Eraseroma'' as a cause of rhinolith: CT and MRI in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A.; Pedrosa, I.; Villafruela, M.

    1997-01-01

    We report a 5-year old girl with progressive difficulty in breathing through the nose whose clinical diagnosis was nasal tumour. CT showed a calcified nodular mass and MRI a nonspecific nodular lesion in the right nasal cavity. The radiological suspicion was a rhinolith. The operative specimen showed that an eraser from a pencil was the primary source. We underline the rarity of this entity and the important role of radiological studies in preoperative recognition. (orig.)

  7. ``Eraseroma`` as a cause of rhinolith: CT and MRI in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A. [Seccion de Neuroradiologia, Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Carretera de Andalucia Km. 5.4, E-28041 Madrid (Spain); Pedrosa, I. [Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario San Carlos, Ciudad Universitaria, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Villafruela, M. [Servicio de Otorrinolaringologia, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Carretera de Andalucia Km. 5.4, E-28041 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-11-01

    We report a 5-year old girl with progressive difficulty in breathing through the nose whose clinical diagnosis was nasal tumour. CT showed a calcified nodular mass and MRI a nonspecific nodular lesion in the right nasal cavity. The radiological suspicion was a rhinolith. The operative specimen showed that an eraser from a pencil was the primary source. We underline the rarity of this entity and the important role of radiological studies in preoperative recognition. (orig.) With 3 figs., 9 refs.

  8. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  9. SPECT/CT versus MRI in patients with nonspecific pain of the hand and wrist - a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huellner, Martin W.; Buerkert, Alexander; Schleich, Florian S.; Strobel, Klaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Schuerch, Maja; Hug, Urs; Wartburg, Urs von

    2012-01-01

    Hand and wrist pain is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the complex anatomy of the involved small structures. The American College of Radiology recommends MRI as the study of choice in patients with chronic wrist pain if radiographs are negative. Lately, state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems have been introduced and may help in the diagnosis of this selected indication. This retrospective study included 21 patients with nonspecific pain of the hand/wrist. The diagnosis of nonspecific wrist pain was made by the referring hand surgeon based on patient history, clinical examination, plain radiography and clinical guidelines. All patients received planar early-phase imaging and late-phase SPECT/CT imaging as well as MRI. Lesions were divided into major (causative) and minor (not causative) pathologies according to clinical follow-up. Furthermore, oedema-like bone marrow changes seen on MRI were compared with focally increased tracer uptake seen on SPECT/CT images. MRI yielded a quite high sensitivity (0.86), but a low specificity (0.20). In contrast, SPECT/CT yielded a high specificity (1.00) and a low sensitivity (0.71). Oedema-like bone marrow changes were detected in 15 lesions in 11 patients. In ten lesions with bone marrow oedema on MRI, foci of elevated tracer uptake were detected on SPECT/CT. Overall, MRI was more sensitive, but SPECT/CT was more specific in the evaluation of causative pathologies. In this initial comparison, SPECT/CT showed higher specificity than MRI in the evaluation of causative pathologies in patients with nonspecific wrist pain. However, MRI was more sensitive. Thus, SPECT/CT was shown to be a useful problem-solving tool in the diagnostic work-up of these patients. (orig.)

  10. FDG uptake on PET and enhancement on CT or MRI in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K. H.; Yun, M.; Kim, M. J.; Ryu, Y. H.; Lee, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    To correlate between FDG PET and enhancement pattern on CT and MRI and assess the factors affecting FDG uptake in HCC. Thirty seven nontreated HCC from 34 pts (M:F=30:4, mean age 53) were enrolled. All cases were histologically diagnosed and classified according to Edmonson and Steiner's grading. Tumor FDG uptake was visually assessed on a scale of 0 to 3 compared to the adjacent liver. (0 liver and 3>>liver) and was semi-quantitatively analyzed using SUV. Enhancement pattern on CT and MRI was classified into 3 groups according to signal intensity or density in arterial and portal phase (GroupI: hyperintense-hypointense, GroupII: isointense-hypointense, GroupIII: hypointense-hypointense). Tumor FDG uptake was correlated with enhancement pattern, grade, size and serum aFP level. The tumor ranged from 1.5cm to 20cm. Of the 37 cases, 19(51%) had positive FDG uptake (2 or 3), while 18(49%) were negative (0 or 1). The correlation between FDG uptake and enhancement pattern was statistically insignificant. Lower FDG uptake was associated with lower tumor grade and/or smaller tumor size (P<0.005). FDG uptake of HCC seems to be useful in predicting the differentiation of the tumor and may be prognostic. Although the significance of dynamic enhancement pattern on CT or MRI is yet controversial, it has no specific correlation with FDG uptake and grade on the tumor in this study

  11. Process of evolution to chronic subdural hematoma, (1); A study with MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ryungchan; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Yokoyama, Masato; Sasaki, Takashi (Kanazawa Medical Univ. Uchinada (Japan)); Mun, Jhongbu; Ohi, Masayoshi

    1989-10-01

    The process of evolution to chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) was discussed on the basis of MRI and CT findings. The materials were 22 sides of 15 cases in which CSH had been diagnosed by means of MRI, CT, and/or surgery. These cases were followed by CT with/without MRI after the initial head injury. Various findings were shown in the subdural space, such as subdural hygroma (40%), acute subdural hematoma (25%), normal state (20%), and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (15%). Regardless of the conditions of the subdural space after the head injury, however, CSH was finally present in all cases after the formation of subdural hygroma and its enlargement. The duration of the formation of hygroma after head injury ranged from 0 to 12 days (mean: 2.7 days), and its final confirmation ranged from 11 to 61 days (mean: 33.4 days). The period from the final confirmation of hygroma to the first recognition of CSH was between 8 and 36 days (mean: 17.7 days), while the period from head injury to the formation of CSH was between 27 and 75 days (mean: 51.1 days). The process of evolution to CSH may be thought to be as follows: A normal subdural space changes into a subdural hygroma by the tearing of the arachnoid membrane due to head injury. Capsule formation follows the process lasting for more than three weeks. CSH develops in consequence of bleeding from the outer membrane. (author).

  12. Importance of CT and MRI in the follow-up of patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balzer, J.O.; Luboldt, W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Indication Presentation and evaluation of diagnostic procedures for the follow-up in patients with suspected local recurrence of rectal cancer. Follow-up usually is performed using endoscopy and endosonography. Imaging techniques applied are also contrast enema as well as helical CT,MR imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). The results demonstrate the difficulty of all available modalities to differentiate between early tumor recurrences from posttherapeutic alterations.Especially the differentiation of scar tissue and local tumor recurrence, the detection of lymph node as well as pulmonary or hepatic metastasis requires a large diagnostic effort with employment of various imaging modalities. Values determined for sensitivity and specificity for CT are 84% and 91% with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 78%.For MRI and PET the sensitivity are 94% and 98%,and the specificity 92% and 90% with a PPV of 93% for the PET. The results demonstrate the increasing importance of CT and MRI in the follow-up of patients with rectal cancer and enable an accurate and early diagnosis through employment of new examination strategies and sequence protocols.PET remains an add-on examination in uncertain local lesions. (orig.) [de

  13. The value of MRI and CT in the pre-operative diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Soichiro; Ishii, Jun (Kanto Rosai Hospital, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1991-05-01

    A prospective analysis of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 51 patients with lumbar disc herniation was made to determine the height of hernia for operation and, if impossible, the indications of myelography. Among the 51 patients, 40 (78%) received surgery based on these imaging modalities (Group A); and the remaining 11 (22%) underwent myelography for the confirmation of the height of hernia or detailed examination (Group B). Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome was achieved in 95% in Group A and in 91% in Group B. Twenty seven patients had multiple disc herniation on CT and MRI; in 17 patients surgery was performed for one disc hernia that was radiologically found to compress the spinal nerve root; and in the other 10 hernia-related disc was not determined by either radiological or neurological manifestations. Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome could, however, be achieved in 26 patients (96%). Myelography should be indicated when there is no neurological radicular sign in the lower extremities, and when there is no radiological evidence of the compressed spinal nerve root in spite of the presence of multiple disc herniation. The height of hernia may be determined when compression of the spinal nerve root is visualized on CT or MRI. (N.K.).

  14. The value of MRI and CT in the pre-operative diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Soichiro; Ishii, Jun

    1991-01-01

    A prospective analysis of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 51 patients with lumbar disc herniation was made to determine the height of hernia for operation and, if impossible, the indications of myelography. Among the 51 patients, 40 (78%) received surgery based on these imaging modalities (Group A); and the remaining 11 (22%) underwent myelography for the confirmation of the height of hernia or detailed examination (Group B). Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome was achieved in 95% in Group A and in 91% in Group B. Twenty seven patients had multiple disc herniation on CT and MRI; in 17 patients surgery was performed for one disc hernia that was radiologically found to compress the spinal nerve root; and in the other 10 hernia-related disc was not determined by either radiological or neurological manifestations. Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome could, however, be achieved in 26 patients (96%). Myelography should be indicated when there is no neurological radicular sign in the lower extremities, and when there is no radiological evidence of the compressed spinal nerve root in spite of the presence of multiple disc herniation. The height of hernia may be determined when compression of the spinal nerve root is visualized on CT or MRI. (N.K.)

  15. CT and MRI in iatrogenic and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: as far as imaging perseives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Santos, J.M. [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, HU Dr. Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain)]|[Section of Neuroradiology, HU Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia (Spain); Lopez Corbalan, J.A. [Section of Neuroradiology, HU Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia (Spain); Martinez-Lage, J.F. [Service of Neurosurgery, HU Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia (Spain); Sicilis Guillen, J. [Service of Neurology, HU Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia (Spain)

    1996-04-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), an invariably fatal dementing illness, affects patients in middle and old age (sporadic form). However, the association of CJD with certain treatments (iatrogenic form) has been described in younger patients. The clinical onset of the two forms seems to differ; in the iatrogenic form a high frequency of the ataxic CJD variant has been reported. Nowadays, a definitive diagnosis of CJD is exclusively histological. We present five cases of CJD, one sporadic and the others iatrogenic, following dura mater grafts and analyse their CT and MRI features. CT typically demonstrates brain atrophy, generally progressive, but in sporadic CJD midfield MRI also showed abnormal signal, with predominant deep grey matter involvement. The use of narrow windows with proton-density sequences may reveal subtle cortical signal abnormalities not clearly visible with conventional windows. The early demonstration of these changes, in the appropriate clinical context, may suggest CJD and this supports the use of mid- or high magnetic fields in the diagnosis of CJD and other forms of dementia. In our cases of iatrogenic CJD, low-field MRI did not reveal more than the progressive atrophy displayed by CT, and raises the question on the one hand of possible differences, based on imaging, from the sporadic form, and on the other of the lack of sensitivity of low-field magnets to signal changes in CJD. (orig.)

  16. CT and MRI in iatrogenic and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: as far as imaging perseives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Santos, J.M.; Lopez Corbalan, J.A.; Martinez-Lage, J.F.; Sicilis Guillen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), an invariably fatal dementing illness, affects patients in middle and old age (sporadic form). However, the association of CJD with certain treatments (iatrogenic form) has been described in younger patients. The clinical onset of the two forms seems to differ; in the iatrogenic form a high frequency of the ataxic CJD variant has been reported. Nowadays, a definitive diagnosis of CJD is exclusively histological. We present five cases of CJD, one sporadic and the others iatrogenic, following dura mater grafts and analyse their CT and MRI features. CT typically demonstrates brain atrophy, generally progressive, but in sporadic CJD midfield MRI also showed abnormal signal, with predominant deep grey matter involvement. The use of narrow windows with proton-density sequences may reveal subtle cortical signal abnormalities not clearly visible with conventional windows. The early demonstration of these changes, in the appropriate clinical context, may suggest CJD and this supports the use of mid- or high magnetic fields in the diagnosis of CJD and other forms of dementia. In our cases of iatrogenic CJD, low-field MRI did not reveal more than the progressive atrophy displayed by CT, and raises the question on the one hand of possible differences, based on imaging, from the sporadic form, and on the other of the lack of sensitivity of low-field magnets to signal changes in CJD. (orig.)

  17. Fully automated deformable registration of breast DCE-MRI and PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, I. D.; Loo, C. E.; Vogel, W. V.; Pengel, K. E.; Gilhuijs, K. G. A.

    2013-02-01

    Accurate characterization of breast tumors is important for the appropriate selection of therapy and monitoring of the response. For this purpose breast imaging and tissue biopsy are important aspects. In this study, a fully automated method for deformable registration of DCE-MRI and PET/CT of the breast is presented. The registration is performed using the CT component of the PET/CT and the pre-contrast T1-weighted non-fat suppressed MRI. Comparable patient setup protocols were used during the MRI and PET examinations in order to avoid having to make assumptions of biomedical properties of the breast during and after the application of chemotherapy. The registration uses a multi-resolution approach to speed up the process and to minimize the probability of converging to local minima. The validation was performed on 140 breasts (70 patients). From a total number of registration cases, 94.2% of the breasts were aligned within 4.0 mm accuracy (1 PET voxel). Fused information may be beneficial to obtain representative biopsy samples, which in turn will benefit the treatment of the patient.

  18. The use of MRI and CT in Imaging Occult Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obadă B.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of hip fractures is particularly important due to the high dependence on the integrity of this structure for people to function in their daily lives. Left unrecognized, patients face increasing morbidity and mortality as time from the original injury lengthens. A delay of just 2 days in surgical treatment for an acute hip fracture doubles mortality. In addition, an unrecognized non-displaced fracture may displace, requiring surgery of much higher risk. This may be part of the reason that the most frequent lawsuit against Emergency Physicians is for missed orthopedic injury. We reviewed the use of MRI and CT for occult hip fractures (OHF detection at a major urban trauma unit. Our study is a retrospective review. Inclusion criteria: all patients presenting to the Emergency Clinical Hospital of Constanta with a suspected, posttraumatic, occult hip fracture, over a 5 years period were included. All patients had negative initial radiographs and underwent further imaging with either CT or MRI. A total of 185 cases meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. 72 occult hip fractures were detected with both imaging modalities. Although MRI certainly enables greater image detail, in our experience both modalities are able to provide satisfactory fracture characterization. The choice of imaging should be determined by availability and indication. MRI provides superior imaging of soft tissue but is less sensitive for degenerative changes in presence of bone edema.

  19. Indication for and accuracy of CT and MRI of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greess, H.; Anders, K.

    2005-01-01

    Recurrent pains of the temporomandibular joint represent a frequent symptom with numerous different causes. CT and MRI can reliably show the cause of these disorders and therefore have substituted conventional X-ray imaging. Modern multi-slice-CT (MSCT) allows for examination of the skull base including the mandible in a very short time with thinnest slice collimation (0.75 mm). With 2D- and 3D- reformations reconstructed out of this volume data set in parasagittal, coronal or any other arbitrary slice orientation excellent imaging of fractures and bony changes of arthrosis as well as benign and malignant tumors of the temporomandibular joint can be performed. MRI offers very good soft tissue contrast in order to visualize the intra-articular disc, the ligaments and muscles, as well the possibility to acquire cross sectional images in any user-defined orientation. MRI is the method of choice to diagnose 'internal derangement', particularly displacement of the intra-articular disc and inflammatory disease of the temporomandibular joint. The present paper will provide diagnostic strategies for the use of MSCT or MRI imaging concerning the different causes of disorders to the temporomandibular joint. (orig.)

  20. The comparative study of lumbar disc disruption with MRI and CT discography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xingcan; Liu Naifang; Li Xiaohong; Xu Wengen; Zou Qing; Yang Yonghong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare MRI with CT discography (CTD) for diagnostic assessment of lumbar disc disruption. Methods: Paired comparative examination in 16 patients with chronic lower back pain without radicular pain and no disc herniation was conducted using CT or MRI. The standard of CTD classification and positive disc was formulated and the correlation between the induced lower back pain and dosage used in CTD was observed. Results: For a total of 21 discs in the 16 patients, CTD showed the disc as type 2 in 12 discs and type 5 in 1 disc with 13 positive discs, while MRI only showed the high-intensity zone of posterior annulus in 6 discs as the indirect sign of disc disruption and disc degeneration in 7 discs. Conclusion: CTD was the only method for showing the direct sign of disc disruption. The induced lower back pain was related with the type of disc disruption. MRI can show some of the indirect signs of disc disruption and CTD can show the direct sign of disc disruption. (authors)

  1. Detection of parenchymal abnormalities in experimentally induced acute pyelonephritis in rabbits using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, CT, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Bo Hyun; Kim, Seung Kwon; Seo, Jin Won [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Laboratory Animal Research Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We evaluated the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in detecting acute pyelonephritis (APN) using the rabbit kidney model and compared it with CT and MRI. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. In a total of 20 New Zealand White rabbits, APN was induced experimentally. CEUS, CT, and MRI were performed on the first, third, and seventh postoperative days. After imaging studies, the subjects were sacrificed and the pathological diagnosis of APN was confirmed in each animal by a pathologist. Imaging studies were obtained in eight animals, including eight CEUS, four computed tomography (CT), and four magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. CEUS depicted diffuse renal enlargement (7), diffuse heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement (6), and focal areas of decreased parenchymal enhancement (6). These findings were well correlated with the CT and MRI findings in five cases in which these studies were available. CT and MRI showed diffuse renal enlargement, diffuse heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement, focal areas of decreased parenchymal enhancement, focal contour bulging, and the finding of perinephric spread of infection. In a rabbit model, CEUS could depict the parenchymal lesions of APN similar to CT or MRI; however, it was limited in depicting the perinephric extension of inflammation.

  2. Grading of Crohn's disease activity using CT, MRI, US and scintigraphy: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puylaert, C.A.J.; Tielbeek, J.A.W.; Bipat, S.; Stoker, J. [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To assess the grading of Crohn's disease activity using CT, MRI, US and scintigraphy. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched (January 1983-March 2014) for studies evaluating CT, MRI, US and scintigraphy in grading Crohn's disease activity compared to endoscopy, biopsies or intraoperative findings. Two independent reviewers assessed the data. Three-by-three tables (none, mild, frank disease) were constructed for all studies, and estimates of accurate, over- and under-grading were calculated/summarized by fixed or random effects models. Our search yielded 9356 articles, 19 of which were included. Per-patient data showed accurate grading values for CT, MRI, US and scintigraphy of 86 % (95 % CI: 75-93 %), 84 % (95 % CI: 67-93 %), 44 % (95 % CI: 28-61 %) and 40 % (95 % CI: 16-70 %), respectively. In the per-patient analysis, CT and MRI showed similar accurate grading estimates (P = 0.8). Per-segment data showed accurate grading values for CT and scintigraphy of 87 % (95 % CI: 77-93 %) and 86 % (95 % CI: 80-91 %), respectively. MRI and US showed grading accuracies of 67-82 % and 56-75 %, respectively. CT and MRI showed comparable high accurate grading estimates in the per-patient analysis. Results for US and scintigraphy were inconsistent, and limited data were available. (orig.)

  3. Detectability and detection rate of acute cerebral hemisphere infarcts on CT and diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Flacke, S.; Keller, E.; Textor, J.; Berlis, A.; Reul, J.; Schild, H.H.; Hartmann, A.; Solymosi, L.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare the detectability and detection rate of acute ischaemic cerebral hemisphere infarcts on CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). We investigated 32 consecutive patients with acute hemisphere stroke with unenhanced CT and DWI within 6 h of stroke onset. The interval between CT and DWI ranged from 15 to 180 min (mean 60 min). Infarct detectability on CT and DWI was determined by comparing the initial CT, DWI and later reference images in a consensus reading of five independent examiners. The ''true'' detection rate was assessed by analysing all single readings. Two patients had intracerebral haematomas on DWI and CT and were excluded. There were 27 patients with ischaemic infarcts; all were visible on DWI and proven by follow-up. DWI was negative in three patients without a final diagnosis of infarct (100 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity, χ 2 = 30, P 2 = 1.48, P = 0.224). With regard to the single readings (30 examinations x 5 examiners = 150 readings), 63 CT readings were true positive and 72 false negative (sensitivity 47 %, specificity 86 %, χ 2 = 2.88, P = 0.089). Of the DWI readings 128 were true positive and 7 false negative (sensitivity 95 %, specificity 87 %, χ 2 = 70.67, P < 0.0001). Interobserver agreement was substantial for CT (χ= 0.72, 95 % confidence interval, 0.6-0.84) and DWI (χ= 0.82, 95 % confidence interval, 0.46-1). Taken together, detectability and detection rate of acute (< 6 h) hemisphere infarcts are significantly higher with DWI than with CT. (orig.)

  4. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M Th; Teixeira, Suzana C; Pengel, Kenneth E; Loo, Claudette E; Vogel, Wouter V; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Sonke, Gabe S; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and

  5. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI of pediatric chest tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyttenbach, R.; Vock, P.; Tschaeppeler, H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the spectrum of pediatric chest masses, to present the results of cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI, and to define diagnostic criteria to limit differential diagnosis. Seventy-eight children with thoracic mass lesions were retrospectively evaluated using CT (72 patients) and/or MR imaging (12 patients). All masses were evaluated for tissue characteristics (attenuation values or signal intensity, enhancement, and calcification) and were differentiated according to age, gender, location, and etiology. Twenty-eight of 38 (74 %) mediastinal masses were malignant (neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma). Thirty of 38 (79 %) pulmonary masses were metastatic in origin, all with an already known primary tumor (osteosarcoma, Wilms tumor). With one exception, all remaining pulmonary lesions were benign. Seventeen of 21 (81 %) chest wall lesions were malignant (Ewing sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The majority of mediastinal and chest wall tumors in children is malignant. Lung lesions are usually benign, unless a known extrapulmonary tumor suggests pulmonary metastases. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI allows narrowing of the differential diagnosis of pediatric chest masses substantially by defining the origin and tissue characteristics. Magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for posterior mediastinal lesions, whereas CT should be used for pulmonary lesions. For the residual locations both modalities are complementary. (orig.)

  6. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabi, H.; Koutsouvelis, N.; Rouzaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial t......-CT images from conventional Dixon MRI sequences with improved bone extraction accuracy. The approach is promising for potential use in PET AC and MRI-only or hybrid PET/MRI-guided RT treatment planning. © 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial...... the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas...

  7. [18F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [18F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars; Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas; Schaefers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [ 18 F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast agent is contraindicated. (orig.)

  8. The role of CT and MRI in the assessment of dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hong; Wang Jun; Li Binxiang; Bai Peichen; Ma Jintang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To test the predictive value of atrophy of hippocampal formation (HF) in detecting dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) patients with CT and MRI. Materials and methods: A total of 30 subjects (13 DAT patients and 17 normal volunteers) were studied with CT. The MR examinations were performed in 13 subjects (8 DAT and 5 normal). The width of choroidal fissure/hippocampal fissure on CT and MR imaging was measured to assess the HF volume. Results: MMSE sensitivity exceeded that of choroidal fissure/hippocampal fissure in DAT patients and the specificity of choroidal fissure/hippocampal fissure was superior to that of MMSE in normal volunteers. A significant correlation (P<0.05) between MMSE score and HF volume was observed in all DAT patients. Conclusion: Dilatation of choroidal fissure/hippocampal fissure and reduction of HF volume were a useful radiologic marker for the diagnosis of DAT

  9. Patellofemoral joint dysfunction. Combined diagnostic imaging evaluation (X-rays, 3D helical CT and MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrascosa, P.; Sanchez, F.; Mazzucco, J.; Capanay, C.; Carrascosa, J.

    2000-01-01

    The comprehensive study including 3D helical CT, Magnetic Resonance (MR) and X-ray exams provide a more complete diagnosis than those obtained through the conventional CT. We studied 43 patients with presumptive or certain diagnosis of patellofemoral instability. All the patients were studied by: a) Radiological pair; b) Tomography under extension and flexion, without and with contraction, using a helical CT equipment; and c) MRI STIR sequence in axial plane. The findings were classified as muscular lesion, cartilage lesion, bone and associated lesions (e.g. synovitis), statistically comparing both studies (comprehensive vs. conventional). The results allow us to accept the hypothesis that the comprehensive study provides a more complete diagnosis about the origin of the patellofemoral dysfunction. In 65% of the patients, the conventional study gave a negative result. Only in 35% of the cases the result was positive, but incomplete, showing only 35.3% of the pathological findings detected by the comprehensive study. (author)

  10. Pancreatic gross tumor volume contouring on computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Results of an international contouring conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A; Heerkens, Hanne D; Paulson, Eric S; Meijer, Gert J; Kotte, Alexis N; Knechtges, Paul; Parikh, Parag J; Bassetti, Michael F; Lee, Percy; Aitken, Katharine L; Palta, Manisha; Myrehaug, Sten; Koay, Eugene J; Portelance, Lorraine; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Erickson, Beth A

    Accurate identification of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma is challenging. We sought to understand differences in GTV delineation using pancreatic computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twelve attending radiation oncologists were convened for an international contouring symposium. All participants had a clinical and research interest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. CT and MRI scans from 3 pancreatic cases were used for contouring. CT and MRI GTVs were analyzed and compared. Interobserver variability was compared using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdorff distances, and Jaccard indices. Mann-Whitney tests were used to check for significant differences. Consensus contours on CT and MRI scans and constructed count maps were used to visualize the agreement. Agreement regarding the optimal method to determine GTV definition using MRI was reached. Six contour sets (3 from CT and 3 from MRI) were obtained and compared for each observer, totaling 72 contour sets. The mean volume of contours on CT was significantly larger at 57.48 mL compared with a mean of 45.76 mL on MRI, P = .011. The standard deviation obtained from the CT contours was significantly larger than the standard deviation from the MRI contours (P = .027). The mean DSC was 0.73 for the CT and 0.72 for the MRI (P = .889). The conformity index measurement was similar for CT and MRI (P = .58). Count maps were created to highlight differences in the contours from CT and MRI. Using MRI as a primary image set to define a pancreatic adenocarcinoma GTV resulted in smaller contours compared with CT. No differences in DSC or the conformity index were seen between MRI and CT. A stepwise method is recommended as an approach to contour a pancreatic GTV using MRI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting CT Image From MRI Data Through Feature Matching With Learned Nonlinear Local Descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhong, Liming; Chen, Yang; Lin, Liyan; Lu, Zhentai; Liu, Shupeng; Wu, Yao; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2018-04-01

    Attenuation correction for positron-emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) hybrid imaging systems and dose planning for MR-based radiation therapy remain challenging due to insufficient high-energy photon attenuation information. We present a novel approach that uses the learned nonlinear local descriptors and feature matching to predict pseudo computed tomography (pCT) images from T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The nonlinear local descriptors are obtained by projecting the linear descriptors into the nonlinear high-dimensional space using an explicit feature map and low-rank approximation with supervised manifold regularization. The nearest neighbors of each local descriptor in the input MR images are searched in a constrained spatial range of the MR images among the training dataset. Then the pCT patches are estimated through k-nearest neighbor regression. The proposed method for pCT prediction is quantitatively analyzed on a dataset consisting of paired brain MRI and CT images from 13 subjects. Our method generates pCT images with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 75.25 ± 18.05 Hounsfield units, a peak signal-to-noise ratio of 30.87 ± 1.15 dB, a relative MAE of 1.56 ± 0.5% in PET attenuation correction, and a dose relative structure volume difference of 0.055 ± 0.107% in , as compared with true CT. The experimental results also show that our method outperforms four state-of-the-art methods.

  12. The Processing of Somatosensory Information Shifts from an Early Parallel into a Serial Processing Mode: A Combined fMRI/MEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Carsten M; Brodoehl, Stefan; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W

    2016-01-01

    The question regarding whether somatosensory inputs are processed in parallel or in series has not been clearly answered. Several studies that have applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to fMRI data have arrived at seemingly divergent conclusions. However, these divergent results could be explained by the hypothesis that the processing route of somatosensory information changes with time. Specifically, we suggest that somatosensory stimuli are processed in parallel only during the early stage, whereas the processing is later dominated by serial processing. This hypothesis was revisited in the present study based on fMRI analyses of tactile stimuli and the application of DCM to magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data collected during sustained (260 ms) tactile stimulation. Bayesian model comparisons were used to infer the processing stream. We demonstrated that the favored processing stream changes over time. We found that the neural activity elicited in the first 100 ms following somatosensory stimuli is best explained by models that support a parallel processing route, whereas a serial processing route is subsequently favored. These results suggest that the secondary somatosensory area (SII) receives information regarding a new stimulus in parallel with the primary somatosensory area (SI), whereas later processing in the SII is dominated by the preprocessed input from the SI.

  13. The Processing of Somatosensory Information shifts from an early parallel into a serial processing mode: a combined fMRI/MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Michael Klingner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The question regarding whether somatosensory inputs are processed in parallel or in series has not been clearly answered. Several studies that have applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM to fMRI data have arrived at seemingly divergent conclusions. However, these divergent results could be explained by the hypothesis that the processing route of somatosensory information changes with time. Specifically, we suggest that somatosensory stimuli are processed in parallel only during the early stage, whereas the processing is later dominated by serial processing. This hypothesis was revisited in the present study based on fMRI analyses of tactile stimuli and the application of DCM to magnetoencephalographic (MEG data collected during sustained (260 ms tactile stimulation. Bayesian model comparisons were used to infer the processing stream. We demonstrated that the favored processing stream changes over time. We found that the neural activity elicited in the first 100 ms following somatosensory stimuli is best explained by models that support a parallel processing route, whereas a serial processing route is subsequently favored. These results suggest that the secondary somatosensory area (SII receives information regarding a new stimulus in parallel with the primary somatosensory area (SI, whereas later processing in the SII is dominated by the preprocessed input from the SI.

  14. Initial observations of electronic medical record usage during CT and MRI interpretation: Frequency of use and impact on workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham; Harris, Mitchell; Zalis, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) systems permit integration of contextual nonimaging EMR data into examination interpretation; however, the extra effort required to search and review these nonradiologic data are not well characterized. We assessed the gross frequency and pattern of EMR usage in the interpretation of diagnostic CT and MRI examinations. We defined nonradiologic EMR data as laboratory data, nonimaging specialty report, clinical note, and administrative data not available on PACS. For abdominal, neuroradiologic, and musculoskeletal CT and MRI, we prospectively recorded the time required for image analysis (including prior imaging studies and their reports), nonradiologic EMR use, and initial report drafting by fellows and staff in randomized sessions. We assessed EMR use as a fraction of work activity and according to technique, subspecialty, inpatient status, and radiologist experience. We observed 372 CT and MRI interpretations by 33 radiologists. For CT, radiologists used the EMR in 34% of abdominal, 57% of neuroradiologic, and 38% of musculoskeletal interpretations. For MRI, EMR was used in 73% of abdominal, 56% of neuroradiologic, and 33% of musculoskeletal interpretations. For CT, EMR usage comprised 18%, 14%, and 18% of diagnostic effort (image analysis plus EMR use) for abdominal, neuroradiologic, and musculoskeletal interpretations, respectively; for MRI, EMR usage comprised 21%, 16%, and 15% of diagnostic effort for abdominal, neuroradiologic, and musculoskeletal interpretations, respectively. Frequency of EMR use was significantly greater for neuroradiology CT and abdominal MRI (p < 0.05, Fisher's test). EMR usage was not consistently related to inpatient status for CT or radiologist experience. For CT and MRI interpretation, EMR usage is frequent and comprises a significant fraction of diagnostic effort.

  15. Comparison of 11C-choline-PET/CT and whole body-MRI for staging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschmann, S.M.; Rieger, A.; Mueller, M.; Bares, R.; Pfannenberg, A.C.; Aschoff, P.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Paulsen, F.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography and computed tomography with 11 C-Choline (Cho-PET/CT) and whole body magneticresonance imaging (WB-MRI) for diagnostic work-up of prostate cancer. Patients, methods: We evaluated retrospectively 42 patients with untreated prostate cancer (n =17), or increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after curative therapy (n = 25) who had been investigated by both Cho-PET/CT and WB-MRI. MRI, CT, and PET images were separately analyzed by experienced radiologists or nuclear medicine experts, followed by consensus reading. Validation was established by histology, follow-up, or consensus reading. Results: 88/103 detected lesions were considered as malignant: 44 bone metastases, 22 local tumor, 15 lymph node metastases, 3 lung, and 3 brain metastases. One further lesion was located in the adrenal gland, which was a second tumor. Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for Cho-PET/CT were 96.6%, 76.5%, and 93.3%, resp., and for WB-MRI 78.4%, 94.1%, and 81.0%, resp. 3 vertebral metastases had initially been missed by Cho-PET/CT and were found retrospectively. MRI identified 2 bone metastases and 1 lymph node metastasis after being informed about the results of Cho-PET/CT. Conclusions: Cho-PET/CT and WB-MRI both presented high accuracy in the detection of bone and lymph node metastases. The strength of MRI is excellent image quality providing detailed anatomical information whereas the advantage of Cho-PET/CT is high image contrast of pathological foci. (orig.)

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of CT- and MRI-scanning in evaluation of occult fracture of the proximal femur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haubro, M; Stougaard, C; Torfing, T

    2015-01-01

    AND METHODS: 67 patients (27 males, 40 females, mean age 80.5) seen in the emergency room with hip pain after fall, inability to stand and a primary X-ray without fracture were evaluated with both CT and MRI. The images were analysed by a senior consulting musculoskeletal radiologist, a resident in radiology...... and a resident in orthopaedic surgery. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated with MRI as the golden standard. Kappa value was used to assess level of agreement in both MRI and CT finding. RESULTS: 15 fractures of the proximal femur were found (7 intertrochanteric-, 3 femoral neck and 5 fractures...

  17. Precise fusion of MRI and dual energy 111In WBC/99mTc HDP SPECT/CT in the diabetic foot using companion CT: an example of SPECT/MRI imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knešaurek, K.; Heiba, S.; Kolker, D.; Vatti, S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to correctly fuse MRI and SPECT 111 In WBC and 99m Tc HDP images using companion CT images. The fused images could be used to assess proper surgical approach in treatment of the diabetic foot. Nine patients who had dual energy 111 In WBC/ 99 m Tc HDP SPECT/CT and MRI studies within a week were investigated in an ongoing project. A GE Infinia SPECT/CT camera and Siemens MAGNETOM 1.5T MR system were used in this study. First, the MRI and corresponding CT images were coregistrated using a transformation based on normalized mutual information. The transformation was saved and used for MRI and 111 In WBC/ 99 m Tc HDP SPECT fusion. A Jaszczak phantom study was also performed in order to estimate accuracy of MRI/ SPECT fusion. The Jaszczak phantom study with 3.7 MBq 111 In hot sphere showed that MRI/SPECT alignment using the approach described above produced registration with 0.7±0.4 mm accuracy in all three dimensions (3D). The nine clinical cases were visually evaluated and showed 1-2 mm 3D fusion accuracy. MRI provides almost perfect anatomy of soft tissue and bony structures but it may exaggerate the extent of infection. 111 In WBC/ 99 m Tc HDP SPECT imaging is more accurate for infection detection but lacks anatomical reference. Combination of these images proved an essential adjunct to diagnosis. A clinical utility of the approach is illustrated in two clinical examples. In conclusion, the CT in dual energy 111 In WBC/ 99 m Tc HDP SPECT/CT studies can be used to accurately fuse and compare 111 In WBC/ 99 m Tc HDP SPECT and MRI images of the diabetic foot. This can significantly help in conservative treatment planning and limb salvage procedures in treatment of diabetic foot infections.

  18. Focal inflammation in the embryological ventral pancreas: assessment using CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, H.; Naganawa, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To identify the characteristic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of nonuniform inflammation between the posterior aspect of the head and the remainder of the pancreas. Materials and methods: Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated images of 19 patients in whom the degree of attenuation in the CT images and/or the signal intensity in the MRI images differed between the posterior aspect of the head (ventral primordium) and the remainder of the pancreas (dorsal primordium) due to benign disorders other than uneven fatty replacement. Multiphase, contrast-enhanced CT examinations were performed in 17 patients. In five, T1- and T2-weighted images with and without fat suppression were obtained using a 1.5 T superconducting MRI system. Results: The lesions were localized in the posterior aspect of the head in 17 patients. In two patients, the lesions occupied the posterior aspect of the head and extended to the neck. The lesions exhibited the following findings: inhomogeneous hypoattenuation (with spotty areas of relatively well-maintained contrast enhancement) during the pancreatic phase (17/17) and no intense peripheral enhancement or central necrotic areas (17/17) in CT images, hypointensity in T1-weighed images (5/5), hyperintensity in T2-weighed images (4/5), no vascular invasion (19/19), failure to depict the entire course of Wirsung's duct (17/19), and calcification (13/19). Santorini's ducts were depicted in all but three patients. Conclusion: Focal inflammation in the embryological ventral pancreas exhibits a unique anatomical distribution and characteristic findings

  19. CT and MRI characteristica of tumours of the temporal bone and the cerebello-pontine angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Henk, C.B.; Dirisamer, A.; Czerny, C.; Gstoettner, W.

    2003-01-01

    Tumours lesions of the temporal bone and of the cerebello-pontine angle are rare.This tumours can be separated into benign and malignant lesions. In this paper the CT and MRI characteristica of tumours of the temporal bone and the cerebello-pontane angle will be demonstrated. High resolution CT (HRCT) as usually performed in the axial plane are using a high resolution bone window level setting, coronal planes are the reconstructed from the axial data set or will be obtained directly. With the MRI FLAIR sequence in the axial plane the whole brain will be scanned either to depict or exclude a tumour invasion into the brain. After this,T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences or fatsuppressed inversion recovery sequences in high resolution technique in the axial plane will be obtained from the temporal bone and axial T1-weighted spinecho sequences before and after the intravenous application of contrast material will be obtained of this region. Finally T1-weighted spinecho sequences in high resolution technique with fatsuppression after the intravenous application of contrast material will be performed in the coronal plane. HRCT and MRI are both used to depict the most exact tumorous borders. HRCT excellently depicts the osseous changes for example exostosis of the external auditory canal, while also with HRCT osseous changes maybe characterized into more benign or malignant types. MRI has a very high soft tissue contrast and may therefore either characterize vascular space-occupying lesions for example glomus jugulare tumours or may differentiate between more benign or malignant lesions. In conclusion HRCT and MRI of the temporal bone are excellent methods to depict and mostly characterize tumour lesions and can help to differentiate between benign and malignant lesion. These imaging methods shall be used complementary and may have a great impact for the therapeutic planning. (orig.) [de

  20. The diagnostic value of MRI and gadolinium-DTPA compared with CT for the diagnosis of bladder tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, V.; Spielmann, R.; Maas, R.; Buecheler, E.; Wagner, B.; Bressel, M.; Porst, H.

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective study, 58 patients with carcinomas of the bladder were examined by CT and MRI; in 48, gadolinium-DTPA was administered intravenously. MRI provided exact staging in 89%, compared with 80% with CT. There was 13% over-staging with CT and 11% with MRI. MRI, unlike CT did not result in any under-staging. In 36 patients a quotient could be calculated from the signal intensity of the tumour and surrounding soft tissues both before and after the intravenous contrast medium and the increased quotient after contrast administration could be estimated. There was a significant increase in the tumour/muscle quotient with a mean of 72±22% (minimum 43%, maximum 153%), corresponding to a marked increase of the signal form the tumour when compared with the precontrast images. This had the following advantages compared with CT: Accurate differentiation between superficial and intramural spread. MRI was better than CT at demonstrating tumours in the roof of the bladder and at the trigone. (orig.) [de

  1. Prospective evaluation of MRI, 11C-acetate PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT for staging of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, H.A.; Akin, O.; Schöder, H.; Olgac, S.; Dalbagni, G.; Hricak, H.; Bochner, B.H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 11 C-acetate positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT for bladder cancer staging, using whole-mount pathologic review of radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node specimens as the reference standard. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this prospective study, which was compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Written informed consent was obtained from 16 patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer who underwent MRI, 11 C-acetate PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT before radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Before imaging 4/16 patients had received intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin treatment, 6 had received systemic chemotherapy, 3 had received both and 3 had received neither. Measures of diagnostic performance including accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were estimated separately for each imaging modality. Results: MRI correctly staged 56% of patients (9/16), overstaged 38% (6/16) and understaged 6% (1/16). CT correctly staged 50% of patients (8/16), overstaged 44% (7/16) and understaged 6% (1/16). In 9 patients, 11 C-acetate PET/CT showed uptake within the bladder wall; the uptake was true-positive in 7 patients and false-positive in 2 patients. Of the remaining 7 patients, 5 had true-negative and 2 had false-negative PET/CT results for cancer in the bladder wall. For all modalities, staging accuracy was reduced in patients with a history of prior intravesical and/or systemic chemotherapy. Conclusion: In staging bladder cancer, MRI, 11 C-acetate PET/CT and CT displayed similar levels of accuracy. For all modalities, a history of intravesical and/or systemic chemotherapy affected staging accuracy.

  2. Prospective evaluation of MRI, {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT for staging of bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, H.A., E-mail: vargasah@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akin, O.; Schöder, H. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Olgac, S. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Dalbagni, G. [Department of Surgery, Urology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hricak, H. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bochner, B.H. [Department of Surgery, Urology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), {sup 11}C-acetate positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT for bladder cancer staging, using whole-mount pathologic review of radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node specimens as the reference standard. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this prospective study, which was compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Written informed consent was obtained from 16 patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer who underwent MRI, {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT before radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Before imaging 4/16 patients had received intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin treatment, 6 had received systemic chemotherapy, 3 had received both and 3 had received neither. Measures of diagnostic performance including accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were estimated separately for each imaging modality. Results: MRI correctly staged 56% of patients (9/16), overstaged 38% (6/16) and understaged 6% (1/16). CT correctly staged 50% of patients (8/16), overstaged 44% (7/16) and understaged 6% (1/16). In 9 patients, {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT showed uptake within the bladder wall; the uptake was true-positive in 7 patients and false-positive in 2 patients. Of the remaining 7 patients, 5 had true-negative and 2 had false-negative PET/CT results for cancer in the bladder wall. For all modalities, staging accuracy was reduced in patients with a history of prior intravesical and/or systemic chemotherapy. Conclusion: In staging bladder cancer, MRI, {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT and CT displayed similar levels of accuracy. For all modalities, a history of intravesical and/or systemic chemotherapy affected staging accuracy.

  3. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alvarez Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume.

  4. Segmentation of human skull in MRI using statistical shape information from CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Defeng; Shi, Lin; Chu, Winnie C W; Cheng, Jack C Y; Heng, Pheng Ann

    2009-09-01

    To automatically segment the skull from the MRI data using a model-based three-dimensional segmentation scheme. This study exploited the statistical anatomy extracted from the CT data of a group of subjects by means of constructing an active shape model of the skull surfaces. To construct a reliable shape model, a novel approach was proposed to optimize the automatic landmarking on the coupled surfaces (i.e., the skull vault) by minimizing the description length that incorporated local thickness information. This model was then used to locate the skull shape in MRI of a different group of patients. Compared with performing landmarking separately on the coupled surfaces, the proposed landmarking method constructed models that had better generalization ability and specificity. The segmentation accuracies were measured by the Dice coefficient and the set difference, and compared with the method based on mathematical morphology operations. The proposed approach using the active shape model based on the statistical skull anatomy presented in the head CT data contributes to more reliable segmentation of the skull from MRI data.

  5. Comparison of CT and MRI in the evaluation of therapeutic responce in thoracic Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkowitz, S.S.; Leonidas, J.C.; Lopez, M.; Cherick, I.; Schiff, R.G.; Karayalcin, G.; Lanzkowsky, P.

    1993-01-01

    Current imaging modalities are accurate in establishing the diagnosis and extent of thoracic Hodgkin disease. After treatment, however, it is extremely difficult to differentiate potential residual active neoplastic disease from scar tissue, or identify early recurrence. We evaluated the contribution of MRI in the assessment of the response to treatment of thoracic Hodgkin disease in the assumption that scar formation would be characterized by low signal intensity in all pulse sequences, whereas active tumor should maintain a degree of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In 47 occasions (23 patients) both CT and MRI were able to identify correctly active disease, but had low specificity in confirming remission because of residual tissues masses. High signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images often persisted despite remission, probably because of edema, necrosis, granulation or other factors. MRI was somewhat more specific than CT and may be quite valuable to confirm remission in patients with residual masses that no longer appear hyperintense on T 2 after treatment. (orig.)

  6. 4 T MRI of chondrocalcinosis in combination with three-dimensional CT, radiography, and arthroscopy: a report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suan, J.C.; Chhem, R.K.; Gati, J.S.; Norley, C.J.; Holdsworth, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    To describe 4 T MRI techniques in imaging chondrocalcinosis within the knee and examine the results together with those demonstrated using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography, conventional radiography, and arthroscopy. From a larger clinical imaging study of early osteoarthritis, knee arthroscopy patients were imaged using high-field MRI and high-resolution 3D CT prior to their surgery. Retrospective review of the imaging data diagnosed three patients with chondrocalcinosis. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient (3D SPGR) and two-dimensional fat-suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) imaging was performed at 4 T. The MR images, multi-planar reformatted CT (MPR-CT) and maximum intensity projection CT (MIP-CT) images, and radiographs were examined by a musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence and location of chondrocalcinosis. The findings from arthroscopy were also included. MRI showed 16 sites of punctate hypointense regions from 18 articular surfaces and five of six menisci with similar signal characteristics. Both meniscal chondrocalcinosis and meniscal tears were clearly visible using the 3D SPGR sequence. Only three sites were demonstrated to have calcification using MPR-CT and MIP-CT revealed an additional three. In articular cartilage surfaces showing surface disruption, arthroscopy demonstrated 11 sites with crystal deposition. Arthroscopy also revealed five menisci with calcification present. Our preliminary findings suggest that imaging chondrocalcinosis using spoiled gradient 4 T MRI is superior and complementary to the other imaging modalities in the detection of crystal deposition in both articular cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  7. 4 T MRI of chondrocalcinosis in combination with three-dimensional CT, radiography, and arthroscopy: a report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suan, J.C.; Chhem, R.K.; Gati, J.S.; Norley, C.J.; Holdsworth, D.W. [Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    To describe 4 T MRI techniques in imaging chondrocalcinosis within the knee and examine the results together with those demonstrated using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography, conventional radiography, and arthroscopy. From a larger clinical imaging study of early osteoarthritis, knee arthroscopy patients were imaged using high-field MRI and high-resolution 3D CT prior to their surgery. Retrospective review of the imaging data diagnosed three patients with chondrocalcinosis. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient (3D SPGR) and two-dimensional fat-suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) imaging was performed at 4 T. The MR images, multi-planar reformatted CT (MPR-CT) and maximum intensity projection CT (MIP-CT) images, and radiographs were examined by a musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence and location of chondrocalcinosis. The findings from arthroscopy were also included. MRI showed 16 sites of punctate hypointense regions from 18 articular surfaces and five of six menisci with similar signal characteristics. Both meniscal chondrocalcinosis and meniscal tears were clearly visible using the 3D SPGR sequence. Only three sites were demonstrated to have calcification using MPR-CT and MIP-CT revealed an additional three. In articular cartilage surfaces showing surface disruption, arthroscopy demonstrated 11 sites with crystal deposition. Arthroscopy also revealed five menisci with calcification present. Our preliminary findings suggest that imaging chondrocalcinosis using spoiled gradient 4 T MRI is superior and complementary to the other imaging modalities in the detection of crystal deposition in both articular cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  8. Imaging features of primary Sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and PET/CT: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, Christian von; Meyer, Bernhard; Fegbeutel, Christine; Länger, Florian; Bengel, Frank; Wacker, Frank; Rodt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the imaging features of primary sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Thirteen patients with a primary sarcoma of the great vessels were retrospectively evaluated. All available images studies including F-18 FDG PET(/CT) (n = 4), MDCT (n = 12) and MRI (n = 6) were evaluated and indicative image features of this rare tumor entity were identified. The median interval between the first imaging study and the final diagnosis was 11 weeks (0–12 weeks). The most frequently observed imaging findings suggestive of malignant disease in patients with sarcomas of the pulmonary arteries were a large filling defect with vascular distension, unilaterality and a lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation. In patients with aortic sarcomas we most frequently observed a pedunculated appearance and an atypical location of the filling defect. The F-18 FDG PET(/CT) examinations demonstrated an unequivocal hypermetabolism of the lesion in all cases (4/4). MRI proved lesion vascularization in 5/6 cases. Intravascular unilateral or atypically located filling defects of the great vessels with vascular distension, a pedunculated shape and lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation are suspicious for primary sarcoma on MDCT or MRI. MR perfusion techniques can add information on the nature of the lesion but the findings may be subtle and equivocal. F-18 FDG PET/CT may have a potential role in these patients and may be considered as part of the imaging workup

  9. T1-weighted MRI as a substitute to CT for refocusing planning in MR-guided focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintermark, Max; Sumer, Suna; Lau, Benison; Cupino, Alan; Tustison, Nicholas J; Demartini, Nicholas; Elias, William J; Kassell, Neal; Patrie, James T; Xin, Wenjun; Eames, Matt; Snell, John; Hananel, Arik; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Precise focusing is essential for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to minimize collateral damage to non-diseased tissues and to achieve temperatures capable of inducing coagulative necrosis at acceptable power deposition levels. CT is usually used for this refocusing but requires a separate study (CT) ahead of the TcMRgFUS procedure. The goal of this study was to determine whether MRI using an appropriate sequence would be a viable alternative to CT for planning ultrasound refocusing in TcMRgFUS. We tested three MRI pulse sequences (3D T1 weighted 3D volume interpolated breath hold examination (VIBE), proton density weighted 3D sampling perfection with applications optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution and 3D true fast imaging with steady state precision T2-weighted imaging) on patients who have already had a CT scan performed. We made detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the MRI data and compared those so-called ‘virtual CT’ to detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the CT data, used as a reference standard. We then loaded both standard and virtual CT in a TcMRgFUS device and compared the calculated phase correction values, as well as the temperature elevation in a phantom. A series of Bland–Altman measurement agreement analyses showed T1 3D VIBE as the optimal MRI sequence, with respect to minimizing the measurement discrepancy between the MRI derived total skull thickness measurement and the CT derived total skull thickness measurement (mean measurement discrepancy: 0.025; 95% CL (−0.22–0.27); p = 0.825). The T1-weighted sequence was also optimal in estimating skull CT density and skull layer thickness. The mean difference between the phase shifts calculated with the standard CT and the virtual CT reconstructed from the T1 dataset was 0.08 ± 1.2 rad on patients and 0.1 ± 0.9 rad on phantom. Compared to the real CT, the MR-based correction showed a 1 °C drop on the

  10. Serial MRI in early Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease with a point mutation of prion protein at codon 180

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, S.; Sugino, M.; Shinoda, K.; Ohsawa, N.; Koizumi, N.; Ohta, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Tateishi, J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 66-year-old woman with histologically diagnosed Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD), followed with MRI from an early clinical stage. MRI demonstrated expansion of the high cortical signal on T2-weighted images, which differs from previous MRI reports of CJD. This patient followed an atypical clinical course: 16 months had passed before she developed akinetic mutism, and periodic sharp waves had not been detected on EEG after 2 years in spite of her akinetic mutism. Brain biopsy showed primary spongiform changes in the grey matter, and a point mutation of the prion protein gene at codon 180 was discovered using polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing and Tth 111 I cutting. This is the first case with the point mutation of the codon 180 variant with an atypical clinical course and characteristic MRI findings. (orig.)

  11. MRI and CT Imaging of an Intrasphenoidal Encephalocele: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agladioglu, Kadir; Ardic, Fazıl Necdet; Tumkaya, Funda; Bir, Ferda

    2014-01-01

    Intrasphenoidal encephalocele (ISE) is a rare clinical entity. The incidence of congenital encephalocele is very low. Accurate diagnosis and surgical approach is of critical value. We present a case of intrasphenoidal encephalocele in a 40-year-old man. He complained of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and recurrent meningitis. In images of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intrasphenoidal encephalocele herniating through a defect of the left lateral sphenoid sinus wall was determined. Incisional biopsies were taken by endoscopic transnasal approach and histopathological examination revealed an encephalocele. In the differential diagnosis, ISE can be taken for inflammatory or malignant sinusoidal soft tissue masses. ISE is differentiated from other entities by demonstrating continuity with normal brain tissue. MRI clearly demonstrates that the herniating soft tissue is isointense with brain and continuous with brain tissue via the sphenoid sinus, thereby the treatment decision-making process is very important

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasound, Contrast-enhanced CT, and Conventional MRI for Differentiating Leiomyoma From Leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; McLean, Karen; Sciallis, Andrew P; Alves, Timothy; Maturen, Katherine E; Mervak, Benjamin M; Moore, Andreea G; Wasnik, Ashish P; Erba, Jake; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether uterine leiomyoma can be distinguished from uterine leiomyosarcoma on ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without diffusion-weighted imaging. Institutional review board approval was obtained and informed consent was waived for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective case-control diagnostic accuracy study. All subjects with resected uterine leiomyosarcoma diagnosed over a 17-year period (1998-2014) at a single institution for whom pre-resection US (n = 10), CT (n = 11), or MRI (n = 7) was available were matched by tumor size and imaging modality with 28 subjects with resected uterine leiomyoma. Six blinded radiologists (three attendings, three residents) assigned 5-point Likert scores for the following features: (1) margins, (2) necrosis, (3) hemorrhage, (4) vascularity, (5) calcifications, (6) heterogeneity, and (7) likelihood of malignancy (primary end point). Mean suspicion scores were calculated and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. The ability of individual morphologic features to predict malignancy was assessed with logistic regression. Mean suspicion scores were 2.5 ± 1.2 (attendings) and 2.4 ± 1.3 (residents) for leiomyoma, and 2.7 ± 1.3 (attendings) and 2.7 ± 1.4 (residents) for leiomyosarcoma. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (range: 0.330-0.685) were not significantly different from chance, either overall (P = .36-.88) or by any modality (P = .28-.96), for any reader. Reader experience had no effect on diagnostic accuracy. No morphologic parameter was significantly predictive of malignancy (P = .10-.97). Uterine leiomyoma cannot be differentiated accurately from leiomyosarcoma on US, CT, or MRI without diffusion-weighted imaging. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R.; Calne, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K)

  14. CT and MRI appearances and radiologic staging of pediatric renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, Ryan T. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R.; Ladino-Torres, Maria F.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McHugh, Jonathan B. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pathology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ehrlich, Peter F. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Surgery, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an uncommon but noteworthy primary pediatric renal malignancy. There is a paucity of published data regarding the CT/MRI appearances and accuracy of pretreatment radiologic staging of this form of cancer in children. To review the various CT/MRI appearances of pediatric RCC and assess the accuracy of pretreatment radiologic staging using these imaging modalities. Institutional Departments of Pathology and Radiology records were searched from 1995 through 2010 for children (younger than 18 years of age) with RCC. Available pretreatment contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings were documented by consensus, and correlation was made between radiologic and surgicopathological TNM staging. Pretreatment imaging studies from 10 RCCs in nine children (four girls and five boys; mean age 12.9 years) were reviewed. The mean size of the primary tumor was 6.2 cm (range, 1.5-12.6 cm). Ninety percent of RCCs demonstrated heterogeneous postcontrast enhancement. Fifty percent of masses had associated hemorrhage, while 40% contained internal calcification. Regarding TNM staging, N staging was correct for 10 of 10 tumors, while M staging was correct for 10 of 10 tumors. Imaging correctly staged only 4 of 10 tumors with respect to T stage. Radiologic and surgicopathological overall staging were concordant for 8 of 10 tumors. Pediatric RCCs typically present as large, heterogeneous masses, and they commonly hemorrhage and contain internal calcification. Radiologic and surgicopathological overall TNM staging are frequently concordant, although radiologic T staging is often incorrect. (orig.)

  15. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R; Calne, D B

    1989-05-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K).

  16. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R.; Calne, D.B.

    1989-05-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K).

  17. Characterization of glial tumors in PET/CT 18F-dopa and in perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nioche, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    MRI provides morphological information about a tumour, as well as information regarding its micro-vascularisation of the tumour. In PET/CT, accumulation of 18 F-Dopa in tumour cells results from the metabolic activity greater than that of healthy tissues.We studied 28 gliomas for which we analysed data from MRI and PET/CT. A registration method has been developed to combine information from both PET and MRI and to extract volumes of interest consistent with the information included in the two modalities. In these volumes, the tumour compartment and normal tissue compartment were identified using a Gaussian mixture model. Parameters from PET or MRI data were then calculated in these compartments. ROC analyses combined with linear discriminant analyses were used to assess whether joint observation of standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV) or of relative rk1 and rCBV could distinguish between low grade and high grade tumours. We found that using this joint analysis, 82% of high-grade tumors and 70% of low grade tumors were correctly classified (AUC of 0.88 for [SUVmax, rCBV] and of 0.92 for [rk1, rCBV]). Considering the combined information from [SUVmax, rCBV], the sensitivity for detecting high-grade tumors was 95% with a specificity of 60%. The negative predictive value was 52% for a positive predictive value of 95%. Similarly, considering the combined information from [rk1, rCBV], we also obtain a specificity of 60% associated with a 95% sensitivity for detecting high-grade tumors, with a negative predictive value of 60% and positive predictive value of 95%. Our work shows that joint analysis of information from microvascular and metabolic is possible by combining PET and MR imaging data. However, we found that, in our patient population, the microvascular information obtained through MR did not achieve better discrimination than the metabolic information derived from PET only. (author)

  18. Diagnostic performance of dual-energy CT stress myocardial perfusion imaging: direct comparison with cardiovascular MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemo-dynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a per-vessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p=0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis.

  19. Preliminary results of a new workflow for MRI/CT-based image-guided brachytherapy in cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Miho Watanabe; Iwai, Yuma; Togasaki, Gentaro; Kurokawa, Marie; Harada, Rintarou; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Uno, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We propose a method of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) that combines MRI-based target volume delineation for the first fraction with CT datasets of subsequent fractions, using an automatic, applicator-based co-registration, and report our preliminary experience. The MRI of the first fraction was used for the first brachytherapy planning. For each subsequent brachytherapy fraction, after the same applicator insertion, a new CT scan with the applicator in place was obtained. The MR image set was registered to the subsequent brachytherapy treatment planning CT using the applicator for rigid body registration. To demonstrate the registration quality, we used here the Dice index as a measurement of tandem delineation overlap between CT and MRI. The median Dice index was 0.879 (range 0.610-0.932), which indicated that the contours on CT and MRI fitted well. With this combination method, the median D90 of HR CTV and the calculated D2 cm 3 of the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid in each fraction were 7.2 (4.0-10.4), 5.9 (2.3-7.7), 4.0 (1.9-6.7), and 3.8 (0.6-7.2) Gy, respectively. Our described method of MRI-guided IGBT offers a practical option for the benefits of target delineation.

  20. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Pelgrim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT, including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET. This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD, as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings.

  1. Thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura: severe clinic with no CT, minor MRI, but a SPECT correlate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, Y. [Radiologische Abteilung, Staedtisches Krankenhaus Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany); Bargemann, T. [Abteilung Internistische Intensivmedizin und Dialyse am Staedtischen Krankenhaus Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany); Harten, P. [Zweite Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik der Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany); Gutschmidt, H.-J. [Abteilung Internistische Intensivmedizin und Dialyse am Staedtischen Krankenhaus Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    A 28-year-old woman with primarily therapy refractory TTP was followed neuroradiologically over 6 months. Despite pronounced neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms including hemiparesis and aphasia she had unremarkable CT scans on two occasions. Three MRI exams showed no correlate for her neurological symptoms except a small petechial cortical hemorrhage in the right parietooccipital gyrus which may account for her TTP-related anxiety disorder. A cerebral HMPAO-SPECT showed long-standing right-sided hypoperfusion compatible with residual vasculature changes. The possible causes for the clinico-neuroradiological discrepancies are discussed in view of the literature.

  2. Myelography, CT and MRI in leukaemic infiltration of the lumbar theca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, W.C.; Lee, S.K.; Ho, Y.J.; Lee, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, while in remission, developed paraparesis, with faecal and urinary incontinence. CT demonstrated increased density of the lumbar theca and enlargement of the nerve roots. Myelography showed complete obstruction below the L3 level. MRI showed increased signal intensity in the lumbar sac on T1 weighting, and the cauda equina enhanced with gadolinium-DTPA. Lymphoblasts were seen in the lumbar spinal fluid. After chemoterhapy, these abnormalities resolved, as did the paraparesis and incontinence. (orig.)

  3. CNS changes in Usher's syndrome with mental disorder: CT, MRI and PET findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, J; Ofuku, K; Sakuma, K; Shiraishi, H; Iio, M; Nawano, S

    1988-01-01

    CNS changes in a case of Usher's syndrome associated with schizophrenia-like mental disorder were observed by CT, MRI and PET. The neuro-radiological findings of the case demonstrate the degenerative and metabolic alterations in various regions of cortex, white matter and subcortical areas in the brain. Mental disorder of the case is almost indistinguishable from that of schizophrenia, but the psychotic feature is regarded as an atypical or mixed organic brain syndrome according to the classification in the third edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III). Images PMID:3264568

  4. CT and MRI Findings of Angiomyolipoma with Epithelial Cysts of the Kidney: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Dong Myung; Chung, Dong Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, In Kyu; Hahn, Seong Tai; Lee, Jae Mun

    2010-01-01

    Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC) or cystic angiomyolipoma has been recently described as a distinct cystic variant of angiomyolipoma. Although angiomyolipoma (AML) is usually composed of adipose, vascular, and muscular tissue lacking an epithelial element, AMLEC contains an epithelial component in the form of gross or microscopic cysts. To date, the radiologic appearance of AMLEC has been demonstrated in only one case report, as a solid mass containing a tiny cystic focus. This report shows another imaging feature of AMLEC, which presents as a multiloculated cystic mass without a visible solid portion on CT and MRI

  5. Thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura: severe clinic with no CT, minor MRI, but a SPECT correlate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Y.; Bargemann, T.; Harten, P.; Gutschmidt, H.-J.

    1999-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman with primarily therapy refractory TTP was followed neuroradiologically over 6 months. Despite pronounced neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms including hemiparesis and aphasia she had unremarkable CT scans on two occasions. Three MRI exams showed no correlate for her neurological symptoms except a small petechial cortical hemorrhage in the right parietooccipital gyrus which may account for her TTP-related anxiety disorder. A cerebral HMPAO-SPECT showed long-standing right-sided hypoperfusion compatible with residual vasculature changes. The possible causes for the clinico-neuroradiological discrepancies are discussed in view of the literature

  6. Labyrinthitis ossificans in a child with sickle cell disease: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Benjamin P.; Saito, Naoko; Wang, Jimmy J.; Mian, Asim Z.; Sakai, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The association between sensorineural hearing loss and sickle cell disease has been described, and labyrinthine hemorrhage has been reported with sickle cell disease. We report the CT and MRI findings of labyrinthitis ossificans in a child with sickle cell disease who presented with sensorineural hearing loss. Labyrinthitis ossificans is associated with an infectious, inflammatory, or destructive insult to the membranous labyrinth; however, it has not been specifically described with sickle cell disease. Recognition of this condition is important because it affects both management and prognosis of this disease. (orig.)

  7. Are the osseous and tendinous-cartilaginous tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distances the same on CT and MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer Hinckel, Betina; Gomes Gobbi, Riccardo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Noda Kihara Filho, Eduardo; Bordalo Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    To verify whether the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG) and the tendinous-cartilaginous TT-TG (the distance between the patellar tendon and trochlear groove: PT-TG) are identical using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The TT-TG and PT-TG distances were measured on the same knee samples by three observers (two measurements per observer) using CT and MRI scans collected retrospectively. The reproducibility of the measurements was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The means and standard deviations of four measurements were calculated for each patient. A paired t-test was used to assess differences between measurements. Fifty knee samples (32 with patellar instability and 18 with other conditions) were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliability was excellent for all four measurements (>0.8). On average, the TT-TG distance on MRI was 3.1-3.6 mm smaller than that on CT, and the PT-TG distance on MRI was 1.0-3.4 mm larger than the TT-TG distance on MRI. The osseous TT-TG and tendinous-cartilaginous PT-TG distances determined by CT and MRI were not identical. (orig.)

  8. Are the osseous and tendinous-cartilaginous tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distances the same on CT and MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer Hinckel, Betina; Gomes Gobbi, Riccardo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura [Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Clinical Hospital of the Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Department of Orthopaedics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Noda Kihara Filho, Eduardo; Bordalo Rodrigues, Marcelo [Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Clinical Hospital of the Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    To verify whether the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG) and the tendinous-cartilaginous TT-TG (the distance between the patellar tendon and trochlear groove: PT-TG) are identical using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The TT-TG and PT-TG distances were measured on the same knee samples by three observers (two measurements per observer) using CT and MRI scans collected retrospectively. The reproducibility of the measurements was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The means and standard deviations of four measurements were calculated for each patient. A paired t-test was used to assess differences between measurements. Fifty knee samples (32 with patellar instability and 18 with other conditions) were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliability was excellent for all four measurements (>0.8). On average, the TT-TG distance on MRI was 3.1-3.6 mm smaller than that on CT, and the PT-TG distance on MRI was 1.0-3.4 mm larger than the TT-TG distance on MRI. The osseous TT-TG and tendinous-cartilaginous PT-TG distances determined by CT and MRI were not identical. (orig.)

  9. Churg-Strauss Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong Joo; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum; Hwang, Cheol Mok; Kim, Dae Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eu Gene [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    This is a case report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) associated with cardiac involvement which is demonstrated in chest CT and cardiac MRI (CMR) without specific cardiac symptoms. A 32-year-old woman had a 3-year history of bronchial asthma, chronic sinusitis, and otitis media. The patient had various typical findings of CSS. The patient had no specific cardiac symptoms or signs such as chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or murmur, but she had diffuse low attenuation lesions in the inner wall of the left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced CT. This corresponded to the area of subendocardial hyperenhancement in delayed contrast-enhanced CMR images. She was treated with steroids for 2 months. Follow-up delayed contrast-enhanced CMR of the LV showed a decrease in the size of the subendocardial enhancement area, and she had no symptoms. Therefore, the radiologist and clinician both should pay careful attention to observe possible cardiac involvement in case of CSS.

  10. Churg-Strauss Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seong Joo; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum; Hwang, Cheol Mok; Kim, Dae Ho; Choi, Eu Gene

    2012-01-01

    This is a case report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) associated with cardiac involvement which is demonstrated in chest CT and cardiac MRI (CMR) without specific cardiac symptoms. A 32-year-old woman had a 3-year history of bronchial asthma, chronic sinusitis, and otitis media. The patient had various typical findings of CSS. The patient had no specific cardiac symptoms or signs such as chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or murmur, but she had diffuse low attenuation lesions in the inner wall of the left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced CT. This corresponded to the area of subendocardial hyperenhancement in delayed contrast-enhanced CMR images. She was treated with steroids for 2 months. Follow-up delayed contrast-enhanced CMR of the LV showed a decrease in the size of the subendocardial enhancement area, and she had no symptoms. Therefore, the radiologist and clinician both should pay careful attention to observe possible cardiac involvement in case of CSS.

  11. The extensor carpi ulnaris pseudolesion: evaluation with microCT, histology, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Sayed; Cunningham, Ryan; Mohamed, Feroze; Amin, Mamta; Popoff, Steven N.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2015-01-01

    To determine if magic angle plays a role in apparent central increased signal intensity of the distal extensor carpi ulnaris tendon (ECU) on MRI, to see if histologic findings of tendon degeneration are associated with increased T1 or T2 tendon signal on MR imaging, and to determine the prevalence of the ECU ''pseudolesion''. A standard 3 Tesla protocol was utilized to scan ten cadaveric wrists. A 40 mm length of 10 ECU and four extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendons were immersion fixed before microCT scanning. Staining with Alcian blue, Masson's trichrome and Safranin O was performed before light microscopy. Fifty clinical wrist MRIs were also reviewed for the presence of increased T1 and/or T2 signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal was observed in 9 of 10 cadaveric ECU tendons, but not in ECRB tendons. MicroCT and histology showed inter-tendinous matrix between the two distal heads of the ECU. Increased mucoid degeneration correlated with increased MRI signal intensity. The tendon fibers were at a maximum of 8.39 to the longitudinal axis on microCT. Clinical MRIs showed increased T1 signal in 6 %, increased T2 signal in 8 %, increased T1 and T2 signal in 80 %, and 6 % showing no increased signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal in the ECU tendon indicates the presence of normal inter-tendinous ground substance, with increased proteoglycan content (mucoid degeneration) responsible for increased signal intensity. None of the fibers were shown on microCT to approach the magic angle. (orig.)

  12. The extensor carpi ulnaris pseudolesion: evaluation with microCT, histology, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Sayed; Cunningham, Ryan; Mohamed, Feroze [Temple University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Amin, Mamta; Popoff, Steven N.; Barbe, Mary F. [Temple University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To determine if magic angle plays a role in apparent central increased signal intensity of the distal extensor carpi ulnaris tendon (ECU) on MRI, to see if histologic findings of tendon degeneration are associated with increased T1 or T2 tendon signal on MR imaging, and to determine the prevalence of the ECU ''pseudolesion''. A standard 3 Tesla protocol was utilized to scan ten cadaveric wrists. A 40 mm length of 10 ECU and four extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendons were immersion fixed before microCT scanning. Staining with Alcian blue, Masson's trichrome and Safranin O was performed before light microscopy. Fifty clinical wrist MRIs were also reviewed for the presence of increased T1 and/or T2 signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal was observed in 9 of 10 cadaveric ECU tendons, but not in ECRB tendons. MicroCT and histology showed inter-tendinous matrix between the two distal heads of the ECU. Increased mucoid degeneration correlated with increased MRI signal intensity. The tendon fibers were at a maximum of 8.39 to the longitudinal axis on microCT. Clinical MRIs showed increased T1 signal in 6 %, increased T2 signal in 8 %, increased T1 and T2 signal in 80 %, and 6 % showing no increased signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal in the ECU tendon indicates the presence of normal inter-tendinous ground substance, with increased proteoglycan content (mucoid degeneration) responsible for increased signal intensity. None of the fibers were shown on microCT to approach the magic angle. (orig.)

  13. CT and MRI of germ-cell tumors with metastasis or multi-located tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tazoe, Makoto; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven cases of germ-cell tumors were examined with a CT scan in our clinic. In the 11 cases of metastasis or multi-localized tumors, the CT findings were studied in connection with the MRI findings. There were 6 cases of germ-cell tumors which had broad infiltrating tumors with multiple lesions on first admission. Their tumor sites were different from that in cases of malignant glioma, being frequently localized in the pineal and/or the suprasellar region, on the wall of the third and/or lateral ventricle, and in the region of the basal ganglia. Five of the cases of germ-cell tumors had metastasis with various patterns connected to a remote area - that is, to spinal cords, to the ventricular wall and basal cistern of the brain stem by CSF dissemination, to a lung by hematogeneous metastasis, and to the peritoneal wall or organs by a V-P shunt. The CT findings of germ-cell tumors were correlated mainly with the results of the histological diagnosis; they were found not to differ with the tumor site. The germinoma in the suprasellar region had less calcification than in the pineal region. Cysts, calcification, and an enlargement of the lateral ventricle on the tumor side were frequently seen in the germinoma of the basal ganglia. On the MRI of 5 cases of germinoma, the T 1 -weighted image revealed a slightly low or iso signal intensity, while the T 2 -weighted image showed a high signal intensity. In the case of multiple tumor lesions, some cases demonstrated different CT findings and radiosensitivities for each tumor. The possibility of a multicentric origin for the tumors is thus suggested in some cases of germ-cell tumors. (author)

  14. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative CT and MRI parameters for monitoring of longitudinal spine involvement in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horger, M; Fritz, J; Thaiss, W M; Ditt, H; Weisel, K; Haap, M; Kloth, Christopher

    2018-03-01

    To compare qualitative and quantitative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters for longitudinal disease monitoring of multiple myelo