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Sample records for sequencing reveals role

  1. Transcriptome sequencing reveals the roles of transcription factors in modulating genotype by nitrogen interaction in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuyue; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Baobao; Wang, Xufeng; Lai, Jinsheng; Tian, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Global transcriptome analysis in maize revealed differential nitrogen response between genotypes and implicate a crucial role of transcription factors in driving genotype by nitrogen interactions at gene expression level. Developing nitrogen-efficient cultivars are essential for sustainable and productive agriculture. Nitrogen use efficiency of plants is highly dependent on the interaction of environmental and genetic variation and results in adaptive phenotypes. This study used transcriptome sequencing to perform a comprehensive genotype by nitrogen (G × N) interaction analysis for two elite Chinese maize inbreds grown at normal and low nitrogen levels in field conditions. We demonstrated that the two maize inbreds showed contrasting agronomic and transcriptomic responses to changes in nitrogen availability. A total of 96 genes with a significant G × N interaction were detected. After characterizing the expression patterns of G × N interaction genes, we found that the G × N interaction genes tended to show condition-specific differential expression. The functional annotations of G × N interaction genes revealed that many different kinds of genes were involved in G × N interactions, but a significant enrichment for transcription factors was detected, particularly the AP2/EREBP and WRKY family, suggesting that transcription factors might play important roles in driving G × N interaction at gene expression level for nitrogen response in maize. Taken together, these results not only provide novel insights into the mechanism of nitrogen response in maize and set important basis for further characterization but also have important implications for other genotype by stress interaction.

  2. Genotypic Resistance Tests Sequences Reveal the Role of Marginalized Populations in HIV-1 Transmission in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilaih, Mohaned; Marzel, Alex; Yang, Wan Lin; Scherrer, Alexandra U; Schüpbach, Jörg; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Hirsch, Hans H; Aubert, Vincent; Cavassini, Matthias; Klimkait, Thomas; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Furrer, Hansjakob; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger

    2016-06-14

    Targeting hard-to-reach/marginalized populations is essential for preventing HIV-transmission. A unique opportunity to identify such populations in Switzerland is provided by a database of all genotypic-resistance-tests from Switzerland, including both sequences from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) and non-cohort sequences. A phylogenetic tree was built using 11,127 SHCS and 2,875 Swiss non-SHCS sequences. Demographics were imputed for non-SHCS patients using a phylogenetic proximity approach. Factors associated with non-cohort outbreaks were determined using logistic regression. Non-B subtype (univariable odds-ratio (OR): 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8-2.1), female gender (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.4-1.7), black ethnicity (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.7-2.1) and heterosexual transmission group (OR:1.8; 95% CI: 1.6-2.0), were all associated with underrepresentation in the SHCS. We found 344 purely non-SHCS transmission clusters, however, these outbreaks were small (median 2, maximum 7 patients) with a strong overlap with the SHCS'. 65% of non-SHCS sequences were part of clusters composed of >= 50% SHCS sequences. Our data suggests that marginalized-populations are underrepresented in the SHCS. However, the limited size of outbreaks among non-SHCS patients in-care implies that no major HIV outbreak in Switzerland was missed by the SHCS surveillance. This study demonstrates the potential of sequence data to assess and extend the scope of infectious-disease surveillance.

  3. Structure-Related Roles for the Conservation of the HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Sequence Revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Soraya; Huarte, Nerea; Rujas, Edurne; Andreu, David; Nieva, José L; Jiménez, María Angeles

    2017-10-17

    Despite extensive characterization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) hydrophobic fusion peptide (FP), the structure-function relationships underlying its extraordinary degree of conservation remain poorly understood. Specifically, the fact that the tandem repeat of the FLGFLG tripeptide is absolutely conserved suggests that high hydrophobicity may not suffice to unleash FP function. Here, we have compared the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures adopted in nonpolar media by two FP surrogates, wtFP-tag and scrFP-tag, which had equal hydrophobicity but contained wild-type and scrambled core sequences LFLGFLG and FGLLGFL, respectively. In addition, these peptides were tagged at their C-termini with an epitope sequence that folded independently, thereby allowing Western blot detection without interfering with FP structure. We observed similar α-helical FP conformations for both specimens dissolved in the low-polarity medium 25% (v/v) 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP), but important differences in contact with micelles of the membrane mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC). Thus, whereas wtFP-tag preserved a helix displaying a Gly-rich ridge, the scrambled sequence lost in great part the helical structure upon being solubilized in DPC. Western blot analyses further revealed the capacity of wtFP-tag to assemble trimers in membranes, whereas membrane oligomers were not observed in the case of the scrFP-tag sequence. We conclude that, beyond hydrophobicity, preserving sequence order is an important feature for defining the secondary structures and oligomeric states adopted by the HIV FP in membranes.

  4. Small RNA sequencing revealed dysregulated piRNAs in Alzheimer's disease and their probable role in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jyoti; Sarkar, Arijita; Parida, Sibun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Mallick, Bibekanand

    2017-02-28

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), ∼23-36 nucleotide-long small non-coding RNAs, earlier believed to be germline-specific, have now been identified in somatic cells including neural cells. However, piRNAs have not yet been studied in the human brain (HB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-affected brain. In this study, by next-generation small RNA sequencing, 564 and 451 piRNAs were identified in the HB and AD-affected brain respectively. The majority of the neuronal piRNAs have intronic origin wherein primary piRNAs are mostly from the negative strand. piRNAs originating from the coding sequence of mRNAs and tRNAs are highly conserved compared to other genomic contexts. We found 1923 mRNAs significantly down-regulated in AD as the predicted targets of 125 up-regulated piRNAs. The filtering of targets based on our criteria coupled with pathway enrichment analysis of all the predicted targets resulted in five most significant AD-associated pathways enriched with four genes (CYCS, LIN7C, KPNA6, and RAB11A) found to be regulated by four piRNAs. The qRT-PCR study verified the reciprocal expression of piRNAs and their targets. This study provides the first evidence of piRNAs in the HB and AD which will provide the foundation for future studies to unravel the regulatory role of piRNAs in the human brain and associated diseases. The sequencing data have been submitted to the GEO database (Accession no. GSE85075).

  5. High-throughput deep sequencing reveals that microRNAs play important roles in salt tolerance of euhalophyte Salicornia europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juanjuan; Wang, Jinhui; Fan, Pengxiang; Jia, Weitao; Nie, Lingling; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xianyang; Lv, Sulian; Wan, Lichuan; Chang, Sandra; Li, Shizhong; Li, Yinxin

    2015-02-26

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in plant development processes and play pivotal roles in plant adaptation to environmental stresses. Salicornia europaea, a salt mash euhalophyte, is a suitable model plant to study salt adaptation mechanisms. S. europaea is also a vegetable, forage, and oilseed that can be used for saline land reclamation and biofuel precursor production on marginal lands. Despite its importance, no miRNA has been identified from S. europaea thus far. Deep sequencing was performed to investigate small RNA transcriptome of S. europaea. Two hundred and ten conserved miRNAs comprising 51 families and 31 novel miRNAs (including seven miRNA star sequences) belonging to 30 families were identified. About half (13 out of 31) of the novel miRNAs were only detected in salt-treated samples. The expression of 43 conserved and 13 novel miRNAs significantly changed in response to salinity. In addition, 53 conserved and 13 novel miRNAs were differentially expressed between the shoots and roots. Furthermore, 306 and 195 S. europaea unigenes were predicted to be targets of 41 conserved and 29 novel miRNA families, respectively. These targets encoded a wide range of proteins, and genes involved in transcription regulation constituted the largest category. Four of these genes encoding laccase, F-box family protein, SAC3/GANP family protein, and NADPH cytochrome P-450 reductase were validated using 5'-RACE. Our results indicate that specific miRNAs are tightly regulated by salinity in the shoots and/or roots of S. europaea, which may play important roles in salt tolerance of this euhalophyte. The S. europaea salt-responsive miRNAs and miRNAs that target transcription factors, nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat proteins and enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis as well as carbon and nitrogen metabolism may be applied in genetic engineering of crops with high stress tolerance, and genetic modification of biofuel crops with high biomass and regulatable

  6. Small RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Viral siRNA Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Xie, Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR) activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (T...

  7. Molecular analysis of Agrobacterium T-DNA integration in tomato reveals a role for left border sequence homology in most integration events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Colwyn M; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2007-10-01

    Studies in several plants have shown that Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA can integrate into plant chromosomal DNA by different mechanisms involving single-stranded (ss) or double-stranded (ds) forms. One mechanism requires sequence homology between plant target and ssT-DNA border sequences and another double-strand-break repair in which preexisting chromosomal DSBs "capture" dsT-DNAs. To learn more about T-DNA integration in Solanum lycopersicum we characterised 98 T-DNA/plant DNA junction sequences and show that T-DNA left border (LB) and right border transfer is much more variable than previously reported in Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus tremula. The analysis of seven plant target sequences showed that regions of homology between the T-DNA LB and plant chromosomal DNA plays an important role in T-DNA integration. One T-DNA insertion generated a target sequence duplication that resulted from nucleolytic processing of a LB/plant DNA heteroduplex that generated a DSB in plant chromosomal DNA. One broken end contained a captured T-DNA that served as a template for DNA repair synthesis. We propose that most T-DNA integrations in tomato require sequence homology between the ssT-DNA LB and plant target DNA which results in the generation of DSBs in plant chromosomal DNA.

  8. Fetal anatomy revealed with fast MR sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, D; Hatabu, H; Gaa, J; Atkinson, M W; Edelman, R R

    1996-10-01

    Although all the imaging studies in this pictorial essay were done for maternal rather than fetal indications, fetal anatomy was well visualized. However, when scans are undertaken for fetal indications, fetal motion in between scout views and imaging sequences may make specific image planes difficult to obtain. Of the different techniques described in this review, we preferred the HASTE technique and use it almost exclusively for scanning pregnant patients. The T2-weighting is ideal for delineating fetal organs. Also, the HASTE technique allows images to be obtained in 430 msec, limiting artifacts arising from maternal and fetal motion. MR imaging should play a more important role in evaluating equivocal sonographic cases as fast scanning techniques are more widely used. Obstetric MR imaging no longer will be limited by fetal motion artifacts. When complex anatomy requires definition in a complicated pregnant patient, MR imaging should be considered as a useful adjunct to sonography.

  9. Sequencing of 50 human exomes reveals adaptation to high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Xin; Liang, Yu; Huerta-Sanchez, Emilia

    2010-01-01

    Residents of the Tibetan Plateau show heritable adaptations to extreme altitude. We sequenced 50 exomes of ethnic Tibetans, encompassing coding sequences of 92% of human genes, with an average coverage of 18x per individual. Genes showing population-specific allele frequency changes, which...... difference between Tibetan and Han samples, representing the fastest allele frequency change observed at any human gene to date. This SNP's association with erythrocyte abundance supports the role of EPAS1 in adaptation to hypoxia. Thus, a population genomic survey has revealed a functionally important locus...

  10. Next generation sequencing reveals the hidden diversity of zooplankton assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope K Lindeque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Plankton net hauls (200 µm were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may

  11. Functional analysis reveals the possible role of the C-terminal sequences and PI motif in the function of lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) orthologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Kun; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Two lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) genes, Lily MADS Box Gene 8 and 9 (LMADS8/9), were characterized. LMADS9 lacked 29 C-terminal amino acids including the PI motif that was present in LMADS8. Both LMADS8/9 mRNAs were prevalent in the first and second whorl tepals during all stages of development and were expressed in the stamen only in young flower buds. LMADS8/9 could both form homodimers, but the ability of LMADS8 homodimers to bind to CArG1 was relatively stronger than that of LMADS9 homodimers. 35S:LMADS8 completely, and 35S:LMADS9 only partially, rescued the second whorl petal formation and partially converted the first whorl sepal into a petal-like structure in Arabidopsis pi-1 mutants. Ectopic expression of LMADS8-C (with deletion of the 29 amino acids of the C-terminal sequence) or LMADS8-PI (with only the PI motif deleted) only partially rescued petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS9/pi plants. In contrast, 35:LMADS9+L8C (with the addition of the 29 amino acids of the LMADS8 C-terminal sequence) or 35S:LMADS9+L8PI (with the addition of the LMADS8 PI motif) demonstrated an increased ability to rescue petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS8/pi plants. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LMADS8-M (with the MADS domain truncated) generated more severe dominant negative phenotypes than those seen in 35S:LMADS9-M flowers. These results revealed that the 29 amino acids including the PI motif in the C-terminal region of the lily PI orthologue are valuable for its function in regulating perianth organ formation.

  12. Functional analysis reveals the possible role of the C-terminal sequences and PI motif in the function of lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) orthologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Kun; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Two lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) genes, Lily MADS Box Gene 8 and 9 (LMADS8/9), were characterized. LMADS9 lacked 29 C-terminal amino acids including the PI motif that was present in LMADS8. Both LMADS8/9 mRNAs were prevalent in the first and second whorl tepals during all stages of development and were expressed in the stamen only in young flower buds. LMADS8/9 could both form homodimers, but the ability of LMADS8 homodimers to bind to CArG1 was relatively stronger than that of LMADS9 homodimers. 35S:LMADS8 completely, and 35S:LMADS9 only partially, rescued the second whorl petal formation and partially converted the first whorl sepal into a petal-like structure in Arabidopsis pi-1 mutants. Ectopic expression of LMADS8-C (with deletion of the 29 amino acids of the C-terminal sequence) or LMADS8-PI (with only the PI motif deleted) only partially rescued petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS9/pi plants. In contrast, 35:LMADS9+L8C (with the addition of the 29 amino acids of the LMADS8 C-terminal sequence) or 35S:LMADS9+L8PI (with the addition of the LMADS8 PI motif) demonstrated an increased ability to rescue petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS8/pi plants. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LMADS8-M (with the MADS domain truncated) generated more severe dominant negative phenotypes than those seen in 35S:LMADS9-M flowers. These results revealed that the 29 amino acids including the PI motif in the C-terminal region of the lily PI orthologue are valuable for its function in regulating perianth organ formation. PMID:22068145

  13. Sequence and Expression Analysis of Interferon Regulatory Factor 10 (IRF10 in Three Diverse Teleost Fish Reveals Its Role in Antiviral Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoqing Xu

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor (IRF 10 was first found in birds and is present in the genome of other tetrapods (but not humans and mice, as well as in teleost fish. The functional role of IRF10 in vertebrate immunity is relatively unknown compared to IRF1-9. The target of this research was to clone and characterize the IRF10 genes in three economically important fish species that will facilitate future evaluation of this molecule in fish innate and adaptive immunity.In the present study, a single IRF10 gene was cloned in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella and Asian swamp eel Monopterus albus, and two, named IRF10a and IRF10b, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The fish IRF10 molecules share highest identities to other vertebrate IRF10s, and have a well conserved DNA binding domain, IRF-associated domain, and an 8 exon/7 intron structure with conserved intron phase. The presence of an upstream ATG or open reading frame (ORF in the 5'-untranslated region of different fish IRF10 cDNA sequences suggests potential regulation at the translational level, and this has been verified by in vitro transcription/translation experiments of the trout IRF10a cDNA, but would still need to be validated in fish cells.Both trout IRF10 paralogues are highly expressed in thymus, blood and spleen but are relatively low in head kidney and caudal kidney. Trout IRF10b expression is significantly higher than IRF10a in integumentary tissues i.e. gills, scales, skin, intestine, adipose fin and tail fins, suggesting that IRF10b may be more important in mucosal immunity. The expression of both trout IRF10 paralogues is up-regulated by recombinant IFN-γ. The expression of the IRF10 genes is highly induced by Poly I:C in vitro and in vivo, and by viral infection, but is less responsive to peptidoglycan and bacterial infection, suggesting an important role of fish IRF10 in antiviral defense.

  14. High-resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing reveals novel binding targets and prognostic role for SOX11 in mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, P-Y; Leshchenko, V V; Fazzari, M J; Perumal, D; Gellen, T; He, T; Iqbal, J; Baumgartner-Wennerholm, S; Nygren, L; Zhang, F; Zhang, W; Suh, K S; Goy, A; Yang, D T; Chan, W-C; Kahl, B S; Verma, A K; Gascoyne, R D; Kimby, E; Sander, B; Ye, B H; Melnick, A M; Parekh, S

    2015-03-05

    Sex determining region Y-box 11 (SOX11) expression is specific for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as compared with other non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. However, the function and direct-binding targets of SOX11 in MCL are largely unknown. We used high-resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing to identify the direct target genes of SOX11 in a genome-wide, unbiased manner and elucidate its functional significance. Pathway analysis identified WNT, PKA and TGF-beta signaling pathways as significantly enriched by SOX11-target genes. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and promoter reporter assays confirmed that SOX11 directly binds to individual genes and modulates their transcription activities in these pathways in MCL. Functional studies using RNA interference demonstrate that SOX11 directly regulates WNT in MCL. We analyzed SOX11 expression in three independent well-annotated tissue microarrays from the University of Wisconsin (UW), Karolinska Institute and British Columbia Cancer Agency. Our findings suggest that high SOX11 expression is associated with improved survival in a subset of MCL patients, particularly those treated with intensive chemotherapy. Transcriptional regulation of WNT and other biological pathways affected by SOX11-target genes may help explain the impact of SOX11 expression on patient outcomes.

  15. Comparative analysis of seven viral nuclear export signals (NESs reveals the crucial role of nuclear export mediated by the third NES consensus sequence of nucleoprotein (NP in influenza A virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Chutiwitoonchai

    Full Text Available The assembly of influenza virus progeny virions requires machinery that exports viral genomic ribonucleoproteins from the cell nucleus. Currently, seven nuclear export signal (NES consensus sequences have been identified in different viral proteins, including NS1, NS2, M1, and NP. The present study examined the roles of viral NES consensus sequences and their significance in terms of viral replication and nuclear export. Mutation of the NP-NES3 consensus sequence resulted in a failure to rescue viruses using a reverse genetics approach, whereas mutation of the NS2-NES1 and NS2-NES2 sequences led to a strong reduction in viral replication kinetics compared with the wild-type sequence. While the viral replication kinetics for other NES mutant viruses were also lower than those of the wild-type, the difference was not so marked. Immunofluorescence analysis after transient expression of NP-NES3, NS2-NES1, or NS2-NES2 proteins in host cells showed that they accumulated in the cell nucleus. These results suggest that the NP-NES3 consensus sequence is mostly required for viral replication. Therefore, each of the hydrophobic (Φ residues within this NES consensus sequence (Φ1, Φ2, Φ3, or Φ4 was mutated, and its viral replication and nuclear export function were analyzed. No viruses harboring NP-NES3 Φ2 or Φ3 mutants could be rescued. Consistent with this, the NP-NES3 Φ2 and Φ3 mutants showed reduced binding affinity with CRM1 in a pull-down assay, and both accumulated in the cell nucleus. Indeed, a nuclear export assay revealed that these mutant proteins showed lower nuclear export activity than the wild-type protein. Moreover, the Φ2 and Φ3 residues (along with other Φ residues within the NP-NES3 consensus were highly conserved among different influenza A viruses, including human, avian, and swine. Taken together, these results suggest that the Φ2 and Φ3 residues within the NP-NES3 protein are important for its nuclear export function

  16. Whole exome sequencing reveals a MLL de novo mutation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 94; Issue 4. Whole exome sequencing reveals a de novo mutation associated with mild developmental delay ... Keywords. Wiedemann–Steiner syndrome; whole exome sequencing; hairy elbows; hypertrichosis cubiti; gene; KMT2A; developmental delay; children.

  17. Genetic relationships revealed by simple sequence repeat (SSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic relationships revealed by simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers among Ghanaian cassava cultivars released by different research groups. ... Genetic diversity was observed within populations (HS = 0.552) and, therefore, suggesting a low rate of inter-population gene flow among the individuals constituting the ...

  18. Small RNA sequencing and degradome analysis of developing fibers of short fiber mutants Ligon-lintles-1 (Li 1 ) and -2 (Li 2 ) revealed a role for miRNAs and their targets in cotton fiber elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoumkina, Marina; Thyssen, Gregory N; Fang, David D; Hinchliffe, Doug J; Florane, Christopher B; Jenkins, Johnie N

    2016-05-17

    The length of cotton fiber is an important agronomic trait that directly affects the quality of yarn and fabric. Understanding the molecular basis of fiber elongation would provide a means for improvement of fiber length. Ligon-lintless-1 (Li 1 ) and -2 (Li 2 ) are monogenic and dominant mutations that result in an extreme reduction in the length of lint fiber on mature seeds. In a near-isogenic state with wild type cotton these two short fiber mutants provide an effective model system to study the mechanisms of fiber elongation. Plant miRNAs regulate many aspects of growth and development. However, the mechanism underlying the miRNA-mediated regulation of fiber development is largely unknown. Small RNA libraries constructed from developing fiber cells of the short fiber mutants Li 1 and Li 2 and their near-isogenic wild type lines were sequenced. We identified 24 conservative and 147 novel miRNA families with targets that were detected through degradome sequencing. The distribution of the target genes into functional categories revealed the largest set of genes were transcription factors. Expression profiles of 20 miRNAs were examined across a fiber developmental time course in wild type and short fiber mutations. We conducted correlation analysis between miRNA transcript abundance and the length of fiber for 11 diverse Upland cotton lines. The expression patterns of 4 miRNAs revealed significant negative correlation with fiber lengths of 11 cotton lines. Our results suggested that the mutations have changed the regulation of miRNAs expression during fiber development. Further investigations of differentially expressed miRNAs in the Li 1 and Li 2 mutants will contribute to better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of cotton fiber development. Four miRNAs negatively correlated with fiber length are good candidates for further investigations of miRNA regulation of important genotype dependent fiber traits. Thus, our results will contribute to further studies

  19. Next generation sequencing in sporadic retinoblastoma patients reveals somatic mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, Sara; Marozza, Annabella; Somma, Serena; Imperatore, Valentina; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; De Francesco, Sonia; Toti, Paolo; Galimberti, Daniela; Meloni, Ilaria; Cetta, Francesco; Piu, Pietro; Di Marco, Chiara; Dosa, Laura; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Carignani, Giulia; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    In about 50% of sporadic cases of retinoblastoma, no constitutive RB1 mutations are detected by conventional methods. However, recent research suggests that, at least in some of these cases, there is somatic mosaicism with respect to RB1 normal and mutant alleles. The increased availability of next generation sequencing improves our ability to detect the exact percentage of patients with mosaicism. Using this technology, we re-tested a series of 40 patients with sporadic retinoblastoma: 10 of them had been previously classified as constitutional heterozygotes, whereas in 30 no RB1 mutations had been found in lymphocytes. In 3 of these 30 patients, we have now identified low-level mosaic variants, varying in frequency between 8 and 24%. In 7 out of the 10 cases previously classified as heterozygous from testing blood cells, we were able to test additional tissues (ocular tissues, urine and/or oral mucosa): in three of them, next generation sequencing has revealed mosaicism. Present results thus confirm that a significant fraction (6/40; 15%) of sporadic retinoblastoma cases are due to postzygotic events and that deep sequencing is an efficient method to unambiguously distinguish mosaics. Re-testing of retinoblastoma patients through next generation sequencing can thus provide new information that may have important implications with respect to genetic counseling and family care.

  20. Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Rowan, Andrew J.; Horswell, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intratumor heterogeneity may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and hinder personalized-medicine strategies that depend on results from single tumor-biopsy samples.METHODSTo examine intratumor heterogeneity, we performed exome sequencing, chromosome aberration analysis, and ploidy...... and 4EBP phosphorylation in vivo and constitutive activation of mTOR kinase activity in vitro. Mutational intratumor heterogeneity was seen for multiple tumor-suppressor genes converging on loss of function; SETD2, PTEN, and KDM5C underwent multiple distinct and spatially separated inactivating...... mutations within a single tumor, suggesting convergent phenotypic evolution. Gene-expression signatures of good and poor prognosis were detected in different regions of the same tumor. Allelic composition and ploidy profiling analysis revealed extensive intratumor heterogeneity, with 26 of 30 tumor samples...

  1. High Throughput Sequencing of Entamoeba 27nt Small RNA Population Reveals Role in Permanent Gene Silencing But No Effect on Regulating Gene Expression Changes during Stage Conversion, Oxidative, or Heat Shock Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanbang; Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M; Manna, Dipak; Hall, Neil; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    The human parasite Entamoeba histolytica has an active RNA interference (RNAi) pathway with an extensive repertoire of 27nt small RNAs that silence genes. However the role of this pathway in regulating amebic biology remains unknown. In this study, we address whether silencing via 27nt small RNAs may be a mechanism for controlling gene expression changes during conversion between the trophozoite and cyst stages of the parasite. We sequenced small RNA libraries generated from trophozoites, early cysts, mature cysts, and excysting cells and mapped them to the E. invadens genome. Our results show that, as in E. histolytica, small RNAs in E. invadens are largely ~27nt in length, have an unusual 5'-polyphosphate structure and mediate gene silencing. However, when comparing the libraries from each developmental time-point we found few changes in the composition of the small RNA populations. Furthermore, genes targeted by small RNAs were permanently silenced with no changes in transcript abundance during development. Thus, the E. invadens 27nt small RNA population does not mediate gene expression changes during development. In order to assess the generalizability of our observations, we examined whether small RNAs may be regulating gene expression changes during stress response in E. histolytica. Comparison of the 27nt small RNA populations from E. histolytica trophozoites from basal conditions, or after heat shock or exposure to oxidative stress showed few differences. Similar to data in E. invadens development, genes targeted by small RNAs were consistently silenced and did not change expression under tested stress conditions. Thus, the biological roles of the 27nt small RNA population in Entamoeba remain elusive. However, as the first characterization of the RNAi pathway in E. invadens these data serve as a useful resource for the study of Entamoeba development and open the door to the development of RNAi-based gene silencing tools in E. invadens.

  2. Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Rowan, Andrew J.; Horswell, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intratumor heterogeneity may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and hinder personalized-medicine strategies that depend on results from single tumor-biopsy samples.METHODSTo examine intratumor heterogeneity, we performed exome sequencing, chromosome aberration analysis, and ploidy ...

  3. Nascent RNA sequencing reveals distinct features in plant transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Hetzel, Jonathan; Duttke, Sascha H.; Benner, Christopher; Chory, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a fundamental and dynamic step in the regulation of gene expression, but the characteristics of plant transcription are poorly understood. We adapted the global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and 5′GRO-seq methods for plants and provide a plant version of the next-generation sequencing software HOMER (homer.ucsd.edu/homer/plants) to facilitate data analysis. Mapping nascent transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings enabled identification of known and novel transcript...

  4. Genetic diversity of taraxacum germplasm revealed by sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) and morphological markers were employed to determine the genetic diversity and relations among 11 population of taraxacum in northeast of China. Data on 34 morphological traits were collected and analyzed. A total of 795 polymorphic SRAP's bands were scored with ...

  5. Whole exome sequencing reveals a MLL de novo mutation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wiedemann–Steiner syndrome; whole exome sequencing; hairy elbows; hypertrichosis cubiti; gene; KMT2A; developmental delay; children. ... Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, WC1N 3JH, United Kingdom; Institute of Neurological Sciences, National Research Council, ...

  6. Deep sequencing reveals complex spurious transcription from transiently transfected plasmids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejepínská, Jana; Malík, Radek; Moravec, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2012), e43283 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0085 Grant - others:EMBO(XE) 0001488 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : transient plasmid transfection * deep sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  7. Registered Report: Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Denise Chroscinski, Darryl Sampey, Alex Hewitt, The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology† ### Abstract The [Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology](https://osf.io/e81xl/wiki/home/) seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of 50 papers in the field of cancer biology published between 2010 and 2012. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “Melanoma genome sequenci...

  8. Revealing complete complex KIR haplotypes phased by long-read sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, D; Vierra-Green, C; Pyo, C-W; Eng, K; Hall, R; Kuang, R; Spellman, S; Ranade, S; Geraghty, D E; Maiers, M

    2017-09-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) region of human chromosome 19 contains up to 16 genes for natural killer (NK) cell receptors that recognize human leukocyte antigen (HLA)/peptide complexes and other ligands. The KIR proteins fulfill functional roles in infections, pregnancy, autoimmune diseases and transplantation. However, their characterization remains a constant challenge. Not only are the genes highly homologous due to their recent evolution by tandem duplications, but the region is structurally dynamic due to frequent transposon-mediated recombination. A sequencing approach that precisely captures the complexity of KIR haplotypes for functional annotation is desirable. We present a unique approach to haplotype the KIR loci using single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing. Using this method, we have-for the first time-comprehensively sequenced and phased sixteen KIR haplotypes from eight individuals without imputation. The information revealed four novel haplotype structures, a novel gene-fusion allele, novel and confirmed insertion/deletion events, a homozygous individual, and overall diversity for the structural haplotypes and their alleles. These KIR haplotypes augment our existing knowledge by providing high-quality references, evolutionary informers, and source material for imputation. The haplotype sequences and gene annotations provide alternative loci for the KIR region in the human genome reference GrCh38.p8.

  9. Sequence alignment reveals possible MAPK docking motifs on HIV proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Evans

    Full Text Available Over the course of HIV infection, virus replication is facilitated by the phosphorylation of HIV proteins by human ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. MAPKs are known to phosphorylate their substrates by first binding with them at a docking site. Docking site interactions could be viable drug targets because the sequences guiding them are more specific than phosphorylation consensus sites. In this study we use multiple bioinformatics tools to discover candidate MAPK docking site motifs on HIV proteins known to be phosphorylated by MAPKs, and we discuss the possibility of targeting docking sites with drugs. Using sequence alignments of HIV proteins of different subtypes, we show that MAPK docking patterns previously described for human proteins appear on the HIV matrix, Tat, and Vif proteins in a strain dependent manner, but are absent from HIV Rev and appear on all HIV Nef strains. We revise the regular expressions of previously annotated MAPK docking patterns in order to provide a subtype independent motif that annotates all HIV proteins. One revision is based on a documented human variant of one of the substrate docking motifs, and the other reduces the number of required basic amino acids in the standard docking motifs from two to one. The proposed patterns are shown to be consistent with in silico docking between ERK1 and the HIV matrix protein. The motif usage on HIV proteins is sufficiently different from human proteins in amino acid sequence similarity to allow for HIV specific targeting using small-molecule drugs.

  10. Sequence similarity network reveals common ancestry of multidomain proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Song

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of homology identification in complex multidomain families with varied domain architectures. The challenge is to distinguish sequence pairs that share common ancestry from pairs that share an inserted domain but are otherwise unrelated. This distinction is essential for accuracy in gene annotation, function prediction, and comparative genomics. There are two major obstacles to multidomain homology identification: lack of a formal definition and lack of curated benchmarks for evaluating the performance of new methods. We offer preliminary solutions to both problems: 1 an extension of the traditional model of homology to include domain insertions; and 2 a manually curated benchmark of well-studied families in mouse and human. We further present Neighborhood Correlation, a novel method that exploits the local structure of the sequence similarity network to identify homologs with great accuracy based on the observation that gene duplication and domain shuffling leave distinct patterns in the sequence similarity network. In a rigorous, empirical comparison using our curated data, Neighborhood Correlation outperforms sequence similarity, alignment length, and domain architecture comparison. Neighborhood Correlation is well suited for automated, genome-scale analyses. It is easy to compute, does not require explicit knowledge of domain architecture, and classifies both single and multidomain homologs with high accuracy. Homolog predictions obtained with our method, as well as our manually curated benchmark and a web-based visualization tool for exploratory analysis of the network neighborhood structure, are available at http://www.neighborhoodcorrelation.org. Our work represents a departure from the prevailing view that the concept of homology cannot be applied to genes that have undergone domain shuffling. In contrast to current approaches that either focus on the homology of individual domains or consider only families with

  11. Metatranscriptomics and Amplicon Sequencing Reveal Mutualisms in Seagrass Microbiomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron C. Crump

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial plants benefit from many well-understood mutualistic relationships with root- and leaf-associated microbiomes, but relatively little is known about these relationships for seagrass and other aquatic plants. We used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and metatranscriptomics to assess potential mutualisms between microorganisms and the seagrasses Zostera marina and Zostera japonica collected from mixed beds in Netarts Bay, OR, United States. The phylogenetic composition of leaf-, root-, and water column-associated bacterial communities were strikingly different, but these communities were not significantly different between plant species. Many taxa present on leaves were related to organisms capable of consuming the common plant metabolic waste product methanol, and of producing agarases, which can limit the growth of epiphytic algae. Taxa present on roots were related to organisms capable of oxidizing toxic sulfur compounds and of fixing nitrogen. Metatranscriptomic sequencing identified expression of genes involved in all of these microbial metabolic processes at levels greater than typical water column bacterioplankton, and also identified expression of genes involved in denitrification and in bacterial synthesis of the plant growth hormone indole-3-acetate. These results provide the first evidence using metatranscriptomics that seagrass microbiomes carry out a broad range of functions that may benefit their hosts, and imply that microbe–plant mutualisms support the health and growth of aquatic plants.

  12. Transcriptome sequencing from diverse human populations reveals differentiated regulatory architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia R Martin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sequencing efforts have documented extensive genetic variation within the human genome. However, our understanding of the origins, global distribution, and functional consequences of this variation is far from complete. While regulatory variation influencing gene expression has been studied within a handful of populations, the breadth of transcriptome differences across diverse human populations has not been systematically analyzed. To better understand the spectrum of gene expression variation, alternative splicing, and the population genetics of regulatory variation in humans, we have sequenced the genomes, exomes, and transcriptomes of EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 45 individuals in the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP. The populations sampled span the geographic breadth of human migration history and include Namibian San, Mbuti Pygmies of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Algerian Mozabites, Pathan of Pakistan, Cambodians of East Asia, Yakut of Siberia, and Mayans of Mexico. We discover that approximately 25.0% of the variation in gene expression found amongst individuals can be attributed to population differences. However, we find few genes that are systematically differentially expressed among populations. Of this population-specific variation, 75.5% is due to expression rather than splicing variability, and we find few genes with strong evidence for differential splicing across populations. Allelic expression analyses indicate that previously mapped common regulatory variants identified in eight populations from the International Haplotype Map Phase 3 project have similar effects in our seven sampled HGDP populations, suggesting that the cellular effects of common variants are shared across diverse populations. Together, these results provide a resource for studies analyzing functional differences across populations by estimating the degree of shared gene expression, alternative splicing, and

  13. Nascent RNA sequencing reveals distinct features in plant transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Jonathan; Duttke, Sascha H; Benner, Christopher; Chory, Joanne

    2016-10-25

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression is a major mechanism used by plants to confer phenotypic plasticity, and yet compared with other eukaryotes or bacteria, little is known about the design principles. We generated an extensive catalog of nascent and steady-state transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), 5'GRO-seq, and RNA-seq and reanalyzed published maize data to capture characteristics of plant transcription. De novo annotation of nascent transcripts accurately mapped start sites and unstable transcripts. Examining the promoters of coding and noncoding transcripts identified comparable chromatin signatures, a conserved "TGT" core promoter motif and unreported transcription factor-binding sites. Mapping of engaged RNA polymerases showed a lack of enhancer RNAs, promoter-proximal pausing, and divergent transcription in Arabidopsis seedlings and maize, which are commonly present in yeast and humans. In contrast, Arabidopsis and maize genes accumulate RNA polymerases in proximity of the polyadenylation site, a trend that coincided with longer genes and CpG hypomethylation. Lack of promoter-proximal pausing and a higher correlation of nascent and steady-state transcripts indicate Arabidopsis may regulate transcription predominantly at the level of initiation. Our findings provide insight into plant transcription and eukaryotic gene expression as a whole.

  14. De novo assembly of genomes from long sequence reads reveals uncharted territories of Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deptula, Paulina; Laine, Pia K; Roberts, Richard J; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Vihinen, Helena; Piironen, Vieno; Paulin, Lars; Jokitalo, Eija; Savijoki, Kirsi; Auvinen, Petri; Varmanen, Pekka

    2017-10-16

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is an industrially important bacterium granted the Generally Recognized as Safe (the GRAS) status, due to its long safe use in food bioprocesses. Despite the recognized role in the food industry and in the production of vitamin B12, as well as its documented health-promoting potential, P. freudenreichii remained poorly characterised at the genomic level. At present, only three complete genome sequences are available for the species. We used the PacBio RS II sequencing platform to generate complete genomes of 20 P. freudenreichii strains and compared them in detail. Comparative analyses revealed both sequence conservation and genome organisational diversity among the strains. Assembly from long reads resulted in the discovery of additional circular elements: two putative conjugative plasmids and three active, lysogenic bacteriophages. It also permitted characterisation of the CRISPR-Cas systems. The use of the PacBio sequencing platform allowed identification of DNA modifications, which in turn allowed characterisation of the restriction-modification systems together with their recognition motifs. The observed genomic differences suggested strain variation in surface piliation and specific mucus binding, which were validated by experimental studies. The phenotypic characterisation displayed large diversity between the strains in ability to utilise a range of carbohydrates, to grow at unfavourable conditions and to form a biofilm. The complete genome sequencing allowed detailed characterisation of the industrially important species, P. freudenreichii by facilitating the discovery of previously unknown features. The results presented here lay a solid foundation for future genetic and functional genomic investigations of this actinobacterial species.

  15. Classic selective sweeps revealed by massive sequencing in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Qanbari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Human driven selection during domestication and subsequent breed formation has likely left detectable signatures within the genome of modern cattle. The elucidation of these signatures of selection is of interest from the perspective of evolutionary biology, and for identifying domestication-related genes that ultimately may help to further genetically improve this economically important animal. To this end, we employed a panel of more than 15 million autosomal SNPs identified from re-sequencing of 43 Fleckvieh animals. We mainly applied two somewhat complementary statistics, the integrated Haplotype Homozygosity Score (iHS reflecting primarily ongoing selection, and the Composite of Likelihood Ratio (CLR having the most power to detect completed selection after fixation of the advantageous allele. We find 106 candidate selection regions, many of which are harboring genes related to phenotypes relevant in domestication, such as coat coloring pattern, neurobehavioral functioning and sensory perception including KIT, MITF, MC1R, NRG4, Erbb4, TMEM132D and TAS2R16, among others. To further investigate the relationship between genes with signatures of selection and genes identified in QTL mapping studies, we use a sample of 3062 animals to perform four genome-wide association analyses using appearance traits, body size and somatic cell count. We show that regions associated with coat coloring significantly (P<0.0001 overlap with the candidate selection regions, suggesting that the selection signals we identify are associated with traits known to be affected by selection during domestication. Results also provide further evidence regarding the complexity of the genetics underlying coat coloring in cattle. This study illustrates the potential of population genetic approaches for identifying genomic regions affecting domestication-related phenotypes and further helps to identify specific regions targeted by selection during speciation, domestication and

  16. Diversity and Structure of Diazotrophic Communities in Mangrove Rhizosphere, Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanying Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Diazotrophic communities make an essential contribution to the productivity through providing new nitrogen. However, knowledge of the roles that both mangrove tree species and geochemical parameters play in shaping mangove rhizosphere diazotrophic communities is still elusive. Here, a comprehensive examination of the diversity and structure of microbial communities in the rhizospheres of three mangrove species, Rhizophora apiculata, Avicennia marina, and Ceriops tagal, was undertaken using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Our results revealed a great diversity of both the total microbial composition and the diazotrophic composition specifically in the mangrove rhizosphere. Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were both ubiquitous and dominant, comprising an average of 45.87 and 86.66% of total microbial and diazotrophic communities, respectively. Sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to the Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were the dominant diazotrophs. Community statistical analyses suggested that both mangrove tree species and additional environmental variables played important roles in shaping total microbial and potential diazotroph communities in mangrove rhizospheres. In contrast to the total microbial community investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, most of the dominant diazotrophic groups identified by nifH gene sequences were significantly different among mangrove species. The dominant diazotrophs of the family Desulfobacteraceae were positively correlated with total phosphorus, but negatively correlated with the nitrogen to phosphorus ratio. The Pseudomonadaceae were positively correlated with the concentration of available potassium, suggesting that diazotrophs potentially play an important role in biogeochemical cycles, such as those of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and potassium, in the mangrove ecosystem.

  17. Protein sequences from mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex revealed by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asara, John M; Schweitzer, Mary H; Freimark, Lisa M; Phillips, Matthew; Cantley, Lewis C

    2007-04-13

    Fossilized bones from extinct taxa harbor the potential for obtaining protein or DNA sequences that could reveal evolutionary links to extant species. We used mass spectrometry to obtain protein sequences from bones of a 160,000- to 600,000-year-old extinct mastodon (Mammut americanum) and a 68-million-year-old dinosaur (Tyrannosaurus rex). The presence of T. rex sequences indicates that their peptide bonds were remarkably stable. Mass spectrometry can thus be used to determine unique sequences from ancient organisms from peptide fragmentation patterns, a valuable tool to study the evolution and adaptation of ancient taxa from which genomic sequences are unlikely to be obtained.

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Significant Bacterial Diversity of Botrytized Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Joseph, C. M. Lucy; Allen, Greg; Benson, Andrew K.; Mills, David A.

    2012-01-01

    While wine fermentation has long been known to involve complex microbial communities, the composition and role of bacteria other than a select set of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has often been assumed either negligible or detrimental. This study served as a pilot study for using barcoded amplicon next-generation sequencing to profile bacterial community structure in wines and grape musts, comparing the taxonomic depth achieved by sequencing two different domains of prokaryotic 16S rDNA (V4 and V5). This study was designed to serve two goals: 1) to empirically determine the most taxonomically informative 16S rDNA target region for barcoded amplicon sequencing of wine, comparing V4 and V5 domains of bacterial 16S rDNA to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) of LAB communities; and 2) to explore the bacterial communities of wine fermentation to better understand the biodiversity of wine at a depth previously unattainable using other techniques. Analysis of amplicons from the V4 and V5 provided similar views of the bacterial communities of botrytized wine fermentations, revealing a broad diversity of low-abundance taxa not traditionally associated with wine, as well as atypical LAB communities initially detected by TRFLP. The V4 domain was determined as the more suitable read for wine ecology studies, as it provided greater taxonomic depth for profiling LAB communities. In addition, targeted enrichment was used to isolate two species of Alphaproteobacteria from a finished fermentation. Significant differences in diversity between inoculated and uninoculated samples suggest that Saccharomyces inoculation exerts selective pressure on bacterial diversity in these fermentations, most notably suppressing abundance of acetic acid bacteria. These results determine the bacterial diversity of botrytized wines to be far higher than previously realized, providing further insight into the fermentation dynamics of these wines, and demonstrate the utility of next

  19. Deep sequencing of the oral microbiome reveals signatures of periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available The oral microbiome, the complex ecosystem of microbes inhabiting the human mouth, harbors several thousands of bacterial types. The proliferation of pathogenic bacteria within the mouth gives rise to periodontitis, an inflammatory disease known to also constitute a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While much is known about individual species associated with pathogenesis, the system-level mechanisms underlying the transition from health to disease are still poorly understood. Through the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and of whole community DNA we provide a glimpse at the global genetic, metabolic, and ecological changes associated with periodontitis in 15 subgingival plaque samples, four from each of two periodontitis patients, and the remaining samples from three healthy individuals. We also demonstrate the power of whole-metagenome sequencing approaches in characterizing the genomes of key players in the oral microbiome, including an unculturable TM7 organism. We reveal the disease microbiome to be enriched in virulence factors, and adapted to a parasitic lifestyle that takes advantage of the disrupted host homeostasis. Furthermore, diseased samples share a common structure that was not found in completely healthy samples, suggesting that the disease state may occupy a narrow region within the space of possible configurations of the oral microbiome. Our pilot study demonstrates the power of high-throughput sequencing as a tool for understanding the role of the oral microbiome in periodontal disease. Despite a modest level of sequencing (~2 lanes Illumina 76 bp PE and high human DNA contamination (up to ~90% we were able to partially reconstruct several oral microbes and to preliminarily characterize some systems-level differences between the healthy and diseased oral microbiomes.

  20. Deep sequencing of phage-displayed peptide libraries reveals sequence motif that detects norovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M.; Huang, Wanzhi; Estes, Mary K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections are the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis and result in about 21 million new cases and $2 billion in costs per year in the United States. Existing diagnostics have limited feasibility for point-of-care applications, so there is a clear need for more reliable, rapid, and simple-to-use diagnostic tools in order to contain outbreaks and prevent inappropriate treatments. In this study, a combination of phage display technology, deep sequencing and computational analysis was used to identify 12-mer peptides with specific binding to norovirus genotype GI.1 virus-like particles (VLPs). After biopanning, phage populations were sequenced and analyzed to identify a consensus peptide motif—YRSWXP. Two 12-mer peptides containing this sequence, NV-O-R5-3 and NV-O-R5-6, were further characterized to evaluate the motif's functional ability to detect VLPs and virus. Results indicated that these peptides effectively detect GI.1 VLPs in solid-phase peptide arrays, ELISAs and dot blots. Further, their specificity for the S-domain of the major capsid protein enables them to detect a wide range of GI and GII norovirus genotypes. Both peptides were able to detect virus in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Overall, the work reported here demonstrates the application of phage display coupled with next generation sequencing and computational analysis to uncover peptides with specific binding ability to a target protein for diagnostic applications. Further, the reagents characterized here can be integrated into existing diagnostic formats to detect clinically relevant genotypes of norovirus in stool. PMID:28035012

  1. Meta-analysis of small RNA-sequencing errors reveals ubiquitous post-transcriptional RNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Tsang, Herbert H; Dai, Denny C; Liu, Yifeng; Bostan, Babak; Fahlman, Richard P

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in DNA-sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain large datasets of small RNA sequences. Here we demonstrate that not all non-perfectly matched small RNA sequences are simple technological sequencing errors, but many hold valuable biological information. Analysis of three small RNA datasets originating from Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana small RNA-sequencing projects demonstrates that many single nucleotide substitution errors overlap when aligning homologous non-identical small RNA sequences. Investigating the sites and identities of substitution errors reveal that many potentially originate as a result of post-transcriptional modifications or RNA editing. Modifications include N1-methyl modified purine nucleotides in tRNA, potential deamination or base substitutions in micro RNAs, 3' micro RNA uridine extensions and 5' micro RNA deletions. Additionally, further analysis of large sequencing datasets reveal that the combined effects of 5' deletions and 3' uridine extensions can alter the specificity by which micro RNAs associate with different Argonaute proteins. Hence, we demonstrate that not all sequencing errors in small RNA datasets are technical artifacts, but that these actually often reveal valuable biological insights to the sites of post-transcriptional RNA modifications.

  2. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Baltrus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species.

  3. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrus, David A; Nishimura, Marc T; Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R; Jones, Corbin D; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2011-07-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. © 2011 Baltrus et al.

  4. Deep sequencing reveals new aspects of progesterone receptor signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Kougioumtzi

    Full Text Available Despite the pleiotropic effects of the progesterone receptor in breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms in play remain largely unknown. To gain a global view of the PR-orchestrated networks, we used next-generation sequencing to determine the progestin-regulated transcriptome in T47D breast cancer cells. We identify a large number of PR target genes involved in critical cellular programs, such as regulation of transcription, apoptosis, cell motion and angiogenesis. Integration of the transcriptomic data with the PR-binding profiling of hormonally treated cells identifies numerous components of the small-GTPases signaling pathways as direct PR targets. Progestin-induced deregulation of the small GTPases may contribute to the PR's role in mammary tumorigenesis. Transcript expression analysis reveals significant expression changes of specific transcript variants in response to the extracellular hormonal stimulus. Using the NET1 gene as an example, we show that the PR can dictate alternative promoter usage leading to the upregulation of an isoform that may play a role in metastatic breast cancer. Future studies should aim to characterize these selectively regulated variants and evaluate their clinical utility in prognosis and targeted therapy of hormonally responsive breast tumors.

  5. Subcellular RNA sequencing reveals broad presence of cytoplasmic intron-sequence retaining transcripts in mouse and rat neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugdha Khaladkar

    Full Text Available Recent findings have revealed the complexity of the transcriptional landscape in mammalian cells. One recently described class of novel transcripts are the Cytoplasmic Intron-sequence Retaining Transcripts (CIRTs, hypothesized to confer post-transcriptional regulatory function. For instance, the neuronal CIRT KCNMA1i16 contributes to the firing properties of hippocampal neurons. Intronic sub-sequence retention within IL1-β mRNA in anucleate platelets has been implicated in activity-dependent splicing and translation. In a recent study, we showed CIRTs harbor functional SINE ID elements which are hypothesized to mediate dendritic localization in neurons. Based on these studies and others, we hypothesized that CIRTs may be present in a broad set of transcripts and comprise novel signals for post-transcriptional regulation. We carried out a transcriptome-wide survey of CIRTs by sequencing micro-dissected subcellular RNA fractions. We sequenced two batches of 150-300 individually dissected dendrites from primary cultures of hippocampal neurons in rat and three batches from mouse hippocampal neurons. After statistical processing to minimize artifacts, we found a broad prevalence of CIRTs in the neurons in both species (44-60% of the expressed transcripts. The sequence patterns, including stereotypical length, biased inclusion of specific introns, and intron-intron junctions, suggested CIRT-specific nuclear processing. Our analysis also suggested that these cytoplasmic intron-sequence retaining transcripts may serve as a primary transcript for ncRNAs. Our results show that retaining intronic sequences is not isolated to a few loci but may be a genome-wide phenomenon for embedding functional signals within certain mRNA. The results hypothesize a novel source of cis-sequences for post-transcriptional regulation. Our results hypothesize two potentially novel splicing pathways: one, within the nucleus for CIRT biogenesis; and another, within the

  6. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Predisposition in a Large Family with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing has become more widely used to reveal genetic defect in monogenic disorders. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, the leading cause of hereditary blindness worldwide, has been attributed to more than 67 disease-causing genes. Due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity, using general molecular screening alone is inadequate for identifying genetic predispositions in susceptible individuals. In order to identify underlying mutation rapidly, we utilized next-generation sequencing in a four-generation Chinese family with RP. Two affected patients and an unaffected sibling were subjected to whole exome sequencing. Through bioinformatics analysis and direct sequencing confirmation, we identified p.R135W transition in the rhodopsin gene. The mutation was subsequently confirmed to cosegregate with the disease in the family. In this study, our results suggest that whole exome sequencing is a robust method in diagnosing familial hereditary disease.

  7. Sequence analysis of mtDNA COI barcode region revealed three haplotypes within Culex pipiens assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koosha, Mona; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Vatandoost, Hassan; Azari-Hamidian, Shahyad; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Mohtarami, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    Members of the Culex (Culex) pipiens assemblage are known vectors of deadly encephalitides, periodic filariasis, and West Nile virus throughout the world. However, members of this assemblage are morphologically indistinguishable or hard to distinguish and play distinct roles in transmission of the diseases. The current study aimed to provide further evidence on utility of the two most popular nuclear (ITS2-rDNA) and mitochondrial (COI barcode region) genetic markers to identify members of the assemblage. Culex pipiens assemblage specimens from different climate zones of Iran were collected and identified to species level based on morphological characteristics. Nucleotide sequences of the loci for the specimens plus available data in the GenBank were analyzed to find species specific genetic structures useful for diagnosis purposes. ITS2 region was highly divergent within species or populations suggesting lack of consistency as a reliable molecular marker. In contrast, sequence analysis of 710 bp of COI gene revealed three fixed haplotypes named here "C, T, H" within the assemblage which can be distinguished by HaeIII and AluI enzymes. There were a correlation between the haplotypes and the world climate regions, where the haplotypes H/T and C are present mainly in temperate and tropical regions of the world, respectively. In the New world, Australia, and Japan only haplotype H is found. In conjunction between tropical and temperate regions such Iran, China, and Turkey, a mix of C/H or C/H/T are present. Although, the haplotypes are not strictly species-specific, however, Cx. quinquefasciatus was mainly of haplotype C. Due to the lack of mating barrier and questionable taxonomic situation of the complex members, the mentioned haplotypes in combination with other morphological and molecular characters might be used to address the genetic structure of the studied populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic signatures of adaptation revealed from transcriptome sequencing of Arctic and red foxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Kutschera, Verena E; Nilsson, Maria A; Janke, Axel

    2015-08-07

    The genus Vulpes (true foxes) comprises numerous species that inhabit a wide range of habitats and climatic conditions, including one species, the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) which is adapted to the arctic region. A close relative to the Arctic fox, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), occurs in subarctic to subtropical habitats. To study the genetic basis of their adaptations to different environments, transcriptome sequences from two Arctic foxes and one red fox individual were generated and analyzed for signatures of positive selection. In addition, the data allowed for a phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimate between the two fox species. The de novo assembly of reads resulted in more than 160,000 contigs/transcripts per individual. Approximately 17,000 homologous genes were identified using human and the non-redundant databases. Positive selection analyses revealed several genes involved in various metabolic and molecular processes such as energy metabolism, cardiac gene regulation, apoptosis and blood coagulation to be under positive selection in foxes. Branch site tests identified four genes to be under positive selection in the Arctic fox transcriptome, two of which are fat metabolism genes. In the red fox transcriptome eight genes are under positive selection, including molecular process genes, notably genes involved in ATP metabolism. Analysis of the three transcriptomes and five Sanger re-sequenced genes in additional individuals identified a lower genetic variability within Arctic foxes compared to red foxes, which is consistent with distribution range differences and demographic responses to past climatic fluctuations. A phylogenomic analysis estimated that the Arctic and red fox lineages diverged about three million years ago. Transcriptome data are an economic way to generate genomic resources for evolutionary studies. Despite not representing an entire genome, this transcriptome analysis identified numerous genes that are relevant to arctic

  9. Deep sequencing reveals unique small RNA repertoire that is regulated during head regeneration in Hydra magnipapillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Srikar; Nair, Aparna; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Poduval, Deepak; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Ghanekar, Yashoda

    2013-01-07

    Small non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs, piRNAs and endo-siRNAs fine-tune gene expression through post-transcriptional regulation, modulating important processes in development, differentiation, homeostasis and regeneration. Using deep sequencing, we have profiled small non-coding RNAs in Hydra magnipapillata and investigated changes in small RNA expression pattern during head regeneration. Our results reveal a unique repertoire of small RNAs in hydra. We have identified 126 miRNA loci; 123 of these miRNAs are unique to hydra. Less than 50% are conserved across two different strains of Hydra vulgaris tested in this study, indicating a highly diverse nature of hydra miRNAs in contrast to bilaterian miRNAs. We also identified siRNAs derived from precursors with perfect stem-loop structure and that arise from inverted repeats. piRNAs were the most abundant small RNAs in hydra, mapping to transposable elements, the annotated transcriptome and unique non-coding regions on the genome. piRNAs that map to transposable elements and the annotated transcriptome display a ping-pong signature. Further, we have identified several miRNAs and piRNAs whose expression is regulated during hydra head regeneration. Our study defines different classes of small RNAs in this cnidarian model system, which may play a role in orchestrating gene expression essential for hydra regeneration.

  10. Molecular indexing enables quantitative targeted RNA sequencing and reveals poor efficiencies in standard library preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Glenn K; Xu, Weihong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Fodor, Stephen P A

    2014-02-04

    We present a simple molecular indexing method for quantitative targeted RNA sequencing, in which mRNAs of interest are selectively captured from complex cDNA libraries and sequenced to determine their absolute concentrations. cDNA fragments are individually labeled so that each molecule can be tracked from the original sample through the library preparation and sequencing process. Multiple copies of cDNA fragments of identical sequence become distinct through labeling, and replicate clones created during PCR amplification steps can be identified and assigned to their distinct parent molecules. Selective capture enables efficient use of sequencing for deep sampling and for the absolute quantitation of rare or transient transcripts that would otherwise escape detection by standard sequencing methods. We have also constructed a set of synthetic barcoded RNA molecules, which can be introduced as controls into the sample preparation mix and used to monitor the efficiency of library construction. The quantitative targeted sequencing revealed extremely low efficiency in standard library preparations, which were further confirmed by using synthetic barcoded RNA molecules. This finding shows that standard library preparation methods result in the loss of rare transcripts and highlights the need for monitoring library efficiency and for developing more efficient sample preparation methods.

  11. Ontogeny of hepatic energy metabolism genes in mice as revealed by RNA-sequencing.

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    Helen J Renaud

    Full Text Available The liver plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by coordinating synthesis, storage, breakdown, and redistribution of nutrients. Hepatic energy metabolism is dynamically regulated throughout different life stages due to different demands for energy during growth and development. However, changes in gene expression patterns throughout ontogeny for factors important in hepatic energy metabolism are not well understood. We performed detailed transcript analysis of energy metabolism genes during various stages of liver development in mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at twelve ages, including perinatal and postnatal time points (n = 3/age. The mRNA was quantified by RNA-Sequencing, with transcript abundance estimated by Cufflinks. One thousand sixty energy metabolism genes were examined; 794 were above detection, of which 627 were significantly changed during at least one developmental age compared to adult liver. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three major clusters dependent on age: GD17.5-Day 5 (perinatal-enriched, Day 10-Day 20 (pre-weaning-enriched, and Day 25-Day 60 (adolescence/adulthood-enriched. Clustering analysis of cumulative mRNA expression values for individual pathways of energy metabolism revealed three patterns of enrichment: glycolysis, ketogenesis, and glycogenesis were all perinatally-enriched; glycogenolysis was the only pathway enriched during pre-weaning ages; whereas lipid droplet metabolism, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism were all enriched in adolescence/adulthood. This study reveals novel findings such as the divergent expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes Acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, indicating a switch from mitochondrial to peroxisomal β-oxidation after weaning; as well as the dynamic ontogeny of genes implicated in obesity such as Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 and Elongation of very long chain fatty

  12. Whole-genome sequencing reveals a potential causal mutation for dwarfism in the Miniature Shetland pony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Julia; Gast, Alana Christina; Schrimpf, Rahel; Rau, Janina; Eikelberg, Deborah; Beineke, Andreas; Hellige, Maren; Distl, Ottmar

    2017-04-01

    The Miniature Shetland pony represents a horse breed with an extremely small body size. Clinical examination of a dwarf Miniature Shetland pony revealed a lowered size at the withers, malformed skull and brachygnathia superior. Computed tomography (CT) showed a shortened maxilla and a cleft of the hard and soft palate which protruded into the nasal passage leading to breathing difficulties. Pathological examination confirmed these findings but did not reveal histopathological signs of premature ossification in limbs or cranial sutures. Whole-genome sequencing of this dwarf Miniature Shetland pony and comparative sequence analysis using 26 reference equids from NCBI Sequence Read Archive revealed three probably damaging missense variants which could be exclusively found in the affected foal. Validation of these three missense mutations in 159 control horses from different horse breeds and five donkeys revealed only the aggrecan (ACAN)-associated g.94370258G>C variant as homozygous wild-type in all control samples. The dwarf Miniature Shetland pony had the homozygous mutant genotype C/C of the ACAN:g.94370258G>C variant and the normal parents were heterozygous G/C. An unaffected full sib and 3/5 unaffected half-sibs were heterozygous G/C for the ACAN:g.94370258G>C variant. In summary, we could demonstrate a dwarf phenotype in a miniature pony breed perfectly associated with a missense mutation within the ACAN gene.

  13. Mitochondrial genome sequencing reveals potential origins of the scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei infesting two iconic Australian marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Tamieka A; Shao, Renfu; Fountain-Jones, Nicholas M; Charleston, Michael; Martin, Alynn; Whiteley, Pam; Holme, Roz; Carver, Scott; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2017-11-28

    Debilitating skin infestations caused by the mite, Sarcoptes scabiei, have a profound impact on human and animal health globally. In Australia, this impact is evident across different segments of Australian society, with a growing recognition that it can contribute to rapid declines of native Australian marsupials. Cross-host transmission has been suggested to play a significant role in the epidemiology and origin of mite infestations in different species but a chronic lack of genetic resources has made further inferences difficult. To investigate the origins and molecular epidemiology of S. scabiei in Australian wildlife, we sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of S. scabiei from diseased wombats (Vombatus ursinus) and koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) spanning New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, and compared them with the recently sequenced mitochondrial genome sequences of S. scabiei from humans. We found unique S. scabiei haplotypes among individual wombat and koala hosts with high sequence similarity (99.1% - 100%). Phylogenetic analysis of near full-length mitochondrial genomes revealed three clades of S. scabiei (one human and two marsupial), with no apparent geographic or host species pattern, suggestive of multiple introductions. The availability of additional mitochondrial gene sequences also enabled a re-evaluation of a range of putative molecular markers of S. scabiei, revealing that cox1 is the most informative gene for molecular epidemiological investigations. Utilising this gene target, we provide additional evidence to support cross-host transmission between different animal hosts. Our results suggest a history of parasite invasion through colonisation of Australia from hosts across the globe and the potential for cross-host transmission being a common feature of the epidemiology of this neglected pathogen. If this is the case, comparable patterns may exist elsewhere in the 'New World'. This work provides a basis for expanded molecular studies into

  14. Multi-region and single-cell sequencing reveal variable genomic heterogeneity in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingshan; Liu, Yang; Di, Jiabo; Su, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Beihai; Wang, Zaozao; Zhuang, Meng; Bai, Fan; Su, Xiangqian

    2017-11-23

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with complex molecular subtypes. While colon cancer has been widely investigated, studies on rectal cancer are very limited. Here, we performed multi-region whole-exome sequencing and single-cell whole-genome sequencing to examine the genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of rectal tumors. We sequenced nine tumor regions and 88 single cells from two rectal cancer patients with tumors of the same molecular classification and characterized their mutation profiles and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) at the multi-region and the single-cell levels. A variable extent of genomic heterogeneity was observed between the two patients, and the degree of ITH increased when analyzed on the single-cell level. We found that major SCNAs were early events in cancer development and inherited steadily. Single-cell sequencing revealed mutations and SCNAs which were hidden in bulk sequencing. In summary, we studied the ITH of rectal cancer at regional and single-cell resolution and demonstrated that variable heterogeneity existed in two patients. The mutational scenarios and SCNA profiles of two patients with treatment naïve from the same molecular subtype are quite different. Our results suggest each tumor possesses its own architecture, which may result in different diagnosis, prognosis, and drug responses. Remarkable ITH exists in the two patients we have studied, providing a preliminary impression of ITH in rectal cancer.

  15. Reanalysis of RNA-sequencing data reveals several additional fusion genes with multiple isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Edgren, Henrik; Nicorici, Daniel; Murumägi, Astrid; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2012-01-01

    RNA-sequencing and tailored bioinformatic methodologies have paved the way for identification of expressed fusion genes from the chaotic genomes of solid tumors. We have recently successfully exploited RNA-sequencing for the discovery of 24 novel fusion genes in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate the importance of continuous optimization of the bioinformatic methodology for this purpose, and report the discovery and experimental validation of 13 additional fusion genes from the same samples. Integration of copy number profiling with the RNA-sequencing results revealed that the majority of the gene fusions were promoter-donating events that occurred at copy number transition points or involved high-level DNA-amplifications. Sequencing of genomic fusion break points confirmed that DNA-level rearrangements underlie selected fusion transcripts. Furthermore, a significant portion (>60%) of the fusion genes were alternatively spliced. This illustrates the importance of reanalyzing sequencing data as gene definitions change and bioinformatic methods improve, and highlights the previously unforeseen isoform diversity among fusion transcripts.

  16. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

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    Gustafsson Lars

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by genotyping. Results Here we used 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize MHC class IIB exon 2 variation in the collared flycatcher, an important organism in evolutionary and immuno-ecological studies. On the basis of over 152,000 sequencing reads we identified 194 putative alleles in 237 individuals. We found an extreme complexity of the MHC class IIB in the collared flycatchers, with our estimates pointing to the presence of at least nine expressed loci and a large, though difficult to estimate precisely, number of pseudogene loci. Many similar alleles occurred in the pseudogenes indicating either a series of recent duplications or extensive concerted evolution. The expressed alleles showed unambiguous signals of historical selection and the occurrence of apparent interlocus exchange of alleles. Placing the collared flycatcher's MHC sequences in the context of passerine diversity revealed transspecific MHC class II evolution within the Muscicapidae family. Conclusions 454 amplicon sequencing is an effective tool for advancing our understanding of the MHC class II structure and evolutionary patterns in Passeriformes. We found a highly dynamic pattern of evolution of MHC class IIB genes with strong signals of selection and pronounced sequence divergence in expressed genes, in contrast to the apparent sequence homogenization in pseudogenes. We show that next generation sequencing offers a universal, affordable method for the characterization and, in perspective

  17. Transmission of single HIV-1 genomes and dynamics of early immune escape revealed by ultra-deep sequencing.

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    Will Fischer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We used ultra-deep sequencing to obtain tens of thousands of HIV-1 sequences from regions targeted by CD8+ T lymphocytes from longitudinal samples from three acutely infected subjects, and modeled viral evolution during the critical first weeks of infection. Previous studies suggested that a single virus established productive infection, but these conclusions were tempered because of limited sampling; now, we have greatly increased our confidence in this observation through modeling the observed earliest sample diversity based on vastly more extensive sampling. Conventional sequencing of HIV-1 from acute/early infection has shown different patterns of escape at different epitopes; we investigated the earliest escapes in exquisite detail. Over 3-6 weeks, ultradeep sequencing revealed that the virus explored an extraordinary array of potential escape routes in the process of evading the earliest CD8 T-lymphocyte responses--using 454 sequencing, we identified over 50 variant forms of each targeted epitope during early immune escape, while only 2-7 variants were detected in the same samples via conventional sequencing. In contrast to the diversity seen within epitopes, non-epitope regions, including the Envelope V3 region, which was sequenced as a control in each subject, displayed very low levels of variation. In early infection, in the regions sequenced, the consensus forms did not have a fitness advantage large enough to trigger reversion to consensus amino acids in the absence of immune pressure. In one subject, a genetic bottleneck was observed, with extensive diversity at the second time point narrowing to two dominant escape forms by the third time point, all within two months of infection. Traces of immune escape were observed in the earliest samples, suggesting that immune pressure is present and effective earlier than previously reported; quantifying the loss rate of the founder virus suggests a direct role for CD8 T-lymphocyte responses

  18. Targeted Genome Sequencing Reveals Varicella-Zoster Virus Open Reading Frame 12 Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Randall J; Lee, Katherine S; Beach, Addilynn; Sanford, Bridget; Baird, Nicholas L; Como, Christina; Graybill, Chiharu; Jones, Dallas; Tekeste, Eden; Ballard, Mitchell; Chen, Xiaomi; Yalacki, David; Frietze, Seth; Jones, Kenneth; Lenac Rovis, Tihana; Jonjić, Stipan; Haas, Jürgen; Gilden, Don

    2017-10-15

    The neurotropic herpesvirus varicella-zoster virus (VZV) establishes a lifelong latent infection in humans following primary infection. The low abundance of VZV nucleic acids in human neurons has hindered an understanding of the mechanisms that regulate viral gene transcription during latency. To overcome this critical barrier, we optimized a targeted capture protocol to enrich VZV DNA and cDNA prior to whole-genome/transcriptome sequence analysis. Since the VZV genome is remarkably stable, it was surprising to detect that VZV32, a VZV laboratory strain with no discernible growth defect in tissue culture, contained a 2,158-bp deletion in open reading frame (ORF) 12. Consequently, ORF 12 and 13 protein expression was abolished and Akt phosphorylation was inhibited. The discovery of the ORF 12 deletion, revealed through targeted genome sequencing analysis, points to the need to authenticate the VZV genome when the virus is propagated in tissue culture. IMPORTANCE Viruses isolated from clinical samples often undergo genetic modifications when cultured in the laboratory. Historically, VZV is among the most genetically stable herpesviruses, a notion supported by more than 60 complete genome sequences from multiple isolates and following multiple in vitro passages. However, application of enrichment protocols to targeted genome sequencing revealed the unexpected deletion of a significant portion of VZV ORF 12 following propagation in cultured human fibroblast cells. While the enrichment protocol did not introduce bias in either the virus genome or transcriptome, the findings indicate the need for authentication of VZV by sequencing when the virus is propagated in tissue culture. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Distinct Genetic Lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) Revealed by COI and 16S DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I. Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected ‘p’ distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The ‘p’ values are distinctly different from intraspecific ‘p’ distance (0–0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus – B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies. PMID:22615962

  20. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

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    Phaik-Eem Lim

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%. Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies.

  1. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal deep divergences among Anopheles punctulatus sibling species in Papua New Guinea

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    Logue Kyle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Anopheles punctulatus group (AP group are the primary vectors of human malaria in Papua New Guinea. The AP group includes 13 sibling species, most of them morphologically indistinguishable. Understanding why only certain species are able to transmit malaria requires a better comprehension of their evolutionary history. In particular, understanding relationships and divergence times among Anopheles species may enable assessing how malaria-related traits (e.g. blood feeding behaviours, vector competence have evolved. Methods DNA sequences of 14 mitochondrial (mt genomes from five AP sibling species and two species of the Anopheles dirus complex of Southeast Asia were sequenced. DNA sequences from all concatenated protein coding genes (10,770 bp were then analysed using a Bayesian approach to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and date the divergence of the AP sibling species. Results Phylogenetic reconstruction using the concatenated DNA sequence of all mitochondrial protein coding genes indicates that the ancestors of the AP group arrived in Papua New Guinea 25 to 54 million years ago and rapidly diverged to form the current sibling species. Conclusion Through evaluation of newly described mt genome sequences, this study has revealed a divergence among members of the AP group in Papua New Guinea that would significantly predate the arrival of humans in this region, 50 thousand years ago. The divergence observed among the mtDNA sequences studied here may have resulted from reproductive isolation during historical changes in sea-level through glacial minima and maxima. This leads to a hypothesis that the AP sibling species have evolved independently for potentially thousands of generations. This suggests that the evolution of many phenotypes, such as insecticide resistance will arise independently in each of the AP sibling species studied here.

  2. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M

    2013-01-01

    The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD). A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs) 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1); P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2); and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3). Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria.

  3. Genetic Diversity of Northern Wheatgrass (Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus as Revealed by Genotyping-by-Sequencing

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    Pingchuan Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies make genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS more feasible for the molecular characterization of plant germplasm with complex and unsequenced genomes. This study represents the first preliminary effort using GBS to discover genome-wide genetic variants of northern wheatgrass (Elymus lanceolatus ssp. lanceolatus (Scribn. and J. G. Sm. Gould plants and to assess the genetic diversity present in four cultivated and six wild accessions. The effort generated the first novel set of genomic resources and 5659 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers for this tetraploid grass. The diversity analysis revealed 8.8% of SNP variation residing among the 10 accessions and 1.9% SNP variation present between cultivated and wild accessions. The Bayesian analysis identified three major clusters of the assayed samples, and the principal coordinates analysis revealed the genetic distinctness of the two accessions collected from Nevada and Wyoming. The flow cytometry analysis confirmed the tetraploid nature of some of the assayed samples and estimated the average genome size to be 9.3–9.4 Gb for this species. These findings are useful for the genetic improvement of this native grass species for forage production and rangeland reclamation. The findings are also encouraging for the broad application of genotyping-by-sequencing in the characterization of genome-wide genetic variability in non-model polyploid plants.

  4. A specific indel marker for the Philippines Schistosoma japonicum revealed by analysis of mitochondrial genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Chen, Fen; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Blair, David; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, near-complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences for Schistosoma japonicum from different regions in the Philippines and Japan were amplified and sequenced. Comparisons among S. japonicum from the Philippines, Japan, and China revealed a geographically based length difference in mt genomes, but the mt genomic organization and gene arrangement were the same. Sequence differences among samples from the Philippines and all samples from the three endemic areas were 0.57-2.12 and 0.76-3.85 %, respectively. The most variable part of the mt genome was the non-coding region. In the coding portion of the genome, protein-coding genes varied more than rRNA genes and tRNAs. The near-complete mt genome sequences for Philippine specimens were identical in length (14,091 bp) which was 4 bp longer than those of S. japonicum samples from Japan and China. This indel provides a unique genetic marker for S. japonicum samples from the Philippines. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated amino acids of 12 protein-coding genes showed that samples of S. japonicum clustered according to their geographical origins. The identified mitochondrial indel marker will be useful for tracing the source of S. japonicum infection in humans and animals in Southeast Asia.

  5. Genome Microscale Heterogeneity among Wild Potatoes Revealed by Diversity Arrays Technology Marker Sequences

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    Alessandra Traini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuber-bearing potato species possess several genes that can be exploited to improve the genetic background of the cultivated potato Solanum tuberosum. Among them, S. bulbocastanum and S. commersonii are well known for their strong resistance to environmental stresses. However, scant information is available for these species in terms of genome organization, gene function, and regulatory networks. Consequently, genomic tools to assist breeding are meager, and efficient exploitation of these species has been limited so far. In this paper, we employed the reference genome sequences from cultivated potato and tomato and a collection of sequences of 1,423 potato Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT markers that show polymorphic representation across the genomes of S. bulbocastanum and/or S. commersonii genotypes. Our results highlighted microscale genome sequence heterogeneity that may play a significant role in functional and structural divergence between related species. Our analytical approach provides knowledge of genome structural and sequence variability that could not be detected by transcriptome and proteome approaches.

  6. Metabolic diversity and ecological niches of Achromatium populations revealed with single-cell genomic sequencing

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    Muammar eMansor

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Large, sulfur-cycling, calcite-precipitating bacteria in the genus Achromatium represent a significant proportion of bacterial communities near sediment-water interfaces throughout the world. Our understanding of their potentially crucial roles in calcium, carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and iron cycling is limited because they have not been cultured or sequenced using environmental genomics approaches to date. We utilized single-cell genomic sequencing to obtain one incomplete and two nearly complete draft genomes for Achromatium collected at Warm Mineral Springs, FL. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the three cells represent distinct and relatively distant Achromatium populations (91-92% identity. The draft genomes encode key genes involved in sulfur and hydrogen oxidation; oxygen, nitrogen and polysulfide respiration; carbon and nitrogen fixation; organic carbon assimilation and storage; chemotaxis; twitching motility; antibiotic resistance; and membrane transport. Known genes for iron and manganese energy metabolism were not detected. The presence of pyrophosphatase and vacuolar (V-type ATPases, which are generally rare in bacterial genomes, suggests a role for these enzymes in calcium transport, proton pumping, and/or energy generation in the membranes of calcite-containing inclusions.

  7. Natural Selection and Functional Potentials of Human Noncoding Elements Revealed by Analysis of Next Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pankaj; Lu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shuhua

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding DNA sequences (NCS) have attracted much attention recently due to their functional potentials. Here we attempted to reveal the functional roles of noncoding sequences from the point of view of natural selection that typically indicates the functional potentials of certain genomic elements. We analyzed nearly 37 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Phase I data of the 1000 Genomes Project. We estimated a series of key parameters of population genetics and molecular evolution to characterize sequence variations of the noncoding genome within and between populations, and identified the natural selection footprints in NCS in worldwide human populations. Our results showed that purifying selection is prevalent and there is substantial constraint of variations in NCS, while positive selectionis more likely to be specific to some particular genomic regions and regional populations. Intriguingly, we observed larger fraction of non-conserved NCS variants with lower derived allele frequency in the genome, indicating possible functional gain of non-conserved NCS. Notably, NCS elements are enriched for potentially functional markers such as eQTLs, TF motif, and DNase I footprints in the genome. More interestingly, some NCS variants associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Type 1 diabetes, and immune-related bowel disorder (IBD) showed signatures of positive selection, although the majority of NCS variants, reported as risk alleles by genome-wide association studies, showed signatures of negative selection. Our analyses provided compelling evidence of natural selection forces on noncoding sequences in the human genome and advanced our understanding of their functional potentials that play important roles in disease etiology and human evolution.

  8. Natural Selection and Functional Potentials of Human Noncoding Elements Revealed by Analysis of Next Generation Sequencing Data.

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    Pankaj Jha

    Full Text Available Noncoding DNA sequences (NCS have attracted much attention recently due to their functional potentials. Here we attempted to reveal the functional roles of noncoding sequences from the point of view of natural selection that typically indicates the functional potentials of certain genomic elements. We analyzed nearly 37 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of Phase I data of the 1000 Genomes Project. We estimated a series of key parameters of population genetics and molecular evolution to characterize sequence variations of the noncoding genome within and between populations, and identified the natural selection footprints in NCS in worldwide human populations. Our results showed that purifying selection is prevalent and there is substantial constraint of variations in NCS, while positive selectionis more likely to be specific to some particular genomic regions and regional populations. Intriguingly, we observed larger fraction of non-conserved NCS variants with lower derived allele frequency in the genome, indicating possible functional gain of non-conserved NCS. Notably, NCS elements are enriched for potentially functional markers such as eQTLs, TF motif, and DNase I footprints in the genome. More interestingly, some NCS variants associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Type 1 diabetes, and immune-related bowel disorder (IBD showed signatures of positive selection, although the majority of NCS variants, reported as risk alleles by genome-wide association studies, showed signatures of negative selection. Our analyses provided compelling evidence of natural selection forces on noncoding sequences in the human genome and advanced our understanding of their functional potentials that play important roles in disease etiology and human evolution.

  9. Single-cell sequencing reveals karyotype heterogeneity in murine and human malignancies.

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    Bakker, Bjorn; Taudt, Aaron; Belderbos, Mirjam E; Porubsky, David; Spierings, Diana C J; de Jong, Tristan V; Halsema, Nancy; Kazemier, Hinke G; Hoekstra-Wakker, Karina; Bradley, Allan; de Bont, Eveline S J M; van den Berg, Anke; Guryev, Victor; Lansdorp, Peter M; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Foijer, Floris

    2016-05-31

    Chromosome instability leads to aneuploidy, a state in which cells have abnormal numbers of chromosomes, and is found in two out of three cancers. In a chromosomal instable p53 deficient mouse model with accelerated lymphomagenesis, we previously observed whole chromosome copy number changes affecting all lymphoma cells. This suggests that chromosome instability is somehow suppressed in the aneuploid lymphomas or that selection for frequently lost/gained chromosomes out-competes the CIN-imposed mis-segregation. To distinguish between these explanations and to examine karyotype dynamics in chromosome instable lymphoma, we use a newly developed single-cell whole genome sequencing (scWGS) platform that provides a complete and unbiased overview of copy number variations (CNV) in individual cells. To analyse these scWGS data, we develop AneuFinder, which allows annotation of copy number changes in a fully automated fashion and quantification of CNV heterogeneity between cells. Single-cell sequencing and AneuFinder analysis reveals high levels of copy number heterogeneity in chromosome instability-driven murine T-cell lymphoma samples, indicating ongoing chromosome instability. Application of this technology to human B cell leukaemias reveals different levels of karyotype heterogeneity in these cancers. Our data show that even though aneuploid tumours select for particular and recurring chromosome combinations, single-cell analysis using AneuFinder reveals copy number heterogeneity. This suggests ongoing chromosome instability that other platforms fail to detect. As chromosome instability might drive tumour evolution, karyotype analysis using single-cell sequencing technology could become an essential tool for cancer treatment stratification.

  10. Genetic variation of human papillomavirus type 16 in individual clinical specimens revealed by deep sequencing.

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    Iwao Kukimoto

    Full Text Available Viral genetic diversity within infected cells or tissues, called viral quasispecies, has been mostly studied for RNA viruses, but has also been described among DNA viruses, including human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 present in cervical precancerous lesions. However, the extent of HPV genetic variation in cervical specimens, and its involvement in HPV-induced carcinogenesis, remains unclear. Here, we employ deep sequencing to comprehensively analyze genetic variation in the HPV16 genome isolated from individual clinical specimens. Through overlapping full-circle PCR, approximately 8-kb DNA fragments covering the whole HPV16 genome were amplified from HPV16-positive cervical exfoliated cells collected from patients with either low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL or invasive cervical cancer (ICC. Deep sequencing of the amplified HPV16 DNA enabled de novo assembly of the full-length HPV16 genome sequence for each of 7 specimens (5 LSIL and 2 ICC samples. Subsequent alignment of read sequences to the assembled HPV16 sequence revealed that 2 LSILs and 1 ICC contained nucleotide variations within E6, E1 and the non-coding region between E5 and L2 with mutation frequencies of 0.60% to 5.42%. In transient replication assays, a novel E1 mutant found in ICC, E1 Q381E, showed reduced ability to support HPV16 origin-dependent replication. In addition, partially deleted E2 genes were detected in 1 LSIL sample in a mixed state with the intact E2 gene. Thus, the methods used in this study provide a fundamental framework for investigating the influence of HPV somatic genetic variation on cervical carcinogenesis.

  11. Genetic variation in the Staphylococcus aureus 8325 strain lineage revealed by whole-genome sequencing.

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    Kristoffer T Bæk

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus strains of the 8325 lineage, especially 8325-4 and derivatives lacking prophage, have been used extensively for decades of research. We report herein the results of our deep sequence analysis of strain 8325-4. Assignment of sequence variants compared with the reference strain 8325 (NRS77/PS47 required correction of errors in the 8325 reference genome, and reassessment of variation previously attributed to chemical mutagenesis of the restriction-defective RN4220. Using an extensive strain pedigree analysis, we discovered that 8325-4 contains 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP arising prior to the construction of RN4220. We identified 5 indels in 8325-4 compared with 8325. Three indels correspond to expected Φ11, 12, 13 excisions, one indel is explained by a sequence assembly artifact, and the final indel (Δ63bp in the spa-sarS intergenic region is common to only a sub-lineage of 8325-4 strains including SH1000. This deletion was found to significantly decrease (75% steady state sarS but not spa transcript levels in post-exponential phase. The sub-lineage 8325-4 was also found to harbor 4 additional SNPs. We also found large sequence variation between 8325, 8325-4 and RN4220 in a cluster of repetitive hypothetical proteins (SA0282 homologs near the Ess secretion cluster. The overall 8325-4 SNP set results in 17 alterations within coding sequences. Remarkably, we discovered that all tested strains of the 8325-4 lineage lack phenol soluble modulin α3 (PSMα3, a virulence determinant implicated in neutrophil chemotaxis, biofilm architecture and surface spreading. Collectively, our results clarify and define the 8325-4 pedigree and reveal clear evidence that mutations existing throughout all branches of this lineage, including the widely used RN6390 and SH1000 strains, could conceivably impact virulence regulation.

  12. cDNA sequences reveal considerable gene prediction inaccuracy in the Plasmodium falciparum genome

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    Valenzuela Jesus G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of the Plasmodium falciparum genome represents a milestone in malaria research. The genome sequence allows for the development of genome-wide approaches such as microarray and proteomics that will greatly facilitate our understanding of the parasite biology and accelerate new drug and vaccine development. Designing and application of these genome-wide assays, however, requires accurate information on gene prediction and genome annotation. Unfortunately, the genes in the parasite genome databases were mostly identified using computer software that could make some erroneous predictions. Results We aimed to obtain cDNA sequences to examine the accuracy of gene prediction in silico. We constructed cDNA libraries from mixed blood stages of P. falciparum parasite using the SMART cDNA library construction technique and generated 17332 high-quality expressed sequence tags (EST, including 2198 from primer-walking experiments. Assembly of our sequence tags produced 2548 contigs and 2671 singletons versus 5220 contigs and 5910 singletons when our EST were assembled with EST in public databases. Comparison of all the assembled EST/contigs with predicted CDS and genomic sequences in the PlasmoDB database identified 356 genes with predicted coding sequences fully covered by EST, including 85 genes (23.6% with introns incorrectly predicted. Careful automatic software and manual alignments found an additional 308 genes that have introns different from those predicted, with 152 new introns discovered and 182 introns with sizes or locations different from those predicted. Alternative spliced and antisense transcripts were also detected. Matching cDNA to predicted genes also revealed silent chromosomal regions, mostly at subtelomere regions. Conclusion Our data indicated that approximately 24% of the genes in the current databases were predicted incorrectly, although some of these inaccuracies could represent alternatively

  13. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

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    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R. (Tumaini); (NIH); (Duke); (Kilimanjaro Repro.); (IAVI)

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  14. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences in childhood encephalomyopathies reveals new disease-associated variants.

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    Aijaz A Wani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of clinical disorders generally caused due to mutations in either mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA or nuclear genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. We analyzed the mtDNA sequences from a group of 23 pediatric patients with clinical and morphological features of mitochondrial encephalopathies and tried to establish a relationship of identified variants with the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Complete mitochondrial genomes were amplified by PCR and sequenced by automated DNA sequencing. Sequencing data was analyzed by SeqScape software and also confirmed by BLASTn program. Nucleotide sequences were compared with the revised Cambridge reference sequence (CRS and sequences present in mitochondrial databases. The data obtained shows that a number of known and novel mtDNA variants were associated with the disease. Most of the non-synonymous variants were heteroplasmic (A4136G, A9194G and T11916A suggesting their possibility of being pathogenic in nature. Some of the missense variants although homoplasmic were showing changes in highly conserved amino acids (T3394C, T3866C, and G9804A and were previously identified with diseased conditions. Similarly, two other variants found in tRNA genes (G5783A and C8309T could alter the secondary structure of Cys-tRNA and Lys-tRNA. Most of the variants occurred in single cases; however, a few occurred in more than one case (e.g. G5783A and A10149T. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The mtDNA variants identified in this study could be the possible cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies with childhood onset in the patient group. Our study further strengthens the pathogenic score of known variants previously reported as provisionally pathogenic in mitochondrial diseases. The novel variants found in the present study can be potential candidates for further investigations to establish the relationship between their incidence and role

  15. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing reveals freshwater beach sands as reservoir of bacterial pathogens.

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    Mohiuddin, Mahi M; Salama, Yasser; Schellhorn, Herb E; Golding, G Brian

    2017-05-15

    Recreational waters and adjacent beach sands harbor complex microbial communities which may contain human pathogens that cannot be detected by conventional methods. Here, we investigate the diversity of bacterial populations inhabiting four freshwater beaches of the Great Lakes region using shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach. Our analysis suggests that average taxonomic richness and alpha diversity are significantly higher (P beach sands compared to the corresponding water environments. Compared to the water environments, beach sands harbored taxa from a more diverse range of phyla, including a higher proportion of sequences from unclassified phyla. Unique phyla were also identified in sand which included species from Aquificae, Candidatus Microgenomates, Latescibacteria, and Candidatus Aminicenantes. Sequences originating from pathogens were detected in both sand and water, with some pathogens enriched in both environments. Both lakes exhibited similar community composition suggesting that geographic location did not appear to have any major impact on bacterial diversity. These findings reveal the diversity of bacterial communities of freshwater beaches and highlight the importance of monitoring pathogens in recreational beaches, especially in the sand environment of these beaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Single nucleus genome sequencing reveals high similarity among nuclei of an endomycorrhizal fungus.

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    Kui Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclei of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi have been described as highly diverse due to their asexual nature and absence of a single cell stage with only one nucleus. This has raised fundamental questions concerning speciation, selection and transmission of the genetic make-up to next generations. Although this concept has become textbook knowledge, it is only based on studying a few loci, including 45S rDNA. To provide a more comprehensive insight into the genetic makeup of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi, we applied de novo genome sequencing of individual nuclei of Rhizophagus irregularis. This revealed a surprisingly low level of polymorphism between nuclei. In contrast, within a nucleus, the 45S rDNA repeat unit turned out to be highly diverged. This finding demystifies a long-lasting hypothesis on the complex genetic makeup of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi. Subsequent genome assembly resulted in the first draft reference genome sequence of an arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungus. Its length is 141 Mbps, representing over 27,000 protein-coding gene models. We used the genomic sequence to reinvestigate the phylogenetic relationships of Rhizophagus irregularis with other fungal phyla. This unambiguously demonstrated that Glomeromycota are more closely related to Mucoromycotina than to its postulated sister Dikarya.

  17. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor

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    Karen Massel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and mobilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum.

  18. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition.

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    Moses M Muraya

    Full Text Available A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS, assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents. Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful

  19. Transcriptome sequencing revealed significant alteration of cortical promoter usage and splicing in schizophrenia.

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    Jing Qin Wu

    Full Text Available While hybridization based analysis of the cortical transcriptome has provided important insight into the neuropathology of schizophrenia, it represents a restricted view of disease-associated gene activity based on predetermined probes. By contrast, sequencing technology can provide un-biased analysis of transcription at nucleotide resolution. Here we use this approach to investigate schizophrenia-associated cortical gene expression.The data was generated from 76 bp reads of RNA-Seq, aligned to the reference genome and assembled into transcripts for quantification of exons, splice variants and alternative promoters in postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG/BA22 from 9 male subjects with schizophrenia and 9 matched non-psychiatric controls. Differentially expressed genes were then subjected to further sequence and functional group analysis. The output, amounting to more than 38 Gb of sequence, revealed significant alteration of gene expression including many previously shown to be associated with schizophrenia. Gene ontology enrichment analysis followed by functional map construction identified three functional clusters highly relevant to schizophrenia including neurotransmission related functions, synaptic vesicle trafficking, and neural development. Significantly, more than 2000 genes displayed schizophrenia-associated alternative promoter usage and more than 1000 genes showed differential splicing (FDR<0.05. Both types of transcriptional isoforms were exemplified by reads aligned to the neurodevelopmentally significant doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1 gene.This study provided the first deep and un-biased analysis of schizophrenia-associated transcriptional diversity within the STG, and revealed variants with important implications for the complex pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  20. Absence of congruency sequence effects reveals neurocognitive inflexibility in Parkinson's disease.

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    Rustamov, Nabi; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Timm, Lydia; Agrawal, Deepashri; Dressler, Dirk; Schrader, Christoph; Tacik, Pawel; Wegner, Florian; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias; Kopp, Bruno

    2013-12-01

    The effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) on action selection in conflictual situations were examined in an experiment using the flanker task in combination with event-related brain potentials (ERPs). More specifically, we investigated the effects of PD on behavioral and neuronal indicators of both instantaneous (within-trial flanker congruency effects) and sequence-dependent (between-trial congruency sequence effects) distractor interference. Consistent with the existing literature, congruency-sensitive ERP components (i.e., fronto-central N2 and positive 'dips' of the lateralized readiness potential, LRP) were observed over medial-frontal and lateral-central regions, respectively. For situations requiring instantaneous action control, patients with PD and healthy controls showed similar congruency effects on reaction time, as well as on N2 and LRP 'dip' amplitudes. As expected, controls showed reliable congruency sequence effects on reaction time, as well as on N2 and LRP 'dip' amplitudes. However, patients with PD were completely unaffected by the congruence sequence across consecutive trials, as revealed by reaction time, as well as by N2 and LRP 'dip' amplitudes. The data imply that the effects of PD on action selection are largely restricted to a lack of adaptive modulation in time which we refer to as neurocognitive inflexibility, in the context of relatively spared abilities to instantaneously exert control over action selection. The findings are discussed in terms of basal ganglia dysfunction induced by PD which results primarily either in executive function deficits or in aberrant habit formation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Chromosomal structures and repetitive sequences divergence in Cucumis species revealed by comparative cytogenetic mapping.

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    Zhang, Yunxia; Cheng, Chunyan; Li, Ji; Yang, Shuqiong; Wang, Yunzhu; Li, Ziang; Chen, Jinfeng; Lou, Qunfeng

    2015-09-25

    Differentiation and copy number of repetitive sequences affect directly chromosome structure which contributes to reproductive isolation and speciation. Comparative cytogenetic mapping has been verified an efficient tool to elucidate the differentiation and distribution of repetitive sequences in genome. In present study, the distinct chromosomal structures of five Cucumis species were revealed through genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique and comparative cytogenetic mapping of major satellite repeats. Chromosome structures of five Cucumis species were investigated using GISH and comparative mapping of specific satellites. Southern hybridization was employed to study the proliferation of satellites, whose structural characteristics were helpful for analyzing chromosome evolution. Preferential distribution of repetitive DNAs at the subtelomeric regions was found in C. sativus, C hystrix and C. metuliferus, while majority was positioned at the pericentromeric heterochromatin regions in C. melo and C. anguria. Further, comparative GISH (cGISH) through using genomic DNA of other species as probes revealed high homology of repeats between C. sativus and C. hystrix. Specific satellites including 45S rDNA, Type I/II, Type III, Type IV, CentM and telomeric repeat were then comparatively mapped in these species. Type I/II and Type IV produced bright signals at the subtelomeric regions of C. sativus and C. hystrix simultaneously, which might explain the significance of their amplification in the divergence of Cucumis subgenus from the ancient ancestor. Unique positioning of Type III and CentM only at the centromeric domains of C. sativus and C. melo, respectively, combining with unique southern bands, revealed rapid evolutionary patterns of centromeric DNA in Cucumis. Obvious interstitial telomeric repeats were observed in chromosomes 1 and 2 of C. sativus, which might provide evidence of the fusion hypothesis of chromosome evolution from x = 12 to x = 7 in

  2. Jazz musicians reveal role of expectancy in human creativity.

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    Przysinda, Emily; Zeng, Tima; Maves, Kellyn; Arkin, Cameron; Loui, Psyche

    2017-12-01

    Creativity has been defined as the ability to produce work that is novel, high in quality, and appropriate to an audience. While the nature of the creative process is under debate, many believe that creativity relies on real-time combinations of known neural and cognitive processes. One useful model of creativity comes from musical improvisation, such as in jazz, in which musicians spontaneously create novel sound sequences. Here we use jazz musicians to test the hypothesis that individuals with training in musical improvisation, which entails creative generation of musical ideas, might process expectancy differently. We compare jazz improvisers, non-improvising musicians, and non-musicians in the domain-general task of divergent thinking, as well as the musical task of preference ratings for chord progressions that vary in expectation while EEGs were recorded. Behavioral results showed for the first time that jazz musicians preferred unexpected chord progressions. ERP results showed that unexpected stimuli elicited larger early and mid-latency ERP responses (ERAN and P3b), followed by smaller long-latency responses (Late Positivity Potential) in jazz musicians. The amplitudes of these ERP components were significantly correlated with behavioral measures of fluency and originality on the divergent thinking task. Together, results highlight the role of expectancy in creativity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptome dynamics through alternative polyadenylation in developmental and environmental responses in plants revealed by deep sequencing.

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    Shen, Yingjia; Venu, R C; Nobuta, Kan; Wu, Xiaohui; Notibala, Varun; Demirci, Caghan; Meyers, Blake C; Wang, Guo-Liang; Ji, Guoli; Li, Qingshun Q

    2011-09-01

    Polyadenylation sites mark the ends of mRNA transcripts. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) may alter sequence elements and/or the coding capacity of transcripts, a mechanism that has been demonstrated to regulate gene expression and transcriptome diversity. To study the role of APA in transcriptome dynamics, we analyzed a large-scale data set of RNA "tags" that signify poly(A) sites and expression levels of mRNA. These tags were derived from a wide range of tissues and developmental stages that were mutated or exposed to environmental treatments, and generated using digital gene expression (DGE)-based protocols of the massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS-DGE) and the Illumina sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS-DGE) sequencing platforms. The data offer a global view of APA and how it contributes to transcriptome dynamics. Upon analysis of these data, we found that ∼60% of Arabidopsis genes have multiple poly(A) sites. Likewise, ∼47% and 82% of rice genes use APA, supported by MPSS-DGE and SBS-DGE tags, respectively. In both species, ∼49%-66% of APA events were mapped upstream of annotated stop codons. Interestingly, 10% of the transcriptomes are made up of APA transcripts that are differentially distributed among developmental stages and in tissues responding to environmental stresses, providing an additional level of transcriptome dynamics. Examples of pollen-specific APA switching and salicylic acid treatment-specific APA clearly demonstrated such dynamics. The significance of these APAs is more evident in the 3034 genes that have conserved APA events between rice and Arabidopsis.

  4. Lichen Biosynthetic Gene Clusters. Part I. Genome Sequencing Reveals a Rich Biosynthetic Potential.

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    Bertrand, Robert L; Abdel-Hameed, Mona; Sorensen, John L

    2018-02-27

    Lichens are symbionts of fungi and algae that produce diverse secondary metabolites with useful properties. Little is known of lichen natural product biosynthesis because of the challenges of working with lichenizing fungi. We describe the first attempt to comprehensively profile the genetic secondary metabolome of a lichenizing fungus. An Illumina platform combined with the Antibiotics and Secondary Metabolites Analysis Shell (FungiSMASH, version 4.0) was used to sequence and annotate assembled contigs of the fungal partner of Cladonia uncialis. Up to 48 putative gene clusters are described comprising type I and type III polyketide synthases (PKS), nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), hybrid PKS-NRPS, and terpene synthases. The number of gene clusters revealed by this work dwarfs the number of known secondary metabolites from C. uncialis, suggesting that lichenizing fungi have an unexplored biosynthetic potential.

  5. Conserved properties of dentate gyrus neurogenesis across postnatal development revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing.

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    Hochgerner, Hannah; Zeisel, Amit; Lönnerberg, Peter; Linnarsson, Sten

    2018-02-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is a brain region in which neurogenesis persists into adulthood; however, the relationship between developmental and adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis has not been examined in detail. Here we used single-cell RNA sequencing to reveal the molecular dynamics and diversity of dentate gyrus cell types in perinatal, juvenile, and adult mice. We found distinct quiescent and proliferating progenitor cell types, linked by transient intermediate states to neuroblast stages and fully mature granule cells. We observed shifts in the molecular identity of quiescent and proliferating radial glia and granule cells during the postnatal period that were then maintained through adult stages. In contrast, intermediate progenitor cells, neuroblasts, and immature granule cells were nearly indistinguishable at all ages. These findings demonstrate the fundamental similarity of postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and pinpoint the early postnatal transformation of radial glia from embryonic progenitors to adult quiescent stem cells.

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome sequencing reveals novel haplotypes in a Polynesian population.

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    Miles Benton

    Full Text Available The high risk of metabolic disease traits in Polynesians may be partly explained by elevated prevalence of genetic variants involved in energy metabolism. The genetics of Polynesian populations has been shaped by island hoping migration events which have possibly favoured thrifty genes. The aim of this study was to sequence the mitochondrial genome in a group of Maoris in an effort to characterise genome variation in this Polynesian population for use in future disease association studies. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 20 non-admixed Maori subjects using Affymetrix technology. DNA diversity analyses showed the Maori group exhibited reduced mitochondrial genome diversity compared to other worldwide populations, which is consistent with historical bottleneck and founder effects. Global phylogenetic analysis positioned these Maori subjects specifically within mitochondrial haplogroup--B4a1a1. Interestingly, we identified several novel variants that collectively form new and unique Maori motifs--B4a1a1c, B4a1a1a3 and B4a1a1a5. Compared to ancestral populations we observed an increased frequency of non-synonymous coding variants of several mitochondrial genes in the Maori group, which may be a result of positive selection and/or genetic drift effects. In conclusion, this study reports the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence data for a Maori population. Overall, these new data reveal novel mitochondrial genome signatures in this Polynesian population and enhance the phylogenetic picture of maternal ancestry in Oceania. The increased frequency of several mitochondrial coding variants makes them good candidates for future studies aimed at assessment of metabolic disease risk in Polynesian populations.

  7. Exome Sequencing Reveals Mutations in AIRE as a Cause of Isolated Hypoparathyroidism.

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    Li, Dong; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Chan, Alice; Lwin, Wint; Tian, Lifeng; Pellegrino da Silva, Renata; Kim, Cecilia E; Anderson, Mark S; Hakonarson, Hakon; Levine, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    Most cases of autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism (HYPO) are caused by loss-of-function mutations in GCM2 or PTH. The objective of this study was to identify the underlying genetic basis for isolated HYPO in a kindred in which 3 of 10 siblings were affected. We studied the parents and the three adult affected subjects, each of whom was diagnosed with HYPO in the first decade of life. We collected clinical and biochemical data and performed whole exome sequencing analysis on DNA from the three affected subjects after negative genetic testing for known causes of HYPO. Whole exome sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing revealed that all three affected subjects were compound heterozygous for two previously reported mutations, c.967_979delCTGTCCCCTCCGC:p.(L323SfsX51) and c.995+(3_5)delGAGinsTAT, in AIRE, which encodes the autoimmune regulator protein that is defective in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1). Each parent carries one mutation, and all of the children of the patients are either heterozygous for one mutation or wild type. The affected sister developed premature ovarian failure, but the two affected brothers have no other features of APS-1 despite elevated serum levels of anti-interferon-α antibodies. Our findings indicate that biallelic mutations in AIRE can cause isolated HYPO as well as syndromic APS-1. The presence of antibodies to interferon-α provides a highly sensitive indicator for loss of AIRE function and represents a useful marker for isolated HYPO due to AIRE mutations. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  8. Complete genome sequence of Thermus brockianus GE-1 reveals key enzymes of xylan/xylose metabolism.

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    Schäfers, Christian; Blank, Saskia; Wiebusch, Sigrid; Elleuche, Skander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2017-01-01

    Thermus brockianus strain GE-1 is a thermophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile bacterium that was isolated from the Geysir geothermal area, Iceland. Like other thermophiles, Thermus species are often used as model organisms to understand the mechanism of action of extremozymes, especially focusing on their heat-activity and thermostability. Genome-specific features of T. brockianus GE-1 and their properties further help to explain processes of the adaption of extremophiles at elevated temperatures. Here we analyze the first whole genome sequence of T. brockianus strain GE-1. Insights of the genome sequence and the methodologies that were applied during de novo assembly and annotation are given in detail. The finished genome shows a phred quality value of QV50. The complete genome size is 2.38 Mb, comprising the chromosome (2,035,182 bp), the megaplasmid pTB1 (342,792 bp) and the smaller plasmid pTB2 (10,299 bp). Gene prediction revealed 2,511 genes in total, including 2,458 protein-encoding genes, 53 RNA and 66 pseudo genes. A unique genomic region on megaplasmid pTB1 was identified encoding key enzymes for xylan depolymerization and xylose metabolism. This is in agreement with the growth experiments in which xylan is utilized as sole source of carbon. Accordingly, we identified sequences encoding the xylanase Xyn10, an endoglucanase, the membrane ABC sugar transporter XylH, the xylose-binding protein XylF, the xylose isomerase XylA catalyzing the first step of xylose metabolism and the xylulokinase XylB, responsible for the second step of xylose metabolism. Our data indicate that an ancestor of T. brockianus obtained the ability to use xylose as alternative carbon source by horizontal gene transfer.

  9. Ultradeep sequencing of a human ultraconserved region reveals somatic and constitutional genomic instability.

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    Anna De Grassi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer-associated genomic instability is crucial, particularly in tumour types in which this instability represents the essential underlying mechanism of tumourigenesis. Currently used methods require the presence of already established neoplastic cells because they only detect clonal mutations. In principle, parallel sequencing of single DNA filaments could reveal the early phases of tumour initiation by detecting low-frequency mutations, provided an adequate depth of coverage and an effective control of the experimental error. We applied ultradeep sequencing to estimate the genomic instability of individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. To overcome the experimental error, we used an ultraconserved region (UCR of the human genome as an internal control. By comparing the mutability outside and inside the UCR, we observed a tendency of the ultraconserved element to accumulate significantly fewer mutations than the flanking segments in both neoplastic and nonneoplastic HNPCC samples. No difference between the two regions was detectable in cells from healthy donors, indicating that all three HNPCC samples have mutation rates higher than the healthy genome. This is the first, to our knowledge, direct evidence of an intrinsic genomic instability of individuals with heterozygous mutations in mismatch repair genes, and constitutes the proof of principle for the development of a more sensitive molecular assay of genomic instability.

  10. Widespread Polycistronic Transcripts in Fungi Revealed by Single-Molecule mRNA Sequencing.

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    Sean P Gordon

    Full Text Available Genes in prokaryotic genomes are often arranged into clusters and co-transcribed into polycistronic RNAs. Isolated examples of polycistronic RNAs were also reported in some higher eukaryotes but their presence was generally considered rare. Here we developed a long-read sequencing strategy to identify polycistronic transcripts in several mushroom forming fungal species including Plicaturopsis crispa, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, and Gloeophyllum trabeum. We found genome-wide prevalence of polycistronic transcription in these Agaricomycetes, involving up to 8% of the transcribed genes. Unlike polycistronic mRNAs in prokaryotes, these co-transcribed genes are also independently transcribed. We show that polycistronic transcription may interfere with expression of the downstream tandem gene. Further comparative genomic analysis indicates that polycistronic transcription is conserved among a wide range of mushroom forming fungi. In summary, our study revealed, for the first time, the genome prevalence of polycistronic transcription in a phylogenetic range of higher fungi. Furthermore, we systematically show that our long-read sequencing approach and combined bioinformatics pipeline is a generic powerful tool for precise characterization of complex transcriptomes that enables identification of mRNA isoforms not recovered via short-read assembly.

  11. Sequence-based Network Completion Reveals the Integrality of Missing Reactions in Metabolic Networks*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Elias W.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are central in connecting genotypes to metabolic phenotypes. However, even for well studied organisms, such as Escherichia coli, draft networks do not contain a complete biochemical network. Missing reactions are referred to as gaps. These gaps need to be filled to enable functional analysis, and gap-filling choices influence model predictions. To investigate whether functional networks existed where all gap-filling reactions were supported by sequence similarity to annotated enzymes, four draft networks were supplemented with all reactions from the Model SEED database for which minimal sequence similarity was found in their genomes. Quadratic programming revealed that the number of reactions that could partake in a gap-filling solution was vast: 3,270 in the case of E. coli, where 72% of the metabolites in the draft network could connect a gap-filling solution. Nonetheless, no network could be completed without the inclusion of orphaned enzymes, suggesting that parts of the biochemistry integral to biomass precursor formation are uncharacterized. However, many gap-filling reactions were well determined, and the resulting networks showed improved prediction of gene essentiality compared with networks generated through canonical gap filling. In addition, gene essentiality predictions that were sensitive to poorly determined gap-filling reactions were of poor quality, suggesting that damage to the network structure resulting from the inclusion of erroneous gap-filling reactions may be predictable. PMID:26041773

  12. Sequence-based Network Completion Reveals the Integrality of Missing Reactions in Metabolic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Elias W; Libourel, Igor G L

    2015-07-31

    Genome-scale metabolic models are central in connecting genotypes to metabolic phenotypes. However, even for well studied organisms, such as Escherichia coli, draft networks do not contain a complete biochemical network. Missing reactions are referred to as gaps. These gaps need to be filled to enable functional analysis, and gap-filling choices influence model predictions. To investigate whether functional networks existed where all gap-filling reactions were supported by sequence similarity to annotated enzymes, four draft networks were supplemented with all reactions from the Model SEED database for which minimal sequence similarity was found in their genomes. Quadratic programming revealed that the number of reactions that could partake in a gap-filling solution was vast: 3,270 in the case of E. coli, where 72% of the metabolites in the draft network could connect a gap-filling solution. Nonetheless, no network could be completed without the inclusion of orphaned enzymes, suggesting that parts of the biochemistry integral to biomass precursor formation are uncharacterized. However, many gap-filling reactions were well determined, and the resulting networks showed improved prediction of gene essentiality compared with networks generated through canonical gap filling. In addition, gene essentiality predictions that were sensitive to poorly determined gap-filling reactions were of poor quality, suggesting that damage to the network structure resulting from the inclusion of erroneous gap-filling reactions may be predictable. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Genomic View of Bipolar Disorder Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Genetic Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Benjamin; Craig, David; Kember, Rachel L.; Liu, Wencheng; Lindquist, Ingrid; Nasser, Sara; Brown, Christopher; Egeland, Janice A.; Paul, Steven M.; Bućan, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders. PMID:24625924

  14. Genomic view of bipolar disorder revealed by whole genome sequencing in a genetic isolate.

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    Benjamin Georgi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders.

  15. The complete genome sequence of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 reveals a cellulolytic and metabolic specialist.

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    Garret Suen

    Full Text Available Fibrobacter succinogenes is an important member of the rumen microbial community that converts plant biomass into nutrients usable by its host. This bacterium, which is also one of only two cultivated species in its phylum, is an efficient and prolific degrader of cellulose. Specifically, it has a particularly high activity against crystalline cellulose that requires close physical contact with this substrate. However, unlike other known cellulolytic microbes, it does not degrade cellulose using a cellulosome or by producing high extracellular titers of cellulase enzymes. To better understand the biology of F. succinogenes, we sequenced the genome of the type strain S85 to completion. A total of 3,085 open reading frames were predicted from its 3.84 Mbp genome. Analysis of sequences predicted to encode for carbohydrate-degrading enzymes revealed an unusually high number of genes that were classified into 49 different families of glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs, carbohydrate esterases, and polysaccharide lyases. Of the 31 identified cellulases, none contain CBMs in families 1, 2, and 3, typically associated with crystalline cellulose degradation. Polysaccharide hydrolysis and utilization assays showed that F. succinogenes was able to hydrolyze a number of polysaccharides, but could only utilize the hydrolytic products of cellulose. This suggests that F. succinogenes uses its array of hemicellulose-degrading enzymes to remove hemicelluloses to gain access to cellulose. This is reflected in its genome, as F. succinogenes lacks many of the genes necessary to transport and metabolize the hydrolytic products of non-cellulose polysaccharides. The F. succinogenes genome reveals a bacterium that specializes in cellulose as its sole energy source, and provides insight into a novel strategy for cellulose degradation.

  16. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, iain J.; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Rodriguez, Jason; Hooper, Sean; Porat, Iris; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Sun, Hui; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Huber, Harald; Zhulin, Igor B.; Whitman, William B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-09-05

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced - Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  17. The complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus reveals differences in sulfur metabolism among heterotrophic Crenarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Kerrie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic, sulfur-reducing peptide fermenter of the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. It is the third heterotrophic, obligate sulfur reducing crenarchaeote to be sequenced and provides an opportunity for comparative analysis of the three genomes. Results The 1.57 Mbp genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeote Staphylothermus marinus has been completely sequenced. The main energy generating pathways likely involve 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases and ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthases. S. marinus possesses several enzymes not present in other crenarchaeotes including a sodium ion-translocating decarboxylase likely to be involved in amino acid degradation. S. marinus lacks sulfur-reducing enzymes present in the other two sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes that have been sequenced – Thermofilum pendens and Hyperthermus butylicus. Instead it has three operons similar to the mbh and mbx operons of Pyrococcus furiosus, which may play a role in sulfur reduction and/or hydrogen production. The two marine organisms, S. marinus and H. butylicus, possess more sodium-dependent transporters than T. pendens and use symporters for potassium uptake while T. pendens uses an ATP-dependent potassium transporter. T. pendens has adapted to a nutrient-rich environment while H. butylicus is adapted to a nutrient-poor environment, and S. marinus lies between these two extremes. Conclusion The three heterotrophic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeotes have adapted to their habitats, terrestrial vs. marine, via their transporter content, and they have also adapted to environments with differing levels of nutrients. Despite the fact that they all use sulfur as an electron acceptor, they are likely to have different pathways for sulfur reduction.

  18. Unprecedented high-resolution view of bacterial operon architecture revealed by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tyrrell; Creecy, James P; Maddox, Scott M; Grissom, Joe E; Conkle, Trevor L; Shadid, Tyler M; Teramoto, Jun; San Miguel, Phillip; Shimada, Tomohiro; Ishihama, Akira; Mori, Hirotada; Wanner, Barry L

    2014-07-08

    We analyzed the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 by strand-specific RNA sequencing at single-nucleotide resolution during steady-state (logarithmic-phase) growth and upon entry into stationary phase in glucose minimal medium. To generate high-resolution transcriptome maps, we developed an organizational schema which showed that in practice only three features are required to define operon architecture: the promoter, terminator, and deep RNA sequence read coverage. We precisely annotated 2,122 promoters and 1,774 terminators, defining 1,510 operons with an average of 1.98 genes per operon. Our analyses revealed an unprecedented view of E. coli operon architecture. A large proportion (36%) of operons are complex with internal promoters or terminators that generate multiple transcription units. For 43% of operons, we observed differential expression of polycistronic genes, despite being in the same operons, indicating that E. coli operon architecture allows fine-tuning of gene expression. We found that 276 of 370 convergent operons terminate inefficiently, generating complementary 3' transcript ends which overlap on average by 286 nucleotides, and 136 of 388 divergent operons have promoters arranged such that their 5' ends overlap on average by 168 nucleotides. We found 89 antisense transcripts of 397-nucleotide average length, 7 unannotated transcripts within intergenic regions, and 18 sense transcripts that completely overlap operons on the opposite strand. Of 519 overlapping transcripts, 75% correspond to sequences that are highly conserved in E. coli (>50 genomes). Our data extend recent studies showing unexpected transcriptome complexity in several bacteria and suggest that antisense RNA regulation is widespread. Importance: We precisely mapped the 5' and 3' ends of RNA transcripts across the E. coli K-12 genome by using a single-nucleotide analytical approach. Our resulting high-resolution transcriptome maps show that ca. one-third of E. coli operons are

  19. Shotgun Bisulfite Sequencing of the Betula platyphylla Genome Reveals the Tree’s DNA Methylation Patterning

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    Chang Su

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. Most studies of DNA methylation have been performed in herbaceous plants, and little is known about the methylation patterns in tree genomes. In the present study, we generated a map of methylated cytosines at single base pair resolution for Betula platyphylla (white birch by bisulfite sequencing combined with transcriptomics to analyze DNA methylation and its effects on gene expression. We obtained a detailed view of the function of DNA methylation sequence composition and distribution in the genome of B. platyphylla. There are 34,460 genes in the whole genome of birch, and 31,297 genes are methylated. Conservatively, we estimated that 14.29% of genomic cytosines are methylcytosines in birch. Among the methylation sites, the CHH context accounts for 48.86%, and is the largest proportion. Combined transcriptome and methylation analysis showed that the genes with moderate methylation levels had higher expression levels than genes with high and low methylation. In addition, methylated genes are highly enriched for the GO subcategories of binding activities, catalytic activities, cellular processes, response to stimulus and cell death, suggesting that methylation mediates these pathways in birch trees.

  20. Molecular footprints of domestication and improvement in soybean revealed by whole genome re-sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Artificial selection played an important role in the origin of modern Glycine max cultivars from the wild soybean Glycine soja. To elucidate the consequences of artificial selection accompanying the domestication and modern improvement of soybean, 25 new and 30 published whole-genome re-sequencing accessions, which represent wild, domesticated landrace, and Chinese elite soybean populations were analyzed. Results A total of 5,102,244 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 707,969 insertion/deletions were identified. Among the SNPs detected, 25.5% were not described previously. We found that artificial selection during domestication led to more pronounced reduction in the genetic diversity of soybean than the switch from landraces to elite cultivars. Only a small proportion (2.99%) of the whole genomic regions appear to be affected by artificial selection for preferred agricultural traits. The selection regions were not distributed randomly or uniformly throughout the genome. Instead, clusters of selection hotspots in certain genomic regions were observed. Moreover, a set of candidate genes (4.38% of the total annotated genes) significantly affected by selection underlying soybean domestication and genetic improvement were identified. Conclusions Given the uniqueness of the soybean germplasm sequenced, this study drew a clear picture of human-mediated evolution of the soybean genomes. The genomic resources and information provided by this study would also facilitate the discovery of genes/loci underlying agronomically important traits. PMID:23984715

  1. ITS2 sequence-structure phylogeny reveals diverse endophytic Pseudocercospora fungi on poplars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong-Hui; Gao, Qian; Sun, Xiaoming; Song, Xiaoyu; Li, Hongchang

    2018-04-01

    For matching the new fungal nomenclature to abolish pleomorphic names for a fungus, a genus Pseudocercospora s. str. was suggested to host holomorphic Pseudocercosproa fungi. But the Pseudocercosproa fungi need extra phylogenetic loci to clarify their taxonomy and diversity for their existing and coming species. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) secondary structures have been promising in charactering species phylogeny in plants, animals and fungi. In present study, a conserved model of ITS2 secondary structures was confirmed on fungi in Pseudocercospora s. str. genus using RNAshape program. The model has a typical eukaryotic four-helix ITS2 secondary structure. But a single U base occurred in conserved motif of U-U mismatch in Helix 2, and a UG emerged in UGGU motif in Helix 3 to Pseudocercospora fungi. The phylogeny analyses based on the ITS2 sequence-secondary structures with compensatory base change characterizations are able to delimit more species for Pseudocercospora s. str. than phylogenic inferences of traditional multi-loci alignments do. The model was employed to explore the diversity of endophytic Pseudocercospora fungi in poplar trees. The analysis results also showed that endophytic Pseudocercospora fungi were diverse in species and evolved a specific lineage in poplar trees. This work suggested that ITS2 sequence-structures could become as additionally significant loci for species phylogenetic and taxonomic studies on Pseudocerospora fungi, and that Pseudocercospora endophytes could be important roles to Pseudocercospora fungi's evolution and function in ecology.

  2. Molecular footprints of domestication and improvement in soybean revealed by whole genome re-sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ying-hui; Zhao, Shan-cen; Ma, Jian-xin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Artificial selection played an important role in the origin of modern Glycine max cultivars from the wild soybean Glycine soja. To elucidate the consequences of artificial selection accompanying the domestication and modern improvement of soybean, 25 new and 30 published whole-genome re......-sequencing accessions, which represent wild, domesticated landrace, and Chinese elite soybean populations were analyzed.RESULTS:A total of 5,102,244 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 707,969 insertion/deletions were identified. Among the SNPs detected, 25.5% were not described previously. We found...... that artificial selection during domestication led to more pronounced reduction in the genetic diversity of soybean than the switch from landraces to elite cultivars. Only a small proportion (2.99%) of the whole genomic regions appear to be affected by artificial selection for preferred agricultural traits...

  3. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

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    Piltz Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5 mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development.

  4. Seventeen new complete mtDNA sequences reveal extensive mitochondrial genome evolution within the Demospongiae.

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    Xiujuan Wang

    Full Text Available Two major transitions in animal evolution--the origins of multicellularity and bilaterality--correlate with major changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA organization. Demosponges, the largest class in the phylum Porifera, underwent only the first of these transitions and their mitochondrial genomes display a peculiar combination of ancestral and animal-specific features. To get an insight into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Demospongiae, we determined 17 new mtDNA sequences from this group and analyzing them with five previously published sequences. Our analysis revealed that all demosponge mtDNAs are 16- to 25-kbp circular molecules, containing 13-15 protein genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 2-27 tRNA genes. All but four pairs of sampled genomes had unique gene orders, with the number of shared gene boundaries ranging from 1 to 41. Although most demosponge species displayed low rates of mitochondrial sequence evolution, a significant acceleration in evolutionary rates occurred in the G1 group (orders Dendroceratida, Dictyoceratida, and Verticillitida. Large variation in mtDNA organization was also observed within the G0 group (order Homosclerophorida including gene rearrangements, loss of tRNA genes, and the presence of two introns in Plakortis angulospiculatus. While introns are rare in modern-day demosponge mtDNA, we inferred that at least one intron was present in cox1 of the common ancestor of all demosponges. Our study uncovered an extensive mitochondrial genomic diversity within the Demospongiae. Although all sampled mitochondrial genomes retained some ancestral features, including a minimally modified genetic code, conserved structures of tRNA genes, and presence of multiple non-coding regions, they vary considerably in their size, gene content, gene order, and the rates of sequence evolution. Some of the changes in demosponge mtDNA, such as the loss of tRNA genes and the appearance of hairpin-containing repetitive elements

  5. Mycobacterium malmesburyense sp. nov., a non-tuberculous species of the genus Mycobacterium revealed by multiple gene sequence characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Rutten, Victor; Pittius, Nicolaas Gey van; Naicker, Brendon; Michel, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in the environment, and an increasing number of NTM species have been isolated and characterized from both humans and animals, highlighting the zoonotic potential of these bacteria. Host exposure to NTM may impact on cross-reactive immune responsiveness, which may affect diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis and may also play a role in the variability of the efficacy of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against tuberculosis. In this study we characterized 10 NTM isolates originating from water, soil, nasal swabs of cattle and African buffalo as well as bovine tissue samples. These isolates were previously identified during an NTM survey and were all found, using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis to be closely related to Mycobacterium moriokaense. A polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterization, antibiotic susceptibility profiling, mycolic acid profiling and phylogenetic analysis of four gene loci, 16S rRNA, hsp65, sodA and rpoB, was employed to characterize these isolates. Sequence data analysis of the four gene loci revealed that these isolates belong to a unique species of the genus Mycobacterium. This evidence was further supported by several differences in phenotypic characteristics between the isolates and the closely related species. We propose the name Mycobacterium malmesburyense sp. nov. for this novel species. The type strain is WCM 7299T (=ATCC BAA-2759T=CIP 110822T).

  6. The complete genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis strain GH1-13 reveals agriculturally beneficial properties and a unique plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Song, Hajin; Sang, Mee Kyung; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Song, Jaekyeong

    2017-10-10

    The bacterial strain Bacillus velezensis GH1-13, isolated from rice paddy soil in Korea, has been shown to promote plant growth and have strong antagonistic activities against pathogens. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of GH1-13, revealing that it possesses a single 4,071,980-bp circular chromosome with 46.2% GC-content. The chromosome encodes 3,930 genes, and we have also identified a unique plasmid in the strain that encodes a further 104 genes (71,628bp and 31.7% GC-content). The genome was found to contain various enzyme-encoding operons, including indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis proteins, 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, various non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, and several polyketide synthases. These properties are responsible for the promotion of plant growth and the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. They therefore have multiple beneficial effects that could be applied to agriculture. Through curing, we found that the unique plasmid of GH1-13 has important roles in the production of phytohormones, such as IAA, and in shaping phenotypic and physiological characteristics. The plasmid therefore likely influences the biological activities of GH1-13. The complete genome sequence of B. velezensis GH1-13 contributes to our understanding of this beneficial strain and will encourage research into its development for agricultural or biotechnological applications, enhancing productivity and crop quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. RNA sequencing reveals a depletion of collagen targeting microRNAs in Dupuytren's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Scott M; Arsoy, Diren; Camilleri, Emily T; Dudakovic, Amel; Paradise, Christopher R; Evans, Jared M; Torres-Mora, Jorge; Rizzo, Marco; Kloen, Peter; Julio, Marianna Kruithof-de; van Wijnen, Andre J; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2015-10-07

    Dupuytren's disease is an inherited disorder in which patients develop fibrotic contractures of the hand. Current treatment strategies include surgical excision or enzymatic digestion of fibrotic tissue. MicroRNAs, which are key posttranscriptional regulators of genes expression, have been shown to play an important regulatory role in disorders of fibrosis. Therefore in this investigation, we apply high throughput next generation RNA sequencing strategies to characterize microRNA expression in diseased and healthy palmar fascia to elucidate molecular mechanisms responsible for pathogenic fibrosis. We applied high throughput RNA sequencing techniques to quantify the expression of all known human microRNAs in Dupuytren's and control palmar fascia. MicroRNAs that were differentially expressed between diseased and healthy tissue samples were used for computational target prediction using the bioinformatics tool ComiR. Molecular pathways that were predicted to be differentially expressed based on computational analysis were validated by performing RT-qPCR on RNA extracted from diseased and non-diseased palmar fascia biopsies. A comparison of microRNAs expressed in Dupuytren's fascia and control fascia identified 74 microRNAs with a 2-fold enrichment in Dupuytren's tissue, and 32 microRNAs with enrichment in control fascia. Computational target prediction for differentially expressed microRNAs indicated preferential targeting of collagens and extracellular matrix related proteins in control palmar fascia. RT-qPCR confirmed the decreased expression of microRNA targeted collagens in control palmar fascia tissues. Control palmar fascia show decreased expression of mRNAs encoding collagens that are preferentially targeted by microRNAs enriched in non-diseased fascia. Thus alterations in microRNA regulatory networks may play an important role in driving the pathogenic fibrosis seen in Dupuytren's disease via direct regulatory effects on extracellular matrix protein synthesis

  8. A Sequence-Independent Strategy for Amplification and Characterisation of Episomal Badnavirus Sequences Reveals Three Previously Uncharacterised Yam Badnaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bömer, Moritz; Turaki, Aliyu A.; Silva, Gonçalo; Kumar, P. Lava; Seal, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) plants are potentially hosts to a diverse range of badnavirus species (genus Badnavirus, family Caulimoviridae), but their detection is complicated by the existence of integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. To date, only two badnavirus genomes have been characterised, namely, Dioscorea bacilliform AL virus (DBALV) and Dioscorea bacilliform SN virus (DBSNV). A further 10 tentative species in yam have been described based on their partial reverse transcriptase (RT)-ribonuclease H (RNaseH) sequences, generically referred to here as Dioscorea bacilliform viruses (DBVs). Further characterisation of DBV species is necessary to determine which represent episomal viruses and which are only present as integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. In this study, a sequence-independent multiply-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) method was evaluated for selective amplification of episomal DBV genomes. This resulted in the identification and characterisation of nine complete genomic sequences (7.4–7.7 kbp) of existing and previously undescribed DBV phylogenetic groups from Dioscorea alata and Dioscorea rotundata accessions. These new yam badnavirus genomes expand our understanding of the diversity and genomic organisation of DBVs, and assist the development of improved diagnostic tools. Our findings also suggest that mixed badnavirus infections occur relatively often in West African yam germplasm. PMID:27399761

  9. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  10. Pervasive within-Mitochondrion Single-Nucleotide Variant Heteroplasmy as Revealed by Single-Mitochondrion Sequencing

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    Jacqueline Morris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A number of mitochondrial diseases arise from single-nucleotide variant (SNV accumulation in multiple mitochondria. Here, we present a method for identification of variants present at the single-mitochondrion level in individual mouse and human neuronal cells, allowing for extremely high-resolution study of mitochondrial mutation dynamics. We identified extensive heteroplasmy between individual mitochondrion, along with three high-confidence variants in mouse and one in human that were present in multiple mitochondria across cells. The pattern of variation revealed by single-mitochondrion data shows surprisingly pervasive levels of heteroplasmy in inbred mice. Distribution of SNV loci suggests inheritance of variants across generations, resulting in Poisson jackpot lines with large SNV load. Comparison of human and mouse variants suggests that the two species might employ distinct modes of somatic segregation. Single-mitochondrion resolution revealed mitochondria mutational dynamics that we hypothesize to affect risk probabilities for mutations reaching disease thresholds. : Morris et al. use independent sequencing of multiple individual mitochondria from mouse and human brain cells to show high pervasiveness of mutations. The mutations are heteroplasmic within single mitochondria and within and between cells. These findings suggest mechanisms by which mutations accumulate over time, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. Keywords: single mitochondrion, single cell, human neuron, mouse neuron, single-nucleotide variation

  11. Whole exome sequencing in 342 congenital cardiac left sided lesion cases reveals extensive genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alexander H; Hanchard, Neil A; Furthner, Dieter; Fernbach, Susan; Azamian, Mahshid; Nicosia, Annarita; Rosenfeld, Jill; Muzny, Donna; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Morris, Shaine; Jhangiani, Shalini; Parekh, Dhaval R; Franklin, Wayne J; Lewin, Mark; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Penny, Daniel J; Fraser, Charles D; Martin, James F; Eng, Christine; Lupski, James R; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Belmont, John W

    2017-10-31

    Left-sided lesions (LSLs) account for an important fraction of severe congenital cardiovascular malformations (CVMs). The genetic contributions to LSLs are complex, and the mutations that cause these malformations span several diverse biological signaling pathways: TGFB, NOTCH, SHH, and more. Here, we use whole exome sequence data generated in 342 LSL cases to identify likely damaging variants in putative candidate CVM genes. Using a series of bioinformatics filters, we focused on genes harboring population-rare, putative loss-of-function (LOF), and predicted damaging variants in 1760 CVM candidate genes constructed a priori from the literature and model organism databases. Gene variants that were not observed in a comparably sequenced control dataset of 5492 samples without severe CVM were then subjected to targeted validation in cases and parents. Whole exome sequencing data from 4593 individuals referred for clinical sequencing were used to bolster evidence for the role of candidate genes in CVMs and LSLs. Our analyses revealed 28 candidate variants in 27 genes, including 17 genes not previously associated with a human CVM disorder, and revealed diverse patterns of inheritance among LOF carriers, including 9 confirmed de novo variants in both novel and newly described human CVM candidate genes (ACVR1, JARID2, NR2F2, PLRG1, SMURF1) as well as established syndromic CVM genes (KMT2D, NF1, TBX20, ZEB2). We also identified two genes (DNAH5, OFD1) with evidence of recessive and hemizygous inheritance patterns, respectively. Within our clinical cohort, we also observed heterozygous LOF variants in JARID2 and SMAD1 in individuals with cardiac phenotypes, and collectively, carriers of LOF variants in our candidate genes had a four times higher odds of having CVM (odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval 2.5-6.5). Our analytical strategy highlights the utility of bioinformatic resources, including human disease records and model organism phenotyping, in novel gene

  12. Whole exome sequencing in 342 congenital cardiac left sided lesion cases reveals extensive genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Left-sided lesions (LSLs account for an important fraction of severe congenital cardiovascular malformations (CVMs. The genetic contributions to LSLs are complex, and the mutations that cause these malformations span several diverse biological signaling pathways: TGFB, NOTCH, SHH, and more. Here, we use whole exome sequence data generated in 342 LSL cases to identify likely damaging variants in putative candidate CVM genes. Methods Using a series of bioinformatics filters, we focused on genes harboring population-rare, putative loss-of-function (LOF, and predicted damaging variants in 1760 CVM candidate genes constructed a priori from the literature and model organism databases. Gene variants that were not observed in a comparably sequenced control dataset of 5492 samples without severe CVM were then subjected to targeted validation in cases and parents. Whole exome sequencing data from 4593 individuals referred for clinical sequencing were used to bolster evidence for the role of candidate genes in CVMs and LSLs. Results Our analyses revealed 28 candidate variants in 27 genes, including 17 genes not previously associated with a human CVM disorder, and revealed diverse patterns of inheritance among LOF carriers, including 9 confirmed de novo variants in both novel and newly described human CVM candidate genes (ACVR1, JARID2, NR2F2, PLRG1, SMURF1 as well as established syndromic CVM genes (KMT2D, NF1, TBX20, ZEB2. We also identified two genes (DNAH5, OFD1 with evidence of recessive and hemizygous inheritance patterns, respectively. Within our clinical cohort, we also observed heterozygous LOF variants in JARID2 and SMAD1 in individuals with cardiac phenotypes, and collectively, carriers of LOF variants in our candidate genes had a four times higher odds of having CVM (odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval 2.5–6.5. Conclusions Our analytical strategy highlights the utility of bioinformatic resources, including human

  13. Meta-analysis of small RNA-sequencing errors reveals ubiquitous post-transcriptional RNA modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Ebhardt, H. Alexander; Tsang, Herbert H.; Dai, Denny C.; Liu, Yifeng; Bostan, Babak; Fahlman, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA-sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain large datasets of small RNA sequences. Here we demonstrate that not all non-perfectly matched small RNA sequences are simple technological sequencing errors, but many hold valuable biological information. Analysis of three small RNA datasets originating from Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana small RNA-sequencing projects demonstrates that many single nucleotide substitution errors overlap when aligning homologous...

  14. Deep RNA sequencing reveals dynamic regulation of myocardial noncoding RNAs in failing human heart and remodeling with mechanical circulatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Yamada, Kathryn A; Patel, Akshar Y; Topkara, Veli K; George, Isaac; Cheema, Faisal H; Ewald, Gregory A; Mann, Douglas L; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2014-03-04

    Microarrays have been used extensively to profile transcriptome remodeling in failing human heart, although the genomic coverage provided is limited and fails to provide a detailed picture of the myocardial transcriptome landscape. Here, we describe sequencing-based transcriptome profiling, providing comprehensive analysis of myocardial mRNA, microRNA (miRNA), and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expression in failing human heart before and after mechanical support with a left ventricular (LV) assist device (LVAD). Deep sequencing of RNA isolated from paired nonischemic (NICM; n=8) and ischemic (ICM; n=8) human failing LV samples collected before and after LVAD and from nonfailing human LV (n=8) was conducted. These analyses revealed high abundance of mRNA (37%) and lncRNA (71%) of mitochondrial origin. miRNASeq revealed 160 and 147 differentially expressed miRNAs in ICM and NICM, respectively, compared with nonfailing LV. Among these, only 2 (ICM) and 5 (NICM) miRNAs are normalized with LVAD. RNASeq detected 18 480, including 113 novel, lncRNAs in human LV. Among the 679 (ICM) and 570 (NICM) lncRNAs differentially expressed with heart failure, ≈10% are improved or normalized with LVAD. In addition, the expression signature of lncRNAs, but not miRNAs or mRNAs, distinguishes ICM from NICM. Further analysis suggests that cis-gene regulation represents a major mechanism of action of human cardiac lncRNAs. The myocardial transcriptome is dynamically regulated in advanced heart failure and after LVAD support. The expression profiles of lncRNAs, but not mRNAs or miRNAs, can discriminate failing hearts of different pathologies and are markedly altered in response to LVAD support. These results suggest an important role for lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of heart failure and in reverse remodeling observed with mechanical support.

  15. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

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    Kateryna V Zhalnina

    Full Text Available The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group.

  16. EEG microstate sequences in healthy humans at rest reveal scale-free dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Ville, Dimitri; Britz, Juliane; Michel, Christoph M

    2010-10-19

    Recent findings identified electroencephalography (EEG) microstates as the electrophysiological correlates of fMRI resting-state networks. Microstates are defined as short periods (100 ms) during which the EEG scalp topography remains quasi-stable; that is, the global topography is fixed but strength might vary and polarity invert. Microstates represent the subsecond coherent activation within global functional brain networks. Surprisingly, these rapidly changing EEG microstates correlate significantly with activity in fMRI resting-state networks after convolution with the hemodynamic response function that constitutes a strong temporal smoothing filter. We postulate here that microstate sequences should reveal scale-free, self-similar dynamics to explain this remarkable effect and thus that microstate time series show dependencies over long time ranges. To that aim, we deploy wavelet-based fractal analysis that allows determining scale-free behavior. We find strong statistical evidence that microstate sequences are scale free over six dyadic scales covering the 256-ms to 16-s range. The degree of long-range dependency is maintained when shuffling the local microstate labels but becomes indistinguishable from white noise when equalizing microstate durations, which indicates that temporal dynamics are their key characteristic. These results advance the understanding of temporal dynamics of brain-scale neuronal network models such as the global workspace model. Whereas microstates can be considered the "atoms of thoughts," the shortest constituting elements of cognition, they carry a dynamic signature that is reminiscent at characteristic timescales up to multiple seconds. The scale-free dynamics of the microstates might be the basis for the rapid reorganization and adaptation of the functional networks of the brain.

  17. Peripheral blood transcriptome sequencing reveals rejection-relevant genes in long-term heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Haibo; Xiao, Xue; Jia, Yixin; Wu, Weili; Liu, Licheng; Jiang, Jun; Zhu, Baoli; Meng, Xu; Chen, Weijun

    2013-10-03

    Peripheral blood-based gene expression patterns have been investigated as biomarkers to monitor the immune system and rule out rejection after heart transplantation. Recent advances in the high-throughput deep sequencing (HTS) technologies provide new leads in transcriptome analysis. By performing Solexa/Illumina's digital gene expression (DGE) profiling, we analyzed gene expression profiles of PBMCs from 6 quiescent (grade 0) and 6 rejection (grade 2R&3R) heart transplant recipients at more than 6 months after transplantation. Subsequently, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was carried out in an independent validation cohort of 47 individuals from three rejection groups (ISHLT, grade 0,1R, 2R&3R). Through DGE sequencing and qPCR validation, 10 genes were identified as informative genes for detection of cardiac transplant rejection. A further clustering analysis showed that the 10 genes were not only effective for distinguishing patients with acute cardiac allograft rejection, but also informative for discriminating patients with renal allograft rejection based on both blood and biopsy samples. Moreover, PPI network analysis revealed that the 10 genes were connected to each other within a short interaction distance. We proposed a 10-gene signature for heart transplant patients at high-risk of developing severe rejection, which was found to be effective as well in other organ transplant. Moreover, we supposed that these genes function systematically as biomarkers in long-time allograft rejection. Further validation in broad transplant population would be required before the non-invasive biomarkers can be generally utilized to predict the risk of transplant rejection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Uncommon nucleotide excision repair phenotypes revealed by targeted high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmels, Nadège; Greff, Géraldine; Obringer, Cathy; Kempf, Nadine; Gasnier, Claire; Tarabeux, Julien; Miguet, Marguerite; Baujat, Geneviève; Bessis, Didier; Bretones, Patricia; Cavau, Anne; Digeon, Béatrice; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Doray, Bérénice; Feillet, François; Gardeazabal, Jesus; Gener, Blanca; Julia, Sophie; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Mazur, Artur; Michot, Caroline; Renaldo-Robin, Florence; Rossi, Massimiliano; Sabouraud, Pascal; Keren, Boris; Depienne, Christel; Muller, Jean; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Laugel, Vincent

    2016-03-22

    Deficient nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity causes a variety of autosomal recessive diseases including xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) a disorder which pre-disposes to skin cancer, and the severe multisystem condition known as Cockayne syndrome (CS). In view of the clinical overlap between NER-related disorders, as well as the existence of multiple phenotypes and the numerous genes involved, we developed a new diagnostic approach based on the enrichment of 16 NER-related genes by multiplex amplification coupled with next-generation sequencing (NGS). Our test cohort consisted of 11 DNA samples, all with known mutations and/or non pathogenic SNPs in two of the tested genes. We then used the same technique to analyse samples from a prospective cohort of 40 patients. Multiplex amplification and sequencing were performed using AmpliSeq protocol on the Ion Torrent PGM (Life Technologies). We identified causative mutations in 17 out of the 40 patients (43%). Four patients showed biallelic mutations in the ERCC6(CSB) gene, five in the ERCC8(CSA) gene: most of them had classical CS features but some had very mild and incomplete phenotypes. A small cohort of 4 unrelated classic XP patients from the Basque country (Northern Spain) revealed a common splicing mutation in POLH (XP-variant), demonstrating a new founder effect in this population. Interestingly, our results also found ERCC2(XPD), ERCC3(XPB) or ERCC5(XPG) mutations in two cases of UV-sensitive syndrome and in two cases with mixed XP/CS phenotypes. Our study confirms that NGS is an efficient technique for the analysis of NER-related disorders on a molecular level. It is particularly useful for phenotypes with combined features or unusually mild symptoms. Targeted NGS used in conjunction with DNA repair functional tests and precise clinical evaluation permits rapid and cost-effective diagnosis in patients with NER-defects.

  19. Seasonal changes in the communities of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes in Ofunato Bay as revealed by shotgun metagenomic sequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Jonaira

    2018-04-30

    Small photosynthetic eukaryotes play important roles in oceanic food webs in coastal regions. We investigated seasonal changes in the communities of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) of the class Mamiellophyceae, including the genera Bathycoccus, Micromonas and Ostreococcus, in Ofunato Bay, which is located in northeastern Japan and faces the Pacific Ocean. The abundances of PPEs were assessed over a period of one year in 2015 at three sampling stations, KSt. 1 (innermost bay area), KSt. 2 (middle bay area) and KSt. 3 (bay entrance area) at depths of 1 m (KSt. 1, KSt. 2 and KSt. 3), 8 m (KSt. 1) or 10 m (KSt. 2 and KSt. 3) by employing MiSeq shotgun metagenomic sequencing. The total abundances of Bathycoccus, Ostreococcus and Micromonas were in the ranges of 42–49%, 35–49% and 13–17%, respectively. Considering all assayed sampling stations and depths, seasonal changes revealed high abundances of PPEs during the winter and summer and low abundances during late winter to early spring and late summer to early autumn. Bathycoccus was most abundant in the winter, and Ostreococcus showed a high abundance during the summer. Another genus, Micromonas, was relatively low in abundance throughout the study period. Taken together with previously suggested blooming periods of phytoplankton, as revealed by chlorophyll a concentrations in Ofunato Bay during spring and late autumn, these results for PPEs suggest that greater phytoplankton blooming has a negative influence on the seasonal occurrences of PPEs in the bay.

  20. Analysis of 90 Mb of the potato genome reveals conservation of gene structures and order with tomato but divergence in repetitive sequence composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Kimberly

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Solanaceae family contains a number of important crop species including potato (Solanum tuberosum which is grown for its underground storage organ known as a tuber. Albeit the 4th most important food crop in the world, other than a collection of ~220,000 Expressed Sequence Tags, limited genomic sequence information is currently available for potato and advances in potato yield and nutrition content would be greatly assisted through access to a complete genome sequence. While morphologically diverse, Solanaceae species such as potato, tomato, pepper, and eggplant share not only genes but also gene order thereby permitting highly informative comparative genomic analyses. Results In this study, we report on analysis 89.9 Mb of potato genomic sequence representing 10.2% of the genome generated through end sequencing of a potato bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clone library (87 Mb and sequencing of 22 potato BAC clones (2.9 Mb. The GC content of potato is very similar to Solanum lycopersicon (tomato and other dicotyledonous species yet distinct from the monocotyledonous grass species, Oryza sativa. Parallel analyses of repetitive sequences in potato and tomato revealed substantial differences in their abundance, 34.2% in potato versus 46.3% in tomato, which is consistent with the increased genome size per haploid genome of these two Solanum species. Specific classes and types of repetitive sequences were also differentially represented between these two species including a telomeric-related repetitive sequence, ribosomal DNA, and a number of unclassified repetitive sequences. Comparative analyses between tomato and potato at the gene level revealed a high level of conservation of gene content, genic feature, and gene order although discordances in synteny were observed. Conclusion Genomic level analyses of potato and tomato confirm that gene sequence and gene order are conserved between these solanaceous species and that

  1. Whole-genome sequencing reveals mutational landscape underlying phenotypic differences between two widespread Chinese cattle breeds.

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    Yao Xu

    Full Text Available Whole-genome sequencing provides a powerful tool to obtain more genetic variability that could produce a range of benefits for cattle breeding industry. Nanyang (Bos indicus and Qinchuan (Bos taurus are two important Chinese indigenous cattle breeds with distinct phenotypes. To identify the genetic characteristics responsible for variation in phenotypes between the two breeds, in the present study, we for the first time sequenced the genomes of four Nanyang and four Qinchuan cattle with 10 to 12 fold on average of 97.86% and 98.98% coverage of genomes, respectively. Comparison with the Bos_taurus_UMD_3.1 reference assembly yielded 9,010,096 SNPs for Nanyang, and 6,965,062 for Qinchuan cattle, 51% and 29% of which were novel SNPs, respectively. A total of 154,934 and 115,032 small indels (1 to 3 bp were found in the Nanyang and Qinchuan genomes, respectively. The SNP and indel distribution revealed that Nanyang showed a genetically high diversity as compared to Qinchuan cattle. Furthermore, a total of 2,907 putative cases of copy number variation (CNV were identified by aligning Nanyang to Qinchuan genome, 783 of which (27% encompassed the coding regions of 495 functional genes. The gene ontology (GO analysis revealed that many CNV genes were enriched in the immune system and environment adaptability. Among several CNV genes related to lipid transport and fat metabolism, Lepin receptor gene (LEPR overlapping with CNV_1815 showed remarkably higher copy number in Qinchuan than Nanyang (log2 (ratio = -2.34988; P value = 1.53E-102. Further qPCR and association analysis investigated that the copy number of the LEPR gene presented positive correlations with transcriptional expression and phenotypic traits, suggesting the LEPR CNV may contribute to the higher fat deposition in muscles of Qinchuan cattle. Our findings provide evidence that the distinct phenotypes of Nanyang and Qinchuan breeds may be due to the different genetic variations including SNPs

  2. Complete genome sequence analysis of novel human bocavirus reveals genetic recombination between human bocavirus 2 and human bocavirus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamrin, Pattara; Okitsu, Shoko; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2013-07-01

    Epidemiological surveillance of human bocavirus (HBoV) was conducted on fecal specimens collected from hospitalized children with diarrhea in Chiang Mai, Thailand in 2011. By partial sequence analysis of VP1 gene, an unusual strain of HBoV (CMH-S011-11), was initially identified as HBoV4. The complete genome sequence of CMH-S011-11 was performed and analyzed further to clarify whether it was a recombinant strain or a new HBoV variant. Analysis of complete genome sequence revealed that the coding sequence starting from NS1, NP1 to VP1/VP2 was 4795 nucleotides long. Interestingly, the nucleotide sequence of NS1 gene of CMH-S011-11 was most closely related to the HBoV2 reference strains detected in Pakistan, which contradicted to the initial genotyping result of the partial VP1 region in the previous study. In addition, comparison of NP1 nucleotide sequence of CMH-S011-11 with those of other HBoV1-4 reference strains also revealed a high level of sequence identity with HBoV2. On the other hand, nucleotide sequence of VP1/VP2 gene of CMH-S011-11 was most closely related to those of HBoV4 reference strains detected in Nigeria. The overall full-length sequence analysis revealed that this CMH-S011-11 was grouped within HBoV4 species, but located in a separate branch from other HBoV4 prototype strains. Recombination analysis revealed that CMH-S011-11 was the result of recombination between HBoV2 and HBoV4 strains with the break point located near the start codon of VP2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome Sequencing Reveals the Potential of Achromobacter sp. HZ01 for Bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Hui Hong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum pollution is a severe environmental issue. Comprehensively revealing the genetic backgrounds of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms contributes to developing effective methods for bioremediation of crude oil-polluted environments. Marine bacterium Achromobacter sp. HZ01 is capable of degrading hydrocarbons and producing biosurfactants. In this study, the draft genome (5.5 Mbp of strain HZ01 has been obtained by Illumina sequencing, containing 5,162 predicted genes. Genome annotation shows that “amino acid metabolism” is the most abundant metabolic pathway. Strain HZ01 is not capable of using some common carbohydrates as the sole carbon sources, which is due to that it contains few genes associated with carbohydrate transport and lacks some important enzymes related to glycometabolism. It contains abundant proteins directly related to petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. AlkB hydroxylase and its homologs were not identified. It harbors a complete enzyme system of terminal oxidation pathway for n-alkane degradation, which may be initiated by cytochrome P450. The enzymes involved in the catechol pathway are relatively complete for the degradation of aromatic compounds. This bacterium lacks several essential enzymes for methane oxidation, and Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase involved in the subterminal oxidation pathway and cycloalkane degradation was not identified. These results suggest that strain HZ01 degrades n-alkanes via the terminal oxidation pathway, degrades aromatic compounds primarily via the catechol pathway and cannot perform methane oxidation or cycloalkane degradation. Additionally, strain HZ01 possesses abundant genes related to the metabolism of secondary metabolites, including some genes involved in biosurfactant (such as glycolipids and lipopeptides synthesis. The genome analysis also reveals its genetic basis for nitrogen metabolism, antibiotic resistance, regulatory responses to environmental changes, cell motility

  4. The Douglas-fir genome sequence reveals specialization of the photosynthetic apparatus in Pinaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. Neale; Patrick E. McGuire; Nicholas C. Wheeler; Kristian A. Stevens; Marc W. Crepeau; Charis Cardeno; Aleksey V. Zimin; Daniela Puiu; Geo M. Pertea; U. Uzay Sezen; Claudio Casola; Tomasz E. Koralewski; Robin Paul; Daniel Gonzalez-Ibeas; Sumaira Zaman; Richard Cronn; Mark Yandell; Carson Holt; Charles H. Langley; James A. Yorke; Steven L. Salzberg; Jill L. Wegrzyn

    2017-01-01

    A reference genome sequence for Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Coastal Douglas-fir) is reported, thus providing a reference sequence for a third genus of the family Pinaceae. The contiguity and quality of the genome assembly far exceeds that of other conifer reference genome sequences (contig N50 = 44,136 bp and scaffold N50...

  5. Exome sequencing reveals MCM8 mutation underlies ovarian failure and chromosomal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAsiri, Saleh; Basit, Sulman; Wood-Trageser, Michelle A.; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Jeffries, Elizabeth P.; Surti, Urvashi; Ketterer, Deborah M.; Afzal, Sibtain; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Faiyaz-Ul Haque, Muhammad; Jiang, Huaiyang; Trakselis, Michael A.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder that includes individuals with manifestations ranging from primary amenorrhea to loss of menstrual function prior to age 40. POF presents as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and can be part of a syndrome or occur in isolation. Here, we studied 3 sisters with primary amenorrhea, hypothyroidism, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. The sisters were born to parents who are first cousins. SNP analysis and whole-exome sequencing revealed the presence of a pathogenic variant of the minichromosome maintenance 8 gene (MCM8, c.446C>G; p.P149R) located within a region of homozygosity that was present in the affected daughters but not in their unaffected sisters. Because MCM8 participates in homologous recombination and dsDNA break repair, we tested fibroblasts from the affected sisters for hypersensitivity to chromosomal breaks. Compared with fibroblasts from unaffected daughters, chromosomal break repair was deficient in fibroblasts from the affected individuals, likely due to inhibited recruitment of MCM8 p.P149R to sites of DNA damage. Our study identifies an autosomal recessive disorder caused by an MCM8 mutation that manifests with endocrine dysfunction and genomic instability. PMID:25437880

  6. Spatial clustering of binding motifs and charges reveals conserved functional features in disordered nucleoporin sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) gates the only channel through which cells exchange material between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Traffic is regulated by transport receptors bound to cargo which interact with numerous of disordered phenylalanine glycine (FG) repeat containing proteins (FG nups) that line this channel. The precise physical mechanism of transport regulation has remained elusive primarily due to the difficulty in understanding the structure and dynamics of such a large assembly of interacting disordered proteins. Here we have performed a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis, specifically tailored towards disordered proteins, on thousands of nuclear pore proteins from a variety of species revealing a set of highly conserved features in the sequence structure among FG nups. Contrary to the general perception that these proteins are functionally equivalent to homogeneous polymers, we show that biophysically important features within individual nups like the separation, spatial localization and ordering along the chain of FG and charge domains are highly conserved. Our current understanding of NPC structure and function should therefore be revised to account for these common features that are functionally relevant for the underlying physical mechanism of NPC gating.

  7. Methylome sequencing in triple-negative breast cancer reveals distinct methylation clusters with prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirzaker, Clare; Zotenko, Elena; Song, Jenny Z; Qu, Wenjia; Nair, Shalima S; Locke, Warwick J; Stone, Andrew; Armstong, Nicola J; Robinson, Mark D; Dobrovic, Alexander; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Peters, Kate M; French, Juliet D; Stein, Sandra; Korbie, Darren J; Trau, Matt; Forbes, John F; Scott, Rodney J; Brown, Melissa A; Francis, Glenn D; Clark, Susan J

    2015-02-02

    Epigenetic alterations in the cancer methylome are common in breast cancer and provide novel options for tumour stratification. Here, we perform whole-genome methylation capture sequencing on small amounts of DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and matched normal samples. We identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) enriched with promoters associated with transcription factor binding sites and DNA hypersensitive sites. Importantly, we stratify TNBCs into three distinct methylation clusters associated with better or worse prognosis and identify 17 DMRs that show a strong association with overall survival, including DMRs located in the Wilms tumour 1 (WT1) gene, bi-directional-promoter and antisense WT1-AS. Our data reveal that coordinated hypermethylation can occur in oestrogen receptor-negative disease, and that characterizing the epigenetic framework provides a potential signature to stratify TNBCs. Together, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of profiling the cancer methylome with limited archival tissue to identify regulatory regions associated with cancer.

  8. Genome sequence of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus reveals mechanisms governing adaptation to a humic-rich ecological niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Emmanuelle; Kohler, Annegret; Baker, Adam R.; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Lombard, Vincent; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Brun, Annick; Aerts, Andrea L.; Bailey, Andrew M.; Billette, Christophe; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Deakin, Greg; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Floudas, Dimitrios; Grimwood, Jane; Hilden, Kristiina; Kues, Ursula; LaButti, Kurt M.; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan M.; Murat, Claude; Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Wosten, Han A. B.; Xu, Jianping; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Foster, Gary D.; Sonnenberg, Anton S. M.; Cullen, Dan; de Vries, Ronald P.; Lundell, Taina; Hibbett, David S.; Henrissat, Bernard; Burton, Kerry S.; Kerrigan, Richard W.; Challen, Michael P.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Martin, Francis

    2012-04-27

    Agaricus bisporus is the model fungus for the adaptation, persistence, and growth in the humic-rich leaf-litter environment. Aside from its ecological role, A. bisporus has been an important component of the human diet for over 200 y and worldwide cultivation of the button mushroom forms a multibillion dollar industry. We present two A. bisporus genomes, their gene repertoires and transcript profiles on compost and during mushroom formation. The genomes encode a full repertoire of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes similar to that of wood-decayers. Comparative transcriptomics of mycelium grown on defined medium, casing-soil, and compost revealed genes encoding enzymes involved in xylan, cellulose, pectin, and protein degradation are more highly expressed in compost. The striking expansion of heme-thiolate peroxidases and etherases is distinctive from Agaricomycotina wood-decayers and suggests a broad attack on decaying lignin and related metabolites found in humic acid-rich environment. Similarly, up-regulation of these genes together with a lignolytic manganese peroxidase, multiple copper radical oxidases, and cytochrome P450s is consistent with challenges posed by complex humic-rich substrates. The gene repertoire and expression of hydrolytic enzymes in A. bisporus is substantially different from the taxonomically related ectomycorrhizal symbiont Laccaria bicolor. A common promoter motif was also identified in genes very highly expressed in humic-rich substrates. These observations reveal genetic and enzymatic mechanisms governing adaptation to the humic-rich ecological niche formed during plant degradation, further defining the critical role such fungi contribute to soil structure and carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. Genome sequence will expedite mushroom breeding for improved agronomic characteristics.

  9. Intergenic DNA sequences from the human X chromosome reveal high rates of global gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Jeffrey D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive efforts devoted to collecting human polymorphism data, little is known about the role of gene flow in the ancestry of human populations. This is partly because most analyses have applied one of two simple models of population structure, the island model or the splitting model, which make unrealistic biological assumptions. Results Here, we analyze 98-kb of DNA sequence from 20 independently evolving intergenic regions on the X chromosome in a sample of 90 humans from six globally diverse populations. We employ an isolation-with-migration (IM model, which assumes that populations split and subsequently exchange migrants, to independently estimate effective population sizes and migration rates. While the maximum effective size of modern humans is estimated at ~10,000, individual populations vary substantially in size, with African populations tending to be larger (2,300–9,000 than non-African populations (300–3,300. We estimate mean rates of bidirectional gene flow at 4.8 × 10-4/generation. Bidirectional migration rates are ~5-fold higher among non-African populations (1.5 × 10-3 than among African populations (2.7 × 10-4. Interestingly, because effective sizes and migration rates are inversely related in African and non-African populations, population migration rates are similar within Africa and Eurasia (e.g., global mean Nm = 2.4. Conclusion We conclude that gene flow has played an important role in structuring global human populations and that migration rates should be incorporated as critical parameters in models of human demography.

  10. The identification of FANCD2 DNA binding domains reveals nuclear localization sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraj, Joshi; Caron, Marie-Christine; Drapeau, Karine; Bérubé, Stéphanie; Guitton-Sert, Laure; Coulombe, Yan; Couturier, Anthony M; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2017-08-21

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disorder characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone-marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. The FA pathway consists of at least 21 FANC genes (FANCA-FANCV), and the encoded protein products interact in a common cellular pathway to gain resistance against DNA interstrand crosslinks. After DNA damage, FANCD2 is monoubiquitinated and accumulates on chromatin. FANCD2 plays a central role in the FA pathway, using yet unidentified DNA binding regions. By using synthetic peptide mapping and DNA binding screen by electromobility shift assays, we found that FANCD2 bears two major DNA binding domains predominantly consisting of evolutionary conserved lysine residues. Furthermore, one domain at the N-terminus of FANCD2 bears also nuclear localization sequences for the protein. Mutations in the bifunctional DNA binding/NLS domain lead to a reduction in FANCD2 monoubiquitination and increase in mitomycin C sensitivity. Such phenotypes are not fully rescued by fusion with an heterologous NLS, which enable separation of DNA binding and nuclear import functions within this domain that are necessary for FANCD2 functions. Collectively, our results enlighten the importance of DNA binding and NLS residues in FANCD2 to activate an efficient FA pathway. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Whole genome sequencing revealed host adaptation-focused genomic plasticity of pathogenic Leptospira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yinghua; Zhu, Yongzhang; Wang, Yuezhu; Chang, Yung-Fu; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Xiugao; Zhuang, Xuran; Zhu, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jinlong; Zeng, Lingbing; Yang, Minjun; Li, Shijun; Wang, Shengyue; Ye, Qiang; Xin, Xiaofang; Zhao, Guoping; Zheng, Huajun; Guo, Xiaokui; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp., has recently been recognized as an emerging infectious disease worldwide. Despite its severity and global importance, knowledge about the molecular pathogenesis and virulence evolution of Leptospira spp. remains limited. Here we sequenced and analyzed 102 isolates representing global sources. A high genomic variability were observed among different Leptospira species, which was attributed to massive gene gain and loss events allowing for adaptation to specific niche conditions and changing host environments. Horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication allowed the stepwise acquisition of virulence factors in pathogenic Leptospira evolved from a recent common ancestor. More importantly, the abundant expansion of specific virulence-related protein families, such as metalloproteases-associated paralogs, were exclusively identified in pathogenic species, reflecting the importance of these protein families in the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. Our observations also indicated that positive selection played a crucial role on this bacteria adaptation to hosts. These novel findings may lead to greater understanding of the global diversity and virulence evolution of Leptospira spp. PMID:26833181

  12. Mutagenic and cytotoxic properties of oxidation products of 5-methylcytosine revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Wen Xing

    Full Text Available 5-methylcytosine (5-mC can be sequentially oxidized to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC, 5-formylcytosine (5-foC, and finally to 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC, which is thought to function in active DNA cytosine demethylation in mammals. Although the roles of 5-mC in epigenetic regulation of gene expression are well established, the effects of 5-hmC, 5-foC and 5-caC on DNA replication remain unclear. Here we report a systematic study on how these cytosine derivatives (5-hmC, 5-foC and 5-caC perturb the efficiency and accuracy of DNA replication using shuttle vector technology in conjugation with next-g sequencing. Our results demonstrated that, in Escherichia coli cells, all the cytosine derivatives could induce CT transition mutation at frequencies of 0.17%-1.12%, though no effect on replication efficiency was observed. These findings provide an important new insight on the potential mutagenic properties of cytosine derivatives occurring as the intermediates of DNA demethylation.

  13. Phylogenetic inferences of Nepenthes species in Peninsular Malaysia revealed by chloroplast (trnL intron) and nuclear (ITS) DNA sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Bunawan, Hamidun; Yen, Choong Chee; Yaakop, Salmah; Noor, Normah Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Background The chloroplastic trnL intron and the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region were sequenced for 11 Nepenthes species recorded in Peninsular Malaysia to examine their phylogenetic relationship and to evaluate the usage of trnL intron and ITS sequences for phylogenetic reconstruction of this genus. Results Phylogeny reconstruction was carried out using neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses. All the trees revealed two major clusters, a lowland group consi...

  14. Whole-genome sequencing reveals the mechanisms for evolution of streptomycin resistance in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuxin; Gao, Jiayuan; Wang, Bini; Huo, Dongxue; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Jiachao; Shao, Yuyu

    2018-04-01

    In this research, we investigated the evolution of streptomycin resistance in Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC14917, which was passaged in medium containing a gradually increasing concentration of streptomycin. After 25 d, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of L. plantarum ATCC14917 had reached 131,072 µg/mL, which was 8,192-fold higher than the MIC of the original parent isolate. The highly resistant L. plantarum ATCC14917 isolate was then passaged in antibiotic-free medium to determine the stability of resistance. The MIC value of the L. plantarum ATCC14917 isolate decreased to 2,048 µg/mL after 35 d but remained constant thereafter, indicating that resistance was irreversible even in the absence of selection pressure. Whole-genome sequencing of parent isolates, control isolates, and isolates following passage was used to study the resistance mechanism of L. plantarum ATCC14917 to streptomycin and adaptation in the presence and absence of selection pressure. Five mutated genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms and structural variants) were verified in highly resistant L. plantarum ATCC14917 isolates, which were related to ribosomal protein S12, LPXTG-motif cell wall anchor domain protein, LrgA family protein, Ser/Thr phosphatase family protein, and a hypothetical protein that may correlate with resistance to streptomycin. After passage in streptomycin-free medium, only the mutant gene encoding ribosomal protein S12 remained; the other 4 mutant genes had reverted to the wild type as found in the parent isolate. Although the MIC value of L. plantarum ATCC14917 was reduced in the absence of selection pressure, it remained 128-fold higher than the MIC value of the parent isolate, indicating that ribosomal protein S12 may play an important role in streptomycin resistance. Using the mobile elements database, we demonstrated that streptomycin resistance-related genes in L. plantarum ATCC14917 were not located on mobile elements. This research offers a way of

  15. Genomic diversity and evolution of Mycobacterium ulcerans revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Qi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. It is an emerging infectious disease that afflicts mainly children and youths in West Africa. Little is known about the evolution and transmission mode of M. ulcerans, partially due to the lack of known genetic polymorphisms among isolates, limiting the application of genetic epidemiology. To systematically profile single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, we sequenced the genomes of three M. ulcerans strains using 454 and Solexa technologies. Comparison with the reference genome of the Ghanaian classical lineage isolate Agy99 revealed 26,564 SNPs in a Japanese strain representing the ancestral lineage. Only 173 SNPs were found when comparing Agy99 with two other Ghanaian isolates, which belong to the two other types previously distinguished in Ghana by variable number tandem repeat typing. We further analyzed a collection of Ghanaian strains using the SNPs discovered. With 68 SNP loci, we were able to differentiate 54 strains into 13 distinct SNP haplotypes. The average SNP nucleotide diversity was low (average 0.06-0.09 across 68 SNP loci, and 96% of the SNP locus pairs were in complete linkage disequilibrium. We estimated that the divergence of the M. ulcerans Ghanaian clade from the Japanese strain occurred 394 to 529 thousand years ago. The Ghanaian subtypes diverged about 1000 to 3000 years ago, or even much more recently, because we found evidence that they evolved significantly faster than average. Our results offer significant insight into the evolution of M. ulcerans and provide a comprehensive report on genetic diversity within a highly clonal M. ulcerans population from a Buruli ulcer endemic region, which can facilitate further epidemiological studies of this pathogen through the development of high-resolution tools.

  16. Analysis of genome sequences from plant pathogenic Rhodococcus reveals genetic novelties in virulence loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L Creason

    Full Text Available Members of Gram-positive Actinobacteria cause economically important diseases to plants. Within the Rhodococcus genus, some members can cause growth deformities and persist as pathogens on a wide range of host plants. The current model predicts that phytopathogenic isolates require a cluster of three loci present on a linear plasmid, with the fas operon central to virulence. The Fas proteins synthesize, modify, and activate a mixture of growth regulating cytokinins, which cause a hormonal imbalance in plants, resulting in abnormal growth. We sequenced and compared the genomes of 20 isolates of Rhodococcus to gain insights into the mechanisms and evolution of virulence in these bacteria. Horizontal gene transfer was identified as critical but limited in the scale of virulence evolution, as few loci are conserved and exclusive to phytopathogenic isolates. Although the fas operon is present in most phytopathogenic isolates, it is absent from phytopathogenic isolate A21d2. Instead, this isolate has a horizontally acquired gene chimera that encodes a novel fusion protein with isopentyltransferase and phosphoribohydrolase domains, predicted to be capable of catalyzing and activating cytokinins, respectively. Cytokinin profiling of the archetypal D188 isolate revealed only one activate cytokinin type that was specifically synthesized in a fas-dependent manner. These results suggest that only the isopentenyladenine cytokinin type is synthesized and necessary for Rhodococcus phytopathogenicity, which is not consistent with the extant model stating that a mixture of cytokinins is necessary for Rhodococcus to cause leafy gall symptoms. In all, data indicate that only four horizontally acquired functions are sufficient to confer the trait of phytopathogenicity to members of the genetically diverse clade of Rhodococcus.

  17. DNA sequence analyses reveal abundant diversity, endemism and evidence for Asian origin of the porcini mushrooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Feng

    Full Text Available The wild gourmet mushroom Boletus edulis and its close allies are of significant ecological and economic importance. They are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but despite their ubiquity there are still many unresolved issues with regard to the taxonomy, systematics and biogeography of this group of mushrooms. Most phylogenetic studies of Boletus so far have characterized samples from North America and Europe and little information is available on samples from other areas, including the ecologically and geographically diverse regions of China. Here we analyzed DNA sequence variation in three gene markers from samples of these mushrooms from across China and compared our findings with those from other representative regions. Our results revealed fifteen novel phylogenetic species (about one-third of the known species and a newly identified lineage represented by Boletus sp. HKAS71346 from tropical Asia. The phylogenetic analyses support eastern Asia as the center of diversity for the porcini sensu stricto clade. Within this clade, B. edulis is the only known holarctic species. The majority of the other phylogenetic species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore, molecular dating and geological evidence suggest that this group of mushrooms originated during the Eocene in eastern Asia, followed by dispersal to and subsequent speciation in other parts of Asia, Europe, and the Americas from the middle Miocene through the early Pliocene. In contrast to the ancient dispersal of porcini in the strict sense in the Northern Hemisphere, the occurrence of B. reticulatus and B. edulis sensu lato in the Southern Hemisphere was probably due to recent human-mediated introductions.

  18. Deep small RNA sequencing from the nematode Ascaris reveals conservation, functional diversification, and novel developmental profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Czech, Benjamin; Crunk, Amanda; Wallace, Adam; Mitreva, Makedonka; Hannon, Gregory J; Davis, Richard E

    2011-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells express several classes of small RNAs that regulate gene expression and ensure genome maintenance. Endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) mainly control gene and transposon expression in the germline, while microRNAs (miRNAs) generally function in post-transcriptional gene silencing in both somatic and germline cells. To provide an evolutionary and developmental perspective on small RNA pathways in nematodes, we identified and characterized known and novel small RNA classes through gametogenesis and embryo development in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum and compared them with known small RNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans. piRNAs, Piwi-clade Argonautes, and other proteins associated with the piRNA pathway have been lost in Ascaris. miRNAs are synthesized immediately after fertilization in utero, before pronuclear fusion, and before the first cleavage of the zygote. This is the earliest expression of small RNAs ever described at a developmental stage long thought to be transcriptionally quiescent. A comparison of the two classes of Ascaris endo-siRNAs, 22G-RNAs and 26G-RNAs, to those in C. elegans, suggests great diversification and plasticity in the use of small RNA pathways during spermatogenesis in different nematodes. Our data reveal conserved characteristics of nematode small RNAs as well as features unique to Ascaris that illustrate significant flexibility in the use of small RNAs pathways, some of which are likely an adaptation to Ascaris' life cycle and parasitism. The transcriptome assembly has been submitted to NCBI Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly Sequence Database(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/TSA.html) under accession numbers JI163767–JI182837 and JI210738–JI257410.

  19. Analysis of genome sequences from plant pathogenic Rhodococcus reveals genetic novelties in virulence loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creason, Allison L; Vandeputte, Olivier M; Savory, Elizabeth A; Davis, Edward W; Putnam, Melodie L; Hu, Erdong; Swader-Hines, David; Mol, Adeline; Baucher, Marie; Prinsen, Els; Zdanowska, Magdalena; Givan, Scott A; El Jaziri, Mondher; Loper, Joyce E; Mahmud, Taifo; Chang, Jeff H

    2014-01-01

    Members of Gram-positive Actinobacteria cause economically important diseases to plants. Within the Rhodococcus genus, some members can cause growth deformities and persist as pathogens on a wide range of host plants. The current model predicts that phytopathogenic isolates require a cluster of three loci present on a linear plasmid, with the fas operon central to virulence. The Fas proteins synthesize, modify, and activate a mixture of growth regulating cytokinins, which cause a hormonal imbalance in plants, resulting in abnormal growth. We sequenced and compared the genomes of 20 isolates of Rhodococcus to gain insights into the mechanisms and evolution of virulence in these bacteria. Horizontal gene transfer was identified as critical but limited in the scale of virulence evolution, as few loci are conserved and exclusive to phytopathogenic isolates. Although the fas operon is present in most phytopathogenic isolates, it is absent from phytopathogenic isolate A21d2. Instead, this isolate has a horizontally acquired gene chimera that encodes a novel fusion protein with isopentyltransferase and phosphoribohydrolase domains, predicted to be capable of catalyzing and activating cytokinins, respectively. Cytokinin profiling of the archetypal D188 isolate revealed only one activate cytokinin type that was specifically synthesized in a fas-dependent manner. These results suggest that only the isopentenyladenine cytokinin type is synthesized and necessary for Rhodococcus phytopathogenicity, which is not consistent with the extant model stating that a mixture of cytokinins is necessary for Rhodococcus to cause leafy gall symptoms. In all, data indicate that only four horizontally acquired functions are sufficient to confer the trait of phytopathogenicity to members of the genetically diverse clade of Rhodococcus.

  20. Amplicon Sequencing Reveals Microbiological Signatures in Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E. Bagwell

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Water quality is an important determinant for the structural integrity of alloy cladded fuels and assemblies during long-term wet storage. Detailed characterization of a water filled storage basin for spent nuclear reactor fuel was performed following the formation and proliferation of an amorphous white flocculent. White precipitant was sampled throughout the storage basin for chemical and spectroscopic characterization, and environmental DNA was extracted for 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity. Accordingly, spectroscopic analyses indicated the precipitant to be primarily amorphous to crystalline aluminum (oxy hydroxides with minor associated elemental components including Fe, Si, Ti, and U. High levels of organic carbon were co-localized with the precipitant relative to bulk dissolved organic concentrations. Bacterial densities were highly variable between sampling locations and with depth within the water filled storage basin; cell numbers ranged from 4 × 103to 4 × 104 cells/mL. Bacterial diversity that was physically associated with the aluminum (oxy hydroxide complexes exceeded an estimated 4,000 OTUs/amplicon library (3% cutoff and the majority of sequences were aligned to the families Burkholderiaceae (23%, Nitrospiraceae (23%, Hyphomicrobiaceae (17%, and Comamonadaceae (6%. We surmise that episodic changes in the physical and chemical properties of the basin contribute to the polymerization of aluminum (oxy hydroxides, which in turn can chemisorb nutrients, carbon ligands and bacterial cells from the surrounding bulk aqueous phase. As such, these precipitants should establish favorable microhabitats for bacterial colonization and growth. Comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries across a selection of natural and engineered aquatic ecosystems were performed and microbial community and taxonomic signatures unique to the spent nuclear fuel (SNF storage basin environment were revealed. These insights

  1. DNA Sequence Analyses Reveal Abundant Diversity, Endemism and Evidence for Asian Origin of the Porcini Mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bang; Xu, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Zeng, Nian-Kai; Li, Yan-Chun; Tolgor, Bau; Kost, Gerhard W.; Yang, Zhu L.

    2012-01-01

    The wild gourmet mushroom Boletus edulis and its close allies are of significant ecological and economic importance. They are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but despite their ubiquity there are still many unresolved issues with regard to the taxonomy, systematics and biogeography of this group of mushrooms. Most phylogenetic studies of Boletus so far have characterized samples from North America and Europe and little information is available on samples from other areas, including the ecologically and geographically diverse regions of China. Here we analyzed DNA sequence variation in three gene markers from samples of these mushrooms from across China and compared our findings with those from other representative regions. Our results revealed fifteen novel phylogenetic species (about one-third of the known species) and a newly identified lineage represented by Boletus sp. HKAS71346 from tropical Asia. The phylogenetic analyses support eastern Asia as the center of diversity for the porcini sensu stricto clade. Within this clade, B. edulis is the only known holarctic species. The majority of the other phylogenetic species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore, molecular dating and geological evidence suggest that this group of mushrooms originated during the Eocene in eastern Asia, followed by dispersal to and subsequent speciation in other parts of Asia, Europe, and the Americas from the middle Miocene through the early Pliocene. In contrast to the ancient dispersal of porcini in the strict sense in the Northern Hemisphere, the occurrence of B. reticulatus and B. edulis sensu lato in the Southern Hemisphere was probably due to recent human-mediated introductions. PMID:22629418

  2. Not All Order Memory Is Equal: Test Demands Reveal Dissociations in Memory for Sequence Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Tanya R.; MacLeod, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Remembering the order of a sequence of events is a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Indeed, a number of formal models represent temporal context as part of the memory system, and memory for order has been researched extensively. Yet, the nature of the code(s) underlying sequence memory is still relatively unknown. Across 4 experiments that…

  3. Deep amplicon sequencing reveals mixed phytoplasma infection within single grapevine plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Mogens; Contaldo, Nicoletta; Makarova, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of phytoplasmas within single plants has not yet been fully investigated. In this project, deep amplicon sequencing was used to generate 50,926 phytoplasma sequences from 11 phytoplasma-infected grapevine samples from a PCR amplicon in the 5' end of the 16S region. After clustering ...

  4. Intraclade heterogeneity in nitrogen utilization by marine prokaryotes revealed using stable isotope probing coupled with tag sequencing (Tag-SIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Morando

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen can greatly influence the structure and productivity of microbial communities through its relative availability and form. However, roles of specific organisms in the uptake of different nitrogen species remain poorly characterized. Most studies seeking to identify agents of assimilation have been correlative, indirectly linking activity measurements (e.g., nitrate uptake with the presence or absence of biological markers, particularly functional genes and their transcripts. Evidence is accumulating of previously underappreciated functional diversity in major microbial subpopulations, which may confer physiological advantages under certain environmental conditions leading to ecotype divergence. This microdiversity further complicates our view of genetic variation in environmental samples requiring the development of more targeted approaches. Here, next-generation tag sequencing was successfully coupled with stable isotope probing (Tag-SIP to assess the ability of individual phylotypes to assimilate a particular N source. Our results provide the first direct evidence of nitrate utilization by organisms thought to lack the genes required for this process including the heterotrophic clades SAR11 and the Archaeal Marine Group II (MG-II. We also provide new direct evidence of in situ nitrate utilization by the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus in support of recent findings. Furthermore, these results revealed widespread functional heterogeneity, i.e. different levels of N assimilation within clades, likely reflecting niche partitioning by ecotypes. The addition of nitrate utilization to ecosystem and ecosystem models by these globally dominant clades will likely improve the mechanistic accuracy of these models.

  5. Deep RNA sequencing reveals hidden features and dynamics of early gene transcription in Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Blanc

    Full Text Available Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1 is the prototype of the genus Chlorovirus (family Phycodnaviridae that infects the unicellular, eukaryotic green alga Chlorella variabilis NC64A. The 331-kb PBCV-1 genome contains 416 major open reading frames. A mRNA-seq approach was used to analyze PBCV-1 transcriptomes at 6 progressive times during the first hour of infection. The alignment of 17 million reads to the PBCV-1 genome allowed the construction of single-base transcriptome maps. Significant transcription was detected for a subset of 50 viral genes as soon as 7 min after infection. By 20 min post infection (p.i., transcripts were detected for most PBCV-1 genes and transcript levels continued to increase globally up to 60 min p.i., at which time 41% or the poly (A+-containing RNAs in the infected cells mapped to the PBCV-1 genome. For some viral genes, the number of transcripts in the latter time points (20 to 60 min p.i. was much higher than that of the most highly expressed host genes. RNA-seq data revealed putative polyadenylation signal sequences in PBCV-1 genes that were identical to the polyadenylation signal AAUAAA of green algae. Several transcripts have an RNA fragment excised. However, the frequency of excision and the resulting putative shortened protein products suggest that most of these excision events have no functional role but are probably the result of the activity of misled splicesomes.

  6. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Maize mosaic rhabdovirus-infected gut tissues of Peregrinus maidis reveals the presence of key components of insect innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, A E; Rotenberg, D; Aritua, V; Hogenhout, S A

    2011-04-01

    The corn planthopper, Peregrinus maidis, causes direct feeding damage to plants and transmits Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV) in a persistent-propagative manner. MMV must cross several insect tissue layers for successful transmission to occur, and the gut serves as an important barrier for rhabdovirus transmission. In order to facilitate the identification of proteins that may interact with MMV either by facilitating acquisition or responding to virus infection, we generated and analysed the gut transcriptome of P. maidis. From two normalized cDNA libraries, we generated a P. maidis gut transcriptome composed of 20,771 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Assembly of the sequences yielded 1860 contigs and 14,032 singletons, and biological roles were assigned to 5793 (36%). Comparison of P. maidis ESTs with other insect amino acid sequences revealed that P. maidis shares greatest sequence similarity with another hemipteran, the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. We identified 202 P. maidis transcripts with putative homology to proteins associated with insect innate immunity, including those implicated in the Toll, Imd, JAK/STAT, Jnk and the small-interfering RNA-mediated pathways. Sequence comparisons between our P. maidis gut EST collection and the currently available National Center for Biotechnology Information EST database collection for Ni. lugens revealed that a pathogen recognition receptor in the Imd pathway, peptidoglycan recognition protein-long class (PGRP-LC), is present in these two members of the family Delphacidae; however, these recognition receptors are lacking in the model hemipteran Acyrthosiphon pisum. In addition, we identified sequences in the P. maidis gut transcriptome that share significant amino acid sequence similarities with the rhabdovirus receptor molecule, acetylcholine receptor (AChR), found in other hosts. This EST analysis sheds new light on immune response pathways in hemipteran guts that will be useful for further dissecting innate

  7. Next-generation sequencing reveals genomic features in the Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Sano, Satoshi; Nunome, Mitsuo; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Kuwayama, Takehito; Takahashi, Shinji; Kawashima, Takaharu; Matsuda, Yoichi; Yoshimura, Takashi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2013-06-01

    The Japanese quail has several advantages as a laboratory animal for biological and biomedical investigations. In this study, the draft genome of the Japanese quail was sequenced and assembled using next-generation sequencing technology. To improve the quality of the assembly, the sequence reads from the Japanese quail were aligned against the reference genome of the chicken. The final draft assembly consisted of 1.75 Gbp with an N50 contig length of 11,409 bp. On the basis of the draft genome sequence obtained, we developed 100 microsatellite markers and used these markers to evaluate the genetic variability and diversity of 11 lines of Japanese quail. Furthermore, we identified Japanese quail orthologs of spermatogenesis markers and analyzed their expression using in situ hybridization. The Japanese quail genome sequence obtained in the present study could enhance the value of this species as a model animal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiological roles revealed by ghrelin and ghrelin receptor deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is a hormone made in the stomach and known primarily for its growth hormone releasing and orexigenic properties. Nevertheless, ghrelin through its receptor, the GHS-R1a, has been shown to exert many roles including regulation of glucose homeostasis, memory & learning, food addiction and neur...

  9. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-03-18

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Inactivation of Wolbachia Reveals Its Biological Roles in Whitefly Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xia; Li, Shao-Jian; Ahmed, Muhammad Z.; De Barro, Paul J.; Ren, Shun-Xiang; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2012-01-01

    Background The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is cryptic species complex composed of numerous species. Individual species from the complex harbor a diversity of bacterial endosymbionts including Wolbachia. However, while Wolbachia is known to have a number of different roles, its role in B. tabaci is unclear. Here, the antibiotic rifampicin is used to selectively eliminate Wolbachia from B. tabaci so as to enable its roles in whitefly development and reproduction to be explored. The indirect effects of Wolbachia elimination on the biology of Encarsia bimaculata, a dominant parasitoid of B. tabaci in South China, were also investigated. Methodology/Principal Finding qRT-PCR and FISH were used to show that after 48 h exposure to 1.0 mg/ml rifampicin, Wolbachia was completely inactivated from B. tabaci Mediterranean (MED) without any significant impact on either the primary symbiont, Portiera aleyrodidarum or any of the other secondary endosymbionts present. For B. tabaci MED, Wolbachia was shown to be associated with decreased juvenile development time, increased likelihood that nymphs completed development, increased adult life span and increased percentage of female progeny. Inactivation was associated with a significant decrease in the body size of the 4th instar which leads us to speculate as to whether Wolbachia may have a nutrient supplementation role. The reduction in nymph body size has consequences for its parasitoid, E. bimaculata. The elimination of Wolbachia lead to a marked increase in the proportion of parasitoid eggs that completed their development, but the reduced size of the whitefly host was also associated with a significant reduction in the size of the emerging parasitoid adult and this was in turn associated with a marked reduction in adult parasitoid longevity. Conclusions/Significance Wolbachia increases the fitness of the whitefly host and provides some protection against parasitization. These observations add to our understanding of the roles

  11. Genomic and Functional Characteristics of Human Cytomegalovirus Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Sijmons

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV was elucidated almost 25 years ago using a traditional cloning and Sanger sequencing approach. Analysis of the genetic content of additional laboratory and clinical isolates has lead to a better, albeit still incomplete, definition of the coding potential and diversity of wild-type HCMV strains. The introduction of a new generation of massively parallel sequencing technologies, collectively called next-generation sequencing, has profoundly increased the throughput and resolution of the genomics field. These increased possibilities are already leading to a better understanding of the circulating diversity of HCMV clinical isolates. The higher resolution of next-generation sequencing provides new opportunities in the study of intrahost viral population structures. Furthermore, deep sequencing enables novel diagnostic applications for sensitive drug resistance mutation detection. RNA-seq applications have changed the picture of the HCMV transcriptome, which resulted in proof of a vast amount of splicing events and alternative transcripts. This review discusses the application of next-generation sequencing technologies, which has provided a clearer picture of the intricate nature of the HCMV genome. The continuing development and application of novel sequencing technologies will further augment our understanding of this ubiquitous, but elusive, herpesvirus.

  12. Genomic and Functional Characteristics of Human Cytomegalovirus Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijmons, Steven; Van Ranst, Marc; Maes, Piet

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was elucidated almost 25 years ago using a traditional cloning and Sanger sequencing approach. Analysis of the genetic content of additional laboratory and clinical isolates has lead to a better, albeit still incomplete, definition of the coding potential and diversity of wild-type HCMV strains. The introduction of a new generation of massively parallel sequencing technologies, collectively called next-generation sequencing, has profoundly increased the throughput and resolution of the genomics field. These increased possibilities are already leading to a better understanding of the circulating diversity of HCMV clinical isolates. The higher resolution of next-generation sequencing provides new opportunities in the study of intrahost viral population structures. Furthermore, deep sequencing enables novel diagnostic applications for sensitive drug resistance mutation detection. RNA-seq applications have changed the picture of the HCMV transcriptome, which resulted in proof of a vast amount of splicing events and alternative transcripts. This review discusses the application of next-generation sequencing technologies, which has provided a clearer picture of the intricate nature of the HCMV genome. The continuing development and application of novel sequencing technologies will further augment our understanding of this ubiquitous, but elusive, herpesvirus. PMID:24603756

  13. Potential human pathogenic bacteria in five hot springs in Eritrea revealed by next generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boga, Hamadi Iddi; Anami, Sylvester Elikana; Mehari, Tadesse; Budambula, Nancy L. M.

    2018-01-01

    Human pathogens can survive and grow in hot springs. For water quality assessment, Escherichia coli or Enterococci are the main thermotolerant enteric bacteria commonly used to estimate the load of pathogenic bacteria in water. However, most of the environmental bacteria are unculturable thus culture methods may cause bias in detection of most pathogens. Illumina sequencing can provide a more comprehensive and accurate insight into environmental bacterial pathogens, which can be used to develop better risk assessment methods and promote public health awareness. In this study, high-throughput Illumina sequencing was used to identify bacterial pathogens from five hot springs; Maiwooi, Akwar, Garbanabra, Elegedi and Gelti, in Eritrea. Water samples were collected from the five hot springs. Total community DNA was extracted from samples using the phenol-chloroform method. The 16S rRNA gene variable region (V4—V7) of the extracted DNA was amplified and library construction done according to Illumina sequencing protocol. The sequence reads (length >200 bp) from Illumina sequencing libraries ranged from 22,091 sequences in the wet sediment sample from Garbanabra to 155,789 sequences in the mat sample from Elegedi. Taxonomy was assigned to each OTU using BLASTn against a curated database derived from GreenGenes, RDPII, SILVA SSU Reference 119 and NCBI. The proportion of potential pathogens from the water samples was highest in Maiwooi (17.8%), followed by Gelti (16.7%), Akwar (13.6%) and Garbanabra (10.9%). Although the numbers of DNA sequence reads from Illumina sequencing were very high for the Elegedi (104,328), corresponding proportion of potential pathogens very low (3.6%). Most of the potential pathogenic bacterial sequences identified were from Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Legionella and Clostridium were the most common detected genera with different species. Most of the potential pathogens were detected from the water samples. However, sequences belonging to

  14. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment.

  15. Ultra-deep sequencing reveals the subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is primarily caused by alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Recent DNA sequencing studies suggests that HNSCC are very heterogeneous between patients; however the intra-patient subclonal...... structure remains unexplored due to lack of sampling multiple tumor biopsies from each patient. Materials and methods: To examine the clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with targeted ultra-deep targeted sequencing on biopsies from 5stage IV...... OSCC patients. From each patient, a series of biopsies were sampled from 3 distinct geographical sites in primary tumor and 1 lymph node metastasis. A whole blood sample was taken as the matched reference. Results and discussion: Our results demonstrate that ultra-deep sequencing gives a level...

  16. Whole-genome sequencing reveals mutational landscape underlying phenotypic differences between two widespread Chinese cattle breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yao; Jiang, Yu; Shi, Tao; Cai, Hanfang; Lan, Xianyong; Zhao, Xin; Plath, Martin; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing provides a powerful tool to obtain more genetic variability that could produce a range of benefits for cattle breeding industry. Nanyang (Bos indicus) and Qinchuan (Bos taurus) are two important Chinese indigenous cattle breeds with distinct phenotypes. To identify the genetic characteristics responsible for variation in phenotypes between the two breeds, in the present study, we for the first time sequenced the genomes of four Nanyang and four Qinchuan cattle with 10 ...

  17. De Novo transcriptome sequencing reveals important molecular networks and metabolic pathways of the plant, Chlorophytum borivilianum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Kalra

    Full Text Available Chlorophytum borivilianum, an endangered medicinal plant species is highly recognized for its aphrodisiac properties provided by saponins present in the plant. The transcriptome information of this species is limited and only few hundred expressed sequence tags (ESTs are available in the public databases. To gain molecular insight of this plant, high throughput transcriptome sequencing of leaf RNA was carried out using Illumina's HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform. A total of 22,161,444 single end reads were retrieved after quality filtering. Available (e.g., De-Bruijn/Eulerian graph and in-house developed bioinformatics tools were used for assembly and annotation of transcriptome. A total of 101,141 assembled transcripts were obtained, with coverage size of 22.42 Mb and average length of 221 bp. Guanine-cytosine (GC content was found to be 44%. Bioinformatics analysis, using non-redundant proteins, gene ontology (GO, enzyme commission (EC and kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG databases, extracted all the known enzymes involved in saponin and flavonoid biosynthesis. Few genes of the alkaloid biosynthesis, along with anticancer and plant defense genes, were also discovered. Additionally, several cytochrome P450 (CYP450 and glycosyltransferase unique sequences were also found. We identified simple sequence repeat motifs in transcripts with an abundance of di-nucleotide simple sequence repeat (SSR; 43.1% markers. Large scale expression profiling through Reads per Kilobase per Million mapped reads (RPKM showed major genes involved in different metabolic pathways of the plant. Genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs and unique sequences from this study provide an important resource for the scientific community, interested in the molecular genetics and functional genomics of C. borivilianum.

  18. De Novo transcriptome sequencing reveals important molecular networks and metabolic pathways of the plant, Chlorophytum borivilianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Shikha; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Kumar, Sunil; Kaur, Jagdeep; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Singh, Kashmir

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophytum borivilianum, an endangered medicinal plant species is highly recognized for its aphrodisiac properties provided by saponins present in the plant. The transcriptome information of this species is limited and only few hundred expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are available in the public databases. To gain molecular insight of this plant, high throughput transcriptome sequencing of leaf RNA was carried out using Illumina's HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform. A total of 22,161,444 single end reads were retrieved after quality filtering. Available (e.g., De-Bruijn/Eulerian graph) and in-house developed bioinformatics tools were used for assembly and annotation of transcriptome. A total of 101,141 assembled transcripts were obtained, with coverage size of 22.42 Mb and average length of 221 bp. Guanine-cytosine (GC) content was found to be 44%. Bioinformatics analysis, using non-redundant proteins, gene ontology (GO), enzyme commission (EC) and kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) databases, extracted all the known enzymes involved in saponin and flavonoid biosynthesis. Few genes of the alkaloid biosynthesis, along with anticancer and plant defense genes, were also discovered. Additionally, several cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and glycosyltransferase unique sequences were also found. We identified simple sequence repeat motifs in transcripts with an abundance of di-nucleotide simple sequence repeat (SSR; 43.1%) markers. Large scale expression profiling through Reads per Kilobase per Million mapped reads (RPKM) showed major genes involved in different metabolic pathways of the plant. Genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and unique sequences from this study provide an important resource for the scientific community, interested in the molecular genetics and functional genomics of C. borivilianum.

  19. Comment on "Protein sequences from mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex revealed by mass spectrometry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Mike; Walker, Angela; Ho, Simon Y W; Yang, Yue; Smith, Colin; Ashton, Peter; Oates, Jane Thomas; Cappellini, Enrico; Koon, Hannah; Penkman, Kirsty; Elsworth, Ben; Ashford, Dave; Solazzo, Caroline; Andrews, Phillip; Strahler, John; Shapiro, Beth; Ostrom, Peggy; Gandhi, Hasand; Miller, Webb; Raney, Brian; Zylber, Maria Ines; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Prigodich, Richard V; Ryan, Michael; Rijsdijk, Kenneth F; Janoo, Anwar; Collins, Matthew J

    2008-01-04

    We used authentication tests developed for ancient DNA to evaluate claims by Asara et al. (Reports, 13 April 2007, p. 280) of collagen peptide sequences recovered from mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex fossils. Although the mastodon samples pass these tests, absence of amino acid composition data, lack of evidence for peptide deamidation, and association of alpha1(I) collagen sequences with amphibians rather than birds suggest that T. rex does not.

  20. Transcriptome sequencing of Mycosphaerella fijiensis during association with Musa acuminata reveals candidate pathogenicity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Roslyn D; Daub, Margaret E

    2016-08-30

    genes with higher expression in infected leaf tissue, suggesting that they may play a role in pathogenicity. For two other scaffolds, no transcripts were detected in either condition, and PCR assays support the hypothesis that at least one of these scaffolds corresponds to a dispensable chromosome that is not required for survival or pathogenicity. Our study revealed major changes in the transcriptome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, when associating with its host compared to during saprophytic growth in medium. This analysis identified putative pathogenicity genes and also provides support for the existence of dispensable chromosomes in this fungus.

  1. RNA interference revealed the roles of two carboxylesterase genes in insecticide detoxification in Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Yang, Meiling; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-10-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) play key roles in metabolism of specific hormones and detoxification of dietary and environmental xenobiotics in insects. We sequenced and characterized CarE cDNAs putatively derived from two different genes named LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most important agricultural pests in the world. The full-length cDNAs of LmCesA1 (1892 bp) and LmCesA2 (1643 bp) encode 543 and 501 amino acid residues, respectively. The two deduced CarEs share a characteristic α/β-hydrolase structure, including a catalytic triad composed of Ser-Glu (Asp)-His and a consensus sequence GQSAG, which suggests that both CarEs are biologically active. Phylogenetic analysis grouped both LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 into clade A which has been suggested to be involved in dietary detoxification. Both transcripts were highly expressed in all the nymphal and adult stages, but only slightly expressed in eggs. Analyses of tissue-dependent expression and in situ hybridization revealed that both transcripts were primarily expressed in gastric caeca. RNA interference (RNAi) of LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 followed by a topical application of carbaryl or deltamethrin did not lead to a significantly increased mortality with either insecticide. However, RNAi of LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 increased insect mortalities by 20.9% and 14.5%, respectively, when chlorpyrifos was applied. These results suggest that these genes might not play a significant role in detoxification of carbaryl and deltamethrin but are most likely to be involved in detoxification of chlorpyrifos in L. migratoria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Whole-genome sequencing reveals novel insights into sulfur oxidation in the extremophile Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huaqun; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoqi; He, Zhili; Liang, Yili; Guo, Xue; Hu, Qi; Xiao, Yunhua; Cong, Jing; Ma, Liyuan; Niu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-07-04

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (A. thiooxidans), a chemolithoautotrophic extremophile, is widely used in the industrial recovery of copper (bioleaching or biomining). The organism grows and survives by autotrophically utilizing energy derived from the oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs). However, the lack of genetic manipulation systems has restricted our exploration of its physiology. With the development of high-throughput sequencing technology, the whole genome sequence analysis of A. thiooxidans has allowed preliminary models to be built for genes/enzymes involved in key energy pathways like sulfur oxidation. The genome of A. thiooxidans A01 was sequenced and annotated. It contains key sulfur oxidation enzymes involved in the oxidation of elemental sulfur and RISCs, such as sulfur dioxygenase (SDO), sulfide quinone reductase (SQR), thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase (TQO), tetrathionate hydrolase (TetH), sulfur oxidizing protein (Sox) system and their associated electron transport components. Also, the sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR) gene was detected in the draft genome sequence of A. thiooxidans A01, and multiple sequence alignment was performed to explore the function of groups of related protein sequences. In addition, another putative pathway was found in the cytoplasm of A. thiooxidans, which catalyzes sulfite to sulfate as the final product by phosphoadenosine phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase and adenylylsulfate (APS) kinase. This differs from its closest relative Acidithiobacillus caldus, which is performed by sulfate adenylyltransferase (SAT). Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that most of sulfur oxidation genes were more strongly expressed in the S0 medium than that in the Na2S2O3 medium at the mid-log phase. Sulfur oxidation model of A. thiooxidans A01 has been constructed based on previous studies from other sulfur oxidizing strains and its genome sequence analyses, providing insights

  3. Exome sequencing reveals novel rare variants in the ryanodine receptor and calcium channel genes in malignant hyperthermia families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jerry H; Jarvik, Gail P; Browning, Brian L; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Gordon, Adam S; Rieder, Mark J; Robertson, Peggy D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Fisher, Nickla A; Hopkins, Philip M

    2013-11-01

    About half of malignant hyperthermia (MH) cases are associated with skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) and calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, α1S subunit (CACNA1S) gene mutations, leaving many with an unknown cause. The authors chose to apply a sequencing approach to uncover causal variants in unknown cases. Sequencing the exome, the protein-coding region of the genome, has power at low sample sizes and identified the cause of over a dozen Mendelian disorders. The authors considered four families with multiple MH cases lacking mutations in RYR1 and CACNA1S by Sanger sequencing of complementary DNA. Exome sequencing in two affecteds per family, chosen for maximum genetic distance, were compared. Variants were ranked by allele frequency, protein change, and measures of conservation among mammals to assess likelihood of causation. Finally, putative pathogenic mutations were genotyped in other family members to verify cosegregation with MH. Exome sequencing revealed one rare RYR1 nonsynonymous variant in each of three families (Asp1056His, Val2627Met, Val4234Leu), and one CACNA1S variant (Thr1009Lys) in the fourth family. These were not seen in variant databases or in our control population sample of 5,379 exomes. Follow-up sequencing in other family members verified cosegregation of alleles with MH. The authors found that using both exome sequencing and allele frequency data from large sequencing efforts may aid genetic diagnosis of MH. In a sample selected by the authors, this technique was more sensitive for variant detection in known genes than Sanger sequencing of complementary DNA, and allows for the possibility of novel gene discovery.

  4. Supplementary Material for: Whole genome sequencing reveals genomic heterogeneity and antibiotic purification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Black, PA

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the interrogation of mycobacterial genomes. Recent studies have reported conflicting findings on the genomic stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the evolution of drug resistance. In an age where whole genome sequencing is increasingly relied upon for defining the structure of bacterial genomes, it is important to investigate the reliability of next generation sequencing to identify clonal variants present in a minor percentage of the population. This study aimed to define a reliable cut-off for identification of low frequency sequence variants and to subsequently investigate genetic heterogeneity and the evolution of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from single colonies from 14 rifampicin mono-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, as well as the primary cultures and follow up MDR cultures from two of these patients. The whole genomes of the M. tuberculosis isolates were sequenced using either the Illumina MiSeq or Illumina HiSeq platforms. Sequences were analysed with an in-house pipeline. Results Using next-generation sequencing in combination with Sanger sequencing and statistical analysis we defined a read frequency cut-off of 30 % to identify low frequency M. tuberculosis variants with high confidence. Using this cut-off we demonstrated a high rate of genetic diversity between single colonies isolated from one population, showing that by using the current sequencing technology, single colonies are not a true reflection of the genetic diversity within a whole population and vice versa. We further showed that numerous heterogeneous variants emerge and then disappear during the evolution of isoniazid resistance within individual patients. Our findings allowed us to formulate a model for the selective bottleneck which occurs during the course of infection, acting as a genomic purification event. Conclusions Our study demonstrated true levels of genetic

  5. Whole genome sequencing reveals genomic heterogeneity and antibiotic purification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Black, PA

    2015-10-24

    Background Whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the interrogation of mycobacterial genomes. Recent studies have reported conflicting findings on the genomic stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the evolution of drug resistance. In an age where whole genome sequencing is increasingly relied upon for defining the structure of bacterial genomes, it is important to investigate the reliability of next generation sequencing to identify clonal variants present in a minor percentage of the population. This study aimed to define a reliable cut-off for identification of low frequency sequence variants and to subsequently investigate genetic heterogeneity and the evolution of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from single colonies from 14 rifampicin mono-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, as well as the primary cultures and follow up MDR cultures from two of these patients. The whole genomes of the M. tuberculosis isolates were sequenced using either the Illumina MiSeq or Illumina HiSeq platforms. Sequences were analysed with an in-house pipeline. Results Using next-generation sequencing in combination with Sanger sequencing and statistical analysis we defined a read frequency cut-off of 30 % to identify low frequency M. tuberculosis variants with high confidence. Using this cut-off we demonstrated a high rate of genetic diversity between single colonies isolated from one population, showing that by using the current sequencing technology, single colonies are not a true reflection of the genetic diversity within a whole population and vice versa. We further showed that numerous heterogeneous variants emerge and then disappear during the evolution of isoniazid resistance within individual patients. Our findings allowed us to formulate a model for the selective bottleneck which occurs during the course of infection, acting as a genomic purification event. Conclusions Our study demonstrated true levels of genetic diversity

  6. Deep Sequencing Reveals a MicroRNA Expression Signature in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Yin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chuang, Eric Y

    2018-01-01

    Deep sequencing is an advanced technology in genomic biology to detect the precise order of nucleotides in a strand of DNA/RNA molecule. The analysis of deep sequencing data also requires sophisticated knowledge in both computational software and bioinformatics. In this chapter, the procedures of deep sequencing analysis of microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome in triple-negative breast cancer and adjacent normal tissue are described in detail. As miRNAs are critical regulators of gene expression and many of them were previously reported to be associated with the malignant progression of human cancer, the analytical method that accurately identifies deregulated miRNAs in a specific type of cancer is thus important for the understanding of its tumor behavior. We obtained raw sequence reads of miRNA expression from 24 triple-negative breast cancers and 14 adjacent normal tissues using deep sequencing technology in this work. Expression data of miRNA reads were normalized with the quantile-quantile scaling method and were analyzed statistically. A miRNA expression signature composed of 25 differentially expressed miRNAs showed to be an effective classifier between triple-negative breast cancers and adjacent normal tissues in a hierarchical clustering analysis.

  7. 3′ terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-transcriptional 3′ end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3′ RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3′ terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. Results The 3′ terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3′ terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3′ terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). Conclusions 3′ RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3′ terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs. PMID:24053768

  8. 3' terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-09-21

    Post-transcriptional 3' end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3' RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3' terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. The 3' terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3' terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3' terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). 3' RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3' terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs.

  9. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals dynamic evolution of the elastin gene that has involved purifying selection and lineage-specific insertions/deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Eric D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elastin gene (ELN is implicated as a factor in both supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and Williams Beuren Syndrome (WBS, two diseases involving pronounced complications in mental or physical development. Although the complete spectrum of functional roles of the processed gene product remains to be established, these roles are inferred to be analogous in human and mouse. This view is supported by genomic sequence comparison, in which there are no large-scale differences in the ~1.8 Mb sequence block encompassing the common region deleted in WBS, with the exception of an overall reversed physical orientation between human and mouse. Results Conserved synteny around ELN does not translate to a high level of conservation in the gene itself. In fact, ELN orthologs in mammals show more sequence divergence than expected for a gene with a critical role in development. The pattern of divergence is non-conventional due to an unusually high ratio of gaps to substitutions. Specifically, multi-sequence alignments of eight mammalian sequences reveal numerous non-aligning regions caused by species-specific insertions and deletions, in spite of the fact that the vast majority of aligning sites appear to be conserved and undergoing purifying selection. Conclusions The pattern of lineage-specific, in-frame insertions/deletions in the coding exons of ELN orthologous genes is unusual and has led to unique features of the gene in each lineage. These differences may indicate that the gene has a slightly different functional mechanism in mammalian lineages, or that the corresponding regions are functionally inert. Identified regions that undergo purifying selection reflect a functional importance associated with evolutionary pressure to retain those features.

  10. Ultra-deep sequencing reveals the subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is primarily caused by alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Recent DNA sequencing studies suggests that HNSCC are very heterogeneous between patients; however the intra-patient subclonal...... structure remains unexplored due to lack of sampling multiple tumor biopsies from each patient. Materials and methods: To examine the clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with targeted ultra-deep targeted sequencing on biopsies from 5stage IV...... of unprecedented high resolution enabling clear detection of subclonal structure and observation of otherwise undetectable mutations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that OSCC show a high degree of inter-patient heterogeneity but a low degree of intra-patient/tumor heterogeneity. However, some OSCC cancers contain...

  11. Which MRI sequence of the spine best reveals bone-marrow metastases of neuroblastoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, James S.; Jaramillo, Diego; Siegel, Marilyn J.; Farooqui, Saleem O.; Fletcher, Barry D.; Hoffer, Fredric A.

    2005-01-01

    MRI is an effective tool in evaluating bone marrow metastases. However, no study has defined which MRI sequences or image characteristics best correlate with bone-marrow metastases in neuroblastoma. To identify and refine MRI criteria and sequence selection for the diagnosis of bone-marrow metastases in children with neuroblastoma. Ninety-one children (mean age: 3.2 years; standard deviation: 2.8 years) enrolled in the RDOG IV study participated in our study. Forty-five children had bone metastases determined by bone-marrow aspiration or biopsy (n=4), radionuclide imaging (n=2), or both (n=39). Spine lesions were characterized using coronal T1-weighted (T1W) sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and coronal gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (GAD) MR sequences. Contingency table analysis was performed to determine which MRI sequences and characteristics were associated with metastases. The MRI criteria for metastatic disease were then developed for each imaging sequence. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of these criteria were determined for the whole group, children younger than 12 months old, and children 12 months and older. The MR characteristics that had significant (P ≤ 0.05) associations with metastases were homogeneous low T1-signal intensity, homogeneous high STIR-signal intensity, and heterogeneous pattern on T1, STIR, or GAD. Homogeneous low T1-signal had the highest sensitivity (88%), but a specificity of 62% for detecting metastases. A heterogeneous pattern on GAD was highly specific (97%), but relatively insensitive (65%) for detecting metastases. These MR characteristics were most accurate in children 12 months and older. The combination of non-contrast-enhanced T1W and GAD sequences can be used to determine the presence of spinal metastases in children with neuroblastoma, particularly those children who are 1 year and older. (orig.)

  12. The solution structure of a chimeric LEKTI domain reveals a chameleon sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidow, Henning; Lauber, Thomas; Vitzithum, Klaus; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Rösch, Paul; Marx, Ute C

    2004-09-07

    The conversion of an alpha-helical to a beta-strand conformation and the presence of chameleon sequences are fascinating from the perspective that such structural features are implicated in the induction of amyloid-related fatal diseases. In this study, we have determined the solution structure of a chimeric domain (Dom1PI) from the multidomain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor LEKTI using multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. This chimeric protein was constructed to investigate the reasons for differences in the folds of the homologous LEKTI domains 1 and 6 [Lauber, T., et al. (2003) J. Mol. Biol. 328, 205-219]. In Dom1PI, two adjacent phenylalanine residues (F28 and F29) of domain 1 were substituted with proline and isoleucine, respectively, as found in the corresponding P4' and P5' positions of domain 6. The three-dimensional structure of Dom1PI is significantly different from the structure of domain 1 and closely resembles the structure of domain 6, despite the sequence being identical to that of domain 1 except for the two substituted phenylalanine residues and being only 31% identical to the sequence of domain 6. The mutation converted a short 3(10)-helix into an extended loop conformation and parts of the long COOH-terminal alpha-helix of domain 1 into a beta-hairpin structure. The latter conformational change occurs in a sequence stretch distinct from the region containing the substituted residues. Therefore, this switch from an alpha-helical structure to a beta-hairpin structure indicates a chameleon sequence of seven residues. We conclude that the secondary structure of Dom1PI is determined not only by the local protein sequence but also by nonlocal interactions.

  13. Working Memory for Sequences of Temporal Durations Reveals a Volatile Single-Item Store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Sanjay G; Husain, Masud

    2016-01-01

    When a sequence is held in working memory, different items are retained with differing fidelity. Here we ask whether a sequence of brief time intervals that must be remembered show recency effects, similar to those observed in verbal and visuospatial working memory. It has been suggested that prioritizing some items over others can be accounted for by a "focus of attention," maintaining some items in a privileged state. We therefore also investigated whether such benefits are vulnerable to disruption by attention or expectation. Participants listened to sequences of one to five tones, of varying durations (200 ms to 2 s). Subsequently, the length of one of the tones in the sequence had to be reproduced by holding a key. The discrepancy between the reproduced and actual durations quantified the fidelity of memory for auditory durations. Recall precision decreased with the number of items that had to be remembered, and was better for the first and last items of sequences, in line with set-size and serial position effects seen in other modalities. To test whether attentional filtering demands might impair performance, an irrelevant variation in pitch was introduced in some blocks of trials. In those blocks, memory precision was worse for sequences that consisted of only one item, i.e., the smallest memory set-size. Thus, when irrelevant information was present, the benefit of having only one item in memory is attenuated. Finally we examined whether expectation could interfere with memory. On half the trials, the number of items in the upcoming sequence was cued. When the number of items was known in advance, performance was paradoxically worse when the sequence consisted of only one item. Thus the benefit of having only one item to remember is stronger when it is unexpectedly the only item. Our results suggest that similar mechanisms are used to hold auditory time durations in working memory, as for visual or verbal stimuli. Further, solitary items were remembered

  14. Working memory for sequences of temporal durations reveals a volatile single-item store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay G Manohar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When a sequence is held in working memory, different items are retained with differing fidelity. Here we ask whether a sequence of brief time intervals that must be remembered show recency effects, similar to those observed in verbal and visuospatial working memory. It has been suggested that prioritising some items over others can be accounted for by a focus of attention, maintaining some items in a privileged state. We therefore also investigated whether such benefits are vulnerable to disruption by attention or expectation. Participants listened to sequences of one to five tones, of varying durations (200ms to 2s. Subsequently, the length of one of the tones in the sequence had to be reproduced by holding a key. The discrepancy between the reproduced and actual durations quantified the fidelity of memory for auditory durations. Recall precision decreased with the number of items that had to be remembered, and was better for the first and last items of sequences, in line with set-size and serial position effects seen in other modalities. To test whether attentional filtering demands might impair performance, an irrelevant variation in pitch was introduced in some blocks of trials. In those blocks, memory precision was worse for sequences that consisted of only one item, i.e. the smallest memory set size. Thus, when irrelevant information was present, the benefit of having only one item in memory is attenuated. Finally we examined whether expectation could interfere with memory. On half the trials, the number of items in the upcoming sequence was cued. When the number of items was known in advance, performance was paradoxically worse when the sequence consisted of only one item. Thus the benefit of having only one item to remember is stronger when it is unexpectedly the only item. Our results suggest that similar mechanisms are used to hold auditory time durations in working memory, as for visual or verbal stimuli. Further, solitary items were

  15. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    The homolog of the gyrB gene, which has been reported to be present in the vicinity of the initiation site of replication in bacteria, was mapped on the Mycoplasma hominis genome, and the region was subsequently sequenced. Five open reading frames were identified flanking the gyrB gene, one...... of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  16. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, King-Hwa; Brautigan, Peter J; Hahn, Christopher N; Daish, Tasman; Rayner, John R; Cheah, Pike-See; Raison, Joy M; Piltz, Sandra; Mann, Jeffrey R; Mattiske, Deidre M; Thomas, Paul Q; Adelson, David L; Scott, Hamish S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5) mouse brain. ...

  17. A genomewide screen for suppressors of Alu-mediated rearrangements reveals a role for PIF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Chisholm

    Full Text Available Alu-mediated rearrangement of tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during carcinogenesis. In breast cancer, this mechanism contributes to loss of the wild-type BRCA1 allele in inherited disease and to loss of heterozygosity in sporadic cancer. To identify genes required for suppression of Alu-mediated recombination we performed a genomewide screen of a collection of 4672 yeast gene deletion mutants using a direct repeat recombination assay. The primary screen and subsequent analysis identified 12 candidate genes including TSA, ELG1, and RRM3, which are known to play a significant role in maintaining genomic stability. Genetic analysis of the corresponding human homologs was performed in sporadic breast tumors and in inherited BRCA1-associated carcinomas. Sequencing of these genes in high risk breast cancer families revealed a potential role for the helicase PIF1 in cancer predisposition. PIF1 variant L319P was identified in three breast cancer families; importantly, this variant, which is predicted to be functionally damaging, was not identified in a large series of controls nor has it been reported in either dbSNP or the 1000 Genomes Project. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Pfh1 is required to maintain both mitochondrial and nuclear genomic integrity. Functional studies in yeast of human PIF1 L319P revealed that this variant cannot complement the essential functions of Pfh1 in either the nucleus or mitochondria. Our results provide a global view of nonessential genes involved in suppressing Alu-mediated recombination and implicate variation in PIF1 in breast cancer predisposition.

  18. EXOME SEQUENCING REVEALS PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCIES IN CHILDREN WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA SEPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Asgari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is a common bacterium mostly associated with healthcare-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. 2 out of 8 (25% fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in primary immunodeficiency genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing primary immunodeficiencies in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  19. Deep-sequencing revealed Citrus bark cracking viroid (CBCVd) as a highly aggressive pathogen on hop

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakše, J.; Radišek, S.; Pokorn, T.; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Javornik, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2015), s. 831-842 ISSN 0032-0862 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14255 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bioinformatic * Citrus bark cracking viroid * Hop * Next-generation sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.383, year: 2015

  20. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  1. Oil palm genome sequence reveals divergence of interfertile species in old and new worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajinder; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie; Manaf, Mohamad Arif Abdul; Rosli, Rozana; Nookiah, Rajanaidu; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ooi, Siew–Eng; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Halim, Mohd Amin; Azizi, Norazah; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Bacher, Blaire; Lakey, Nathan; Smith, Steven W; He, Dong; Hogan, Michael; Budiman, Muhammad A; Lee, Ernest K; DeSalle, Rob; Kudrna, David; Goicoechea, Jose Louis; Wing, Rod; Wilson, Richard K; Fulton, Robert S; Ordway, Jared M; Martienssen, Robert A; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi

    2013-01-01

    Oil palm is the most productive oil-bearing crop. Planted on only 5% of the total vegetable oil acreage, palm oil accounts for 33% of vegetable oil, and 45% of edible oil worldwide, but increased cultivation competes with dwindling rainforest reserves. We report the 1.8 gigabase (Gb) genome sequence of the African oil palm Elaeis guineensis, the predominant source of worldwide oil production. 1.535 Gb of assembled sequence and transcriptome data from 30 tissue types were used to predict at least 34,802 genes, including oil biosynthesis genes and homologues of WRINKLED1 (WRI1), and other transcriptional regulators1, which are highly expressed in the kernel. We also report the draft sequence of the S. American oil palm Elaeis oleifera, which has the same number of chromosomes (2n=32) and produces fertile interspecific hybrids with E. guineensis2, but appears to have diverged in the new world. Segmental duplications of chromosome arms define the palaeotetraploid origin of palm trees. The oil palm sequence enables the discovery of genes for important traits as well as somaclonal epigenetic alterations which restrict the use of clones in commercial plantings3, and thus helps achieve sustainability for biofuels and edible oils, reducing the rainforest footprint of this tropical plantation crop. PMID:23883927

  2. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  3. Transcription profile of boar spermatozoa as revealed by RNA-sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) overcomes the limitations of the current hybridization-based techniques to detect the actual pool of RNA transcripts in spermatozoa. The application of this technology in livestock can speed the discovery of potential predictors of male fertility. As a first ...

  4. High diversity of picornaviruses in rats from different continents revealed by deep sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arn Hansen, Thomas; Mollerup, Sarah; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock are not uncommon, and an important component in containment of such emerging viral diseases is rapid and reliable diagnostics. Such methods are often PCR-based and hence require the availability of sequence data from the pathogen. Rattus norv...

  5. Sequence exploration reveals information bias among molecular markers used in phylogenetic reconstruction for Colletotrichum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersad, Sephra N; Hosein, Fazeeda N; Carrington, Christine Vf

    2014-01-01

    The Colletotrichum gloeosporioides species complex is among the most destructive fungal plant pathogens in the world, however, identification of isolates of quarantine importance to the intra-specific level is confounded by a number of factors that affect phylogenetic reconstruction. Information bias and quality parameters were investigated to determine whether nucleotide sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees accurately reflect the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of individuals. Sequence exploration of GAPDH, ACT, TUB2 and ITS markers indicated that the query sequences had different patterns of nucleotide substitution but were without evidence of base substitution saturation. Regions of high entropy were much more dispersed in the ACT and GAPDH marker alignments than for the ITS and TUB2 markers. A discernible bimodal gap in the genetic distance frequency histograms was produced for the ACT and GAPDH markers which indicated successful separation of intra- and inter-specific sequences in the data set. Overall, analyses indicated clear differences in the ability of these markers to phylogenetically separate individuals to the intra-specific level which coincided with information bias.

  6. Comment on "Protein sequences from mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex revealed by mass spectrometry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevzner, Pavel A; Kim, Sangtae; Ng, Julio

    2008-08-22

    Asara et al. (Reports, 13 April 2007, p. 280) reported sequencing of Tyrannosaurus rex proteins and used them to establish the evolutionary relationships between birds and dinosaurs. We argue that the reported T. rex peptides may represent statistical artifacts and call for complete data release to enable experimental and computational verification of their findings.

  7. Taxonomy of anaerobic digestion microbiome reveals biases associated with the applied high throughput sequencing strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campanaro, Stefano; Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis

    2018-01-01

    In the past few years, many studies investigated the anaerobic digestion microbiome by means of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Results obtained from these studies were compared to each other without taking into consideration the followed procedure for amplicons preparation and data analysis...

  8. Reduced representation bisulphite sequencing of the cattle genome reveals DNA methylation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reduced representation bisulphite sequencing (RRBS), we obtained the first single-base-resolution maps of bovine DNA methylation in ten somatic tissues. In total, we observed 1,868,049 cytosines in the CG-enriched regions. Similar to the methylation patterns in other species, the CG context wa...

  9. Reduced representation bisulphite sequencing of the ten bovine somatic tissues reveals DNA methylation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a major component epigenetics, DNA methylation has been proved that widely functions in individual development and various diseases. It has been well studied in model organisms and human but includes limited data for the economic animals. Using reduced representation bisulphite sequencing (RRBS),...

  10. Community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in undisturbed vegetation revealed by analyses of LSU rdna sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren; Holtgrewe-Stukenbrock, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots and are found in most ecosystems. In this study the community structure of AMF in a clade of the genus Glomus was examined in undisturbed costal grassland using LSU rDNA sequences amplified from roots of Hieracium...

  11. Low diversity in the mitogenome of sperm whales revealed by next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alana Alexander; Debbie Steel; Beth Slikas; Kendra Hoekzema; Colm Carraher; Matthew Parks; Richard Cronn; C. Scott Baker

    2012-01-01

    Large population sizes and global distributions generally associate with high mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) diversity. The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is an exception, showing low CR diversity relative to other cetaceans; however, diversity levels throughout the remainder of the sperm whale mitogenome are unknown. We sequenced 20...

  12. Small RNA sequencing reveals metastasis-related microRNAs in lung adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Iben; Venø, Morten T.; Yan, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The majority of lung cancer deaths are caused by metastatic disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression and miRNA dysregulation can contribute to metastatic progression. Here, small RNA sequencing was used to profile the miRNA and piwi-interacting RNA (pi...

  13. Sequence dependence of electron-induced DNA strand breakage revealed by DNA nanoarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian; Rackwitz, Jenny; Cauët, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    sections for electron induced single strand breaks in specific 13 mer oligonucleotides we used atomic force microscopy analysis of DNA origami based DNA nanoarrays. We investigated the DNA sequences 5'-TT(XYX)3TT with X = A, G, C and Y = T, BrU 5-bromouracil and found absolute strand break cross sections...

  14. Fosmid library end sequencing reveals a rarely known genome structure of marine shrimp Penaeus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ming

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon is one of the most important aquaculture species in the world, representing the crustacean lineage which possesses the greatest species diversity among marine invertebrates. Yet, we barely know anything about their genomic structure. To understand the organization and evolution of the P. monodon genome, a fosmid library consisting of 288,000 colonies and was constructed, equivalent to 5.3-fold coverage of the 2.17 Gb genome. Approximately 11.1 Mb of fosmid end sequences (FESs from 20,926 non-redundant reads representing 0.45% of the P. monodon genome were obtained for repetitive and protein-coding sequence analyses. Results We found that microsatellite sequences were highly abundant in the P. monodon genome, comprising 8.3% of the total length. The density and the average length of microsatellites were evidently higher in comparison to those of other taxa. AT-rich microsatellite motifs, especially poly (AT and poly (AAT, were the most abundant. High abundance of microsatellite sequences were also found in the transcribed regions. Furthermore, via self-BlastN analysis we identified 103 novel repetitive element families which were categorized into four groups, i.e., 33 WSSV-like repeats, 14 retrotransposons, 5 gene-like repeats, and 51 unannotated repeats. Overall, various types of repeats comprise 51.18% of the P. monodon genome in length. Approximately 7.4% of the FESs contained protein-coding sequences, and the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP gene and the Innexin 3 gene homologues appear to be present in high abundance in the P. monodon genome. Conclusions The redundancy of various repeat types in the P. monodon genome illustrates its highly repetitive nature. In particular, long and dense microsatellite sequences as well as abundant WSSV-like sequences highlight the uniqueness of genome organization of penaeid shrimp from those of other taxa. These results provide substantial

  15. Whole exome sequencing reveals concomitant mutations of multiple FA genes in individual Fanconi anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lixian; Yuan, Weiping; Zeng, Huimin; Zhou, Quanquan; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Li, Miaomiao; Wang, Xiaomin; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Fengchun; Yang, Yungui; Cheng, Tao; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2014-05-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited genetic syndrome with highly variable clinical manifestations. Fifteen genetic subtypes of FA have been identified. Traditional complementation tests for grouping studies have been used generally in FA patients and in stepwise methods to identify the FA type, which can result in incomplete genetic information from FA patients. We diagnosed five pediatric patients with FA based on clinical manifestations, and we performed exome sequencing of peripheral blood specimens from these patients and their family members. The related sequencing data were then analyzed by bioinformatics, and the FANC gene mutations identified by exome sequencing were confirmed by PCR re-sequencing. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of FANC genes were identified in all of the patients. The FA subtypes of the patients included FANCA, FANCM and FANCD2. Interestingly, four FA patients harbored multiple mutations in at least two FA genes, and some of these mutations have not been previously reported. These patients' clinical manifestations were vastly different from each other, as were their treatment responses to androstanazol and prednisone. This finding suggests that heterozygous mutation(s) in FA genes could also have diverse biological and/or pathophysiological effects on FA patients or FA gene carriers. Interestingly, we were not able to identify de novo mutations in the genes implicated in DNA repair pathways when the sequencing data of patients were compared with those of their parents. Our results indicate that Chinese FA patients and carriers might have higher and more complex mutation rates in FANC genes than have been conventionally recognized. Testing of the fifteen FANC genes in FA patients and their family members should be a regular clinical practice to determine the optimal care for the individual patient, to counsel the family and to obtain a better understanding of FA pathophysiology.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Fer-de-Lance Virus reveals a novel gene in reptilian Paramyxoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, G.; Batts, W.N.; Ahne, W.; Winton, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The complete RNA genome sequence of the archetype reptilian paramyxovirus, Fer-de-Lance virus (FDLV), has been determined. The genome is 15,378 nucleotides in length and consists of seven nonoverlapping genes in the order 3??? N-U-P-M-F-HN-L 5???, coding for the nucleocapsid, unknown, phospho-, matrix, fusion, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase, and large polymerase proteins, respectively. The gene junctions contain highly conserved transcription start and stop signal sequences and tri-nucleotide intergenic regions similar to those of other Paramyxoviridae. The FDLV P gene expression strategy is like that of rubulaviruses, which express the accessory V protein from the primary transcript and edit a portion of the mRNA to encode P and I proteins. There is also an overlapping open reading frame potentially encoding a small basic protein in the P gene. The gene designated U (unknown), encodes a deduced protein of 19.4 kDa that has no counterpart in other paramyxoviruses and has no similarity with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Active transcription of the U gene in infected cells was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis, and bicistronic N-U mRNA was also evident. The genomes of two other snake paramyxovirus genotypes were also found to have U genes, with 11 to 16% nucleotide divergence from the FDLV U gene. Pairwise comparisons of amino acid identities and phylogenetic analyses of all deduced FDLV protein sequences with homologous sequences from other Paramyxoviridae indicate that FDLV represents a new genus within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae. We suggest the name Ferlavirus for the new genus, with FDLV as the type species.

  17. Hybrid sequencing approach applied to human fecal metagenomic clone libraries revealed clones with potential biotechnological applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Džunková

    Full Text Available Natural environments represent an incredible source of microbial genetic diversity. Discovery of novel biomolecules involves biotechnological methods that often require the design and implementation of biochemical assays to screen clone libraries. However, when an assay is applied to thousands of clones, one may eventually end up with very few positive clones which, in most of the cases, have to be "domesticated" for downstream characterization and application, and this makes screening both laborious and expensive. The negative clones, which are not considered by the selected assay, may also have biotechnological potential; however, unfortunately they would remain unexplored. Knowledge of the clone sequences provides important clues about potential biotechnological application of the clones in the library; however, the sequencing of clones one-by-one would be very time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we characterized the first metagenomic clone library from the feces of a healthy human volunteer, using a method based on 454 pyrosequencing coupled with a clone-by-clone Sanger end-sequencing. Instead of whole individual clone sequencing, we sequenced 358 clones in a pool. The medium-large insert (7-15 kb cloning strategy allowed us to assemble these clones correctly, and to assign the clone ends to maintain the link between the position of a living clone in the library and the annotated contig from the 454 assembly. Finally, we found several open reading frames (ORFs with previously described potential medical application. The proposed approach allows planning ad-hoc biochemical assays for the clones of interest, and the appropriate sub-cloning strategy for gene expression in suitable vectors/hosts.

  18. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl-Emiliane Tien Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10m and oxygen-starved basin (200m waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n=5010 had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI’s non-redundant ‘nr’ database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  19. Whole exome sequencing of pediatric gastric adenocarcinoma reveals an atypical presentation of Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Vivian Y; Federman, Noah; Martinez-Agosto, Julian; Tatishchev, Sergei F; Nelson, Stanley F

    2013-04-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a rare diagnosis in childhood. A 14-year-old male patient presented with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma, and a strong family history of colon cancer. Clinical sequencing of CDH1 and APC were negative. Whole exome sequencing was therefore applied to capture the majority of protein-coding regions for the identification of single-nucleotide variants, small insertion/deletions, and copy number abnormalities in the patient's germline as well as primary tumor. DNA was extracted from the patient's blood, primary tumor, and the unaffected mother's blood. DNA libraries were constructed and sequenced on Illumina HiSeq2000. Data were post-processed using Picard and Samtools, then analyzed with the Genome Analysis Toolkit. Variants were annotated using an in-house Ensembl-based program. Copy number was assessed using ExomeCNV. Each sample was sequenced to a mean depth of coverage of greater than 120×. A rare non-synonymous coding single-nucleotide variant (SNV) in TP53 was identified in the germline. There were 10 somatic cancer protein-damaging variants that were not observed in the unaffected mother genome. ExomeCNV comparing tumor to the patient's germline, identified abnormal copy number, spanning 6,946 genes. We present an unusual case of Li-Fraumeni detected by whole exome sequencing. There were also likely driver somatic mutations in the gastric adenocarcinoma. These results highlight the need for more thorough and broad scale germline and cancer analyses to accurately inform patients of inherited risk to cancer and to identify somatic mutations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. RNA deep sequencing reveals differential microRNA expression during development of sea urchin and sea star.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Kadri

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small (20-23 nt, non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA gene expression. They have been implicated in regulation of developmental processes in diverse organisms. The echinoderms, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin and Patiria miniata (sea star are excellent model organisms for studying development with well-characterized transcriptional networks. However, to date, nothing is known about the role of miRNAs during development in these organisms, except that the genes that are involved in the miRNA biogenesis pathway are expressed during their developmental stages. In this paper, we used Illumina Genome Analyzer (Illumina, Inc. to sequence small RNA libraries in mixed stage population of embryos from one to three days after fertilization of sea urchin and sea star (total of 22,670,000 reads. Analysis of these data revealed the miRNA populations in these two species. We found that 47 and 38 known miRNAs are expressed in sea urchin and sea star, respectively, during early development (32 in common. We also found 13 potentially novel miRNAs in the sea urchin embryonic library. miRNA expression is generally conserved between the two species during development, but 7 miRNAs are highly expressed in only one species. We expect that our two datasets will be a valuable resource for everyone working in the field of developmental biology and the regulatory networks that affect it. The computational pipeline to analyze Illumina reads is available at http://www.benoslab.pitt.edu/services.html.

  1. RNA deep sequencing reveals differential microRNA expression during development of sea urchin and sea star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Sabah; Hinman, Veronica F; Benos, Panayiotis V

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-23 nt), non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA gene expression. They have been implicated in regulation of developmental processes in diverse organisms. The echinoderms, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) and Patiria miniata (sea star) are excellent model organisms for studying development with well-characterized transcriptional networks. However, to date, nothing is known about the role of miRNAs during development in these organisms, except that the genes that are involved in the miRNA biogenesis pathway are expressed during their developmental stages. In this paper, we used Illumina Genome Analyzer (Illumina, Inc.) to sequence small RNA libraries in mixed stage population of embryos from one to three days after fertilization of sea urchin and sea star (total of 22,670,000 reads). Analysis of these data revealed the miRNA populations in these two species. We found that 47 and 38 known miRNAs are expressed in sea urchin and sea star, respectively, during early development (32 in common). We also found 13 potentially novel miRNAs in the sea urchin embryonic library. miRNA expression is generally conserved between the two species during development, but 7 miRNAs are highly expressed in only one species. We expect that our two datasets will be a valuable resource for everyone working in the field of developmental biology and the regulatory networks that affect it. The computational pipeline to analyze Illumina reads is available at http://www.benoslab.pitt.edu/services.html. © 2011 Kadri et al.

  2. RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Differential MicroRNA Expression during Development of Sea Urchin and Sea Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Sabah; Hinman, Veronica F.; Benos, Panayiotis V.

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20–23 nt), non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA gene expression. They have been implicated in regulation of developmental processes in diverse organisms. The echinoderms, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) and Patiria miniata (sea star) are excellent model organisms for studying development with well-characterized transcriptional networks. However, to date, nothing is known about the role of miRNAs during development in these organisms, except that the genes that are involved in the miRNA biogenesis pathway are expressed during their developmental stages. In this paper, we used Illumina Genome Analyzer (Illumina, Inc.) to sequence small RNA libraries in mixed stage population of embryos from one to three days after fertilization of sea urchin and sea star (total of 22,670,000 reads). Analysis of these data revealed the miRNA populations in these two species. We found that 47 and 38 known miRNAs are expressed in sea urchin and sea star, respectively, during early development (32 in common). We also found 13 potentially novel miRNAs in the sea urchin embryonic library. miRNA expression is generally conserved between the two species during development, but 7 miRNAs are highly expressed in only one species. We expect that our two datasets will be a valuable resource for everyone working in the field of developmental biology and the regulatory networks that affect it. The computational pipeline to analyze Illumina reads is available at http://www.benoslab.pitt.edu/services.html. PMID:22216218

  3. Intraclade Heterogeneity in Nitrogen Utilization by Marine Prokaryotes Revealed Using Stable Isotope Probing Coupled with Tag Sequencing (Tag-SIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morando, Michael; Capone, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen can greatly influence the structure and productivity of microbial communities through its relative availability and form. However, the roles of specific organisms in the uptake of different nitrogen species remain poorly characterized. Most studies seeking to identify agents of assimilation have been correlative, indirectly linking activity measurements (e.g., nitrate uptake) with the presence or absence of biological markers, particularly functional genes and their transcripts. Evidence is accumulating of previously underappreciated functional diversity in major microbial subpopulations, which may confer physiological advantages under certain environmental conditions leading to ecotype divergence. This microdiversity further complicates our view of genetic variation in environmental samples requiring the development of more targeted approaches. Here, next-generation tag sequencing was successfully coupled with stable isotope probing (Tag-SIP) to assess the ability of individual phylotypes to assimilate a specific N source. Our results provide the first direct evidence of nitrate utilization by organisms thought to lack the genes required for this process including the heterotrophic clades SAR11 and the Archaeal Marine Group II. Alternatively, this may suggest the existence of tightly coupled metabolisms with primary assimilators, e.g., symbiosis, or the rapid and efficient scavenging of recently released products by highly active individuals. These results may be connected with global dominance often seen with these clades, likely conferring an advantage over other clades unable to access these resources. We also provide new direct evidence of in situ nitrate utilization by the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus in support of recent findings. Furthermore, these results revealed widespread functional heterogeneity, i.e., different levels of nitrogen assimilation within clades, likely reflecting niche partitioning by ecotypes. PMID:27994576

  4. RNA deep sequencing reveals novel candidate genes and polymorphisms in boar testis and liver tissues with divergent androstenone levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Gunawan

    Full Text Available Boar taint is an unpleasant smell and taste of pork meat derived from some entire male pigs. The main causes of boar taint are the two compounds androstenone (5α-androst-16-en-3-one and skatole (3-methylindole. It is crucial to understand the genetic mechanism of boar taint to select pigs for lower androstenone levels and thus reduce boar taint. The aim of the present study was to investigate transcriptome differences in boar testis and liver tissues with divergent androstenone levels using RNA deep sequencing (RNA-Seq. The total number of reads produced for each testis and liver sample ranged from 13,221,550 to 33,206,723 and 12,755,487 to 46,050,468, respectively. In testis samples 46 genes were differentially regulated whereas 25 genes showed differential expression in the liver. The fold change values ranged from -4.68 to 2.90 in testis samples and -2.86 to 3.89 in liver samples. Differentially regulated genes in high androstenone testis and liver samples were enriched in metabolic processes such as lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and molecular transport. This study provides evidence for transcriptome profile and gene polymorphisms of boars with divergent androstenone level using RNA-Seq technology. Digital gene expression analysis identified candidate genes in flavin monooxygenease family, cytochrome P450 family and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase family. Moreover, polymorphism and association analysis revealed mutation in IRG6, MX1, IFIT2, CYP7A1, FMO5 and KRT18 genes could be potential candidate markers for androstenone levels in boars. Further studies are required for proving the role of candidate genes to be used in genomic selection against boar taint in pig breeding programs.

  5. Genome sequences and SNP analyses of Corynespora cassiicola from cotton and soybean in the southeastern United States reveal limited diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh K Shrestha

    Full Text Available Corynespora cassiicola attackes diverse agriculturally important plants, including soybean and cotton, in the US. It is a reemerge pathogen on cotton in southeastern US. Whole genome sequences of four cotton and one soybean isolate from Tennessee were used to develop single nucleotide polymorphism markers for cotton isolates. Cotton isolates had little diversity at the genome level and very little differentiation from the soybean isolate. Analysis of 75 isolates from cotton and soybean, using targeted-sequencing of 22 polymorphic SNP sites, revealed eight multi-locus genotypes and it appears a single clonal lineage predominates across the southeastern region. The cotton and soybean genome sequences were significantly different from the public reference genome derived from a rubber isolate and the utility of these novel resources will be discussed.

  6. Novel RAD sequence data reveal a lack of genomic divergence between dietary ecotypes in a landlocked salmonid population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limborg, Morten T.; Larson, Wesley; Shedd, Kyle; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Preservation of heritable ecological diversity within species and populations is a key challenge for managing natural resources and wild populations. Salmonid fish are iconic and socio-economically important species for commercial, aquaculture, and recreational fisheries across the globe. Many salmonids are known to exhibit ecological divergence within species, including distinct feeding ecotypes within the same lakes. Here we used 5559 SNPs, derived from RAD sequencing, to perform population genetic comparisons between two dietary ecotypes of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Jo-Jo Lake, Alaska (USA). We tested the standing hypothesis that these two ecotypes are currently diverging as a result of adaptation to distinct dietary niches; results support earlier conclusions of a single panmictic population. The RAD sequence data revealed 40 new SNPs not previously detected in the species, and our sequence data can be used in future studies of ecotypic diversity in salmonid species.

  7. Phylogenetic inferences of Nepenthes species in Peninsular Malaysia revealed by chloroplast (trnL intron) and nuclear (ITS) DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunawan, Hamidun; Yen, Choong Chee; Yaakop, Salmah; Noor, Normah Mohd

    2017-01-26

    The chloroplastic trnL intron and the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region were sequenced for 11 Nepenthes species recorded in Peninsular Malaysia to examine their phylogenetic relationship and to evaluate the usage of trnL intron and ITS sequences for phylogenetic reconstruction of this genus. Phylogeny reconstruction was carried out using neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses. All the trees revealed two major clusters, a lowland group consisting of N. ampullaria, N. mirabilis, N. gracilis and N. rafflesiana, and another containing both intermediately distributed species (N. albomarginata and N. benstonei) and four highland species (N. sanguinea, N. macfarlanei, N. ramispina and N. alba). The trnL intron and ITS sequences proved to provide phylogenetic informative characters for deriving a phylogeny of Nepenthes species in Peninsular Malaysia. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular phylogenetic study of Nepenthes species occurring along an altitudinal gradient in Peninsular Malaysia.

  8. Single-virion sequencing of lamivudine-treated HBV populations reveal population evolution dynamics and demographic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O; Aw, Pauline P K; de Sessions, Paola Florez; Hong, Shuzhen; See, Lee Xian; Hong, Lewis Z; Wilm, Andreas; Li, Chen Hao; Hue, Stephane; Lim, Seng Gee; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Burkholder, William F; Hibberd, Martin

    2017-10-27

    Viral populations are complex, dynamic, and fast evolving. The evolution of groups of closely related viruses in a competitive environment is termed quasispecies. To fully understand the role that quasispecies play in viral evolution, characterizing the trajectories of viral genotypes in an evolving population is the key. In particular, long-range haplotype information for thousands of individual viruses is critical; yet generating this information is non-trivial. Popular deep sequencing methods generate relatively short reads that do not preserve linkage information, while third generation sequencing methods have higher error rates that make detection of low frequency mutations a bioinformatics challenge. Here we applied BAsE-Seq, an Illumina-based single-virion sequencing technology, to eight samples from four chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients - once before antiviral treatment and once after viral rebound due to resistance. With single-virion sequencing, we obtained 248-8796 single-virion sequences per sample, which allowed us to find evidence for both hard and soft selective sweeps. We were able to reconstruct population demographic history that was independently verified by clinically collected data. We further verified four of the samples independently through PacBio SMRT and Illumina Pooled deep sequencing. Overall, we showed that single-virion sequencing yields insight into viral evolution and population dynamics in an efficient and high throughput manner. We believe that single-virion sequencing is widely applicable to the study of viral evolution in the context of drug resistance and host adaptation, allows differentiation between soft or hard selective sweeps, and may be useful in the reconstruction of intra-host viral population demographic history.

  9. COI and ITS2 sequences delimit species, reveal cryptic taxa and host specificity of fig-associated Sycophila (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Zhou, Xin; Feng, Gui; Hu, Haoyuan; Niu, Liming; Hebert, Paul D N; Huang, Dawei

    2010-01-01

    Although the genus Sycophila has broad host preferences, some species are specifically associated with figs as nonpollinator wasps. Because of their sexual dimorphism, morphological plasticity, cryptic mating behaviour and poorly known biology, species identifications are often uncertain. It is particularly difficult to match conspecific females and males. In this study, we employed two molecular markers, mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS2, to identify Sycophila from six Chinese fig species. Morphological studies revealed 25 female and male morphs, while sequence results for both genes were consistent in supporting the presence of 15 species, of which 13 were host specialists and two used dual hosts. A single species of Sycophila was respectively found on four fig species, but six species were isolated from Ficus benjamina and a same number was reared from Ficus microcarpa. Sequence results revealed three male morphs in one species and detected two species that were overlooked by morphological analysis. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Atypical case of Wolfram syndrome revealed through targeted exome sequencing in a patient with suspected mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Daniel S; Vafai, Scott B; Horton, Laura C; Slate, Nancy G; Liu, Shangtao; Borowsky, Mark L; Calvo, Sarah E; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2012-01-06

    Mitochondrial diseases comprise a diverse set of clinical disorders that affect multiple organ systems with varying severity and age of onset. Due to their clinical and genetic heterogeneity, these diseases are difficult to diagnose. We have developed a targeted exome sequencing approach to improve our ability to properly diagnose mitochondrial diseases and apply it here to an individual patient. Our method targets mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the exons of 1,600 nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biology or Mendelian disorders with multi-system phenotypes, thereby allowing for simultaneous evaluation of multiple disease loci. Targeted exome sequencing was performed on a patient initially suspected to have a mitochondrial disorder. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, diffuse brain atrophy, autonomic neuropathy, optic nerve atrophy, and a severe amnestic syndrome. Further work-up revealed multiple heteroplasmic mtDNA deletions as well as profound thiamine deficiency without a clear nutritional cause. Targeted exome sequencing revealed a homozygous c.1672C > T (p.R558C) missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 that has previously been reported in a patient with Wolfram syndrome. This case demonstrates how clinical application of next-generation sequencing technology can enhance the diagnosis of patients suspected to have rare genetic disorders. Furthermore, the finding of unexplained thiamine deficiency in a patient with Wolfram syndrome suggests a potential link between WFS1 biology and thiamine metabolism that has implications for the clinical management of Wolfram syndrome patients.

  11. Atypical case of Wolfram syndrome revealed through targeted exome sequencing in a patient with suspected mitochondrial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieber Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial diseases comprise a diverse set of clinical disorders that affect multiple organ systems with varying severity and age of onset. Due to their clinical and genetic heterogeneity, these diseases are difficult to diagnose. We have developed a targeted exome sequencing approach to improve our ability to properly diagnose mitochondrial diseases and apply it here to an individual patient. Our method targets mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA and the exons of 1,600 nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biology or Mendelian disorders with multi-system phenotypes, thereby allowing for simultaneous evaluation of multiple disease loci. Case Presentation Targeted exome sequencing was performed on a patient initially suspected to have a mitochondrial disorder. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, diffuse brain atrophy, autonomic neuropathy, optic nerve atrophy, and a severe amnestic syndrome. Further work-up revealed multiple heteroplasmic mtDNA deletions as well as profound thiamine deficiency without a clear nutritional cause. Targeted exome sequencing revealed a homozygous c.1672C > T (p.R558C missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 that has previously been reported in a patient with Wolfram syndrome. Conclusion This case demonstrates how clinical application of next-generation sequencing technology can enhance the diagnosis of patients suspected to have rare genetic disorders. Furthermore, the finding of unexplained thiamine deficiency in a patient with Wolfram syndrome suggests a potential link between WFS1 biology and thiamine metabolism that has implications for the clinical management of Wolfram syndrome patients.

  12. Deep sequencing of virus-infected cells reveals HIV-encoded small RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopman, Nick C. T.; Willemsen, Marcel; Liu, Ying Poi; Bradley, Ted; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Berkhout, Ben; Haasnoot, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Small virus-derived interfering RNAs (viRNAs) play an important role in antiviral defence in plants, insects and nematodes by triggering the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The role of RNAi as an antiviral defence mechanism in mammalian cells has been obscure due to the lack of viRNA detection.

  13. Genome sequencing of Ewing sarcoma patients reveals genetic predisposition | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The largest and most comprehensive genomic analysis of individuals with Ewing sarcoma performed to date reveals that some patients are genetically predisposed to developing the cancer.  Learn more...

  14. Nascent RNA sequencing reveals widespread pausing and divergent initiation at human promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core, Leighton J; Waterfall, Joshua J; Lis, John T

    2008-12-19

    RNA polymerases are highly regulated molecular machines. We present a method (global run-on sequencing, GRO-seq) that maps the position, amount, and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases genome-wide. In this method, nuclear run-on RNA molecules are subjected to large-scale parallel sequencing and mapped to the genome. We show that peaks of promoter-proximal polymerase reside on approximately 30% of human genes, transcription extends beyond pre-messenger RNA 3' cleavage, and antisense transcription is prevalent. Additionally, most promoters have an engaged polymerase upstream and in an orientation opposite to the annotated gene. This divergent polymerase is associated with active genes but does not elongate effectively beyond the promoter. These results imply that the interplay between polymerases and regulators over broad promoter regions dictates the orientation and efficiency of productive transcription.

  15. Plant genetic archaeology: whole-genome sequencing reveals the pedigree of a classical trisomic line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomé, Patrice A; Weigel, Detlef

    2014-12-18

    The circadian oscillator is astonishingly robust to changes in the environment but also to genomic changes that alter the copy number of its components through genome duplication, gene duplication, and homeologous gene loss. While studying the potential effect of aneuploidy on the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock, we discovered that a line thought to be trisomic for chromosome 3 also bears the gi-1 mutation, resulting in a short period and late flowering. With the help of whole-genome sequencing, we uncovered the unexpected complexity of this trisomic stock's history, as its genome shows evidence of past outcrossing with another A. thaliana accession. Our study indicates that although historical aneuploidy lines exist and are available, it might be safer to generate new individuals and confirm their genomes and karyotypes by sequencing. Copyright © 2015 Salomé and Weigel.

  16. 454-sequencing reveals stochastic local reassembly and high disturbance tolerance within arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekberg, Karin Ylva Margareta; Schnoor, Tim; Kjøller, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    applied within a semi-natural grassland would shift the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal community towards disturbance-tolerant fungi that are rare in undisturbed soils. 2. We used 454-sequencing of the large subunit rDNAregion to characterizeAMfungal communities in Plantago lanceolata roots grown...... unpredictable, with approximately 40%of all sequences within a sample belonging to a single OTU of varying identity. The distribution of two plant species that are often poorly colonized by AMfungi (Dianthus deltoides and Carex arenaria) correlated significantly with the OTU composition, which may indicate...... that host quality could be an additional driver of fungal communities. 4. Synthesis. Our results suggest that factors other than disturbance drive the relative abundance of OTUs in this grassland and question the long-held assumption that communities shift in a predictable manner after a disturbance event...

  17. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Otto, Thomas D.

    2014-09-09

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host–parasite interface may have mediated host switching.

  18. Sequence analysis of RNase MRP RNA reveals its origination from eukaryotic RNase P RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanglong; Stribinskis, Vilius; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Li, Yong

    2006-01-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryote-specific endoribonuclease that generates RNA primers for mitochondrial DNA replication and processes precursor rRNA. RNase P is a ubiquitous endoribonuclease that cleaves precursor tRNA transcripts to produce their mature 5′ termini. We found extensive sequence homology of catalytic domains and specificity domains between their RNA subunits in many organisms. In Candida glabrata, the internal loop of helix P3 is 100% conserved between MRP and P RNAs. The helix P8 of MRP RNA from microsporidia Encephalitozoon cuniculi is identical to that of P RNA. Sequence homology can be widely spread over the whole molecule of MRP RNA and P RNA, such as those from Dictyostelium discoideum. These conserved nucleotides between the MRP and P RNAs strongly support the hypothesis that the MRP RNA is derived from the P RNA molecule in early eukaryote evolution. PMID:16540690

  19. Deep sequencing reveals low incidence of endogenous LINE-1 retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Arokium

    Full Text Available Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1 retrotransposition induces insertional mutations that can result in diseases. It was recently shown that the copy number of L1 and other retroelements is stable in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. However, by using an engineered reporter construct over-expressing L1, another study suggests that reprogramming activates L1 mobility in iPSCs. Given the potential of human iPSCs in therapeutic applications, it is important to clarify whether these cells harbor somatic insertions resulting from endogenous L1 retrotransposition. Here, we verified L1 expression during and after reprogramming as well as potential somatic insertions driven by the most active human endogenous L1 subfamily (L1Hs. Our results indicate that L1 over-expression is initiated during the reprogramming process and is subsequently sustained in isolated clones. To detect potential somatic insertions in iPSCs caused by L1Hs retotransposition, we used a novel sequencing strategy. As opposed to conventional sequencing direction, we sequenced from the 3' end of L1Hs to the genomic DNA, thus enabling the direct detection of the polyA tail signature of retrotransposition for verification of true insertions. Deep coverage sequencing thus allowed us to detect seven potential somatic insertions with low read counts from two iPSC clones. Negative PCR amplification in parental cells, presence of a polyA tail and absence from seven L1 germline insertion databases highly suggested true somatic insertions in iPSCs. Furthermore, these insertions could not be detected in iPSCs by PCR, likely due to low abundance. We conclude that L1Hs retrotransposes at low levels in iPSCs and therefore warrants careful analyses for genotoxic effects.

  20. Functional metagenomics reveals novel β-galactosidases not predictable from gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Romantsov, Tatyana; Engel, Katja; Doxey, Andrew C; Rose, David R; Neufeld, Josh D; Charles, Trevor C

    2017-01-01

    The techniques of metagenomics have allowed researchers to access the genomic potential of uncultivated microbes, but there remain significant barriers to determination of gene function based on DNA sequence alone. Functional metagenomics, in which DNA is cloned and expressed in surrogate hosts, can overcome these barriers, and make important contributions to the discovery of novel enzymes. In this study, a soil metagenomic library carried in an IncP cosmid was used for functional complementation for β-galactosidase activity in both Sinorhizobium meliloti (α-Proteobacteria) and Escherichia coli (γ-Proteobacteria) backgrounds. One β-galactosidase, encoded by six overlapping clones that were selected in both hosts, was identified as a member of glycoside hydrolase family 2. We could not identify ORFs obviously encoding possible β-galactosidases in 19 other sequenced clones that were only able to complement S. meliloti. Based on low sequence identity to other known glycoside hydrolases, yet not β-galactosidases, three of these ORFs were examined further. Biochemical analysis confirmed that all three encoded β-galactosidase activity. Lac36W_ORF11 and Lac161_ORF7 had conserved domains, but lacked similarities to known glycoside hydrolases. Lac161_ORF10 had neither conserved domains nor similarity to known glycoside hydrolases. Bioinformatic and structural modeling implied that Lac161_ORF10 protein represented a novel enzyme family with a five-bladed propeller glycoside hydrolase domain. By discovering founding members of three novel β-galactosidase families, we have reinforced the value of functional metagenomics for isolating novel genes that could not have been predicted from DNA sequence analysis alone.

  1. Whole-genome sequencing reveals novel insights into sulfur oxidation in the extremophile Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Huaqun; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoqi; He, Zhili; Liang, Yili; Guo, Xue; Hu, Qi; Xiao, Yunhua; Cong, Jing; Ma, Liyuan; Niu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Background Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (A. thiooxidans), a chemolithoautotrophic extremophile, is widely used in the industrial recovery of copper (bioleaching or biomining). The organism grows and survives by autotrophically utilizing energy derived from the oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs). However, the lack of genetic manipulation systems has restricted our exploration of its physiology. With the development of high-throughput sequencing techno...

  2. Giraffe genome sequence reveals clues to its unique morphology and physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Agaba, Morris; Ishengoma, Edson; Miller, Webb C.; McGrath, Barbara C.; Hudson, Chelsea N.; Bedoya Reina, Oscar C.; Ratan, Aakrosh; Burhans, Rico; Chikhi, Rayan; Medvedev, Paul; Praul, Craig A.; Wu-Cavener, Lan; Wood, Brendan; Robertson, Heather; Penfold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The origins of giraffe's imposing stature and associated cardiovascular adaptations are unknown. Okapi, which lacks these unique features, is giraffe's closest relative and provides a useful comparison, to identify genetic variation underlying giraffe's long neck and cardiovascular system. The genomes of giraffe and okapi were sequenced, and through comparative analyses genes and pathways were identified that exhibit unique genetic changes and likely contribute to giraffe's unique features. S...

  3. Sequencing Chromosomal Abnormalities Reveals Neurodevelopmental Loci that Confer Risk across Diagnostic Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Blumenthal, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of balanced chromosomal abnormalities, combined with convergent genomic studies of gene expression, copy-number variation, and genome-wide association, identifies 22 new loci that contribute to autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders. These data support a polygenic risk model f...... for autism and provide new insight into how different types of mutations of the same genes can lead to variable disease phenotypes that manifest at different stages of life....

  4. Sequence diversity in haloalkane dehalogenases, as revealed by PCR using family-specific primers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotík, Michael; Faměrová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 2 (2012), s. 212-217 ISSN 0167-7012 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0137; GA ČR GAP207/10/0135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Dehalogenation * Consensus sequence * Degenerate PCR primer Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.161, year: 2012

  5. Bisulfite sequencing reveals that Aspergillus flavus holds a hollow in DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yang Liu

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus first gained scientific attention for its production of aflatoxin. The underlying regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been serving as a theoretical model for biosynthesis of other microbial secondary metabolites. Nevertheless, for several decades, the DNA methylation status, one of the important epigenomic modifications involved in gene regulation, in A. flavus remains to be controversial. Here, we applied bisulfite sequencing in conjunction with a biological replicate strategy to investigate the DNA methylation profiling of A. flavus genome. Both the bisulfite sequencing data and the methylome comparisons with other fungi confirm that the DNA methylation level of this fungus is negligible. Further investigation into the DNA methyltransferase of Aspergillus uncovers its close relationship with RID-like enzymes as well as its divergence with the methyltransferase of species with validated DNA methylation. The lack of repeat contents of the A. flavus' genome and the high RIP-index of the small amount of remanent repeat potentially support our speculation that DNA methylation may be absent in A. flavus or that it may possess de novo DNA methylation which occurs very transiently during the obscure sexual stage of this fungal species. This work contributes to our understanding on the DNA methylation status of A. flavus, as well as reinforces our views on the DNA methylation in fungal species. In addition, our strategy of applying bisulfite sequencing to DNA methylation detection in species with low DNA methylation may serve as a reference for later scientific investigations in other hypomethylated species.

  6. Unique features of the loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) megagenome revealed through sequence annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Jill L; Liechty, John D; Stevens, Kristian A; Wu, Le-Shin; Loopstra, Carol A; Vasquez-Gross, Hans A; Dougherty, William M; Lin, Brian Y; Zieve, Jacob J; Martínez-García, Pedro J; Holt, Carson; Yandell, Mark; Zimin, Aleksey V; Yorke, James A; Crepeau, Marc W; Puiu, Daniela; Salzberg, Steven L; Dejong, Pieter J; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Main, Doreen; Langley, Charles H; Neale, David B

    2014-03-01

    The largest genus in the conifer family Pinaceae is Pinus, with over 100 species. The size and complexity of their genomes (∼20-40 Gb, 2n = 24) have delayed the arrival of a well-annotated reference sequence. In this study, we present the annotation of the first whole-genome shotgun assembly of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), which comprises 20.1 Gb of sequence. The MAKER-P annotation pipeline combined evidence-based alignments and ab initio predictions to generate 50,172 gene models, of which 15,653 are classified as high confidence. Clustering these gene models with 13 other plant species resulted in 20,646 gene families, of which 1554 are predicted to be unique to conifers. Among the conifer gene families, 159 are composed exclusively of loblolly pine members. The gene models for loblolly pine have the highest median and mean intron lengths of 24 fully sequenced plant genomes. Conifer genomes are full of repetitive DNA, with the most significant contributions from long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons. In depth analysis of the tandem and interspersed repetitive content yielded a combined estimate of 82%.

  7. Sequencing of bovine herpesvirus 4 v.test strain reveals important genome features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillet Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a useful model for the human pathogenic gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Although genome manipulations of this virus have been greatly facilitated by the cloning of the BoHV-4 V.test strain as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC, the lack of a complete genome sequence for this strain limits its experimental use. Methods In this study, we have determined the complete sequence of BoHV-4 V.test strain by a pyrosequencing approach. Results The long unique coding region (LUR consists of 108,241 bp encoding at least 79 open reading frames and is flanked by several polyrepetitive DNA units (prDNA. As previously suggested, we showed that the prDNA unit located at the left prDNA-LUR junction (prDNA-G differs from the other prDNA units (prDNA-inner. Namely, the prDNA-G unit lacks the conserved pac-2 cleavage and packaging signal in its right terminal region. Based on the mechanisms of cleavage and packaging of herpesvirus genomes, this feature implies that only genomes bearing left and right end prDNA units are encapsulated into virions. Conclusions In this study, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the BAC-cloned BoHV-4 V.test strain and identified genome organization features that could be important in other herpesviruses.

  8. Sequencing of first-strand cDNA library reveals full-length transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Macfarlan, Todd S; Sartor, Maureen A; Iwase, Shigeki

    2015-01-21

    Massively parallel strand-specific sequencing of RNA (ssRNA-seq) has emerged as a powerful tool for profiling complex transcriptomes. However, many current methods for ssRNA-seq suffer from the underrepresentation of both the 5' and 3' ends of RNAs, which can be attributed to second-strand cDNA synthesis. The 5' and 3' ends of RNA harbour crucial information for gene regulation; namely, transcription start sites (TSSs) and polyadenylation sites. Here we report a novel ssRNA-seq method that does not involve second-strand cDNA synthesis, as we Directly Ligate sequencing Adaptors to the First-strand cDNA (DLAF). This novel method with fewer enzymatic reactions results in a higher quality of the libraries than the conventional method. Sequencing of DLAF libraries followed by a novel analysis pipeline enables the profiling of both 5' ends and polyadenylation sites at near-base resolution. Therefore, DLAF offers the first genomics tool to obtain the 'full-length' transcriptome with a single library.

  9. High-throughput sequencing reveals an altered T cell repertoire in X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Manish; Simchoni, Noa; Hamm, David; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-12-01

    To examine the T cell receptor structure in the absence of B cells, the TCR β CDR3 was sequenced from DNA of 15 X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) subjects and 18 male controls, using the Illumina HiSeq platform and the ImmunoSEQ analyzer. V gene usage and the V-J combinations, derived from both productive and non-productive sequences, were significantly different between XLA samples and controls. Although the CDR3 length was similar for XLA and control samples, the CDR3 region of the XLA T cell receptor contained significantly fewer deletions and insertions in V, D, and J gene segments, differences intrinsic to the V(D)J recombination process and not due to peripheral T cell selection. XLA CDR3s demonstrated fewer charged amino acid residues, more sharing of CDR3 sequences, and almost completely lacked a population of highly modified Vβ gene segments found in control DNA, suggesting both a skewed and contracted T cell repertoire in XLA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Next generation sequencing and FISH reveal uneven and nonrandom microsatellite distribution in two grasshopper genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cuadrado, Ángeles; Montiel, Eugenia E; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2015-06-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, are one of the prominent DNA sequences shaping the repeated fraction of eukaryotic genomes. In spite of their profuse use as molecular markers for a variety of genetic and evolutionary studies, their genomic location, distribution, and function are not yet well understood. Here we report the first thorough joint analysis of microsatellite motifs at both genomic and chromosomal levels in animal species, by a combination of 454 sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques performed on two grasshopper species. The in silico analysis of the 454 reads suggested that microsatellite expansion is not driving size increase of these genomes, as SSR abundance was higher in the species showing the smallest genome. However, the two species showed the same uneven and nonrandom location of SSRs, with clear predominance of dinucleotide motifs and association with several types of repetitive elements, mostly histone gene spacers, ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers (IGS), and transposable elements (TEs). The FISH analysis showed a dispersed chromosome distribution of microsatellite motifs in euchromatic regions, in coincidence with chromosome location patterns previously observed for many mobile elements in these species. However, some SSR motifs were clustered, especially those located in the histone gene cluster.

  11. Single-cell paired-end genome sequencing reveals structural variation per cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Thierry; Kumar, Parveen; Van Loo, Peter; Cooke, Susanna L.; Marshall, John; Lin, Meng-Lay; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Van der Aa, Niels; Mateiu, Ligia; McBride, David J.; Bignell, Graham R.; McLaren, Stuart; Teague, Jon; Butler, Adam; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Quail, Michael A.; D’Hooghe, Thomas; Moreau, Yves; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The nature and pace of genome mutation is largely unknown. Because standard methods sequence DNA from populations of cells, the genetic composition of individual cells is lost, de novo mutations in cells are concealed within the bulk signal and per cell cycle mutation rates and mechanisms remain elusive. Although single-cell genome analyses could resolve these problems, such analyses are error-prone because of whole-genome amplification (WGA) artefacts and are limited in the types of DNA mutation that can be discerned. We developed methods for paired-end sequence analysis of single-cell WGA products that enable (i) detecting multiple classes of DNA mutation, (ii) distinguishing DNA copy number changes from allelic WGA-amplification artefacts by the discovery of matching aberrantly mapping read pairs among the surfeit of paired-end WGA and mapping artefacts and (iii) delineating the break points and architecture of structural variants. By applying the methods, we capture DNA copy number changes acquired over one cell cycle in breast cancer cells and in blastomeres derived from a human zygote after in vitro fertilization. Furthermore, we were able to discover and fine-map a heritable inter-chromosomal rearrangement t(1;16)(p36;p12) by sequencing a single blastomere. The methods will expedite applications in basic genome research and provide a stepping stone to novel approaches for clinical genetic diagnosis. PMID:23630320

  12. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleeha Maria

    Full Text Available Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD.We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB, or cone dystrophy (CD. We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.

  13. Immune selection in vitro reveals human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef sequence motifs important for its immune evasion function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Martha J; Lee, Patricia; Ng, Hwee L; Yang, Otto O

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef downregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), impairing the clearance of infected cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). While sequence motifs mediating this function have been determined by in vitro mutagenesis studies of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 molecular clones, it is unclear whether the highly variable Nef sequences of primary isolates in vivo rely on the same sequence motifs. To address this issue, nef quasispecies from nine chronically HIV-1-infected persons were examined for sequence evolution and altered MHC-I downregulatory function under Gag-specific CTL immune pressure in vitro. This selection resulted in decreased nef diversity and strong purifying selection. Site-by-site analysis identified 13 codons undergoing purifying selection and 1 undergoing positive selection. Of the former, only 6 have been reported to have roles in Nef function, including 4 associated with MHC-I downregulation. Functional testing of naturally occurring in vivo polymorphisms at the 7 sites with no previously known functional role revealed 3 mutations (A84D, Y135F, and G140R) that ablated MHC-I downregulation and 3 (N52A, S169I, and V180E) that partially impaired MHC-I downregulation. Globally, the CTL pressure in vitro selected functional Nef from the in vivo quasispecies mixtures that predominately lacked MHC-I downregulatory function at the baseline. Overall, these data demonstrate that CTL pressure exerts a strong purifying selective pressure for MHC-I downregulation and identifies novel functional motifs present in Nef sequences in vivo.

  14. Genomic library screening for viruses from the human dental plaque revealed pathogen-specific lytic phage sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarbou, Ahmed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenesis presents an astounding arsenal of virulence factors that allow them to conquer many different niches throughout the course of infection. Principally fascinating is the fact that some bacterial species are able to induce different diseases by expression of different combinations of virulence factors. Nevertheless, studies aiming at screening for the presence of bacteriophages in humans have been limited. Such screening procedures would eventually lead to identification of phage-encoded properties that impart increased bacterial fitness and/or virulence in a particular niche, and hence, would potentially be used to reverse the course of bacterial infections. As the human oral cavity represents a rich and dynamic ecosystem for several upper respiratory tract pathogens. However, little is known about virus diversity in human dental plaque which is an important reservoir. We applied the culture-independent approach to characterize virus diversity in human dental plaque making a library from a virus DNA fraction amplified using a multiple displacement method and sequenced 80 clones. The resulting sequence showed 44% significant identities to GenBank databases by TBLASTX analysis. TBLAST homology comparisons showed that 66% was viral; 18% eukarya; 10% bacterial; 6% mobile elements. These sequences were sorted into 6 contigs and 45 single sequences in which 4 contigs and a single sequence showed significant identity to a small region of a putative prophage in the Corynebacterium diphtheria genome. These findings interestingly highlight the uniqueness of over half of the sequences, whilst the dominance of a pathogen-specific prophage sequences imply their role in virulence.

  15. SMRT Sequencing Revealed Mitogenome Characteristics and Mitogenome-Wide DNA Modification Pattern in Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xincong; Hu, Liqin; Shen, Pengyuan; Li, Rui; Liu, Dongbo

    2017-01-01

    Single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing was used to characterize mitochondrial (mt) genome of Ophiocordyceps sinensis and to analyze the mt genome-wide pattern of epigenetic DNA modification. The complete mt genome of O. sinensis , with a size of 157,539 bp, is the fourth largest Ascomycota mt genome sequenced to date. It contained 14 conserved protein-coding genes (PCGs), 1 intronic protein rps3 , 27 tRNAs and 2 rRNA subunits, which are common characteristics of the known mt genomes in Hypocreales. A phylogenetic tree inferred from 14 PCGs in Pezizomycotina fungi supports O. sinensis as most closely related to Hirsutella rhossiliensis in Ophiocordycipitaceae. A total of 36 sequence sites in rps3 were under positive selection, with dN/dS >1 in the 20 compared fungi. Among them, 16 sites were statistically significant. In addition, the mt genome-wide base modification pattern of O. sinensis was determined in this study, especially DNA methylation. The methylations were located in coding and uncoding regions of mt PCGs in O. sinensis , and might be closely related to the expression of PCGs or the binding affinity of transcription factor A to mtDNA. Consequently, these methylations may affect the enzymatic activity of oxidative phosphorylation and then the mt respiratory rate; or they may influence mt biogenesis. Therefore, methylations in the mitogenome of O. sinensis might be a genetic feature to adapt to the cold and low PO 2 environment at high altitude, where O. sinensis is endemic. This is the first report on epigenetic modifications in a fungal mt genome.

  16. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Langewisch

    Full Text Available In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species.

  17. Limited Variation in BK Virus T-Cell Epitopes Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Malaya K.; Tan, Susanna K.; Chen, Sharon F.; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Concepcion, Katherine R.; Kjelson, Lynn; Mallempati, Kalyan; Farina, Heidi M.; Fernández-Viña, Marcelo; Tyan, Dolly; Grimm, Paul C.; Anderson, Matthew W.; Concepcion, Waldo

    2015-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection causing end-organ disease remains a formidable challenge to the hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and kidney transplant fields. As BKV-specific treatments are limited, immunologic-based therapies may be a promising and novel therapeutic option for transplant recipients with persistent BKV infection. Here, we describe a whole-genome, deep-sequencing methodology and bioinformatics pipeline that identify BKV variants across the genome and at BKV-specific HLA-A2-, HLA-B0702-, and HLA-B08-restricted CD8 T-cell epitopes. BKV whole genomes were amplified using long-range PCR with four inverse primer sets, and fragmentation libraries were sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). An error model and variant-calling algorithm were developed to accurately identify rare variants. A total of 65 samples from 18 pediatric HCT and kidney recipients with quantifiable BKV DNAemia underwent whole-genome sequencing. Limited genetic variation was observed. The median number of amino acid variants identified per sample was 8 (range, 2 to 37; interquartile range, 10), with the majority of variants (77%) detected at a frequency of <5%. When normalized for length, there was no statistical difference in the median number of variants across all genes. Similarly, the predominant virus population within samples harbored T-cell epitopes similar to the reference BKV strain that was matched for the BKV genotype. Despite the conservation of epitopes, low-level variants in T-cell epitopes were detected in 77.7% (14/18) of patients. Understanding epitope variation across the whole genome provides insight into the virus-immune interface and may help guide the development of protocols for novel immunologic-based therapies. PMID:26202116

  18. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  19. Evolution of the RH gene family in vertebrates revealed by brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami) genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akinori; Komata, Hidero; Iwashita, Shogo; Seto, Shotaro; Ikeya, Hironobu; Tabata, Mitsutoshi; Kitano, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    In vertebrates, there are four major genes in the RH (Rhesus) gene family, RH, RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG. These genes are thought to have been formed by the two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R-WGD) in the common ancestor of all vertebrates. In our previous work, where we analyzed details of the gene duplications process of this gene family, three nucleotide sequences belonging to this family were identified in Far Eastern brook lamprey (Lethenteron reissneri), and the phylogenetic positions of the genes were determined. Lampreys, along with hagfishes, are cyclostomata (jawless fishes), which is a sister group of gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). Although those results suggested that one gene was orthologous to the gnathostome RHCG genes, we did not identify clear orthologues for other genes. In this study, therefore, we identified three novel cDNA sequences that belong to the RH gene family using de novo transcriptome analysis of another cyclostome: the brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami). We also determined the nucleotide sequences for the RHBG and RHCG genes in a red stingray (Dasyatis akajei), which belongs to the cartilaginous fishes. The phylogenetic tree showed that two brown hagfish genes, which were probably duplicated in the cyclostome lineage, formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHAG genes, whereas another brown hagfish gene formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHCG genes. We estimated that the RH genes had a higher evolutionary rate than the RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG genes. Interestingly, in the RHBG genes, only the bird lineage showed a higher rate of nonsynonymous substitutions. It is likely that this higher rate was caused by a state of relaxed functional constraints rather than positive selection nor by pseudogenization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langewisch, Tiffany; Zhang, Hongxin; Vincent, Ryan; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bilyeu, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species.

  1. Complex Routes of Nosocomial Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Transmission Revealed by Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Kathy E; Gouliouris, Theodore; Brodrick, Hayley; Coll, Francesc; Brown, Nicholas M; Reynolds, Rosy; Reuter, Sandra; Török, M Estée; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J

    2017-04-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) is a leading cause of nosocomial infection. Here, we describe the utility of whole-genome sequencing in defining nosocomial VREfm transmission. A retrospective study at a single hospital in the United Kingdom identified 342 patients with E. faecium bloodstream infection over 7 years. Of these, 293 patients had a stored isolate and formed the basis for the study. The first stored isolate from each case was sequenced (200 VREfm [197 vanA, 2 vanB, and 1 isolate containing both vanA and vanB], 93 vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium) and epidemiological data were collected. Genomes were also available for E. faecium associated with bloodstream infections in 15 patients in neighboring hospitals, and 456 patients across the United Kingdom and Ireland. The majority of infections in the 293 patients were hospital-acquired (n = 249) or healthcare-associated (n = 42). Phylogenetic analysis showed that 291 of 293 isolates resided in a hospital-associated clade that contained numerous discrete clusters of closely related isolates, indicative of multiple introductions into the hospital followed by clonal expansion associated with transmission. Fine-scale analysis of 6 exemplar phylogenetic clusters containing isolates from 93 patients (32%) identified complex transmission routes that spanned numerous wards and years, extending beyond the detection of conventional infection control. These contained both vancomycin-resistant and -susceptible isolates. We also identified closely related isolates from patients at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and regional and national hospitals, suggesting interhospital transmission. These findings provide important insights for infection control practice and signpost areas for interventions. We conclude that sequencing represents a powerful tool for the enhanced surveillance and control of nosocomial E. faecium transmission and infection.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis within the Lolium/Festuca species complex reveals high sequence conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaban, Adrian; Sharma, Sapna; Byrne, Stephen L; Spannagl, Manuel; Mayer, Klaus F X; Asp, Torben

    2015-03-28

    The Lolium-Festuca complex incorporates species from the Lolium genera and the broad leaf fescues, both belonging to the subfamily Pooideae. This subfamily also includes wheat, barley, oat and rye, making it extremely important to world agriculture. Species within the Lolium-Festuca complex show very diverse phenotypes, and many of them are related to agronomically important traits. Analysis of sequenced transcriptomes of these non-model species may shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotypic diversity. We have generated de novo transcriptome assemblies for four species from the Lolium-Festuca complex, ranging from 52,166 to 72,133 transcripts per assembly. We have also predicted a set of proteins and validated it with a high-confidence protein database from three closely related species (H. vulgare, B. distachyon and O. sativa). We have obtained gene family clusters for the four species using OrthoMCL and analyzed their inferred phylogenetic relationships. Our results indicate that VRN2 is a candidate gene for differentiating vernalization and non-vernalization types in the Lolium-Festuca complex. Grouping of the gene families based on their BLAST identity enabled us to divide ortholog groups into those that are very conserved and those that are more evolutionarily relaxed. The ratio of the non-synonumous to synonymous substitutions enabled us to pinpoint protein sequences evolving in response to positive selection. These proteins may explain some of the differences between the more stress tolerant Festuca, and the less stress tolerant Lolium species. Our data presents a comprehensive transcriptome sequence comparison between species from the Lolium-Festuca complex, with the identification of potential candidate genes underlying some important phenotypical differences within the complex (such as VRN2). The orthologous genes between the species have a very high %id (91,61%) and the majority of gene families were shared for all of them. It is

  3. Selfish supernumerary chromosome reveals its origin as a mosaic of host genome and organellar sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martis, M.M.; Klemme, S.; Banaei-Moghaddam, A.M.; Blattner, F.R.; Macas, Jiří; Schmutzer, T.; Scholz, U.; Gundlach, H.; Wicker, T.; Šimková, Hana; Novák, Petr; Neumann, Pavel; Kubaláková, Marie; Bauer, E.; Haseneyer, G.; Fuchs, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Stein, N.; Mayer, K.F.X.; Houben, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 33 (2012), s. 13343-13346 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) OC10037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : FULL-LENGTH CDNAS * SECALE-CEREALE L. * B-CHROMOSOMES * REPETITIVE SEQUENCES Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  4. Exome sequencing reveals VCP mutations as a cause of familial ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Janel O.; Mandrioli, Jessica; Benatar, Michael; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Brunetti, Maura; Gronka, Susan; Wuu, Joanne; Ding, Jinhui; McCluskey, Leo; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Falcone, Dana; Hernandez, Dena G.

    2010-01-01

    Using exome sequencing, we identified a p.R191Q amino acid change in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene in an Italian family with autosomal dominantly inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutations in VCP have previously been identified in families with Inclusion Body Myopathy, Paget’s disease and Frontotemporal Dementia (IBMPFD). Screening of VCP in a cohort of 210 familial ALS cases and 78 autopsy-proven ALS cases identified four additional mutations including a p.R155H mut...

  5. Diversity of sponge mitochondrial introns revealed by cox 1 sequences of Tetillidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rot Chagai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mitochondrial introns are rare. In sponges and cnidarians they have been found in the cox 1 gene of some spirophorid and homosclerophorid sponges, as well as in the cox 1 and nad 5 genes of some Hexacorallia. Their sporadic distribution has raised a debate as to whether these mobile elements have been vertically or horizontally transmitted among their hosts. The first sponge found to possess a mitochondrial intron was a spirophorid sponge from the Tetillidae family. To better understand the mode of transmission of mitochondrial introns in sponges, we studied cox 1 intron distribution among representatives of this family. Results Seventeen tetillid cox 1 sequences were examined. Among these sequences only six were found to possess group I introns. Remarkably, three different forms of introns were found, named introns 714, 723 and 870 based on their different positions in the cox 1 alignment. These introns had distinct secondary structures and encoded LAGLIDADG ORFs belonging to three different lineages. Interestingly, sponges harboring the same intron form did not always form monophyletic groups, suggesting that their introns might have been transferred horizontally. To evaluate whether the introns were vertically or horizontally transmitted in sponges and cnidarians we used a host parasite approach. We tested for co-speciation between introns 723 (the introns with the highest number of sponge representatives and their nesting cox 1 sequences. Reciprocal AU tests indicated that the intron and cox 1 tree are significantly different, while a likelihood ratio test was not significant. A global test of co-phylogeny had significant results; however, when cnidarian sequences were analyzed separately the results were not significant. Conclusions The co-speciation analyses thus suggest that a vertical transmission of introns in the ancestor of sponges and cnidarians, followed by numerous independent losses, cannot solely

  6. Comparative sequence analyses of the major quantitative trait locus phosphorus uptake 1 (Pup1) reveal a complex genetic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Sigrid; Lu, Xiaochun; Chin, Joong Hyoun; Tanaka, Juan Pariasca; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Takashi; De Leon, Teresa; Ulat, Victor Jun; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Yano, Masahiro; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2009-06-01

    The phosphorus uptake 1 (Pup1) locus was identified as a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for tolerance of phosphorus deficiency in rice. Near-isogenic lines with the Pup1 region from tolerant donor parent Kasalath typically show threefold higher phosphorus uptake and grain yield in phosphorus-deficient field trials than the intolerant parent Nipponbare. In this study, we report the fine mapping of the Pup1 locus to the long arm of chromosome 12 (15.31-15.47 Mb). Genes in the region were initially identified on the basis of the Nipponbare reference genome, but did not reveal any obvious candidate genes related to phosphorus uptake. Kasalath BAC clones were therefore sequenced and revealed a 278-kbp sequence significantly different from the syntenic regions in Nipponbare (145 kb) and in the indica reference genome of 93-11 (742 kbp). Size differences are caused by large insertions or deletions (INDELs), and an exceptionally large number of retrotransposon and transposon-related elements (TEs) present in all three sequences (45%-54%). About 46 kb of the Kasalath sequence did not align with the entire Nipponbare genome, and only three Nipponbare genes (fatty acid alpha-dioxygenase, dirigent protein and aspartic proteinase) are highly conserved in Kasalath. Two Nipponbare genes (expressed proteins) might have evolved by at least three TE integrations in an ancestor gene that is still present in Kasalath. Several predicted Kasalath genes are novel or unknown genes that are mainly located within INDEL regions. Our results highlight the importance of sequencing QTL regions in the respective donor parent, as important genes might not be present in the current reference genomes.

  7. Deep RNA sequencing at single base-pair resolution reveals high complexity of the rice transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Guo, Guangwu; Hu, Xueda

    2010-01-01

    fusion events are more common than expected. In-depth analysis revealed a multitude of fusion transcripts that might be by-products of alternative splicing. Validation and chimeric transcript structural analysis provided evidence that some of these transcripts are likely to be functional in the cell...

  8. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of lung cancers reveal diverse mutational and splicing events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Lee, William; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Chen, Zhongqiang; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Haverty, Peter M; Gnad, Florian; Guan, Yinghui; Gilbert, Houston N; Stinson, Jeremy; Klijn, Christiaan; Guillory, Joseph; Bhatt, Deepali; Vartanian, Steffan; Walter, Kimberly; Chan, Jocelyn; Holcomb, Thomas; Dijkgraaf, Peter; Johnson, Stephanie; Koeman, Julie; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F; Stern, Howard M; Hoeflich, Klaus P; Wu, Thomas D; Settleman, Jeff; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gentleman, Robert C; Neve, Richard M; Stokoe, David; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Shames, David S; Zhang, Zemin

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of both underlying genetic lesions and response to therapeutic treatments. We performed deep whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing on 19 lung cancer cell lines and three lung tumor/normal pairs. Overall, our data show that cell line models exhibit similar mutation spectra to human tumor samples. Smoker and never-smoker cancer samples exhibit distinguishable patterns of mutations. A number of epigenetic regulators, including KDM6A, ASH1L, SMARCA4, and ATAD2, are frequently altered by mutations or copy number changes. A systematic survey of splice-site mutations identified 106 splice site mutations associated with cancer specific aberrant splicing, including mutations in several known cancer-related genes. RAC1b, an isoform of the RAC1 GTPase that includes one additional exon, was found to be preferentially up-regulated in lung cancer. We further show that its expression is significantly associated with sensitivity to a MAP2K (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901. Taken together, these data present a comprehensive genomic landscape of a large number of lung cancer samples and further demonstrate that cancer-specific alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon that has potential utility as therapeutic biomarkers. The detailed characterizations of the lung cancer cell lines also provide genomic context to the vast amount of experimental data gathered for these lines over the decades, and represent highly valuable resources for cancer biology.

  9. Extracellular DNA amplicon sequencing reveals high levels of benthic eukaryotic diversity in the central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims to characterize the benthic eukaryotic biodiversity patterns at a coarse taxonomic level in three areas of the central Red Sea (a lagoon, an offshore area in Thuwal and a shallow coastal area near Jeddah) based on extracellular DNA. High-throughput amplicon sequencing targeting the V9 region of the 18S rRNA gene was undertaken for 32 sediment samples. High levels of alpha-diversity were detected with 16,089 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being identified. The majority of the OTUs were assigned to Metazoa (29.2%), Alveolata (22.4%) and Stramenopiles (17.8%). Stramenopiles (Diatomea) and Alveolata (Ciliophora) were frequent in a lagoon and in shallower coastal stations, whereas metazoans (Arthropoda: Maxillopoda) were dominant in deeper offshore stations. Only 24.6% of total OTUs were shared among all areas. Beta-diversity was generally lower between the lagoon and Jeddah (nearshore) than between either of those and the offshore area, suggesting a nearshore–offshore biodiversity gradient. The current approach allowed for a broad-range of benthic eukaryotic biodiversity to be analysed with significantly less labour than would be required by other traditional taxonomic approaches. Our findings suggest that next generation sequencing techniques have the potential to provide a fast and standardised screening of benthic biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales.

  10. Re-inspection of small RNA sequence datasets reveals several novel human miRNA genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Birkballe Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: miRNAs are key players in gene expression regulation. To fully understand the complex nature of cellular differentiation or initiation and progression of disease, it is important to assess the expression patterns of as many miRNAs as possible. Thereby, identifying novel miRNAs is an essential prerequisite to make possible a comprehensive and coherent understanding of cellular biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on two extensive, but previously published, small RNA sequence datasets from human embryonic stem cells and human embroid bodies, respectively [1], we identified 112 novel miRNA-like structures and were able to validate miRNA processing in 12 out of 17 investigated cases. Several miRNA candidates were furthermore substantiated by including additional available small RNA datasets, thereby demonstrating the power of combining datasets to identify miRNAs that otherwise may be assigned as experimental noise. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis highlights that existing datasets are not yet exhaustedly studied and continuous re-analysis of the available data is important to uncover all features of small RNA sequencing.

  11. Deep sequencing reveals as-yet-undiscovered small RNAs in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano Reiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Escherichia coli, approximately 100 regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs have been identified experimentally and many more have been predicted by various methods. To provide a comprehensive overview of sRNAs, we analysed the low-molecular-weight RNAs (E. coli with deep sequencing, because the regulatory RNAs in bacteria are usually 50-200 nt in length. Results We discovered 229 novel candidate sRNAs (≥ 50 nt with computational or experimental evidence of transcription initiation. Among them, the expression of seven intergenic sRNAs and three cis-antisense sRNAs was detected by northern blot analysis. Interestingly, five novel sRNAs are expressed from prophage regions and we note that these sRNAs have several specific characteristics. Furthermore, we conducted an evolutionary conservation analysis of the candidate sRNAs and summarised the data among closely related bacterial strains. Conclusions This comprehensive screen for E. coli sRNAs using a deep sequencing approach has shown that many as-yet-undiscovered sRNAs are potentially encoded in the E. coli genome. We constructed the Escherichia coli Small RNA Browser (ECSBrowser; http://rna.iab.keio.ac.jp/, which integrates the data for previously identified sRNAs and the novel sRNAs found in this study.

  12. Genome sequencing reveals complex secondary metabolome in themarine actinomycete Salinispora tropica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udwary, Daniel W.; Zeigler, Lisa; Asolkar, Ratnakar; Singan,Vasanth; Lapidus, Alla; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.; Moore, BradleyS.

    2007-05-01

    Recent fermentation studies have identified actinomycetes ofthe marine-dwelling genus Salinispora as prolific natural productproducers. To further evaluate their biosynthetic potential, we analyzedall identifiable secondary natural product gene clusters from therecently sequenced 5,184,724 bp S. tropica CNB-440 circular genome. Ouranalysis shows that biosynthetic potential meets or exceeds that shown byprevious Streptomyces genome sequences as well as other naturalproduct-producing actinomycetes. The S. tropica genome features ninepolyketide synthase systems of every known formally classified family,non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and several hybrid clusters. While afew clusters appear to encode molecules previously identified inStreptomyces species,the majority of the 15 biosynthetic loci are novel.Specific chemical information about putative and observed natural productmolecules is presented and discussed. In addition, our bioinformaticanalysis was critical for the structure elucidation of the novelpolyenemacrolactam salinilactam A. This study demonstrates the potentialfor genomic analysis to complement and strengthen traditional naturalproduct isolation studies and firmly establishes the genus Salinispora asa rich source of novel drug-like molecules.

  13. Next-generation sequencing reveals DGUOK mutations in adult patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garone, Caterina; Bordoni, Andreina; Gutierrez Rios, Purificacion; Calvo, Sarah E.; Ripolone, Michela; Ranieri, Michela; Rizzuti, Mafalda; Villa, Luisa; Magri, Francesca; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Moggio, Maurizio; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Sciacco, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders still remains elusive in a large proportion of patients, but advances in next generation sequencing are significantly improving our chances to detect mutations even in sporadic patients. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions are caused by different molecular defects resulting in a wide spectrum of predominantly adult-onset clinical presentations, ranging from progressive external ophthalmoplegia to multi-systemic disorders of variable severity. The mutations underlying these conditions remain undisclosed in half of the affected subjects. We applied next-generation sequencing of known mitochondrial targets (MitoExome) to probands presenting with adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy and harbouring mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions in skeletal muscle. We identified autosomal recessive mutations in the DGUOK gene (encoding mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase), which has previously been associated with an infantile hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial DNA depletion. Mutations in DGUOK occurred in five independent subjects, representing 5.6% of our cohort of patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions, and impaired both muscle DGUOK activity and protein stability. Clinical presentations were variable, including mitochondrial myopathy with or without progressive external ophthalmoplegia, recurrent rhabdomyolysis in a young female who had received a liver transplant at 9 months of age and adult-onset lower motor neuron syndrome with mild cognitive impairment. These findings reinforce the concept that mutations in genes involved in deoxyribonucleotide metabolism can cause diverse clinical phenotypes and suggest that DGUOK should be screened in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. PMID:23043144

  14. Landscape of Infiltrating T Cells in Liver Cancer Revealed by Single-Cell Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunhong; Zheng, Liangtao; Yoo, Jae-Kwang; Guo, Huahu; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xinyi; Kang, Boxi; Hu, Ruozhen; Huang, Julie Y; Zhang, Qiming; Liu, Zhouzerui; Dong, Minghui; Hu, Xueda; Ouyang, Wenjun; Peng, Jirun; Zhang, Zemin

    2017-06-15

    Systematic interrogation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes is key to the development of immunotherapies and the prediction of their clinical responses in cancers. Here, we perform deep single-cell RNA sequencing on 5,063 single T cells isolated from peripheral blood, tumor, and adjacent normal tissues from six hepatocellular carcinoma patients. The transcriptional profiles of these individual cells, coupled with assembled T cell receptor (TCR) sequences, enable us to identify 11 T cell subsets based on their molecular and functional properties and delineate their developmental trajectory. Specific subsets such as exhausted CD8 + T cells and Tregs are preferentially enriched and potentially clonally expanded in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and we identified signature genes for each subset. One of the genes, layilin, is upregulated on activated CD8 + T cells and Tregs and represses the CD8 + T cell functions in vitro. This compendium of transcriptome data provides valuable insights and a rich resource for understanding the immune landscape in cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1 based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1. Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis.

  16. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik; Chowdhury, Punam; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1). Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis. PMID:26504510

  17. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik; Chowdhury, Punam; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1). Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis.

  18. Exploring the sequence diversity in glycoside hydrolase family 13_18 reveals a novel glucosylglycerol phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceus, Jorick; Decuyper, Lena; D'hooghe, Matthias; Desmet, Tom

    2018-04-01

    In the carbohydrate-active enzyme database, GH13_18 is a family of retaining glycoside phosphorylases that act on α-glucosides. In this work, we explored the functional diversity of this family by comparing distinctive sequence motifs in different branches of its phylogenetic tree. A glycoside phosphorylase from Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 that was predicted to have a novel function was expressed and characterised. The enzyme was found to catalyse the reversible phosphorolysis of 2-O-α-D-glucosylglycerol with retention of the anomeric configuration, a specificity that has never been described before. Homology modelling, docking and mutagenesis were performed to pinpoint particular acceptor site residues (Tyr194, Ala333, Gln336) involved in the binding of glycerol. The new enzyme specificity provides additional insights into bacterial metabolic routes, being the first report of a phosphorolytic route for glucosylglycerol in a glucosylglycerol-producing organism. Furthermore, glucosylglycerol phosphorylase might be an attractive biocatalyst for the production of the osmolyte glucosylglycerol, which is currently produced on industrial scale by exploiting a side activity of the closely related sucrose phosphorylase. Family GH13_18 has clearly proven to be more diverse than was initially assumed, and the analysis of specificity-determining sequence motifs has shown to be a straightforward and fruitful tool for enzyme discovery.

  19. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of strawberry and other rosids reveals significant microsynteny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott Albert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragaria belongs to the Rosaceae, an economically important family that includes a number of important fruit producing genera such as Malus and Prunus. Using genomic sequences from 50 Fragaria fosmids, we have examined the microsynteny between Fragaria and other plant models. Results In more than half of the strawberry fosmids, we found syntenic regions that are conserved in Populus, Vitis, Medicago and/or Arabidopsis with Populus containing the greatest number of syntenic regions with Fragaria. The longest syntenic region was between LG VIII of the poplar genome and the strawberry fosmid 72E18, where seven out of twelve predicted genes were collinear. We also observed an unexpectedly high level of conserved synteny between Fragaria (rosid I and Vitis (basal rosid. One of the strawberry fosmids, 34E24, contained a cluster of R gene analogs (RGAs with NBS and LRR domains. We detected clusters of RGAs with high sequence similarity to those in 34E24 in all the genomes compared. In the phylogenetic tree we have generated, all the NBS-LRR genes grouped together with Arabidopsis CNL-A type NBS-LRR genes. The Fragaria RGA grouped together with those of Vitis and Populus in the phylogenetic tree. Conclusions Our analysis shows considerable microsynteny between Fragaria and other plant genomes such as Populus, Medicago, Vitis, and Arabidopsis to a lesser degree. We also detected a cluster of NBS-LRR type genes that are conserved in all the genomes compared.

  20. Time Correlations of Lightning Flash Sequences in Thunderstorms Revealed by Fractal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Xueqiang; Chen, Mingli; Zhang, Guangshu

    2018-01-01

    By using the data of lightning detection and ranging system at the Kennedy Space Center, the temporal fractal and correlation of interevent time series of lightning flash sequences in thunderstorms have been investigated with Allan factor (AF), Fano factor (FF), and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) methods. AF, FF, and DFA methods are powerful tools to detect the time-scaling structures and correlations in point processes. Totally 40 thunderstorms with distinguishing features of a single-cell storm and apparent increase and decrease in the total flash rate were selected for the analysis. It is found that the time-scaling exponents for AF (αAF) and FF (αFF) analyses are 1.62 and 0.95 in average, respectively, indicating a strong time correlation of the lightning flash sequences. DFA analysis shows that there is a crossover phenomenon—a crossover timescale (τc) ranging from 54 to 195 s with an average of 114 s. The occurrence of a lightning flash in a thunderstorm behaves randomly at timescales τc but shows strong time correlation at scales >τc. Physically, these may imply that the establishment of an extensive strong electric field necessary for the occurrence of a lightning flash needs a timescale >τc, which behaves strongly time correlated. But the initiation of a lightning flash within a well-established extensive strong electric field may involve the heterogeneities of the electric field at a timescale τc, which behave randomly.

  1. Molecular pathogenesis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia revealed by exome sequencing, developmental data, and bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Mauro; High, Frances A.; Russell, Meaghan K.; Kashani, Alireza; Tracy, Adam A.; Coletti, Caroline M.; Hila, Regis; Shamia, Ahmed; Wells, Julie; Ackerman, Kate G.; Wilson, Jay M.; Bult, Carol J.; Lee, Charles; Lage, Kasper; Pober, Barbara R.; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and severe birth defect. Despite its clinical significance, the genetic and developmental pathways underlying this disorder are incompletely understood. In this study, we report a catalog of variants detected by a whole exome sequencing study on 275 individuals with CDH. Predicted pathogenic variants in genes previously identified in either humans or mice with diaphragm defects are enriched in our CDH cohort compared with 120 size-matched random gene sets. This enrichment was absent in control populations. Variants in these critical genes can be found in up to 30.9% of individuals with CDH. In addition, we filtered variants by using genes derived from regions of recurrent copy number variations in CDH, expression profiles of the developing diaphragm, protein interaction networks expanded from the known CDH-causing genes, and prioritized genes with ultrarare and highly disruptive variants, in 11.3% of CDH patients. These strategies have identified several high priority genes and developmental pathways that likely contribute to the CDH phenotype. These data are valuable for comparison of candidate genes generated from whole exome sequencing of other CDH cohorts or multiplex kindreds and provide ideal candidates for further functional studies. Furthermore, we propose that these genes and pathways will enhance our understanding of the heterogeneous molecular etiology of CDH. PMID:25107291

  2. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a rare interferon gamma receptor 1 mutation associated with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Dong, Huimin; Xue, Yinping

    2018-02-13

    Our study is aimed to explore the underlying genetic basis of myasthenia gravis. We collected a Chinese pedigree with myasthenia gravis, and whole-exome sequencing was performed on the two affected siblings and their parents. The candidate pathogenic gene was identified by bioinformatics filtering, which was further verified by Sanger sequencing. The homozygous mutation c.G40A (p.V14M) in interferon gamma receptor 1was identified. Moreover, the mutation was also detected in 3 cases of 44 sporadic myasthenia gravis patients. The p.V14M substitution in interferon gamma receptor 1 may affect the signal peptide function and the translocation on cell membrane, which could disrupt the binding of the ligand of interferon gamma and antibody production, contributing to myasthenia gravis susceptibility. We discovered that a rare variant c.G40A in interferon gamma receptor 1 potentially contributes to the myasthenia gravis pathogenesis. Further functional studies are needed to confirm the effect of the interferon gamma receptor 1 on the myasthenia gravis phenotype.

  3. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorn, Michelle A.; Alanjary, Mohammad M.; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R.; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites. PMID:27902408

  4. Ultra Deep Sequencing of a Baculovirus Population Reveals Widespread Genomic Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Chateigner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses rely on widespread genetic variation and large population size for adaptation. Large DNA virus populations are thought to harbor little variation though natural populations may be polymorphic. To measure the genetic variation present in a dsDNA virus population, we deep sequenced a natural strain of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. With 124,221X average genome coverage of our 133,926 bp long consensus, we could detect low frequency mutations (0.025%. K-means clustering was used to classify the mutations in four categories according to their frequency in the population. We found 60 high frequency non-synonymous mutations under balancing selection distributed in all functional classes. These mutants could alter viral adaptation dynamics, either through competitive or synergistic processes. Lastly, we developed a technique for the delimitation of large deletions in next generation sequencing data. We found that large deletions occur along the entire viral genome, with hotspots located in homologous repeat regions (hrs. Present in 25.4% of the genomes, these deletion mutants presumably require functional complementation to complete their infection cycle. They might thus have a large impact on the fitness of the baculovirus population. Altogether, we found a wide breadth of genomic variation in the baculovirus population, suggesting it has high adaptive potential.

  5. Giraffe genome sequence reveals clues to its unique morphology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaba, Morris; Ishengoma, Edson; Miller, Webb C; McGrath, Barbara C; Hudson, Chelsea N; Bedoya Reina, Oscar C; Ratan, Aakrosh; Burhans, Rico; Chikhi, Rayan; Medvedev, Paul; Praul, Craig A; Wu-Cavener, Lan; Wood, Brendan; Robertson, Heather; Penfold, Linda; Cavener, Douglas R

    2016-05-17

    The origins of giraffe's imposing stature and associated cardiovascular adaptations are unknown. Okapi, which lacks these unique features, is giraffe's closest relative and provides a useful comparison, to identify genetic variation underlying giraffe's long neck and cardiovascular system. The genomes of giraffe and okapi were sequenced, and through comparative analyses genes and pathways were identified that exhibit unique genetic changes and likely contribute to giraffe's unique features. Some of these genes are in the HOX, NOTCH and FGF signalling pathways, which regulate both skeletal and cardiovascular development, suggesting that giraffe's stature and cardiovascular adaptations evolved in parallel through changes in a small number of genes. Mitochondrial metabolism and volatile fatty acids transport genes are also evolutionarily diverged in giraffe and may be related to its unusual diet that includes toxic plants. Unexpectedly, substantial evolutionary changes have occurred in giraffe and okapi in double-strand break repair and centrosome functions.

  6. Comparative transcriptome analysis within the Lolium/Festuca species complex reveals high sequence conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czaban, Adrian; Sharma, Sapna; Byrne, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    -Festuca complex show very diverse phenotypes, including for many agronomically important traits. Analysis of sequenced transcriptomes of these non-model species may shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotypic diversity. Results We have generated de novo transcriptome assemblies for four......Background The Lolium-Festuca complex incorporates species from the Lolium genera and the broad leaf fescues, both belonging to the subfamily Pooideae. This subfamily also includes wheat, barley, oat and rye, making it extremely important to world agriculture. Species within the Lolium...... species from the Lolium-Festuca complex, ranging from 52,166 to 72,133 transcripts per assembly. We have also predicted a set of proteins and validated it with a high-confidence protein database from three closely related species (H. vulgare, B. distachyon and O. sativa). We have obtained gene family...

  7. Sequence analysis of three mitochondrial DNA molecules reveals interesting differences among Saccharomyces yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Casaregola, S.; Ussery, David

    2003-01-01

    Saccharomyces yeasts, others have highly diverged. The two mtDNAs are much more compact than that of S. cerevisiae and contain fewer introns and intergenic sequences, although they have almost the same coding potential. A few genes contain group I introns, but group II introns, otherwise found in S. cerevisiae...... mtDNA, are not present. Surprisingly, four genes (ATP6, COX2, COX3 and COB) in the mtDNA of S. servazzii contain, in total, five + 1 frameshifts. mtDNAs of S. castellii, S. servazzii and S. cerevisiae contain all genes on the same strand, except for one tRNA gene. On the other hand, the gene order...

  8. Genetic Diversity of Selected Mangifera Species Revealed by Inter Simple Sequence Repeats Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Ariffin, Zulhairil; Md Sah, Muhammad Shafie; Idris, Salma; Hashim, Nuradni

    2015-01-01

    ISSR markers were employed to reveal genetic diversity and genetic relatedness among 28 Mangifera accessions collected from Yan (Kedah), Bukit Gantang (Perak), Sibuti (Sarawak), and Papar (Sabah). A total of 198 markers were generated using nine anchored primers and one nonanchored primer. Genetic variation among the 28 accessions of Mangifera species including wild relatives, landraces, and clonal varieties is high, with an average degree of polymorphism of 98% and mean Shannon index, H0=7.5...

  9. Transcriptome sequencing reveals high isoform diversity in the ant Formica exsecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor Dhaygude

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptome resources for social insects have the potential to provide new insight into polyphenism, i.e., how divergent phenotypes arise from the same genome. Here we present a transcriptome based on paired-end RNA sequencing data for the ant Formica exsecta (Formicidae, Hymenoptera. The RNA sequencing libraries were constructed from samples of several life stages of both sexes and female castes of queens and workers, in order to maximize representation of expressed genes. We first compare the performance of common assembly and scaffolding software (Trinity, Velvet-Oases, and SOAPdenovo-trans, in producing de novo assemblies. Second, we annotate the resulting expressed contigs to the currently published genomes of ants, and other insects, including the honeybee, to filter genes that have annotation evidence of being true genes. Our pipeline resulted in a final assembly of altogether 39,262 mRNA transcripts, with an average coverage of >300X, belonging to 17,496 unique genes with annotation in the related ant species. From these genes, 536 genes were unique to one caste or sex only, highlighting the importance of comprehensive sampling. Our final assembly also showed expression of several splice variants in 6,975 genes, and we show that accounting for splice variants affects the outcome of downstream analyses such as gene ontologies. Our transcriptome provides an outstanding resource for future genetic studies on F. exsecta and other ant species, and the presented transcriptome assembly can be adapted to any non-model species that has genomic resources available from a related taxon.

  10. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydia reveals an association between Chlamydia psittaci genotypes and host species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannekoek, Yvonne; Dickx, Veerle; Beeckman, Delphine S A; Jolley, Keith A; Keijzers, Wendy C; Vretou, Evangelia; Maiden, Martin C J; Vanrompay, Daisy; van der Ende, Arie

    2010-12-02

    Chlamydia comprises a group of obligate intracellular bacterial parasites responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and animals, including several zoonoses. Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases such as trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Chlamydia psittaci, causing zoonotic pneumonia in humans, is usually hosted by birds, while Chlamydia abortus, causing abortion and fetal death in mammals, including humans, is mainly hosted by goats and sheep. We used multi-locus sequence typing to asses the population structure of Chlamydia. In total, 132 Chlamydia isolates were analyzed, including 60 C. trachomatis, 18 C. pneumoniae, 16 C. abortus, 34 C. psittaci and one of each of C. pecorum, C. caviae, C. muridarum and C. felis. Cluster analyses utilizing the Neighbour-Joining algorithm with the maximum composite likelihood model of concatenated sequences of 7 housekeeping fragments showed that C. psittaci 84/2334 isolated from a parrot grouped together with the C. abortus isolates from goats and sheep. Cluster analyses of the individual alleles showed that in all instances C. psittaci 84/2334 formed one group with C. abortus. Moving 84/2334 from the C. psittaci group to the C. abortus group resulted in a significant increase in the number of fixed differences and elimination of the number of shared mutations between C. psittaci and C. abortus. C. psittaci M56 from a muskrat branched separately from the main group of C. psittaci isolates. C. psittaci genotypes appeared to be associated with host species. The phylogenetic tree of C. psittaci did not follow that of its host bird species, suggesting host species jumps. In conclusion, we report for the first time an association between C. psittaci genotypes with host species.

  11. Whole genome sequencing of the monomorphic pathogen Mycobacterium bovis reveals local differentiation of cattle clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Moira; Fresia, Pablo; Greif, Gonzalo; Iraola, Gregorio; Castro-Ramos, Miguel; Juambeltz, Arturo; Nuñez, Álvaro; Naya, Hugo; Robello, Carlos; Berná, Luisa

    2018-01-02

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) poses serious risks to animal welfare and economy, as well as to public health as a zoonosis. Its etiological agent, Mycobacterium bovis, belongs to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), a group of genetically monomorphic organisms featured by a remarkably high overall nucleotide identity (99.9%). Indeed, this characteristic is of major concern for correct typing and determination of strain-specific traits based on sequence diversity. Due to its historical economic dependence on cattle production, Uruguay is deeply affected by the prevailing incidence of Mycobacterium bovis. With the world's highest number of cattle per human, and its intensive cattle production, Uruguay represents a particularly suited setting to evaluate genomic variability among isolates, and the diversity traits associated to this pathogen. We compared 186 genomes from MTBC strains isolated worldwide, and found a highly structured population in M. bovis. The analysis of 23 new M. bovis genomes, belonging to strains isolated in Uruguay evidenced three groups present in the country. Despite presenting an expected highly conserved genomic structure and sequence, these strains segregate into a clustered manner within the worldwide phylogeny. Analysis of the non-pe/ppe differential areas against a reference genome defined four main sources of variability, namely: regions of difference (RD), variable genes, duplications and novel genes. RDs and variant analysis segregated the strains into clusters that are concordant with their spoligotype identities. Due to its high homoplasy rate, spoligotyping failed to reflect the true genomic diversity among worldwide representative strains, however, it remains a good indicator for closely related populations. This study introduces a comprehensive population structure analysis of worldwide M. bovis isolates. The incorporation and analysis of 23 novel Uruguayan M. bovis genomes, sheds light onto the genomic diversity of this

  12. Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydia reveals an association between Chlamydia psittaci genotypes and host species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Pannekoek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia comprises a group of obligate intracellular bacterial parasites responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and animals, including several zoonoses. Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases such as trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Chlamydia psittaci, causing zoonotic pneumonia in humans, is usually hosted by birds, while Chlamydia abortus, causing abortion and fetal death in mammals, including humans, is mainly hosted by goats and sheep. We used multi-locus sequence typing to asses the population structure of Chlamydia. In total, 132 Chlamydia isolates were analyzed, including 60 C. trachomatis, 18 C. pneumoniae, 16 C. abortus, 34 C. psittaci and one of each of C. pecorum, C. caviae, C. muridarum and C. felis. Cluster analyses utilizing the Neighbour-Joining algorithm with the maximum composite likelihood model of concatenated sequences of 7 housekeeping fragments showed that C. psittaci 84/2334 isolated from a parrot grouped together with the C. abortus isolates from goats and sheep. Cluster analyses of the individual alleles showed that in all instances C. psittaci 84/2334 formed one group with C. abortus. Moving 84/2334 from the C. psittaci group to the C. abortus group resulted in a significant increase in the number of fixed differences and elimination of the number of shared mutations between C. psittaci and C. abortus. C. psittaci M56 from a muskrat branched separately from the main group of C. psittaci isolates. C. psittaci genotypes appeared to be associated with host species. The phylogenetic tree of C. psittaci did not follow that of its host bird species, suggesting host species jumps. In conclusion, we report for the first time an association between C. psittaci genotypes with host species.

  13. Next-generation sequencing reveals recent horizontal transfer of a DNA transposon between divergent mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupu Diao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal transfer of genetic material between complex organisms often involves transposable elements (TEs. For example, a DNA transposon mariner has been shown to undergo horizontal transfer between different orders of insects and between different phyla of animals. Here we report the discovery and characterization of an ITmD37D transposon, MJ1, in Anopheles sinensis. We show that some MJ1 elements in Aedes aegypti and An. sinensis contain intact open reading frames and share nearly 99% nucleotide identity over the entire transposon, which is unexpectedly high given that these two genera had diverged 145-200 million years ago. Chromosomal hybridization and TE-display showed that MJ1 copy number is low in An. sinensis. Among 24 mosquito species surveyed, MJ1 is only found in Ae. aegypti and the hyrcanus group of anopheline mosquitoes to which An. sinensis belongs. Phylogenetic analysis is consistent with horizontal transfer and provides the basis for inference of its timing and direction. Although report of horizontal transfer of DNA transposons between higher eukaryotes is accumulating, our analysis is one of a small number of cases in which horizontal transfer of nearly identical TEs among highly divergent species has been thoroughly investigated and strongly supported. Horizontal transfer involving mosquitoes is of particular interest because there are ongoing investigations of the possibility of spreading pathogen-resistant genes into mosquito populations to control malaria and other infectious diseases. The initial indication of horizontal transfer of MJ1 came from comparisons between a 0.4x coverage An. sinensis 454 sequence database and available TEs in mosquito genomes. Therefore we have shown that it is feasible to use low coverage sequencing to systematically uncover horizontal transfer events. Expanding such efforts across a wide range of species will generate novel insights into the relative frequency of horizontal transfer of

  14. Exome sequencing reveals novel and recurrent mutations with clinical significance in inherited retinal dystrophies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María González-del Pozo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the underlying molecular genetic cause in four Spanish families clinically diagnosed of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, comprising one autosomal dominant RP (adRP, two autosomal recessive RP (arRP and one with two possible modes of inheritance: arRP or X-Linked RP (XLRP. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES using NimbleGen SeqCap EZ Exome V3 sample preparation kit and SOLID 5500xl platform. All variants passing filter criteria were validated by Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation and the absence in local control population. This strategy allowed the detection of: (i one novel heterozygous splice-site deletion in RHO, c.937-2_944del, (ii one rare homozygous mutation in C2orf71, c.1795T>C; p.Cys599Arg, not previously associated with the disease, (iii two heterozygous null mutations in ABCA4, c.2041C>T; p.R681* and c.6088C>T; p.R2030*, and (iv one mutation, c.2405-2406delAG; p.Glu802Glyfs*31 in the ORF15 of RPGR. The molecular findings for RHO and C2orf71 confirmed the initial diagnosis of adRP and arRP, respectively, while patients with the two ABCA4 mutations, both previously associated with Stargardt disease, presented symptoms of RP with early macular involvement. Finally, the X-Linked inheritance was confirmed for the family with the RPGR mutation. This latter finding allowed the inclusion of carrier sisters in our preimplantational genetic diagnosis program.

  15. Replication origin-flanking roadblocks reveal origin-licensing dynamics and altered sequence dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Megan D; Azmi, Ishara F; Kang, Sukhyun; Zhao, Yanding; Bell, Stephen P

    2017-12-29

    In eukaryotes, DNA replication initiates from multiple origins of replication for timely genome duplication. These sites are selected by origin licensing, during which the core enzyme of the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase, the Mcm2-7 (minichromosome maintenance) complex, is loaded at each origin. This origin licensing requires loading two Mcm2-7 helicases around origin DNA in a head-to-head orientation. Current models suggest that the origin-recognition complex (ORC) and cell-division cycle 6 (Cdc6) proteins recognize and encircle origin DNA and assemble an Mcm2-7 double-hexamer around adjacent double-stranded DNA. To test this model and assess the location of Mcm2-7 initial loading, we placed DNA-protein roadblocks at defined positions adjacent to the essential ORC-binding site within Saccharomyces cerevisiae origin DNA. Roadblocks were made either by covalent cross-linking of the HpaII methyltransferase to DNA or through binding of a transcription activator-like effector (TALE) protein. Contrary to the sites of Mcm2-7 recruitment being precisely defined, only single roadblocks that inhibited ORC-DNA binding showed helicase loading defects. We observed inhibition of helicase loading without inhibition of ORC-DNA binding only when roadblocks were placed on both sides of the origin to restrict sliding of a helicase-loading intermediate. Consistent with a sliding helicase-loading intermediate, when either one of the flanking roadblocks was eliminated, the remaining roadblock had no effect on helicase loading. Interestingly, either origin-flanking nucleosomes or roadblocks resulted in helicase loading being dependent on an additional origin sequence known to be a weaker ORC-DNA-binding site. Together, our findings support a model in which sliding helicase-loading intermediates increase the flexibility of the DNA sequence requirements for origin licensing. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Shotgun Metagenomic Sequencing Reveals Functional Genes and Microbiome Associated with Bovine Digital Dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zinicola

    Full Text Available Metagenomic methods amplifying 16S ribosomal RNA genes have been used to describe the microbial diversity of healthy skin and lesion stages of bovine digital dermatitis (DD and to detect critical pathogens involved with disease pathogenesis. In this study, we characterized the microbiome and for the first time, the composition of functional genes of healthy skin (HS, active (ADD and inactive (IDD lesion stages using a whole-genome shotgun approach. Metagenomic sequences were annotated using MG-RAST pipeline. Six phyla were identified as the most abundant. Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were the predominant bacterial phyla in the microbiome of HS, while Spirochetes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were highly abundant in ADD and IDD. T. denticola-like, T. vincentii-like and T. phagedenis-like constituted the most abundant species in ADD and IDD. Recruitment plots comparing sequences from HS, ADD and IDD samples to the genomes of specific Treponema spp., supported the presence of T. denticola and T. vincentii in ADD and IDD. Comparison of the functional composition of HS to ADD and IDD identified a significant difference in genes associated with motility/chemotaxis and iron acquisition/metabolism. We also provide evidence that the microbiome of ADD and IDD compared to that of HS had significantly higher abundance of genes associated with resistance to copper and zinc, which are commonly used in footbaths to prevent and control DD. In conclusion, the results from this study provide new insights into the HS, ADD and IDD microbiomes, improve our understanding of the disease pathogenesis and generate unprecedented knowledge regarding the functional genetic composition of the digital dermatitis microbiome.

  17. Genetic alterations in mesiodens as revealed by targeted next-generation sequencing and gene co-occurrence network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y Y; Hwang, J; Kim, H-S; Kwon, H J; Kim, S; Lee, J H; Lee, J H

    2017-10-01

    Mesiodens is the most common type of supernumerary tooth which includes a population prevalence of 0.15%-1.9%. Alongside evidence that the condition is heritable, mutations in single genes have been reported in few human supernumerary tooth cases. Gene sequencing methods in tradition way are time-consuming and labor-intensive, whereas next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics are cost-effective for large samples and target sizes. We describe the application of a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) and bioinformatics approach to samples from 17 mesiodens patients. Subjects were diagnosed on the basis of panoramic radiograph. A total of 101 candidate genes which were captured custom genes were sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq 2500. Multistep bioinformatics processing was performed including variant identification, base calling, and in silico analysis of putative disease-causing variants. Targeted capture identified 88 non-synonymous, rare, exonic variants involving 42 of the 101 candidate genes. Moreover, we investigated gene co-occurrence relationships between the genomic alterations and identified 88 significant relationships among 18 most recurrent driver alterations. Our search for co-occurring genetic alterations revealed that such alterations interact cooperatively to drive mesiodens. We discovered a gene co-occurrence network in mesiodens patients with functionally enriched gene groups in the sonic hedgehog (SHH), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), and wingless integrated (WNT) signaling pathways. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unexpected allelic heterogeneity and spectrum of mutations in Fowler syndrome revealed by next-generation exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Emilie; Albrecht, Steffen; Ha, Kevin C H; Jacob, Karine; Bolduc, Nathalie; Polychronakos, Constantin; Dechelotte, Pierre; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2010-08-01

    Protein coding genes constitute approximately 1% of the human genome but harbor 85% of the mutations with large effects on disease-related traits. Therefore, efficient strategies for selectively sequencing complete coding regions (i.e., "whole exome") have the potential to contribute our understanding of human diseases. We used a method for whole-exome sequencing coupling Agilent whole-exome capture to the Illumina DNA-sequencing platform, and investigated two unrelated fetuses from nonconsanguineous families with Fowler Syndrome (FS), a stereotyped phenotype lethal disease. We report novel germline mutations in feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular-receptor-family member 2, FLVCR2, which has recently been shown to cause FS. Using this technology, we identified three types of genetic abnormalities: point-mutations, insertions-deletions, and intronic splice-site changes (first pathogenic report using this technology), in the fetuses who both were compound heterozygotes for the disease. Although revealing a high level of allelic heterogeneity and mutational spectrum in FS, this study further illustrates the successful application of whole-exome sequencing to uncover genetic defects in rare Mendelian disorders. Of importance, we show that we can identify genes underlying rare, monogenic and recessive diseases using a limited number of patients (n=2), in the absence of shared genetic heritage and in the presence of allelic heterogeneity.

  19. qDNAmod: a statistical model-based tool to reveal intercellular heterogeneity of DNA modification from SMRT sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhixing; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Zhang, Xuegong

    2014-01-01

    In an isogenic cell population, phenotypic heterogeneity among individual cells is common and critical for survival of the population under different environment conditions. DNA modification is an important epigenetic factor that can regulate phenotypic heterogeneity. The single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology provides a unique platform for detecting a wide range of DNA modifications, including N6-methyladenine (6-mA), N4-methylcytosine (4-mC) and 5-methylcytosine (5-mC). Here we present qDNAmod, a novel bioinformatic tool for genome-wide quantitative profiling of intercellular heterogeneity of DNA modification from SMRT sequencing data. It is capable of estimating proportion of isogenic haploid cells, in which the same loci of the genome are differentially modified. We tested the reliability of qDNAmod with the SMRT sequencing data of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain ST556. qDNAmod detected extensive intercellular heterogeneity of DNA methylation (6-mA) in a clonal population of ST556. Subsequent biochemical analyses revealed that the recognition sequences of two type I restriction–modification (R-M) systems are responsible for the intercellular heterogeneity of DNA methylation initially identified by qDNAmod. qDNAmod thus represents a valuable tool for studying intercellular phenotypic heterogeneity from genome-wide DNA modification. PMID:25404133

  20. Genome sequencing reveals metabolic and cellular interdependence in an amoeba-kinetoplastid symbiosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tanifuji, G.; Cenci, U.; Moog, D.; Dean, S.; Nakayama, T.; David, Vojtěch; Fiala, Ivan; Curtis, B.A.; Sibbald, S. J.; Onodera, N. T.; Colp, M.; Flegontov, Pavel; Johnson-MacKinnon, J.; McPhee, M.; Inagaki, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Kelly, S.; Gull, K.; Lukeš, Julius; Archibald, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, SEP 15 (2017), č. článku 11688. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S; GA MŠk LL1601 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : trypanosoma-brucei reveals * hidden markov model * neoparamoeba-pemaquidensis * gill disease * phylogenetic analyses * ichthyobodo-necator * gene prediction * host control * evolution * proteomics Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. The complete genome sequence of Dickeya zeae EC1 reveals substantial divergence from other Dickeya strains and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianuan; Cheng, Yingying; Lv, Mingfa; Liao, Lisheng; Chen, Yufan; Gu, Yanfang; Liu, Shiyin; Jiang, Zide; Xiong, Yuanyan; Zhang, Lianhui

    2015-08-04

    Dickeya zeae is a bacterial species that infects monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Two antibiotic-like phytotoxins named zeamine and zeamine II were reported to play an important role in rice seed germination, and two genes associated with zeamines production, i.e., zmsA and zmsK, have been thoroughly characterized. However, other virulence factors and its molecular mechanisms of host specificity and pathogenesis are hardly known. The complete genome of D. zeae strain EC1 isolated from diseased rice plants was sequenced, annotated, and compared with the genomes of other Dickeya spp.. The pathogen contains a chromosome of 4,532,364 bp with 4,154 predicted protein-coding genes. Comparative genomics analysis indicates that D. zeae EC1 is most co-linear with D. chrysanthemi Ech1591, most conserved with D. zeae Ech586 and least similar to D. paradisiaca Ech703. Substantial genomic rearrangement was revealed by comparing EC1 with Ech586 and Ech703. Most virulence genes were well-conserved in Dickeya strains except Ech703. Significantly, the zms gene cluster involved in biosynthesis of zeamines, which were shown previously as key virulence determinants, is present in D. zeae strains isolated from rice, and some D. solani strains, but absent in other Dickeya species and the D. zeae strains isolated from other plants or sources. In addition, a DNA fragment containing 9 genes associated with fatty acid biosynthesis was found inserted in the fli gene cluster encoding flagellar biosynthesis of strain EC1 and other two rice isolates but not in other strains. This gene cluster shares a high protein similarity to the fatty acid genes from Pantoea ananatis. Our findings delineate the genetic background of D. zeae EC1, which infects both dicotyledons and monocotyledons, and suggest that D. zeae strains isolated from rice could be grouped into a distinct pathovar, i.e., D. zeae subsp. oryzae. In addition, the results of this study also unveiled that the zms gene cluster presented in

  2. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Krüger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1 identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2 assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3 connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities.We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses

  3. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanhua; Billings, Gabriel; Hubbard, Troy P; Park, Joseph S; Yin Leung, Ka; Liu, Qin; Davis, Brigid M; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao; Waldor, Matthew K

    2017-10-03

    Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection). Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant's fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen) collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot). PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida 's fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses. IMPORTANCE Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) enables genome-wide mapping of the genetic determinants of fitness, typically based on observations at a single sampling point. Here, we move beyond analysis of endpoint TIS data to create a framework for analysis of time series TIS data, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). We applied PACE to identify genes that contribute to colonization of a natural host by the fish pathogen

  4. High-throughput sequencing of the B-cell receptor in African Burkitt lymphoma reveals clues to pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Katharine A; Coffey, David G; Morales, Alicia J; Carlson, Christopher S; Towlerton, Andrea M H; Gerdts, Sarah E; Nkrumah, Francis K; Neequaye, Janet; Biggar, Robert J; Orem, Jackson; Casper, Corey; Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Bhatia, Kishor G; Warren, Edus H

    2017-03-28

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL), the most common pediatric cancer in sub-Saharan Africa, is a malignancy of antigen-experienced B lymphocytes. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of the immunoglobulin heavy ( IGH ) and light chain ( IGK / IGL ) loci was performed on genomic DNA from 51 primary BL tumors: 19 from Uganda and 32 from Ghana. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and tumor RNA sequencing (RNAseq) was performed on the Ugandan tumors to confirm and extend the findings from the HTS of tumor DNA. Clonal IGH and IGK / IGL rearrangements were identified in 41 and 46 tumors, respectively. Evidence for rearrangement of the second IGH allele was observed in only 6 of 41 tumor samples with a clonal IGH rearrangement, suggesting that the normal process of biallelic IGHD to IGHJ diversity-joining (DJ) rearrangement is often disrupted in BL progenitor cells. Most tumors, including those with a sole dominant, nonexpressed DJ rearrangement, contained many IGH and IGK / IGL sequences that differed from the dominant rearrangement by < 10 nucleotides, suggesting that the target of ongoing mutagenesis of these loci in BL tumor cells is not limited to expressed alleles. IGHV usage in both BL tumor cohorts revealed enrichment for IGHV genes that are infrequently used in memory B cells from healthy subjects. Analysis of publicly available DNA sequencing and RNAseq data revealed that these same IGHV genes were overrepresented in dominant tumor-associated IGH rearrangements in several independent BL tumor cohorts. These data suggest that BL derives from an abnormal B-cell progenitor and that aberrant mutational processes are active on the immunoglobulin loci in BL cells.

  5. Transcriptome and Degradome Sequencing Reveals Dormancy Mechanisms of Cunninghamia lanceolata Seeds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huimin; Liu, Yongxiu; Soppe, Wim J.J.; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Seeds with physiological dormancy usually experience primary and secondary dormancy in the nature; however, little is known about the differential regulation of primary and secondary dormancy. We combined multiple approaches to investigate cytological changes, hormonal levels, and gene expression dynamics in Cunninghamia lanceolata seeds during primary dormancy release and secondary dormancy induction. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that protein bodies in the embryo cells coalesced during primary dormancy release and then separated during secondary dormancy induction. Transcriptomic profiling demonstrated that expression of genes negatively regulating gibberellic acid (GA) sensitivity reduced specifically during primary dormancy release, whereas the expression of genes positively regulating abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis increased during secondary dormancy induction. Parallel analysis of RNA ends revealed uncapped transcripts for ∼55% of all unigenes. A negative correlation between fold changes in expression levels of uncapped versus capped mRNAs was observed during primary dormancy release. However, this correlation was loose during secondary dormancy induction. Our analyses suggest that the reversible changes in cytology and gene expression during dormancy release and induction are related to ABA/GA balance. Moreover, mRNA degradation functions as a critical posttranscriptional regulator during primary dormancy release. These findings provide a mechanistic framework for understanding physiological dormancy in seeds. PMID:27760880

  6. Transcriptome and Degradome Sequencing Reveals Dormancy Mechanisms of Cunninghamia lanceolata Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dechang; Xu, Huimin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Deng, Xin; Liu, Yongxiu; Soppe, Wim J J; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-12-01

    Seeds with physiological dormancy usually experience primary and secondary dormancy in the nature; however, little is known about the differential regulation of primary and secondary dormancy. We combined multiple approaches to investigate cytological changes, hormonal levels, and gene expression dynamics in Cunninghamia lanceolata seeds during primary dormancy release and secondary dormancy induction. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that protein bodies in the embryo cells coalesced during primary dormancy release and then separated during secondary dormancy induction. Transcriptomic profiling demonstrated that expression of genes negatively regulating gibberellic acid (GA) sensitivity reduced specifically during primary dormancy release, whereas the expression of genes positively regulating abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis increased during secondary dormancy induction. Parallel analysis of RNA ends revealed uncapped transcripts for ∼55% of all unigenes. A negative correlation between fold changes in expression levels of uncapped versus capped mRNAs was observed during primary dormancy release. However, this correlation was loose during secondary dormancy induction. Our analyses suggest that the reversible changes in cytology and gene expression during dormancy release and induction are related to ABA/GA balance. Moreover, mRNA degradation functions as a critical posttranscriptional regulator during primary dormancy release. These findings provide a mechanistic framework for understanding physiological dormancy in seeds. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Whole-body single-cell sequencing reveals transcriptional domains in the annelid larval body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Kaia; Eling, Nils; Vergara, Hernando Martinez; Bertucci, Paola Yanina; Musser, Jacob; Vopalensky, Pavel; Brunet, Thibaut; Collier, Paul; Benes, Vladimir; Marioni, John C; Arendt, Detlev

    2018-01-24

    Animal bodies comprise diverse arrays of cells. To characterise cellular identities across an entire body, we have compared the transcriptomes of single cells randomly picked from dissociated whole larvae of the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii. We identify five transcriptionally distinct groups of differentiated cells, each expressing a unique set of transcription factors and effector genes that implement cellular phenotypes. Spatial mapping of cells into a cellular expression atlas, and wholemount in situ hybridisation of group-specific genes reveals spatially coherent transcriptional domains in the larval body, comprising e.g. apical sensory-neurosecretory cells vs. neural/epidermal surface cells. These domains represent new, basic subdivisions of the annelid body based entirely on differential gene expression, and are composed of multiple, transcriptionally similar cell types. They do not represent clonal domains, as revealed by developmental lineage analysis. We propose that the transcriptional domains that subdivide the annelid larval body represent families of related cell types that have arisen by evolutionary diversification. Their possible evolutionary conservation makes them a promising tool for evo-devo research. (167/250). © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Reczko, Martin; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases. PMID:28046107

  9. Multilocus sequence typing reveals two evolutionary lineages of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianjun; Schuenzel, Erin L; Li, Jianqiang; Schaad, Norman W

    2009-08-01

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli, causal agent of bacterial fruit blotch, has caused considerable damage to the watermelon and melon industry in China and the United States. Understanding the emergence and spread of this pathogen is important for controlling the disease. To build a fingerprinting database for reliable identification and tracking of strains of A. avenae subsp. citrulli, a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed using seven conserved loci. The study included 8 original strains from the 1978 description of A. avenae subsp. citrulli, 51 from China, and 34 from worldwide collections. Two major clonal complexes (CCs), CC1 and CC2, were identified within A. avenae subsp. citrulli; 48 strains typed as CC1 and 45 as CC2. All eight original 1978 strains isolated from watermelon and melon grouped in CC1. CC2 strains were predominant in the worldwide collection and all but five were isolated from watermelon. In China, a major seed producer for melon and watermelon, the predominant strains were CC1 and were found nearly equally on melon and watermelon.

  10. DNA interaction with platinum-based cytostatics revealed by DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerkova, Kristyna; Vaculovic, Tomas; Vaculovicova, Marketa; Kynicky, Jindrich; Brtnicky, Martin; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-12-15

    The main mechanism of action of platinum-based cytostatic drugs - cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin - is the formation of DNA cross-links, which restricts the transcription due to the disability of DNA to enter the active site of the polymerase. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed as a simplified model of the amplification process in the cell nucleus. PCR with fluorescently labelled dideoxynucleotides commonly employed for DNA sequencing was used to monitor the effect of platinum-based cytostatics on DNA in terms of decrease in labeling efficiency dependent on a presence of the DNA-drug cross-link. It was found that significantly different amounts of the drugs - cisplatin (0.21 μg/mL), oxaliplatin (5.23 μg/mL), and carboplatin (71.11 μg/mL) - were required to cause the same quenching effect (50%) on the fluorescent labelling of 50 μg/mL of DNA. Moreover, it was found that even though the amounts of the drugs was applied to the reaction mixture differing by several orders of magnitude, the amount of incorporated platinum, quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, was in all cases at the level of tenths of μg per 5 μg of DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptome sequencing of two phenotypic mosaic Eucalyptus trees reveals large scale transcriptome re-modelling.

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    Amanda Padovan

    Full Text Available Phenotypic mosaic trees offer an ideal system for studying differential gene expression. We have investigated two mosaic eucalypt trees from two closely related species (Eucalyptus melliodora and E. sideroxylon, which each support two types of leaves: one part of the canopy is resistant to insect herbivory and the remaining leaves are susceptible. Driving this ecological distinction are differences in plant secondary metabolites. We used these phenotypic mosaics to investigate genome wide patterns of foliar gene expression with the aim of identifying patterns of differential gene expression and the somatic mutation(s that lead to this phenotypic mosaicism. We sequenced the mRNA pool from leaves of the resistant and susceptible ecotypes from both mosaic eucalypts using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. We found large differences in pathway regulation and gene expression between the ecotypes of each mosaic. The expression of the genes in the MVA and MEP pathways is reflected by variation in leaf chemistry, however this is not the case for the terpene synthases. Apart from the terpene biosynthetic pathway, there are several other metabolic pathways that are differentially regulated between the two ecotypes, suggesting there is much more phenotypic diversity than has been described. Despite the close relationship between the two species, they show large differences in the global patterns of gene and pathway regulation.

  12. Multivariate sequence analysis reveals additional function impacting residues in the SDR superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pratibha; Singh, Noopur; Dixit, Aparna; Choudhury, Devapriya

    2014-10-01

    The "extended" type of short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR), share a remarkable similarity in their tertiary structures inspite of being highly divergent in their functions and sequences. We have carried out principal component analysis (PCA) on structurally equivalent residue positions of 10 SDR families using information theoretic measures like Jensen-Shannon divergence and average shannon entropy as variables. The results classify residue positions in the SDR fold into six groups, one of which is characterized by low Shannon entropies but high Jensen-Shannon divergence against the reference family SDR1E, suggesting that these positions are responsible for the specific functional identities of individual SDR families, distinguishing them from the reference family SDR1E. Site directed mutagenesis of three residues from this group in the enzyme UDP-Galactose 4-epimerase belonging to SDR1E shows that the mutants promote the formation of NADH containing abortive complexes. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations have been used to suggest a mechanism by which the mutants interfere with the re-oxidation of NADH leading to the formation of abortive complexes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Unique Features of Germline Variation in Five Egyptian Familial Breast Cancer Families Revealed by Exome Sequencing.

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    Yeong C Kim

    Full Text Available Genetic predisposition increases the risk of familial breast cancer. Recent studies indicate that genetic predisposition for familial breast cancer can be ethnic-specific. However, current knowledge of genetic predisposition for the disease is predominantly derived from Western populations. Using this existing information as the sole reference to judge the predisposition in non-Western populations is not adequate and can potentially lead to misdiagnosis. Efforts are required to collect genetic predisposition from non-Western populations. The Egyptian population has high genetic variations in reflecting its divergent ethnic origins, and incident rate of familial breast cancer in Egypt is also higher than the rate in many other populations. Using whole exome sequencing, we investigated genetic predisposition in five Egyptian familial breast cancer families. No pathogenic variants in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other classical breast cancer-predisposition genes were present in these five families. Comparison of the genetic variants with those in Caucasian familial breast cancer showed that variants in the Egyptian families were more variable and heterogeneous than the variants in Caucasian families. Multiple damaging variants in genes of different functional categories were identified either in a single family or shared between families. Our study demonstrates that genetic predisposition in Egyptian breast cancer families may differ from those in other disease populations, and supports a comprehensive screening of local disease families to determine the genetic predisposition in Egyptian familial breast cancer.

  14. Exome sequences of multiplex, multigenerational families reveal schizophrenia risk loci with potential implications for neurocognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Mark Z; Carless, Melanie A; Peralta, Juan; Curran, Joanne E; Quillen, Ellen E; Almeida, Marcio; Blackburn, August; Blondell, Lucy; Roalf, David R; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Gur, Ruben C; Göring, Harald H H; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Gur, Raquel E; Almasy, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness, involving disruptions in thought and behavior, with a worldwide prevalence of about one percent. Although highly heritable, much of the genetic liability of schizophrenia is yet to be explained. We searched for susceptibility loci in multiplex, multigenerational families affected by schizophrenia, targeting protein-altering variation with in silico predicted functional effects. Exome sequencing was performed on 136 samples from eight European-American families, including 23 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. In total, 11,878 non-synonymous variants from 6,396 genes were tested for their association with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Pathway enrichment analyses were conducted on gene-based test results, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, and epistatic effects. Using a significance threshold of FDR schizophrenia, with significant cis effects on gene expression (p = 5.5 × 10 -4 ), including brain tissue data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project (minimum p = 6.0 × 10 -5 ). A second SNP, rs10378 located in TMEM176A, also shows risk effects in the exome data (p = 2.8 × 10 -5 ; q-value = 0.073). PPIs among our top gene-based association results (p schizophrenia risk, whose effects may be modulated by genes involved in synaptic plasticity and neurocognitive performance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Whole Blood Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Gene Expression Differences between Dapulian and Landrace Piglets

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    Jiaqing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little genomic information regarding gene expression differences at the whole blood transcriptome level of different pig breeds at the neonatal stage. To solve this, we characterized differentially expressed genes (DEGs in the whole blood of Dapulian (DPL and Landrace piglets using RNA-seq (RNA-sequencing technology. In this study, 83 DEGs were identified between the two breeds. Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analyses identified immune response and metabolism as the most commonly enriched terms and pathways in the DEGs. Genes related to immunity and lipid metabolism were more highly expressed in the DPL piglets, while genes related to body growth were more highly expressed in the Landrace piglets. Additionally, the DPL piglets had twofold more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and alternative splicing (AS than the Landrace piglets. These results expand our knowledge of the genes transcribed in the piglet whole blood of two breeds and provide a basis for future research of the molecular mechanisms underlying the piglet differences.

  16. Molecular phylogenetic lineage of Plagiopogon and Askenasia (Protozoa, Ciliophora) revealed by their gene sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An; Yi, Zhenzhen; Lin, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xiaozhong; Al-Farraj, Saleh A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.

    2015-08-01

    Prostomates and haptorians are two basal groups of ciliates with limited morphological characteristics available for taxonomy. Morphologically, the structures used to identify prostomates and haptorians are similar or even identical, which generate heavy taxonomic and phylogenetic confusion. In present work, phylogenetic positions lineage of two rare genera, Plagiopogon and Askenasia, were investigated. Three genes including small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (hereafter SSU rDNA), internal transcribed spacer region (ITS region), and large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (LSU rDNA) were analyzed, 10 new sequences five species each. Our findings included 1) class Prostomatea and order Haptorida are multiphyletic; 2) it may not be appropriate to place order Cyclotrichiida in subclass Haptoria, and the systematic lineage of order Cyclotrichiida needs to be verified further; 3) genus Plagiopogon branches consistently within a clade covering most prostomes and is basal of clade Colepidae, implying its close lineage to Prostomatea; and 4) Askenasia is phylogenetically distant from the subclass Haptoria but close to classes Prostomatea, Plagiopylea and Oligohymenophorea. We supposed that the toxicyst of Askenasia may be close to taxa of prostomes instead of haptorians, and the dorsal brush is a more typical morphological characteristics of haptorians than toxicysts.

  17. RNA sequencing reveals pronounced changes in the noncoding transcriptome of aging synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bei Jun; Ueberham, Uwe; Mills, James D; Kirazov, Ludmil; Kirazov, Evgeni; Knobloch, Mara; Bochmann, Jana; Jendrek, Renate; Takenaka, Konii; Bliim, Nicola; Arendt, Thomas; Janitz, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Normal aging is associated with impairments in cognitive functions. These alterations are caused by diminutive changes in the biology of synapses, and ineffective neurotransmission, rather than loss of neurons. Hitherto, only a few studies, exploring molecular mechanisms of healthy brain aging in higher vertebrates, utilized synaptosomal fractions to survey local changes in aging-related transcriptome dynamics. Here we present, for the first time, a comparative analysis of the synaptosomes transcriptome in the aging mouse brain using RNA sequencing. Our results show changes in the expression of genes contributing to biological pathways related to neurite guidance, synaptosomal physiology, and RNA splicing. More intriguingly, we also discovered alterations in the expression of thousands of novel, unannotated lincRNAs during aging. Further, detailed characterization of the cleavage and polyadenylation factor I subunit 1 (Clp1) mRNA and protein expression indicates its increased expression in neuronal processes of hippocampal stratum radiatum in aging mice. Together, our study uncovers a new layer of transcriptional regulation which is targeted by aging within the local environment of interconnecting neuronal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Revealing Genomic Profile That Underlies Tropism of Myeloma Cells Using Whole Exome Sequencing

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    Youngil Koh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previously we established two cell lines (SNU_MM1393_BM and SNU_MM1393_SC from different tissues (bone marrow and subcutis of mice which were injected with single patient’s myeloma sample. We tried to define genetic changes specific for each cell line using whole exome sequencing (WES. Materials and Methods. We extracted DNA from SNU_MM1393_BM and SNU_MM1393_SC and performed WES. For single nucleotide variants (SNV calling, we used Varscan2. Annotation of mutation was performed using ANNOVAR. Results. When calling of somatic mutations was performed, 68 genes were nonsynonymously mutated only in SNU_MM1393_SC, while 136 genes were nonsynonymously mutated only in SNU_MM1393_BM. KIAA1199, FRY, AP3B2, and OPTC were representative genes specifically mutated in SNU_MM1393_SC. When comparison analysis was performed using TCGA data, mutational pattern of SNU_MM1393_SC resembled that of melanoma mostly. Pathway analysis using KEGG database showed that mutated genes specific of SNU_MM1393_BM were related to differentiation, while those of SNU_MM1393_SC were related to tumorigenesis. Conclusion. We found out genetic changes that underlie tropism of myeloma cells using WES. Genetic signature of cutaneous plasmacytoma shares that of melanoma implying common mechanism for skin tropism. KIAA1199, FRY, AP3B2, and OPTC are candidate genes for skin tropism of cancers.

  19. Genomic DNA sequences from mastodon and woolly mammoth reveal deep speciation of forest and savanna elephants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadin Rohland

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the history of living and extinct elephantids, we generated 39,763 bp of aligned nuclear DNA sequence across 375 loci for African savanna elephant, African forest elephant, Asian elephant, the extinct American mastodon, and the woolly mammoth. Our data establish that the Asian elephant is the closest living relative of the extinct mammoth in the nuclear genome, extending previous findings from mitochondrial DNA analyses. We also find that savanna and forest elephants, which some have argued are the same species, are as or more divergent in the nuclear genome as mammoths and Asian elephants, which are considered to be distinct genera, thus resolving a long-standing debate about the appropriate taxonomic classification of the African elephants. Finally, we document a much larger effective population size in forest elephants compared with the other elephantid taxa, likely reflecting species differences in ancient geographic structure and range and differences in life history traits such as variance in male reproductive success.

  20. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal evolutionary relationships of the Phytophthora 1c clade species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, Erica S; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Zeng, Qiandong; Saville, Amanda C; Olarte, Rodrigo A; Carbone, Ignazio; Hu, Chia-Hui; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Samaniego, Jose A; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Ristaino, Jean B

    2015-11-01

    Phytophthora infestans is one of the most destructive plant pathogens of potato and tomato globally. The pathogen is closely related to four other Phytophthora species in the 1c clade including P. phaseoli, P. ipomoeae, P. mirabilis and P. andina that are important pathogens of other wild and domesticated hosts. P. andina is an interspecific hybrid between P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. We have sequenced mitochondrial genomes of the sister species of P. infestans and examined the evolutionary relationships within the clade. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the P. phaseoli mitochondrial lineage is basal within the clade. P. mirabilis and P. ipomoeae are sister lineages and share a common ancestor with the Ic mitochondrial lineage of P. andina. These lineages in turn are sister to the P. infestans and P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineages. The P. andina Ic lineage diverged much earlier than the P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineage and P. infestans. The presence of two mitochondrial lineages in P. andina supports the hybrid nature of this species. The ancestral state of the P. andina Ic lineage in the tree and its occurrence only in the Andean regions of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru suggests that the origin of this species hybrid in nature may occur there.

  1. Analysis of the 9p21.3 sequence associated with coronary artery disease reveals a tendency for duplication in a CAD patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Walker, Robert L.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Topol, Eric J.; Larionov, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Tandem segmental duplications (SDs) greater than 10 kb are widespread in complex genomes. They provide material for gene divergence and evolutionary adaptation, while formation of specific de novo SDs is a hallmark of cancer and some human diseases. Most SDs map to distinct genomic regions termed ‘duplication blocks’. SDs organization within these blocks is often poorly characterized as they are mosaics of ancestral duplicons juxtaposed with younger duplicons arising from more recent duplication events. Structural and functional analysis of SDs is further hampered as long repetitive DNA structures are underrepresented in existing BAC and YAC libraries. We applied Transformation-Associated Recombination (TAR) cloning, a versatile technique for large DNA manipulation, to selectively isolate the coronary artery disease (CAD) interval sequence within the 9p21.3 chromosome locus from a patient with coronary artery disease and normal individuals. Four tandem head-to-tail duplicons, each ∼50 kb long, were recovered in the patient but not in normal individuals. Sequence analysis revealed that the repeats varied by 10-15 SNPs between each other and by 82 SNPs between the human genome sequence (version hg19). SNPs polymorphism within the junctions between repeats allowed two junction types to be distinguished, Type 1 and Type 2, which were found at a 2:1 ratio. The junction sequences contained an Alu element, a sequence previously shown to play a role in duplication. Knowledge of structural variation in the CAD interval from more patients could help link this locus to cardiovascular diseases susceptibility, and maybe relevant to other cases of regional amplification, including cancer. PMID:29632643

  2. Molecular sequence typing reveals genotypic diversity among Escherichia coli isolates recovered from a cantaloupe packinghouse in Northwestern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, B; Campos Sauceda, J P; Lee, B G; Yambao, J C; Cháidez Quiroz, C

    2017-06-01

    The increase in the consumption of fresh produce has correlated with a rise in the number of reported foodborne illnesses. To identify potential risk factors associated with postharvest practices, the present study employed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for the genotypic classification of Escherichia coli isolates recovered from three sources sampled at seven operational stages in a cantaloupe packinghouse in Northwestern Mexico. The MLST analysis results indicated that the E. coli isolates were classified into 18 different sequence types (ST), and 11 of these STs were found to be novel. ST-171 was the predominant type and was found in 19% (7/36) of the recovered isolates. Interestingly, the novel ST-827 was found to be significantly associated with isolates recovered from workers' hands, sampled during final postwash stages. Further phylogenetic analyses to examine the relatedness of the STs revealed genetic heterogeneity. Fourteen of the identified STs were assigned to known clonal groups, while the remaining four novel STs were distinct and did not cluster with any clonal group. The present study has provided the first evidence indicating that several sources from distinct operational stages in a cantaloupe packinghouse may contribute to a genotypic and phylogenetic diverse set of E. coli isolates. Packinghouses can be considered as a potential source of microbial contamination. Using multilocus sequence typing, this study identified a genotypic and phylogenetic diverse set of Escherichia coli isolates recovered from the surfaces of cantaloupes, workers' hands and processing equipment at a cantaloupe packinghouse. A total of 61% of the sequence types identified were novel, and a distinct sequence type, ST-827, was significantly associated with worker's hands, sampled during the final postwash operational stages in the packinghouse. These findings serve as a baseline to identify potential sources of microbial contamination at distinct operational stages in

  3. Whole genome sequencing reveals mycobacterial microevolution among concurrent isolates from sputum and blood in HIV infected TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssengooba, Willy; de Jong, Bouke C; Joloba, Moses L; Cobelens, Frank G; Meehan, Conor J

    2016-08-05

    In the context of advanced immunosuppression, M. tuberculosis is known to cause detectable mycobacteremia. However, little is known about the intra-patient mycobacterial microevolution and the direction of seeding between the sputum and blood compartments. From a diagnostic study of HIV-infected TB patients, 51 pairs of concurrent blood and sputum M. tuberculosis isolates from the same patient were available. In a previous analysis, we identified a subset with genotypic concordance, based on spoligotyping and 24 locus MIRU-VNTR. These paired isolates with identical genotypes were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Of the 25 concordant pairs (49 % of the 51 paired isolates), 15 (60 %) remained viable for extraction of high quality DNA for whole genome sequencing. Two patient pairs were excluded due to poor quality sequence reads. The median CD4 cell count was 32 (IQR; 16-101)/mm(3) and ten (77 %) patients were on ART. No drug resistance mutations were identified in any of the sequences analyzed. Three (23.1 %) of 13 patients had SNPs separating paired isolates from blood and sputum compartments, indicating evidence of microevolution. Using a phylogenetic approach to identify the ancestral compartment, in two (15 %) patients the blood isolate was ancestral to the sputum isolate, in one (8 %) it was the opposite, and ten (77 %) of the pairs were identical. Among HIV-infected patients with poor cellular immunity, infection with multiple strains of M. tuberculosis was found in half of the patients. In those patients with identical strains, whole genome sequencing indicated that M. tuberculosis intra-patient microevolution does occur in a few patients, yet did not reveal a consistent direction of spread between sputum and blood. This suggests that these compartments are highly connected and potentially seed each other repeatedly.

  4. Genome Sequencing Technologies and Nursing: What Are the Roles of Nurses and Nurse Scientists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Wright, Michelle L; Hickey, Kathleen T; Housman, David E

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology have resulted in an abundance of personalized data with challenging clinical utility and meaning for clinicians. This wealth of data has potential to dramatically impact the quality of healthcare. Nurses are at the focal point in educating patients regarding relevant healthcare needs; therefore, an understanding of sequencing technology and utilizing these data are critical. The objective of this study was to explicate the role of nurses and nurse scientists as integral members of healthcare teams in improving understanding of DNA sequencing data and translational genomics for patients. A history of the nurse role in newborn screening is used as an exemplar. This study serves as an exemplar on how genome sequencing has been utilized in nursing science and incorporates linkages of other omics approaches used by nurses that are included in this special issue. This special issue showcased nurse scientists conducting multi-omic research from various methods, including targeted candidate genes, pharmacogenomics, proteomics, epigenomics, and the microbiome. From this vantage point, we provide an overview of the roles of nurse scientists in genome sequencing research and provide recommendations for the best utilization of nurses and nurse scientists related to genome sequencing.

  5. Sequence-dependent collective properties of DNAs and their role in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Pasquale; Scipioni, Anita

    2013-03-01

    DNA actively interacts with proteins involved in replication, transcription, repair, and regulation processes inside the cell. The base sequence encodes the dynamics of these transformations from the atomic to the nanometre scale length, and over higher spatial scales. In fact, although an important part of the DNA informational content acts locally, it exerts its functions as collective properties of relatively long sequences and manifests as static and dynamic curvature. Physical models that explore different aspects of DNA collective properties associated to such superstructural properties encoded in the sequence will be reviewed. The B-DNA periodicity operates as band-pass-filter; only the local physical-chemical variance associated to the sequence, in phase with the helical periodicity, sums up and reveals at higher scale. In this light, the gel electrophoresis behaviour of DNAs, the nucleosome thermodynamic stability and positioning along genomes were interpreted and discussed. Finally, a part of this review is reserved to describe the ability of some inorganic crystal surfaces to recognize and stabilize certain DNA tracts with peculiar sequences. The collective superstructural properties of DNAs could be involved in the selective interaction between DNA sequence and particular crystal surfaces. It may be conceived that sequences strongly adsorbed on surface could nucleate and expand bits of information in primeval DNA (and/or RNA) chains, early characterized by random sequences, since more protected against the physical-chemical injuries by the environment, and therefore involved in the evolution of their informational content.

  6. Transcriptomic changes during tuber dormancy release process revealed by RNA sequencing in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bailin; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Yikai; Jin, Xin; Yang, Jiangwei; Si, Huaijun; Wang, Di

    2015-03-20

    Potato tuber dormancy release is a critical development process that allows potato to produce new plant. The first Illumina RNA sequencing to generate the expressed mRNAs at dormancy tuber (DT), dormancy release tuber (DRT) and sprouting tuber (ST) was performed. We identified 26,639 genes including 5,912 (3,450 up-regulated while 2,462 down-regulated) and 3,885 (2,141 up-regulated while 1,744 down-regulated) genes were differentially expressed from DT vs DRT and DRT vs ST. The RNA-Seq results were further verified using qRT-PCR. We found reserve mobilization events were activated before the bud emergence (DT vs DRT) and highlighted after dormancy release (DRT vs ST). Overexpressed genes related to metabolism of auxin, gibberellic acid, cytokinin and barssinosteriod were dominated in DT vs DRT, whereas overexpressed genes involved in metabolism of ethylene, jasmonate and salicylate were prominent in DRT vs ST. Various histone and cyclin isoforms associated genes involved in cell division/cycle were mainly up-regulated in DT vs DRT. Dormancy release process was also companied by stress response and redox regulation, those genes related to biotic stress, cell wall and second metabolism was preferentially overexpressed in DRT vs ST, which might accelerate dormancy breaking and sprout outgrowth. The metabolic processes activated during tuber dormancy release were also supported by plant seed models. These results represented the first comprehensive picture of a large number of genes involved in tuber dormancy release process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. De novo gene evolution of antifreeze glycoproteins in codfishes revealed by whole genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalsrud, Helle Tessand; Tørresen, Ole Kristian; Hongrø Solbakken, Monica; Salzburger, Walter; Hanel, Reinhold; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2017-12-05

    New genes can arise through duplication of a pre-existing gene or de novo from non-coding DNA, providing raw material for evolution of new functions in response to a changing environment. A prime example is the independent evolution of antifreeze glycoprotein genes (afgps) in the Arctic codfishes and Antarctic notothenioids to prevent freezing. However, the highly repetitive nature of these genes complicates studies of their organization. In notothenioids, afgps evolved from an extant gene, yet the evolutionary origin of afgps in codfishes is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that afgps in codfishes have evolved de novo from non-coding DNA 13-18 Ma, coinciding with the cooling of the Northern Hemisphere. Using whole-genome sequence data from several codfishes and notothenioids, we find higher copy number of afgp in species exposed to more severe freezing suggesting a gene dosage effect. Notably, antifreeze function is lost in one lineage of codfishes analogous to the afgp losses in non-Antarctic notothenioids. This indicates that selection can eliminate the antifreeze function when freezing is no longer imminent. Additionally, we show that evolution of afgp-assisting antifreeze potentiating protein genes (afpps) in notothenioids coincides with origin and lineage-specific losses of afgp. The origin of afgps in codfishes is one of the first examples of an essential gene born from non-coding DNA in a non-model species. Our study underlines the power of comparative genomics to uncover past molecular signatures of genome evolution, and further highlights the impact of de novo gene origin in response to a changing selection regime. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Metavirome Sequencing of the Termite Gut Reveals the Presence of an Unexplored Bacteriophage Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhe, Chinmay V.; Husseneder, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite; Coptotermes formosanus is nutritionally dependent on the complex and diverse community of bacteria and protozoa in their gut. Although, there have been many studies to decipher the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in the guts of termites, their bacteriophages remain unstudied. We sequenced the metavirome of the guts of Formosan subterranean termite workers to study the diversity of bacteriophages and other associated viruses. Results showed that the termites harbor a virome in their gut comprised of varied and previously unknown bacteriophages. Between 87–90% of the predicted dsDNA virus genes by Metavir showed similarity to the tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales). Many predicted genes from the virome matched to bacterial prophage regions. These data are suggestive of a virome dominated by temperate bacteriophages. We predicted the genomes of seven novel Caudovirales bacteriophages from the termite gut. Three of these predicted bacteriophage genomes were found in high proportions in all the three termite colonies tested. Two bacteriophages are predicted to infect endosymbiotic bacteria of the gut protozoa. The presence of these putative bacteriophages infecting endosymbionts of the gut protozoa, suggests a quadripartite relationship between the termites their symbiotic protozoa, endosymbiotic bacteria of the protozoa and their bacteriophages. Other than Caudovirales, ss-DNA virus related genes were also present in the termite gut. We predicted the genomes of 12 novel Microviridae phages from the termite gut and seven of those possibly represent a new proposed subfamily. Circovirus like genomes were also assembled from the termite gut at lower relative abundance. We predicted 10 novel circovirus genomes in this study. Whether these circoviruses infect the termites remains elusive at the moment. The functional and taxonomical annotations suggest that the termites may harbor a core virome comprised of

  9. Differential Expression Profiles of the Transcriptome in Breast Cancer Cell Lines Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: As MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells are the typical cell lines of two clinical breast tumour subtypes, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the transcriptome differences between MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Methods: The mRNA, miRNA (MicroRNA and lncRNA (Long non-coding RNA expression profiles were examined using NGS (next generation sequencing instrument Illumina HiSeq-2500. GO (Gene Ontology and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses were performed to identify the biological functions of differentially expressed coding RNAs. Subsequently, we constructed an mRNA-ncRNA (non-coding RNA targeting regulatory network. Finally, we performed RT-qPCR (real-time quantitative PCR to confirm the NGS results. Results: There are sharp distinctions of the coding and non-coding RNA profiles between MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Among the mRNAs and ncRNAs with the most differential expression, SLPI, SOD2, miR-7, miR-143 and miR-145 were highly expressed in MCF-7 cells, while CD55, KRT17, miR-21, miR-10b, miR-9, NEAT1 and PICSAR were over-expressed in MDA-MB-231 cells. Differentially expressed mRNAs are primarily involved in biological processes of locomotion, biological adhesion, ECM-receptor interaction pathway and focal adhesion. In the targeting regulatory network of differentially expressed RNAs, mRNAs and miRNAs are primarily associated with tumour metastasis, but the functions of lncRNAs remain uncharacterized. Conclusion: These results provide a basis for future studies of breast cancer metastasis and drug resistance.

  10. Deep sequencing reveals a novel closterovirus associated with wild rose leaf rosette disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Yang, Zuokun; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guoping; Ning, Guogui; Xu, Wenxing

    2015-06-01

    A bizarre virus-like symptom of a leaf rosette formed by dense small leaves on branches of wild roses (Rosa multiflora Thunb.), designated as 'wild rose leaf rosette disease' (WRLRD), was observed in China. To investigate the presumed causal virus, a wild rose sample affected by WRLRD was subjected to deep sequencing of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for a complete survey of the infecting viruses and viroids. The assembly of siRNAs led to the reconstruction of the complete genomes of three known viruses, namely Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Blackberry chlorotic ringspot virus (BCRV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), and of a novel virus provisionally named 'rose leaf rosette-associated virus' (RLRaV). Phylogenetic analysis clearly placed RLRaV alongside members of the genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae. Genome organization of RLRaV RNA (17,653 nucleotides) showed 13 open reading frames (ORFs), except ORF1 and the quintuple gene block, most of which showed no significant similarities with known viral proteins, but, instead, had detectable identities to fungal or bacterial proteins. Additional novel molecular features indicated that RLRaV seems to be the most complex virus among the known genus members. To our knowledge, this is the first report of WRLRD and its associated closterovirus, as well as two ilarviruses and one capilovirus, infecting wild roses. Our findings present novel information about the closterovirus and the aetiology of this rose disease which should facilitate its control. More importantly, the novel features of RLRaV help to clarify the molecular and evolutionary features of the closterovirus. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  11. An abundance of ubiquitously expressed genes revealed by tissue transcriptome sequence data.

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    Daniel Ramsköld

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The parts of the genome transcribed by a cell or tissue reflect the biological processes and functions it carries out. We characterized the features of mammalian tissue transcriptomes at the gene level through analysis of RNA deep sequencing (RNA-Seq data across human and mouse tissues and cell lines. We observed that roughly 8,000 protein-coding genes were ubiquitously expressed, contributing to around 75% of all mRNAs by message copy number in most tissues. These mRNAs encoded proteins that were often intracellular, and tended to be involved in metabolism, transcription, RNA processing or translation. In contrast, genes for secreted or plasma membrane proteins were generally expressed in only a subset of tissues. The distribution of expression levels was broad but fairly continuous: no support was found for the concept of distinct expression classes of genes. Expression estimates that included reads mapping to coding exons only correlated better with qRT-PCR data than estimates which also included 3' untranslated regions (UTRs. Muscle and liver had the least complex transcriptomes, in that they expressed predominantly ubiquitous genes and a large fraction of the transcripts came from a few highly expressed genes, whereas brain, kidney and testis expressed more complex transcriptomes with the vast majority of genes expressed and relatively small contributions from the most expressed genes. mRNAs expressed in brain had unusually long 3'UTRs, and mean 3'UTR length was higher for genes involved in development, morphogenesis and signal transduction, suggesting added complexity of UTR-based regulation for these genes. Our results support a model in which variable exterior components feed into a large, densely connected core composed of ubiquitously expressed intracellular proteins.

  12. Metavirome Sequencing of the Termite Gut Reveals the Presence of an Unexplored Bacteriophage Community

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    Chinmay V. Tikhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Formosan subterranean termite; Coptotermes formosanus is nutritionally dependent on the complex and diverse community of bacteria and protozoa in their gut. Although, there have been many studies to decipher the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in the guts of termites, their bacteriophages remain unstudied. We sequenced the metavirome of the guts of Formosan subterranean termite workers to study the diversity of bacteriophages and other associated viruses. Results showed that the termites harbor a virome in their gut comprised of varied and previously unknown bacteriophages. Between 87–90% of the predicted dsDNA virus genes by Metavir showed similarity to the tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales. Many predicted genes from the virome matched to bacterial prophage regions. These data are suggestive of a virome dominated by temperate bacteriophages. We predicted the genomes of seven novel Caudovirales bacteriophages from the termite gut. Three of these predicted bacteriophage genomes were found in high proportions in all the three termite colonies tested. Two bacteriophages are predicted to infect endosymbiotic bacteria of the gut protozoa. The presence of these putative bacteriophages infecting endosymbionts of the gut protozoa, suggests a quadripartite relationship between the termites their symbiotic protozoa, endosymbiotic bacteria of the protozoa and their bacteriophages. Other than Caudovirales, ss-DNA virus related genes were also present in the termite gut. We predicted the genomes of 12 novel Microviridae phages from the termite gut and seven of those possibly represent a new proposed subfamily. Circovirus like genomes were also assembled from the termite gut at lower relative abundance. We predicted 10 novel circovirus genomes in this study. Whether these circoviruses infect the termites remains elusive at the moment. The functional and taxonomical annotations suggest that the termites may harbor a core

  13. Metavirome Sequencing of the Termite Gut Reveals the Presence of an Unexplored Bacteriophage Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhe, Chinmay V; Husseneder, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite; Coptotermes formosanus is nutritionally dependent on the complex and diverse community of bacteria and protozoa in their gut. Although, there have been many studies to decipher the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in the guts of termites, their bacteriophages remain unstudied. We sequenced the metavirome of the guts of Formosan subterranean termite workers to study the diversity of bacteriophages and other associated viruses. Results showed that the termites harbor a virome in their gut comprised of varied and previously unknown bacteriophages. Between 87-90% of the predicted dsDNA virus genes by Metavir showed similarity to the tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales) . Many predicted genes from the virome matched to bacterial prophage regions. These data are suggestive of a virome dominated by temperate bacteriophages. We predicted the genomes of seven novel Caudovirales bacteriophages from the termite gut. Three of these predicted bacteriophage genomes were found in high proportions in all the three termite colonies tested. Two bacteriophages are predicted to infect endosymbiotic bacteria of the gut protozoa. The presence of these putative bacteriophages infecting endosymbionts of the gut protozoa, suggests a quadripartite relationship between the termites their symbiotic protozoa, endosymbiotic bacteria of the protozoa and their bacteriophages. Other than Caudovirales, ss-DNA virus related genes were also present in the termite gut. We predicted the genomes of 12 novel Microviridae phages from the termite gut and seven of those possibly represent a new proposed subfamily. Circovirus like genomes were also assembled from the termite gut at lower relative abundance. We predicted 10 novel circovirus genomes in this study. Whether these circoviruses infect the termites remains elusive at the moment. The functional and taxonomical annotations suggest that the termites may harbor a core virome comprised of the

  14. MicroRNAs in Amoebozoa: deep sequencing of the small RNA population in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum reveals developmentally regulated microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avesson, Lotta; Reimegård, Johan; Wagner, E Gerhart H; Söderbom, Fredrik

    2012-10-01

    The RNA interference machinery has served as a guardian of eukaryotic genomes since the divergence from prokaryotes. Although the basic components have a shared origin, silencing pathways directed by small RNAs have evolved in diverse directions in different eukaryotic lineages. Micro (mi)RNAs regulate protein-coding genes and play vital roles in plants and animals, but less is known about their functions in other organisms. Here, we report, for the first time, deep sequencing of small RNAs from the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. RNA from growing single-cell amoebae as well as from two multicellular developmental stages was sequenced. Computational analyses combined with experimental data reveal the expression of miRNAs, several of them exhibiting distinct expression patterns during development. To our knowledge, this is the first report of miRNAs in the Amoebozoa supergroup. We also show that overexpressed miRNA precursors generate miRNAs and, in most cases, miRNA* sequences, whose biogenesis is dependent on the Dicer-like protein DrnB, further supporting the presence of miRNAs in D. discoideum. In addition, we find miRNAs processed from hairpin structures originating from an intron as well as from a class of repetitive elements. We believe that these repetitive elements are sources for newly evolved miRNAs.

  15. MicroRNA Expression Profile in Penile Cancer Revealed by Next-Generation Small RNA Sequencing.

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    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available Penile cancer (PeCa is a relatively rare tumor entity but possesses higher morbidity and mortality rates especially in developing countries. To date, the concrete pathogenic signaling pathways and core machineries involved in tumorigenesis and progression of PeCa remain to be elucidated. Several studies suggested miRNAs, which modulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level, were frequently mis-regulated and aberrantly expressed in human cancers. However, the miRNA profile in human PeCa has not been reported before. In this present study, the miRNA profile was obtained from 10 fresh penile cancerous tissues and matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues via next-generation sequencing. As a result, a total of 751 and 806 annotated miRNAs were identified in normal and cancerous penile tissues, respectively. Among which, 56 miRNAs with significantly different expression levels between paired tissues were identified. Subsequently, several annotated miRNAs were selected randomly and validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Compared with the previous publications regarding to the altered miRNAs expression in various cancers and especially genitourinary (prostate, bladder, kidney, testis cancers, the most majority of deregulated miRNAs showed the similar expression pattern in penile cancer. Moreover, the bioinformatics analyses suggested that the putative target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs between cancerous and matched normal penile tissues were tightly associated with cell junction, proliferation, growth as well as genomic instability and so on, by modulating Wnt, MAPK, p53, PI3K-Akt, Notch and TGF-β signaling pathways, which were all well-established to participate in cancer initiation and progression. Our work presents a global view of the differentially expressed miRNAs and potentially regulatory networks of their target genes for clarifying the pathogenic transformation of normal penis to PeCa, which research resource also

  16. The Role and Challenges of Exome Sequencing in Studies of Human Diseases

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    Zuoheng eWang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have transformed the genetics study of human diseases; this is an era of unprecedented productivity. Exome sequencing, the targeted sequencing of the protein-coding portion of the human genome, has been shown to be a powerful and cost-effective method for detection of disease variants underlying Mendelian disorders. Increasing effort has been made in the interest of the identification of rare variants associated with complex traits in sequencing studies. Here we provided an overview of the application fields for exome sequencing in human diseases. We describe a general framework of computation and bioinformatics for handling sequencing data. We then demonstrate data quality and agreement between exome sequencing and exome microarray (chip genotypes using data collected on the same set of subjects in a genetic study of panic disorder. Our results show that, in sequencing data, the data quality was generally higher for variants within the exonic target regions, compared to that outside the target regions, due to the target enrichment. We also compared genotype concordance for variant calls obtained by exome sequencing vs. exome genotyping microarrays. The overall consistency rate was > 99.83% and the heterozygous consistency rate was > 97.55%. The two platforms share a large amount of agreement over low frequency variants in the exonic regions, while exome sequencing provides much more information on variants not included on exome genotyping microarrays. The results demonstrate that exome sequencing data are of high quality and can be used to investigate the role of rare coding variants in human diseases.

  17. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates from Pakistan during 2009–2013 reveals circulation of new sub genotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, Naila; Naeem, Khalid; Abbas, Muhammad Athar; Ali Malik, Akbar; Rashid, Farooq; Rafique, Saba; Ghafar, Abdul; Rehman, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Despite observing the standard bio-security measures at commercial poultry farms and extensive use of Newcastle disease vaccines, a new genotype VII-f of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) got introduced in Pakistan during 2011. In this regard 300 ND outbreaks recorded so far have resulted into huge losses of approximately USD 200 million during 2011–2013. A total of 33 NDV isolates recovered during 2009–2013 throughout Pakistan were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a new velogenic sub genotype VII-f circulating in commercial and domestic poultry along with the earlier reported sub genotype VII-b. Partial sequencing of Fusion gene revealed two types of cleavage site motifs; lentogenic 112 GRQGRL 117 and velogenic 112 RRQKRF 117 along with some point mutations indicative of genetic diversity. We report here a new sub genotype of virulent NDV circulating in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan and provide evidence for the possible genetic diversity which may be causing new NDV out breaks. - Highlights: • The first report of isolation of new genotype VII-f of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in Pakistan. • We report the partial Fusion gene sequences of new genotype VII-f of virulent NDV from Pakistan. • We report the phylogenetic relationship of new NDV strains with reported NDV strains. • Provide outbreak history of new virulent NDV strain in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan. • We provide possible evidence for the role of backyard poultry in NDV outbreaks

  18. High throughput sequencing of small RNA component of leaves and inflorescence revealed conserved and novel miRNAs as well as phasiRNA loci in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sangeeta; Zheng, Yun; Kudapa, Himabindu; Jagadeeswaran, Guru; Hivrale, Vandana; Varshney, Rajeev K; Sunkar, Ramanjulu

    2015-06-01

    Among legumes, chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the second most important crop after soybean. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles by regulating target gene expression important for plant development and tolerance to stress conditions. Additionally, recently discovered phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs), a new class of small RNAs, are abundantly produced in legumes. Nevertheless, little is known about these regulatory molecules in chickpea. The small RNA population was sequenced from leaves and flowers of chickpea to identify conserved and novel miRNAs as well as phasiRNAs/phasiRNA loci. Bioinformatics analysis revealed 157 miRNA loci for the 96 highly conserved and known miRNA homologs belonging to 38 miRNA families in chickpea. Furthermore, 20 novel miRNAs belonging to 17 miRNA families were identified. Sequence analysis revealed approximately 60 phasiRNA loci. Potential target genes likely to be regulated by these miRNAs were predicted and some were confirmed by modified 5' RACE assay. Predicted targets are mostly transcription factors that might be important for developmental processes, and others include superoxide dismutases, plantacyanin, laccases and F-box proteins that could participate in stress responses and protein degradation. Overall, this study provides an inventory of miRNA-target gene interactions for chickpea, useful for the comparative analysis of small RNAs among legumes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. First DNA sequences from Asian cave bear fossils reveal deep divergences and complex phylogeographic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michael; Rohland, Nadin; Weinstock, Jacobo; Baryshnikov, Gennady; Sher, Andrei; Nagel, Doris; Rabeder, Gernot; Pinhasi, Ron; Schmidt, Heiko A; Hofreiter, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Until recently, cave bears were believed to have only inhabited Europe. However, recent morphological evidence suggests that cave bears' geographic range extended as far east as Transbaikalia, Eastern Siberia. These Asian cave bears were morphologically distinct from European cave bears. However, how they related to European lineages remains unclear, stressing the need to assess the phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationship between Asian cave bears and their European relatives. In this work, we address this issue using a 227 base-pair fragment of the mitochondrial control region obtained from nine fossil bone samples from eight sites from the Urals, Caucasus, Altai Mountains, Ukraine and Yana River region in Eastern Siberia. Results of the phylogenetic analyses indicate that (i) the cave bear from the Yana River is most closely related to cave bears from the Caucasus region; (ii) the Caucasus/Yana group of bears is genetically very distinct from both European cave bears and brown bears, suggesting that these bears could represent an independent species; and (iii) the Western European cave bear lineage reached at least temporarily to the Altai Mountains, 7000 km east of their known centre of distribution. These results suggest that the diversity of cave bears was greater than previously believed, and that they could survive in a much wider range of ecological conditions than previously assumed. They also agree with recent studies on other extinct and extant species, such as wolves, hyenas and steppe bison, which have also revealed higher genetic and ecological diversity in Pleistocene populations than previously known.

  20. The use of high-throughput small RNA sequencing reveals differentially expressed microRNAs in response to aster yellows phytoplasma-infection in Vitis vinifera cv. 'Chardonnay'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Marius C; Solofoharivelo, Marie-Chrystine; Souza-Richards, Rose; Stephan, Dirk; Murray, Shane; Burger, Johan T

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are cell wall-less plant pathogenic bacteria responsible for major crop losses throughout the world. In grapevine they cause grapevine yellows, a detrimental disease associated with a variety of symptoms. The high economic impact of this disease has sparked considerable interest among researchers to understand molecular mechanisms related to pathogenesis. Increasing evidence exist that a class of small non-coding endogenous RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), play an important role in post-transcriptional gene regulation during plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, we aimed to dissect complex high-throughput small RNA sequencing data for the genome-wide identification of known and novel differentially expressed miRNAs, using read libraries constructed from healthy and phytoplasma-infected Chardonnay leaf material. Furthermore, we utilised computational resources to predict putative miRNA targets to explore the involvement of possible pathogen response pathways. We identified multiple known miRNA sequence variants (isomiRs), likely generated through post-transcriptional modifications. Sequences of 13 known, canonical miRNAs were shown to be differentially expressed. A total of 175 novel miRNA precursor sequences, each derived from a unique genomic location, were predicted, of which 23 were differentially expressed. A homology search revealed that some of these novel miRNAs shared high sequence similarity with conserved miRNAs from other plant species, as well as known grapevine miRNAs. The relative expression of randomly selected known and novel miRNAs was determined with real-time RT-qPCR analysis, thereby validating the trend of expression seen in the normalised small RNA sequencing read count data. Among the putative miRNA targets, we identified genes involved in plant morphology, hormone signalling, nutrient homeostasis, as well as plant stress. Our results may assist in understanding the role that miRNA pathways play

  1. Genome re-sequencing of semi-wild soybean reveals a complex Soja population structure and deep introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jie; Wang, Yu; Wu, Sanling; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ye, Chu-Yu; Bai, Xuefei; Li, Zefeng; Yan, Chenghai; Wang, Weidi; Wang, Ziqiang; Shu, Qingyao; Xie, Jiahua; Lee, Suk-Ha; Fan, Longjiang

    2014-01-01

    Semi-wild soybean is a unique type of soybean that retains both wild and domesticated characteristics, which provides an important intermediate type for understanding the evolution of the subgenus Soja population in the Glycine genus. In this study, a semi-wild soybean line (Maliaodou) and a wild line (Lanxi 1) collected from the lower Yangtze regions were deeply sequenced while nine other semi-wild lines were sequenced to a 3-fold genome coverage. Sequence analysis revealed that (1) no independent phylogenetic branch covering all 10 semi-wild lines was observed in the Soja phylogenetic tree; (2) besides two distinct subpopulations of wild and cultivated soybean in the Soja population structure, all semi-wild lines were mixed with some wild lines into a subpopulation rather than an independent one or an intermediate transition type of soybean domestication; (3) high heterozygous rates (0.19-0.49) were observed in several semi-wild lines; and (4) over 100 putative selective regions were identified by selective sweep analysis, including those related to the development of seed size. Our results suggested a hybridization origin for the semi-wild soybean, which makes a complex Soja population structure.

  2. Whole Exome Sequencing for a Patient with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome Reveals de Novo Variants besides an Overt CREBBP Mutation

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    Hee Jeong Yoo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS is a rare condition with a prevalence of 1 in 125,000–720,000 births and characterized by clinical features that include facial, dental, and limb dysmorphology and growth retardation. Most cases of RSTS occur sporadically and are caused by de novo mutations. Cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities are detected in only 55% of RSTS cases. Previous genetic studies have yielded inconsistent results due to the variety of methods used for genetic analysis. The purpose of this study was to use whole exome sequencing (WES to evaluate the genetic causes of RSTS in a young girl presenting with an Autism phenotype. We used the Autism diagnostic observation schedule (ADOS and Autism diagnostic interview revised (ADI-R to confirm her diagnosis of Autism. In addition, various questionnaires were used to evaluate other psychiatric features. We used WES to analyze the DNA sequences of the patient and her parents and to search for de novo variants. The patient showed all the typical features of Autism, WES revealed a de novo frameshift mutation in CREBBP and de novo sequence variants in TNC and IGFALS genes. Mutations in the CREBBP gene have been extensively reported in RSTS patients, while potential missense mutations in TNC and IGFALS genes have not previously been associated with RSTS. The TNC and IGFALS genes are involved in central nervous system development and growth. It is possible for patients with RSTS to have additional de novo variants that could account for previously unexplained phenotypes.

  3. Sequencing of Single Pollen Nuclei Reveals Meiotic Recombination Events at Megabase Resolution and Circumvents Segregation Distortion Caused by Postmeiotic Processes

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    Steven Dreissig

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is a fundamental mechanism to generate novel allelic combinations which can be harnessed by breeders to achieve crop improvement. The recombination landscape of many crop species, including the major crop barley, is characterized by a dearth of recombination in 65% of the genome. In addition, segregation distortion caused by selection on genetically linked loci is a frequent and undesirable phenomenon in double haploid populations which hampers genetic mapping and breeding. Here, we present an approach to directly investigate recombination at the DNA sequence level by combining flow-sorting of haploid pollen nuclei of barley with single-cell genome sequencing. We confirm the skewed distribution of recombination events toward distal chromosomal regions at megabase resolution and show that segregation distortion is almost absent if directly measured in pollen. Furthermore, we show a bimodal distribution of inter-crossover distances, which supports the existence of two classes of crossovers which are sensitive or less sensitive to physical interference. We conclude that single pollen nuclei sequencing is an approach capable of revealing recombination patterns in the absence of segregation distortion.

  4. High-resolution deep sequencing reveals biodiversity, population structure, and persistence of HIV-1 quasispecies within host ecosystems

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    Yin Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing provides the basis for analysis of biodiversity of taxonomically similar organisms in an environment. While extensively applied to microbiome studies, population genetics studies of viruses are limited. To define the scope of HIV-1 population biodiversity within infected individuals, a suite of phylogenetic and population genetic algorithms was applied to HIV-1 envelope hypervariable domain 3 (Env V3 within peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a group of perinatally HIV-1 subtype B infected, therapy-naïve children. Results Biodiversity of HIV-1 Env V3 quasispecies ranged from about 70 to 270 unique sequence clusters across individuals. Viral population structure was organized into a limited number of clusters that included the dominant variants combined with multiple clusters of low frequency variants. Next generation viral quasispecies evolved from low frequency variants at earlier time points through multiple non-synonymous changes in lineages within the evolutionary landscape. Minor V3 variants detected as long as four years after infection co-localized in phylogenetic reconstructions with early transmitting viruses or with subsequent plasma virus circulating two years later. Conclusions Deep sequencing defines HIV-1 population complexity and structure, reveals the ebb and flow of dominant and rare viral variants in the host ecosystem, and identifies an evolutionary record of low-frequency cell-associated viral V3 variants that persist for years. Bioinformatics pipeline developed for HIV-1 can be applied for biodiversity studies of virome populations in human, animal, or plant ecosystems.

  5. High-throughput sequencing-based analysis of endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps reveals unexpectedly high fungal diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Li, Yu-Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Cordyceps, known in Chinese as “DongChong XiaCao”, is a parasitic complex of a fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) and a caterpillar. The current study explored the endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting Chinese Cordyceps. Samples were collected from five different geographical regions of Qinghai and Tibet, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences from each sample were obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that Ascomycota was the dominant fungal phylum in Chinese Cordyceps and its soil microhabitat from different sampling regions. Among the Ascomycota, 65 genera were identified, and the abundant operational taxonomic units showed the strongest sequence similarity to Ophiocordyceps, Verticillium, Pseudallescheria, Candida and Ilyonectria Not surprisingly, the genus Ophiocordyceps was the largest among the fungal communities identified in the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. In addition, fungal communities in the soil microhabitats were clustered separately from the external mycelial cortices and fruiting bodies of Chinese Cordyceps from different sampling regions. There was no significant structural difference in the fungal communities between the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. This study revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps and its microhabitats. PMID:27625176

  6. Genome re-sequencing of semi-wild soybean reveals a complex Soja population structure and deep introgression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Qiu

    Full Text Available Semi-wild soybean is a unique type of soybean that retains both wild and domesticated characteristics, which provides an important intermediate type for understanding the evolution of the subgenus Soja population in the Glycine genus. In this study, a semi-wild soybean line (Maliaodou and a wild line (Lanxi 1 collected from the lower Yangtze regions were deeply sequenced while nine other semi-wild lines were sequenced to a 3-fold genome coverage. Sequence analysis revealed that (1 no independent phylogenetic branch covering all 10 semi-wild lines was observed in the Soja phylogenetic tree; (2 besides two distinct subpopulations of wild and cultivated soybean in the Soja population structure, all semi-wild lines were mixed with some wild lines into a subpopulation rather than an independent one or an intermediate transition type of soybean domestication; (3 high heterozygous rates (0.19-0.49 were observed in several semi-wild lines; and (4 over 100 putative selective regions were identified by selective sweep analysis, including those related to the development of seed size. Our results suggested a hybridization origin for the semi-wild soybean, which makes a complex Soja population structure.

  7. Accurate and High-Coverage Immune Repertoire Sequencing Reveals Characteristics of Antibody Repertoire Diversification in Young Children with Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ning

    Accurately measuring the immune repertoire sequence composition, diversity, and abundance is important in studying repertoire response in infections, vaccinations, and cancer immunology. Using molecular identifiers (MIDs) to tag mRNA molecules is an effective method in improving the accuracy of immune repertoire sequencing (IR-seq). However, it is still difficult to use IR-seq on small amount of clinical samples to achieve a high coverage of the repertoire diversities. This is especially challenging in studying infections and vaccinations where B cell subpopulations with fewer cells, such as memory B cells or plasmablasts, are often of great interest to study somatic mutation patterns and diversity changes. Here, we describe an approach of IR-seq based on the use of MIDs in combination with a clustering method that can reveal more than 80% of the antibody diversity in a sample and can be applied to as few as 1,000 B cells. We applied this to study the antibody repertoires of young children before and during an acute malaria infection. We discovered unexpectedly high levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in infants and revealed characteristics of antibody repertoire development in young children that would have a profound impact on immunization in children.

  8. Metagenome Sequence Analysis of Filamentous Microbial Communities Obtained from Geochemically Distinct Geothermal Channels Reveals Specialization of Three Aquificales Lineages

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    Cristina eTakacs-vesbach

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Aquificales are thermophilic microorganisms that inhabit hydrothermal systems worldwide and are considered one of the earliest lineages of the domain Bacteria. We analyzed metagenome sequence obtained from six thermal ‘filamentous streamer’ communities (~40 Mbp per site, which targeted three different groups of Aquificales found in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. Unassembled metagenome sequence and PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed that acidic, sulfidic sites were dominated by Hydrogenobaculum (Aquificaceae populations, whereas the circumneutral pH (6.5 - 7.8 sites containing dissolved sulfide were dominated by Sulfurihydrogenibium spp. (Hydrogenothermaceae. Thermocrinis (Aquificaceae populations were found primarily in the circumneutral sites with undetectable sulfide, and to a lesser extent in one sulfidic system at pH 8. Phylogenetic analysis of assembled sequence containing 16S rRNA genes as well as conserved protein-encoding genes revealed that the composition and function of these communities varied across geochemical conditions. Each Aquificales lineage contained genes for CO2 fixation by the reverse TCA cycle, but only the Sulfurihydrogenibium populations perform citrate cleavage using ATP citrate lyase (Acl. The Aquificaceae populations use an alternative pathway catalyzed by two separate enzymes, citryl CoA synthetase (Ccs and citryl CoA lyase (Ccl. All three Aquificales lineages contained evidence of aerobic respiration, albeit due to completely different types of heme Cu oxidases (subunit I involved in oxygen reduction. The distribution of Aquificales populations and differences among functional genes involved in energy generation and electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, H2, O2 have resulted in niche specialization among members of the Aquificales.

  9. Deep sequencing of plant and animal DNA contained within traditional Chinese medicines reveals legality issues and health safety concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L Coghlan

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been practiced for thousands of years, but only within the last few decades has its use become more widespread outside of Asia. Concerns continue to be raised about the efficacy, legality, and safety of many popular complementary alternative medicines, including TCMs. Ingredients of some TCMs are known to include derivatives of endangered, trade-restricted species of plants and animals, and therefore contravene the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES legislation. Chromatographic studies have detected the presence of heavy metals and plant toxins within some TCMs, and there are numerous cases of adverse reactions. It is in the interests of both biodiversity conservation and public safety that techniques are developed to screen medicinals like TCMs. Targeting both the p-loop region of the plastid trnL gene and the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, over 49,000 amplicon sequence reads were generated from 15 TCM samples presented in the form of powders, tablets, capsules, bile flakes, and herbal teas. Here we show that second-generation, high-throughput sequencing (HTS of DNA represents an effective means to genetically audit organic ingredients within complex TCMs. Comparison of DNA sequence data to reference databases revealed the presence of 68 different plant families and included genera, such as Ephedra and Asarum, that are potentially toxic. Similarly, animal families were identified that include genera that are classified as vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered, including Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus and Saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica. Bovidae, Cervidae, and Bufonidae DNA were also detected in many of the TCM samples and were rarely declared on the product packaging. This study demonstrates that deep sequencing via HTS is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed TCM products and will assist in monitoring their legality and safety

  10. Genome sequencing of a virulent avian Pasteurella multocida strain GX-Pm reveals the candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengjie; Sizhu, Suolang; Luo, Qingping; Xu, Xuewen; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Anding

    2016-04-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) was first shown to be the causative agent of fowl cholera by Louis Pasteur in 1881. First genomic study was performed on an avirulent avian strain Pm70, and until 2013, two genomes of virulent avian strains X73 and P1059 were sequenced. Comparative genome study supplied important information for further study on the pathogenesis of fowl cholera. In the previous study, a capsular serotype A strain GX-Pm was isolated from the liver of a chicken, which died during an outbreak of fowl cholera in 2011. The strain showed multiple drug resistance and was highly virulent to chickens. Therefore, the present study performed the genome sequencing and a comparative genomic analysis to reveal the candidate genes involved in virulence of P. multocida. Sequenced draft genome sequence of GX-Pm was 2,292,886 bp, contained 2941 protein-coding genes, 5 genomic islands, 4 IS elements and 2 prophage regions. Notability, all the predicted drug-resistance genes were included in predicted genomic islands. A comparative genome study on virulent avian strains P1059, X73 and GX-Pm with the avirulent avian strain Pm 70 indicated that 475 unique genes were only identified in either of virulent strains but absent in the avirulent strain. Among these genes, 20 genes were contained within genomes of all three virulent strains, including a few of putative virulence genes. Further characterization of the pathogenic functions of these genes would benefit the understanding of pathogenesis of fowl cholera. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multilocus sequence analysis of Thermoanaerobacter isolates reveals recombining but differentiated subpopulations from geothermal springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia

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    Isaac David Wagner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Thermal environments have island-like characteristics and provide a unique opportunity to study population structure and diversity patterns of microbial taxa inhabiting these sites. Strains having ≥98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the obligately anaerobic Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter uzonensis were isolated from seven geothermal springs, separated by up to 1600 m, within the Uzon Caldera (Kamchatka, Russian Far East. The intraspecies variation and spatial patterns of diversity for this taxon were assessed by multilocus sequence analysis of 106 strains. Analysis of eight protein-coding loci (gyrB, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, recG, rplB, and rpoB revealed that all loci were polymorphic and that nucleotide substitutions were mostly synonymous. There were 148 variable nucleotide sites across 8003 bp concatenates of the protein-coding loci. While pairwise FST values indicated a small but significant level of genetic differentiation between most subpopulations, there was a negligible relationship between genetic divergence and spatial separation. Strains with the same allelic profile were only isolated from the same hot spring, occasionally from consecutive years, and single locus variant sequence types were usually derived from the same spring. While recombination occurred, there was an "epidemic" population structure in which a particular T. uzonensis sequence type rose in frequency relative to the rest of the population. These results demonstrate spatial diversity patterns for an anaerobic bacterial species in a relative small geographic location and reinforce the view that terrestrial geothermal springs are excellent places to look for biogeographic diversity patterns regardless of the involved distances.

  12. Multilocus sequence analysis of Thermoanaerobacter isolates reveals recombining, but differentiated, populations from geothermal springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Isaac D; Varghese, Litty B; Hemme, Christopher L; Wiegel, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Thermal environments have island-like characteristics and provide a unique opportunity to study population structure and diversity patterns of microbial taxa inhabiting these sites. Strains having ≥98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the obligately anaerobic Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter uzonensis were isolated from seven geothermal springs, separated by up to 1600 m, within the Uzon Caldera (Kamchatka, Russian Far East). The intraspecies variation and spatial patterns of diversity for this taxon were assessed by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 106 strains. Analysis of eight protein-coding loci (gyrB, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, recG, rplB, and rpoB) revealed that all loci were polymorphic and that nucleotide substitutions were mostly synonymous. There were 148 variable nucleotide sites across 8003 bp concatenates of the protein-coding loci. While pairwise F ST values indicated a small but significant level of genetic differentiation between most subpopulations, there was a negligible relationship between genetic divergence and spatial separation. Strains with the same allelic profile were only isolated from the same hot spring, occasionally from consecutive years, and single locus variant (SLV) sequence types were usually derived from the same spring. While recombination occurred, there was an "epidemic" population structure in which a particular T. uzonensis sequence type rose in frequency relative to the rest of the population. These results demonstrate spatial diversity patterns for an anaerobic bacterial species in a relative small geographic location and reinforce the view that terrestrial geothermal springs are excellent places to look for biogeographic diversity patterns regardless of the involved distances.

  13. Genomic fossils reveal adaptation of non-autonomous pararetroviruses driven by concerted evolution of noncoding regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sunlu; Zheng, Huizhen; Kishima, Yuji

    2017-06-01

    The interplay of different virus species in a host cell after infection can affect the adaptation of each virus. Endogenous viral elements, such as endogenous pararetroviruses (PRVs), have arisen from vertical inheritance of viral sequences integrated into host germline genomes. As viral genomic fossils, these sequences can thus serve as valuable paleogenomic data to study the long-term evolutionary dynamics of virus-virus interactions, but they have rarely been applied for this purpose. All extant PRVs have been considered autonomous species in their parasitic life cycle in host cells. Here, we provide evidence for multiple non-autonomous PRV species with structural defects in viral activity that have frequently infected ancient grass hosts and adapted through interplay between viruses. Our paleogenomic analyses using endogenous PRVs in grass genomes revealed that these non-autonomous PRV species have participated in interplay with autonomous PRVs in a possible commensal partnership, or, alternatively, with one another in a possible mutualistic partnership. These partnerships, which have been established by the sharing of noncoding regulatory sequences (NRSs) in intergenic regions between two partner viruses, have been further maintained and altered by the sequence homogenization of NRSs between partners. Strikingly, we found that frequent region-specific recombination, rather than mutation selection, is the main causative mechanism of NRS homogenization. Our results, obtained from ancient DNA records of viruses, suggest that adaptation of PRVs has occurred by concerted evolution of NRSs between different virus species in the same host. Our findings further imply that evaluation of within-host NRS interactions within and between populations of viral pathogens may be important.

  14. Dual-task performance reveals increased involvement of executive control in fine motor sequencing in healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Sarah A; Li, Karen Z H; Penhune, Virginia B

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the role of executive control in fine motor sequencing using a motor-cognitive dual-task paradigm. Younger and older adults performed a sequential tapping task separately and concurrently with a semantic judgment task (Experiment 1) and a mental arithmetic task (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 established that under low cognitive load, older adults were slower and less accurate in sequential tapping than younger adults. Load was manipulated in Experiment 2, and across mental arithmetic difficulty levels, older adults were less accurate in sequential tapping when performing mental arithmetic than younger adults. At the highest difficulty level, both groups suffered performance costs. In line with gross motor research, these findings suggest a role for executive functions in fine motor performance in old age.

  15. Nuclear species-diagnostic SNP markers mined from 454 amplicon sequencing reveal admixture genomic structure of modern citrus varieties.

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    Franck Curk

    Full Text Available Most cultivated Citrus species originated from interspecific hybridisation between four ancestral taxa (C. reticulata, C. maxima, C. medica, and C. micrantha with limited further interspecific recombination due to vegetative propagation. This evolution resulted in admixture genomes with frequent interspecific heterozygosity. Moreover, a major part of the phenotypic diversity of edible citrus results from the initial differentiation between these taxa. Deciphering the phylogenomic structure of citrus germplasm is therefore essential for an efficient utilization of citrus biodiversity in breeding schemes. The objective of this work was to develop a set of species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers for the four Citrus ancestral taxa covering the nine chromosomes, and to use these markers to infer the phylogenomic structure of secondary species and modern cultivars. Species-diagnostic SNPs were mined from 454 amplicon sequencing of 57 gene fragments from 26 genotypes of the four basic taxa. Of the 1,053 SNPs mined from 28,507 kb sequence, 273 were found to be highly diagnostic for a single basic taxon. Species-diagnostic SNP markers (105 were used to analyse the admixture structure of varieties and rootstocks. This revealed C. maxima introgressions in most of the old and in all recent selections of mandarins, and suggested that C. reticulata × C. maxima reticulation and introgression processes were important in edible mandarin domestication. The large range of phylogenomic constitutions between C. reticulata and C. maxima revealed in mandarins, tangelos, tangors, sweet oranges, sour oranges, grapefruits, and orangelos is favourable for genetic association studies based on phylogenomic structures of the germplasm. Inferred admixture structures were in agreement with previous hypotheses regarding the origin of several secondary species and also revealed the probable origin of several acid citrus varieties. The developed species

  16. The Sequence Characteristics and Expression Models Reveal Superoxide Dismutase Involved in Cold Response and Fruiting Body Development in Volvariella volvacea

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    Jun-Jie Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the first defence for cells to counteract the toxicity of active oxygen, superoxide dismutase (SOD plays an important role in the response of living organisms to stress and cell differentiation. One extracellular Cu-ZnSOD (ecCu-ZnSOD, and two MnSODs, were identified based on the Volvariella volvacea genome sequence. All three genes have complicated alternative splicing modes during transcription; only when the fourth intron is retained can the Vv_Cu-Znsod1 gene be translated into a protein sequence with SOD functional domains. The expression levels of the three sod genes in the pilei are higher than in the stipe. The Vv_Cu-Znsod1 and the Vv_Mnsod2 are co-expressed in different developmental stages of the fruiting body, with the highest level of expression in the pilei of the egg stage, and they show a significant, positive correlation with the efficiency of karyogamy, indicating the potential role of these two genes during karyogamy. The expression of the ecCu-Znsod and two Vv_Mnsod genes showed a significant up-regulated when treated by cold stress for one hour; however, the lack of the intracellular Cu-ZnSOD encoding gene (icCu-Znsod and the special locus of the ecCu-Znsod gene initiation codon suggested a possible reason for the autolysis phenomenon of V. volvacea in cold conditions.

  17. The interacting role of media sequence and product involvement in cross-media campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorveld, H.A.M.; Neijens, P.C.; Smit, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the role of media sequence on consumers' responses to cross-media campaigns. To do so, we conducted an experiment in which we studied the effects of a combination of TV commercials and websites (TV commercial-website vs. website-TV commercial) for two different

  18. Transcriptional analysis of the HeT-A retrotransposon in mutant and wild type stocks reveals high sequence variability at Drosophila telomeres and other unusual features

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    Piñeyro David

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomere replication in Drosophila depends on the transposition of a domesticated retroelement, the HeT-A retrotransposon. The sequence of the HeT-A retrotransposon changes rapidly resulting in differentiated subfamilies. This pattern of sequence change contrasts with the essential function with which the HeT-A is entrusted and brings about questions concerning the extent of sequence variability, the telomere contribution of different subfamilies, and whether wild type and mutant Drosophila stocks show different HeT-A scenarios. Results A detailed study on the variability of HeT-A reveals that both the level of variability and the number of subfamilies are higher than previously reported. Comparisons between GIII, a strain with longer telomeres, and its parental strain Oregon-R indicate that both strains have the same set of HeT-A subfamilies. Finally, the presence of a highly conserved splicing pattern only in its antisense transcripts indicates a putative regulatory, functional or structural role for the HeT-A RNA. Interestingly, our results also suggest that most HeT-A copies are actively expressed regardless of which telomere and where in the telomere they are located. Conclusions Our study demonstrates how the HeT-A sequence changes much faster than previously reported resulting in at least nine different subfamilies most of which could actively contribute to telomere extension in Drosophila. Interestingly, the only significant difference observed between Oregon-R and GIII resides in the nature and proportion of the antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism that would in part explain the longer telomeres of the GIII stock.

  19. Deep sequencing of the Camellia sinensis transcriptome revealed candidate genes for major metabolic pathways of tea-specific compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, CY; Yang, H; Wei, CL; Yu, O; Zhang, ZZ; Sun, J; Wan, XC

    2011-01-01

    Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. However, the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, is difficult to culture in vitro, to transform, and has a large genome, rendering little genomic information available. Recent advances in large-scale RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provide a fast, cost-effective, and reliable approach to generate large expression datasets for functional genomic analysis, which is especially suitable for non-model species with un-sequenced genomes. Using high-throughput Illumina RNA-seq, the transcriptome from poly (A){sup +} RNA of C. sinensis was analyzed at an unprecedented depth (2.59 gigabase pairs). Approximate 34.5 million reads were obtained, trimmed, and assembled into 127,094 unigenes, with an average length of 355 bp and an N50 of 506 bp, which consisted of 788 contig clusters and 126,306 singletons. This number of unigenes was 10-fold higher than existing C. sinensis sequences deposited in GenBank (as of August 2010). Sequence similarity analyses against six public databases (Uniprot, NR and COGs at NCBI, Pfam, InterPro and KEGG) found 55,088 unigenes that could be annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. Some of the unigenes were assigned to putative metabolic pathways. Targeted searches using these annotations identified the majority of genes associated with several primary metabolic pathways and natural product pathways that are important to tea quality, such as flavonoid, theanine and caffeine biosynthesis pathways. Novel candidate genes of these secondary pathways were discovered. Comparisons with four previously prepared cDNA libraries revealed that this transcriptome dataset has both a high degree of consistency with previous EST data and an approximate 20 times increase in coverage. Thirteen unigenes related to theanine and flavonoid synthesis were validated. Their expression patterns in different organs of the tea plant were analyzed by RT-PCR and quantitative real

  20. Deep sequencing of the Camellia sinensis transcriptome revealed candidate genes for major metabolic pathways of tea-specific compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. However, the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, is difficult to culture in vitro, to transform, and has a large genome, rendering little genomic information available. Recent advances in large-scale RNA sequencing (RNA-seq provide a fast, cost-effective, and reliable approach to generate large expression datasets for functional genomic analysis, which is especially suitable for non-model species with un-sequenced genomes. Results Using high-throughput Illumina RNA-seq, the transcriptome from poly (A+ RNA of C. sinensis was analyzed at an unprecedented depth (2.59 gigabase pairs. Approximate 34.5 million reads were obtained, trimmed, and assembled into 127,094 unigenes, with an average length of 355 bp and an N50 of 506 bp, which consisted of 788 contig clusters and 126,306 singletons. This number of unigenes was 10-fold higher than existing C. sinensis sequences deposited in GenBank (as of August 2010. Sequence similarity analyses against six public databases (Uniprot, NR and COGs at NCBI, Pfam, InterPro and KEGG found 55,088 unigenes that could be annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. Some of the unigenes were assigned to putative metabolic pathways. Targeted searches using these annotations identified the majority of genes associated with several primary metabolic pathways and natural product pathways that are important to tea quality, such as flavonoid, theanine and caffeine biosynthesis pathways. Novel candidate genes of these secondary pathways were discovered. Comparisons with four previously prepared cDNA libraries revealed that this transcriptome dataset has both a high degree of consistency with previous EST data and an approximate 20 times increase in coverage. Thirteen unigenes related to theanine and flavonoid synthesis were validated. Their expression patterns in different organs of the tea plant were

  1. Candidate genes revealed by a genome scan for mosquito resistance to a bacterial insecticide: sequence and gene expression variations

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    David Jean-Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scans are becoming an increasingly popular approach to study the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation, but on their own, they are often helpless at identifying the specific gene(s or mutation(s targeted by selection. This shortcoming is hopefully bound to disappear in the near future, thanks to the wealth of new genomic resources that are currently being developed for many species. In this article, we provide a foretaste of this exciting new era by conducting a genome scan in the mosquito Aedes aegypti with the aim to look for candidate genes involved in resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti insecticidal toxins. Results The genome of a Bti-resistant and a Bti-susceptible strains was surveyed using about 500 MITE-based molecular markers, and the loci showing the highest inter-strain genetic differentiation were sequenced and mapped on the Aedes aegypti genome sequence. Several good candidate genes for Bti-resistance were identified in the vicinity of these highly differentiated markers. Two of them, coding for a cadherin and a leucine aminopeptidase, were further examined at the sequence and gene expression levels. In the resistant strain, the cadherin gene displayed patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms consistent with the action of positive selection (e.g. an excess of high compared to intermediate frequency mutations, as well as a significant under-expression compared to the susceptible strain. Conclusion Both sequence and gene expression analyses agree to suggest a role for positive selection in the evolution of this cadherin gene in the resistant strain. However, it is unlikely that resistance to Bti is conferred by this gene alone, and further investigation will be needed to characterize other genes significantly associated with Bti resistance in Ae. aegypti. Beyond these results, this article illustrates how genome scans can build on the body of new genomic information (here, full

  2. Multilocus sequencing reveals multiple geographically structured lineages of Coniophora arida and C. olivacea (Boletales) in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauserud, Håvard; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Decock, Cony

    2007-01-01

    Coniophora arida and C. olivacea (Coniophoraceae, Boletales) are widespread wood-decay fungi in temperate and boreal regions, occurring both in buildings and natural environments. Genetic variation and geographic structure among isolates of C. arida and C. olivaceae were investigated in this study, with an emphasis on North America. Multilocus sequencing of three DNA regions revealed three main lineages in C. arida and six in C. olivacea, some of which might represent cryptic species. Most of the lineages are present in North America, mainly in allopatry, suggesting recent or ongoing geographic speciation. One of the C. arida isolates included a high number of heterozygous sites and might represent a hybrid between two cryptic C. arida lineages. The data indicate out-crossing reproductive modes in both C. arida and C. olivacea. Together with other recent investigations of Coniophora species our data suggest that the genus comprises a significant number of cryptic species and is much more diverse than previously deduced from morphological characteristics.

  3. Analysis of Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. QTF5 Reveals Its Benzoic Acid Degradation Ability and Heavy Metal Tolerance

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    Yang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. QTF5 was isolated from the continuous permafrost near the bitumen layers in the Qiangtang basin of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in China (5,111 m above sea level. It is psychrotolerant and highly and widely tolerant to heavy metals and has the ability to metabolize benzoic acid and salicylic acid. To gain insight into the genetic basis for its adaptation, we performed whole genome sequencing and analyzed the resistant genes and metabolic pathways. Based on 120 published and annotated genomes representing 31 species in the genus Pseudomonas, in silico genomic DNA-DNA hybridization (<54% and average nucleotide identity calculation (<94% revealed that QTF5 is closest to Pseudomonas lini and should be classified into a novel species. This study provides the genetic basis to identify the genes linked to its specific mechanisms for adaptation to extreme environment and application of this microorganism in environmental conservation.

  4. Exome sequencing revealed PMM2 gene mutations in a French-Canadian family with congenital atrophy of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Anne; Beauchemin, Philippe; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Dupré, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two affected and one unaffected siblings from a French-Canadian family were evaluated in our neurogenetic clinic. The oldest brother had intentional and postural hand tremor while his youngest sister presented mild ataxia, a similar hand tremor and global developmental delay. Brain MRIs of the two affected family members further revealed a significant cerebellar atrophy. For this study we conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) investigation using genomic DNA prepared from the affected brother and sister, alongside DNA prepared from their unaffected mother, and identified two mutations previously reported to cause a rare disorder known as Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation, type Ia (CDG1A) (OMIM #212065). This study emphasizes how the diagnosis of patients presenting a mild tremor phenotype associated with cerebellar atrophy may benefit from WES in establishing genetic defects associated with their conditions.

  5. The complete genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis 9912D reveals its biocontrol mechanism as a novel commercial biological fungicide agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hua-Qi; Li, Qing-Lian; Hu, Jiang-Chun

    2017-04-10

    A Bacillus sp. 9912 mutant, 9912D, was approved as a new biological fungicide agent by the Ministry of Agriculture of the People's Republic of China in 2016 owing to its excellent inhibitory effect on various plant pathogens and being environment-friendly. Here, we present the genome of 9912D with a circular chromosome having 4436 coding DNA sequences (CDSs), and a circular plasmid encoding 59 CDSs. This strain was finally designated as Bacillus velezensis based on phylogenomic analyses. Genome analysis revealed a total of 19 candidate gene clusters involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis, including potential new type II lantibiotics. The absence of fengycin biosynthetic gene cluster is noteworthy. Our data offer insights into the genetic, biological and physiological characteristics of this strain and aid in deeper understanding of its biocontrol mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Complex mutations & subpopulations of deletions at exon 19 of EGFR in NSCLC revealed by next generation sequencing: potential clinical implications.

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    Antonio Marchetti

    Full Text Available Microdeletions at exon 19 are the most frequent genetic alterations affecting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and they are strongly associated with response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A series of 116 NSCLC DNA samples investigated by Sanger Sequencing (SS, including 106 samples carrying exon 19 EGFR deletions and 10 without deletions (control samples, were subjected to deep next generation sequencing (NGS. All samples with deletions at SS showed deletions with NGS. No deletions were seen in control cases. In 93 (88% cases, deletions detected by NGS were exactly corresponding to those identified by SS. In 13 cases (12% NGS resolved deletions not accurately characterized by SS. In 21 (20% cases the NGS showed presence of complex (double/multiple frameshift deletions producing a net in-frame change. In 5 of these cases the SS could not define the exact sequence of mutant alleles, in the other 16 cases the results obtained by SS were conventionally considered as deletions plus insertions. Different interpretative hypotheses for complex mutations are discussed. In 46 (43% tumors deep NGS showed, for the first time to our knowledge, subpopulations of DNA molecules carrying EGFR deletions different from the main one. Each of these subpopulations accounted for 0.1% to 17% of the genomic DNA in the different tumors investigated. Our findings suggest that a region in exon 19 is highly unstable in a large proportion of patients carrying EGFR deletions. As a corollary to this study, NGS data were compared with those obtained by immunohistochemistry using the 6B6 anti-mutant EGFR antibody. The immunoreaction was E746-A750del specific. In conclusion, NGS analysis of EGFR exon 19 in NSCLCs allowed us to formulate a new interpretative hypothesis for complex mutations and revealed the presence of subpopulations of deletions with potential pathogenetic and clinical impact.

  7. Exome Sequencing Analysis Reveals Variants in Primary Immunodeficiency Genes in Patients With Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R.; Dawany, Noor; Moran, Christopher J.; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Sarmady, Mahdi; Sasson, Ariella; Pauly-Hubbard, Helen; Martinez, Alejandro; Maurer, Kelly; Soong, Joanne; Rappaport, Eric; Franke, Andre; Keller, Andreas; Winter, Harland S.; Mamula, Petar; Piccoli, David; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Daly, Mark; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Devoto, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD), IBD diagnosed ≤5 y of age, frequently presents with a different and more severe phenotype than older-onset IBD. We investigated whether patients with VEO-IBD carry rare or novel variants in genes associated with immunodeficiencies that might contribute to disease development. Methods Patients with VEO-IBD and parents (when available) were recruited from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from March 2013 through July 2014. We analyzed DNA from 125 patients with VEO-IBD (ages 3 weeks to 4 y) and 19 parents, 4 of whom also had IBD. Exome capture was performed by Agilent SureSelect V4, and sequencing was performed using the Illumina HiSeq platform. Alignment to human genome GRCh37 was achieved followed by post-processing and variant calling. Following functional annotation, candidate variants were analyzed for change in protein function, minor allele frequency 1 Mbp of coding sequence, were selected from the whole exome data. Our analysis revealed novel and rare variants within these genes that could contribute to the development of VEO-IBD, including rare heterozygous missense variants in IL10RA and previously unidentified variants in MSH5 and CD19. Conclusions In an exome sequence analysis of patients with VEO-IBD and their parents, we identified variants in genes that regulate B- and T-cell functions and could contribute to pathogenesis. Our analysis could lead to the identification of previously unidentified IBD-associated variants. PMID:26193622

  8. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism.

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    C Alexander Valencia

    Full Text Available The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism.Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis.A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content <30% of controls, and reduced respiratory chain complex activity; both patients had good post-transplant outcome. One infant with severe lactic acidosis was found to carry two heterozygous variants in ACAD9, which was associated with isolated complex I deficiency and diffuse hypergranular hepatocytes. The two subjects with heterozygous variants of unknown clinical significance in POLG and DGUOK developed ALF following drug exposure. Their hepatocytes displayed abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy.Targeted next generation sequencing and correlation with histological, ultrastructural and functional studies on liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF.

  9. Staphylococcus epidermidis pan-genome sequence analysis reveals diversity of skin commensal and hospital infection-associated isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Sean; Mijares, Lilia A; Becker, Jesse; Blakesley, Robert W; Bouffard, Gerard G; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Gupta, Jyoti; Gurson, Natalie; Park, Morgan; Schmidt, Brian; Thomas, Pamela J; Otto, Michael; Kong, Heidi H; Murray, Patrick R; Segre, Julia A

    2012-07-25

    While Staphylococcus epidermidis is commonly isolated from healthy human skin, it is also the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections on indwelling medical devices. Despite its importance, few genome sequences existed and the most frequent hospital-associated lineage, ST2, had not been fully sequenced. We cultivated 71 commensal S. epidermidis isolates from 15 skin sites and compared them with 28 nosocomial isolates from venous catheters and blood cultures. We produced 21 commensal and 9 nosocomial draft genomes, and annotated and compared their gene content, phylogenetic relatedness and biochemical functions. The commensal strains had an open pan-genome with 80% core genes and 20% variable genes. The variable genome was characterized by an overabundance of transposable elements, transcription factors and transporters. Biochemical diversity, as assayed by antibiotic resistance and in vitro biofilm formation, demonstrated the varied phenotypic consequences of this genomic diversity. The nosocomial isolates exhibited both large-scale rearrangements and single-nucleotide variation. We showed that S. epidermidis genomes separate into two phylogenetic groups, one consisting only of commensals. The formate dehydrogenase gene, present only in commensals, is a discriminatory marker between the two groups. Commensal skin S. epidermidis have an open pan-genome and show considerable diversity between isolates, even when derived from a single individual or body site. For ST2, the most common nosocomial lineage, we detect variation between three independent isolates sequenced. Finally, phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized group of S. epidermidis strains characterized by reduced virulence and formate dehydrogenase, which we propose as a clinical molecular marker.

  10. Appearances can be deceptive: revealing a hidden viral infection with deep sequencing in a plant quarantine context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candresse, Thierry; Filloux, Denis; Muhire, Brejnev; Julian, Charlotte; Galzi, Serge; Fort, Guillaume; Bernardo, Pauline; Daugrois, Jean-Heindrich; Fernandez, Emmanuel; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive inventories of plant viral diversity are essential for effective quarantine and sanitation efforts. The safety of regulated plant material exchanges presently relies heavily on techniques such as PCR or nucleic acid hybridisation, which are only suited to the detection and characterisation of specific, well characterised pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the utility of sequence-independent next generation sequencing (NGS) of both virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and virion-associated nucleic acids (VANA) for the detailed identification and characterisation of viruses infecting two quarantined sugarcane plants. Both plants originated from Egypt and were known to be infected with Sugarcane streak Egypt Virus (SSEV; Genus Mastrevirus, Family Geminiviridae), but were revealed by the NGS approaches to also be infected by a second highly divergent mastrevirus, here named Sugarcane white streak Virus (SWSV). This novel virus had escaped detection by all routine quarantine detection assays and was found to also be present in sugarcane plants originating from Sudan. Complete SWSV genomes were cloned and sequenced from six plants and all were found to share >91% genome-wide identity. With the exception of two SWSV variants, which potentially express unusually large RepA proteins, the SWSV isolates display genome characteristics very typical to those of all other previously described mastreviruses. An analysis of virus-derived siRNAs for SWSV and SSEV showed them to be strongly influenced by secondary structures within both genomic single stranded DNA and mRNA transcripts. In addition, the distribution of siRNA size frequencies indicates that these mastreviruses are likely subject to both transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our study stresses the potential advantages of NGS-based virus metagenomic screening in a plant quarantine setting and indicates that such techniques could dramatically reduce the numbers of non

  11. Appearances can be deceptive: revealing a hidden viral infection with deep sequencing in a plant quarantine context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Candresse

    Full Text Available Comprehensive inventories of plant viral diversity are essential for effective quarantine and sanitation efforts. The safety of regulated plant material exchanges presently relies heavily on techniques such as PCR or nucleic acid hybridisation, which are only suited to the detection and characterisation of specific, well characterised pathogens. Here, we demonstrate the utility of sequence-independent next generation sequencing (NGS of both virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and virion-associated nucleic acids (VANA for the detailed identification and characterisation of viruses infecting two quarantined sugarcane plants. Both plants originated from Egypt and were known to be infected with Sugarcane streak Egypt Virus (SSEV; Genus Mastrevirus, Family Geminiviridae, but were revealed by the NGS approaches to also be infected by a second highly divergent mastrevirus, here named Sugarcane white streak Virus (SWSV. This novel virus had escaped detection by all routine quarantine detection assays and was found to also be present in sugarcane plants originating from Sudan. Complete SWSV genomes were cloned and sequenced from six plants and all were found to share >91% genome-wide identity. With the exception of two SWSV variants, which potentially express unusually large RepA proteins, the SWSV isolates display genome characteristics very typical to those of all other previously described mastreviruses. An analysis of virus-derived siRNAs for SWSV and SSEV showed them to be strongly influenced by secondary structures within both genomic single stranded DNA and mRNA transcripts. In addition, the distribution of siRNA size frequencies indicates that these mastreviruses are likely subject to both transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our study stresses the potential advantages of NGS-based virus metagenomic screening in a plant quarantine setting and indicates that such techniques could dramatically reduce the numbers of non

  12. Role of sequence and structural polymorphism on the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils.

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    Gwonchan Yoon

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils playing a critical role in disease expression, have recently been found to exhibit the excellent mechanical properties such as elastic modulus in the order of 10 GPa, which is comparable to that of other mechanical proteins such as microtubule, actin filament, and spider silk. These remarkable mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are correlated with their functional role in disease expression. This suggests the importance in understanding how these excellent mechanical properties are originated through self-assembly process that may depend on the amino acid sequence. However, the sequence-structure-property relationship of amyloid fibrils has not been fully understood yet. In this work, we characterize the mechanical properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP fibrils with respect to their molecular structures as well as their amino acid sequence by using all-atom explicit water molecular dynamics (MD simulation. The simulation result suggests that the remarkable bending rigidity of amyloid fibrils can be achieved through a specific self-aggregation pattern such as antiparallel stacking of β strands (peptide chain. Moreover, we have shown that a single point mutation of hIAPP chain constituting a hIAPP fibril significantly affects the thermodynamic stability of hIAPP fibril formed by parallel stacking of peptide chain, and that a single point mutation results in a significant change in the bending rigidity of hIAPP fibrils formed by antiparallel stacking of β strands. This clearly elucidates the role of amino acid sequence on not only the equilibrium conformations of amyloid fibrils but also their mechanical properties. Our study sheds light on sequence-structure-property relationships of amyloid fibrils, which suggests that the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are encoded in their sequence-dependent molecular architecture.

  13. A new morphologically cryptic species of Phyllomedusa (Anura: Phyllomedusidae) from Amazonian forests of northern Peru revealed by DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago; Köhler, Jörn; Riva, Ignacio DE LA; Padial, José M

    2017-05-22

    We describe and name Phyllomedusa chaparroi sp. nov., a medium-sized species (snout-vent length in adult males 67.9-77.5 mm) of monkey frog from Amazonian rainforests of northern Peru. Although morphologically most similar to P. boliviana and P. camba (indistinguishable from the latter in external qualitative and quantitative traits), phylogenetic analysis of combined mitochondrial and nuclear markers place the new species sister to a clade containing P. neildi, P. tarsius, and P. trinitatis. Phyllomedusa chaparroi can be readily differentiated from these species by having a dark reddish-brown iris with indistinct tiny orange spots versus an orange iris with marked dark reticulation found in P. neildi, P. tarsius, and P. trinitatis. Furthermore, genetic distances for a 532 bp sequence of the 16S gene between the new species and its sister species are 2.8-4.1 %, whereas distances are 4.5-5.5 % to the morphologically cryptic P. camba. We briefly discuss the importance of DNA sequences in revealing morphologically cryptic species and modify the content of the P. tarsius species group based on phylogenetic analyses and observations on iris coloration.

  14. Integrated analysis of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing reveals diverse transcriptomic aberrations driven by somatic genomic changes in liver cancers.

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    Yuichi Shiraishi

    Full Text Available Recent studies applying high-throughput sequencing technologies have identified several recurrently mutated genes and pathways in multiple cancer genomes. However, transcriptional consequences from these genomic alterations in cancer genome remain unclear. In this study, we performed integrated and comparative analyses of whole genomes and transcriptomes of 22 hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs and their matched controls. Comparison of whole genome sequence (WGS and RNA-Seq revealed much evidence that various types of genomic mutations triggered diverse transcriptional changes. Not only splice-site mutations, but also silent mutations in coding regions, deep intronic mutations and structural changes caused splicing aberrations. HBV integrations generated diverse patterns of virus-human fusion transcripts depending on affected gene, such as TERT, CDK15, FN1 and MLL4. Structural variations could drive over-expression of genes such as WNT ligands, with/without creating gene fusions. Furthermore, by taking account of genomic mutations causing transcriptional aberrations, we could improve the sensitivity of deleterious mutation detection in known cancer driver genes (TP53, AXIN1, ARID2, RPS6KA3, and identified recurrent disruptions in putative cancer driver genes such as HNF4A, CPS1, TSC1 and THRAP3 in HCCs. These findings indicate genomic alterations in cancer genome have diverse transcriptomic effects, and integrated analysis of WGS and RNA-Seq can facilitate the interpretation of a large number of genomic alterations detected in cancer genome.

  15. Deep sequencing of Lotus corniculatus L. reveals key enzymes and potential transcription factors related to the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Hua, Wenping; Wang, Jian; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Xu, Ziqin; Wang, Zhezhi

    2013-04-01

    Lotus corniculatus L. is used worldwide as a forage crop due to its abundance of secondary metabolites and its ability to grow in severe environments. Although the entire genome of L. corniculatus var. japonicus R. is being sequenced, the differences in morphology and production of secondary metabolites between these two related species have led us to investigate this variability at the genetic level, in particular the differences in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our goal is to use the resulting information to develop more valuable forage crops and medicinal materials. Here, we conducted Illumina/Solexa sequencing to profile the transcriptome of L. corniculatus. We produced 26,492,952 short reads that corresponded to 2.38 gigabytes of total nucleotides. These reads were then assembled into 45,698 unigenes, of which a large number associated with secondary metabolism were annotated. In addition, we identified 2,998 unigenes based on homology with L. japonicus transcription factors (TFs) and grouped them into 55 families. Meanwhile, a comparison of four tag-based digital gene expression libraries, built from the flowers, pods, leaves, and roots, revealed distinct patterns of spatial expression of candidate unigenes in flavonoid biosynthesis. Based on these results, we identified many key enzymes from L. corniculatus which were different from reference genes of L. japonicus, and five TFs that are potential enhancers in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results provide initial genetics resources that will be valuable in efforts to manipulate the flavonoid metabolic pathway in plants.

  16. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, C Alexander; Wang, Xinjian; Wang, Jin; Peters, Anna; Simmons, Julia R; Moran, Molly C; Mathur, Abhinav; Husami, Ammar; Qian, Yaping; Sheridan, Rachel; Bove, Kevin E; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Miethke, Alexander G

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF) remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism. Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis. A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF.

  17. Fungi Sailing the Arctic Ocean: Speciose Communities in North Atlantic Driftwood as Revealed by High-Throughput Amplicon Sequencing.

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    Rämä, Teppo; Davey, Marie L; Nordén, Jenni; Halvorsen, Rune; Blaalid, Rakel; Mathiassen, Geir H; Alsos, Inger G; Kauserud, Håvard

    2016-08-01

    High amounts of driftwood sail across the oceans and provide habitat for organisms tolerating the rough and saline environment. Fungi have adapted to the extremely cold and saline conditions which driftwood faces in the high north. For the first time, we applied high-throughput sequencing to fungi residing in driftwood to reveal their taxonomic richness, community composition, and ecology in the North Atlantic. Using pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons obtained from 49 marine logs, we found 807 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on clustering at 97 % sequence similarity cut-off level. The phylum Ascomycota comprised 74 % of the OTUs and 20 % belonged to Basidiomycota. The richness of basidiomycetes decreased with prolonged submersion in the sea, supporting the general view of ascomycetes being more extremotolerant. However, more than one fourth of the fungal OTUs remained unassigned to any fungal class, emphasising the need for better DNA reference data from the marine habitat. Different fungal communities were detected in coniferous and deciduous logs. Our results highlight that driftwood hosts a considerably higher fungal diversity than currently known. The driftwood fungal community is not a terrestrial relic but a speciose assemblage of fungi adapted to the stressful marine environment and different kinds of wooden substrates found in it.

  18. Ancient biomolecules: their origins, fossilization, and role in revealing the history of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Derek E G; Summons, Roger E

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of traces of a blood meal in the abdomen of a 50-million-year-old mosquito reminds us of the insights that the chemistry of fossils can provide. Ancient DNA is the best known fossil molecule. It is less well known that new fossil targets and a growing database of ancient gene sequences are paralleled by discoveries on other classes of organic molecules. New analytical tools, such as the synchrotron, reveal traces of the original composition of arthropod cuticles that are more than 400 my old. Pigments such as melanin are readily fossilized, surviving virtually unaltered for ∼200 my. Other biomarkers provide evidence of microbial processes in ancient sediments, and have been used to reveal the presence of demosponges, for example, more than 635 mya, long before their spicules appear in the fossil record. Ancient biomolecules are a powerful complement to fossil remains in revealing the history of life. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

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    Gerda Saxer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9 - 9.5×10(-9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13 to 1.6×10(-10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes.

  20. Analysis of streptococcal CRISPRs from human saliva reveals substantial sequence diversity within and between subjects over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, David T.; Sun, Christine L.; Salzman, Julia; Rao, Nitya; Loomer, Peter; Armitage, Gary C.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Relman, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses may play an important role in the evolution of human microbial communities. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity to previously encountered viruses. Little is known about CRISPR composition in members of human microbial communities, the relative rate of CRISPR locus change, or how CRISPR loci differ between the microbiota of different individuals. We collected saliva from four periodontally healthy human subjects over an 11- to 17-mo time period and analyzed CRISPR sequences with corresponding streptococcal repeats in order to improve our understanding of the predominant features of oral streptococcal adaptive immune repertoires. We analyzed a total of 6859 CRISPR bearing reads and 427,917 bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. We found a core (ranging from 7% to 22%) of shared CRISPR spacers that remained stable over time within each subject, but nearly a third of CRISPR spacers varied between time points. We document high spacer diversity within each subject, suggesting constant addition of new CRISPR spacers. No greater than 2% of CRISPR spacers were shared between subjects, suggesting that each individual was exposed to different virus populations. We detect changes in CRISPR spacer sequence diversity over time that may be attributable to locus diversification or to changes in streptococcal population structure, yet the composition of the populations within subjects remained relatively stable. The individual-specific and traceable character of CRISPR spacer complements could potentially open the way for expansion of the domain of personalized medicine to the oral microbiome, where lineages may be tracked as a function of health and other factors. PMID:21149389

  1. Whole genome sequencing of pairwise human subjects reveals DNA mutations specific to developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lun-Qing; Su, Guang-Hao; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Yin, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Fu-Yong; Zhu, Zhen-Hua; Guo, Zhi-Xiong; Fang, Jian-Feng; Zou, Cheng-da; Chen, Xing-Guang; Zhang, Ya; Xu, Cai-Ying; Zhen, Yun-Fang; Wang, Xiao-Dong

    2018-02-25

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common congenital malformation characterized by mismatch in shape between the femoral head and acetabulum, and leads to hip dysplasia. To date, the pathogenesis of DDH is poorly understood and may involve multiple factors, including genetic predisposition. However, comprehensive genetic analysis has not been applied to investigate a genetic component of DDH. In the present study, 10 pairs of healthy fathers and DDH daughters were enrolled to identify genetic hallmarks of DDH using high throughput whole genome sequencing. The DDH-specific DNA mutations were found in each patient. Overall 1344 genes contained DDH-specific mutations. Functional enrichment analysis showed that these genes played important roles in the cytoskeleton, microtubule cytoskeleton, sarcoplasm and microtubule associated complex. These functions affected osteoblast and osteoclast development. Therefore, we proposed that the DDH-specific mutations might affect bone development, and caused DDH. Our pairwise high throughput sequencing results comprehensively delineated genetic hallmarks of DDH. Further research into the biological impact of these mutations may inform the development of DDH diagnostic tools and allow neonatal gene screening. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Single-cell transcriptome sequencing reveals that cell division cycle 5-like protein is essential for porcine oocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Man; Wang, Yan-Kui; Liu, Yun-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Pei-Chao; Li, Xuan; Du, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Cai-Xia

    2018-02-02

    The brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) test is used in both basic biological research and assisted reproduction to identify oocytes likely to be developmentally competent. However, the underlying molecular mechanism targeted by the BCB test is still unclear. To explore this question, we first confirmed that BCB-positive porcine oocytes had higher rates of meiotic maturation, better rates of cleavage and development into blastocysts, and lower death rates. Subsequent single-cell transcriptome sequencing on porcine germinal vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes identified 155 genes that were significantly differentially expressed between BCB-negative and BCB-positive oocytes. These included genes such as cdc5l , ldha , spata22 , rgs2 , paip1 , wee1b , and hsp27 , which are enriched in functionally important signaling pathways including cell cycle regulation, oocyte meiosis, spliceosome formation, and nucleotide excision repair. In BCB-positive GV oocytes that additionally had a lower frequency of DNA double-strand breaks, the CDC5L protein was significantly more abundant. cdc5l /CDC5L inhibition by short interference (si)RNA or antibody microinjection significantly impaired porcine oocyte meiotic maturation and subsequent parthenote development. Taken together, our single-oocyte sequencing data point to a potential new role for CDC5L in porcine oocyte meiosis and early embryo development, and supports further analysis of this protein in the context of the BCB test. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Illumina sequencing-based analysis of a microbial community enriched under anaerobic methane oxidation condition coupled to denitrification revealed coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Luciene Alves Batista; Leite, Laura Rabelo; Oliveira, Guilherme; Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto Lemos; de Araújo, Juliana Calabria

    2017-07-01

    Methane is produced in anaerobic environments, such as reactors used to treat wastewaters, and can be consumed by methanotrophs. The composition and structure of a microbial community enriched from anaerobic sewage sludge under methane-oxidation condition coupled to denitrification were investigated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis retrieved sequences of Methylocaldum and Chloroflexi. Deep sequencing analysis revealed a complex community that changed over time and was affected by methane concentration. Methylocaldum (8.2%), Methylosinus (2.3%), Methylomonas (0.02%), Methylacidiphilales (0.45%), Nitrospirales (0.18%), and Methanosarcinales (0.3%) were detected. Despite denitrifying conditions provided, Nitrospirales and Methanosarcinales, known to perform anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (DAMO) process, were in very low abundance. Results demonstrated that aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs coexisted in the reactor together with heterotrophic microorganisms, suggesting that a diverse microbial community was important to sustain methanotrophic activity. The methanogenic sludge was a good inoculum to enrich methanotrophs, and cultivation conditions play a selective role in determining community composition.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae R11 reveals multiple genes potentially associated with high-level polymyxin E resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Zhang, Chao; Fu, Jiafang; Chen, Wenbing; Jiang, Tianyi; Cao, Guangxiang

    2018-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain R11 is a multidrug-resistant bacterium isolated from sewage water near a swine feedlot in China. Strain R11 can survive in medium containing up to 192 μg/mL polymyxin E, indicating a tolerance for this antibiotic that is significantly higher than that reported for other gram-negative bacteria. In this study, conjugation experiments showed that partial polymyxin E resistance could be transferred from strain R11 to Escherichia coli strain 25922, revealing that some genes related to polymyxin E resistance are plasmid-based. The complete genome sequence of this strain was determined, yielding a total of 4 993 008 bp (G+C content, 53.15%) and 4908 genes for the circular chromosome and 4 circular plasmids. Genome analysis revealed a total of 73 putative antibiotic resistance genes, including several polymyxin E resistance genes and genes potentially involved in multidrug resistance. These data provide insights into the genetic basis of the polymyxin E resistance and multidrug resistance of E. cloacae.

  5. Dual RNA sequencing reveals the expression of unique transcriptomic signatures in lipopolysaccharide-induced BV-2 microglial cells.

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    Amitabh Das

    Full Text Available Microglial cells become rapidly activated through interactions with pathogens, and the persistent activation of these cells is associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies have investigated the transcriptomic signatures in microglia or macrophages using microarray technologies. However, this method has numerous restrictions, such as spatial biases, uneven probe properties, low sensitivity, and dependency on the probes spotted. To overcome this limitation and identify novel transcribed genes in response to LPS, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq to determine the novel transcriptomic signatures in BV-2 microglial cells. Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that approximately 263 and 319 genes (≥ 1.5 log2-fold, such as cytokines and chemokines, were strongly induced after 2 and 4 h, respectively, and the induction of several genes with unknown immunological functions was also observed. Importantly, we observed that previously unidentified transcription factors (TFs (irf1, irf7, and irf9, histone demethylases (kdm4a and DNA methyltransferases (dnmt3l were significantly and selectively expressed in BV-2 microglial cells. The gene expression levels, transcription start sites (TSS, isoforms, and differential promoter usage revealed a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation upon infection with LPS. In addition, gene ontology, molecular networks and pathway analyses identified the top significantly regulated functional classification, canonical pathways and network functions at each activation status. Moreover, we further analyzed differentially expressed genes to identify transcription factor (TF motifs (-950 to +50 bp of the 5' upstream promoters and epigenetic mechanisms. Furthermore, we confirmed that the expressions of key inflammatory genes as well as pro-inflammatory mediators in the supernatants were significantly induced in LPS treated primary microglial cells. This

  6. Role of Monomer Sequence, Hydrogen Bonding and Mesoscale Architecture in Marine Antifouling Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalman, Rachel

    Polypeptoids are non-natural, sequence specific polymers that offer the opportunity to probe the effect of monomer sequence, chirality, and chain shape on self-assembly and surface properties. Additionally, polypeptoid synthesis is more scaleable than traditional polypeptides suggesting their utility in large area applications. We have designed efficient marine anti-fouling coatings by using triblock copolymer scaffolds to which polypeptoids are tethered in order to tune both the modulus and surface energies with great precision. Surprisingly, when short sequences are tethered to a polymer backbone, polypeptoids consistently outperform analogous polypeptides in antifouling properties. We hypothesize that the hydrogen bonding inherent to the polypeptide backbone drives the observed differences in performance. We also find that the polymer scaffold housing the polypeptoids also plays a crucial role in directing surface presentation and therefore the overall coating properties.

  7. Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus from Humans to Green Monkeys in The Gambia as Revealed by Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senghore, Madikay; Bayliss, Sion C; Kwambana-Adams, Brenda A; Foster-Nyarko, Ebenezer; Manneh, Jainaba; Dione, Michel; Badji, Henry; Ebruke, Chinelo; Doughty, Emma L; Thorpe, Harry A; Jasinska, Anna J; Schmitt, Christopher A; Cramer, Jennifer D; Turner, Trudy R; Weinstock, George; Freimer, Nelson B; Pallen, Mark J; Feil, Edward J; Antonio, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and animals. We genome sequenced 90 S. aureus isolates from The Gambia: 46 isolates from invasive disease in humans, 13 human carriage isolates, and 31 monkey carriage isolates. We inferred multiple anthroponotic transmissions of S. aureus from humans to green monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus) in The Gambia over different time scales. We report a novel monkey-associated clade of S. aureus that emerged from a human-to-monkey switch estimated to have occurred 2,700 years ago. Adaptation of this lineage to the monkey host is accompanied by the loss of phage-carrying genes that are known to play an important role in human colonization. We also report recent anthroponotic transmission of the well-characterized human lineages sequence type 6 (ST6) and ST15 to monkeys, probably because of steadily increasing encroachment of humans into the monkeys' habitat. Although we have found no evidence of transmission of S. aureus from monkeys to humans, as the two species come into ever-closer contact, there might be an increased risk of additional interspecies exchanges of potential pathogens. The population structures of Staphylococcus aureus in humans and monkeys in sub-Saharan Africa have been previously described using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). However, these data lack the power to accurately infer details regarding the origin and maintenance of new adaptive lineages. Here, we describe the use of whole-genome sequencing to detect transmission of S. aureus between humans and nonhuman primates and to document the genetic changes accompanying host adaptation. We note that human-to-monkey switches tend to be more common than the reverse and that a novel monkey-associated clade is likely to have emerged from such a switch approximately 2,700 years ago. Moreover, analysis of the accessory genome provides important clues as to the genetic changes underpinning host adaptation and, in particular, shows that human

  8. Targeted deep sequencing of mucinous ovarian tumors reveals multiple overlapping RAS-pathway activating mutations in borderline and cancerous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Robertson; Kommoss, Stefan; Winterhoff, Boris J; Kipp, Benjamin R; Garcia, Joaquin J; Voss, Jesse; Halling, Kevin; Karnezis, Anthony; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Doeberitz, Magnus Von Knebel; Gilks, Blake C; Huntsman, David G; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie; McAlpine, Jessica N; Anglesio, Michael S

    2015-05-19

    Mucinous ovarian tumors represent a distinct histotype of epithelial ovarian cancer. The rarest (2-4 % of ovarian carcinomas) of the five major histotypes, their genomic landscape remains poorly described. We undertook hotspot sequencing of 50 genes commonly mutated in human cancer across 69 mucinous ovarian tumors. Our goals were to establish the overall frequency of cancer-hotspot mutations across a large cohort, especially those tumors previously thought to be "RAS-pathway alteration negative", using highly-sensitive next-generation sequencing as well as further explore a small number of cases with apparent heterogeneity in RAS-pathway activating alterations. Using the Ion Torrent PGM platform, we performed next generation sequencing analysis using the v2 Cancer Hotspot Panel. Regions of disparate ERBB2-amplification status were sequenced independently for two mucinous carcinoma (MC) cases, previously established as showing ERBB2 amplification/overexpression heterogeneity, to assess the hypothesis of subclonal populations containing either KRAS mutation or ERBB2 amplification independently or simultaneously. We detected mutations in KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, PIK3CA, PTEN, BRAF, FGFR2, STK11, CTNNB1, SRC, SMAD4, GNA11 and ERBB2. KRAS mutations remain the most frequently observed alteration among MC (64.9 %) and mucinous borderline tumors (MBOT) (92.3 %). TP53 mutation occurred more frequently in carcinomas than borderline tumors (56.8 % and 11.5 %, respectively), and combined IHC and mutation data suggest alterations occur in approximately 68 % of MC and as many as 20 % of MBOT. Proven and potential RAS-pathway activating changes were observed in all but one MC. Concurrent ERBB2 amplification and KRAS mutation were observed in a substantial number of cases (7/63 total), as was co-occurrence of KRAS and BRAF mutations (one case). Microdissection of ERBB2-amplified regions of tumors harboring KRAS mutation suggests these alterations are occurring in the same cell

  9. Genetic Variation within Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans Revealed through Genotyping-By-Sequencing, and Implications for Late Blight Epidemiology.

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    Zachariah R Hansen

    Full Text Available Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS was performed on 257 Phytophthora infestans isolates belonging to four clonal lineages to study within-lineage diversity. The four lineages used in the study were US-8 (n = 28, US-11 (n = 27, US-23 (n = 166, and US-24 (n = 36, with isolates originating from 23 of the United States and Ontario, Canada. The majority of isolates were collected between 2010 and 2014 (94%, with the remaining isolates collected from 1994 to 2009, and 2015. Between 3,774 and 5,070 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified within each lineage and were used to investigate relationships among individuals. K-means hierarchical clustering revealed three clusters within lineage US-23, with US-23 isolates clustering more by collection year than by geographic origin. K-means hierarchical clustering did not reveal significant clustering within the smaller US-8, US-11, and US-24 data sets. Neighbor-joining (NJ trees were also constructed for each lineage. All four NJ trees revealed evidence for pathogen dispersal and overwintering within regions, as well as long-distance pathogen transport across regions. In the US-23 NJ tree, grouping by year was more prominent than grouping by region, which indicates the importance of long-distance pathogen transport as a source of initial late blight inoculum. Our results support previous studies that found significant genetic diversity within clonal lineages of P. infestans and show that GBS offers sufficiently high resolution to detect sub-structuring within clonal populations.

  10. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates from Pakistan during 2009–2013 reveals circulation of new sub genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddique, Naila, E-mail: naila.nrlpd@gmail.com [National Reference Laboratory for Poultry Diseases, Animal Sciences Institute, National Agricultural Research Center, Islamabad (Pakistan); Naeem, Khalid; Abbas, Muhammad Athar; Ali Malik, Akbar; Rashid, Farooq; Rafique, Saba; Ghafar, Abdul; Rehman, Abdul [National Reference Laboratory for Poultry Diseases, Animal Sciences Institute, National Agricultural Research Center, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-09-15

    Despite observing the standard bio-security measures at commercial poultry farms and extensive use of Newcastle disease vaccines, a new genotype VII-f of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) got introduced in Pakistan during 2011. In this regard 300 ND outbreaks recorded so far have resulted into huge losses of approximately USD 200 million during 2011–2013. A total of 33 NDV isolates recovered during 2009–2013 throughout Pakistan were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a new velogenic sub genotype VII-f circulating in commercial and domestic poultry along with the earlier reported sub genotype VII-b. Partial sequencing of Fusion gene revealed two types of cleavage site motifs; lentogenic {sup 112}GRQGRL{sup 117} and velogenic {sup 112}RRQKRF{sup 117} along with some point mutations indicative of genetic diversity. We report here a new sub genotype of virulent NDV circulating in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan and provide evidence for the possible genetic diversity which may be causing new NDV out breaks. - Highlights: • The first report of isolation of new genotype VII-f of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in Pakistan. • We report the partial Fusion gene sequences of new genotype VII-f of virulent NDV from Pakistan. • We report the phylogenetic relationship of new NDV strains with reported NDV strains. • Provide outbreak history of new virulent NDV strain in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan. • We provide possible evidence for the role of backyard poultry in NDV outbreaks.

  11. Gene Expression Profiles in Paired Gingival Biopsies from Periodontitis-Affected and Healthy Tissues Revealed by Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Båge, Tove; Lagervall, Maria; Jansson, Leif; Lundeberg, Joakim; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the soft tissue and bone that surrounds the teeth. Despite extensive research, distinctive genes responsible for the disease have not been identified. The objective of this study was to elucidate transcriptome changes in periodontitis, by investigating gene expression profiles in gingival tissue obtained from periodontitis-affected and healthy gingiva from the same patient, using RNA-sequencing. Gingival biopsies were obtained from a disease-affected and a healthy site from each of 10 individuals diagnosed with periodontitis. Enrichment analysis performed among uniquely expressed genes for the periodontitis-affected and healthy tissues revealed several regulated pathways indicative of inflammation for the periodontitis-affected condition. Hierarchical clustering of the sequenced biopsies demonstrated clustering according to the degree of inflammation, as observed histologically in the biopsies, rather than clustering at the individual level. Among the top 50 upregulated genes in periodontitis-affected tissues, we investigated two genes which have not previously been demonstrated to be involved in periodontitis. These included interferon regulatory factor 4 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 18, which were also expressed at the protein level in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis. In conclusion, this study provides a first step towards a quantitative comprehensive insight into the transcriptome changes in periodontitis. We demonstrate for the first time site-specific local variation in gene expression profiles of periodontitis-affected and healthy tissues obtained from patients with periodontitis, using RNA-seq. Further, we have identified novel genes expressed in periodontitis tissues, which may constitute potential therapeutic targets for future treatment strategies of periodontitis. PMID:23029519

  12. High-throughput sequencing of mGluR signaling pathway genes reveals enrichment of rare variants in autism.

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    Raymond J Kelleher

    Full Text Available Identification of common molecular pathways affected by genetic variation in autism is important for understanding disease pathogenesis and devising effective therapies. Here, we test the hypothesis that rare genetic variation in the metabotropic glutamate-receptor (mGluR signaling pathway contributes to autism susceptibility. Single-nucleotide variants in genes encoding components of the mGluR signaling pathway were identified by high-throughput multiplex sequencing of pooled samples from 290 non-syndromic autism cases and 300 ethnically matched controls on two independent next-generation platforms. This analysis revealed significant enrichment of rare functional variants in the mGluR pathway in autism cases. Higher burdens of rare, potentially deleterious variants were identified in autism cases for three pathway genes previously implicated in syndromic autism spectrum disorder, TSC1, TSC2, and SHANK3, suggesting that genetic variation in these genes also contributes to risk for non-syndromic autism. In addition, our analysis identified HOMER1, which encodes a postsynaptic density-localized scaffolding protein that interacts with Shank3 to regulate mGluR activity, as a novel autism-risk gene. Rare, potentially deleterious HOMER1 variants identified uniquely in the autism population affected functionally important protein regions or regulatory sequences and co-segregated closely with autism among children of affected families. We also identified rare ASD-associated coding variants predicted to have damaging effects on components of the Ras/MAPK cascade. Collectively, these findings suggest that altered signaling downstream of mGluRs contributes to the pathogenesis of non-syndromic autism.

  13. Multilocus Sequence Typing Reveals Relevant Genetic Variation and Different Evolutionary Dynamics among Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis

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    Marco Scortichini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Forty-five Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis (Xaj strains originating from Juglans regia cultivation in different countries were molecularly typed by means of MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST, using acnB, gapA, gyrB and rpoD gene fragments. A total of 2.5 kilobases was used to infer the phylogenetic relationship among the strains and possible recombination events. Haplotype diversity, linkage disequilibrium analysis, selection tests, gene flow estimates and codon adaptation index were also assessed. The dendrograms built by maximum likelihood with concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed two major and two minor phylotypes. The same haplotype was found in strains originating from different continents, and different haplotypes were found in strains isolated in the same year from the same location. A recombination breakpoint was detected within the rpoD gene fragment. At the pathovar level, the Xaj populations studied here are clonal and under neutral selection. However, four Xaj strains isolated from walnut fruits with apical necrosis are under diversifying selection, suggesting a possible new adaptation. Gene flow estimates do not support the hypothesis of geographic isolation of the strains, even though the genetic diversity between the strains increases as the geographic distance between them increases. A triplet deletion, causing the absence of valine, was found in the rpoD fragment of all 45 Xaj strains when compared with X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306. The codon adaptation index was high in all four genes studied, indicating a relevant metabolic activity.

  14. Exploring evidence of positive selection reveals genetic basis of meat quality traits in Berkshire pigs through whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Song, Ki-Duk; Seo, Minseok; Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Kim, Jaemin; Kwak, Woori; Oh, Jae-Don; Kim, EuiSoo; Jeong, Dong Kee; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2015-08-20

    Natural and artificial selection following domestication has led to the existence of more than a hundred pig breeds, as well as incredible variation in phenotypic traits. Berkshire pigs are regarded as having superior meat quality compared to other breeds. As the meat production industry seeks selective breeding approaches to improve profitable traits such as meat quality, information about genetic determinants of these traits is in high demand. However, most of the studies have been performed using trained sensory panel analysis without investigating the underlying genetic factors. Here we investigate the relationship between genomic composition and this phenotypic trait by scanning for signatures of positive selection in whole-genome sequencing data. We generated genomes of 10 Berkshire pigs at a total of 100.6 coverage depth, using the Illumina Hiseq2000 platform. Along with the genomes of 11 Landrace and 13 Yorkshire pigs, we identified genomic variants of 18.9 million SNVs and 3.4 million Indels in the mapped regions. We identified several associated genes related to lipid metabolism, intramuscular fatty acid deposition, and muscle fiber type which attribute to pork quality (TG, FABP1, AKIRIN2, GLP2R, TGFBR3, JPH3, ICAM2, and ERN1) by applying between population statistical tests (XP-EHH and XP-CLR). A statistical enrichment test was also conducted to detect breed specific genetic variation. In addition, de novo short sequence read assembly strategy identified several candidate genes (SLC25A14, IGF1, PI4KA, CACNA1A) as also contributing to lipid metabolism. Results revealed several candidate genes involved in Berkshire meat quality; most of these genes are involved in lipid metabolism and intramuscular fat deposition. These results can provide a basis for future research on the genomic characteristics of Berkshire pigs.

  15. Genome sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes "Quargel" listeriosis outbreak strains reveals two different strains with distinct in vitro virulence potential.

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    Kathrin Rychli

    Full Text Available A large listeriosis outbreak occurred in Austria, Germany and the Czech Republic in 2009 and 2010. The outbreak was traced back to a traditional Austrian curd cheese called "Quargel" which was contaminated with two distinct serovar 1/2a Listeria monocytogenes strains (QOC1 and QOC2. In this study we sequenced and analysed the genomes of both outbreak strains in order to investigate the extent of genetic diversity between the two strains belonging to MLST sequence types 398 (QOC2 and 403 (QOC1. Both genomes are highly similar, but also display distinct properties: The QOC1 genome is approximately 74 kbp larger than the QOC2 genome. In addition, the strains harbour 93 (QOC1 and 45 (QOC2 genes encoding strain-specific proteins. A 21 kbp region showing highest similarity to plasmid pLMIV encoding three putative internalins is integrated in the QOC1 genome. In contrast to QOC1, strain QOC2 harbours a vip homologue, which encodes a LPXTG surface protein involved in cell invasion. In accordance, in vitro virulence assays revealed distinct differences in invasion efficiency and intracellular proliferation within different cell types. The higher virulence potential of QOC1 in non-phagocytic cells may be explained by the presence of additional internalins in the pLMIV-like region, whereas the higher invasion capability of QOC2 into phagocytic cells may be due to the presence of a vip homologue. In addition, both strains show differences in stress-related gene content. Strain QOC1 encodes a so-called stress survival islet 1, whereas strain QOC2 harbours a homologue of the uncharacterized LMOf2365_0481 gene. Consistently, QOC1 shows higher resistance to acidic, alkaline and gastric stress. In conclusion, our results show that strain QOC1 and QOC2 are distinct and did not recently evolve from a common ancestor.

  16. Infidelity of SARS-CoV Nsp14-Exonuclease Mutant Virus Replication Is Revealed by Complete Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Becker, Michelle M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Li, Kelvin; Venter, Eli; Lu, Xiaotao; Scherbakova, Sana; Graham, Rachel L.; Baric, Ralph S.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Spiro, David J.; Denison, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Most RNA viruses lack the mechanisms to recognize and correct mutations that arise during genome replication, resulting in quasispecies diversity that is required for pathogenesis and adaptation. However, it is not known how viruses encoding large viral RNA genomes such as the Coronaviridae (26 to 32 kb) balance the requirements for genome stability and quasispecies diversity. Further, the limits of replication infidelity during replication of large RNA genomes and how decreased fidelity impacts virus fitness over time are not known. Our previous work demonstrated that genetic inactivation of the coronavirus exoribonuclease (ExoN) in nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14) of murine hepatitis virus results in a 15-fold decrease in replication fidelity. However, it is not known whether nsp14-ExoN is required for replication fidelity of all coronaviruses, nor the impact of decreased fidelity on genome diversity and fitness during replication and passage. We report here the engineering and recovery of nsp14-ExoN mutant viruses of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that have stable growth defects and demonstrate a 21-fold increase in mutation frequency during replication in culture. Analysis of complete genome sequences from SARS-ExoN mutant viral clones revealed unique mutation sets in every genome examined from the same round of replication and a total of 100 unique mutations across the genome. Using novel bioinformatic tools and deep sequencing across the full-length genome following 10 population passages in vitro, we demonstrate retention of ExoN mutations and continued increased diversity and mutational load compared to wild-type SARS-CoV. The results define a novel genetic and bioinformatics model for introduction and identification of multi-allelic mutations in replication competent viruses that will be powerful tools for testing the effects of decreased fidelity and increased quasispecies diversity on viral replication, pathogenesis, and

  17. RNA sequencing reveals high resolution expression change of major plant hormone pathway genes after young seedless grape berries treated with gibberellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lijuan; Li, Yanmei; Chen, Shangwu; Perl, Avihai; Zhao, Fengxia; Ma, Huiqin

    2014-12-01

    Seedless varieties are of particular importance to the table-grape and raisin industries. Gibberellin (GA) application is widely used in the early stages of seedless berry development to increase berry size and economic value. However, the underlying mechanism of GA induction of berry enlargement is not well understood. Here, RNA-sequencing analysis of 'Centennial Seedless' (Vitis vinifera L.) berries treated with GA3 12 days after flowering is reported. Pair-wise comparison of GA3-treated and control samples detected 165, 444, 463 genes with an over two-fold change in expression 1, 3, and 7 days after GA3 treatment, respectively. The number of differentially expressed genes increased with time after GA3 treatment, and the differential expression was dominated by downregulation. Significantly modulated expression included genes encoding synthesis and catabolism to manage plant hormone homeostasis, hormone transporters, receptors and key components in signaling pathways; exogenous GA3 induced multipoint cross talk with auxin, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, ABA and ethylene. The temporal gene-expression patterns of cell-wall-modification enzymes, cytoskeleton and membrane components and transporters revealed a pivotal role for cell-wall-relaxation genes in GA3-induced berry enlargement. Our results provide the first sequential transcriptomic atlas of exogenous GA3-induced berry enlargement and reveal the complexity of GA3's effect on berry sizing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unique and conserved microRNAs in wheat chromosome 5D revealed by next-generation sequencing.

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    Kuaybe Yucebilgili Kurtoglu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are a class of short, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators in gene expression. miRNA analysis of Triticum aestivum chromosome 5D was performed on 454 GS FLX Titanium sequences of flow-sorted chromosome 5D with a total of 3,208,630 good quality reads representing 1.34x and 1.61x coverage of the short (5DS and long (5DL arms of the chromosome respectively. In silico and structural analyses revealed a total of 55 miRNAs; 48 and 42 miRNAs were found to be present on 5DL and 5DS respectively, of which 35 were common to both chromosome arms, while 13 miRNAs were specific to 5DL and 7 miRNAs were specific to 5DS. In total, 14 of the predicted miRNAs were identified in wheat for the first time. Representation (the copy number of each miRNA was also found to be higher in 5DL (1,949 compared to 5DS (1,191. Targets were predicted for each miRNA, while expression analysis gave evidence of expression for 6 out of 55 miRNAs. Occurrences of the same miRNAs were also found in Brachypodium distachyon and Oryza sativa genome sequences to identify syntenic miRNA coding sequences. Based on this analysis, two other miRNAs: miR1133 and miR167 were detected in B. distachyon syntenic region of wheat 5DS. Five of the predicted miRNA coding regions (miR6220, miR5070, miR169, miR5085, miR2118 were experimentally verified to be located to the 5D chromosome and three of them : miR2118, miR169 and miR5085, were shown to be 5D specific. Furthermore miR2118 was shown to be expressed in Chinese Spring adult leaves. miRNA genes identified in this study will expand our understanding of gene regulation in bread wheat.

  19. Deep sequencing reveals the complex and coordinated transcriptional regulation of genes related to grain quality in rice cultivars

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    An Gynheung

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milling yield and eating quality are two important grain quality traits in rice. To identify the genes involved in these two traits, we performed a deep transcriptional analysis of developing seeds using both massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS and sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS. Five MPSS and five SBS libraries were constructed from 6-day-old developing seeds of Cypress (high milling yield, LaGrue (low milling yield, Ilpumbyeo (high eating quality, YR15965 (low eating quality, and Nipponbare (control. Results The transcriptomes revealed by MPSS and SBS had a high correlation co-efficient (0.81 to 0.90, and about 70% of the transcripts were commonly identified in both types of the libraries. SBS, however, identified 30% more transcripts than MPSS. Among the highly expressed genes in Cypress and Ilpumbyeo, over 100 conserved cis regulatory elements were identified. Numerous specifically expressed transcription factor (TF genes were identified in Cypress (282, LaGrue (312, Ilpumbyeo (363, YR15965 (260, and Nipponbare (357. Many key grain quality-related genes (i.e., genes involved in starch metabolism, aspartate amino acid metabolism, storage and allergenic protein synthesis, and seed maturation that were expressed at high levels underwent alternative splicing and produced antisense transcripts either in Cypress or Ilpumbyeo. Further, a time course RT-PCR analysis confirmed a higher expression level of genes involved in starch metabolism such as those encoding ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase and granule bound starch synthase I (GBSS I in Cypress than that in LaGrue during early seed development. Conclusion This study represents the most comprehensive analysis of the developing seed transcriptome of rice available to date. Using two high throughput sequencing methods, we identified many differentially expressed genes that may affect milling yield or eating quality in rice. Many of the identified genes are involved

  20. Deep sequencing reveals the complex and coordinated transcriptional regulation of genes related to grain quality in rice cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venu, Rc; Sreerekha, Mv; Nobuta, Kan; Beló, André; Ning, Yuese; An, Gynheung; Meyers, Blake C; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2011-04-14

    Milling yield and eating quality are two important grain quality traits in rice. To identify the genes involved in these two traits, we performed a deep transcriptional analysis of developing seeds using both massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) and sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS). Five MPSS and five SBS libraries were constructed from 6-day-old developing seeds of Cypress (high milling yield), LaGrue (low milling yield), Ilpumbyeo (high eating quality), YR15965 (low eating quality), and Nipponbare (control). The transcriptomes revealed by MPSS and SBS had a high correlation co-efficient (0.81 to 0.90), and about 70% of the transcripts were commonly identified in both types of the libraries. SBS, however, identified 30% more transcripts than MPSS. Among the highly expressed genes in Cypress and Ilpumbyeo, over 100 conserved cis regulatory elements were identified. Numerous specifically expressed transcription factor (TF) genes were identified in Cypress (282), LaGrue (312), Ilpumbyeo (363), YR15965 (260), and Nipponbare (357). Many key grain quality-related genes (i.e., genes involved in starch metabolism, aspartate amino acid metabolism, storage and allergenic protein synthesis, and seed maturation) that were expressed at high levels underwent alternative splicing and produced antisense transcripts either in Cypress or Ilpumbyeo. Further, a time course RT-PCR analysis confirmed a higher expression level of genes involved in starch metabolism such as those encoding ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and granule bound starch synthase I (GBSS I) in Cypress than that in LaGrue during early seed development. This study represents the most comprehensive analysis of the developing seed transcriptome of rice available to date. Using two high throughput sequencing methods, we identified many differentially expressed genes that may affect milling yield or eating quality in rice. Many of the identified genes are involved in the biosynthesis of starch, aspartate

  1. Multiple mitochondrial introgression events and heteroplasmy in trypanosoma cruzi revealed by maxicircle MLST and next generation sequencing.

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    Louisa A Messenger

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA is a valuable taxonomic marker due to its relatively fast rate of evolution. In Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, the mitochondrial genome has a unique structural organization consisting of 20-50 maxicircles (∼20 kb and thousands of minicircles (0.5-10 kb. T. cruzi is an early diverging protist displaying remarkable genetic heterogeneity and is recognized as a complex of six discrete typing units (DTUs. The majority of infected humans are asymptomatic for life while 30-35% develop potentially fatal cardiac and/or digestive syndromes. However, the relationship between specific clinical outcomes and T. cruzi genotype remains elusive. The availability of whole genome sequences has driven advances in high resolution genotyping techniques and re-invigorated interest in exploring the diversity present within the various DTUs.To describe intra-DTU diversity, we developed a highly resolutive maxicircle multilocus sequence typing (mtMLST scheme based on ten gene fragments. A panel of 32 TcI isolates was genotyped using the mtMLST scheme, GPI, mini-exon and 25 microsatellite loci. Comparison of nuclear and mitochondrial data revealed clearly incongruent phylogenetic histories among different geographical populations as well as major DTUs. In parallel, we exploited read depth data, generated by Illumina sequencing of the maxicircle genome from the TcI reference strain Sylvio X10/1, to provide the first evidence of mitochondrial heteroplasmy (heterogeneous mitochondrial genomes in an individual cell in T. cruzi.mtMLST provides a powerful approach to genotyping at the sub-DTU level. This strategy will facilitate attempts to resolve phenotypic variation in T. cruzi and to address epidemiologically important hypotheses in conjunction with intensive spatio-temporal sampling. The observations of both general and specific incidences of nuclear-mitochondrial phylogenetic incongruence indicate that genetic recombination

  2. RNA Sequencing and Coexpression Analysis Reveal Key Genes Involved in α-Linolenic Acid Biosynthesis in Perilla frutescens Seed

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    Tianyuan Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Perilla frutescen is used as traditional food and medicine in East Asia. Its seeds contain high levels of α-linolenic acid (ALA, which is important for health, but is scarce in our daily meals. Previous reports on RNA-seq of perilla seed had identified fatty acid (FA and triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis genes, but the underlying mechanism of ALA biosynthesis and its regulation still need to be further explored. So we conducted Illumina RNA-sequencing in seven temporal developmental stages of perilla seeds. Sequencing generated a total of 127 million clean reads, containing 15.88 Gb of valid data. The de novo assembly of sequence reads yielded 64,156 unigenes with an average length of 777 bp. A total of 39,760 unigenes were annotated and 11,693 unigenes were found to be differentially expressed in all samples. According to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis, 486 unigenes were annotated in the “lipid metabolism” pathway. Of these, 150 unigenes were found to be involved in fatty acid (FA biosynthesis and triacylglycerol (TAG assembly in perilla seeds. A coexpression analysis showed that a total of 104 genes were highly coexpressed (r > 0.95. The coexpression network could be divided into two main subnetworks showing over expression in the medium or earlier and late phases, respectively. In order to identify the putative regulatory genes, a transcription factor (TF analysis was performed. This led to the identification of 45 gene families, mainly including the AP2-EREBP, bHLH, MYB, and NAC families, etc. After coexpression analysis of TFs with highly expression of FAD2 and FAD3 genes, 162 TFs were found to be significantly associated with two FAD genes (r > 0.95. Those TFs were predicted to be the key regulatory factors in ALA biosynthesis in perilla seed. The qRT-PCR analysis also verified the relevance of expression pattern between two FAD genes and partial candidate TFs. Although it has been reported that some TFs

  3. V(D)J recombination frequency is affected by the sequence interposed between a pair of recombination signals: sequence comparison reveals a putative recombinational enhancer element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roch, F A; Hobi, R; Berchtold, M W

    1997-01-01

    this activity suggests that the effect is no mediated through attachment of the recombination substrate to a nuclear matrix-associated recombination complex but through cis-activation. The presence of a 26 bp A-T-rich sequence motif in the 5' and 3' MARs of Emu and in all of the other upregulating fragments....... These we prepared by interposing between the recombination signal sequences (RSS) of the plasmid pBlueRec various fragments, including Emu, possibly affecting V(D)J recombination. Our work shows that sequences inserted between RSS 23 and RSS 12, with distances from their proximal ends of 26 and 284 bp...

  4. Exome sequencing in Jewish and Arab patients with rhabdomyolysis reveals single-gene etiology in 43% of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivante, Asaf; Ityel, Hadas; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Chen, Jing; Shril, Shirlee; van der Ven, Amelie T; Mann, Nina; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Segel, Reeval; Aran, Adi; Zeharia, Avraham; Staretz-Chacham, Orna; Bar-Yosef, Omer; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Landau, Yuval E; Lifton, Richard P; Anikster, Yair; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical emergency that may cause acute kidney injury (AKI). It can be acquired or due to monogenic mutations. Around 60 different rare monogenic forms of rhabdomyolysis have been reported to date. In the clinical setting, identifying the underlying molecular diagnosis is challenging due to nonspecific presentation, the high number of causative genes, and current lack of data on the prevalence of monogenic forms. We employed whole exome sequencing (WES) to reveal the percentage of rhabdomyolysis cases explained by single-gene (monogenic) mutations in one of 58 candidate genes. We investigated a cohort of 21 unrelated families with rhabdomyolysis, in whom no underlying etiology had been previously established. Using WES, we identified causative mutations in candidate genes in nine of the 21 families (43%). We detected disease-causing mutations in eight of 58 candidate genes, grouped into the following categories: (1) disorders of fatty acid metabolism (CPT2), (2) disorders of glycogen metabolism (PFKM and PGAM2), (3) disorders of abnormal skeletal muscle relaxation and contraction (CACNA1S, MYH3, RYR1 and SCN4A), and (4) disorders of purine metabolism (AHCY). Our findings demonstrate a very high detection rate for monogenic etiologies using WES and reveal broad genetic heterogeneity for rhabdomyolysis. These results highlight the importance of molecular genetic diagnostics for establishing an etiologic diagnosis. Because these patients are at risk for recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent risk for AKI, WES allows adequate prophylaxis and treatment for these patients and their family members and enables a personalized medicine approach.

  5. Phylogenetic diversity and genotypical complexity of H9N2 influenza A viruses revealed by genomic sequence analysis.

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    Guoying Dong

    Full Text Available H9N2 influenza A viruses have become established worldwide in terrestrial poultry and wild birds, and are occasionally transmitted to mammals including humans and pigs. To comprehensively elucidate the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of H9N2 influenza viruses, we performed a large-scale sequence analysis of 571 viral genomes from the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource Database, representing the spectrum of H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from 1966 to 2009. Our study provides a panoramic framework for better understanding the genesis and evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses, and for describing the history of H9N2 viruses circulating in diverse hosts. Panorama phylogenetic analysis of the eight viral gene segments revealed the complexity and diversity of H9N2 influenza viruses. The 571 H9N2 viral genomes were classified into 74 separate lineages, which had marked host and geographical differences in phylogeny. Panorama genotypical analysis also revealed that H9N2 viruses include at least 98 genotypes, which were further divided according to their HA lineages into seven series (A-G. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal genes showed that H9N2 viruses are closely related to H3, H4, H5, H7, H10, and H14 subtype influenza viruses. Our results indicate that H9N2 viruses have undergone extensive reassortments to generate multiple reassortants and genotypes, suggesting that the continued circulation of multiple genotypical H9N2 viruses throughout the world in diverse hosts has the potential to cause future influenza outbreaks in poultry and epidemics in humans. We propose a nomenclature system for identifying and unifying all lineages and genotypes of H9N2 influenza viruses in order to facilitate international communication on the evolution, ecology and epidemiology of H9N2 influenza viruses.

  6. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex

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    Marianne Anke Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group. For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group. Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools.

  7. Genome sequence comparison reveals a candidate gene involved in male-hermaphrodite differentiation in papaya (Carica papaya) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroki; Urasaki, Naoya; Natsume, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Shudo, Ayano; Terauchi, Ryohei; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-04-01

    The sex type of papaya (Carica papaya) is determined by the pair of sex chromosomes (XX, female; XY, male; and XY(h), hermaphrodite), in which there is a non-recombining genomic region in the Y and Y(h) chromosomes. This region is presumed to be involved in determination of males and hermaphrodites; it is designated as the male-specific region in the Y chromosome (MSY) and the hermaphrodite-specific region in the Y(h) chromosome (HSY). Here, we identified the genes determining male and hermaphrodite sex types by comparing MSY and HSY genomic sequences. In the MSY and HSY genomic regions, we identified 14,528 nucleotide substitutions and 965 short indels with a large gap and two highly diverged regions. In the predicted genes expressed in flower buds, we found no nucleotide differences leading to amino acid changes between the MSY and HSY. However, we found an HSY-specific transposon insertion in a gene (SVP like) showing a similarity to the Short Vegetative Phase (SVP) gene. Study of SVP-like transcripts revealed that the MSY allele encoded an intact protein, while the HSY allele encoded a truncated protein. Our findings demonstrated that the SVP-like gene is a candidate gene for male-hermaphrodite determination in papaya.

  8. RNA Sequencing of Murine Norovirus-Infected Cells Reveals Transcriptional Alteration of Genes Important to Viral Recognition and Antigen Presentation

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    Daniel Enosi Tuipulotu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses inherently exploit normal cellular functions to promote replication and survival. One mechanism involves transcriptional control of the host, and knowledge of the genes modified and their molecular function can aid in understanding viral-host interactions. Norovirus pathogenesis, despite the recent advances in cell cultivation, remains largely uncharacterized. Several studies have utilized the related murine norovirus (MNV to identify innate response, antigen presentation, and cellular recognition components that are activated during infection. In this study, we have used next-generation sequencing to probe the transcriptomic changes of MNV-infected mouse macrophages. Our in-depth analysis has revealed that MNV is a potent stimulator of the innate response including genes involved in interferon and cytokine production pathways. We observed that genes involved in viral recognition, namely IFIH1, DDX58, and DHX58 were significantly upregulated with infection, whereas we observed significant downregulation of cytokine receptors (Il17rc, Il1rl1, Cxcr3, and Cxcr5 and TLR7. Furthermore, we identified that pathways involved in protein degradation (including genes Psmb3, Psmb4, Psmb5, Psmb9, and Psme2, antigen presentation, and lymphocyte activation are downregulated by MNV infection. Thus, our findings illustrate that MNV induces perturbations in the innate immune transcriptome, particularly in MHC maturation and viral recognition that can contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  9. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-03-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25-45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets.

  10. Mitochondrial sequences reveal a clear separation between Angolan and South African giraffe along a cryptic rift valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Friederike; Fennessy, Julian; Bidon, Tobias; Tutchings, Andy; Marais, Andri; Deacon, Francois; Janke, Axel

    2014-10-23

    The current taxonomy of the African giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is primarily based on pelage pattern and geographic distribution, and nine subspecies are currently recognized. Although genetic studies have been conducted, their resolution is low, mainly due to limited sampling. Detailed knowledge about the genetic variation and phylogeography of the South African giraffe (G. c. giraffa) and the Angolan giraffe (G. c. angolensis) is lacking. We investigate genetic variation among giraffe matrilines by increased sampling, with a focus on giraffe key areas in southern Africa. The 1,562 nucleotides long mitochondrial DNA dataset (cytochrome b and partial control region) comprises 138 parsimony informative sites among 161 giraffe individuals from eight populations. We additionally included two okapis as an outgroup. The analyses of the maternally inherited sequences reveal a deep divergence between northern and southern giraffe populations in Africa, and a general pattern of distinct matrilineal clades corresponding to their geographic distribution. Divergence time estimates among giraffe populations place the deepest splits at several hundred thousand years ago. Our increased sampling in southern Africa suggests that the distribution ranges of the Angolan and South African giraffe need to be redefined. Knowledge about the phylogeography and genetic variation of these two maternal lineages is crucial for the development of appropriate management strategies.

  11. Genome Sequencing of Museum Specimens Reveals Rapid Changes in the Genetic Composition of Honey Bees in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cridland, Julie M; Ramirez, Santiago R; Dean, Cheryl A; Sciligo, Amber; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2018-02-01

    The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, is an enormously influential pollinator in both natural and managed ecosystems. In North America, this species has been introduced numerous times from a variety of different source populations in Europe and Africa. Since then, feral populations have expanded into many different environments across their broad introduced range. Here, we used whole genome sequencing of historical museum specimens and newly collected modern populations from California (USA) to analyze the impact of demography and selection on introduced populations during the past 105 years. We find that populations from both northern and southern California exhibit pronounced genetic changes, but have changed in different ways. In northern populations, honey bees underwent a substantial shift from western European to eastern European ancestry since the 1960s, whereas southern populations are dominated by the introgression of Africanized genomes during the past two decades. Additionally, we identify an isolated island population that has experienced comparatively little change over a large time span. Fine-scale comparison of different populations and time points also revealed SNPs that differ in frequency, highlighting a number of genes that may be important for recent adaptations in these introduced populations. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  13. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have

  14. Exome Sequencing Reveals De Novo WDR45 Mutations Causing a Phenotypically Distinct, X-Linked Dominant Form of NBIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Tobias B.; Hogarth, Penelope; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Sanford, Lynn; Meyer, Esther; Kara, Eleanna; Cuno, Stephan M.; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; Hardy, John; Strom, Tim M.; Boddaert, Nathalie; Houlden, Henry H.; Kurian, Manju A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. We report that de novo mutations in WDR45, a gene located at Xp11.23 and encoding a beta-propeller scaffold protein with a putative role in autophagy, cause a distinctive NBIA phenotype. The clinical features include early-onset global developmental delay and further neurological deterioration (parkinsonism, dystonia, and dementia developing by early adulthood). Brain MRI revealed evidence of iron deposition in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Males and females are phenotypically similar, an observation that might be explained by somatic mosaicism in surviving males and germline or somatic mutations in females, as well as skewing of X chromosome inactivation. This clinically recognizable disorder is among the more common forms of NBIA, and we suggest that it be named accordingly as beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:23176820

  15. Genetic divergence of Asiatic Bdellocephala (Turbellaria, Tricladida, Paludicola) as revealed by partial 18S rRNA gene sequence comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznedelov, K D; Timoshkin, O A; Goldman, E

    1997-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of small ribosomal RNA genes were used for analysis of genetic differences among Asiatic species of freshwater triclad genus Bdellocephala. Representatives of four species and four subspecies of this genus were used to establish homology between nucleotides in the 5'-end portion of small ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Within 552 nucleotide sites of aligned sequences compared, six variable base positions were discovered, dividing Bdellocephala into five different genotypes. Sequence data allow to distinguish two groups of these genotypes. One of them unites species from Kamchatka and Japan, another one unites Baikalian taxa. Agreement between available morphological, cytological and sequence data is discussed.

  16. Targeted gene disruption reveals an essential role for ceruloplasmin in cellular iron efflux

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Z. Leah; Durley, Alison P.; Man, Tsz Kwong; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    1999-01-01

    Aceruloplasminemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism. Affected individuals evidence iron accumulation in tissue parenchyma in association with absent serum ceruloplasmin. Genetic studies of such patients reveal inherited mutations in the ceruloplasmin gene. To elucidate the role of ceruloplasmin in iron homeostasis, we created an animal model of aceruloplasminemia by disrupting the murine ceruloplasmin (Cp) gene. Although normal at birth, Cp−/− mice demonstrate progressive...

  17. Small RNA and Transcriptome Sequencing Reveal a Potential miRNA-Mediated Interaction Network That Functions during Somatic Embryogenesis in Lilium pumilum DC. Fisch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Xue, Bingyang; Gai, Meizhu; Song, Shengli; Jia, Nana; Sun, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    Plant somatic embryos are widely used in the fields of germplasm conservation, breeding for genetic engineering and artificial seed production. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in somatic embryogenesis (SE) regulation. However, their regulatory roles during various stages of SE remain unclear. In this study, six types of embryogenic samples of Lilium pumilum DC. Fisch., including organogenic callus, embryogenic callus induced for 4 weeks, embryogenic callus induced for 6 weeks, globular embryos, torpedo embryos and cotyledon embryos, were prepared for small RNA sequencing. The results revealed a total of 2,378,760 small RNA reads, among which the most common size was 24 nt. Four hundred and fifty-two known miRNAs, belonging to more than 86 families, 57 novel miRNAs and 40 miRNA*s were identified. The 86 known miRNA families were sorted according to an alignment with their homologs across 24 land plants into the following four categories: 23 highly conserved, 4 moderately conserved, 15 less conserved and 44 species-specific miRNAs. Differentially expressed known miRNAs were identified during various stages of SE. Subsequently, the expression levels of 12 differentially expressed miRNAs and 4 targets were validated using qRT-PCR. In addition, six samples were mixed in equal amounts for transcript sequencing, and the sequencing data were used as transcripts for miRNA target prediction. A total of 66,422 unigenes with an average length of 800 bp were assembled from 56,258,974 raw reads. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment indicated that 38,004 and 15,497 unigenes were successfully assigned to GO terms and KEGG pathways, respectively. Among the unigenes, 2,182 transcripts were predicted to be targets for 396 known miRNAs. The potential targets of the identified miRNAs were mostly classified into the following GO terms: cell, binding and metabolic process. Enriched KEGG analysis demonstrated that carbohydrate metabolism

  18. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Labadorf

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480 of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05 and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes, that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD.

  19. Apple ring rot-responsive putative microRNAs revealed by high-throughput sequencing in Malus × domestica Borkh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin-Yi; Du, Bei-Bei; Gao, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Tu, Xu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Zhen; Qu, Shen-Chun

    2014-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, which silence target mRNA via cleavage or translational inhibition to function in regulating gene expression. MiRNAs act as important regulators of plant development and stress response. For understanding the role of miRNAs responsive to apple ring rot stress, we identified disease-responsive miRNAs using high-throughput sequencing in Malus × domestica Borkh.. Four small RNA libraries were constructed from two control strains in M. domestica, crabapple (CKHu) and Fuji Naga-fu No. 6 (CKFu), and two disease stress strains, crabapple (DSHu) and Fuji Naga-fu No. 6 (DSFu). A total of 59 miRNA families were identified and five miRNAs might be responsive to apple ring rot infection and validated via qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we predicted 76 target genes which were regulated by conserved miRNAs potentially. Our study demonstrated that miRNAs was responsive to apple ring rot infection and may have important implications on apple disease resistance.

  20. Global Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Molecular Profiles of Summer Diapause Induction Stage of Onion Maggot, Delia antiqua (Diptera: Anthomyiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Ren

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The onion maggot, Delia antiqua, is a worldwide subterranean pest and can enter diapause during the summer and winter seasons. The molecular regulation of the ontogenesis transition remains largely unknown. Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to identify candidate genes and processes linked to summer diapause (SD induction by comparing the transcriptome differences between the most sensitive larval developmental stage of SD and nondiapause (ND. Nine pairwise comparisons were performed, and significantly differentially regulated transcripts were identified. Several functional terms related to lipid, carbohydrate, and energy metabolism, environmental adaption, immune response, and aging were enriched during the most sensitive SD induction period. A subset of genes, including circadian clock genes, were expressed differentially under diapause induction conditions, and there was much more variation in the most sensitive period of ND- than SD-destined larvae. These expression variations probably resulted in a deep restructuring of metabolic pathways. Potential regulatory elements of SD induction including genes related to lipid, carbohydrate, energy metabolism, and environmental adaption. Collectively, our results suggest the circadian clock is one of the key drivers for integrating environmental signals into the SD induction. Our transcriptome analysis provides insight into the fundamental role of the circadian clock in SD induction in this important model insect species, and contributes to the in-depth elucidation of the molecular regulation mechanism of insect diapause induction.

  1. RNA-Based Amplicon Sequencing Reveals Microbiota Development during Ripening of Artisanal versus Industrial Lard d'Arnad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Bellio, Alberto; Romano, Angelo; Macori, Guerrino; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Decastelli, Lucia; Cocolin, Luca

    2017-08-15

    Valle d'Aosta Lard d'Arnad is a protected designation of origin (PDO) product produced from fat of the shoulder and back of heavy pigs. Its manufacturing process can be very diverse, especially regarding the maturation temperature and the NaCl concentration used for the brine; thereby, the main goal of this study was to investigate the impact of those parameters on the microbiota developed during curing and ripening. Three farms producing Lard d'Arnad were selected. Two plants, reflecting the industrial process characterized either by low maturation temperature (plant A [10% NaCl, 2°C]) or by using a low NaCl concentration (plant B [2.5% NaCl, 4°C]), were selected, while the third was characterized by an artisanal process (plant C [30% NaCl, 8°C]). Lard samples were obtained at time 0 and after 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days of maturation. From each plant, 3 independent lots were analyzed. The diversity of live microbiota was evaluated by using classical plate counts and amplicon target sequencing of small subunit (SSU) rRNA. The main taxa identified by sequencing were Acinetobacter johnsonii , Psychrobacter , Staphylococcus equorum , Staphylococcus sciuri , Pseudomonas fragi , Brochothrix , Halomonas , and Vibrio , and differences in their relative abundances distinguished samples from the individual plants. The composition of the microbiota was more similar among plants A and B, and it was characterized by the higher presence of taxa recognized as undesired bacteria in food-processing environments. Oligotype analysis of Halomonas and Acinetobacter revealed the presence of several characteristic oligotypes associated with A and B samples. IMPORTANCE Changes in the food production process can drastically affect the microbial community structure, with a possible impact on the final characteristics of the products. The industrial processes of Lard d'Arnad production are characterized by a reduction in the salt concentration in the brines to address a consumer demand

  2. Whole genome sequencing reveals complex evolution patterns of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains in patients.

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    Matthias Merker

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant (MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC strains represent a major threat for tuberculosis (TB control. Treatment of MDR-TB patients is long and less effective, resulting in a significant number of treatment failures. The development of further resistances leads to extensively drug-resistant (XDR variants. However, data on the individual reasons for treatment failure, e.g. an induced mutational burst, and on the evolution of bacteria in the patient are only sparsely available. To address this question, we investigated the intra-patient evolution of serial MTBC isolates obtained from three MDR-TB patients undergoing longitudinal treatment, finally leading to XDR-TB. Sequential isolates displayed identical IS6110 fingerprint patterns, suggesting the absence of exogenous re-infection. We utilized whole genome sequencing (WGS to screen for variations in three isolates from Patient A and four isolates from Patient B and C, respectively. Acquired polymorphisms were subsequently validated in up to 15 serial isolates by Sanger sequencing. We determined eight (Patient A and nine (Patient B polymorphisms, which occurred in a stepwise manner during the course of the therapy and were linked to resistance or a potential compensatory mechanism. For both patients, our analysis revealed the long-term co-existence of clonal subpopulations that displayed different drug resistance allele combinations. Out of these, the most resistant clone was fixed in the population. In contrast, baseline and follow-up isolates of Patient C were distinguished each by eleven unique polymorphisms, indicating an exogenous re-infection with an XDR strain not detected by IS6110 RFLP typing. Our study demonstrates that intra-patient microevolution of MDR-MTBC strains under longitudinal treatment is more complex than previously anticipated. However, a mutator phenotype was not detected. The presence of different subpopulations might confound phenotypic and

  3. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  4. The Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in Sarcomas: Evolution From Light Microscope to Molecular Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisberg, Roman; Roszik, Jason; Conley, Anthony; Patel, Shreyaskumar R; Subbiah, Vivek

    2017-10-13

    Sarcomas are rare, heterogeneous group of soft tissue and bone tumors. Precise diagnosis of specific subtypes is challenging using conventional methods. Herein, we review the role of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology that is used for rapid sequencing of DNA and RNA. Recent sarcoma specific studies recommend that molecular genetic testing should be added at diagnosis for appropriate clinical management in addition to diagnosis by expert pathologists. NGS has already been used to identify potentially actionable mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions. Rationally, choosing a drug based on an individual patient profile aka: "precision oncology" has been so far limited to few case reports in sarcomas. As we improve our ability to deliver personalized medicine using all modalities including conventional therapy, more patients may eventually benefit. As the cost and capacity of NGS outpace Moore's law, so does the probability of success.

  5. The role of 3D volumetric MR sequences in diagnosing intraventricular neurocysticercosis: preliminar results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Edward Frota Mont'Alverne Filho

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper was to investigate the role of two three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MRI sequences: enhanced spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR, and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA in the evaluation of intraventricular neurocysticercosis cysts and scolices. METHOD: Seven neurocysticercosis patients suspected of presenting intraventricular lesions were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging using enhanced SPGR, and FIESTA. RESULTS: Enhanced SPGR detected eight cystic lesions, with scolices in four. Contrast enhancement was observed in three cysts. FIESTA also detected eight cystic lesions with the presence of scolices in seven of those cystic lesions. Four patients presented parenchymal involvement, while the remaining three presented the racemose form. CONCLUSION: FIESTA and SPGR are sequences that can detect intraventricular cysts of neurocysticercosis, and FIESTA also is good for the detection of the scolex. Considering this information we suggest that FIESTA and SPGR should be included in the MRI protocol for the investigation of intraventricular neurocysticercosis.

  6. High-Throughput Sequencing of the Expressed Torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) Antibody Sequences Distinguishes IgM and IgT Repertoires and Reveals Evidence of Convergent Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xi; Sun, Jianqiang; Tan, Engkong; Shimizu, Kentaro; Reza, Md Shaheed; Watabe, Shugo; Asakawa, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) or antibody diversity arises from somatic recombination of immunoglobulin (Ig) gene segments and is concentrated within the Ig heavy (H) chain complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR-H3). We performed high-throughput sequencing of the expressed antibody heavy-chain repertoire from adult torafugu. We found that torafugu use between 70 and 82% of all possible V (variable), D (diversity), and J (joining) gene segment combinations and that they share a similar frequency distribution of these VDJ combinations. The CDR-H3 sequence repertoire observed in individuals is biased with the preferential use of a small number of VDJ, dominated by sequences containing inserted nucleotides. We uncovered the common CDR-H3 amino-acid (aa) sequences shared by individuals. Common CDR-H3 sequences feature highly convergent nucleic-acid recombination compared with private ones. Finally, we observed differences in repertoires between IgM and IgT, including the unequal usage frequencies of V gene segment and the biased number of nucleotide insertion/deletion at VDJ junction regions that leads to distinct distributions of CDR-H3 lengths.

  7. High-Throughput Sequencing of the Expressed Torafugu (Takifugu rubripes Antibody Sequences Distinguishes IgM and IgT Repertoires and Reveals Evidence of Convergent Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Fu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available B-cell antigen receptor (BCR or antibody diversity arises from somatic recombination of immunoglobulin (Ig gene segments and is concentrated within the Ig heavy (H chain complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR-H3. We performed high-throughput sequencing of the expressed antibody heavy-chain repertoire from adult torafugu. We found that torafugu use between 70 and 82% of all possible V (variable, D (diversity, and J (joining gene segment combinations and that they share a similar frequency distribution of these VDJ combinations. The CDR-H3 sequence repertoire observed in individuals is biased with the preferential use of a small number of VDJ, dominated by sequences containing inserted nucleotides. We uncovered the common CDR-H3 amino-acid (aa sequences shared by individuals. Common CDR-H3 sequences feature highly convergent nucleic-acid recombination compared with private ones. Finally, we observed differences in repertoires between IgM and IgT, including the unequal usage frequencies of V gene segment and the biased number of nucleotide insertion/deletion at VDJ junction regions that leads to distinct distributions of CDR-H3 lengths.

  8. High-throughput sequencing of small RNA transcriptome reveals salt stress regulated microRNAs in sugarcane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Carnavale Bottino

    Full Text Available Salt stress is a primary cause of crop losses worldwide, and it has been the subject of intense investigation to unravel the complex mechanisms responsible for salinity tolerance. MicroRNA is implicated in many developmental processes and in responses to various abiotic stresses, playing pivotal roles in plant adaptation. Deep sequencing technology was chosen to determine the small RNA transcriptome of Saccharum sp cultivars grown on saline conditions. We constructed four small RNAs libraries prepared from plants grown on hydroponic culture submitted to 170 mM NaCl and harvested after 1 h, 6 hs and 24 hs. Each library was sequenced individually and together generated more than 50 million short reads. Ninety-eight conserved miRNAs and 33 miRNAs* were identified by bioinformatics. Several of the microRNA showed considerable differences of expression in the four libraries. To confirm the results of the bioinformatics-based analysis, we studied the expression of the 10 most abundant miRNAs and 1 miRNA* in plants treated with 170 mM NaCl and in plants with a severe treatment of 340 mM NaCl. The results showed that 11 selected miRNAs had higher expression in samples treated with severe salt treatment compared to the mild one. We also investigated the regulation of the same miRNAs in shoots of four cultivars grown on soil treated with 170 mM NaCl. Cultivars could be grouped according to miRNAs expression in response to salt stress. Furthermore, the majority of the predicted target genes had an inverse regulation with their correspondent microRNAs. The targets encode a wide range of proteins, including transcription factors, metabolic enzymes and genes involved in hormone signaling, probably assisting the plants to develop tolerance to salinity. Our work provides insights into the regulatory functions of miRNAs, thereby expanding our knowledge on potential salt-stressed regulated genes.

  9. Magic angle spinning NMR reveals sequence-dependent structural plasticity, dynamics, and the spacer peptide 1 conformation in HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yun; Hou, Guangjin; Suiter, Christopher L; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Lipton, Andrew S; Burton, Sarah; Hung, Ivan; Gor'kov, Peter L; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William; Rice, David; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-11-27

    A key stage in HIV-1 maturation toward an infectious virion requires sequential proteolytic cleavage of the Gag polyprotein leading to the formation of a conical capsid core that encloses the viral RNA genome and a small complement of proteins. The final step of this process involves severing the SP1 peptide from the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate, which triggers the condensation of the CA protein into the capsid shell. The details of the overall mechanism, including the conformation of the SP1 peptide in CA-SP1, are still under intense debate. In this report, we examine tubular assemblies of CA and the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. At magnetic fields of 19.9 T and above, outstanding quality 2D and 3D MAS NMR spectra were obtained for tubular CA and CA-SP1 assemblies, permitting resonance assignments for subsequent detailed structural characterization. Dipolar- and scalar-based correlation experiments unequivocally indicate that SP1 peptide is in a random coil conformation and mobile in the assembled CA-SP1. Analysis of two CA protein sequence variants reveals that, unexpectedly, the conformations of the SP1 tail, the functionally important CypA loop, and the loop preceding helix 8 are modulated by residue variations at distal sites. These findings provide support for the role of SP1 as a trigger of the disassembly of the immature CA capsid for its subsequent de novo reassembly into mature cores and establish the importance of sequence-dependent conformational plasticity in CA assembly.

  10. Genetic variation in Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Kemunting) populations from Malaysia as revealed by inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, T S; Abdullah, T L; Abdullah, N A P; Sinniah, U R

    2015-12-14

    Kemunting (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) from the Myrtaceae family, is native to Malaysia. It is widely used in traditional medicine to treat various illnesses and possesses significant antibacterial properties. In addition, it has great potential as ornamental in landscape design. Genetic variability studies are important for the rational management and conservation of genetic material. In the present study, inter-simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of 18 R. tomentosa populations collected from ten states of Peninsular Malaysia. The 11 primers selected generated 173 bands that ranged in size from 1.6 kb to 130 bp, which corresponded to an average of 15.73 bands per primer. Of these bands, 97.69% (169 in total) were polymorphic. High genetic diversity was documented at the species level (H(T) = 0.2705; I = 0.3973; PPB = 97.69%) but there was a low diversity at population level (H(S) = 0.0073; I = 0 .1085; PPB = 20.14%). The high level of genetic differentiation revealed by G(ST) (73%) and analysis of molecular variance (63%), together with the limited gene flow among population (N(m) = 0.1851), suggests that the populations examined are isolated. Results from an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis clearly grouped the populations into two geographic groups. This clear grouping can also be demonstrated by the significant Mantel test (r = 0.581, P = 0.001). We recommend that all the R. tomentosa populations be preserved in conservation program.

  11. Sequence-Based Mapping and Genome Editing Reveal Mutations in Stickleback Hps5 Cause Oculocutaneous Albinism and the casper Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Hart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present and characterize the spontaneous X-linked recessive mutation casper, which causes oculocutaneous albinism in threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus. In humans, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome results in pigmentation defects due to disrupted formation of the melanin-containing lysosomal-related organelle (LRO, the melanosome. casper mutants display not only reduced pigmentation of melanosomes in melanophores, but also reductions in the iridescent silver color from iridophores, while the yellow pigmentation from xanthophores appears unaffected. We mapped casper using high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA from bulked casper mutants to a region of the stickleback X chromosome (chromosome 19 near the stickleback ortholog of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (Hps5. casper mutants have an insertion of a single nucleotide in the sixth exon of Hps5, predicted to generate an early frameshift. Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 induced lesions in Hps5 and phenocopied the casper mutation. Injecting single or paired Hps5 guide RNAs revealed higher incidences of genomic deletions from paired guide RNAs compared to single gRNAs. Stickleback Hps5 provides a genetic system where a hemizygous locus in XY males and a diploid locus in XX females can be used to generate an easily scored visible phenotype, facilitating quantitative studies of different genome editing approaches. Lastly, we show the ability to better visualize patterns of fluorescent transgenic reporters in Hps5 mutant fish. Thus, Hps5 mutations present an opportunity to study pigmented LROs in the emerging stickleback model system, as well as a tool to aid in assaying genome editing and visualizing enhancer activity in transgenic fish.

  12. Exome sequencing reveals genetic differentiation due to high-altitude adaptation in the Tibetan cashmere goat (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shen; Yao, Na; Yang, Min; Liu, Xuexue; Dong, Kunzhe; Zhao, Qianjun; Pu, Yabin; He, Xiaohong; Guan, Weijun; Yang, Ning; Ma, Yuehui; Jiang, Lin

    2016-02-18

    The Tibetan cashmere goat (Capra hircus), one of the most ancient breeds in China, has historically been a critical source of meat and cashmere production for local farmers. To adapt to the high-altitude area, extremely harsh climate, and hypoxic environment that the Tibetan cashmere goat lives in, this goat has developed distinct phenotypic traits compared to lowland breeds. However, the genetic components underlying this phenotypic adaptation remain largely unknown. We obtained 118,700 autosomal SNPs through exome sequencing of 330 cashmere goats located at a wide geographic range, including the Tibetan Plateau and low-altitude regions in China. The great majority of SNPs showed low genetic differentiation among populations; however, approximately 2-3% of the loci showed more genetic differentiation than expected under a selectively neutral model. Together with a combined analysis of high- and low-altitude breeds, we revealed 339 genes potentially under high-altitude selection. Genes associated with cardiovascular system development were significantly enriched in our study. Among these genes, the most evident one was endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), which has been previously reported to be involved in complex oxygen sensing and significantly associated with high-altitude adaptation of human, dog, and grey wolf. The missense mutation Q579L that we identified in EPAS1, which occurs next to the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) domain, was exclusively enriched in the high-altitude populations. Our study provides insights concerning the population variation in six different cashmere goat populations in China. The variants in cardiovascular system-related genes may explain the observed phenotypic adaptation of the Tibetan cashmere goat.

  13. Spatial dynamics and mixing of bluefin tuna in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea revealed using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, Gregory N; Cariani, Alessia; Maes, Gregory E; Van Houdt, Jeroen; Herten, Koen; Cannas, Rita; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Albaina, Aitor; Estonba, Andone; Lutcavage, Molly; Hanke, Alex; Rooker, Jay; Franks, James S; Quattro, Joseph M; Basilone, Gualtiero; Fraile, Igaratza; Laconcha, Urtzi; Goñi, Nicolas; Kimoto, Ai; Macías, David; Alemany, Francisco; Deguara, Simeon; Zgozi, Salem W; Garibaldi, Fulvio; Oray, Isik K; Karakulak, Firdes Saadet; Abid, Noureddine; Santos, Miguel N; Addis, Piero; Arrizabalaga, Haritz; Tinti, Fausto

    2018-02-06

    The Atlantic bluefin tuna is a highly migratory species emblematic of the challenges associated with shared fisheries management. In an effort to resolve the species' stock dynamics, a genomewide search for spatially informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was undertaken, by way of sequencing reduced representation libraries. An allele frequency approach to SNP discovery was used, combining the data of 555 larvae and young-of-the-year (LYOY) into pools representing major geographical areas and mapping against a newly assembled genomic reference. From a set of 184,895 candidate loci, 384 were selected for validation using 167 LYOY. A highly discriminatory genotyping panel of 95 SNPs was ultimately developed by selecting loci with the most pronounced differences between western Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea LYOY. The panel was evaluated by genotyping a different set of LYOY (n = 326), and from these, 77.8% and 82.1% were correctly assigned to western Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea origins, respectively. The panel revealed temporally persistent differentiation among LYOY from the western Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea (F ST  = 0.008, p = .034). The composition of six mixed feeding aggregations in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea was characterized using genotypes from medium (n = 184) and large (n = 48) adults, applying population assignment and mixture analyses. The results provide evidence of persistent population structuring across broad geographic areas and extensive mixing in the Atlantic Ocean, particularly in the mid-Atlantic Bight and Gulf of St. Lawrence. The genomic reference and genotyping tools presented here constitute novel resources useful for future research and conservation efforts. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Temporal sequencing of throughfall drop generation as revealed by use of a large-scale rainfall simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanko, K.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Iida, S.; SUN, X.; Shinohara, Y.; Sakai, N.

    2017-12-01

    Scientists have been interested in throughfall drop size and its distribution because of its importance to soil erosion and the forest water balance. An indoor experiment was employed to deepen our understanding of throughfall drop generation processes to promote better management of forested ecosystems. The indoor experiment provides a unique opportunity to examine an array of constant rainfall intensities that are ideal conditions to pick up the effect of changing intensities and not found in the fields. Throughfall drop generation was examined for three species- Cryptomeria japonica D. Don (Japanese cedar), Chamaecyparis obtusa (Siebold & Zucc.) Endl. (Japanese cypress), and Zelkova serrata Thunb. (Japanese zelkova)- under both leafed and leafless conditions in the large-scale rainfall simulator in the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (Tsukuba, Japan) at varying rainfall intensities ranging from15 to 100 mm h-1. Drop size distributions of the applied rainfall and throughfall were measured simultaneously by 20 laser disdrometers. Utilizing the drop size dataset, throughfall was separated into three components: free throughfall, canopy drip, and splash throughfall. The temporal sequencing of the throughfall components were analyzed on a 1-min interval during each experimental run. The throughfall component percentage and drop size of canopy drip differed among tree species and rainfall intensities and by elapsed time from the beginning of the rainfall event. Preliminary analysis revealed that the time differences to produce branch drip as compared to leaf (or needle) drip was partly due to differential canopy wet-up processes and the disappearance of branch drips due to canopy saturation, leading to dissimilar throughfall drop size distributions beneath the various tree species examined. This research was supported by JSPS Invitation Fellowship for Research in Japan (Grant No.: S16088) and JSPS KAKENHI (Grant No.: JP15H05626).

  15. Rapid genome-wide evolution in Brassica rapa populations following drought revealed by sequencing of ancestral and descendant gene pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Steven J; Kane, Nolan C; O'Hara, Niamh B; Tittes, Silas; Rest, Joshua S

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that evolution can occur rapidly in response to selection. Recent advances in sequencing suggest the possibility of documenting genetic changes as they occur in populations, thus uncovering the genetic basis of evolution, particularly if samples are available from both before and after selection. Here, we had a unique opportunity to directly assess genetic changes in natural populations following an evolutionary response to a fluctuation in climate. We analysed genome-wide differences between ancestors and descendants of natural populations of Brassica rapa plants from two locations that rapidly evolved changes in multiple phenotypic traits, including flowering time, following a multiyear late-season drought in California. These ancestor-descendant comparisons revealed evolutionary shifts in allele frequencies in many genes. Some genes showing evolutionary shifts have functions related to drought stress and flowering time, consistent with an adaptive response to selection. Loci differentiated between ancestors and descendants (FST outliers) were generally different from those showing signatures of selection based on site frequency spectrum analysis (Tajima's D), indicating that the loci that evolved in response to the recent drought and those under historical selection were generally distinct. Very few genes showed similar evolutionary responses between two geographically distinct populations, suggesting independent genetic trajectories of evolution yielding parallel phenotypic changes. The results show that selection can result in rapid genome-wide evolutionary shifts in allele frequencies in natural populations, and highlight the usefulness of combining resurrection experiments in natural populations with genomics for studying the genetic basis of adaptive evolution. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Distinct genetic diversity of Oncomelania hupensis, intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum in mainland China as revealed by ITS sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, which causes schistosomiasis endemic in the Far East, and especially in mainland China. O. hupensis largely determines the parasite's geographical range. How O. hupensis's genetic diversity is distributed geographically in mainland China has never been well examined with DNA sequence data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigate the genetic variation among O. hupensis from different geographical origins using the combined complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 and ITS2 regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. 165 O. hupensis isolates were obtained in 29 localities from 7 provinces across mainland China: lake/marshland and hill regions in Anhui, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi and Jiangsu provinces, located along the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River, and mountainous regions in Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. Phylogenetic and haplotype network analyses showed distinct genetic diversity and no shared haplotypes between populations from lake/marshland regions of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and populations from mountainous regions of Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. The genetic distance between these two groups is up to 0.81 based on Fst, and branch time was estimated as 2-6 Ma. As revealed in the phylogenetic tree, snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces were also clustered separately. Geographical separation appears to be an important factor accounting for the diversification of the two groups of O. hupensis in mainland China, and probably for the separate clades between snails from Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. In lake/marshland and hill regions along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, three clades were identified in the phylogenetic tree, but without any obvious clustering of snails from different provinces. CONCLUSIONS: O. hupensis in mainland China may have considerable genetic diversity, and a more

  17. De novo Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals a Considerable Bias in the Incidence of Simple Sequence Repeats towards the Downstream of ‘Pre-miRNAs’ of Black Pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Nisha; Asha, Srinivasan; Mallika, Vijayan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has an advantageon transformational development of species with limited available sequence data as it helps to decode the genome and transcriptome. We carried out the de novo sequencing using illuminaHiSeq™ 2000 to generate the first leaf transcriptome of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), an important spice variety native to South India and also grown in other tropical regions. Despite the economic and biochemical importance of pepper, a scientifically rigorous study at the molecular level is far from complete due to lack of sufficient sequence information and cytological complexity of its genome. The 55 million raw reads obtained, when assembled using Trinity program generated 2,23,386 contigs and 1,28,157 unigenes. Reports suggest that the repeat-rich genomic regions give rise to small non-coding functional RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most abundant type of non-coding regulatory RNAs. In spite of the widespread research on miRNAs, little is known about the hair-pin precursors of miRNAs bearing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs). We used the array of transcripts generated, for the in silico prediction and detection of ‘43 pre-miRNA candidates bearing different types of SSR motifs’. The analysis identified 3913 different types of SSR motifs with an average of one SSR per 3.04 MB of thetranscriptome. About 0.033% of the transcriptome constituted ‘pre-miRNA candidates bearing SSRs’. The abundance, type and distribution of SSR motifs studied across the hair-pin miRNA precursors, showed a significant bias in the position of SSRs towards the downstream of predicted ‘pre-miRNA candidates’. The catalogue of transcripts identified, together with the demonstration of reliable existence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors, permits future opportunities for understanding the genetic mechanism of black pepper and likely functions of ‘tandem repeats’ in miRNAs. PMID:23469176

  18. De novo transcriptome sequencing reveals a considerable bias in the incidence of simple sequence repeats towards the downstream of 'Pre-miRNAs' of black pepper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Joy

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing has an advantageon transformational development of species with limited available sequence data as it helps to decode the genome and transcriptome. We carried out the de novo sequencing using illuminaHiSeq™ 2000 to generate the first leaf transcriptome of black pepper (Piper nigrum L., an important spice variety native to South India and also grown in other tropical regions. Despite the economic and biochemical importance of pepper, a scientifically rigorous study at the molecular level is far from complete due to lack of sufficient sequence information and cytological complexity of its genome. The 55 million raw reads obtained, when assembled using Trinity program generated 2,23,386 contigs and 1,28,157 unigenes. Reports suggest that the repeat-rich genomic regions give rise to small non-coding functional RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are the most abundant type of non-coding regulatory RNAs. In spite of the widespread research on miRNAs, little is known about the hair-pin precursors of miRNAs bearing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs. We used the array of transcripts generated, for the in silico prediction and detection of '43 pre-miRNA candidates bearing different types of SSR motifs'. The analysis identified 3913 different types of SSR motifs with an average of one SSR per 3.04 MB of thetranscriptome. About 0.033% of the transcriptome constituted 'pre-miRNA candidates bearing SSRs'. The abundance, type and distribution of SSR motifs studied across the hair-pin miRNA precursors, showed a significant bias in the position of SSRs towards the downstream of predicted 'pre-miRNA candidates'. The catalogue of transcripts identified, together with the demonstration of reliable existence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors, permits future opportunities for understanding the genetic mechanism of black pepper and likely functions of 'tandem repeats' in miRNAs.

  19. Dissecting a role for melanopsin in behavioural light aversion reveals a response independent of conventional photoreception.

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    Ma'ayan Semo

    Full Text Available Melanopsin photoreception plays a vital role in irradiance detection for non-image forming responses to light. However, little is known about the involvement of melanopsin in emotional processing of luminance. When confronted with a gradient in light, organisms exhibit spatial movements relative to this stimulus. In rodents, behavioural light aversion (BLA is a well-documented but poorly understood phenomenon during which animals attribute salience to light and remove themselves from it. Here, using genetically modified mice and an open field behavioural paradigm, we investigate the role of melanopsin in BLA. While wildtype (WT, melanopsin knockout (Opn4(-/- and rd/rd cl (melanopsin only (MO mice all exhibit BLA, our novel methodology reveals that isolated melanopsin photoreception produces a slow, potentiating response to light. In order to control for the involvement of pupillary constriction in BLA we eliminated this variable with topical atropine application. This manipulation enhanced BLA in WT and MO mice, but most remarkably, revealed light aversion in triple knockout (TKO mice, lacking three elements deemed essential for conventional photoreception (Opn4(-/- Gnat1(-/- Cnga3(-/-. Using a number of complementary strategies, we determined this response to be generated at the level of the retina. Our findings have significant implications for the understanding of how melanopsin signalling may modulate aversive responses to light in mice and humans. In addition, we also reveal a clear potential for light perception in TKO mice.

  20. High-throughput sequencing technology to reveal the composition and function of cecal microbiota in Dagu chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunhe; Yang, Huixin; Zhang, Lili; Su, Yuhong; Shi, Donghui; Xiao, Haidi; Tian, Yumin

    2016-11-04

    The chicken gut microbiota is an important and complicated ecosystem for the host. They play an important role in converting food into nutrient and energy. The coding capacity of microbiome vastly surpasses that of the host's genome, encoding biochemical pathways that the host has not developed. An optimal gut microbiota can increase agricultural productivity. This study aims to explore the composition and function of cecal microbiota in Dagu chicken under two feeding modes, free-range (outdoor, OD) and cage (indoor, ID) raising. Cecal samples were collected from 24 chickens across 4 groups (12-w OD, 12-w ID, 18-w OD, and 18-w ID). We performed high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes V4 hypervariable regions to characterize the cecal microbiota of Dagu chicken and compare the difference of cecal microbiota between free-range and cage raising chickens. It was found that 34 special operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in OD groups and 4 special OTUs in ID groups. 24 phyla were shared by the 24 samples. Bacteroidetes was the most abundant phylum with the largest proportion, followed by Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. The OD groups showed a higher proportion of Bacteroidetes (>50 %) in cecum, but a lower Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in both 12-w old (0.42, 0.62) and 18-w old groups (0.37, 0.49) compared with the ID groups. Cecal microbiota in the OD groups have higher abundance of functions involved in amino acids and glycan metabolic pathway. The composition and function of cecal microbiota in Dagu chicken under two feeding modes, free-range and cage raising are different. The cage raising mode showed a lower proportion of Bacteroidetes in cecum, but a higher Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio compared with free-range mode. Cecal microbiota in free-range mode have higher abundance of functions involved in amino acids and glycan metabolic pathway.

  1. Targeted Exome Sequencing of Krebs Cycle Genes Reveals Candidate Cancer-Predisposing Mutations in Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, Laura; Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Richter, Susan; Contreras, Laura; Currás-Freixes, María; Pita, Guillermo; Letón, Rocío; Galarreta, Antonio; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Honrado, Emiliano; Jiménez, Scherezade; Maestre, Lorena; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2017-10-15

    Purpose: Mutations in Krebs cycle genes are frequently found in patients with pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas. Disruption of SDH, FH or MDH2 enzymatic activities lead to accumulation of specific metabolites, which give rise to epigenetic changes in the genome that cause a characteristic hypermethylated phenotype. Tumors showing this phenotype, but no alterations in the known predisposing genes, could harbor mutations in other Krebs cycle genes. Experimental Design: We used downregulation and methylation of RBP1, as a marker of a hypermethylation phenotype, to select eleven pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas for targeted exome sequencing of a panel of Krebs cycle-related genes. Methylation profiling, metabolite assessment and additional analyses were also performed in selected cases. Results: One of the 11 tumors was found to carry a known cancer-predisposing somatic mutation in IDH1 A variant in GOT2 , c.357A>T, found in a patient with multiple tumors, was associated with higher tumor mRNA and protein expression levels, increased GOT2 enzymatic activity in lymphoblastic cells, and altered metabolite ratios both in tumors and in GOT2 knockdown HeLa cells transfected with the variant. Array methylation-based analysis uncovered a somatic epigenetic mutation in SDHC in a patient with multiple pheochromocytomas and a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Finally, a truncating germline IDH3B mutation was found in a patient with a single paraganglioma showing an altered α-ketoglutarate/isocitrate ratio. Conclusions: This study further attests to the relevance of the Krebs cycle in the development of PCC and PGL, and points to a potential role of other metabolic enzymes involved in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytosol. Clin Cancer Res; 23(20); 6315-24. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Next Generation Sequencing Analysis Reveals Segmental Patterns of microRNA Expression in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Stanger, Simone J.; Mihalas, Bettina P.; Reilly, Jackson N.; Anderson, Amanda L.; Dun, Matthew D.; Tyagi, Sonika; Holt, Janet E.; McLaughlin, Eileen A.

    2015-01-01

    The functional maturation of mammalian spermatozoa is accomplished as the cells descend through the highly specialized microenvironment of the epididymis. This dynamic environment is, in turn, created by the combined secretory and absorptive activity of the surrounding epithelium and displays an extraordinary level of regionalization. Although the regulatory network responsible for spatial coordination of epididymal function remains unclear, recent evidence has highlighted a novel role for the RNA interference pathway. Indeed, as noncanonical regulators of gene expression, small noncoding RNAs have emerged as key elements of the circuitry involved in regulating epididymal function and hence sperm maturation. Herein we have employed next generation sequencing technology to profile the genome-wide miRNA signatures of mouse epididymal cells and characterize segmental patterns of expression. An impressive profile of some 370 miRNAs were detected in the mouse epididymis, with a subset of these specifically identified within the epithelial cells that line the tubule (218). A majority of the latter miRNAs (75%) were detected at equivalent levels along the entire length of the mouse epididymis. We did however identify a small cohort of miRNAs that displayed highly regionalized patterns of expression, including miR-204-5p and miR-196b-5p, which were down- and up-regulated by approximately 39- and 45-fold between the caput/caudal regions, respectively. In addition we identified 79 miRNAs (representing ~ 21% of all miRNAs) as displaying conserved expression within all regions of the mouse, rat and human epididymal tissue. These included 8/14 members of let-7 family of miRNAs that have been widely implicated in the control of androgen signaling and the repression of cell proliferation and oncogenic pathways. Overall these data provide novel insights into the sophistication of the miRNA network that regulates the function of the male reproductive tract. PMID:26270822

  3. Mutations in UCP2 in congenital hyperinsulinism reveal a role for regulation of insulin secretion.

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    M Mar González-Barroso

    Full Text Available Although the most common mechanism underlying congenital hyperinsulinism is dysfunction of the pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium channel, the pathogenesis and genetic origins of this disease remains largely unexplained in more than half of all patients. UCP2 knockout mice exhibit an hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, suggesting an involvement of UCP2 in insulin secretion. However, a possible pathogenic role for UCP2 protein in the development of human congenital hyperinsulinism or of any human disease has not yet been investigated. We studied ten children exhibiting congenital hyperinsulinism, without detectable mutations in the known congenital hyperinsulinism-causing genes. Parental-inherited heterozygous UCP2 variants encoding amino-acid changes were found in two unrelated children with congenital hyperinsulinism. Functional assays in yeast and in insulin-secreting cells revealed an impaired activity of UCP2 mutants. Therefore, we report the finding of UCP2 coding variants in human congenital hyperinsulinism, which reveals a role for this gene in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism in humans. Our results show for the first time a direct association between UCP2 amino acid alteration and human disease and highlight a role for mitochondria in hormone secretion.

  4. RNA Sequencing of Contaminated Seeds Reveals the State of the Seed Permissive for Pre-Harvest Aflatoxin Contamination and Points to a Potential Susceptibility Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Josh; Marasigan, Kathleen; Liakos, Vasileios; Sobolev, Victor; Vellidis, George; Holbrook, Corley; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination (PAC) is a major problem facing peanut production worldwide. Produced by the ubiquitous soil fungus, Aspergillus flavus, aflatoxin is the most naturally occurring known carcinogen. The interaction between fungus and host resulting in PAC is complex, and breeding for PAC resistance has been slow. It has been shown that aflatoxin production can be induced by applying drought stress as peanut seeds mature. We have implemented an automated rainout shelter that controls temperature and moisture in the root and peg zone to induce aflatoxin production. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), seeds meeting the following conditions were selected: infected with Aspergillus flavus and contaminated with aflatoxin; and not contaminated with aflatoxin. RNA sequencing analysis revealed groups of genes that describe the transcriptional state of contaminated vs. uncontaminated seed. These data suggest that fatty acid biosynthesis and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling are altered in contaminated seeds and point to a potential susceptibility factor, ABR1, as a repressor of ABA signaling that may play a role in permitting PAC. PMID:27827875

  5. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces coelicoflavus ZG0656 reveals the putative biosynthetic gene cluster of acarviostatin family α-amylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X; Geng, P; Bai, F; Bai, G; Sun, T; Li, X; Shi, L; Zhong, Q

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this study are to obtain the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces coelicoflavus ZG0656, which produces novel acarviostatin family α-amylase inhibitors, and then to reveal the putative acarviostatin-related gene cluster and the biosynthetic pathway. The draft genome sequence of S. coelicoflavus ZG0656 was generated using a shotgun approach employing a combination of 454 and Solexa sequencing technologies. Genome analysis revealed a putative gene cluster for acarviostatin biosynthesis, termed sct-cluster. The cluster contains 13 acarviostatin synthetic genes, six transporter genes, four starch degrading or transglycosylation enzyme genes and two regulator genes. On the basis of bioinformatic analysis, we proposed a putative biosynthetic pathway of acarviostatins. The intracellular steps produce a structural core, acarviostatin I00-7-P, and the extracellular assemblies lead to diverse acarviostatin end products. The draft genome sequence of S. coelicoflavus ZG0656 revealed the putative biosynthetic gene cluster of acarviostatins and a putative pathway of acarviostatin production. To our knowledge, S. coelicoflavus ZG0656 is the first strain in this species for which a genome sequence has been reported. The analysis of sct-cluster provided important insights into the biosynthesis of acarviostatins. This work will be a platform for producing novel variants and yield improvement. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. High-Throughput Sequencing and Characterization of the Small RNA Transcriptome Reveal Features of Novel and Conserved MicroRNAs in Panax ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yimian; Yuan, Lichai; Lu, Shanfa

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play vital regulatory roles in many organisms through direct cleavage of transcripts, translational repression, or chromatin modification. Identification of miRNAs has been carried out in various plant species. However, no information is available for miRNAs from Panax ginseng, an economically significant medicinal plant species. Using the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, we obtained 13,326,328 small RNA reads from the roots, stems, leaves and flowers of P. ginseng. Analysis of these small RNAs revealed the existence of a large, diverse and highly complicated small RNA population in P. ginseng. We identified 73 conserved miRNAs, which could be grouped into 33 families, and 28 non-conserved ones belonging to 9 families. Characterization of P. ginseng miRNA precursors revealed many features, such as production of two miRNAs from distinct regions of a precursor, clusters of two precursors in a transcript, and generation of miRNAs from both sense and antisense transcripts. It suggests the complexity of miRNA production in P. gingseng. Using a computational approach, we predicted for the conserved and non-conserved miRNA families 99 and 31 target genes, respectively, of which eight were experimentally validated. Among all predicted targets, only about 20% are conserved among various plant species, whereas the others appear to be non-conserved, indicating the diversity of miRNA functions. Consistently, many miRNAs exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns. Moreover, we identified five dehydration- and ten heat-responsive miRNAs and found the existence of a crosstalk among some of the stress-responsive miRNAs. Our results provide the first clue to the elucidation of miRNA functions in P. ginseng. PMID:22962612

  7. Full Genome Sequencing Reveals New Southern African Territories Genotypes Bringing Us Closer to Understanding True Variability of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasecka-Dykes, Lidia; Wright, Caroline F; Di Nardo, Antonello; Logan, Grace; Mioulet, Valerie; Jackson, Terry; Tuthill, Tobias J; Knowles, Nick J; King, Donald P

    2018-04-13

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hooved animals that poses a constant burden on farmers in endemic regions and threatens the livestock industries in disease-free countries. Despite the increased number of publicly available whole genome sequences, FMDV data are biased by the opportunistic nature of sampling. Since whole genomic sequences of Southern African Territories (SAT) are particularly underrepresented, this study sequenced 34 isolates from eastern and southern Africa. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two novel genotypes (that comprised 8/34 of these SAT isolates) which contained unusual 5′ untranslated and non-structural encoding regions. While recombination has occurred between these sequences, phylogeny violation analyses indicated that the high degree of sequence diversity for the novel SAT genotypes has not solely arisen from recombination events. Based on estimates of the timing of ancestral divergence, these data are interpreted as being representative of un-sampled FMDV isolates that have been subjected to geographical isolation within Africa by the effects of the Great African Rinderpest Pandemic (1887–1897), which caused a mass die-out of FMDV-susceptible hosts. These findings demonstrate that further sequencing of African FMDV isolates is likely to reveal more unusual genotypes and will allow for better understanding of natural variability and evolution of FMDV.

  8. Application of a hierarchical enzyme classification method reveals the role of gut microbiome in human metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Enzymes are known as the molecular machines that drive the metabolism of an organism; hence identification of the full enzyme complement of an organism is essential to build the metabolic blueprint of that species as well as to understand the interplay of multiple species in an ecosystem. Experimental characterization of the enzymatic reactions of all enzymes in a genome is a tedious and expensive task. The problem is more pronounced in the metagenomic samples where even the species are not adequately cultured or characterized. Enzymes encoded by the gut microbiota play an essential role in the host metabolism; thus, warranting the need to accurately identify and annotate the full enzyme complements of species in the genomic and metagenomic projects. To fulfill this need, we develop and apply a method called ECemble, an ensemble approach to identify enzymes and enzyme classes and study the human gut metabolic pathways. Results ECemble method uses an ensemble of machine-learning methods to accurately model and predict enzymes from protein sequences and also identifies the enzyme classes and subclasses at the finest resolution. A tenfold cross-validation result shows accuracy between 97 and 99% at different levels in the hierarchy of enzyme classification, which is superior to comparable methods. We applied ECemble to predict the entire complements of enzymes from ten sequenced proteomes including the human proteome. We also applied this method to predict enzymes encoded by the human gut microbiome from gut metagenomic samples, and to study the role played by the microbe-derived enzymes in the human metabolism. After mapping the known and predicted enzymes to canonical human pathways, we identified 48 pathways that have at least one bacteria-encoded enzyme, which demonstrates the complementary role of gut microbiome in human gut metabolism. These pathways are primarily involved in metabolizing dietary nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids

  9. Whole-exome sequencing of a patient with severe and complex hemostatic abnormalities reveals a possible contributing frameshift mutation in C3AR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinøe, Eva; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Jønson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    -threatening coagulation disorder causing recurrent venous thromboembolic events, severe thrombocytopenia, and subdural hematomas. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a frameshift mutation (C3AR1 c.355-356dup, p.Asp119Alafs*19) resulting in a premature stop codon in C3AR1 (Complement Component 3a Receptor 1). Based...

  10. Genetic diversity of the Pichia membranifaciens strains revealed from rRNA gene sequencing and electrophoretic karyotyping, and the proposal of Candida californica comb. nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Zuo-Wei; Robert, Vincent; Bai, Feng-Yan

    The genetic diversity of the types or authentic strains of 20 facultative synonyms of Pichia membranifaciens (E.C. Hansen) E.C. Hansen was revealed on the basis of large-subunit (26S) rDNA D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer region sequencing and electrophoretic karyotyping. At least five

  11. Conditional Knockout in Mice Reveals the Critical Roles of Ppp2ca in Epidermis Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Fang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is an important tissue in Homo sapines and other animals, and an abnormal epidermis will cause many diseases. Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is an important serine and threonine phosphatase. The α isoform of the PP2A catalytic subunit (Ppp2ca gene encoding PP2Acα is critical for cell proliferation, growth, metabolism and tumorigenesis. However, to date, no study has revealed its roles in epidermis development. To specifically investigate the roles of PP2Acα in epidermis development, we first generated Ppp2caflox/flox transgenic mice, and conditionally knocked out Ppp2ca in the epidermis driven by Krt14-Cre. Our study showed that Ppp2caflox/flox; Krt14-Cre mice had significant hair loss. In addition, histological analyses showed that the morphogenesis and hair regeneration cycle of hair follicles were disrupted in these mice. Moreover, Ppp2caflox/flox; Krt14-Cre mice had smaller size, melanin deposition and hyperproliferation at the base of the claws. Accordingly, our study demonstrates that PP2Acα plays important roles in both hair follicle and epidermis development. Additionally, the Ppp2caflox/flox mice generated in this study can serve as a useful transgene model to study the roles of PP2Acα in other developmental processes and diseases.

  12. Conditional Knockout in Mice Reveals the Critical Roles of Ppp2ca in Epidermis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Li, Lei; Li, Jianmin

    2016-05-18

    The epidermis is an important tissue in Homo sapines and other animals, and an abnormal epidermis will cause many diseases. Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an important serine and threonine phosphatase. The α isoform of the PP2A catalytic subunit (Ppp2ca gene encoding PP2Acα) is critical for cell proliferation, growth, metabolism and tumorigenesis. However, to date, no study has revealed its roles in epidermis development. To specifically investigate the roles of PP2Acα in epidermis development, we first generated Ppp2ca(flox/flox) transgenic mice, and conditionally knocked out Ppp2ca in the epidermis driven by Krt14-Cre. Our study showed that Ppp2ca(flox/flox); Krt14-Cre mice had significant hair loss. In addition, histological analyses showed that the morphogenesis and hair regeneration cycle of hair follicles were disrupted in these mice. Moreover, Ppp2ca(flox/flox); Krt14-Cre mice had smaller size, melanin deposition and hyperproliferation at the base of the claws. Accordingly, our study demonstrates that PP2Acα plays important roles in both hair follicle and epidermis development. Additionally, the Ppp2ca(flox/flox) mice generated in this study can serve as a useful transgene model to study the roles of PP2Acα in other developmental processes and diseases.

  13. Identities among actin-encoding cDNAs of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus and other eukaryote species revealed by nucleotide and amino acid sequence analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia B. Poletto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actin-encoding cDNAs of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus were isolated by RT-PCR using total RNA samples of different tissues and further characterized by nucleotide sequencing and in silico amino acid (aa sequence analysis. Comparisons among the actin gene sequences of O. niloticus and those of other species evidenced that the isolated genes present a high similarity to other fish and other vertebrate actin genes. The highest nucleotide resemblance was observed between O. niloticus and O. mossambicus a-actin and b-actin genes. Analysis of the predicted aa sequences revealed two distinct types of cytoplasmic actins, one cardiac muscle actin type and one skeletal muscle actin type that were expressed in different tissues of Nile tilapia. The evolutionary relationships between the Nile tilapia actin genes and diverse other organisms is discussed.

  14. cDNA encoding the chicken ortholog of the mouse dilute gene product. Sequence comparison reveals a myosin I subfamily with conserved C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, G; Lichte, B; Meyer, H E; Kilimann, M W

    1992-10-26

    We report the cDNA-deduced primary structure of the chicken counterpart of the murine dilute gene product, a member of the myosin I family. Comparison of the chicken and mouse sequences reveals a distinct pattern of domains of high and low sequence conservation. An internal deletion of 25 amino acids probably reflects differential mRNA processing. Compared with other myosin heavy chain molecules, sequence similarity is highest with the MYO2 gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MYO2 protein, implicated in vectorial vesicle transport, is homologous to the dilute protein over practically its entire length. In addition, the C-terminal domain of the dilute protein is highly similar to a putative glutamic acid decarboxylase sequence cloned from mouse brain. Alternatively, this closely related clone might represent an isoform of the dilute protein derived from a second gene, potentially involved in genetic conditions related to dilute.

  15. Identification of a Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived From Cellular Proteins